5 Burst results for "Indian Boarding School Era"

"indian boarding school era" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

06:36 min | Last week

"indian boarding school era" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Now we already dug into a lot more at least explained it a little bit. Only going to really dig into the boarding school system going forward. The boarding school system. is where native language is probably suffered the most from the mid nineteenth century until as recently as nineteen sixties native families in both canada and the. Us were compelled by law to send their kids to boarding schools often far from home in the us. So-called indian schools were sadly often run by people with deep racial biases one example. This is the carlisle indian industrial school that existed in carlisle pennsylvania. It's founder richard pratt and the richer so many dick's he sucks. described as mission in eighteen ninety to kill the indian in him and saves the man him. No acculturation there. That's why washing. No we want to give you the tools to succeed the new society that round you a new way of living like it or not is here to stay while also maintaining pride in your culture. Now this was less gentle of out the old in with the new real face of future. And fuck your past kind of at the height of the indian boarding school era between eighteen seventy seven and nineteen eighteen. The us allocated adjusted for inflation. Two point eight billion dollars to support the nation's boarding school infrastructure and educational system designed primarily to destroy You know native culture languages Assimilate indigenous people into white european culture. the cherokee nation would get especially simulated after the trail of tears in eighteen thirties. Cherokee nation reestablish itself is somewhat sovereign nation indian territory present day oklahoma. A bilingual public education system was created and cherokee tribes govern their own schools for quite some time and students learned everything from latin to algebra in cherokee and it was a system that worked than the eighteen cherokee students or. I'm sorry in the eighteen eighties. Cherokee students had a higher literacy rate and cherokee than their white neighbors in arkansas and texas but then starting in hundred eighty seven when land belonging to the cherokee nation and four other tribes in. Oklahoma was divided up and given to individuals at process of allotment the government began his takeover of tribally. Run school systems. These new administrators had very little if any respect for native languages. John d. benedict superintendent of schools in indian territory during the transition complained in an eighteen nineteen in eighteen ninety nine letter about educator. Speaking to their students in native languages he also complained about female students studying mathematics instead of learning domestic skills and housekeeping different times under this new. Fuck your culture and language and bow down to western patriarchy system. That native student attend native students cheeses natives student attendance come on mouth plummeted amongst cherokee and many other tribes and tribal nations right. It was working just fine when they were allowed to learn in their own language and then when they were not started to not work so fine at all the choctaw nation also in oklahoma attendance in rural schools fell by forty three percent between eighteen ninety two and nineteen seven college. Attendance dropped zero. This english only system native children were punished for speaking their own languages. Mouths were washed out with soap Kids were spank sometimes whipped with leather strap such punishment. We continue in parts of rural oklahoma. All the way up until the seventies the nineteen seventies not eighteen saudis in early nineteen hundreds. Cherokee children were sent to boarding schools like the shylock. Oh indian agricultural school an indian boarding school on the oklahoma kansas state line in january of eighteen eighty four schlock opened its doors to one hundred and fifty kids in the cheyenne arapaho wichita comanche and pony tribes by eighteen. Ninety five enrollment had increased to three hundred and fifty two by ninety o. Six students hailed from a wide variety of tribes across oklahoma in the west. Large off reservation. Schools like this one used rigorous military discipline stressed instruction and trades manual and domestic labor known as quote actual work alumni. Would report twenty. Two bugle calls a day. Government issue uniforms scanty meals inadequate healthcare very little individual attention probably zero affection during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries estimated one third of all tribal children living in the us force to attend indian boarding schools. Like this like shellac. Oh i can imagine that happened. You imagine being told that your culture including your language best forgotten your family's ways or not to be remembered that they were less than they were primitive sent miles and hundreds of miles away from your home raised by people who don't give a fuck about you. Such a shame that all this could have been done with some dignity respect compassion especially because by this time communities not a threat whatsoever to the sovereignty of the us government right the concord. We're going to remain Conquered some compassion. Wasn't going to change. That and i say that someone who's not against similarly assimilation not all forms not at all. If a new culture takes over and their way is now by far the most dominant way into refuse to assimilate equals economic destruction than. I do think it's a situation of if you can't beat them join them but tonight allow those joining you to still retain pride in their old ways to destroy that cultural pride to keep their old. you know. it's not let them keep their old language or adding yours. Just seems unnecessary. Seems like some store winner. Shit like i said earlier. How ironic these native languages would later helped. Us and not just one but but two world wars had government led assimilation. Worked more effectively would have been no navajo code breakers because no one would know how to speak now. Also how remarkable. That americans were willing to help the war effort at all. After all this shit before we dig into the main thrust today's info World war two's code talkers. Let's first talk. A look at the code talkers. Codebreakers of their code dockers. Let's first look at the code. Doctors who helped win world war one. I'd no idea that even existed before going over the research for this week suck while the tribal children were being sometimes literally whipped for speaking in their native tongue at schools back home in oklahoma. On the battlefields of france the native languages were much needed. Answer to a very big problem in the autumn of nineteen eighteen. Us troops were involved in the muse. Argonne offensive on the western front as one of the largest frontline commitments of american soldiers in world war. One over twenty six thousand americans will die here. Roughly one hundred thousand will be wounded indications in the in the field were being compromised the beginning of this This this Offensive fighting last over six weeks ending on armistice day november eleventh nine hundred eighteen the end of the war well over a million. Total combatants will take part in this This giant battle second-deadliest battle in american history. The germans had successfully tap telephone lines were deciphering codes and repeatedly capturing runners sent out to deliver messages directly. Germans despite losing the.

oklahoma carlisle indian industrial sch richard pratt Us indian agricultural school carlisle John d pennsylvania dick arkansas canada Oklahoma texas wichita kansas us government Argonne france
"indian boarding school era" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

04:25 min | Last month

"indian boarding school era" Discussed on Minority Korner

"Just sake. Him seem bring up. Couldn't it so gye. Essentially like the an indian boarding school era which went from eighteen. Sixty to nineteen seventy eight. Oh my god yes. These two years ago this was still going on forty two forty three good math and yes quick mahathir. That was that is so we're looking at like hundreds of thousands of native american. Children are removed from their homes and families in least in boarding schools operated by the federal government and these churches and we actually even have an exact like with most things that are fucked up leagues act number of because they weren't really thinking of these you know humans per se and bhai the one thousand nine hundred. There were twenty thousand children and indian boarding schools and by nine hundred thousand five number more than tripled so it was like rubbing In the twentieth century and by nineteen twenty six nearly eighty three percent of indian school age children were attending these boarding schools. Eighty-three percent there were about three hundred and fifty seven boarding schools and thirty seats like i said in nineteen hundreds i in one thousand nine hundred twenty thousand children in boarding schools twenty five about sixty thousand almost sixty one thousand children and these boarding schools so hundreds of boarding schools but these when the when it first started out. The bureau of indian affairs established Which is so wild. That was like a thing. And there was a secretary of the of the indian borough of affairs which they were probably a white person. Just gonna say thank well. The first boarding school was on the indian reservation in the state of washington and the schools were part of a plan that were devised by well intentioned eastern reformers herbert walls while and henry coast. It just reminds me of like we still have those sort of like this is like well intention white liberal pitic exactly for the god calling it. They're just go. To the rebuke. Seaworthy bell reboot speaking the truth..

mahathir bureau of indian affairs federal government herbert walls henry coast washington
"indian boarding school era" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:21 min | 2 years ago

"indian boarding school era" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"The bags back on the road. There and read it's go real good pass board. Hamma traveler pursued six hundred forty seven today. The amateur traveler talks about art, museums and western culture, hikes petroglyphs and Naro cactus. As we go to Phoenix, Arizona. The metre traveler, I'm your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Phoenix. I'd like to welcome back to the show Cindy Carlson from exploration vacation dot net. Who has come to talk to us about Phoenix cine? Welcome to the show. I Chris thanks for having me or welcome back to the show said he was here about one hundred episodes ago. I was surprised it was that long ago talking about northern Vietnam. And if you haven't heard that episode I like that episode, obviously because otherwise she would be back. So Cindy, we're talking about a much more domestic destination this time in what's your connection with Phoenix? My now there's been down there about thirty years now. And so I've been going down there pre regularly since about nineteen ninety five bending sometimes just a few days and sometimes spending even a couple of weeks down there exploring the area. Excellent. So she is a snowbird in the language of the area. Yes. My parents are snowbirds I'd snowbird if I could convince my husband to spend more time down there but likes books. Gets a tad warm in the summer for me and Phoenix. And just so we know we usually don't talk about whether for a while. But one of the reasons a lot of people come down in the wintertime, lovely lovely weather summertime. They'll get one hundred days in a row that will go of one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. So that just baby something you think about we have a friend who moved to Phoenix because the summer's here in San Jose that only got two ninety were not hot enough for her. So if you like hot weather, that's definitely good time to go lot more people there in the winter. And there's a lot to do. Actually, I haven't been there in the summer, but there's a lot to do in the summer inside. And there's actually water in rivers and floats and things I have a lot of friends that live there year round. And they actually say summers aren't always that bad. Right. Well, it depends. Again, what you like. And I do know that the friends who go out hiking tend to do it early in the morning in the summertime or or later in the evening usually early in the morning when it's the coolest time of day, but what kind of itinerary do. Recommend for us for Phoenix. So I tried to put together, and I tend to worry that's really aimed at first time. Visitors to Phoenix it gives them an idea of what Phoenix is about where it came from what the landscapes like and what the people who've lived their past and present are like and it's geared. It's five days because five days seems to be to me a good amount of time to get a real feeling for Phoenix. It's still leaves you enough time that if you want to spend time golfing or laying by the pool or you wanna make a trip up to Grand Canyon, which I know you've covered on one a year. Previous shows you can add that on then it's a week's vacation and still do all the stuff that I'm recommending will you we won't took quite as much about site trips. But there are a number different things if you had north or south either down to Tucson, we've done it episode on that or up to flagstaff area up to Grand Canyon or even up to the north east corner of the state, we've got different shows about northern Phoenix. So we won't be talking about them now. But what should we do in Phoenix? Well, actually, let me back up a bit here. I should start with. Why should we go to Phoenix of all the places we should go to sell? I think Phoenix gets the bad rap as as a snowboard destination. Oh, it's just where the retirees go because warm it's hot in the summer. Why would you ever go to Phoenix? And Phoenix, particularly in the last fifteen years twenty years, maybe now has really become a arts and culture hub. It's got a a thriving lively downtown great art scene. It has spectacular scenery all around the city with the snoring desert there. It's become a real interesting place to go. There's something there. I think for everyone, and it's really a worthwhile destination. There's a lot to see in Phoenix that you probably won't see and other places. The only part of that that I would show is that that has happened over the last ten or fifteen years because I've been going there at longer than that. And I think it's getting better known for that over the last ten fifteen years, I think that's been there for. A while in terms of the arts and culture. I think part of it is as light rail's come in. It's maybe it's more that it's expanded places like downtown Mesa that used to be really dead are now little art tub's. Okay. And so maybe that's it because it's been building. It's I've always liked Phoenix. But I think it's really become something that a lot of people don't expect excellent. And we're should we start? So I'm gonna suggest that people start by learning about the Sonoran desert by actually going out to the desert botanical garden, which is in northeast. It's a beautiful place as botanical garden it, of course, has landscaped areas and non native plants, but it also has large areas of native plants. It's a great place to soak in the beauty of the desert and to learn about the desert, so that when you go hiking on your own, you know, that even those those Challah cactuses might look really friendly fuzzy that to get near them. So it gives you both that introduction to the desert as well as beautiful place to wander. You can easily spend a few hours or half day there. They have a fabulous cafes. What's a nice place to spend some time in the garden, and then wandered to the cafe will want to make sure that we're talking about the same place because the desert botanical garden that I know is not in north Phoenix. It's on almost in Scottsdale. So it would be east of Phoenix. It's right on the border of Scottsdale. And Phoenix you that's not north Phoenix east, east Phoenix. Okay. And that's another thing. I should mention that. I have geographic dyslexia when it comes to Unix. So keen on is because I miss a west when I really mean east it's over by Scottsdale, and it's beautiful. It's right at the foot of the mountains beautiful place to walk in wander. I happen to see it. The first time when there was a truly exhibit. So my experience there is quite different because there was all sorts of glass being shown at the same time. But what if a place especially for kids to recommend our kids love the butterfly exhibit, for instance, there as well as some of the other. And they've actually redone the gardens since you've been there since the league's of it. And there are still still Hulas and some other sculptures in the garden. They do special events visitors coming into Phoenix should check the schedule and see they sometimes do big fun parties out in the garden at night and different things can be hard to get tickets to those. But there are blast. If you can get them. Excellent. So because that's not necessarily a full day. If you want to do a little more that day, I would continue on towards the west to the Pueblo grandee museum, which it's a museum in an archaeological park, it's fairly small museum. But they do really nice job of talking about the hokum people who live in the Phoenix area more than thousand years ago. They actually were the original ones building canals in the salt. River valley canals bring all Phoenix's water in today. But that actually goes back to ancient culture that lived there more than a thousand years ago. It's a nice little museum the archaeological site itself, isn't terribly into. There's not a lot left. But the museum dozen nice job of introducing you to what this area was like in the people who live there a long time ago. The other alternative end out your first day would be if it's on a Thursday had over to Scottsdale and do evening art walk and have dinner down on the in the arts district in historic Scottsdale, which is a really fun place. And I'll talk about that a little more in the next day. We should say we haven't really even gone very far from the Phoenix harbor airport here for the first two stops does botanical gardens. The public grid museum are practically stone's throw from the airport. So we haven't ranged very far afield yet. This is all fairly easy to a stone. So for Phoenix anyway, which is a gigantic Norma's area. Geographically is a very large area. Geographically. That's right. I forget to actually put together two different options, depending on visitors interest level of interest in native cultures or cowboy culture, I've got two different options. One the one would. Be two more about the people who live in the southwest today. And that would be a trip to the heard museum in downtown Phoenix even closer to sky harbor airport. We haven't left really Phoenix at all for these. The today's the herd is both a cultural history and art museum about half the museum or more is devoted to exhibits on the peoples of the southwest with separate areas on each different culture, and both modern and historic pieces of art in basket tree in different daily aims of daily life. The other part of the museum includes an exhibit which for in my part of the country is something people don't know as much about as the Indian boarding school era. They've just redone the exhibit. I haven't seen the new one. But the old one was both fascinating and really heartbreaking. But really really interesting again mostly history. But combining modern perspectives and information as well. And presenting it in a way. It's very very acceptable like the exempts really geared for both adults and for children in the area. You're talking about here is an era where they want to pending on how you how you look at this. The one side would say they wanted to include the native Americans in American culture, and therefore they wanted to inculturated them. And the other side would say that they wanted them to lose their identity as native Americans and inculturated them. But it was definitely a very intentional move to bring them in to have the move away from their families to go to these boarding schools and two tournament white people would be the crude way of saying that.

Phoenix Phoenix cine Phoenix harbor Cindy Carlson Scottsdale Chris Christensen Arizona Naro cactus Vietnam art museum Hamma Sonoran desert Pueblo grandee museum Indian boarding school era public grid museum Grand Canyon summers
"indian boarding school era" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"indian boarding school era" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"The. The bag on a roll. Anna read it's go in real good pass board. Hammet traveler pursuit six hundred forty seven today. BMI traveler talks about art, museums and western culture, hikes petroglyphs and Sua cactus. As we go to Phoenix, Arizona. Walk. The amateur traveler your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Phoenix. I'd like to welcome back to the show Cindy Carlson from exploration vacation dot net. Who has come to talk to us about Phoenix cine? Welcome to the show. I Chris thanks for having me or welcome back to the show said he was here about one hundred episodes ago. I was surprised it was that long ago talking about northern Vietnam. And if you haven't heard that episode I like that episode, obviously because otherwise she would be back. So Cindy, we're talking about a much more domestic destination this time in what's your connection with Phoenix? My now there's been down there about thirty years now. And so I've been going down there pretty regularly since about nineteen ninety five bending sometimes just a few days and sometimes spending even a couple of weeks down there exploring the area. Excellent. So she is a snowbird in the language of the area. Yes. My parents are snowbirds I'd snowbird if I could convince my husband to spend more time down there, but likes us books. Gets tad warm in the summer for me and Phoenix. And just so we know we usually don't talk about whether for a while. But one of the reasons lot of people come down in the wintertime, lovely lovely weather summertime. They'll get one hundred days in a row that will go of one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. So that just maybe something you think about we have a friend who moved to Phoenix because the summer's here in San Jose that only got two ninety were not hot enough for her. So if you like hot weather, that's definitely a good time to go lot more people there in the winter. And there's a lot to do. Actually, I haven't been there in the summer, but there's a lot to do in the summer inside. And there's actually water in rivers in floats and things I have a lot of friends that live there year round. And they actually say summers aren't always that bad. Right. Well, it depends. Again, what you like. And I do know that the friends who go out hiking tend to do it early in the morning in the summertime or or later in the evening usually early in the morning when it's the coolest time of day. But what kind of itenerary do? Recommend for us for Phoenix. So I tried to put together, and I worry that's really aimed at first time. Visitors to Phoenix it gives them an idea of what Phoenix is about where it came from what the landscapes like and what the people who've lived their past and present are like and it's geared. It's five days because five days seems to be to me a good amount of time to get a real feeling for Phoenix. Still leaves you enough time that if you want to spend time golfing or laying by the pool or you want to make a trip up to Grand Canyon, which I know you've covered on one a year previous shows, you can add that on and then it's a week's vacation and still do all the stuff that I'm recommending will you we won't talk quite as much about side trips. But there are a number different things if you head north or south either down to Tucson, we've done it episode on that or up to flagstaff area up to Grand Canyon or even to the north east corner of the state, we've got different shows about northern Phoenix. So we won't be talking about them now. But what should we do in Phoenix? Well, actually, let me back up a bit here. I should start with. Why should we go to Phoenix of all the places we should go to sell? I think Phoenix gets the bad rap as as a snowboard destination. Oh, it's just where the retirees because warm it's hot in the summer. Why would you ever go to Phoenix? And Phoenix, particularly in the last fifteen years twenty years, maybe now as really become a arts and culture hub. It's got a a thriving lively downtown great art scene. It has spectacular scenery all around the city with the Sonoran desert there. It's become a real interesting place to go. There's something there. I think for everyone, and it's really a worthwhile destination. There's a lot to see in Phoenix that you probably won't see and other places. The only part of that that I would show is that that has happened over the last ten or fifteen years because I've been going there at longer than that. And I think it's getting better known for that over the last ten fifteen years, I think that's been there for. In terms of the arts and culture. I think part of it is as light rail's come in. It's maybe it's more that expanded places like downtown Mesa that used to be really dead are now little art. Okay. And so maybe that's it because it's been building. It's I've always liked Phoenix. But I think it's really become something that a lot of people don't expect excellent. And we're should we start? So I'm going to suggest that people start by learning about the Sonoran desert by actually going out to the desert botanical garden, which is in northeast. It's a beautiful place as mechanical garden it, of course, has landscaped areas and non native plants, but it also has large areas of native plants. It's a great place to soak in the beauty of the desert and to learn about the desert, so that when you go hiking on your own, you know, that even those those Challah cactuses might look really friendly in fuzzy that to get near them. So it gives you both that introduction to the desert as well as beautiful place to wander. You can easily spend a few hours or half day there. They have a fabulous cafe. So it's a nice place to spend some time in the garden. And then wander to the cafe will want to make sure that we're talking about the same place because the desert botanical garden that I know is not in north Phoenix. It's on almost in Scottsdale. So it would be east of Phoenix. It's right on the border of Scottsdale and Phoenix that's not north Phoenix east, east Phoenix. Okay. And that's another thing. I should mention that. I have geographic dyslexia when it comes to Unix. So keen is because I miss a west when I really mean east it's over by Scottsdale, and it's beautiful. It's right at the foot of the mountains beautiful place to walk in wander. I happen to see it. The first time when there was a truly exhibit. So my experience there is quite different because there was all sorts of glass being shown at the same time. But what if place especially for kids to recommend our kids love the butterfly exhibit, for instance, there as well as some of the other. And they've actually redone the gardens since you've been there since the CIA Julia exhibit, and there are still still chew Hulas and some other sculptures in the garden. They do special events visitors coming into Phoenix should check the schedule and see they sometimes do big fun parties out in the garden at night and different things can be hard to get tickets to those. But there blast if you can get them. Excellent. So because that's not necessarily a full day. If you want to do a little more that day, I would continue on towards the west to the grandee museum, which it's a museum in an archaeological park, it's fairly small museum. But they do have really nice job of talking about the hokum people who live in the Phoenix area more than thousand years ago. They actually were the original ones building canals in the salt. River valley canals bring all Phoenix's water in today. But that actually goes back to ancient culture that lived there more than a thousand years ago. It's a nice little museum the archaeological site itself, isn't terribly into. Interesting. There's not a lot left, but the museum dozen nice job of introducing you to what this area was like in the people who live there a long time ago. The other alternative end out your first day would be if it's on a Thursday head over to Scottsdale and do evening art walk and have dinner down on the in the arts district in historic Scottsdale, which is a really fun place. And I'll talk about that a little more and went in the next day. We should say we haven't really even gone very far from the Phoenix harbor airport here for the first who stops does botanical gardens. The public grid museum are practically stone's throw from the airport. So we haven't ranged very far afield yet. This is all fairly easy to stone. So for Phoenix anyway, which is a gigantic Norma situ area. Geographically is a very large area geographically that's right for day to actually put together to different options, depending on visitors inter level of interest in native cultures or cowboy culture. I've got two different options won the won would. Be two and more about the people who live in the southwest today. And that would be a trip to the heard museum in downtown Phoenix even closer sky harbor airport. We haven't left really Phoenix at all for these. The today's the herd is both a cultural history and art museum about half the museum or more is devoted to exhibits on the peoples of the southwest with separate areas on each different culture, and both modern and historic pieces of art in basket tree in different daily aims daily life. The other part of the museum includes an exhibit which for in my part of the country is something people don't know as much about as the Indian boarding school era. They've just redone the exhibit. I haven't seen the new one. But the old one was both fascinating and really heartbreaking. But really really interesting again mostly history. But combining modern perspectives and information as well. And presenting it in a way. That's very very acceptable like the exempts really geared for

Phoenix Phoenix cine Phoenix harbor Sonoran desert Cindy Carlson Scottsdale Chris Christensen Arizona Vietnam Hammet art museum Anna BMI Sua cactus grandee museum public grid museum Tucson Grand Canyon summers
"indian boarding school era" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"indian boarding school era" Discussed on Here & Now

"I hear the laugh in the throat clearing there. But Don means your social workers might have felt you know, your mother was incapable. She was an alcoholic we need to get her into the best place possible, and that's a white family. Yeah. What we have here is a fundamental difference in worldview, the standards that they're talking about those are white middle-class standards. That are being applied to children of a tribe. And now the tribe is the child's family, I want to make that absolutely clear. The other part of that is that indigenous people are not members of a race. They are citizens of sovereign nation. You're not taking a child out of a race. You're putting them with people who are part of the dominant culture you with people who are part of another nation. Exactly, how did you feel about testifying before this commission, which you know, one point in the film. They're kind of called out on their white privilege and initially, although they seem very earnest and caring traveling the state lot of native peoples weren't showing up because it entrust it. Well, I was asked to participate in the truth and reconciliation commission by someone I trusted I was initially reluctant to participate. I didn't want to I didn't wanna bring up things from my past. This was part of my childhood. I wanted it to stay there. And to be quite honest with you, I was scared of opening up this can of worms and having to heal things that I didn't I was afraid to deal with and I had a breakdown three years ago, and it was from running from this trauma that I hadn't dealt with. So this this really needed to happen for me. Well, it sounds like for others. We heard from a woman who seem to be in her seventies. Georgina speaking about how profoundly she was wound. By this. And then the truth and reconciliation commission released its final report in two thousand fifteen and this commission, by the way, included the main secretary of state, Maine's governor, very conservative Paula page. His secretary of state defied the governor and decided to be a part of this commission was very adamant about its conclusion that what had happened to your people the web Inaki people in Maine was cultural genocide was there some reward in that conclusion. Absolutely. A lot of good has come from this. The reason I did decide to testify was so that it might help other people, and I do believe that it will do that. By the way, dawn you have a nine year old now, and you've been able to raise that child in your tribal community. What's that been like to watch your child be able to have that it's been the most beautiful part of my healing experience. Actually, she and I are members of a drum group called, mama. Get. Singers. We take part in ceremony. We have grandmother moon ceremony ever every month. We've even attended language immersion camp about a healing center called the Biesen which is just north of reservation. I feel like I've given her a good sense of connection to our community. But at the same time, I've been learning with her, you know, she she she began this connection to our community when she was first born and at thirty four years old I began that you know, right right alongside her. Don, Neptune Adams, thank you so much. Thank you. And by the way, wab Inaki means people of the dawn the documentary, dawn land about Maine's Watanake truth and reconciliation commission premieres tonight on PBS stations across the country is terrific. And according to native news dot net in two thousand sixteen the Lakota people's project launched a campaign to establish a national tooth and reconciliation commission to address the US Indian boarding school era..

Maine Don throat clearing Georgina wab Inaki US Indian boarding school era Paula page Neptune Adams thirty four years three years nine year