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"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:14 min | Last month

"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Allen joke he's the CEO of Unilever massive consumer products company you know everything Jason from dove soap to Ben and Jerry's ice cream and so much more this four hundred brands he's by that two and a half billion people daily so we talked about a lot of things you know what they're seeing in terms of what people are buying it as a result of this shut down in Penn down make but he also talked a lot about balancing profits with doing the right thing we've been operating multi stakeholder model are for quite some time for about ten years now we've being explicit that we believe that if we look after our employees and our customers if we worry about society and the planet if we take care of our supplier partners that then ultimately our shareholders will be well rewarded hello we didn't honestly think it through that way that was kind of how it played out for us our reflex was first told take here are employees I remember March twelfth which is this Thursday our crisis team as saying we should go in Sir I mean Jeff Goldblum manage for you one hundred percent indefinite lockdown for all office employees at the time it felt a little overwhelming but it was in the interest of saving he's by the frightening when we announced on the thirteenth it felt just right by this Saturday the fourteenth I wasn't sure we were moving fast enough and this was the head of that any government says junctions along and other than in China I think we could return to our community and you mentioned some of the things we tried to do there than we realize how important ability to continue to supply our factories running on our supply networks running would be and then we started to worry about caption costs I'm not at the moment we're trying to anticipate and work to short and longer term changes in demand patterns so I think that multi stakeholder thinking which we've been getting used to for a decade service will initially use of this crisis how surprise for you though by the scale and pace of the virus I think one of the benefits of being a truly global company and remember sixty percent of our turnover comes from either side of western Europe and North America are are the biggest businesses in Unilever beyond the U. S. R. India Brazil China Indonesia and so I mean in daily contact with our leader in China and a leader in initially we have had employees impacted by corona Marcin which already stood up at international and crisis management team actually before the beginning of March we had sort of anticipated those to come I house I must say though I'm very worried about the global science we've seen this play out where you know the healthcare systems all over Italy the United Kingdom the United States hi best being taxed and in some ways been overwhelmed I'm very worried what's going to happen when this really takes hold in the favelas of Brazil the townships of Africa the slums of India and the refugee camps around the Middle East I really don't think we've seen the worst human suffering yes that is to say that well you know it's interesting that you say that because I think we talk about that too we we look at these developing markets what's your responsibility in helping those markets and I'm just curious the conversations you might be having with leaders in those markets yeah I think it is multi factorial of course I mean our basic responsibility is people do need soul and believe each surface cleaners on basic foodstuffs these are sold into the moment still the first line of defense against this virus so our first responsibility is to keep manufacturing and I'm producing products we noticed most governments going through a predictable pattern which is still under react or react to the point where the whole supply chain in the country shuts down and at that point we are we've been quite proactive with governments to see you really don't want to shut down supplies of essential group somewhere in the Middle those discussions right now are in emerging markets you know I was gonna do this later but let me bring in the polling question for breakaway members and I'll read it out for you Alex which group of stakeholders should corporations be prioritizing right now and the choices our employees communities shareholders customers so is everybody weighs in on that how do you see it I think I know your answer as a rule the question because in which case it's a tough call because ultimately after after all the stake holders but it for sure begins with your employees you know what I mean so without showing things take care for your employees you cannot you cannot respond I don't do things the chief exec of this company is our front line people who are making the goods are serving our customers so for me that's for stars we'll see I know you almost need you need all of the all of the above we'll talk to you about your work workers because as we said at the top you're taking care of your workers right now so you haven't laid anybody off does it get harder the longer this goes on yes we've got about a hundred and fifty thousand employees on the payroll although we think every day there's about three million people who work directly and only for Unilever but all those hundred and fifty thousand there's about seventy thousand all eyes for office space there's about fifty thousand dollars who are in factories and there's another twenty or thirty thousand gold rates in some kind of field sales operation and we have to take very different approaches for those different communities and also in different geographies at different points in time so as I mentioned Olson two thousand office workers are working from home with the exception of China where we're learning from China to re open I also see some do's and some dorms that's Unilever CEO Alan Jo peas the brief this week in the magazine and really talked about the pandemic ultimately decent kind of strengthening his resolve about being a purpose led company and being accountable to all stakeholders right we talk about this weather to your consumers your shareholders your community at large your employees I mean you really especially in a crisis like this you realise how everybody is impacted and how you really need to take care of all of them well and it's interesting to you know these are words we throw around all the time quote unquote normal times around strategy and especially leadership and I do feel like leadership and leaders are being tested in unbelievable ways right now so really great interview glad you got some time with Alan job you're listening to Bloomberg business week coming up we talk New England luxury resorts turning the page with president of the ocean house management collection or finding the hospitality industry it may be changed.

CEO Ben Jerry Allen Unilever Jason
"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:24 min | Last month

"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Week featuring a debrief with Allen joke he's the CEO of Unilever massive consumer products company you know everything Jason from dove soap to Ben and Jerry's ice cream and so much more this four hundred brands used by that two and a half billion people daily so we talked about a lot of things you know what they're seeing in terms of what people are buying as a result of this shut down in Penn dammit but he also talked a lot about balancing profits with doing the right thing we've been operating multi stakeholder model for quite some time for about ten years now we being explicit that we believe that if we look after our employees and our customers if we worry about society and the planet if we take care of our supplier partners that then also their shareholders will be well rewarded hello we didn't honestly think it through that way that was kind of played out for is a reflex was first sold take here are employees I remember March twelfth which is this Thursday our crisis team as saying we should go in Sir I mean shows gold manage for you one hundred percent indefinitely look for all office employees at the time it felt a little overwhelming but it was in the interest of saving he's by the frightening when we announced on the thirteenth it felt just right by this Saturday the fourteenth I wasn't sure we were moving fast enough and this was the head of that any government says gestiones looked on and other than in China I think we could we turn to our community and you mentioned some of the things we tried to do there than we realize how important ability to continue to supply our factories running on our supply networks running would be and then we started to worry about caption costs I'm not over the moon we're trying to anticipate and work to short and longer term changes in demand patterns so I think that multi stakeholder thinking which we've been getting used to for a decade service will initially use of this crisis no surprise for you though by the scale and pace of the virus I think one of the benefits of being a truly global company and remember sixty percent of our turnover comes from either side of western Europe and North America are are the biggest businesses in Unilever beyond the U. S. R. India Brazil China Indonesia and so I mean in daily contact with our leader in China and a leader in initially we have had employees impacted by Marcin which already stood up at international or crisis management team actually before the beginning of March we had a sort of anticipated this to column I has I must say though I'm very worried about the global science we've seen this play out where you know the healthcare systems all it's really of the United Kingdom the United States hi based in taxes in some ways been overwhelmed I'm very worried what's going to happen when this really takes hold in the favelas of Brazil the townships of Africa the slums of India and the refugee camps or in the Middle East I really don't think we've seen the worst human suffering yet as difficult as it is to say that well you know it's interesting that you say that because I think we talk about that too we we look at these developing markets what's your responsibility in helping those markets and I'm just curious conversations you might be having with leaders in those markets yeah I think it's multi factorial of course I mean our basic responsibility is people do need soul and believe each surface cleaners on basic foodstuffs these are sold into the moment still the first line of defense against this virus sorry first responsibility is to keep manufacturing and I'm producing products we noticed most governments going through a predictable pattern which is under react and then drops to over react to the point where the whole supply chain in the country shop stern we are we've been quite proactive with governments to see you really don't want to shop dine and supplies and ascential group somewhere in the Middle those discussions right now are in emerging markets you know I was gonna do this later but let me bring in the polling question for breakaway members and I'll read it out for you Alex which group of stakeholders should corporations be prioritizing right now and the choices our employees communities shareholders customers so is everybody weighs in on that how do you see it I think I know your answer as a rule the question because in which case it's a tough it's a tough call because ultimately you have to look after all the stake holders but it for sure begins with your employees you know what I mean so without showing all things take care for your employees you cannot you cannot respond I don't do things the chief exec of this company is our front line people who are making the goods are serving our customers so for me that's where stars will seems to I know you almost need you need all of the all of the above we'll talk to you about your work workers because as we said at the top you're taking care of your workers right now so you haven't laid anybody off does it get harder the longer this goes on yes we've got about a hundred and fifty thousand employees on the payroll although we think every day there's about three million people who are only for Unilever but all those hundred and fifty thousand there's about seventy thousand dollars for office space there's about fifty thousand dollars who are in factories and there's another twenty or thirty thousand region some kind of field sales operation and we had to take very different approaches for those different communities and also in different geographies at different points in time so as I mentioned Olson two thousand office workers are working from home with the exception of China where we're learning from China to re open I also see some do's and some dorms that's Unilever CEO Alan Jo peas the brief this week in the magazine and really talked about the pandemic ultimately decent kind of strengthening his resolve about being a purpose led company and being accountable to all stakeholders right we talk about this weather to your consumers your shareholders your community at large your employees I mean you really especially in a crisis like this you realise how everybody's impacted and how you really need to take care of all of that well and it's interesting to you know these are words we throw around all the time quote unquote normal times around strategy and especially leadership and I do feel like leadership and leaders are being tested in unbelievable ways right now so really great interview glad you got some time with Allen joke you're listening to Bloomberg business week coming up we talk New England luxury resorts turning the page with president of the ocean house management collection or finding the hospitality industry it may be changed forever this is Bloomberg.

CEO Ben Jerry Allen Unilever Jason
"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:16 min | Last month

"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Featuring a debrief with Alan Shope he's the CEO of Unilever massive consumer products company you know everything Jason from dove soap to Ben and Jerry's ice cream and so much more this four hundred brands he's right at two and a half billion people daily so we talked about a lot of things you know what they're seeing in terms of what people are buying as a result of this shut down in Penn dammit but he also talked a lot about balancing profits with doing the right thing we've been operating multi stakeholder model are for quite some time for about ten years now we've being explicit that we believe that if we look after our employees and our customers if we worry about society and the planet if we take care of our supplier partners that then ultimately our shareholders will be well rewarded hello we didn't honestly think it through that way that was played out for is a reflex was first told take here are employees I remember March twelfth which is this Thursday our crisis team as saying we should go into each other's goal minder tree one hundred percent indefinite lockdown for all office employees at the time it felt a little overwhelming but it was in the interest of saving he's by the frightening when we announced on the thirteenth it felt just right by the Saturday the fourteenth I wasn't sure if we're moving fast enough and this was ahead of that any government suggestions a lot and other than in China I think we could return to our community and you mentioned some of the things we tried to do there than we realize how important ability to continue to supply our factories running in our supply networks running would be and then we started to worry about cashing costs I'm not over the moon we're trying to anticipate and work to short and longer term changes in demand patterns so I think that multi stakeholder thinking which we've been getting used to for a decade service will initially use of this crisis no surprise for you though by the scale and pace of the virus I think one of the benefits of being a truly global company and remember sixty percent of our turnover comes from either side of western Europe and North America are are the biggest businesses in Unilever beyond the U. S. R. India Brazil China Indonesia and so I mean in daily contact with our leader in China and a leader in initially we have had employees impacted by corona Marcin which already stood up at international or crisis management team actually before the beginning of March we had a sort of anticipated those to come I house I must say I'm very worried about the global science we've seen this play out where you know the healthcare systems all over Italy of the United Kingdom the United States hi best being taxed and in some ways been overwhelmed I'm very worried what's going to happen when this really takes hold in the favelas of Brazil the townships of Africa the slums of India and the refugee camps or in the Middle East I really don't think we've seen the worst human suffering yes loses as to say that well you know it's interesting that you say that because I think we talk about that too we we look at these developing markets what's your responsibility in helping those markets and I'm just curious conversations you might be having with leaders in those markets yeah I think it's multi factorial of course I mean our basic responsibility as people do need soul and believe each surface cleaners on basic foodstuffs these are sold into the moment still the first line of defense against this virus star first responsibility is to keep manufacturing and I'm producing products we noticed most governments going through a predictable pattern which is under react and then props to over react to the point where the whole supply chain in the country shop stern we are we've been quite proactive with governments to see you really don't want to shut down supplies of essential group somewhere in the middle of those discussions right now are in emerging markets you know I was gonna do this later but let me bring in the polling question for breakaway members and I'll read it out for you Alex which group of stakeholders should corporations be prioritizing right now and the choices our employees communities shareholders customers so is everybody weighs in on that how do you see it I think I know your answer as a rule the question because in which case it's a tough it's a tough call because ultimately after after all the stake holders but it for sure begins with your employees you know what I mean so what I'm showing things take care for your employees you cannot you cannot respond I don't do anything is the chief executive's company is our front line people who are making or serving our customers so stars who seems to I know you almost need you need all of the all of the above we'll talk to you about your work workers because as we said at the top you're taking care of your workers right now so you haven't laid anybody off does it get harder the longer this goes on yes we've got about a hundred fifty thousand employees on the payroll although we think every day there's about three million people who are only for Unilever but all those hundred and fifty thousand there's about seventy thousand dollars for office space there's about fifty thousand dollars who are in factories and there's another twenty or thirty thousand region some kind of field sales operation I take very different approaches for those different communities and also in different geographies at different points in time so as I mentioned Olson two thousand office workers are working from home with the exception of China where we're learning from China to re open I also see some dues in some dorms that's Unilever CEO Allen Joe peas the brief this week in the magazine and really talked about the pandemic ultimately decent kind of strengthening his resolve about being a purpose led company and being accountable to all stakeholders right we talk about this whether it's your consumers your shareholders your community at large your employees I mean you really especially in a crisis like this you realise how everybody is impacted and how you really need to take care of all of that well and it's interesting to you know these are words we throw around all the time quote unquote normal times around strategy and especially leadership and I do feel like leadership and leaders are being tested in unbelievable ways right now so really great interview glad you got some time with Alan Jones you're listening to Bloomberg business week coming up we talk New England luxury resorts turning the page with president of the ocean house management collection or finding the hospitality industry it may be changed.

Alan Shope CEO Ben Jerry Unilever Jason
"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:02 min | Last month

"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Magazine this week featuring a debrief with Allen joke he's the CEO of Unilever massive consumer products company you know everything Jason from dove soap to Ben and Jerry's ice cream and so much more this four hundred brands he's by that two and a half billion people daily so we talked about a lot of things you know what they're seeing in terms of what people are buying as a result of this shut down in Penn dammit but he also talked a lot about balancing profits with doing the right thing we've been operating multi stakeholder model are for quite some time for about ten years now we being explicit that we believe that if we look after our employees and our customers if we worry about society and the planet if we take care of our supplier partners then ultimately our shareholders will be well rewarded hello we didn't honestly think it through that way that was kind of played out for is a reflex was first told take here are employees I remember March twelfth which is this Thursday our crisis team as saying we should go in Sir I mean yes gold miner tree one hundred percent indefinitely look for all office employees at the time it felt a little overwhelming but it was in the interest of saving please by this Friday when we announced on the thirteenth it felt just right by this Saturday the fourteenth I wasn't sure if we're moving fast enough and this was the head of that any government transactions a lot and other than in China I think we could return to our community and you mentioned some of the things we tried to do there than we realize how important ability to continue to supply factories running on our supply networks running would be and then we started to worry about caption costs I'm not over the moon we're trying to anticipate and work to short and longer term changes in demand patterns so I think that multi stakeholder thinking which we've been getting used to for a decade service will initially use of this crisis no surprise for you though by the scale and pace of the virus I think one of the benefits of being a truly global company and remember sixty percent of our turnover comes from either side of western Europe and North America are are the biggest businesses in Unilever beyond the U. S. R. India Brazil China Indonesia and so I mean in daily contact with our leader in China and a leader in initially we have had employees impacted by corona Marcin which already stood up at international and crisis management team actually before the beginning of March we had sort of anticipated those to come I has I must say though I'm very worried about the global science we've seen this play out where you know the healthcare systems all over Italy of the United Kingdom the United States based being taxed in some ways been overwhelmed I'm very worried what's going to happen when this really takes hold in the favelas of Brazil the townships of Africa the slums of India and the refugee camps or in the Middle East I really don't think we've seen the worst human suffering yet as difficult as it is to say that well you know it's interesting that you say that because I think we talk about that too we we look at these developing markets what's your responsibility in helping those markets and I'm just curious conversations you might be having with leaders in those markets yeah I think it's multi factorial of course I mean our basic responsibility is people do need soul and believe each surface cleaners on basic foodstuffs these are sold into the moment still the first line of defense against this virus star first responsibility is to keep manufacturing and I'm producing products we noticed most governments going through a predictable pattern which is under react or react to the point where the whole supply chain in the country shop seven we are we've been quite governments to see you really don't want to shut down supplies are sensual group somewhere in the middle of those discussions right now are in emerging markets you know I was gonna do this later but let me bring in the polling question for breakaway members and I'll read it out for you Alex which group of stakeholders should corporations be prioritizing right now and the choices our employees communities shareholders customers so is everybody weighs in on that how do you see it I think I know your answer as a rule the question because in which case it's a tough it's a tough call because ultimately after after all the stake holders but it for sure begins with your employees you know what I mean so without showing all things take care for your employees you cannot you cannot respond I don't do things the chief exec of this company is our front line people who are making the goods are serving our customers so stars pool seems to I know you almost you need all of the all of the above we'll talk to you about your work workers because as we said at the top you're taking care of your workers right now so you haven't laid anybody off does it get harder the longer this goes on yes we've got about a hundred fifty thousand employees on the payroll although we think every day there's about three million people who are only for Unilever but all those hundred and fifty thousand there's about seventy thousand dollars for office space there's about fifty thousand dollars who are in factories and there's another twenty or thirty thousand region some kind of field sales operation and we have to take very different approaches for those different communities and also in different geographies at different points in time so as I mentioned Olson two thousand office workers are working from home with the exception of China where we're learning from China to reopen I also see some dues in some dorms that's Unilever CEO Allen Joe peas the brief this week in the magazine and really talked about the pandemic ultimately decent kind of strengthening his resolve about being a purpose led company and being accountable to all stakeholders right we talk about this whether it's your consumers your shareholders your community at large your employees I mean you really especially in a crisis like this you realise how everybody's impacted and how you really need to take care of all of them well and it's interesting to you know these are words we throw around all the time quote unquote normal times around strategy and especially leadership and I do feel like leadership and leaders are being tested in unbelievable ways right now so really great interview cut you got some.

CEO Ben Jerry Allen Unilever Jason
"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:10 min | Last month

"india brazil china" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The DMV can I help you yes we're here to make someone happy you got the right place may I offer you one of tasty cakes iconic butterscotch grip it I suppose pretty good actually ma'am did I just see you smile don't push all lock and there you have it another very happy customer proving all it takes is a tasty cake to make happy happen this is Bloomberg business week with Carol Massar and Jason Kelly from Bloomberg radio well today were you said the most important and informative conversation we had on our daily Bloomberg business week radio show all about the virus and what happens next yeah and we're taking you inside the magazine this week featuring a debrief with Allen job he's the CEO of Unilever massive consumer products company you know everything Jason from dove soap to Ben and Jerry's ice cream and so much more this four hundred brands he's right at two and a half billion people daily so we talked about a lot of things you know what they're seeing in terms of what people are buying as a result of this shut down in Penn dammit but he also talked a lot about balancing profits with doing the right thing we've been operating multi stakeholder model are for quite some time for about ten years now we being explicit that we believe that if we look after our employees and our customers if we worry about society and the planet if we take care of our supplier partners that then ultimately our shareholders will be well rewarded hello we didn't honestly think it through that way that was kind of how it played out for is a reflex was first told take your employees I remember March twelfth which is this Thursday our crisis team as saying we should go in Sir I mean yes gold miner tree one hundred percent indefinite lockdown for all office employees at the time it felt a little overwhelming but it was in the interest of saving he's by the frightening when we announced on the thirteenth it felt just right by this Saturday the fourteenth I wasn't sure if we're moving fast enough and this was the head of that any government suggestions a lot other than in China I think we could we turn to our community and you mentioned some of the things we tried to do there then we realize how important ability to continue to supply our factories running on our supply networks running would be and then we started to worry about caption costs I'm not over the moon we're trying to anticipate and work to short and longer term changes in demand patterns so I think that multi stakeholder thinking which we've been getting used to for a decade service will initially use of this crisis no surprise for you though by the scale and pace of the virus I think one of the benefits of being a truly global company and remember sixty percent of our turnover comes from either side of western Europe and North America are are the biggest businesses in Unilever beyond the U. S. R. India Brazil China Indonesia and soul I mean in daily contact with our leader in China and a leader in initially we had employees impacted by corona Marcin which already stood up at international and crisis management team actually before the beginning of March we had a sort of anticipated this to column I has I must say though I'm very worried about the global sites we've seen this play out where you know the healthcare systems all it's really of the United Kingdom the United States based in taxes in some ways been overwhelmed I'm very worried what's going to happen when this really takes hold in the favelas of Brazil the townships of Africa the slums of India and the refugee camps or in the Middle East I really don't think we've seen the worst human suffering yet as difficult as it is to say that well you know it's interesting that you say that because I think we talk about that too we we look at these developing markets what's your responsibility in helping those markets and I'm just curious the conversations you might be having with leaders in those markets yeah I think it's multi factorial of course I mean our basic responsibility is people do need soul and believe each surface cleaners on basic foodstuffs these are sold into the moment still the first line of defense against this virus star first responsibility is to keep manufacturing and I'm producing products we noticed most governments going through a predictable pattern which is under react and then props to overreact to the point where the whole supply chain in the country shops and we are we've been quite cool actually governments to see you really don't want to shop dine and supplies in the central group somewhere in the middle of those discussions right now are in emerging markets you know I was gonna do this later but let me bring in the polling question for breakaway members and I'll read it out for you Alex which group of stakeholders should corporations be prioritizing right now and the choices our employees communities shareholders customers so is everybody weighs in on that how do you see it I think I know your answer as a rule the question because in which case it's a tough it's a tough call because ultimately you have to look after all the stakeholders but it for sure begins with your employees you know what I mean so without showing things take care for your employees you cannot you cannot respond I don't do things the chief exec of this company is our front line people who are making the goods are serving our customers so stars who seems to I know you almost see you need all of the all of the above we'll talk to you about your work workers because as we said at the top you're taking care of your workers right now so you haven't laid anybody off does it get harder the longer this goes on yes we go about a hundred and fifty thousand employees on the payroll although we think every day there's about three million people who are only for Unilever but all those hundred and fifty thousand there's about seventy thousand dollars for office space there's about fifty thousand dollars who are in factories and there's another twenty or thirty thousand region some kind of field sales operation and we had to take very different approaches for those different communities and also in different geographies at different points in time so as I mentioned Olson two thousand office workers are working from home with the exception of China where we're learning from China to re open I also see some do's and some dorms that's Unilever CEO Allen Joe peas the brief this week in the magazine and really talked about the pandemic ultimately decent kind of strengthening his resolve about being a purpose led company and being accountable to all stakeholders right we talk about this whether it's your consumers your shareholders your community at large your employees I mean you really especially in a crisis like this you realise how everybody is impacted and how you really need to take care of all of that well and it's interesting to you know these are words we throw around all the time quote unquote normal times around strategy and especially leadership and I do feel like leadership and leaders are being tested in unbelievable ways right now so really great interview glad you got some time with Allen joke you're listening to Bloomberg business week coming up we talk New England luxury resorts turning the page with president of the ocean house management collection or finding the hospitality industry it may be changed forever this is Bloomberg okay.

"india brazil china" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

08:52 min | 8 months ago

"india brazil china" Discussed on The Heat

"Bobby is the headache. Go to school and become friends in the House House. What kind of people having headaches having fevers they're having the EIZABURO name sniffing and it's just edible to people with existing issues news Find it was and it is a public policy failure. Actually visu winning our future by doing this. The Aaron Delhi India's capital with almost twenty million residents is unbreathable over the last week levels of dangerous fine particles Leeann owners PM. Two two point five have ranged eight to sixteen times. The safe limit humid. It's toxic. Mix a pollutants Delhi Chief Minister of in Castroville. It was likely to a gas chamber. Emergency measures have been taken by deadliest govern including casting school halting construction diverted flights handing out face masks and rationing the number of vehicles allowed on the street but all these just ineffective stopgap measures in a country where diseases related to air pollution. Kill an estimated one point point five million people a year. Hello I'm Nathan King and welcome to the heat. PODCAST with us to discuss. The crisis in Delhi is Dr a shadow Chakrabarti she. He is a risk of behavioral scientists. Also an expert on climate science. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much thank you. We've all seen the videos coming out deli before our well. Listen kind of paint. A scene of what actually is going on in the because it's quite incredible. The best way to describe it is gas chamber. And so I've I've been to Delhi myself. I've never been there During this time of year. which is this expected? Consistent pollution the great smog that rolls in every November in between between harvest between Rice and wheat. Right but I have friends there. I have extended family there. And they haven't been able to leave their homes except to go to the office and and you know. Just run to the car with their masks on. And it's been like that for the last five days and this is expected to consistently happen for at least a few more days And then we know it's coming back again next year so you said Rice and wheat burning. What exactly of the residents daily breed in what is so unique to this pollution? Shen right and air pollution is has particulate matter and is made up of nitric oxide and self rock side and there's all these different components but what really earliest contributing to the smog. In Delhi is The burning of stubble following rice harvest in the Punjab region. And so what's unique unique about this particular type of smog is that it is It is resembling a smoky fog. Which is why it's called smog? And it's visible and and the tiny levels particularly matter that you described as pm two point five can enter deep into the lungs and reach highest seven hundred micrograms per cubic meter in some areas and the World Health Organization recommends that PM two point five levels should not be more than twenty five micrograms per cubic meter in an average of twenty four hours so we wave past those levels over several days to go deeper into that this particular matter. What does it actually you too to people especially overseas the more vulnerable young an elderly so for young people it can cause severe developmental hold delays? You can imagine children that are inhaling that kind that kind of toxins are now going to have the same sort of brain and cognitive development that their their counterparts in other parts of the world that don't have to deal with this type of pollution and in fact studies have shown exactly that that there are developmental delays in children that are inhaling this type type of toxicity the elderly as well are experiencing chronic respiratory issues and it doesn't even matter necessarily how vulnerable in terms of age men and women across all age spectrums are being admitted to the hospital because of weasing because of asthma because of respiratory conditions that are stemming from these toxic harmful chemicals and this is something that again it happens every year hospitals report doctors report and it's worse this year than ever. This is the worst in three years in terms of health effects from breathing in these pollutants On the public services to. That's exactly right. It's a stress on the public services. And don't forget those who can afford. It can actually protect themselves much better than those. Who can't so? It's also creating this climate apartheid where you have those who are more vulnerable and the more exposed that are going to be affected not just in terms of health but in terms of productivity. So it's actually creating an even bigger gap between the rich and the poor more and more pollution hitting Deli just in the last few years. Is it increase in. Production is not a plan in terms of air quality and people saying on the streets. I've seen pretty pistol. Yeah as you can imagine because this is not. It's something that is that we shouldn't be prepared for right. This is something that has been more or less a problem for decades ever. Since the Green Revolution in India the idea Jio was to create the upper Indian states of job in Haryana as the bread basket of India so by incentivizing farmers to plant rice to plant wheat and the government made it easy for them to do that by making electricity free and so something like rice is very water intensive and you need to be able to have a lot of energy to pump that water for the rice paddy fields and so for that reason because the government made it easy for these farmers to harvest these crops crops. They started doing it. Why wouldn't they the issue though is that it was only a little bit of turnaround time between Rice season? We'd season it's just a couple of weeks and so ultimately how do you turn that land around so that you can start the new crop bright stable so you don't have to burn the stubble but that's the cheapest and easiest way to do it because ultimately what should be done is machine tilling of the fields Or fellow for a couple of months. Try and get the nitrogen back that he's Oklahoma exactly or reusing the stubble for animal feed but this particular stubble just doesn't is not nutritious for animals. It can't be re Packaged that way and Labour's actually just like cut down these crops and so the stubble is pretty high rated. We're talking about several inches and it's really sharp and so you also would I need to pay laborers a considerable amount of money to do this work. It's not the easiest work so the cost just made it not not prohibitive exactly. So what's what's the government doing. I mean During the very popular prime minister just re elected This is a big crisis. Firmness seconds of so Angela Merkel Chancellor from Germany was visiting Delhi when this kicked off last week and her and mody went into the smog for a public appearance despite how toxic the levels were and McKell Said very clearly that this is unacceptable and we can help you figure out ways to reduce this through enhancing vehicular transport to green systems. uh-huh there's real obvious measures that can take place here but we need to talk about the difference between short term solutions and long-term solutions. These pledges an overhaul of the transport system Overhaul of agriculture and making it more sustainable there's ways to look at it that can immediately take effect versus really transforming the society as a whole Hawk you know lot developing countries especially India have said look we understand. There's a climate crisis but you guys in the developed world had terrible pollution hundreds of years when you went through your industrial religion. I remember my dad growing him in London he got asthma. Because of all the smog remember the Churchill smokes kind of is now India. The reason why shouldn't there be some robin lecturing. Germans were not feeling right. Yeah I mean can you imagine so. The West had its opportunity unity to go through the industrial revolution to really prosper and grow with economy. And now you have. Countries like India Brazil China that are saying what about our turn. Why do we have to do differently? Friendly but ultimately if we don't change the practice if all of these countries did the same thing the US and the West did too. Oh Yeah we just can't afford it. We can't on a global populace afford it. You can see how much it's hurting. The citizens at in the urban centers and Delis Not Unique Deli is In the list of thirteen of the most polluted cities or fourteen of the most polluted of the fifteen cities that the World Health Organization has really red flagged so it's not only hurting the domestic domestic population climate change air pollution are not impacts that Respect national borders so having a city or a region that it is suffering from pollution. We're going to see that shift from across borders and so these aren't.

"india brazil china" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

12:43 min | 10 months ago

"india brazil china" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"New age beliefs practices Mrs Astrology Psychic abilities and crystals and crystal therapy. They're they're seeing a resurgence in ascension and this is where the Guardian article kind of takes a closer look at it. You could find websites that will tell you which crystal you should use. According to your astrological sign the more scientific than that in a way it makes perfect sense. PSEUDOSCIENCE begets more pseudoscience. Why not you know plenty of room on the the pile for him. I would have been rich by now guys j you totally would have been rich hashtags for crystals and hashtag healing crystals tens of millions millions Yep. I came up with this idea when it was like a year before we started the S Ju. I'm like all right. I'M GONNA make a website that recharges crystals bristles and I built it. It was done churches. The website was completed. It was done and I and Steve had a very severe severe hit a very heart to heart with me like don't do this and I'm like yeah but Steve. They're going to spend their money anyway. Like why shouldn't why can't I have that money. You know like like divert all of that money to like embryonic stem cell research here like something that will really help the world so many good things would have benefited from me becoming rich ten Eliza Crystal shop like in my old neighborhood. I just recently moved so I don't walk by it anymore. What goes on in there they sell crystals and like dream catchers and Shit and there I walked by it with my very good friend. Who happens to be really into this stuff. There was a gift card in the window and it said like I love you. Even though I love you because you don't mind that I'm into all this will bullshit. That's so us because I really love my friend and I'm constantly trying to get her out of it. But at the end of the day I have to just love her regardless of the fact that she believes in all this bullshit. Oh my Gosh I there are a couple of people in my life as well Cara who absolutely lutely absolutely believe in crystals and Crystal Power Hook Line and parent care amid as well. It's here. Ono Yep the thing about this particular your guardian article getting back to the article is that although they don't really go into this deep dive about the the the Bank of crystals and crystal healing they take a look into the actual trade the actual market for these things and how the heck do these things get from remote parts to the earth onto the shelves and into the stores of where we can buy them here in America and elsewhere so it's scary and it reads like something thing out of the movie blood diamond to be perfectly honest and they go to Madagascar Madagascar large island country off the east coast of of Southern Africa also one of the poorest countries in the world but it has lots and lots of minerals and crystals rose quartz words Amethyst citrine Labrador Labrador eight among others some very popular ones that we see in by I here in the West Gems and precious metals were Madagascar's fastest growing export in two thousand seventeen up one hundred seventy percent sent from two thousand sixteen so in just one year whoa they are along among the other nations such as India Brazil China. These really large large industrialized nations. Madagascar is right alongside them as far as as one of the key producers of crystals for the entire world but it's human human bodies rather than machinery that pulled crystals from the earth the people are the beasts of burden more than eighty percent crystals mind in Madagascar our remind by small groups of people families with no regulation and they're practically paid nothing for their labor. It is so poorly regulated the mining locations or out there in remote areas of what are already remote areas of the world far from the eyes of authority from health officials and from humanitarian groups. The countryside's are run by gangs. They rule the using ruthless tactics such as theft and intimidation and rape and murders. This is the environment in which these minds exist and they are terribly unsafe. They're prone to collapsing. Workers become buried alive to die. They can't always get them out. out people are seriously injured in landslides dirt avalanches. They have little to no protective clothing these workers. They don't wear masks there barefoot it. They're constantly breathing in dust and rock particles. They become sick. They're exposed to higher risks of cancer and silicosis and that is and the longer they tried to make a living in these minds the more subject they are to it child labor. Child Labor is widespread. US Department of Labor and the International Labor Organization estimate that about eighty five thousand children work in the minds of Madagascar and it's a particularly nightmarish scenario for children because in some cases think of this they are lowered in by ropes into holes in the ground which are barely one meter in diameter and they go down as far as twenty five meters below the surface to scrape and dig by hand and which in a space which I will generously generously define as CLAUSTROPHOBIC Oberg to me. That's the stuff of nightmares I it's hard to even imagine it no no shaft support whatsoever literally just a hole in the ground and in some cases nine hundred thousand tonnes of soil and rock above you suspended only by its own natural cohesion cohesion at at any point. These things can collapse so when we talk about what's the harm talk about belief in nonsense. We remind people every day that there's a huge cost to the belief in the ridiculous and the non on scientific crystals may seem like harmless or at least it's my body who else my herding by believing that crystals have healing properties. Well what y'all need a peer down. I think one of these black holes in the grounds of Madagascar to get your answer pseudoscience can kill cost tremendous suffering not just to the person trying to make use of the nonsense but all the people in steps it takes to deliver these dangerous goods to our shelves and our markets yet but I would say though that is a distinct problem because you know nothing collecting minerals. I love to collect gems and gemstones etc but you know yeah. We definitely have to to address the issue. It's like the conflict free diamond thing trying to be conscious about where you're where you're gems are being sourced. Unfortunately most of these semi-precious stones are being sourced to all around the world and in in these kind of lawless places but what we do about it you know even if also crystal healing in culture the it would still be a market for these things you want to support industry. Yeah you just want to also support regulation and you know obviously civil rights that that's where the conflict really comes in. We know relatively clear how to stay away from blood diamonds now. It's relatively clear not to buy rubies now like we know certain things but it it's hard. I guess as a consumer to really understand that if you're not gonNA think about rose courts like this yeah exactly or just court wards. It's everywhere yeah where did I do. I do think though like if you if you're industry is based on pseudoscience pseudoscience that I do think it's a setup for problems like we talked about the traditional Chinese medicine market trafficking and in parts of endangered animals like Pangolin England scales or the Supplement Industry Trafficking in contaminated adulterated products. You know yeah. There's probably if you're pope. Businesses is a scam. You're probably not worrying about where you're sourcing your raw material you know. I think that's really the problem yeah all right Bob. Tell us about out this massive neutron star yes. The biggest neutron star ever has apparently been discovered so big that some think we may never find one one bigger so are they correct if so why or why not this was recently published in nature astronomy we've talked about neutron stars over and over and over they're not really stars right there kind of corpses of stars beautiful and fascinating but still pretty much burned out cinders in many ways but they are still amazing amazing city sized with the mass of a son or to squeeze into that tiny tiny volume with gravitational effects and behaviors that are just mind boggling and and still very very mysterious so the name of this neutron star is kind of long and boring. I won't even say it. I'm going to call it Fred. Fred is forty six hundred light years from worth and it emits radio waves and spins two hundred eighty nine times per second around its it's access and that makes it that makes it a pulsar of course that really fascinating part of the story that was not not just it's it's huge mass but the method that they used to determine kermit mass was especially interesting. I hadn't heard of it before kind of Put your imagination goggles on. We've got it's a binary system. It's not just a neutron star. It's a binary. There's another player here and to white worth the white dwarf and the Neutron Star orbiting each other and it's also was nearly edge on the the the orbital plane was pretty much edge on to to the astronomers is so then so you have this white dwarf orbiting around a black hole essentially and every four days it would kind of finish orbit or so every four days it would kind of come between us and the neutron star so that's that's Kinda critical critical what happens when that in this very specific scenario is you have what's called the Shapiro delay when the White Dwarf was between us and the Neutron Star are the gravitational effects of on Space Time around the white dwarf impacted the radio waves coming from the neutron star behind it okay okay and that would actually delay just by little bit the pulsar's radio waves from hitting the earth and the delay only amounted to about one ten ten millionth of a second so very minor very tiny tiny delay unless the the white dwarf was between us there would be no delay but only when it was between you. You'd have this delay so what that delay would give us is the the mass of the White Dwarf because the amount of delay is directly related to the mass of the of the White Dwarf and so now we have the mass of the White Dwarf and that would then give us the mass of the other partner in the binary system because it's relatively simple calculation collation. If you have one mass and you know about the you know the binary system in its orbit you can then calculate the mass of the other object which is a neutron star which is what they did so that was the technique very fascinate technique apparently very very accurate so when it was all said and done the mass was calculated to be two point one four solar masses so the neutron star had the equivalent mass of a two point one four of our son in terms of in terms of its mass so a big deal what is two point one four actually that's a very interesting number because as far as we can tell as far as what our theories are telling us that the maximum maximum mass that a neutron star could have is two point one six or probably maybe closer to two point one seven and so this bad boy was really really close to having the amount of mass it it needs the maximum mass it could have without turning into into a black hole okay so and that's because and that's because of degeneracy pressure. We've talked about this a few times on the show real quick once you once you get past passed passed two point one seven solar masses than the new trying to generously the neutrons together are saying you know you can't go any farther than this. This is pushing back pushing back but when you have more than two point one seven solar masses than trying to genesee pressure gives out and that's the last thing that that was holding back that mass from becoming.

Madagascar Steve Fred Eliza Crystal Amethyst citrine Labrador Labr US Department of Labor partner Cara genesee Bob Supplement Industry Traffickin Ono India Brazil China International Labor Organizati Southern Africa
"india brazil china" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"india brazil china" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Supply chain finance evolves, suppliers, sending the invoices receivables to financial institution lower price in the amount owed. Basically, get paid quicker and the buyer or the person who was opposed to pay the invoice in the first place, usually gets to dictate better terms. As the result of them being paid foster, it's not particularly sexy area fintech, but my goodness, is it important this company just as a fun fact counts. Former UK prime Minister David Cameron, as one of its advisors, here's to be a mate. If the goal founded the company, which might to do with it. The new funding is expected to be used to accelerate greenhouse expansion into new markets in Brazil China, and India really interesting markets. And the development of new technologies thoughts are I think the whole point. I mean, I'm working capital finance rather than the actual story of. This is a century an industry, which is, which is borne out of the inefficiencies of processes, which is basically what it is. It's like we've got a thirty day pay psycho, a sixty day pay cycle. And it's just that's just the way it is. And I know a lot of people were sort of small businesses who are supplied to pick businesses who get held at ransom and something like this. Whether or not you're talking about this big to small business large businesses large business, or whatever it might be. I think it's actually, the, the value of it is incredibly high incredibly hard. And I think that's what is markets is so interesting. India, Brazil, China, how many small businesses, you know, start ups are those parts of the world that big banks wouldn't even look at twice or even you know how many innovative finance companies all their targeting this businesses and those bases. All our businesses small business things were instantly comes to mind. It sounds good. I think the only thing I want to know is, what is the interest rate that you are implicitly, paying because this feels like alone, it doesn't sound like there's an APR. To the way it works is basically the Bank agrees to CEO invoices. A hundred pounds. The Bank says will buy the you for ninety pounds the and green so facilitates that transaction and it's usually a set amount, depending on the value of the invoicing question. Yes. So, and I think it ninety pounds on one hundred if you get thirty days early doesn't.

Brazil China India David Cameron prime Minister UK CEO Brazil ninety pounds hundred pounds thirty days thirty day sixty day
"india brazil china" Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"india brazil china" Discussed on CFR On the Record

"About it. First of all with reification. But also with a whole bunch of badmouth, Allah G, and sloppy terminology Belgium, and it's not helping I would disagree with with Corey maybe respectfully, maybe not. Remains to be seen because I think that there is a commonality to what we're witnessing across the globe. That is to say that at the largest macro historical level. We're passing through a transition from the industrial era to the digital era. It is causing societies around the world to go through profound transitions. People feel disoriented they feel scared. They're living with economic insecurity. They're feeling that traditional communal groupings are being diluted, and and they're revolting, and it is causing a challenge to the political establishments, particularly among the the Atlantic democracies, but it's not restricted to the Atlantic democracies. And so I do think that that this is something that we can see as a. Systemic or programmatic development that having been said, I would agree with Corey that the geopolitical implications. Should not be exaggerated largely because the way that these populist governments are conducting themselves does not lend. To common purpose and common foreign policy. In fact, I'm struck by the degree to which there hasn't really been a consequential geopolitical realignment despite the powerful forces of populism bubbling up from below despite Trump, I think NATO is in strong shape. Look at public opinion. Look at what congress has been doing. I can't find anyone else other than the president himself who thinks we should scuttle NATO. If you look at Europe, aired one. Chin ski. Louis sitting too. You're right. I mean, someone that's in the position of responsibility. And now, we know what? Yes. Take take Chint skeet take Luigi Demayo also Vini take air to one take the Brexit people. They are not forming a serious political alignment. In fact, they are in different groupings in the European parliament or they're not they're not forming some kind of United front. As one might expected. Take the bricks India Brazil, China Russia, they're going on every all direction sometimes the Chinese are in alliance with the Russian sometimes not the Indians, and the Brazilians go this way, they go that way, the one the one thing where where I think we do see a kind of inkling of geopolitical lines is Russia China. I think we need to take that seriously. I don't think it's going to last. I think the Chinese are going to wake up. I'm sorry. The Russians are going to wake up sometime soon realize that the real threat that they face doesn't come from the west they should stop worrying about Ukraine, they should realize that China just took over south and central Asia and is eating their lunch. And when they realized that I think they're going to tilt to the west and start worrying about the east. Well, without getting into the question of terminology. I think one could on the basis of simply observation. One is struck by the the

Corey China NATO Trump Belgium Ukraine Europe Luigi Demayo China Russia Asia president congress Louis India Brazil Chint Russia Brexit
"india brazil china" Discussed on Global GoalsCast

Global GoalsCast

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"india brazil china" Discussed on Global GoalsCast

"She prepares them for jobs, but for life to with techniques so that they can make their own choices about healthy eating and caring for their bodies. That was at the heart of her critique of Geldof and Bano she took them to task for dictating western ideas, her goal now is for the girl. She teaches to come up with solutions for the problems. They face many issues remained in girls facing we don't have any physicians targeted through for women, especially from the Muslim community and try just for that by teaching them. How to code and giving them the skills. I think that that that's how duty as a security at Mariam's. I'm the code events. I love seeing how she inspires a girls. But what's really moving to see how the girls inspire her? I see myself all the time, I cry when I see him, but I- many ways I cry because now I can help him moso. I cry society, failing them in someone siding. They life. It's just impossible change that much. I can relate to them. I can I can see exactly the teams they have, you know, opportunities and networks and connections. The what is at one of village, however, destitute children who have not seen anything like a computer. This is one titan. We've mentioned to my village what to set up our library. And we asked the children to draw a computer in the not even fathom what a computer was. That's Louise, Wembley assistant to and protege of Marianne. She grew up in Maria small village deep in the mountains of Kenya. She loved reading the hardy boys got straight A's through high school and studied mathematics and economics through university. She realized her real passion was for the environment and helping people when I do them the cool a good to meet very many people through Meriem, go to meet people who helped me push me walk forward. So now, I guess you explore both my strands in my passions normal to interrupt with young girls. Young women and teach them about climate change in about technology. So out predicts that are going on in Kibera in a slum like Madeira in Korogocho, these are places where we have gone as I am the could in Ritchie note to the girls who been also. Affected by if GM, which is female genital mutilation in Alabama reges rich out to the Gazan coma, which is our affiliate company. Kenya? This gulls who cannot leave the come because they are in the country on refugee status. So for the first time this year, we got to celebrate international day of the with them came over to Kenya. In went all the way to Cooma in give some computers in the Senate. There could be lessons seeing in having the big dreams that they have just interacting them in getting to see that. There must put themselves in these tiny box that the world puts them in their dreams are quite big. It's very inspiring for me one Galata time, we are strengthening the community because we involve the communities lettera walk with in our wok. We look for mentors among the people who are in the community. So that this guy gets to learn from the people that they knew in the people that. They see it. They look up to these people that, you know, look like them, they something about young black girls from the village from the slums, even from the town's seeing a black woman was made it because then they knew that they too can make it. I felt very happy to see miam- coming all the way from UK up to here to help us, and I'm so thankful to have also, and I like her confidence and how she talks out also like to be like her in future today have learned about this big girls. And I've also learned about the code. It isn't Myra that I'm originally that is only a status, but he's never written on my face. Never eaten. Anything might never destroy might might your network wanted. Some in my district because I'm the one to right? My destiny, I write my own story. Those are some clips of Elizabeth anabol- secondary school students who live in cocoon refugee camp. And these are just some of the girls Mariam has worked with I equally could have featured some girls from India Brazil, China, you can watch those clips in our social media feed. Mariam herself finds it hard to believe just how far she's come. I can sit down the United nation. Now, I'm thinking just forty four years old. But if you ask me nineteen nineties that I'll do that. That's not possible. I was a kid. I was on the on the street. We can one day having close. My my life was in hundreds of NGOs in from in an in older civilized religious. So I was reading older girls, you know? So now, I'm here. Going back to the Fiji comes helping young women goes in southern giving them older close. I'm giving them competent. I'm giving them really prize. Because I know that is the future. I I'm not saying there's no other team to come. I'm not saying there's no fourteen what I'm trying to do is change the mindset of this. I need some clothes. Also, some kills because he kills I can buy more clothes. I am the codex mobilizing governments and five or six in front fundation invest in these goes to see them differently. Not just objective development. But see them three men who can actually do something is their life and give them joke and kills them. Give them t- buck when a young woman has money which killed when she knows that she's safe, and she can express herself she's part of the world. And that's what I'm trying to change the world by twenty thirty wash me 'cause I'm gonna teach one woman in goes out code.

Kenya Mariam Geldof Bano GM Elizabeth anabol- secondary sc Korogocho Meriem United nation Kibera Cooma Louise Maria small Wembley Alabama UK miam Senate Ritchie