35 Burst results for "Independent Film"

Ep4: Unboxing The Mystery Box Film Challenge

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 8 months ago

Ep4: Unboxing The Mystery Box Film Challenge

"I can't really stressing enough. Anyone can participate in the mystery. Box film challenge you. Don't have to be in scranton wilkes-barre you don't have to be in northeast. Pennsylvania you can be anywhere in participate. We've made it so we've made it really streamlined. Like keeping announcing the items online. And that's because of the pandemic it's like okay if you wanna do a challenge during a pandemic how we're gonna do this like we don't want to give out physical boxes and it's really not that conducive if you want to grow it so announcing the items was the best way to do it and it's it's really easy to it's just like people just have to go find the items if they have them in their house or they had the borrow him or if you wanna buy 'em yourself that's that's a really good we do. We're on facebook on instagram. We'll have a facebook group so you could talk to people this where we usually put the list of the requirements items prompts on. There's usually a document i to facebook page on the facebook group in the video is always there when we announced but this is the first year that the mystery box film challenge is on film freeway. That was a decision that i made that phone. Freeways really the premier place to find film festivals film challenges and i wanted just to get more is on the challenge because last year had lake. We had i think twenty one sign ups and we got twelve films back so usually are ratio is lake. We get a lot of sign ups in usually we get about half of them to submit a film which was amazing during a pandemic all types of films different genres like first time filmmakers season professionals to it's it's everybody you can do it. You can totally participate in this challenge. It's so much fun. And it's just a great way to connect with people in network with filmmakers in your area and asking for help and we're always here he always email us if you need help or have any questions but yeah all our items in prompts and requirements and specifications are on our film freeway page. If you searched the mystery box challenge on film freeway and like i said before you have two months to make film they need to be wanna ten minutes in laying that includes your credit entitles. They can't go beyond ten minutes Ill should align with the pg thirteen rating. We don't allow our crm teen films. These are short films are not gonna be feature films. So it's pretty good for that. And then you have your technical specifications as well and we do the emission on phil freeway as well. We used to have people email us. They're finish phones but we're not doing that. Everything is going to be through film freeway We do have a submission fee this year all past years. The film challenge has been free but with Just doing the challenge. It's a lot of it's like. We want to do a lot. More marketing in the marketing costs money. And we want to give her filmmaker swag like shirts and stickers and It better prizes in that costs money so like we have a regular deadlines mission is five dollars and then we have a late deadline for this year. So regular deadline for this year's film challenges november tenth. You still have time You can do a filming day you can edit and day and do whatever and are late. Deadline is november thirtieth and that will be a ten dollar fee early We kind of Wanted to do the challenge between like late summer and fall on we try to pretty close to one the northeast. Pennsylvania film festival has a festival. The festival usually is in march But it's just a pain the butt film in the winter. that can't be done. It's just a pain in the butt to film in the winter so we had the challenge earlier this year so it was. We kicked it off on september first skinner complete in the end of november to give people that end of summer fall timeframe which is still pretty nice to film. It's actually unseasonably warm now. Still which is awesome northeast pennsylvania. So i hope everyone can participate in the film challenge. It's a really great challenge to be creative and to just get yourself out there and start making films it's a real catalyst for people on lake like this is like if you wanna skies the limit if you want to do any type of film you want and have all the requirements inc for the challenge. I wanted to participate in the challenge. One year i actually wrote my script. And i just couldn't get anyone to get enough pete. I couldn't get a crew and actors together to do it. But i was like i'm going to keep the script and i'm gonna keep working on it and i'm gonna eventually produce it so i wrote a script. Siro my script for the mystery box challenge. This call fallout. And so i kept working on it and working on the script editing. I had my colleagues rita the detailer with me at lunch. They gave me feedback. So i just kept the script that i wrote for the mystery box kept working working working at and i gave it to my friend bridget. She edited it for me. Give me feedback. I kept ending it in editing. It got to a point where i thought it was good. And i just didn't then the pandemic again the pandemic hits and i just haven't i have not produced the film yet but i do want to. It's not really conducive to film during the pandemic. Because it's all takes place in a basement so really. The premise of fallout is. There's a group of friends who are hunkering down for an impending nuclear attack. While one of their friends is outside could be dead could not be dead Who knows and they're really freaked out in steph happens in. I don't want to give too much away. But i decided to submit that script to a couple screenplay competitions recently on film freeway in. It's gotten right now. It's gotten six official selections for six different vessels which is pretty awesome Just to get it out there in get it recognized which is pretty cool and it's like all right. This is really something. So i really want to film this. But it's like don't have. It's a catalyst. The mystery box film challenges are really creative. way to really get into filmmaking. Answer really start making something i i mean. I find a lot of people even myself included you. Stop yourself sometimes. If you wanna make film you stop yourself. It's like even. I wanna participate this year. Even though i'm the organizer. I still want to participate in writing my scripts and like i know what i to ride. And it's like okay. Who am i gonna get. Who is like the crew and stuff like that and making it simple so we can get it done in a day and i can edit it on time and get it in. So it's it's in own if you don't end up if you write something you end up not making it to the deadline to keep your script and keep reworking it. I mean you know. They asked for help. Get your parents involved. If the if you need to be can't find anyone you know you don't need to have a professional camera you can. Have someone help you edit or you can try editing yourself. I mean it's just anyone can participate. So i hope you guys Take some time to go to our website. The mystery box film challenge go to our film freeway page. Take a look at the list of items and problems in specifications and requirements and see if he can get a film. We would love to see your film. And you'll get them will be the premier's gonna be at the northeast pennsylvania film festival. We don't know what they yet. Um that'll come close when it gets to march but I'm so glad you guys can join me to for the une boxing. The mystery box film challenge. And i hope you guys participate. If you have any questions you can email the mystery box. Film challenge mystery box any p. Mail dot com. The mystery box challenge is on facebook. Instagram follow us. And we're also on youtube where you can find pass emissions to get some inspiration They're really talented. People who cemented in any type of person. Like if you're just new to filmmaking you for professional like everyone's got some great stuff and it's on youtube for everyone to look at so thank you guys so much for joining us for our scranton talks podcasts. About the mystery box film challenge. To go and participate. There is still time. We're on the halfway point so so go on our phone. Freeway patients admit to our film challenge. It's gonna be awesome. I can't wait to see you guys. And i hope if you do submit You get to join us at the film festival for the premiere of the films in copa. Get to meet you. That'd be great and get to network with other filmmakers as well in scranton So the the film festival usually happens downtown. Scranton in pennsylvania so i hope you guys can participate. Thank you so much for joining us for grand talks podcast. Be sure to subscribe to our podcast to get all the latest episodes. We upload episodes once a month Be sure to check out our facebook instagram. like i said again and we do our scranton. Talks live on facebook and on electric city television. If your local once a month our next Interview is gonna be on october. Nineteenth live on our facebook page on the independent film creative hub. Electric television will be talking with bridget. Lamonica she's a local filmmaker from northeast pennsylvania. Who actually is living and working in atlanta now. So we'll be talking to her about her projects what she's been doing Like working in the film industry. She's fully in the film industry a freelance basis working atlanta. So we'll be talking with her on october nineteenth at seven fifteen pm so i hope you can join us for that and thank you once again for joining us on this episode of scranton talks Be sure to check out the independent film creative. A website at www dot com are creative dot com where you can check a directory of pete filmmakers. Who are on there if you need any help finding actors and crew. That's the place to go for the with. You're looking for your crew for your mystery. Buxom challenge in. It's free to sign up so you can make your own directory on there so go there and check it out. Thank you guys so much again. Be sure to tell all your friends about scranton talks. Podcasts can't wait to hear from you on the next episode.

Scranton Alinsky Northeast Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Facebook Wilkes Skinner Bridget Pete Rita Youtube Boxing Lamonica Atlanta
Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 8 months ago

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
Ep2: Chatting It Up With Drought's Hannah Black & Megan Petersen

Scranton Talks

19:36 min | 10 months ago

Ep2: Chatting It Up With Drought's Hannah Black & Megan Petersen

"So we come back from multiple callbacks, 'cause we were like, there's no way. Things don't work out like this for us. But it just did. And so casting was really, really fun. And everyone ended up just being local to Wellington. Because like you guys are saying there's so much talent outside of Atlanta. And LA and New York. There's so much talent in those places for sure. But the best roles at least for our film were right here. So. Yeah, exactly. And sometimes that works even better because again, like you're saying you got to have sort of a family on set because if you don't have that relationship that you're having fun, you know, because I think it should be about having fun being professional, but if you're not having fun, I mean, then it's not, you know, the production value is not there either. Long amounts of hours with each other. And very hot conditions. So we'll talk about weather, right? So when we were following it, I thought you would talk about hot conditions. There's always something that happens on the set. There's always a setback there's always something, so maybe you can, you know, most people talk about, you know, oh yeah, we had this, we had that, but you girls had something bigger, maybe you can tell us about that. Yes, because what's so funny, I'll tell you is that we had all the typical things like our grip truck got stuck in the sand, our ice cream truck broke down. And we rarely ever talk about those challenges because they are all, you know, I guess overshadowed by the fact that this film is about no rain and on day 12 of production we had to stop everything because a hurricane for hurricane that category four hurricane. It was headed towards Wilmington. And not moving. And he was coming right towards our city. So we had to stop on day 12 with an 18 day shoot and everyone evacuated to places like Charlotte or Atlanta. And we were stuck outside of our town for two weeks. I didn't know what we were going to come to when we came back. Because when Lincoln essentially became an island, it flooded everywhere. We weren't sure if our locations were going to be okay. And not even just for our films, but because those people who came our family do, and we didn't want their businesses to damage. There was a lot and I was also going out of the country during that time. So amazing Hannah, somehow put the Tetris of our crew to schedule back together and everyone was able to come back two months later to film. But then it was 44°. Okay. So one question about that, I mean, so when you have something like that, I said back. It's very hard on your motivation. It's very hard because now you're like, what am I going to do? And it takes a toll, especially if you're an artist, you're trying to create something that's meaningful, and now you have a big setback. How do you bounce back from that emotionally? You know, just say, you know, I just keep doing it. Keep doing it. Besides that you have the responsibility of finishing, but just more in the sense of like a personal, you know, no. The question. Hold on, but you think that's okay. Like, how did we do that? I think part of it is just we have invested so much already. And I think we could say just ourselves invested, but then when we look at our crew and our cast and all the people that contributed to this crowdfunding campaign and shared our film like when we are doing our campaign, it's like it didn't feel like it was our movie and felt like it was our communities movie. And so it had to, we had to finish it. We had to keep on going, even though we were tired, because not only us but so many people aboard their heart and soul into making this happen. And it just, it just wasn't really an option to be like, well, you know, we tried our best. And we had a lot, I mean, a hurricane was big, but we also hit some equally challenging things during that production after production before production. Just a lot of lifestyle, hard stuff in between. And so it's kind of like, I don't know. We just kind of had, I think also 'cause we're a partnership. So when one person is tired, the other person can lift them up and vice versa. Megan, what do you think? Yeah, the thing I was thinking of is a lot of times those setbacks I think we used as motivation to be like, this will not stop us. And it almost made us get more fire. Every once in a while it gets to you. And I think that that's when it's okay to call up your friend or like I got to just call it Hannah. And sometimes we're like, I can't do it today. Like today I take a break from the movie. Because maybe these are a can be at least a nonstop thing you're working on. You can really get burnt out on it. And the thing we didn't want to do is get so tired that we made a wrong decision. Out of just because we felt fired. So the process of making the movie took longer than I think some do, but a lot of that is in part because we allowed ourselves to take a breath if we needed it. Yeah, that's extremely important. I mean, you pretty much said it like you have to step back and do something fun, relax and then come back to it, right? I mean, that was guilty. I feel guilty. Exactly. Well, I mean, I was going to ask you about what your advice for filmmakers was, but I can not set out, but let me make sure that's where it doesn't have another question. And then I'll ask my final question that you girls go with just show the trader one more time do a little plug for Amazon Prime because I know that it's on Amazon Prime and then go from there. I'll check well also if we have any questions on our site. It was exploring your social media. And I was interested because you put it on your Facebook our hopes, raise autism awareness, brand jobs to our community, provide opportunities for women to live if you want it to elaborate on those. Yeah. I think it was really cool. We were able to pay our crew and we were really proud of that. It wasn't a huge amount. But we were also able to give them an interest in the film. So once the film makes money, our hope is that it does because we don't have investors. It is our crew and our cast and we can give that money back to them. In 2018 when we filmed our town was in a really big world for any filmmaking happening in the area. And it kept everyone energized. I think it kept. It gave people opportunities for roles they hadn't begun before. And now they've moved on to studio productions in our doing those roles. So I think got that goal and yes, number one is to raise autism awareness and acceptance in this film to get people talking about it. And to just promote the message that there is no such thing as normal. And we are here to accept each other but also ourselves. And then finally, from when it in film, you know, one of the reasons we set out to even write female characters is because we are actors first. And we auditioned for a lot of roles that were very grateful to audition for their typically very small and they could be like dumb blond or quirky white dress and we're like, ah, women are so much more than that. And so our hope is that people can see two female characters interacting that just have a family relationship and the complexities that come behind that. So those are our hopes. Thanks for reading those. I clearly asked about them. That's awesome with those goals that you have for this film. I was just amazing. Yeah, and I think that's important. That's very important to have goals. I mean, other than that, I think you have given great advice throughout the whole talk right now, which is really what we want to do. And I think you couldn't have said it better that, you know, you're doing this for yourself. Obviously, but also people get opportunities because they do a project. You know, like not a lot of times, you know, people are just doing something in the last 6 because something there's always someone watching, right? I always say that. There's always someone looking at your staff and then seeing what's out there and it's great that you're actors or maybe someone got a production somewhere out of that. And I think that's the most rewarding experience that you can get as a filmmaker to really see somebody in your film, making it as well. So we're going to do a little plug. How do we find your film? So I'll put it on the comments after the link, but yeah, so you can find drought on Amazon Prime. This week actually we're running a special where you can rent for 4.99 and purchase for 9.99. But then at the end of this week, you'll go back up to its normal price. You should just buy it then, right? You know? Yeah. And if you like it, it would mean so much if you guys rated it and murdered you. I'm an honest review. You know, that's really important to us. So yeah, it was on prem. Okay. All right. So this is I promise this is the last question, okay? So this is just if you were to tell yourself before you even started this project. One thing that you would have done differently, maybe just or you would have told yourself before you got this project going like that, maybe yeah, we could have gotten different at different ways. You know, like, oh, sorry, Meg's. You know, you go first. I was thinking you have sex. Okay. I feel like everything was supposed to happen the way it was. So I wouldn't change anything because had learned so much. The learning curve on this project was huge because every single role that Megan and I stepped into was new. But I will say if I could go back and tell myself something that I'll continue to tell myself for the next projects that we do, I really struggled on set and only Megan really knows this. As a director, because I felt like I was completely under qualified, which I was and still am. But I felt like I needed to know everything. Especially technical stuff, which I was not familiar with at all. And so I really got in my head when I was in director mode that I just was so inadequate and it made it was just really unhealthy. Unhealthy thoughts, you know, of like, I'm not good enough or like, no one's gonna listen to me, all that stuff. It's such a waste of time. And so what, maybe I don't know all the answers, but that's why you have a team. So I think I would go back and tell myself just chill. Just trust your gut. You know that other people are working just as hard, you don't have to know the answers, and that's why you have all these great people with you. So yeah, I think that's maybe something that I go back and tell myself. Intel others, you don't have to know everything, just take it one step at a time. That's perfect. Yeah. You know, it's going to sound cheesy. It's mine. It's about the same. I would think in my modes though if I don't know something, I try to learn everything I can about it. And sometimes you just don't have the capacity. I don't need to know everything that the gaffer is doing. As I do more or sound or the first AC or DIT, you know, I wanted to know everyone was doing. I think that comes from a good place. And I think what Hannah's talking about comes from a place of wanting to be a good team, team member. But being a good team member is sometimes releasing responsibility and letting people do what they're there to do. And as we do more projects or as you can do more projects out there, you'll learn more and more each time. And you'll feel, I think more like you have more knowledge of everything going on. It's okay if you don't. That's perfect. I think that's perfect by this way. I mean, pretty much what we've been saying and we're gonna keep saying it and we're gonna try to do this little segment as much as we can find filmmakers that are doing great things in this area and outside this area because I think we're all connected anyway. So maybe one, maybe one day we'll get to work in a project together, and definitely. Ladies, we wish are the best and the best of luck on your future and it looks like it's gonna be a pretty good one. I mean, you have a great movie that I think is going to inspire not only filmmakers, but just anyone looking to just be creative. Thank you so much for listening to our Scranton talks podcasts, and I hope you enjoyed your time with us. Be sure to catch our next episode as we chat with director and filmmaker Tristan Marcellus Winfrey about his film the helium against documentary. He is a huge advocate for mental health awareness, and he uses his platform to make change in the world one step at a time. Be sure to visit our website, WW our creative hub dot com. If you're interested in watching the film drought, be sure to check it out for rent and purchase on Amazon Prime Video. And be sure to follow them on Facebook and Instagram as well. And be sure to subscribe to the screen toxic podcast, to stay up to date on our latest episodes. And be sure to tell all your Friends about us.

Independent Film Hurricane Hannah Atlanta Amazon Megan Autism Wellington Wilmington Charlotte Lincoln LA New York Facebook MEG Intel Tristan Marcellus Winfrey Scranton Instagram
"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

04:20 min | 10 months ago

"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Interesting program. <Speech_Male> <hes> my <Speech_Male> palm is already <Speech_Music_Male> read. If you <Speech_Music_Male> know here it is. <Speech_Music_Male> It's a little red little <Speech_Music_Male> purple <Speech_Music_Male> You can see my lifeline. <Speech_Music_Male> Here <Speech_Music_Male> saying that. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Going to get hit by <Speech_Music_Male> a trust weight. When <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i get to this road <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Music_Male> other than that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Who knows what tomorrow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at one. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pm harm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reading <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cube. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jamie landfill <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> makes <Speech_Music_Male> a <SpeakerChange> great <Speech_Music_Male> night for now <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> round <Music> around <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> round <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jamila <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> visit <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> listened <Speech_Music_Male> to <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> down.

"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

08:15 min | 10 months ago

"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Messy heat. He's just the awesome guy. Man is been doing sound for for a while was Great to be on san and it was one of those things. Where i'm you know a new director and all that around tons of directors and he was just great about giving advice and helpful things to stay but he never did it in a way. Where it's like i've done thousands of moody's in this awesome health way But as far as in the ad it that's all the sounded zion. I was me but yeah he got on my own locations while pretty cool So are you. Are you thinking about because you mentioned When i asked you about where we're going to be you mentioned the streaming services. Are you thinking about putting it in any kind of festival or any kind of like Airing in initiator at all or for people on like physically Yeah that's the downer is i. I don't know from going to be able to theatre premiere. It seems kinda weird right now. I've been reaching out. How and i think they seem scared. That it's you now. I can put you in touch with the guy. Actually i asked him to be on tonight. to be in the in the chat room tonight because he's a every month every last wednesday of the month. We do a a classic film review. He's filmmaker himself but you also formerly a film critic and he has a lot of connections. He's had he's been Had his films screened in many theaters. Now he's had like several premieres every time it get the new theatre run it. It's different premier for that theatre ten but he might be able to help you. I'll put you in touch with him. But i think you know i think every filmmaker uh that's really the goal. I mean amazon prime and all streaming services are nice. And maybe you'll get some recognition. People will see you film. Maybe you'll make a couple of bucks what you really want to be in the back of that theater and see people's reactions. Yeah that's the thing. I was trying to schedule it. And it just a lot of these sater's locally seems like i don't know what's going on. I feel like they might think things are gonna get shut down again. Because i'm not all agree to their terms and everything and then all of a sudden it's like why are you guys the wing waiting to see what's going to happen in the bronx bad boyer. No i hear you when before you said the word during the pandemic and i thought my thought was like well take things to pandemic but good him. i'm not so sure i mean i would love. I would love it to be over. I really well. I mean i i never wanna hear that word again. At five led a word that received them nineteen. I am just so sick of it. But i do have a feeling that things are going to start to get shut down again and people kind of jumping now for me with my band playing gigs. Since may of twenty twenty. So it's more than a year. I've been out you know you're in a couple of months and things have seemed very normal where i am but i know they're areas of the country where it's not getting so normal people starting get scared again so i. I think that you might might be onto that. Might affect your ability to get it played in a real movie theater and i think maybe the pandemic has condition people that you know what on a big screen at home in more comfortable than theater and might've really hurt beaters altogether and all across the board for even like major You know studio releases and things like that. I think people might be I hate to say it done with the we. We think so. I i hope not but it is. It is scary. It's kind of the argyll going buddy. May sometimes it's like. I'll even recently have the opportunity to go. Go see something in the movies or it's on. Hbo checks his watch. It now Kirk set shadow to director jake danger. Jolly gabriel april and my co host. Becky has another question for you Had it filming during the pandemic help. Jake grow as a filmmaker. She definitely is going to be podcast soon. Enough right ja. She's she's yeah now. That was one of the things it was i was. I was careful as i could be when it was nattering the because i can a couple of scenes from supposedly even if you were vaccinated you're still supposed to be mass indoors and all that stuff and it's like i had everything available had sanitize you know the mass everything everybody in. It's like what. If i were someone catches it and they say it's my fall even though i followed all the precautions so i'd say it was a it helped me grow as far as more stressful situations you you know. It seems to me that it might actually having your first feature film during such a challenging time might be a real character builder and strength. Build their for people because If can pull it off. Join those kind of challenges. Your next film should be a breeze. Yeah well you would think so anyway. got a couple of pieces of artwork. You sent me. I wanna share first of all this the posted for the movie october. Twenty twenty one days have an actual like nfl were october. The twelfth fifteenth advocate. Well i was hoping to actually share with you. The theatrical community today but i've been waiting a week to hear back and i haven't heard anything that's why give me the number. I'm going to follow up with the son of a bitch It might change but my my prime released today actually for october. Nineteen tober nineteenth. We're going to have you back here. i believe in october. Fifth right. sir. Okay looking forward to that and this is the other thing you sent me now I have to ask you this because it sounds like it. Looks like it says martian farthest is that what it is martian. Yes i'll marshon. Forest is a dear friend. Mine although he would say the f. asylum anyway Yeah a crates awesome tease. Normally there Movies like i've got one out for the movie house right jackson. Don't worry about it. Well china so it makes great shirts and You know. I talked to him. And i was like. Hey you know. Let's collaborate on shirts. So i he put up the poster art made by james allow for me and then he designed and sell. It should have along the key characters crystal and we're hopefully did renewed getaway.

sater moody jake danger Jolly gabriel boyer san amazon Hbo Becky Kirk Jake nfl jackson china james
"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:31 min | 10 months ago

"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Carnage homes house in. I already asked him. They had like They have all kinds of stuff in there but one of them was like lodge like a cabin seen scenery in their vassal. Shoot a scene there and we worked out everything while they added this room. That kinda looks like a barber shop right. So i mean it was really last minute but i was leg. This works got extremely lucky. The gas station was never going to happen the matter what i did So i got lucky. Avid people tell will talk toby. We'll tell people joel. Limit your writing your imagination. go while ads. like i can't do that in space and figuring. I know you can't do that and that this is the problem. This is why. I brought it up because i know a lot of people who never finished film because they wrote things into it that will Beyond what they would actually be able to do as an independence omega with really for all intents and purposes no budget. I mean you're talking low budget money out of your pocket but for all intents and purposes no budget here. I had a friend who He he's working on his film but for four years and it requires a house blown up blown now. You can do that in after fax it but it will definitely look pretty cheap. It's not gonna look like the real thing so we've got shopping around for a location where they're going to do a distraction. Ted down a house in a neighborhood where what for whatever reason. The property is condemned and they need to either You know have a crane. Come in and knock it down and all that stuff but all that stuff melts Shop around that but as you experience with the gas stations thank you would think people would say you could bring a cameras here in film it when we're doing it but people are not always happy until accommodating and i think for a lot of independent filmmakers when they write these things and they think it's going to be really easy to get those locations think it's good to hear that eye opener because A lot of people. Just take that lightly. So i'm glad to hear that you all kaneohe things but you actually got some experience in dealing with the frustration of like. It's just a gas station. It's only gonna take whatever you think. It's going to take five minutes but it's gonna take five hours whatever that's another part of it with independent filmmaker thing well. This is an easy shot that just saying a couple of lines of dialogue. She take a couple of minutes right. And but it in order to get the lighting to get the sound ripe. Get everything right play places. You can't russia kenya now you cannot. That's something i learned to do under schedule. China over deliver but under schedule the best. Those are my favorite days of filmmaking. When i finally kinda learn like. We're only gonna get this new setups done. It put. i don't wanna push it and that gives time kind of experimental little if you get it on early. Track takes ways. Yeah you don't wanna russia and that's the thing people forget about like you just said it's like it's not what you gotta just like every time changing. We have a question for you in the chat. Room rebecca griffiths. You know what has been. Jake's favorite setting to film in favorite film. Well that's a great question. Maybe it'd be the whole rebecca. Would you like to be the host your questions. great go on there. Becky okay yeah. She interstate dalby in the film. She awesome. I don't wanna be is one of those things where it's like if i pick one or the other locations now. I hear what you're saying. I i kind of anticipated where you're going with that. I think you just have to you know respect. Everybody say yeah. I like shoot. You know what i would say for myself. I like shooting anytime. I can shoot outdoors. Because i don't have to mess with the light that much. I don't have you don't have to spend hours. Working on lighting so outdoor locations always my favorite to shoot him. He just easier four people say that that would be my answer. But i'm just curious off. So yeah i'll answer it in. I think everybody understanding because everybody's been awesome. You know what i mean. You know my friend. Darren let me film in the in the his comic book store you. We're great friend. That's that was always a dream to to get someone to college store but everybody hated because it was kinda hot There was like fans only stuff in In there but it the haunted house is kind of my favorite. Because obviously i'm not now but it felt almost like a set in the right because it's a controlled environment. Almost kinda felt the closest like a high budget production. Is it could field because you know we were on these real sad since it was convenient so at right. Now let's get. Let's get into this exactly how much you had to do on this. Did you have a lighting director or depeeed or both those job yours as well So that was one of the great things about Alexander juicy hispanic. Dan dan stem in him. He like he hates it. When i bring it up but sorry perhaps bringing up buddy. He won an emmy so all the sudden. There's this guy making this goofy movie about clay zombies with a sandwich over anyway. I mean he found about. He don't the majority of the movie but i did have to do some things during the pandemic and his scheduled grady. My schedule was crazy. Cutting in line at all. So there's about thirty minutes of the movie. I filmed that the majority of it was saying and he's heated. Awesome job pilots have had to do the camera work mining for holy. What about sound design and all that stuff. The sound will we Is that something that fell on. You get making sure not. Only the mics were in the right place. But the Post production sound and all. That kind of stuff is that. Is that all on you as well or do you have a sound designer for the on location stuff had a great guy.

rebecca griffiths toby joel russia Ted dalby kenya Becky Jake rebecca China Darren Dan dan Alexander grady
"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

03:44 min | 10 months ago

"independent film" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Gonna turn into a big mama. Mia big green he grew. I'm looking at my window. And all i see is green. Have to know if you touch the lake. You're gonna have a bad day off. where are they kicking. My dog rams wars industries rounding up. Everyone everything that haven't turned.

First Date With Tyson Brown and Shelby Duclos

Black Girl Nerds

01:43 min | 11 months ago

First Date With Tyson Brown and Shelby Duclos

"Welcome to the bloggers podcast. I'm your host ryan in. This segment is dedicated to all the people that think. There's a problem with virtual dating but if you insist on doing the traditional dating i have two guests on me today. There are the stars of the first day and if they can get you the first day i don't know who can. I'm talking about actors. Tyson brown is shelby. Do clo- how are you guys doing tyson. Show you how you doing good this. This is the craziest first day. Like i feel like nobody story unravel. This is the craziest thing i've ever seen it. It's a well think of that. take place. yes but tyson. I'm gonna start with you because i think it's actually both interesting with you guys backgrounds that you kept it very local as far as getting your start in and starting to act and everything within Sacramento can talk a little bit about your starred and just Why you thought it was important to start with the indie project. That was just something that kind of came your way tyson. I'll go with you. I something a definitely came away. I was really lucky. For a manual darren. Dahbi onto of additives project consists adventure journey Other than that. I really do like independent films. That kinda center focus way more than story than just like the gifts and stuff so. That's something i'm definitely looking forward to do or keep doing my career shelby. How about you. How did that how to start. How did this come about for you. Kind of like tasted just kind of came about for me too. I was doing some student projects before this film. But this one was definitely different than the others. And i just i felt like it was really special and i loved the script so i still super lucky but yeah just kinda came out for me to

Tyson Tyson Brown Shelby Ryan Sacramento Darren
Interview With Roger Corman

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Roger Corman

"The word legendary is overused but in the case of roger corman. It's well deserved. Roger trained as an engineer at stanford but after four days on the job. He quit to make movies. He began producing and directing low budget. Independent films are getting the underserved teen market. What is films lacked in production value. They made up for imagination. And as roger famously declared he never lost a dime on a picture and he made a lot of them. From nineteen fifty. Five to nineteen seventy-one. He directed over fifty films. Everything from monster. Movies to biker. Pictures to his famous adaptations. The works of edgar allan poe. He focused on producing and film distribution launching the careers of some of the biggest names in hollywood including francis ford coppola jonathan demme joe dante and bringing films by autour like david cronenberg. Ingmar bergman federico fellini to america. Rogers sat down with history of harsh showrunner. Kurt sanga to talk about his remarkable career. You started off directing and producing low budget films in the nineteen fifties How did you deal with the limitations. Faced the early films. I directed i was beginning to director with short schedule and i did what i could. I absorbed films saying. I use certain camera techniques that i've seen before and invented some myself. Now i'm not certain. I really invented them just that i had never seen them in other films. They may not have been as original as i thought. Nine fifty seven directed something like nine films Including tack of the crab monsters personal favourite Fm didn't have a lot of production values. But it was packed. Full of interesting ideas. A what are your memories of that film. Well i remember specifically said didn't have very much money and i remember exactly. The crab monster cost twelve hundred dollars and it was paper my shea but it was very big and it looked pretty good but we were shooting at on the rocks at cabrillo beach and the waves were hitting up against the monster and i could see the waves. Were destroying the back of the monster. So i had to shoot as fast as i possibly could and from only certain angles not to let the audience see that. The vaster was being destroyed. Well we shotted speaking monsters. Tell me about the monster from it. Conquered the world well. The monster from saturn was based upon my studies at the university where i studied physics and i tried within the fantastic world of science fiction to be as logical as possible and i realized a giant planet like saturn would have heavy gravity so therefore a giraffe could not exist but a turtle could because it was close to the ground and would be able to handle the gravity so i had the monster built all about the height of my hand here and thus say was physically correct for the planet saturn. I was having coffee as they were setting up the first shot and beverly garland very hip. Young actress came up to the monster and she looked and she noticed that i was watching her

Francis Ford Autour Kurt Sanga Roger Corman Joe Dante Jonathan Demme Federico Fellini Edgar Allan Poe Ingmar Bergman David Cronenberg Stanford Roger Cabrillo Beach Rogers Hollywood America Beverly Garland
The Startup Story of Netflix | Shaun Cauthen

The LEADx Show

05:33 min | 1 year ago

The Startup Story of Netflix | Shaun Cauthen

"And then that's why i'm voting for now that's a that's going to be like. What the heck did we say. We just missed that cold cut. Sean so i i mentioned were talking mainly for forbes. We're gonna take this audio. Put it out as a cast as well and I want everyone who's listening and stuff to to know that this is kind of interesting. I mean i was just decided. I'm going to watch a documentary. While i'm on my treadmill and so choose brand new recommended for me net flicks versus the world on amazon prime which reading from imdb the story of how a tiny broke silicon valley startup slew giants of the movie rental world warded off amazon and forced movie making and distribution into the digital age. And i was blown away by it. And i mean like who made this thing and then i said who shone coffin and i want to make sure i don't forget so i i learn a little bit about you from your website. Texas movie director dot com. I then started stalking you on twitter. Where you're handle is dude versus movie. And that's a dude. Vs movie and i reached out and said hey man. I'm a fan from a couple of angles a the netflix's story but also what it's like to be an indie moviemaker these days. Do you wanna talk and you were nice enough to say yes. So welcome to the cast. Thanks for chatting for forbes. Thanks for having me. I mean when you reached out. Like i've i've actually used twitter to reach out to people that watch the movie. So it's it's interesting to talk to people from like south. Africa are vancouver or across the pond in england. Because you know as a you know Independent moviemaker here in austin texas outside of hollywood itself. It's it's cool to have your work seen around the world expr- especially when it was a. It was a tough hill to climb so to speak to get the film ned. Well we'll get more into that in a second but so how. How did you get into the movie making business. What's your back when you look like a pretty young guy so to have something like you know out there like this seems pretty. Cool my Camera must be doing good things for me. 'cause i'm i'm thirty seven i have Four children and they definitely make me look tired. all the No so i I went to i. I went to college here in austin at university of texas to become the next you know mcconnell. Hey no no. I'm a texan. So i wanted to university of texas to get a film degree in the graduated I worked on a few independent films. Here in austin and then started working for tv on a show called room raiders. The basically someone would go through three different rooms in based on that they would decide who they went on a date with So yes oh. That show ended up getting canceled. But i moved out to la. And i did a celebrity interviews and red carpets for a platform call cannot lose which is a european station and i worked for the spanish version of that and so i was out there in hollywood for bed and and most most people in la will attest to this. Like you're not going to own a house in l. a. Unless like you're like a millionaire. You're hitting a big. We decided although i loved l. a. in i loved what i did out in la. I wanted to move back to texas. I could actually own a house tonight. And i ended up back out here but i always had the desire to kind of a make movies and like i said before having poor children young girls madeta girls In my wife having a successful career herself documentary as is what you can do. Is you could go fly somewhere for a week. Flight home to be with the family and everything so That's that's what i did in the first movie i worked on. There is a couple of guys making a trying to raise money to make a documentary about nickelodeon. And i grew up in that nickelodeon like i loading kid like. I didn't have the disney channel nickelodeon so it was definitely something that i was like. Well i'm used to interview in celebrities in such such like that. So i can jump onto this project and help them because Interviewing people for movies. Like tom cruise and will smith and everything. I knew the nickelodeon people weren't going to be above that level. So i was are used to working with a high profile tile talent so i came on there I helped shoot. I helped edit. And i helped produce and then at the end of that. I was looking on the next project i wanted to do in the book and i don't. I don't read a lot. Because i'm always jumping from show to show or working on different cell for spending time with my family but i read this book. That's called netflix. That epic battle for america's eyeballs which gina keating wrote. And it was. it was about netflixing their origin. That would be a great documentary. So i reach out turn. I was like hey. I'm starting my next documentary. I would love to interview you. She said why Actually started my documentary Maybe we should team up. And so that's how the the movie started.

Amazon Austin University Of Texas Twitter Netflix LA Hollywood Sean Nickelodeon Texas Mcconnell Vancouver Africa England Disney Channel Will Smith Tom Cruise Gina Keating America
Fear Of Death Is Contagious In The Psychological Thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow'

Fresh Air

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Fear Of Death Is Contagious In The Psychological Thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow'

"Our film critic Justin Chang says, she dies tomorrow feel surprisingly in tune with our present moment of unease. Everything you need to know going into sheet is tomorrow is pretty much right there in the title. This moody and more deadly funny psychological horror film opens on a young. Woman. Who Awakens one morning with a horrifying from edition of doom she believes that she's going to die tomorrow and it sends her into an eerily calm. Almost Zombie like trance. She wanders the rooms of her recently purchased lock home. She plays Mozart's requiem repeatedly on a record player and shops online for an urn to hold her cremated remains. She never explains why she thinks her death is imminent, but the look on her face is so grave and haunted that we find ourselves believing it to. The woman played by the excellent actress Caitlin she'll is named amy. Not. Coincidentally, that's also the name of the filmmaker amy scientists who has said that the movie was inspired by her own experiences with anxiety and her recognition of how easily that panic could affect those around her. And she dies tomorrow the fear of death proves contagious. The mere act telling someone that you're going to die tomorrow is enough to plant the idea that they are going to die tomorrow and so on and so on. The first person amy tells is her friend Jane played with a sharp comic edge by Jane Addams who thinks she's being ridiculous but the seed has been planted by the time Jane stops by her brother's house where a birthday party for her sister in law is in full swing she too has come to believe that she's going to die tomorrow. And once she voices this fear, the other party guests, it's only a matter of time before they also succumb. In the montage you're about to hear Simon's uses thunderously loud music written by Mondo boys and wild strobe lighting effects to achieve startling moments of operatic intensity. I'm going. To die. Tomorrow. Throughout the movie in these feverishly heightened intervals, Simon seems to be expressing level of horror that the characters themselves cannot. Jane's brother and sister in law. That's Christmas Gina and Katie Nolan do panic a little over what will happen to their daughter when they're both gone. But for the most part, everyone here tends to retreat into their own private moods showing little concern for others Jennifer Kim plays a party guest who abruptly breaks off a relationship something she'd been meaning to do for months. Her now ex boyfriend played by tune had been bay does something much more frighteningly impulsive. Interestingly no one really tries to ward off the crisis or even figure out what's going on a sense of futility sets in and stays there. There's something troublingly resonant for me about the characters inertia. Speaking as someone who's able to work from home and hasn't suffered so many have during the pandemic I'm not afraid of dying tomorrow but I recognize something of myself incitements as characters, the ones who retreat into a state of false calm maybe because screaming and expressing how they really feel might be too horrible or flat out exhausting to bear. I don't want to overstate the metaphorical implications of she is tomorrow, which was made well before the pandemic. But Simon's clearly has her finger on something about how people might respond or not respond to an invisible threat. She's made a fascinating disaster movie of the mind. This is the second feature scientists as written and directed seven years after her debut film. The lovers on the run drama sun don't shine. She's worked for more than a decade as an actor writer director and producer rooted in the independent film world, but with increasing forays into Hollywood. She's one of the key creative forces behind the TV series, the girlfriend experience, and you might also have seen her performances in recent studio thrillers like Alien Covenant and Pet cemetery a role that helped her finance this much lower budget horror movie. Depending on your persuasion, don't like she dies tomorrow might not sound like ideal pandemic viewing but I think one of the great virtues of the horror genre is that it can put our own fears into perspective. There can be enormous value in confronting our feelings of dread had on and feeling a sense of kinship with characters who are confronting there's to. Sign it's doesn't provide easy answers. She also doesn't tell us if her characters worries are justified. She closes the movie on a note, picked between serenity and alarm leaving us to wonder if the end is as near as it seems or tomorrow might, in fact, be another day.

Jane Addams Simon AMY Justin Chang Mozart Caitlin Mondo Jennifer Kim Pet Cemetery Gina Hollywood Katie Nolan Writer Producer Director
Screw It, We're Giving Out 2021 Oscars Right Now

The Big Picture

08:30 min | 2 years ago

Screw It, We're Giving Out 2021 Oscars Right Now

"I'M SEAN FANTASY ANIMATED AVANCE. And this is the big picture conversation show about the best movies of the year so far which might just be the year in full hopefully not but normally at this time of year we'd handout out best of the year at the quarter. Turn Awards Amanda So. Let's just give out some awards in case we don't get a chance to do so down the road. How do you feel about the fact that we've only gotten three months of movies? And maybe that's all we're going to get a really dark way of thinking. I'm not really ready to do that. This early in the week. I think this is more an opportunity to appreciate some of the great movies that we have gotten and that maybe we wouldn't have spent as much time talking about as we are going to. And this podcast where you know making lemonade out of lemons etc. Can we go with that? I'm shocked by your optimism. Bill I appreciate it well time. I don't know all we're going to do is just make making podcast and keep watching movies. It's funny. I'm watching so many movies. Maybe more movies than I have ever seen in my life. I looked at letterbox over the weekend and I have watched one hundred and fifty movies in the year twenty twenty. I haven't watched one hundred fifty two thousand twenty releases but I've watched a lot an unusually high number and yet when I started putting together this list that you and I collaborated on for the best movies of the year and we're going to hand out the six key awards at the Oscars. Through the first three months. I found a lot of repetition and there was really only about twelve movies that I think I liked which is not great. How did you feel about the sleep that we had in front of US positive? In the fact that there are a lot of movies that I really love on this list and a lot of movies that again I think would get Kinda lost in their mind. Dump ury shuffle. And we wouldn't really get to talk about them at the end of the year. I it is true. I have been watching more movies. There's just like a lot of bad movies you know and I do feel like watching at home. I just become aware even more quickly. I'm just like Oh this isn't working for me and there is something that is transporting about the theater experience. Or you're just GONNA go along with the ride. You're you're willing to to buy in so but that's always been true there. We always talk about a lot of movies. That have interesting parts where I really liked this or didn't quite get there so I don't know I'm a glass half full person today. I don't know what that's about. I think it's because we're going to talk about AAA fire like for an hour and just say ct thanks to everyone who washed this weekend and let me know on twitter so whatever whatever we have to do whatever we have to do. But I am looking forward to that aspect of this guests. Yeah you hit on something that I've been thinking about as well. Which is that. I'm just more likely to tap out on something that I know isn't working for me now sitting at home and it's it's a I guess a bit ironic given that all we have is time. We have so much time to power through the bad movies. But if I'm like forty seven minutes into something that I know I'm not responding to it all I'll just turn it off. I'll just turn it off and I I never walk movies. You joked last week that I walked out of last Christmas. That's one of the only movies I've walked out of in the last ten years and I don't like to tap out on something even in a streaming environment but there's also something Pity lists about the movie watching experience right now where it's sort of like you know what life is in a very odd and discomfiting and weird place right now and so because of that. I can't bother with bullshit you know. There's there's there are a lot of masterpieces at our fingertips if we want them. So the idea of powering through another mediocre Netflix. Movie just doesn't seem like a good use of time. I do think that most of the things that we're going to talk about here are a great use of time now. Portrait of a lady on fire obviously will be a part of these nominations. I think a couple of these. Nominations are goofy. And we're trying to have fun with them. But for the most part we played it pretty straight. Would you agree yes? There are a couple. We had to fill out some categories. And that's okay at once again. Well this is actually not totally true. There are some categories where they've where we're featuring women very prominently. Which is really exciting. No spoilers but you know once again. It's not totally so far. Ben A robust year for movies about women. And I think we're also GONNA talk a little bit about what's to come in the rest of twenty twenty or what we think might come in two thousand Twenty Gonna. Tell you Sean. They're still not making a lot of movies about women. I don't know whether you notice that. So sometimes we were. Just some of these are trying to get to five. How about that in a festive way? It's funny you say that because I feel like they're not making a lot of mainstream movies about one but they are making a lot of independent films woman and I feel like a lot of the films that we chose here were of the more quote unquote independent variety. And that's been the best stuff and part of that is because of the thing that you pointed out this time of year. This first three months is usually not a banner period for great film releases. Every once in a while you get a get out in your life and that gets to dominate the movie world for those first three months but this year there have only been a couple of genuine hits and those hits have mostly been led by women which has been Nice. We'll talk about at least one of them here in this episode. But I wouldn't describe it as a good movie year in general let alone one for an episode like this. Nevertheless there is. There's some stuff I'm happy where it again a chance to go through here. I agree okay. Should we get into the categories? Let's do it so we're going to start with best supporting actress again. Six categories here. You Know I. I wouldn't say this has been a scientific vote. This was literally. Just what could I think of? And what could Amanda think of? We did a little bit of negotiating. A little bit of bartering here but it was pretty much just like I think these things were good. Hey We're an academy UNTO OURSELVES. Yes it was like oh. I remembered this and think that I could talk about it for a few minutes again. This is one of the categories where we had three pretty obvious ones and then we had to wear nominations and fake awards giving or an art just like let's making an art were here to hold your attention We're here to present around picture of the movie going experience. How about that? I think that's decent so I'm going to read our five nominees and we can. We can talk about them in loose terms and then we're GONNA have to make a decision on a winner live in time and we actually effectively communicate and agree on something like this in this format. Well there's only one answer that I'm going to accept in this category. I will actually throw my ear bites across the room and quit this podcast so sure. We can agree with those conditions okay. I'm going to read the nominees under those circumstances. Sonia Braga for Rile Kate del Castillo for bad boys for life. L. Fanning for all the Bright Adele HAENEL for portrait of a lady on fire and an inspired choice Elisa Schlesinger for Spencer confidential. Obviously the winner here is allies slesinger for her work with the Boston accent and Spencer financial. No I don't. This is one of the few categories that we probably need to do much debating on. I think that this you you came up with all of the fun ideas in this category. You came up with Kato Castio. Who gave just an absolutely incredible performance as a witch in bad boys for life? Love everything she did there. ELISA SLESINGER in an otherwise fairly bad spencer confidential movie provided. I thought pretty good comic relief as the the Bad Boston. Girlfriend of the Titular Spencer but of course Who's the winner? Here amid the winner is del for portrait of a lady on fire. I have spoken at great length about what adulthood means to me but in this performance. And you know. She's obviously been a movie star in a very accomplished actor in in France and in front of my for a very long time. So I'm a little Li to this party but I also just found this performance to be a revelation and an interesting thing about this movie which I hope we can talk more about. Is that you know. This movie is interested in the the the female gaze but also just how we look at people and how a work of captures a person and whether that person can be captured entirely in a painting of film and what we remember about someone but it is also just about the fact that some people just really capture your eye and I literally couldn't look away from this person.

Spencer Boston Elisa Slesinger Twitter United States Kato Castio Netflix URY Bill Sonia Braga France Amanda BEN Rile Kate Del Castillo Adele Haenel Spencer Financial L. Fanning Elisa Schlesinger
Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

The Big Picture

15:27 min | 2 years ago

Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

"Unfortunately this Shithole has more fucking leaks in the Iraqi navy. Fuck Yourself. I'm tired from fucking your wife. How's your mother good? She's tired from fucking my father. You have a job Tom. I'm a firefighter. Oh God bless you a hero. I'm not hero. We'd all be here. We could use the petroleum. No excuse me Christmas. Utah a lot of fucking money. What did you do? I mean if you take away nothing else for my class from this experience let it be this. If you're not a genius don't bother right. The world needs plenty of electricity and a lot of them are happy and they can help. It really can't be that we can always do. Better let me keep trying. If you guys keep trying I'm shawn fantasy and this is the big picture. A conversation show about Mark Wahlberg. This episode may break the all time record for big picture dissonance later in the show. I have an interview with Kelly. Reichardt the writer and director behind independent film classics. Like old joy. Meek's cutoff in the new film. First cow which might be the best movie of Two Thousand Twenty so far. I hope you'll stick around for that but I were joined by the frog. Sheriff Chris Ryan. I heard that Mark. Wahlberg actually dropped out of first cow. He was gonNA play the cow Alao. But you're already doing animal. Humor here on driver too is calling. Chris. You're here because you're a fan of Mark Wahlberg work. He's The star of a new movie. That is hitting Netflix. This Friday called Spencer confidential. I think gets his fifth film with Peterberg. The actor turned director of such films as lone survivor and deepwater horizon. This is a very strange movie but I think it's going to be a a very watched movie because the corona virus is scaring America into staying inside their house. And so I think that there's a potential for a lot of viewership of this movie. So we're talking about Mark Wahlberg one of the most resilient and persistent movie stars. I guess of the past twenty five years so let's just start with WHO is Mark Wahlberg. How did this happen? That Mark Wahlberg became one of the signature figures of movies in the twenty first century. I would not say I'm a fan of Mark Wahlberg as like I'm a I'm agnostic as a citizen. Yeah I would say that. I am very interested in the way that he has conducted his career. Which is kind of a weird throwback to a studio systems our he makes three to four movies every eighteen months somehow and just releases them at like a hugely prolific rate at. I'm fascinated by all the little pockets of his career that he has created where he repeats. You know he goes back to these little micro genres that he and he works a lot of people over and over again by the way he kind of has conducted his career to me is almost unique among Hollywood movie stars anymore. I mean most of the time when people achieve a certain level success. They just like see in three years for my next blockbuster or award fodder and he's just like nope. I'm grinding out. Family movie violent action film and then every once in a while Raunchy comedy and it's just like pretty pretty like unique among all Hollywood stars so I'm fascinated. What do you make them Amanda? I was fascinated when going back to you. Remember how many great directors he's worked with and how many actually excellent movies he's been in. Chris was asking me how much we watching I had to do for this podcast and the answer is a lot. Because I wouldn't say that Mark Wahlberg stays with me besides certain shots that will certainly be discussed on this podcast but he especially I guess in the first decade of this century just goes on a tremendous run. I really from Boogie nights on and works with a does a lot of really great movies and then kind of decides to just become like the Peterberg comedy guy in the second decade of the century. And I it's a really interesting shift. He just Kinda decides no. I'm going to do this now. And it's very fascinating to me I can't really make sense of. I also is Christmas talking about his efficiency. Just pulled up his daily schedule. Do you guys remember the days? Will he wakes up. Like four o'clock in the morning posted this on his own instagram typical daily scheduled to thirty. Am Wake Up. What don't you forty five prayer time. Three fifteen am breakfast. There's a lot of work work. He's golfing from seven thirty to eight. Which is the golf people? And there's a chamber recovery at nine thirty that takes more time than golf workout number two lunches and our so our meeting slash work calls also an hour and he goes to bed at seven thirty PM and which in Los Angeles for. I'd say six at least six months of the year. That is still broad daylight. Yeah Yeah Su. There is real efficiency baked into this. He's clearly very deliberate guy. He's making choices. And I think that pertains to his daily life and also his his career. There is clearly thought going into this. It's not a type of thought. I can access. I still don't know why you would wake up at two thirty and I don't know why you would do like five deep water horizons. There's a rumor that he has a routine. I think you. I'm speculating here. But I think he's a member of Wilshire Country Club here in Los Angeles. My husband told me this last night and he likes to play alone. He likes to play. And that's why he's playing so early in the morning and he's trying to get in like a quick nine or quick eighteen. I don't know five days a week which I'm who among? Us would love to do that if I could wake up before five. Am I would do it. I'll tell you I would love to do that. I'll tell you something else I am. I find golf to be social and I get crippled like when I play by myself. I'm like all the neurosis is creeping like. Should I take another shot now like it really playing golf? If you're not playing with anyone can just tell you. He's got three snacks on the schedule. Including one that takes an hour and a half from eight to nine thirty. Am is snack after seven. Thirty to eight am golf. Probably a euphemism. Oh Okay so you think. His sessions are ninety minutes. So you're saying to jump off something. Amanda said You know who? He reminds me of a bizarre way Cruz. Where it's like that run. Where cruises like I'll just work with Barry Levinson Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg and every great director at it seems like I'm just the most important factor in the whole world and then one day he wakes up and says I'M GONNA make action movies for the rest of my life? It's very unlikely though. I mean his origins restraints obviously member of this very well known family. He's from Massachusetts. He starts out as a a rap artist and ultimately becomes a Calvin Klein M. C. An. Mc Yes we watched the vibrations video. Recently I took my top five twenty two. Would you make of good vibrations? And and how did you feel about the funky bunch all these years later? It's just really bizarre that this was a thing that we lived through. Who is the funky bunch? I I still don't know who's in it. Were you in a Chris? Thought it was the backup dancers. I mean yes. That's who they were but like do you know anything about them and where they are now. I was pretty. Yeah I was pretty. I was pretty authentic back then so I was. I was already listening to deep deep newer. Grab I love talking about the early nineties with you. Can we talk about the Calvin Klein ads for a second really really important? You're almost put these on my list. And it's and my honorable mention boxer briefs. Yeah I was still a boxer sky back then that was not interested in the product. Would you just tear the ads out of the magazine? Crumpled them up and throw them in the garbage. I think that the those are the signature moment in his career without the advertising campaign he would not have become weirdly Tom Like sub Tom Cruise but he you know. He soared to a of fame on that ad campaign. They're just extremely important. Ninety s imagery obviously came as also in them. And that's where the whole K. Moss thing starts Them Hating each other. Great early celebrity feud they're very important that's all and also it looks great. I mean he and his image was of basically like a tough guy with a bad attitude whether that was true or not he obviously got into some altercations and his his personal history is pretty complicated. We're not gonNA spend too much time talking about on this show. But I think that he basically leveraged his complicated persona in the public into a movie career and if you look at the first few movies that he makes replays these kind of like weird intimidating Undeveloped YOUNG MEN. You know in the basketball diaries in. Ryen Russillo favorite movie fear And even in boogie nights. There's something like violently adolescent about his his persona which is very different from the kind of actor and movie star that he is right now so a lot of times. I think that we could. You could write like a series of essays about how much actors of his generation have attempted to mimic the kind of like rough and tumble blue collar upbringing. That Walberg apparently had like how how often like DiCaprio Damon or these guys have tried to be like no I'm Jim Carroll and he's just a function Carol I'm the real thing but it's weird like even in his authenticity. If you WANNA call it that he still lacks like any kind of emotional intelligence or psychological depth to portraying those things and you could write all these essays. But you could just watch the departed. Because that's what this does that. Do you need that from an actor? Do you need to feel like this person is like in control and has that depth that Chris was talking about? I think I do ultimately. I think that there is a reason that I gravitate to Matt Damon instead of Wahlberg. And I think that you not just because of the departed and the Boston. Bill will talk about that a lot as a comparison but I like I said I really remember a lot of Walberg performances. Even though he's been given a lot of great ones and I think that's because they have a I don't WanNa say surface level. That's unfair. They're actually a lot of depth but they aren't the emotional depths and I think I personally don't hang onto those. I think I'm always wondering how in command of the Ark of his career. He is because you pointed out he makes he's. I mean he's just been a lot of great movies a lot of movies that are going to stand the test of time and it always seems like he's being cast the way that a lot of young actresses or cast as the. Nayef as the like the naive and innocent who gets corrupted when put into a system and like did someone in a room. Say That to him. This is your lane man will early like you think so. Well I just don't think that he I think he's largely in charge of the movies that he makes. Now he's like. I think that the movies that we see our movies that Mark Wahlberg once made for the most part and my suspicion is the reason he made that transition. Amanda was referencing about just mostly doing action. Comedy movies now is because those movies are more fun and easier to make for him there either like a physical challenge there like a day on the set whereas making boogie nights as hard Russell Smart. Yeah I think that he is both like sinking very strategically as the schedule would suggest and also like not over thinking it i. That's the VIBE. I guess sometime at the end of the day he's going like it very much is what it is. He is a very Surface level or just immediate actor. That's that's what you're getting and so I think he wants. He gets to produce the movies himself and make the decisions. You just kind of like. Yeah action comedies. Got There before we get into our top fives and I think we should figure out what we mean. When we say top five if it's five performances or his top five movies because there's some complexity. There is a very strange celebrity. The the nine eleven thing is you're staring right at. It's just hanging over my head as I think about him as a public person. So in twenty twelve Walberg was quoted in a magazine interview regarding. What would have happened if he had flown aboard American Airlines Flight? Eleven on September eleventh. Two thousand one. He'd been booked on a flight on flight. Eleven but his plans changed the day before the scheduled flight and he cancelled his reservation. Walberg received public criticism for stating quote. If I was on that plane with my kids it wouldn't have went down like it did and there would have been a lot of blood in that first class cabin and then me saying okay. We're going to land somewhere safely. Don't worry Warburg apologized for those statements. But they're actually the sort of thing that kind of inform his public persona and when we watch him in an action movie. We think that he's the kind of guy who's like I would have kicked some ass on nine eleven which I don't know if you like complicates the quality of the films that he makes but I can't get stuff like that. Outta my head once I've read or heard about it and I feel like we've referred back to it even in a joking fashion over the years right. Yeah it is definitely one of the top three things that I think about. When someone says Mark Wahlberg schedule yeah nine eleven yeah and the last night of prosthetic but like you know. I'm human beings. It's the point of the movie full movie as leading to that so yes I agree. It's funny he is both. I think very funny as a comedic actor like entirely humorless and it's that some things he's in on the joke on some things he's just kind of being like no I would have save. I would have stopped nine eleven. Which is just a ridiculous thing to say. And that's the joke of Andy Sandberg's say Heidi Mother for me. Yeah you know portrayal of him is this is like he's kind of total rube but also not. There's something very elusive about. Whatever's going on with an entourage thing it's like. Do you watch entourage because you think it's completely ridiculous or do you watch entourage because you think it's like six awesome representative drama and I dare to say that Mark Wahlberg is like Yup? That's how it went. I you probably think you're right. Insulin entourage Ari comes on and it's really like Whoa but most but he's like that's accurate me. Like Vince is very much living my experience. He's like we should make a show about it. I think. I think that you guys are right. Do you think that this should be five performances or top five movies I choose? I don't know I don't know where I landed. I think I did I tried to be interesting here but I I wouldn't say that any of these performances leap out at me except for my number one and number two as like excellent performances. They're more like movies. I really like was he ever given a truly great performance. Yes I I think. There's one and a half great performances on this movie and it's just a half is the end of boogie nights. No no I. Well that might be the case now. There's another movie I still did performances but I think they are. They are a little bit also an award for the movie knowing how best to use him right. Okay well then let's get into it. Let's go into our top five Mark Wilbur performances slash movies number five Amanda. Why don't you start us off? This goes out to Bill Simmons and apparently to right who I still have never met. Hello Ryan. I'm going with fear. Why not whow revisit? Yes I did okay okay seen Djing

Mark Wahlberg Chris Ryan Amanda Director Tom Cruise Walberg Bill Simmons Iraqi Navy Mark Shawn Fantasy Meek Utah Netflix Kelly Los Angeles Golf Calvin Klein Ryen Russillo Mark Wilbur
Searching for Summer Shipp

True Crime Brewery

11:41 min | 2 years ago

Searching for Summer Shipp

"So summer shipp grew up under her given name Dolores in Granite City Illinois. Her mother Cora raised her and her three brothers alone after their alcoholic. Father left the family. Now Cora raise children as Jehovah's Witnesses and this was a religion there's some are continued to practice throughout her life. She did stop attending services but observed religion. She never celebrated Christmas birthdays. She said that every day was a holiday and she liked by her daughter and her friends gifts when it was her birthday. Isn't that Nice good? Sounds like a nice lady really really nice so some are grew up in extreme poverty under pretty rough circumstances and of this. She has pretty frugal but in our young adulthood she married a wealthy man John Ship and she lived for years in luxury however difficult childhood in Granite City. That never was far from her mind. John Ship was the manager for the local metro-goldwyn-mayer branch. Mgm when he moved to Kansas City from Florida in nineteen sixty nine now summer had moved to Kansas City just a few months previously. She saw the city as a place to forget her pass and she's going to create new life for herself. Yeah that was important to her to kind of start over. The childhood was rough so John. Lived in the same apartment complex as a friend of summers and when she visited that friend at the community pool she really caught Johns I. Some are was not a classic beauty but she was really pretty at five foot one inches tall and just over a hundred pounds. She was tiny but she was a bundle of energy sometimes described as sprightly so although John had a girlfriend at the time he broke things off with her to be with summer in October of nineteen. Seventy summer was pregnant and she told John on the night. He took her to see an advance screening of the movie. Two thousand one a space odyssey and after that they decided to move in together and just see if they could make things work. John's apartment became their first home together and their front door was just feet from the pool so John worked as he floated in the water and Sunday himself. The phone set nearby and when it rang he would just paddle to the edge of the pool and work on deals so this is kind of living the dream. I guess float around in the pool. Yeah phones broke their nice good way to do it but he did work hard. He negotiated film showing contracts for hundreds of theaters throughout Missouri and Kansas. So he was really on his way up in the industry at this point so some are in. John got married at the courthouse with John's brother and a friend of summers as witnesses and they had a daughter who they named Brandy. She had read here like her mother's but even brighter and darker and both summer and John were just thrilled with this little girl. They moved out of the apartment and rented a cottage that summer adored for a while and then as the money kept coming in two years later they moved into a duplex in a very upper class area living near professional football players so John left MGM and but an independent Film Distribution Company called Thomas Films and after he bought it he changed the name to Thomas and ship films. The company was more successful than he had ever could have been able to imagine. He made a ton of money so much money that he felt like he'd WanNa Lottery. Are He come up from humble beginnings himself? Yes I think in summer really didn't know what to do with all this money. It was foreign to both of them and I guess summer was able to kind of not focus on it. She just wasn't that interested in things but I think John it kind of affected him and he got carried away with it here. Well I knew her. Religion would seem to me to make her less desirous of money. And what money can buy share? I mean I'm sure she liked not having to worry about it like she had all her life absolutely and remember up until this time she's still going by her original name. Dolores but when brandy was just a toddler that's when she legally took on her new name. Summer brandies middle name was Alexis so some are named herself summer. Alexis ship and by the time brandy was three. John was making over two hundred thousand dollars a year. And this is the nineteen seventies. So I looked it up. And that's about seven hundred thousand dollars a year equivalent in today's money so ton of money tournament in nineteen seventy four. They bought a two story. English Tudor home in the exclusive Crestwood neighborhood and they had a house with a huge private in ground pool. An Art Gallery Jim Asana just everything. Yes so brandy was Kinda spoiled. When she was a little girl. It was almost unavoidable even though she did get a lot of attention as well as things but like I mentioned John's lifestyle just became out of control as his income was soaring. He spent time on the West and east coasts partying with the rich and famous. Eventually he found himself with an expensive dependence on cocaine and pills and is John pulled away from his home and family life into this life. Some are just kind of channeled her love and attention into raising her daughter. So Brandy got a lot of attention. Showered on her. Maybe too much if that's possible. Do you think that's possible to give a kid too much attention? No again it depends on what kind of attention. Well here's my thought on it. You can give them too much attention if you're allowing them to control you like when you're on the phone they're trying to take your attention away when people come over when you have worked to do. I mean there has to be a respect as well sure. That's why I said it depends on the kind of attention right so I think that it can be a bad thing when you get to the extreme. But that's not really the attention being the problem I guess that's more like the The fruits of the attention. Well yeah it's kind of the control like you want your child to see you as being in control of things when you don't want your child to take over control of what's going on day to day. Well I mean it can really be unhealthy and they can have a rude awakening when they get older. And everybody's not just falling over themselves to please them herbs moving so I think that's another issue is you don't want to raise them to feel entitled to everything so anyway I mean they did love her and it was a nice childhood although she was probably a little bit spoiled. Well how does she turn out? She turns out great. Okay so in. Nineteen seventy six. John took brandy in summer to the cons film festival ru and they spent time with David Kerosene is that the Kung Fu guy. Well that's the Carribean family. I don't know which one is which I think David was Kung-fu guy okay. And cary grant roll my love who carry granted yes. He was in one of my favorite movies. What was it sweep? Listen in Seattle now. An affair to remember. I know I was GONNA say that next so afterwards they went on an extended vacation to London Rome and Paris and they flew back to the United States on the First Air France Concorde flight from Paris to Washington. Dc wrong that's That's cool that's cool. That's Nice. Yes where she? Oh totally. And some are just felt like this poor country girl who was living like royalty. John became one of the biggest independent film distributors in the country and they were dining with. Paul Newman Joanne Woodward and Clint Eastwood Big names. Very big names especially in the seventies absolutely well when still around working yeah. He's still big but as her life was changing. Some are really didn't change. Who she was and I respect that. While John was traveling all over the world she stayed home and spent time with her daughter. She also invited other children over for play dates reading books and singing with them so she liked to share in her good fortune which. I think is so important. She even took time to volunteer at a home for emotionally disturbed young women and as a reward for good behavior. She would bring some of the girls to her house to swim for a day and loved it and they worked hard and did things so that they could earn a day at the pool so are like summer. She sounds like she's cutter head on straight and she's living the life. Well you know it's funny because they started reading the book about summer than I found online and I had no idea I was going to do the case but I did just feel such an affection for this woman that I enjoyed reading the book. It wasn't like work and I really enjoyed being able to Read about her in her life. Of course Jon was away a lot of the time. And he had his drinking habits in his drug habits so understandably their marriage suffered. There is a large Christmas office party in the late seventies when summer walked in on John and he and other parties were snorting large amounts of cocaine right on his desk so she walked out feeling pretty angry and worried at the same time. Sure I mean not only worried John but for her daughter you know. It's just very risky behavior. That he was getting into their relationship was getting more and more distant. Rose probably not a lot of good that comes out of a cocaine addiction or a drug addiction for that matter in marriage right. Something's going to happen well and it's interesting that when things stopped going so well for John and he has to really deal with things he does get better. So by nineteen eighty. His company started going downhill and the small films that John Distributed. Were really being snatched up by the major film companies without that business. He was quickly falling behind on his debts and he fell into some deep financial trouble because he hadn't saved enough. He was a big spender and happens. Cocaine is not free. I know but wouldn't you just put enough in a savings somewhere? In case the bottom falls out as a backup will most people would but a lot of people disfigure that. There's no end to this stuff. I guess you feel that way now is at this very very successful company. Money's just rolling in. I'd be of the opinion that this no change in that things are going to keep happening for me. Well and I'm kind of surprised that the way summer grew up that she didn't squirrel away more money because I personally waiting for the other shoe to drop and I liked to be prepared. Well Yeah but she did. She work well not really now. Not at that point or any money. She had came through her husband. Sheriff so what you're going to say to him honey. I need an extra thousand this week. 'cause I'm saving for when you go bankrupt? Well I just say. I WANNA start a savings account. I WANNA put a thousand dollars a week away and it shouldn't have fazed him when he was making so much

John Brandy John Ship Cocaine MGM Dolores Cora Granite City John Distributed Shipp Granite City Illinois Kansas City Florida Alexis Seattle Carribean Family Crestwood Football Kansas
Golden Globes 2020: Female directors snubbed yet again

All Of It

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Golden Globes 2020: Female directors snubbed yet again

"Me it's beginning to look a lot like awards season in the past week the Gotham independent film awards were handed out to the critics choice association released its nominations on Sunday the LA critics did their thing over the weekend as well and yesterday the nominations for the twenty twenty golden globes were announced in in the case of the latter there was a quite a bit of controversy the golden globes once again failed to nominate any female directors in film or TV honestly there were quite a few out there who are doing spectacular work Greta girl getting one ever given a online five live you wild the LA film critics and the critics circle offered a bit more in the way of diversity giving accolades the films including hustlers the farewell and Diane and among all three groups however married story parasite and the Irishman led the film category is joining us now to talk awards and what it all means is box culture writer and friend of the show Constance Grady because it's nice to see you thanks so much for having me so we'll talk about the the snobs in a minute but were there any surprises in the golden globe nominees for you I think the big surprise for a lot of people was joker getting nods not as for Joaquin perf walking Phoenix's performance which was expected but also getting nominated for Best Picture and Best Director especially since as you've already mentioned there were so many snobs in the directing category that was a movie that really became as big signifier in the culture wars when it came out honestly even before it came out there were some people who were saying that it was glamorizing the idea that a disenfranchised late and then turning to violence would be like this complete reasonable into laudable act and some people saying that it was the big greedy Christine's treatment that super hero movies deserved and then when it actually came out the critical consensus was that it was not really even interesting enough to justify that level of controversy so for it to make such a surprising sweep in a category that saw so many big films overlooked was really surprising I think for a lot of people do you think it it it seems to me that it really comes down to Joaquin Phoenix's performance I know that really maybe it was it was enough to sweep it into the best film category that performance really is undeniable and certainly you know a director does a lot of work to pull a performance out of an actor having said that I think there are a lot of other films in that that were in the conversation for Best Director Best Picture that didn't get pulled out that have really fantastic performances as well you know you could talk about it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood the Mister Rogers movie starring Tom Hanks Tom Hanks turns in a great performance and he was nominated as well but the director Merial Heller who did a lot of work with Hanks as well was not nominated so let's talk about that no women directors nominate you had hustlers affair well book smart little women when they see us what do you think was going on I mean this is speculation but you are culture writer yeah yeah I think one of the big things to remember about the golden globes is the end voting bloc the voting body for this award is super super weird the **** the Hollywood foreign press association is just ninety something people living in southern California extensively it's supposed to be a journalist for foreign publication of a lot of the members of the award body actually aren't and because it's a weird number in ninety people it's like not really enough to get a consensus pick on the and on the films of the year you know the academy in comparison has like eight thousand people in its body so you get like this weird sort of personal preferences can really tell things really strongly one way or the other so that's why it's kind of idiosyncratic yeah their picks tend to be very quirky and unusual compared to a lot of the other big awards shows and sometimes that means that they can recognize really really cool TV you know there was a time when the globe's had a reputation for being much better on TV than the end use words like the and needs would nominate modern family over and over and over again and that those route they're recognizing you know crazy ex girlfriend a Jane the virgin and other critically acclaimed show that never really got any any love but other times it means that the gloves will just completely shut out movies and TV shows that are really sort of in the middle of the conversation for no particular reason other than that didn't really connect with the voting body and kind of consistently it seems that the voting body does not connect with movie is directed by women the director honey boy tweeted good morning to everyone that's writing me about hash tag golden globes I feel you know this I was on the inside for the first time this year there are not they are not or people they do not represent us do not look for justice in the award system we are building a New

Gotham
As Paramount Decrees fall, theaters brace for more change

All Things Considered

02:09 min | 2 years ago

As Paramount Decrees fall, theaters brace for more change

"Than France is the author of the big picture in the fight for the future of movies he says that in the late nineteen thirties the DOJ sued the big Hollywood studios for stifling competition by offering exclusive deals to particular feeders and through a practice called block booking with that means is that the studio would say to the theater okay you want to play this really popular film you also required to place all of our other films which you may or may not want in nineteen forty eight when the Supreme Court ruled against the studios effectively ended their direct ownership of theaters and block booking opening the market to independent theaters after the councilman only forty stores explosion in the number of movie theaters in America increase significantly over the fifties sixties seventies and now there are countless other ways to watch movies on TV or on your phone their screens pretty much everywhere which is why the DOJ argues the paramount decrees aren't needed anymore author Ben Fritz says that while streaming and TV I have created more competition the move could still hurt some in the film world well the biggest losers are most likely to be independent theaters we're not panicking but we are concerned because we know what these practices condemn Randy Hester is the president of home town cinemas a small theater chain in Texas and on the board of the independent cinema alliance Hester worries ending the paramount decrees could we open the door to studio control over which films he's able to book potentially threatening his bottom line to the department of justice it's just a consent decree that's been on the books for seventy years myself I would only that thought out but this is our livelihood this is our life and I'm speaking for thousands of independent theater owners across the country ending the decrees could affect independent film to says Josh well he's president of film independent a nonprofit that supports independent filmmaking if you love films that are not just pumped out by a studio machine you really should care about this because it's going to result in last choice for consumers and fewer opportunities for independent filmmakers to get their work out into the world the DOJ's anti trust division for its part said it would phase out the paramount decrease over two years and will continue to monitor the market closely for anti competitive

France DOJ Supreme Court Ben Fritz Randy Hester President Trump Texas Hollywood America Seventy Years Two Years
"independent film" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Remarkable with them and <music> creates such a conducive environment to be free and crazy and loose and <hes> you never wanna leave the set down because it's just a just try again too excitable what he take out your canteen candy and i was like food i mean i i hear i am just as woman in a cave leave while it was wild but exhilarating yeah exhilarating <hes> do you. Are you a shape shifter. I hope so. I hope i can be at times like your. I wanna become other people but still have a part of me in there. I think that's a unique. I think you are one and but act now not certainly it's not not all actors are in their through rare thing that people who can really inhabit. I think more people in this industry wanting to be. I think more people are fighting against what they look like and what a studio might want that to preserve in them with no studio or ah breaking apart. I mean independent film big. You know he's really on the rise or it. It is taking a warming. The station agent was an independent movie. It wasn't very we shot for five hundred thousand dollars. Are you kidding me. Huge huge that little film a little film that could beautiful so what's going on on now. What are you working on <hes> promotion. I'm attached to this beautiful film. <hes> <hes> that i'm were hoping we get the financing together <hes> <hes> directed by <hes> under palo alto <hes> he did hannah with <hes> charlotte rampling <hes> beautiful beautiful italian director and is remarkable movie <hes> remarkable. He's a stunning director so i'm in the process of hoping to get that made. I've got another beautiful awful. Film called <hes> light on broken glass that i'm trying to get made <hes> and i'm attached to a few things so i'm i'm not working working right now. They're busy though but i'm i'm not no not really doing great but i have i have. I'm i'm campaigning. There's there's no. I think what i'm trying to say. There is no dread. There's just night. There seems to be like you know projects. You want to be involved with excited about and could happen but i i think i'm one of many women who are in their late. Forties fifties sixty what we're having a little bit of a heyday now we have jobs who have worked with apple apple who really want a higher and higher is often so i'm just i'm on route from riding the wave. I saw allison janney the other night god she's remarkable and and i'm just going to ride the wave. You should do movie with her at that. I'd be in heaven. Heaven was great talking to you. Thank you thank you so much food. That was patricia clarkson. I love ver i love. I seriously you ever again h. B. o. sharp objects. She's great knit nominated for the best supporting actress in a limited series or movie category and go look at her resume. Go see some of the movies we discussed. I re watched a art..

director allison janney patricia clarkson palo alto apple h. B. hannah five hundred thousand dollars
Peter Fonda, Henry Fonda And Jane Fonda discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Peter Fonda, Henry Fonda And Jane Fonda discussed on BBC World Service

"A family Peter Fonda was the son of the Hollywood star Henry Fonda the younger brother of Jane Fonda and we're told that he was surrounded by members of his family when he died in the in fact they've issued a statement and I'll just read it to you it says in one of the saddest moments of our lives we are not able to find the appropriate words to express the pain in our hearts as we grieve we ask that you respect our privacy while we mourn the loss of this sweet and gracious mon they say we also wish for old to celebrate his an indomitable spirit on love of life in honor of pizza please raise a glass to freedom and he has quite an impressive career spanning several films award nominations but that film easy rider is probably the thing he's going to be most remembered for yes easy rider was such a a landmark film for so many reasons that and and certainly Peter Fonda will be forever remembered for writing the phone for producing it for starring alongside Dennis Hopper as this pair of long head bikers traveling through the southern United States said the phone was the first counter culture film to be a really huge hit and run with the back of the the heady days of the nineteen sixties and it really kick started the independent film movement it touched a nerve with the the young people of America at the time it earned Peter Fonda on the rest of the writing team and also a nomination for best original screenplay and I think really catapulted him to stardom he was in big demand in Hollywood after that film on such a big name I mean that the tributes of of asset to be made elsewhere yeah many attributes and in addition to the family statement Jane Fonda has been paying tribute to her brother she said I am very sound he was my sweet hearted baby brother the talker of the family I've heard beautiful alone time she says in these last days and he went out laughing one of the tribute from the filmmaker rob Reiner he says my heart goes out to Jane of the loss of her brother Peter Fonda was a revolutionary filmmaker during a revolutionary time born in the house only now living his spirit will be messed up from prime his speech about his chest into merely are about the life of Peter

Peter Fonda Henry Fonda Jane Fonda Dennis Hopper United States America Hollywood Rob Reiner
Cord-Cutting 101: How to quit cable for online streaming video

TechStuff

01:22 min | 3 years ago

Cord-Cutting 101: How to quit cable for online streaming video

"We've seen cable subscriptions on the decline streaming services of doing pretty well. So well, in fact, that now these distribution companies are also production companies, you know, a decade ago. It would seem odd to suggest a company like Netflix would be able to go toe to toe with established older media companies to produce award winning content. And yet that's happened. Several times in the last few years today, we have a culture of cord cutters who are canceling cable subscriptions in favor of online delivery. You have cord nevers. Those are people who never had a subscription to pay TV and the first place they've only received things either over the air or online and this trend hasn't been so large as to necessitate a complete change in the entertainment industry, but it could be the beginning of another very large disruption. So if the streaming model continues to grow, or at least hold steady while cable subscriptions continue to fall, we might see. A drastic change in television and film production. I we're seeing an increased emphasis on huge tent pole blockbusters in film. You know, like, the vast majority of them are coming from a single movie studio that being the Walt Disney company, which owns not just all the Disney IP, but Star Wars and marvel and they just had the acquisition of FOX as well, they're still a call for independent films. But many of those have sought new ways to reach audiences some have been released both in

Walt Disney Company Netflix FOX
"independent film" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:42 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Talk into our movie guy, Kevin car and Kevin. There's some big movie coming out this. I'm not sure what it is. What are we talking about here? Little independent film. You may have heard somewhere I hear they played it at Kahn or some such. French film. It's called vendor. Avengers endgame, and it is be twenty seconds marvel cinematic universe film that started back with Iran in two thousand eight and it. Close up the ark of the 0 arc which is about the 0 stones that the titan Thanos searches for. So he can get the gauntlet. And of course, the end of the last episode last summer staff fingers and wipes out half of all. All sentient beings in the universe. And this one picks up for that left off where the remaining avengers are sort of reeling. From what happened they pick up the pieces trying to figure out what to do. They can stop them or or bring people back or whatever could be done. Of course, trying to come up with a plan and executing it throughout the movie, this is a huge movie, and it's got a huge cast of characters. Arguably fewer than the last one. You know, half of them disappeared. But yeah, this is a great ending to this one this two part movie series in sort of putting, you know, coming not ending the marvel cinematic universe, but kind of ending the arc that we've seen over the last twenty one films. A four hour movie. What were they thinking with that? It's a three hour movie. But when you throw in trailers. It's going to be about three and a half hours. You'll spend theaters keep in mind, though, that you know, there's this is the first time long movie of become the phenomenon. Titanic was three hours over three hours return of the king was three and a half hours going all the way back in history gone with the wind four our movies. So if a common for a very popular big budget super blockbuster movies to be this long. We live in a day and age of instant instantaneous and go move quick. No one reads even articles they Moore's headlines soccer's popular because it's only two our versus baseball. It's over three. I I'm surprised they would go with a three hour movie. They made it as long as it needed to go. I mean, the last movie evanger, divinity war. I think that was two and a half hours and even like Black Panther was probably two hours twenty minutes. And that was those are two Christie movies of last year. So. I think you're so room for three hour movie certainly as is room for three hour three hour movies because it's just doing huge businesses weekend box office record for Thursday night show. Breaking a record for Friday. Kevin. I'm sure you've seen this figure as well. I saw a worldwide this weekend is think could push almost a billion dollars on track to crack three hundred million for the weekend. If the if the receipt stay going the momentum stave the weekend, it's not too frontloaded. But yeah, it could crack through a million in states alone, and depending on how well it doesn't China. That's the big sort of question. How far our I'll be in China. It could do a billion dollars the first weekend winches on heard of that. Even if it doesn't that's still phenomenal. Even only makes like nine hundred Shane's that's the entire gross theatrical gross of the first Jurassic Park movie worldwide. Well, I, you know, I'm I'm old. But I remember the first time a movie cracked a hundred million people went nuts with jaws. Yeah. Nuts. God again, believe it. Number billion billion Brees says, okay? Gums making this one do that is the anticipation for it. And also, everyone no one wants to have the movie spoiled for which by the way, if you haven't seen the if you didn't go sometime today, or if you didn't go last night, stay on social media because there's going to be spoilers all throughout the weekend. If you're on Twitter's rolling, your three or feeding you get something spoiled for you at this point, you kind of did it to yourself insulate yourself. And then you'll see the movie what's pushing this box. There are exactly my kids said that to me today. Aki goes. Be able to see it or not because it's hard to get a showing in. So I'm risking spoilers. When I go to school on Monday. Yeah. Do go at nine in the morning. I'm sure they must have tickets then. Well, my wife my wife is going at nine in the morning on Sunday. And I think that just opened up a screening a couple of days ago for that time slot. But you know, even like weirdly early shows, like ten o'clock in the morning are pretty sold out at this point. Sometimes it so is it a worthy finish to the whole cycle of movies here. And also, it's not the end of the the all the movies. I mean movie in the summer, we got tapped him gonna come back. Don't think they're in. The marvel movie, but what the ark of this sort of this? I three waves of of the vendors films. Yeah. Absolutely. It works. The guys directed at Jebel all these characters really well put together something that's very streamlined in the movie, and there's a big buzz about when you should go to the bathroom in the movie. I saw an article about that. Unfortunately, all the slow moments are in the first hour because instead it's that's the more morose heavier moments because that's when they're dealing with one done before they kind of figure out what they want to try new boy once it hits that second act. There's really no good time to the stopping no outside. You get your adult diapers on all right with that. Kevin car will let you go. People wanna find out more work, and they go what can they do? Just go to in the movies dot com. Cheers, buddy. Thanks. Thanks. So with that in mind as we to do every Friday, we kinda keep it a little light and go with a movie topic in this case what better day to do this. Then this why not? Best or favorite superhero movie? Yes. Going back as fours. Whatever I'm like the first superman movie back in the seventies. I'm thinking. What before? Gordon, and all that..

Kevin car China Kahn Iran Twitter Christie Brees Moore baseball Aki Gordon Shane Jebel Jurassic Park three hour billion dollars three hours twenty minutes twenty seconds
"independent film" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

Collider Movie Talk

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

"It's going to hit a billion scared, Tom. It's still got a couple of weeks to hit a billion before in game. And it's still make money after in game. Just like Black Panther did apt Infinity war. So it was expected. This isn't a major drop off. This is right about where it was going to be this is this is actually a little higher than what I predicted. I thought it was gonna hold on really strong just because of the lack of competition this weekend. But what wound up happening is? You know, even though wonder park was a pretty expensive animated movie to make both wonder park and five feet apart did overperform compared to the original expectations. Oh, maybe that did eat into captain marvel just a little bit. But that's still a great holdover. Because when you look at the average of weakened to drops in the MC you that number is lower than the average. So that is a great sign, and I'm fully with you on that. I think that this one is gonna gonna continue to go strong through to endgame, and then probably linger there after just because the MCI was going to be a huge part of the conversation for quite a while. Now, absolutely anything stand out to you Rocca while I'm definitely this. I mean, what you mentioned the drop off is incredible was fifty four percent, which is fantastic. And now people are talking about the race to get to a billion. Will it be what augmented as quickly as Oklahoma got two billion? Will it be? We'll get to a billion quicker than that. We'll see and Peres right holding over just like Black Panther did going into Infinity war it over. And ironically, it had a better second weekend than Infinity war in terms of the drop enter the drop was lower than the INFINITI Wardrop. So that bodes well for the film overall. There is a Mark of a captain marvel whether people like it or not. A market for it at least. So that's great for me. What stood out is the hit the dragon hit drag that thing is still going? It's still kicking third film still doing it's business still make an it's money. I'm a fan of that. And I liked it. It's still there for like people who want to go and finish out the trilogy and enjoy the phone because everyone, including Mark Riley told me how great it is. So I still haven't found my way to it. So, but I will eventually, and I what does this mean this overperforming of the smaller films is very interesting for me to think about because why did they overperform? Why did they do better than people thought sometimes on the weekend? That's kind of dead. And there was stuff going on tournaments sports stuff going on. There was things that distract you. So I was shocked by this. But that's what you just said. There are there independent films a difference. You have these blockbuster films that we see captain marvel is a blockbuster all these high pump machine films where the marketing is you'd left and right and sometimes people wanna see stub differently. We've learned in the past several years. That NB films are now calling to the casual filmgoer. Right. You know, you shouldn't be that way back in the day. Really surp-. Yeah. But look at captive state cap to state did not do that fell apart in a lot of there was a lot of promotions happened for that film versus I think at least for me, I saw wedding state. A lot of people knew as probably going to underperform because how the embargo was up like the day before drop you the studio really wasn't behind wasn't competent when as as other ones. But yeah, you get these independent films. People wanna see now smaller films..

captain marvel INFINITI Tom Oklahoma Mark Riley Peres fifty four percent five feet
"independent film" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of the monkeys. We're gonna continue to play as our music bumps coming back from commercial in news and stuff like that place a monkey stuff throughout the morning. Peter Tork passed away. Yesterday. And and it's it's a sad story. But we'll listen to some monkeys music as we make it through the morning and coming up, we are gonna talk all kinds of Oscar stuff, we've got some memorable Oscar moments we get some Oscar facts by the number. Hey, what's the Oscar menu? They always have insane food for the Academy Award parties, we got who's going to present the best picture of clips and and much more Academy Award. I and my predictions for the winners, and then our regular Friday features are coming up, but every year the day before the Oscars, the independent spirit awards are handed out, and it takes place in California on a beach. It's just a really sort of. It's it's full on like sort of casual it takes place on a beach. Inside a tent, and it honors independent film for the year. And a lot of the independent film nominees for the spirit awards sometimes crossover into the Academy Awards, and that's usually the case every year. And that's the case this year too. So it's fun to watch that to see maybe who might win the Oscar the next day, or you know, in the independent world who wins the awards. I really always enjoy this. And I like a lot of the nominees because you know, some of these movies get completely ignored because they don't have the money or the studios behind them. But I have the list here of all the nominees, and we can talk a little bit about that. And if you want to jump in at any time, it's three one two nine eight one seven two hundred three one two nine eight one seven two.

Oscar Academy Awards Peter Tork California
Oscars 2019: Who will win and who should in a wide-open race

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Oscars 2019: Who will win and who should in a wide-open race

"And Roma is just one film that's up for best picture. But of course, there are many others. Well, there are and in fact, my brother asked me to his his his his businesses. He goes, please help me with the with the business. Oscar lottery who do you think's gonna win and the everything's pointing to green day winning best picture. And I think that the the awards are going to be fairly equally. Distributed. But either way I think it's going to be a good year for diversity for gender equality and also new independent stories vying with big budget, superheroes and foreign films and in terms of best actor best actress wou I think Christian bale will get best actor, and I think that Glenn Close. It's about time. She will probably get Pakistan slash she never had it before. She's been nominated a lot. Yeah. But she's an she's not hasn't won it. I mean, it's far as I know gosh. Now, I'm freaking out as far as I know. She hasn't. It's a very very strong diverse nominated pal pallet this year, and sashes stone and words daily was saying something very very interesting that we've never had such differences. We never had marvel films up for awards versus basically independent films. It's really quite amazing. The the one thing that Netflix has done for us. It's made people realize that we need more. More than just superheroes and more than just older stars. We need new stories.

Roma Glenn Close Pakistan Netflix Oscar
"independent film" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"So you can get onto one tree hill feel less pressure because it was sort of like a slut aside. Gig. But sort of like it wasn't musing felt when so much pressure. We'll also all of my friends at the time were successful actors on their own TV shows, you know, they like if I hung out with my friends, or like, my first teenage boy friend it was like go visiting them on sets. So it wasn't like this. Oh who knows if that will happen or not it was like, okay? I really I mean, they might be worse. Because like you don't have any experience didn't have any experience. I felt so behind but I was fortunate enough to it kind of worked out. I mean, I really did love it didn't kind. Did the beginning in the beginning. It definitely worked out. But in the beginning, I got like an independent film, which immediately got me into sag, and that and I really loved being onset is an actor for the first time because I always visit and hang out in the hair and makeup room. And just kind of follow around my friends, and it was the first time I was in the hair and makeup room for reason, and I really loved doing the work. And so after that, I just was excited to keep auditioning and keep booking things and then the writers strike happened. So there were no auditions, and we didn't talk about it. But I actually went on tour with finally Cyrus ill see works with her a lot right now. And in Miley would've been fourteen chitter fifteen th day when we were on the road. I was one of her backup singers for the best of both worlds tour, and that's what kept me afloat. I mean, I didn't have any backup plan. I had like absorbed music became your side, gay so music became the side gate. Yeah. And then by the time, I got back to LA. I was like, you know, what this is what I wanna do. I was not working on the tour anymore. I I'm a terrible backup singer. I've said this before on this podcast in it's okay. It's true. And I I just took a bunch of classes, I took writing classes, I took acting classes, I took acting intensive and I really pushed myself into it. And and and then I got the job. Yeah. And I were working on vampire together we had this day off, and we didn't leave my bed. I think we just like, yes. Less slept in my bed all day. And just like I think it'd been after a night out and we were exhausted and shootings exhausting to. And we were like let's show each other the worst project we've ever been in. Legitimately watched like a sorta. If they were both horrible, also bad. I don't say any of them come on. No, can you at least give us some clues as to why. This really kind of you know. Teen movie buried and kind of thing. Was in it. And like there's lots of naked people. I was not one of them. But one of those movies where it was one of those movies where like, you know, for my parents thrilled. I was in it probably not. So I should can't assign. It's pretty bad years hot and cool. Was yours. Yours is a pirate movie. Now, you so Barras. Yes. Kayla children's pirate movie where I to be a boy pirate in heaven, very cheap mustache lie. Yes. You were. I was a hidden boy pirate. And. On. And and like the one thing that I took away from it would funny enough is still on my resume is I had to take sword fighting classes for a few weeks. So still on my resume guys swashbuckler. Yeah. I I had an audition like months back and someone in one of the casting directors was like so it says here that you do sword fighting is this an active hobby if yours and I was like oh God. Why is that on there such a good lesson for people to started in a movie like that? And then you know, I've had so much success. So it's good for everyone to realize that you know, you gotta start somewhere. Sometimes you got to carve your own path your own sword. So stay tuned guys. We will be right back after this break with ill, see cheaper..

LA Miley Cyrus Kayla
"independent film" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

05:42 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"And getting you high thing that comes in all of those writers work, where where there's a there's this detail that normally gets cut out of like if I were to the translation of that onto screen would normally get because normally independent film is, you know? At best. He walked to the store and any of those authors would say he sauntered slowly to the store and in his right hand. He carried a coffee cut that twenty years before his grandmother had used to murder his grandfather. Wow. What an end in that coffee cutter. In that was his half drink drunk coffee from last night that he was determined to finish. He took a sip now. Coming up. His Purdue producer indie film. Producer would be like just show him at the dams. Bing. Just one final line for people that want to create and create more and put this stuff out there. Just once final word of advice that people use right? Went to right went to create researching stop get off Google. You don't need to know anything more. Just sit there go where there's no WI fi and sit there and write for X amount of hours each day, even when nothing's coming out. And and if nothing's coming out right that nothing's coming and and. And you just have to sit there and do there's no preparation that boredom. That comes from sitting there when nothing's coming out is part of the writing process. Thank you so much for joining us face. It will say love it's twenty and thank you. Thanks for having. Thank you. Thank you so much for talking about this. Because you know, it's hard to get the word out stuff. We'll be spreading it. So. Joining us and good luck by peace. Right. So was fun. Cool. On. Yeah. 'cause he was pretty candid. Yeah. Really come to this situation in America. This is in. Minist- elements and stuff the guys go. Seen it yet. But it's like a great people are complaining that obviously didn't didn't it didn't make the gnomes. Yes. So basically Oscar nominations. And I'm actually excited because obviously they probably weren't win. But the fact that they are in the nation for best picture, I love. So that is. Black panther. Congratulations to the back. The Black Panther team for making best page. I think is the first superhero to be superhero film to be nominated. So congratulations to model. I'm really happy about this. Even though I don't think it's going to win. And I don't know. I mean, I wanted to win even though I know it small for me, and we all was e, but then my ideal Osco at these very tainted by the five or so much Wightman film that now this is eight needs to be this level of art, which is also something to critique in of itself, and may clansman is also nominated for best take. I've been kind of program. Number one about film course, by is by no means best. You just have to be like. Good. Something under something underhand because it's a nice best. This by no means by no means let's days films. He's done. He's like been around the agent. So why making for best region? A message. But I remember just because of your Kadhamy she think we need to to Bill. We all living in in a tight spot right now where they are under so much pressure to see I think people were saying that they should have pulled. If Bill street could talk in this in this category. I haven't watched it yet. You've washed. Yeah. Good. Yeah. Do you think it has to be on this? Thing is a very very artistic film literary misery novel arty. Off cabeza. Yes, they missed. The deadline comes in February. Stat meyer. I want to say. Yeah. I mean, I didn't mind. It might be up for next year because Regina kings, eighty one lead best supporting actress mentioned and whatnot for the film. Bender. I'm studying must have been definitely because a lot of films are nominated for golden graves also nominated for the kademi. And so we have human rhapsody which has lady Gaga also nominated the favor. Wait stars. I had. Stories. Born Baheen maps d. Pretty McCurry's pretty much Justice. Some people say the people that went to review it, and I hear that. He did quite people. He did it just this. Charisma as well. So a star is born no seeing. I'm not see many of the lists happened, actually..

McCurry Producer murder Bing Google Osco WI lady Gaga Oscar America Stat meyer Regina kings Bill Wightman Kadhamy Bender twenty years
"independent film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"They wanted every territory, and if you go to a festival and pick something up a lotta times certain territories are already presold that's not on the table. Now, there's there's so much more content being made that if you look at dramatic competition. You know, a lot of these already have distribution is no longer that divide. And I I don't have any defense. I don't know where it's going. But you're right that things are definitely changing. It's scary. And like, you know, a movie a movie like the souvenir, which Eric mentioned earlier, which was is being distributed by eight twenty four already has a deal for a sequel before you know, it. Even premiered at Sundance. So what are we doing here? Even one film, which now forgetting the title of that eight twenty four produced, but then soul to HBO as its own kind of corporate synergy in we are seeing a lot of deals that seems to like hearken back to not that. I'm an expert on this but deals of Sundance pass in terms of fifteen million dollar deals from Amazon they've picked up a bunch apple just purchase Talaa for seven million dollars. I believe so there are still some big fifteen fourteen million dollars sales going on that seems pretty astronaut Michael in terms of will they be making that money back. But of course, Amazon is sells toilet paper as well. And so other things Netflix Snead's subscriber base and things of that nature as well. So the money is there to spend. I think I think it's like also, you know, to the point important to keep in mind that Sundance is is an industry event. It's a red carpet event, it's driven by celebrity. It's driven by names, and it's driven by some very big brands and big corporate partnerships. So it's not really. Place for independent film. If we're being honest, I think that there's a lot of voices that kind of come through especially in something like India Assad, something like Hollas, a great example. But Sunday, it's also an institution literally so Hala came up through Sundance. She had workshop here. It's a great movie, and it's a great personal story. And it did get a big deal. So it does kind of fit that model of what Sundance is supposed to be. But it also is Sundance has to make room. I think in their program for the projects that they are the filmmakers that their training, essentially interesting, and we have a podcast will release later with Dan Mirvish co-founder of slammed in. So I went and spoke to him for a while. And slim dance is a place where the films these are filmed, you likely won't see, but these are probably filmmakers you will eventually hear about. And so a lot of people. Go to slam has to be a first feature can't have distribution and their networking. They're meeting each other showing off their stuff and really learning about how to make movies. Still. So it's kind of like a farm system in a way. And I think if you're talking about where independent truly independent or people risking independence where it's happening. It's probably more happening slam dance in a lot of ways. But I think that. The thing I noticed and the thing that I think is extremely valuable about going to Sundance the trend. I picked up on not across the board. But the really seemed to be a consistent theme in the films. I saw of female characters having to take charge of situations and male characters who were either. Clueless or actively villainous, and it's a really interesting thing happening in movies, and this is ground zero. And a lot of ways for that. Like, you're seeing new new voices. Even if they're coming up through the Sundance institute expressing these things, and I think if you're an aspiring creative, and you come to this festival and see what's happening. You'll see where things are moving your..

Sundance Sundance institute Amazon Hala HBO Dan Mirvish Netflix Snead India Assad Eric Michael co-founder apple Talaa fifteen fourteen million dolla fifteen million dollar seven million dollars
"independent film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"And it's him in his family as they're trying to make it to the European Union you to claim a Silom gets a safety and it takes over three years to do. So, but they do make it, unfortunately, he still has some visa issue. So we can't come to Sundance, but of the footage was transferred via different files and things of that nature. I spoke with the editor and the producer of the film to see how that all came together. And it still feels like he's still very much in limbo. They still don't have a permanent home, and they're still seeking protection. So definitely felt like a real pressing political year on the documentary front too. I think. The trend. I most. Was aware of this year was perpetuated by sonny's his slogan this year, which was risk independence. I believe that. Maybe they should change that slogan to risk distribution by eight twenty four because a twenty four has maybe like ten titles here they've picked up a few more. And it's not, you know, no knock on eight twenty four. But I think that we're really seeing shift in the type of movie that Sundance is choosing to program. And maybe this is something that has probably been going on for a good while now, but I think it's kinda hard to call an a movie that's already got distribution from a major company like eight twenty four an independent film, and you know, that's really hard term to define an independent film. But when we're at a festival like this. I think that like this year more than anything, I've really realized how much I do appreciate movies that are truly independent and that are like bat shit out. Out there that don't have distributors at that are exciting in fresh in ways that maybe don't stick to a certain social agenda that Sundance has sort of p non themselves over the past couple of years. It's not to say again that like the movies that eight twenty four are bringing are bad because twenty four is great. And they're doing a great service for independent features. They picked up the farewell a few days ago, but they are here with a number of movies. And it seems like all of their movies are the ones that are getting the most buzz too, and that are going to be nominated for awards at the end of this festival. So what I think what I'd really hope for in a festival is that they are able to elevate certain filmmakers that don't have distribution or that don't really have, you know, haven't made a name for themselves yet in a way that movie that is already being distributed by eight twenty four could do. Without the festival, I would really like to see more of that in Sundance future. And it's weird. It's weird. And it's kind of unsettling for this trend to exist for me because I think we're we're pushing further away from independent film. Yeah. It's it's really interesting mean, we have a new had programmer this year, can you Tani? And but I think what you're picking up on the are the industry trends of the way that things are getting financed. You know a couple years ago. The talking point was like why is it wise net flicks movie at Sundance, you know, because you mentioned velvet buzz on its here playing probably today on Netflix in two days. And but but I completely agree with you. I think I probably because I was late and missed a lot of movies. I've seen five or six and three or four of those Ray twenty four. I mean, it's you know, it's an established thing that you expect at this point. It used to be that. There was a divide between what was in competition and out of. Fission and some of that was based whether you had distribution or not because the idea of being competition potentially winning awards was way to elevate your film to the point where hopefully you will get a bump from the festival from the curation from the jury, and it can help you get acquired, but because so many 'financiers financing movies earlier in the process that they have all the rights control. What happens with the with the film, alternate Lii, which is exactly what Netflix wanted with my film amateur..

Sundance Netflix European Union editor sonny Lii producer programmer Tani Ray three years two days
"independent film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Very long the other thing I want to mention sort of as a segue to there's a number of India episode IX that I want to see I think more than features this year which Ryan kind of tune me to last night. There's of course, the Michael Jackson documentary, which I guess technically wasn't in the Pacific category. But it did sell to HBO and will be released as a miniseries that's been getting some crazy crazy reactions. I guess the first half is very hard to watch as there's graphic descriptions of from Michael Jackson, Michael Jackson's victims of what he would do to them. And there was actually like a number of protests or just one I guess small protests that broke out trying to support Michael Jackson. But from the from what I've heard from the people that have seen it. It's hard to it's gonna be hard for them to ever. Listen to Michael Jackson again, which is. Statement considering he is the king of pop, but that, but that's the power of film. Right. Like, we went through this era where so of our biggest pop stars like Michael Jackson, and then you have surviving R Kelly out there as well to change culture to the point where after this documentary comes out, you know, that that period post Michael Jackson's death, where all of a sudden it was he was on the airwaves and incredibly popular that's going to end, and it's going to be because of this film. You're not gonna hear R Kelly anytime soon either as you shouldn't in that's going to be because of a film. It's no wonder that Michael Jackson's estate is worried about this film, or is condemning it, and it's probably because they just don't want to lose any of those royalties or that money because from what I've heard it's pretty the evidence. There is pretty unequivocal that he did.

Michael Jackson R Kelly HBO India Ryan
The Scene at Sundance Film Festival 2019

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

03:51 min | 3 years ago

The Scene at Sundance Film Festival 2019

"One of Utah's most famous events the Sundance film festival kicked off yesterday. James Nelson rights runs broadcast based in Salt Lake City joins me now to tell us more of this year's edition of this event, one of the largest and most famous independent film festivals in the world. Welcome to the program. So James, could you I still about the selection of films in offer this year will thank you Marcus great to be with you across the ocean. There I'll tell you what fourteen thousand two hundred and fifty nine films were submitted. That's an all time record. And it shows you how much Sundance is growing over the many years decades related it's been in existence, but the number of films that finally make it to the screen for the people to come and see and for the Hollywood folks to take a. A close look at is only one hundred sixteen. So the odds are not good that you'll make it into Sundance. But Marcus if you do oh my goodness. Sundance is a heck of a trampoline or springboard to get out there in the world and make some noise exactly what I'm wondering. I'm wondering what the films that are making noise this year. What's going to be the biggest to discussion topics? What feels like going to be creating most of us. Well, you know, one that has ties to Utah believe it or not is a story about a serial killer Ted Bundy from decades ago that film, you know, has got a lot of people talking. And by the way, a little side note on the movie, it's called extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile. That's the story about Ted Bundy a side note is one of the Metallica performers is got a cameo appearance. He plays a Utah highway patrolman, but that story has got a lot of early hype and buzz because it was such a horrific event. And yet that story still haunts Utah, Colorado and Florida Florida being where Ted Bundy was finally executed in the electric chair electric chair some years ago, Marcus this you'll feel them recommendations, by the way. I'll tell you. What sonia? The white swan would be a recommendation that I would make this. This is a true life story directed by an so it sqi it chronicles Sonja Henie one of the world's greatest athletes. She won three gold medals ten world championships. And she was by the way, the inventor of figure skating as we know the beautiful sport today. She goes to Hollywood, this is sort of the film that script becomes very rich. She becomes even more famous. But then like a skater slipping on ice, she falls in that movie has a cold is the ending. However, it might be Sonia's. The white swan it might be her best performance. So that's a mystery another one I wanna tell you about. Very the last tree is a film about a British boy of Nigerian heritage raised in Lincolnshire. I don't know if I pronounced that correctly markets, particularly thank you. He's got a lovely life. In a pretty darn good neighborhood with foster parents things are going along quite well. But then the real mom shows up, and she grabs it takes her home to a flat much different neighborhood much different field for this youngster in with all of those big differences. The boys lost he struggles and distances himself from both mothers, just so he can go out into the world and try and find

Ted Bundy Utah Sundance Marcus Sonja Henie James Nelson Sonia Hollywood Salt Lake City Metallica Lincolnshire Florida Florida Colorado
"independent film" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Hi, always. You know, she's a very very special lady. She is in fact, my best friend so everything that I'm about to ask her. I know the answer to. There's always a surprise with this one. And if you don't know anything about her her first movie was step up, and it was a job produce did I produce. Yes. So and she went she said, why are you making me be director? I said because I need you to understand the pain that I endure every day of my life, and and the privilege and. When an after that, she took some time off. Well, I did hairspray. She helped me with hairspray. And then went on to direct twenty-seven dresses the proposal hot pursuit the guilt trip. And a now dumpling, and is I think was listed in variety as the most hired in the last decade woman director in the business has has directed the most movies four studios in there. And this was her first independent film with dumpling. And with an I don't even know if you know this your box office is crawling very close to seven hundred million dollars. Yeah. So which which is which is that is very very. With with all the women who are working today. This is a very aspirational kind of a box office to own. So that's that's all good. Anyway. Obviously the first question that I have for you, young obvious. It is obvious when you are. Choosing a project. What is it that you're looking for and then ultimately wide dumpling? I feel like we're so close extremes. Don't you think we're close your big stage? I'm always looking for well, you know, these answers. So it's awkward. It's awkward because he knows everything. But actually don't know that what you looking for in a project. Okay. I love character-driven anything anything I can glomming onto or connect with. I'm sure that most directors would say the same thing anything that's grounded in truth, and in the truth, you can basically go anywhere under as zany as it can be like the proposal. I think that we had a lot of set pieces that I feel like functioned in worked because everything was grounded in truth. And so for this movie dumpling, I I got halfway through the script. And got wrote an Email is in London on Email to my agency and a half to do this movie. It's mandatory because of the friendships and the girl power, and what they're struggling with and the death of Lucy, and the mom and daughter struggle. His also real for most girls who are. Raised in this world, and I didn't have anything of its kind. And so I wrote him I have to do this movie immediately. Please tell them I accept I don't want to do this. And he said great, wait till the drag queens show up. I was like what? Has that happened in the small town in Texas? And I honestly thought maybe I should have finished reading it before. I said, yes. But to my delight they are the fairy godmothers of our story. And and and that's really alternately. Why took it is just you You know. know, it's hard to describe. But girls I'd had didn't have movies like this helping us. Dismantle the narrative about who. We are from society's point of view or friends teachers. Magazines, movies and stuff like that..

director Lucy London Texas seven hundred million dollars
"independent film" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

12:56 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Through the work collaborating on that cover. He's just really like my craftsmanship. And who wanted to me? A script. And I really love you to do the custody divine at that time. I really didn't know if that was an area I've always wanted to do so there. Yeah. And also didn't know if I can get it in get it done in the turnaround time because it would kind of like here's a script overshooting in a week. And I'm like, yeah. Okay. Like, I don't even know where a star. By cuts. I'm just saying that like, I don't know. You know for me. I'm ready. And then he was like, I just seen your work. I think would be it's gonna be. So it's gonna be organic for you, really easy. And I read the script, and I fell in love with the script so much and also giving. Like more of an input, which is great because you know, you have more of a leverage to like put your own input in and kind of go back and forth with editing, and then I also become a big producer, the independent films are helping areas of production. And but it became like kind of like a baby loved that we shot for four months in New York City, and then we did retakes the past the tender, and it's actually incredible. Because the Audrey Hepburn granddaughter and the Hepburn that's going to be her debut. Wow. Yes. So it's like kind of like. To me like, I literally have her grandmother and my room hanging. My office what an inspiration for fashion. And it was kind of like nerve wracking because there's she's already kind of known. She's been in Harper's bazaar, cover bread marathon, all these other magazines, and you're just kind of like, you get this great opportunity, and you wanna make sure your stuff the bar and the caliber to what the person is being perceived as their first film and. And there's other people like Linda look houses in Sidney Leslie most been and. Other actresses from that are very well known. But. What is the name of the film? What is it called the man in the attic? Okay. All right. And that's going to be where we'll be able to see that. It's going to be probably around some film festivals. And then they'll probably after that Goto, hopefully, some smaller with the Paris theater. And then hopefully, the extreme we're just we're in the distribution meetings. Now. Oh, that's exciting. So then you know, how that is. Yeah. Process. I mean, we filmed a year and a half ago. But also, you get all these opportunities with certain companies, and then you're just kind of like waiting to see who's gonna who's gonna let it be the way that you originally wanted it to look like though. There's a lot of that. But on a high. No, it's kind of encourage beautiful, and it's great for my first film because I got a lot of input. So so it was great. Exposure for me. How I did it. I I did another short bell knew when I was filming someone just off through my social media that I was working on it and had her collaborated. She was the author for EP eat, pray love. Oh, yeah version. Oh, yeah. She did an a film short on call letting go, and I was a costume designer for that and associate producer, and then that actually went into a couple of film festivals. So that was really exciting. Wow. Nine just through. So the rector that has been looking for a partner Viner virtually show, and then he referred me. And again, it was like literally a week before they were going to start filming for the TV show. And it was I took the interview and we liked each other. And it worked out thankfully networking. You know, I say that every time I have a show that you have to network, and you never know who you are meeting or what door it's going to open. I mean, it's incredible to think when I had you on and how far and how much you've done since. And it seems now you're going into the film TV realm, which is very hard to break into. And also, I think when you meet these people it's good to like build a relationship and understand van or me million people or a day, but not with one or two people. Stay in touch with them. I try to like, you know, my contact and like invite some events or just remind them that working on this project even person and Paul you like I did this. Hey, look at it. You know, just to see if it's kinda continually organically growing your network, but reminding like, hey, we could all collaborate in some aspects together. So I think that's great. And I think that's great advice to because it seems that you really live by that. And I see that. And and I think that honesty, and and the way you do that people see that in you and see your talents and want you to be part of their projects. And that's how it evolves you're now an ambassador for clothing line to correct. Yeah. It's actually pretty much. It's called the OJ the label, and what Baidu artisan, they finally artisans and Tunisia, and they help them with the help them pretty much microfinance their brands by like these designers already you're kind of working on brand, but they need to sell them. So these two ladies who are the co founders Kenza and Simone joins forces to start this to help them with resources and getting their names out there and getting them established over the world, especially in New York, and I became the Brandon master, which I was I feel honored could I work with a lot of emerging artists. And just really appreciate what the whole concept of it to like, you're you're helping people who who need the money, but you're not just like, you know, raising funds for them. You're also having them work. On something that they love to do. And you're still containing them being able to do that educate themselves and make money off what they do. So it's kind of like. This is the way I feel like in my own company how I'm starting to work in many different areas by like trying to help emerging artists. The emerging clients emerging designers and make them the next, you know, give them that chance and opportunity to help them push their talents out there and their creativity. That's incredible just working in New York, Mary are you also across Europe and in California. I get invited to many different events. I know the collaborative many different designers, and then the spring I'll be going to the Middle East by two with say the label plus for and you style and a lot of designers and Europe have reached out to like collaborate. I try not to like the room with everybody in the do like anything. I I like to kind of a lot of energy towards one or two brands. And then when I feel like my work has, you know, not that they might work as going to the neck, but where I feel like emerging brands can like take the next level. Then I'll go hopefully, the next emerging artists are next emerging designer and get them ready. That's exciting. So right now, you're working with a couple of different artists. Yes, I'm actually working very special project that I'm hoping to announce to you maybe next week or the week. We'll probably an all announced the YouTube it'll be for America. But it's. It's kinda mix me both worlds with fashion and film. So it's really. You know, we're still in like kind of indifferent motions kinda ties in every single aspect of what I've been doing within my company. So I'm very excited about that. It's amazing. So you own your company yourself? Yeah. And you started your company when? It'll be nine years tomorrow. Wow. Congratulations. Thank you. That's amazing. Thank you very much. That is just incredible. So you started this company, and did you really think back then that it would evolve into something so different? You know, now, you're just in everything which I think your direction at I was just the runway. Correct. And now, look you've done. I never I I always was hoping that I would become successful. And my energy potion. Passion was like red carpet and being like, do whatever you have to do to land the celebrity on the red carpet and style them, right? But I never thought that I would still appreciate and to do that. But love other areas and get both opportunities like an never imagined that I would be able to literally associate producer, it'll cost you design a film, or, you know, had the creative director of a brand or something. So. I didn't think I know it takes years, but I didn't think those opportunities for certain brands that I admire would actually or companies reach out to me. So I've been very lucky, and you know, like, you have even taught me told me that it takes, you know, you can always how your downfalls, you know, your trials, and like your hurdles that like in in business, you have to just kind of like pushing work harder and figure it out, and we actually you, and I won things weren't the way that I you know, where they were now. So now, that's right. I mean, I remember meeting you. But I there was so much. I saw in you immediately that how many years ago was that was that was four years ago. Is that four years ago? Yeah, it's incredible. Because you were just, you know, I it was an it was a crossroads, and I think as a entrepreneur as you know, you're gonna hit those crossroads. But you you evolve into so many different people in different things, come your way. You have to have the passion for it as I speak of every week. And also the drive, and I think when you're open to all of that look at the opportunities that are coming your way. I mean, people are everywhere. So it's it's very exciting. And I do want to mention is young. So she so she's got a, you know, a lot of years to just keep evolving, where do you see your brand going? I hope like I live, right. I love exactly where I am. But I do hope in five years. I can hopefully like them the brand to come out with you know, maybe the interior design label or homegoods. I'm starting to really appreciate the there's a lot of my clients. I feel build them and their wardrobe and ask you about their home. And then it's personal Africa time goes hand in hand. And then I'm just hoping that like I get the opportunity he'll start creatively. Working with Burt lake licensing, the brand and kind of doing other areas like maybe home furnishings and kids wear something working with those brands and kind of having a creative collaboration with them so exciting. So you just see the brand growing in all different directions. So one overall Sunday could become an agency where I help other stylists. You know, like I dream of being a grave director one night to for like bigger Brandon that maybe kind of like made the. Thirty known, and then hopefully, my company can help other stylists. Copy designers to get the job or help them understand the report, and the dynamics and how to like because I feel like the world's changing with, you know, the millennials, and it's not as easy to build this Bill the next generation of fashion stylists. Why I think it's pretty exciting. And now I'm starting to visualize because you know, my field is is all of the arts. And now, I'm in radio, I'm gonna talk to you energy and another time about a possible reality show because now I'm starting to think in terms of television for you. So now, I'm already in that direction as you're speaking. So you and I are going to do a little collaboration on that. Because I am thinking now that it would be fantastic. And I have an idea and a concept as you're speaking that I think would do very well for you. I just wanna listen remind our listeners, you're listening to women L loop..

producer New York City director Audrey Hepburn Burt lake Europe Middle East Africa Baidu Tunisia Harper YouTube homegoods Goto Linda Paris theater Sidney Leslie partner Paul
"independent film" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

Herald & News Basin Views

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

"It's not happening to the degree that it is for the big blockbusters. So what what's great is? I mean going back to the film festivals. Going back to fill minded communities in towns, like Klamath falls who could bring some of these more independent films, and especially with the film festivals to be bringing fest to be bringing independent films here, and exposing audiences here to something that is different. It's not just aquaman or trans. Formers? It's you know, an organ made film that is compelling and complicated and beautiful and something that isn't going to have twenty million dollars in a publicity budget and the among those film festivals. Claim does have a climb with film group and every year in September. They put on the Klamath independent film festival, and it's used to be getting bigger and bigger every year, which is great because it's focused exclusively on films that were either shot in Oregon or made by Oregon filmmakers, the climate area has had several contributors to that and has had several people including yourself who have gone onto quite great success in the Hollywood scene. It was fasting. When I got down to to the Hollywood area as we've talked before I spent about twelve years working in that industry and coming from Oregon down there. I thought you know, Hollywood so influential, you know, it's so massive for a scene that has such a profound influence. On global culture. It's surprisingly small in everyone kind of knows everyone. These little little circles that work with their own little industries. You've mentioned Bergen Bergen Swanson grew up here in Klamath falls. He is now a line producer those worked on movies like wild and three billboards outside, Missouri. And he just this year had a film called widows that came out, of course, James ivory grew up in climate, falls and ease an icon. Ick. Filmmaker I can't even his age is several pages long at this point. But he made films like Howard's. And and his most recent project. Call me by your name, one Academy Award for in the course of festival circuits and just Hollywood being what it is you ever randomly run into James. I of your Bergen sponsor someone with Oregon routinely go..

Hollywood Oregon producer Klamath Bergen Bergen Swanson James ivory Klamath falls Bergen Howard Academy Award Missouri twenty million dollars twelve years
"independent film" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

Herald & News Basin Views

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"independent film" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

"It's not happening to the degree that it is for the big blockbusters. So what what's great is? I mean going back to the film festivals. Going back to fill minded communities in towns, like Klamath falls who could bring some of these more independent films, and especially with the film festivals to be bringing fest to be bringing independent films here, and exposing audiences here to something that is different. It's not just aquaman or trans. Formers? It's you know, an organ made film that is compelling and complicated and beautiful and something that isn't going to have twenty million dollars in a publicity budget and the among those film festivals. Claim does have a climb with film group and every year in September. They put on the Klamath independent film festival, and it's used to be getting bigger and bigger every year, which is great because it's focused exclusively on films that were either shot in Oregon or made by Oregon filmmakers, the climate area has had several contributors to that and has had several people including yourself who have gone onto quite great success in the Hollywood scene. It was fasting. When I got down to to the Hollywood area as we've talked before I spent about twelve years working in that industry and coming from Oregon down there. I thought you know, Hollywood so influential, you know, it's so massive for a scene that has such a profound influence. On global culture. It's surprisingly small in everyone kind of knows everyone. These little little circles that work with their own little industries. You've mentioned Bergen Bergen Swanson grew up here in Klamath falls. He is now a line producer those worked on movies like wild and three billboards outside, Missouri. And he just this year had a film called widows that came out, of course, James ivory grew up in climate, falls and ease an icon. Ick. Filmmaker I can't even his age is several pages long at this point. But he made films like Howard's. And and his most recent project. Call me by your name, one Academy Award for in the course of festival circuits and just Hollywood being what it is you ever randomly run into James. I of your Bergen sponsor someone with Oregon routinely go..

Hollywood Oregon producer Klamath Bergen Bergen Swanson James ivory Klamath falls Bergen Howard Academy Award Missouri twenty million dollars twelve years
Black Filmmakers Make History in 2018, but Female Directors Still Shut Out says Study

The Frame

04:32 min | 3 years ago

Black Filmmakers Make History in 2018, but Female Directors Still Shut Out says Study

"And of the filmmakers behind those movies only four point three percent where women and in terms of progress. Twenty eighteen was worse for female directors than the year before as their share of jobs plummeted from seven point three percent to three point six percent. And for those of you who understand Matt that's a drop of more than fifty percent right in. I think that when we look at female directors, and we look at the trends across the twelve years. I think what we're seeing here is a problem for women in general. But when we look to women of color, there were only nine out of one thousand three hundred and thirty five hires in sue we really have to think about intersection -ality when we talk about. Female directors because we're really seeing a floor effect, particularly with women of color, and it's also not just men who get jobs. It's white men almost all the time fewer than ten percent of the male directors from those twelve hundred films were either black or Asian absolutely now. One interesting finding that we do have in the report is that we took a deep dive on the last three hundred films over the last three years, and what we do see just over that shorter amount of time. We see a notable uptick from thirteen percent of all directors in two thousand sixteen or from underrepresented racial ethnic groups and in twenty eighteen that number jumps to twenty two percent. So we're seeing progress it's not as fast or a steep, perhaps as some of us would like to see, but I think it becomes really important to acknowledge the positive steps that Hollywood has taken and. And the giant leaps that still need to happen for particularly women and other underrepresented groups of behind the camera. You did a couple of things in this study that I was really interested in one is what all call the Sundance effect. And that is men who have successful independent films seem to have a much easier. Time moving from Sundance to big budget productions than women what are the numbers say about that? Well, what we're seeing really interestingly in the research is that there's a a one and done phenomenon for most women they get one chance across this twelve year span of time, whereas their male counterparts get more at bats. If you will, and this is really problematic because it affects the career sustainability for female directors in what if you really look at the data closely. What you see is that the studios are adding a few new women each year as opposed to going. Back to the the roster of talent, and including them in hiring decisions as well.

Sundance Matt Hollywood Three Percent Twenty Two Percent Thirteen Percent Fifty Percent Twelve Years Six Percent Ten Percent Three Years Twelve Year
Foreign Indie Films Struggle in China

WSJ What's News

04:23 min | 3 years ago

Foreign Indie Films Struggle in China

"Independent films are having a tough time in China with US filmmakers reporting a slowdown. But it's hard to say just how much of that is due to trade. Joining me now in our studio with the details is Wall Street Journal reporter Julie were now. Julia, what are you hearing from US filmmakers about changes in China and how that's been impacting business for them overseas. There's a lot of anxiety in Hollywood right now over a number of changes that are affecting the how quickly their films are going through a massive approval process in China. We've been hearing that some independent films are seeing very long delays. One of the folks we talked to they have five films that had just stuck in regulatory hurdles in China since July of last year, which is significantly longer period of time than usual. We also have some big overhauls happening with the sort of entertainment overseers in China that have just really slowed the process and people as. With many things in China are not exactly sure why this is happening. It's it can be pretty Paik. Right. And as you noted in your piece Chinese regulators often don't give specific reasons for the changes, they make but US filmmakers are telling you that it's getting harder to do business there amid trade tensions with the US. What were you able to find out about potential reasoning? Well, one of the things that's happening. For instance, is that there's been a real crackdown on the amount of foreign content. That's allowed on these streaming services. And in China streaming services are huge. And there's a lot of folks there who maybe never even had gone had a television in the first place on a movie theater where everybody's on their phones watching a lot of content, and that's really important Hollywood all of a sudden now, they're sort of restricting how much content there can be what hours the foreign content is allowed to get into the streaming services. And that's really slowing deals for these kinds of providers and the Chinese market for foreign films is huge. That's right. I mean for furry. Some of these films that Americans are familiar with getting into China can sometimes mean, you know, doubling the amount of sales that they get for a film and within the next couple of years. China's supposed to overtake the US in terms of just the amount of revenue coming through from from ticket sales. So it's a really big market. Of course, the news over the weekend is that the US and China reached a truce when it comes to additional tariffs are US filmmakers optimistic that may help things along so one of the issues here is that China has bigger ambitions than you know, what we're hearing about in the news in terms of this trade war in these trade tariffs, and that is keeping Zayed's relatively high in Hollywood really what China wants to do is create its own Hollywood quality productions that will eventually make Hollywood irrelevant and not really important to their market. And they are starting to be able to do. That and that is happening, regardless of the trade tariffs four out of the five top grossing films this year in China are Chinese made films, and these are some pretty, you know, fun action packed films that Chinese consumers just can't get enough of. And so what Hollywood has been doing is moving toward these co-productions where you know, they might be using Chinese actors or using Chinese directors and trying to get into China that way as opposed to the traditional route of just producing a film here and sending it abroad. What else did you hear from US filmmakers, independent filmmakers about what they're doing? Amid this slowdown to help offset potential losses or how they're changing the way they do business. A lot of what's interesting is that a lot of the studios that we talked to said that they haven't really created their business models in such a way that they're dependent on China just yet because things change so rapidly their regulation, for instance, like what's happ? Inning with these streaming. Blackout period can come down at any minute. And so we were hearing terms like getting into China is a bonus, for instance, as opposed to, you know, their full on business model that said there are some studios that have major Chinese investors or and some of that money has been starting to dry up which is another concern for these studios.

China United States Hollywood Wall Street Journal Julia Reporter Julie Happ Zayed