26 Burst results for "Incheon"

"incheon" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

01:37 min | 5 months ago

"incheon" Discussed on Back To Back

"Thing like you're going to be there and i was like cool. I don't really believe you. But and so it was like a called domino's like oh you should come to this thing. Where all of your own clothing case dom sat down next to me. The guy in front of turnaround in wisconsin. And it was like i everything you're wearing and dom basically had to remove himself a situation because he was like so like louis overwhelmed and a couple of days later we both got the call. dumb drove out. He was some calabasas to work on. the same To emerge and i went on his At noon and essentially spent the entire day with him until about four him at four hours ago will flight at five. And he's like yeah. I mean like driving to the airport and it was like And so we don't driving a two thousand chevy at the ten minutes and you'll out to my car and this is what i was doing a lot of consulting so i was like literally my car like in meetings meetings today for like a two years and i never really left my car so like there's takeout boxes water models water also up to the the passenger seat so actually passing and he opens opens at the passenger side door and Dump on his driveway in bel air incheon and he starts shoveling them in the back and the most i think.

calabasas dom wisconsin louis bel air incheon
"incheon" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:29 min | 5 months ago

"incheon" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"I can't remember from incheon this a minute ago but I i wonder about like what are the natural limits on tempo. So if if you have something that is occurring at regular intervals People will can eventually start to pick that out as kind of rhythm and maybe if there are certain tonality associated with it. Most people would say okay. I think this is the sound is intended to be a kind of music. But like how slow can the repetition of of whatever that sound is get. Or how fast can it get. Before you have foreclose the possibility that anybody listening to it will think that it's supposed to be musical southbound. If you imagine a song has Has one beat per minute are would most people who hear that sound be likely to perceive that as rhythm or perceive it as music spontaneously unless they were prime to in some way i would guess probably not but like what's the limit their like how slow tempo get and consequently also. How fast can it get before you reach the point where people are not hearing music. They're just here in kind of a buzz or a were as i say. This thunder is rumbling. Right outside my window. I don't know likes picking that up. It also reminds me of the The fictional drug in the dune novels suda which Which of course you in the in the books where we're told that individuals will take some oda in order to enjoy some moody music. Which is a special kind of music that is just going to sound like just straight garbage unless you're currently using this mysterious narcotic owes it like a chopped and screwed thing i don't know but it also i think there was something similar in In a brass is get the the british satire series from chris morris in which they were people who would take this fictional drug called cake and they would listen to some sort of music and of course it likes music. It sounds like garbage unless you on this fictional drug. Have you seen the cake episode. You know. I haven't oh it's it's so good. They are actually trolled Actual british politicians into commented to commenting on the cake epidemic. Oh nice nice. What like condemning this epidemic of degenerate culture. Yes yes calling out cake in particular Nice today's episode is brought to you by american express..

incheon chris morris american express
Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:11 min | 10 months ago

Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

"Edition of the briefing with me. Andrew mueller last night for the sixth consecutive night northern ireland witnessed scenes of the kind of violence likely to prompt considerable agitation in observers with long enough memories. More than fifty. Five police officers are known to have been injured in the last week and considerable damage done to buildings and vehicles. The worst of the most recent disturbances occurred around one of these so-called peace walls which separate nationalist and loyalist communities in west belfast. The northern ireland assembly has been recalled for an emergency session at stormont today on joined with more on this by lord. Peter hain former secretary of state for northern ireland lord as you would know better than most people the good agreement did not end sectarian tension in northern ireland. There has been sporadic tension and violence over the decades since but measured against that scale. How bad is what we're seeing. Now was nothing like as you indicate the level of bombing and assassination and horror at the said. He has also troubles brought to northern ireland. Whistle the terrorism but It is serious and it needs to be addressed not just by northern ireland's leaders who displaying frankly a lack of leadership which is really disturbing but also by trade minister boris johnson and state for northern ireland who've been pretty absent from the scene in northern ireland now full quite a while and especially over this. What's your read of what's behind this because there is always the trap of reading significance which might not exist into what might just be a bunch of board young men looking for trouble. No this is that there are elements of that and they're a variety of other factors but the main problem has arisen over frustration amongst the unionist community the protestant community over the fact that there are checks and controls in for businesses doing trade. With great britain with england scotland or wales across the irish sea northern ireland of course is on an island with the republic of ireland to the cells and also within the united kingdom and within the united kingdom the rest of the united kingdom there are no barriers to trade of any kind between scotland. And or between wales and england for that matter scotland wales but they're on house result of brexit across the irish sea between england scotland and wales to northern ireland for the first time and that is the reason because the type of brexit that boris johnson. The prime minister pursued which was to break any real alignment with the european trade and customs arrangements and to go for at entirely separate of great britain but in order to make sure that the good friday peace process and the stability which has brought since ninety nine hundred was maintained. The irish border had to be kept open. Let's say the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland to itself as it has been now for decades and has become invisible with all sorts of human activity. Crossing it in their efforts not had the toxic role played a toxic role. Because it's been invisible it did in generations gone by and that's that's also the good if however that's it become the external frontier customs frontier of the european union. Then it could have ignited all those old problems that had beset and an bedeviled northern ireland. So instead what boris johnson agreed to was to keep the border open that men the northern ireland remained in the european union's customs union and it's trading markets but that's Inevitably because the united kingdom was leaving Great britain would be outside those arrangements so they have to be checks across the irish sea between northern ireland and great britain. of course. The prime minister denied this in his normal airy way At the beginning on the unionists and loyalists in particular who some of the most hardline involved feel betrayed. Because he didn't he wasn't straight with them way. Do you save in the causal connection between that dissatisfaction with the post brexit arrangements. And what we've seen in west belfast. Is it possible that there are people who are or were associated with loyalist paramilitarism. Who are leveraging that discontent to cause trouble. Yes there are and they're also criminals amongst them who drug. Traffic is and so on who've presented a police crackdown which has been quite effective in their communities to try and get rid of this drug trafficking problem and bought ignited. Not because of that so much though it's fit into it but also but primarily because suddenly loyalist protestant unionists suddenly found that Country what boris johnson told them. There are actually checks and controls strangling a lot of northern ireland businesses in a mountain of tape and naturally they see that as a break within the united kingdom because which puts northern ireland in a different place from say england scotland or wales and so they feel that their fundamental beliefs in the the union of the united kingdom northern ireland. Being within that is being threatened. And that is what ignites it. There was none of this until that issue suddenly arose around new year because the prime minister frankly say told a lot of porky's on us and didn't level with the unionist community and they suddenly found themselves in this predicament and had created Insecurity and understandable anxiety out of which these other factors criminality usa Vandalism and so on out of which that's fed you mentioned earlier a an absence of leadership both in northern ireland and in the united kingdom what would a constructive response from especially northern irish politicians. At this point look like presumably not like the one We saw her on twitter from arlene foster who went and it is a a term with which you will be familiar. Full water battery Suggesting that the violence will die quote. Take the focus off the real lawbreakers incheon. Fine that's probably not the most helpful into intercession. She could have made at this point. Is it well when you become first minister which is effective northern ireland as she is Although it's an unusual arrangement that she has joins us with the deputy minister. Michelle neil who's a shouldn't fain leader when you reach these positions you've got to speak for the whole of the community promises and president presidents naturally have their own party agendas to follow in their own party members to satisfy in any country in any democratic system. But you're trying to speak for the whole nation and that for the whole nation as well once you assume those positions and what has been disappointing about both of them and especially in recent days. Me aline fosters utterances. She's not adopted that role. She's effective acting as a party politician. A democratic unionist party rather than speaking for the whole of the the the the community across northern ireland and across the religious and political divides that have bedeviled for so many generations. And i think that's the kind of leadership we need. And we have gossips equally across the water London has been virtually silent on northern ireland. Now full rarely ever since David cameron and the conservatives came to power in two thousand ten under make this point on a on a party. Basis is a leave a politician and also it was labor secretary of state for northern ireland. A because it's traditionally been a nonpartisan issue between both the major parties. I make it. Because i'm genuinely an i've being hugely critical of the the absence of of number ten downing street of the prime minister in a way. That's attorney blend. Gordon brown were in vogue. John major's conservative prime minister before them. playing an honest broker role effectively. What they've done is said will not you know the the good friday process the peace settlement that i helped to negotiate in two thousand seven that brought the old enemies to share power together. That that's all done and dusted and therefore we can concentrate on the other pressures of government and that was fatal So we only seen a couple of sentences from the prime minister over the last few days when parts of belfast up in flames and a couple of tweets from the northern ireland secretary of state. Frankly that's not good enough. They should be convening all party. Talks in person to try and resolve these as labor shattered secretary. St louis hague has called for And they should be on the case all the time instead of effectively absence without leave as has been the case over northern ireland now sadly for a number of years lord haein. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing. Here is markle's ailing goffin. With the days of the headlines. Thanks andrew in the serum institute.

Ireland Boris Johnson United Kingdom Wales Scotland Irish Sea Andrew Mueller England Republic Of Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Assembly Peter Hain European Union's Customs Union Stormont Britain United Kingdom Northern Arlene Foster Michelle Neil European Union Great Britain
Where Estate Planning and Social Inequality Meet

Pod 4 Good

04:26 min | 11 months ago

Where Estate Planning and Social Inequality Meet

"I'm richie philanthropy. Jesse vice admiral flint pod. Chris miller and today our guests are laurel and riley carbone kern founders of tall grass estate. Planning their goal was to create a different kind of law firm when they're reaches out to people who are routinely overlooked traditional law firms or people who are hesitant to work with traditional law firms we talked to riley in laurel about social justice through estate planning the lord of the rings and why everyone needs estate planning even sar on the deceiver enjoy. We are very excited. Have riley and laurel kaduna kern from tall grass estate. Planning on the podcast today. Hello both of you view. Elo mainly grits. Thank you welcome. Mo- more popular of the two of us. I would say it's all the incheon. Listen we fight over the attention. That's always been our problem. And i relate to. That aren't i don't have to fight for our listeners. They're going to be asking this point why we are having an estate. Planning company on the podcast. So we'll start with the most basic question which is how is estate planning social justice issue. I recognize that estate. Planning sounds like feels like smells like the most untold listed whitebread topic. Anyone has ever thought about. We are as spicy as as yes manny's however we are grateful to be able to do a fair amount of pro bono low bono work and we see in that practice a number of things pop up like over and over and over again people who their grandparents great grandparents own a piece of property and then didn't know about estate planning and so now they're in a situation where like fifteen people own it To be able to like apply for grants for certain things they would need to track all of down or pay for a quiet title action. It should be something that is giving them wealth insecurity but instead it's costing them money to have this asset and if you know what state planning is if you're willing to hear about it and learn about it It can really enhanced generational wealth for for non. Just you know middle class. America or or upper class market but like literally everyone. And that's why it's so important to us to help. People understand estate. Planning is for every single person. The the misconception is that estate planning is about figuring out who gets your stuff when you die and there's a whole lot of people who look at their lives and think i don't have stuff so who cares That's that's a wrong understanding of what it is. It's really just about making sure that the right people are in control at the right times of the right things and what we see your your question about it. Being a social justice issue is that there are massive disparity in who plans for that kind of control and because all of us no matter. What our demographic Racial status religious status nationality cetera. All of us are subject to losing that control because of disability and death because of the disparity in who plans there's also a disparity generational wealth and the influence political influence financial prosperity. That come along with that so over generations you see the disparity linked to you know we think of as as a as a pretty clear as one example reinforcement of systemic racism. Disproportionately people who have large amounts of money are larger. Amounts of money are thinking about doing estate planning right. It has occurred to them. Hey i should probably do a power return. He get a trust in place right but the reason that they're doing that planning the things that they see may be happening down the down the line in their lives and being possible. Those things are possible for every single person regardless of how much you have but if you have a plan in place it's gonna affect your life and your loved ones a lot differently than if you don't have that planning in place

Jesse Vice Admiral Flint Pod Riley Carbone Kern Tall Grass Estate Laurel Kaduna Kern Riley Chris Miller Bono Richie Laurel Manny America
"incheon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"incheon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"This is how he reacts, She said. He doesn't care. She goes on to rape. She said he doesn't care about the abuse. That the employees of sea yorg get. He doesn't care about the abuse that families that are told to disconnect. He doesn't care of Incheon goes on And she says, and he doesn't care about the families of cruise. This is all for publicity. I mean, how anyone is falling for this is mind blowing. I would bet that Tom had this rant written for him and had a Scientology assistant recording. Release it. Hearing a rich actor with enormous power addresses. Crew in this way is a sign of weakness and a deeply troubled person. This is not just a rant of another a hole. She's really and she said Tom addressing his crew. This way's clear indication he's abusing his power. He thinks this is normal behavior and to a Scientologist. It is normal behavior said No one needs to be addressed by Tom, she said on a movie set. Their covert officers who monitor mass wearing cruiser separate into groups and everyone. The wardrobes have their own zone. Everyone has responds, she said. They cannot mix with others owns. The set is she goes into great detail. Their covert monitor officers assigned to every single production. There are already, sir get guidelines, she said. That my short answer to how I feel about another one of Tom's psychotic rants being exposed. I'm getting small, bleep energy from Tom. Yeah, Okay, so she is like, she said people praising him. It's just a farce. It's all of this or she is just like, and several people. That we like a reporter for the having deposed Yashar Ali and Marlo Stern for the Daily Beast. They both have covered Scientology four years and.

Tom Incheon rape Scientology Yashar Ali reporter Marlo Stern
"incheon" Discussed on What's Nexxt!!!

What's Nexxt!!!

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"incheon" Discussed on What's Nexxt!!!

"Chasse where we have. These conversations very go go go say artery just as proposed infighting rates. So what you're saying. Would you not somebody else's voice off roads. Just want to thank every ryan. I mean this is amazing. And i said what are the next steps. What's next in those are one of my hashtags has always say what's nets so i just want to thank everyone that participated and hasn't youth from New in the chat doing some things if they has questions. We didn't get to them though. Just thank everyone for actually apply tuning in will appreciate loan. Preachy guys doing amazing japan on ways as in just seeing in which he is doing thanking mortgage line. Thank you So just keep the conversation going. We have to Because they used to. Diversity is both word now you know. Stop it make the change. Stop talking about it and make the change. Green intentional about changing intentional about adding black women rag meeting in technology. Don't talk about you know the about is the wish good word have experienced are a extra night version of our. What's next A real way. Conversations with the puerto house kingston square insurgencies reaon a the partners. This week you have a goodwill sandbox approved that you guys thanks preaching gars competent foundation. Reproof incheon offsets appreciation. Who might even out The were one of his inaugural ethnic guy and most importantly the people that you're leaving water the people who am to win tonight yet. Let's watch this. Because that means that you know you can never best conversation in the world but sometimes the most important thing about it is that it needed to reach more pizza absolute recruit and listen to it again and you know oregon has so a beer off in this week's episode. We're preaching globe entrepreneurship. Who offer booth do an allowance platform sircar and happening sarah. Guessing czar was nothing less for us to sam very keen to our program tonight and she had the choice of like forty seven. Debit grads to the to our sponsors marketing. But there are some you really appreciate you guys in connection with that boom all on an figs inc. Everyone matt music music..

Chasse incheon puerto house japan sam oregon
How Trump's signature issues are backfiring with the voters he needs to win

All In with Chris Hayes

05:48 min | 1 year ago

How Trump's signature issues are backfiring with the voters he needs to win

"Are officially two weeks from the end of voting and the twenty twenty election. We don't say election to anymore because voters across the country are already mailing ballots and heading to the polls today was the first day of. Early voting in the battleground state of Wisconsin you can tell from the footage it was chilly, and yet we saw long lines at busy polling places. We're also just forty eight hours from the final big set piece event of the campaign. The last presidential debate which will go on with the rule change. The candidates microphones will be muted while their opponent gives an initial two minute answer to each topic. Of course, they made that necessary change because the president is so compulsively antisocial that he cannot abide by just the normal give and take of conversation and debate the debate. This Thursday is hugely important for president trump because when you're far down the polls as he appears to be a chance to change the trajectory. That said it is also, of course, serious risk because we saw what happened last time. I'm not here to call out his lies everybody knows he's a liar but you I. I want to make sure. I. I WanNa make your accident. Can you let them finish her now? He doesn't know how to do that T- as. You pick. It. Be Surprised. By the wrong night at the wrong times and you agreed with Sanders. Valid is no manifesto. Mr Number two just lost the left number two. You just lost the left. You agreed with Bernie Sanders on a plan. If -solutely. Forgotten. How horrible that was my God. I put it out. My Mary. Well, that did not go over. Well, not only pulling immediately show the president lost the debate. If you look at, say the five thirty polling average that first debate on September twenty ninth and trump's coronavirus diagnosis, which, of course happened just a few days. Later they're kind of an inflection point after which he loses three more points. But here's the craziest thing during the turning the debate into this unwatchable cringe inducing boorish display actually arguably helped donald trump because keeping the focus on how just outrageously unlikable the president is is better than focusing on his actual policy positions as compared to Joe. Biden because he is even further behind on the issues. I, mean keep in mind. This is a very divided country right now we know that we know that polarization pretty much rules everything around us, and so a lot of the time when you ask voters about any specific issue, the results basically converge on whether or not you like Donald Trump right? And that is why this new pulling out today from New York, times colleges so striking. They asked voters about a whole bunch of issues. Some that are major news stories right now like for instance, another covert rescue package on that the polling shows an incredible national consensus in favor of a new two trillion dollar stimulus. Now, that comes as we learned today that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told the White House not to agree we deal was speaker Nancy Pelosi out the election because he's concerned about dividing his Republican conference. Voters overwhelmingly support a mask mandate fifty, nine to thirty, nine percent after watching the president who of course discounted the masks for months and made fun of people wore them fall ill with the corona virus and spend three days in the hospital. The Obama Administration, signature, legislative achievement, the affordable care act, which, of course. Trump back. Lawsuit is attempting to destroy right now in the Spring Gordon arguments week after election day that also comes out ahead of fifty five to forty. As does Joe Biden's current platform his plan to add a public health insurance option it would auto enroll people into it if they didn't have insurance and that has a whopping sixty, seven percent of voter support again. Twenty, five percent oppose those are big big spreads then. There are the issues that are less front of mine right now or at least getting less covers the climate crisis, for example. It's not exactly the top issue among national political talkers. The moment were really either the campaigns, and that's somewhat understandable the pandemic and the resulting economic devastation and yet. When you ask voters if they think a Biden administration should invest two trillion dollars in clean energy and other ways to help reduce the effects of climate change and reduce carbon emissions by a margin of forty points. They see s forty points on these signature tent pole. Climate Plan of the behind campaign in a country polarized is remarkable. Remember in the past debates, it was very clear that both trump and pence thought that fracking was going to be one of their best issues. It was like their their secret weapon I mean they were just talking of love fracking Americans love fracking. Let's FRAC every last Frankel Incheon this fracking country and it even put Joe Biden Kamla Harrison the defensive promising over and over that they book well, we don't have a thing with we're not gonna Ban fracking everyone knows fracking obviously track. Well, when it comes down to it, it's not even true. It's a wash. Voters are evenly split on one of the trump campaign's best issues thing they think is their wedge. No the fracking debate is actually largely about one crucial state Pennsylvania, where natural gases they may traders she but guess what a majority of registered voters in Pennsylvania oppose fracking according to CBS new Newspoll over the summer. So Donald Trump's ongoing negligent malignant incompetent managing the pandemic the disastrous conditions that the country eight million people fall into poverty and trump's personal odious nece are obviously the big things driving much of this campaign.

Donald Trump President Trump Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Kamla Harrison Wisconsin Biden Pennsylvania Mr Number New York Mitch Mcconnell Obama Administration Senate Majority White House Nancy Pelosi JOE CBS
"incheon" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"incheon" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And Carlo Ko Phi news and handles going to talk more about this coming up at nine o'clock as well. Right now, let's take a look at your drive. Robin's looking at the 91. There's a crash in Corona. It's on the 91 westbound before auto center. It's actually the surface club on ramp to the 91 West. Will be blocked with an overturned trailer and gravel all over on the on ramp and also on the main lines. So what does do it on your 91 Westbound drive is slowing it down on grand. And then it's going to stay pretty heavy to Green River still have the work zone in Merrill Omagh, on the 60 west between country village and haven. Three right lanes are closed till eight with some backup from Pedley Ko Phi and this guy sponsored by injury. Attorney Superwoman super lawyer dot com. Jeff with a structure fire downtown Los Angeles L. A City l A city fires is that this is a very active Incheon. Now number one. Getting into downtown Los Angeles on the freeways is okay. Bourbon of this smoke is going over the Santa Monica Freeway, but not impacting the drive. Now, the address we were given by city fires. Ada one South Crocker, That's pretty much a thin San Pedro. We're pretty close to it. Now We're right above it, right. There's a lot of smoke coming up. So quite active like intelligence, commercial residential, But again, I don't want South Crocker. If you live or work anywhere around there, just be heads up and try and avoid that area again. Getting downtown on all the freeways not impacted right now. Kind of a normal, Dr. Injured in an accident visit. Superwoman superlawyer dot com Jeff Bark, a F I and the sky May I find this guy helps get you there faster. I'm robbing banks. Dodgers held steady against the Braves through eight innings in last night's National League Championship Series, Game one. But in the ninth,.

South Crocker Los Angeles Jeff Bark Pedley Ko Phi Carlo Ko Santa Monica Freeway Merrill Omagh Corona Robin Dodgers Incheon San Pedro Braves Green River Attorney Dr. Injured
"incheon" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"incheon" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"With Bryan Dickerson and Incheon Discotheque Inc. CEO and Magic Links, CEO and cofounder won't talk about the culture of your company's What is the culture over there Are your is still very small company founded with two of my friends from U. C. Berkeley were still living together, working out of our apartment with some of our employees. So it's a Silicon Valley. It's little but in L A. But in L. A The bigger valley in l A. I want to culture over there. Yeah, I mean, we're similarly small, right? So when you have a team of there were three people seven people, part time. Andre, You have a small team culture is important, but like you don't have much time to put it in place. But I think the main thing is we're way we know we're successful if we make the people who we work with successful, and so that's that's sort of true North as we think about culture always wonder at what point do you consider expanding and hiring new employees were actually doing that right now It's Part of it was limitations on our resource is recently brought in some more funding. So we're able to make some key hires both on the tech development side and also the operation side for us. We want to make sure that people will bring on our being optimized. To their full potential, So we want to make sure that there's just stolen a gang of people in the office. We bring them in one at a time. Make sure people are fully loaded essentially. 100% capacity before we look to bring on other people. We just want to make sure that we're leveraging our resource is our dollars. Yeah, absolutely. I kind of think it is like we have a bird. There's a burning need, And we're like, two wait to hire. Generally. That's how we've been slightly started. Mon class call girls to me. Yeah, Why didn't we think of you? And so So once that need is like so acute Then you know you need that resource and you get someone on board who want to be in front of that as much as you can, But right now, it's like we want. We want to build that traction, so that when we bring someone on board, we know there 100%. And what is the focus? What's the focus level? When you're thinking about all these things about me? You have once the next step How do you stay focused as the CEO. I think we tried where I tried to look at what our key objectives are confined, like good saying. We It's good that it is is me and my co founders for, uh, for us. The first one right now is how do we get more users and more engagement? So platform right so that we'll think about Okay, We need to add these features or these services to our trap or tow car product so way first look at what's necessary to get more users too. I gave them more. And then Lastly, we better monetize that Brian's deal and co founder of Magic Links What is exponential once you start getting people to come play with you? Yeah, I mean, we see eh, So we're all about empowering, authentic communication. So when someone on YouTube is doing that You'll see the viewership arise there. Subscribers rise and their commerce numbers rise. And so as we start to see those are the type of partnerships and we were constantly learning a marketplace. Right. So we see that we observe those patterns and we try to find those type of partners. On and bring value to them, and it is exponential as they as you see them sort of starting gracefully their their fans. It's like beyond exponential right at this point. I mean, it's We had a long conversation by the earlier I mean, just everything is taking off so much when you say no. Say no to anything. I mean, you know people started diving in and be a part of it. Yeah, it's still making sure that you have the right people on born. So if something good it is important to prioritize and know when to say no Tio wrong opportunities that would distract you keep saying yes. And someday you could say no. That's what to do, where aspiring former connected community of entrepreneurs on paddle Bryant CEO A roundtable Bryan Dickerson in Chen. Um, what's next? Yeah. I mean, I kind of constantly pushing boundaries, right? So like a CEO, How do you think about what's next? How do you know what to do? I agree. Like a lot of times. You don't know. But you're trying to take in signals from the market. You're listening to your partners and your customers on Greely trying to listen and understand, Teo. What's there burning? Need? Because I think if you can solve that burning need and then give Koby bold and just try to do it and do it with your hair on fire, then hopefully successful follow, you know, you know which to use. Facebook, live our YouTube or what? I am. What outlet to go These days. We initially went with Facebook mobile ads because it allowed us to be very targeted. We started off in only one city, so we really wanted to focus our marketing. On the Los Angeles customer for us now, we found that The pain marking is still working. But we're really relying on word of mouth and organic growth, which is the best way is the most efficient was word of mouth work on the Internet. People posting about events are about the app on social media writing great reviews for us, but really, it's when someone for discotheque specifically it's when someone wants to go out and Knowing I was a social activity. They tell their friends. Hey, used discotheque, Teo Get on by this ticket to get on this guest list because you want your friends to go with you together, and everyone likes to say money and skip lines. Size. Wonder where all these hallways people get into these clubs. That's you, right? Hey, did you know that it's going to be this guy? Get it? It's going to be us moving forward. In the past. It was all about knowing individual third party promoters, human middlemen who have limited contract with different venues and having toe call them find them Texas to get in and For us..

CEO Bryan Dickerson Facebook Incheon Discotheque Inc YouTube Magic Links Andre us U. C. Berkeley Los Angeles Texas Koby Teo Greely Brian co founder
"incheon" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"incheon" Discussed on WJR 760

"Flavor, But you wanna have the same. Size steak, because if you do that they all cook at the same rate they are going to grow at the same time and again the cool thing about the weather connected because of the airport and has four probes on it. You can actually have some people like there's medium. Some people like a medium rare You control the stakes differently. And it told you want to take certain steaks off it Certain done. This isn't so everybody gets the exact same temperature correctly. Oh, that's fantastic. Yes, we look Att cooking a perfect steak. My perfect steak is about an inch and 1/4 stick. Incheon accords were gonna have Because I know I don't need to reverse irrigating. I have two roasted first serious second. I could just put that directly on the great about 450 degrees for 500 agrees. I don't mean heated. I haven't because something that gets bigger, the temperatures have to come down. Because of the steak is so thick the energy can't penetrate into it fast enough. The outside burns and the inside gets undercooked. Right? So I like that 155 100 agree grill. And in accordance and 1/2 I slip it about 4.5 minute mark to the other side. You know it steers itself off. You want to get slick. You can rotate the steak 90 degrees at about the two minute mark, and that's going to create those beautiful diamonds. And, you know, I like to see them mind about three hours before him in a Coke, and that's important because you get the salt Salt water on a molecular level will be the only thing that penetrate into a steak and some wine. Get some salt on the steak. It's gonna draw itself.

Incheon
"incheon" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"incheon" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Brings out flavor, But you wanna have the same Size steak, because if you do that they all cook at the same rate Valderrama grow at the same time and again the cool thing about the weather connected because of the airport and has four probes on it. You can actually have him. Some people like there's medium. Some people like a medium rare You control the stakes differently. And it told you want to take certain steaks off it Certain done. This isn't so everybody gets the exact same temperature correctly. Oh, that's fantastic. Yes. So you look a cooking a perfect steak. My perfect steak is about an inch and 1/4 stick. Incheon Accord to attention in half. Because I know I don't need to reverse irrigating. I have two roasted first and second. I could just put that directly on the great about 450 degrees for 500 degrees. I don't need his high haven't because something that gets bigger, the temperatures have to come down. Because of the steak is so thick, the energy can't penetrate into it fast enough. The outside burns and the inside gets undercooked. Right, so I like that 455 degree grill. And in accordance and 1/2. I slip it about the 4.5 minute mark to the other side. You know, it's Sears itself off. You want to get slick. You can rotate the steak 90 degrees at about the two minute mark, and that's going to create those beautiful diamonds. And, you know, I like to season mind about three hours before him in a Coke, and that's important because you get the salt Salt water on a molecular level will be the only thing that kind of training to a stake. And so if I get some salt on the steak, it's gonna draw itself.

Valderrama Sears Incheon
Coronavirus cases surge in more than half of the US

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus cases surge in more than half of the US

"COVERT 19 cases They're spiking in some 30 states, including Florida in Arizona, where Governor Doug Ducey says he's putting the state on pause. Incheon. All 15 of our county's it's growing, and it's growing fast across all age groups and demographics on ABC. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is blaming the Trump administration. Instead of what the administration did deny DeLay death. It's time for this administration to take this seriously. Health and human Services Secretary Alex is our tells NBC, a county by county issue so getting in there And getting to the bottom of why we're seeing cases surging. And then in addition to the traditional contact tracing what we're doing now is we've got a test entire communities the Corona virus death toll in the US it's over 125,000 the highest globally by

Governor Doug Ducey Incheon Nancy Pelosi Alex ABC United States Secretary Florida Arizona
AYURVEDA: The ancient Science of Self Healing and practical spirituality in the post covid-19 era with Acharya Shunya

My Seven Chakras

05:15 min | 1 year ago

AYURVEDA: The ancient Science of Self Healing and practical spirituality in the post covid-19 era with Acharya Shunya

"What's up action, tribe, heroes, hose and founder of my seven Jucker as my seven chocolate dot com, the shore we help you expedients, effortless healing, awakening and abundance in today's episode we talk about some really powerful and embroidered topics, including what roared as I read a play in healing, the true nature of self, the importance of cleansing, and so much more, but before that I'd like to remind you that I have recently released a twenty four page pdf outlining some of my favorite ways to raise my web rations and fien better almost immediately to get your free pdf was my. Joker does DOT COM forward slash? Feel better now. That's my seven juxtapose dot com follow today's feel better now all right, so let's bring on our special guest today. Who happens to be our second dime? Guest Ajaria Shuna so a CIA is a globally recognized spiritual leader and Wittig Lineage Order, who awakens health and consciousness through thick sciences of Ira Way Danta and Yoga, and she's a driving force behind noble and online, nor for profit wisdom, school and worldwide spiritual community, and the author of the bestselling book on the Reading Art of mind, body and soul, wellbeing and health I iradar lifestyle, wisdom, and forthcoming second book with sounds drew of Italy's in two thousand and twenty sovereign self so a Ajaria welcome once again. Are you ready to inspire I? Am Ready to inspire and thank you for inviting me back. I really enjoyed our conversation last time create. I did as well. And, so to begin our session today to begin our conversation today. What is your favorite or that? One Inspirational Court that is on your mind these days, and how you are of applying it in your in your life I'm really been condom leading on our food for word, Sanskrit statement by a teacher of non-relative duality from India Shankar up, and he had said them Jagan Michio which it really means is that. Everything I see is a lower order of reality and the theater in me is of a higher order of reality, and that is allowing me to be more within and give less importance to what's going on without me if you know what I mean. Wonderful thanks a lot for shedding BRAHMA MUSSET SUTTON JAN meteorite. Yes, which means that what you see around you? That is allusively at his transient at his changing. What is done is your true self, your eternal self, and that is something that you have to discover for yourself and then, but there are things that you can do to help you and facilitate that process. Of discovering their sovereign cells, and that's what we're going to talk about today so a Ajaria. What is a you're either? Because there's so many definitions right, there are so many connotations I grew up in India so I have a certain view of Irish. You studied Iowa and learn from the masters all your life. So, what is your understanding or your definition of I read? The description of IRA denial weight is or in the sketches. These, are you show V? The High Veda which means the Veda Veda means the knowledge off life is. And so I was a teaching from the ancients years, if India, which happily were men and women known as we. She's into Shaka's. was really a putting together a lot of wisdom. That connects SAS to life to the source of life. Rich may be make on Rana, or you know soul or consciousness ultimately, and how does it play out in the different containers of life, which is the body, the senses, the mind, the, and even the soul, which is really an Ospent of that super consciousness, a carrier of that universal consciousness, and so therefore I another at the Incheon sages who? Who gave us? Yoga will give us meditation. They also give Messiah that today. More and more people call it holistic medicine, which is totally fine, because it's way more holistic than any other medicine that I haven't gone to. At least or at least it's compatible to a lot of holistic ancient traditions from the word, it's no way behind it and be discreet. Discuss some of that in our previous. Discussion, but to. I would say that it's spiritual. Medicine is spirits medicine. That's why in India. Sometimes they call it. It's God's own medicine. And they ancient does Aj may have these celestial healers known as the Ashini Chimeras these are these twin brothers who care of the all the medical needs of the gods, and they are said to be the first I obey. The doctors apparant the living today in the heavens, so I love all these connections of spirituality.

Jagan Michio Ira Way Danta India Dot Com Ajaria CIA Founder Ajaria Shuna IRA India Shankar AJ Iowa Inspirational Court Yoga Rich Italy Rana
"incheon" Discussed on Our Different Take

Our Different Take

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"incheon" Discussed on Our Different Take

"I'm going all the way up. I'll probably do look at all chickens from. Patriot only. Incheon Correcting Fair. That's cool. That's cool. I think we have a subject for another podcast for sure. Why would be I mean? All right now, a word from our sponsor. I would like to introduce you to our new sponsor. True Vision held true vision supplies some of the best health and wellness products you will find. Two of the most popular products are the true fix and true control combination. True. Fix Reduces appetite block shirt cravings boasts energy and bust visceral fat. While true control, correct your blood chemistry, cleanse your liver fights bad cholesterol and strengthens lean muscle. What else could you want? This is a great product. So if you're interested visit our website at are different take dot com, go to the sponsor page and click on the link for more INFO. You won't be disappointed. That's our new sponsor. Yeah. Yep I'm glad they're part of our podcast. So yeah, go to our website. Click on the link engaged some good stuff. Good stuff. Technical difficulties. Here we go. and. Now it's time for ask meant he's.

Incheon
"incheon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Camera flash ball pops and paper is taken away his sentence was eventually commuted largely for political reasons but he and most of its troops were found guilty this is what justice looked like for the male many massacre but what about the massacre Incheon known Americans killed a similar number of German troops there no trials for the Americans no prosecutions and certainly no death sentences but there was a call for an investigation one that if you know anything about it's all inside it declassified finally got one stilled with confidential reports from just after the war including one about should known a soldier named Max Cohen described seeing roughly seventy German prisoners machine gun by the eleventh armored then there was a back and forth general Dwight D. Eisenhower demanded a full investigation the eleventh armored said they sent it Eisenhower's office said we don't have it send it again then the eleventh armored basically said it's too late the war's over the unit's disbanded in the end Eisenhower never received any investigation into two known I wanted to show all this to bend friends the Nuremberg prosecutor okay so this is a confidential report he is not this one it's sitting on his couch in Florida I ask been what he makes of it.

Max Cohen Dwight D. Eisenhower Florida Incheon prosecutor
Why Are Some Words 'Bad'?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

10:47 min | 2 years ago

Why Are Some Words 'Bad'?

"We're talking about that words specifically bad words for the adults listening. Don't turn this down. I promise we won't actually say any swears cuss curse words. Potty talk however you characterize this kind of language in your family now some of you listening might not really know any bad words and that's great but but then again maybe you have heard an adult around you say a word and then ask you not to repeat it or maybe you've heard another kid say a bad word. Maybe even some of you have said one of those bad words yourself and perhaps you've gotten in trouble for it. You have sent us questions about why these words exist and why they're often so powerful and we thought these questions deserved their own episode because it's important to be able to talk about the things that are confusing or hard and even the things that make us or our adults uncomfortable. Here's who we found to guide us in this conversation. My name is Ben. Bergen and and I'm a professor at the University of California San Diego and I steady language and the brain whenever we speak. It's because of signals that are sent from our brain whenever we understand words. It's because the signals that go into our ears and into our eyes get connected in our brain and our brain allows us to. I understand how meaning works allows us to convey messages and it's the really smart control system at the middle of our bodies professor. Bergen has also written a book all about bad words has a cheeky title. But the subtitle is what swearing reveals about our language our brains and ourselves so he has spent a lot of time studying bad words why we use them and how we use them and what's going on in in our brains. When we say bad words I became really interested in swearing when I became apparent so I have two kids who were five into into and when my son was born all of a sudden I realized that I used some strong language as an adult that I I felt a little uncomfortable with around this new child and I wanted to understand more about how that strong language worked? Does it cause harm two children to hear it. Why do we use it? Why does it feel so powerful and so I started doing some research? Does it cause harm to children to hear or use bad language. Guage as far as we can tell there's no particular harm that it causes two children so children here lots of words and they find them Some of them exciting. They find some of them boring. They find some of them intriguing interesting because maybe they provoke interesting reactions. Sion's and the people around them but for the most part the words themselves don't cause any harm the the thing it does cause harm we know is when people talk to children in ways that make them feel bad about themselves so telling children that they a worthless telling children that they're bad or threatening children. We know that that can cause harm but it doesn't matter so much which words you use. What matters is the message that you're conveying Well I hope we can get into a little bit more of that but let's start with some of the questions that we have from our a young listeners because it will probably not surprise the kids who are listening and it will definitely not surprise any adults who are listening that we have a lot of questions from kids about bad words and why people use them and why kids can't use them so let's start with Daschle. Hello My name is Anne from North Carolina and my question is why are some bad bad word were some words bad in wind. Wise the Middle Finger bad my name is Logan in Iowa from Omaha and my question is why are some words bad. Why are some words bad? That's a great question. It's very hard to give a single answer because for each word there's a different history. Three words come into a language over the course of many many many years and centuries and they change and so the way that a word is used at one time may change over the course of generations of people who use that word words. In general that are considered bad tend to come from particular places they tend to relate to part of our lives that we don't like talking about about in public and in particular they tend to relate to experiences of like bathroom functions. So things that you we do in a bathroom or too religious ideas. Sometimes they relate to other groups of people that we have negative feelings about those those words. Over time they evolved they change so that not only do people not want to talk about those things but they don't even want to say those words or hear those particular particular words. What about the Middle Finger? I know you study words but do you have a sense of white gestures. Things that you do with your body could also be considered batter those connected to the words so the Middle Finger has a very long history. It's been used in the same way that we use it now for at least two thousand years. We know that the ancient Incheon Greeks used it the ancient Romans used it and it was very similar to what it is now. We think that it might might have originally been used to represent a penis and That just as we don't like to show private parts in public look in the same way. We don't like to show demonstrations of what private parts might look like in public but over the course of time. It's just become a general term or general gesture that is used to denigrate people or to show dislike for people. The middle finger isn't universal. Though in lots of other cultures there are different gestures that mean similar things and in some places in the world. The Middle Finger doesn't mean what it means here you at all. That's so interesting because I think a lot of people will understand that to be true. That may be something that is not a such a bad word in your family family or in your culture can be really bad or have a totally different meaning in somebody else's family or somebody else's culture and Ben even the things that you were talking talking about like Bathroom humor some families are okay with that and some families aren't and there. Are Maybe things that we say at home. That are okay that we wouldn't say at school. Aw So it's interesting to think about the fact that words don't have a universal bad meaning or a universal bad sense to them or a good sense to them. Yes the the words that we think are bad. We think are bad because we learned that they are bad. We were told that by our parents wants or we noticed that they were bleeped out when we're listening to music or maybe we were even punished for using them. That's how we learned that those particular words are bad but as you say it may differ from family to family. I know that there are families that my children go to school with who have very different rules at home. About what words they can say and what words they can't say and certainly across time the words that we think are bad words now were not bad Edwards one hundred or two hundred years ago and they won't be bad words in the future either are their historical bad words. That don't really have any meaning now. So they're more just kind of fun but that were really bad way back two hundred years ago. Sure there's a whole history of words that used to be really strong bad words but people have totally totally forgotten about one of them is zounds downs zones yeah that's a good one or Gad. Souks Gad's oops it was bad get dukes was really bad. It was religious term. It comes from God's hooks and it's meant to refer to to the Stigmata of Jesus on the Cross There's another one that I don't think anyone knows about any more. But that was the F. Word back in Shakespeare's Day. We have another question from Merrin. I am nine years old. I live in Evansville Indiana. My question is is. Why aren't kids allowed to say bad words or cuss words? Why aren't kids allowed to say bad? Words cuss words. That's a great question. Some kids are in some circumstances. So it's important to remember that social rules change depending on who you you are and where you are and who's around you so it's certainly true that in certain places people are expected not to use bad words so for example in a classroom where they're adults around or with particular adults may be in your home. Those are places where there's as an expectation that people will talk in a certain way and in our culture at this time we've decided that those words are not appropriate for for those circumstances. It's kind of like you know when you need to use the bathroom. There's a particular sites that you use the bathroom and lots of other places that you don't. That's just how our society works but there are certain places and certain times where kids can use strong words in particular where there aren't people around who feel that it's inappropriate so when kids are just around other kids and a everyone is comfortable and making sure that they're keeping each other's Feeling in safe. Then it's okay for those kids to use those words in some families at home. It's okay for kids to use strong words so so it all it all depends. I would also add that. One of the jobs of the adults in your life is to try to teach you what's acceptable and what's not and how your behaviors you and your language affect you and other people and what the consequences are of how you behave. And then when you're an adult you have more freedom to make choices for yourself about what kind words you're going to use but those choices will be based on what you've learned from the adults in your life from all of the people around you

BEN Bergen Professor University Of California San D North Carolina Daschle Zounds Downs Sion Evansville Logan Merrin Edwards Indiana Omaha Shakespeare Iowa Two Hundred Years Two Thousand Years Nine Years
"incheon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Works for voice and drone the same drone in fact the hurdy gurdy that is an excerpt from Brian alliance contemporary British composer in a piece called song for soprano when hurdy gurdy based on the song of Solomon and performed by members of the short lived English group red bird back in the nineteen nineties prior to that we went back to the twelfth century for music from Hildegard of Bingen the German abbess and composer preschool very CV Takase performed by members of the group sequentially a and this combination of voice and drone takes us next to medieval Scandinavia the record is called ice and longboats ancient music of Scandinavia and there was a fair amount of musical detective work that had to be done in the making of this record once you get past the the Latin stage you get into Old Norse songs and there's you know there's no written notation for the music or anything like that but we are into the Latin period with this piece called looks it looks it will hear the ensemble ball to come performing on this record called Aisin longboats Incheon music of Scandinavia and and that is music from.

Solomon Scandinavia Aisin longboats Incheon
"incheon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"You a few sources of the Central Energy Peters Turkey any time I distancing started really. I went to the most coaching absolutely Louis interest as much as we. The birds situation which percents interest to put stress on still the argument. Take a few take a look. It also has arms take care the over the team of support in his team. The situation it took the forty four the rich regular tasty in your easy to feed in the central it contract fifteen sec the Kuenssberg I total points to twenty take more initiative which is exciting. They include preceding increase work in terms of trends at this point four the Department of Agriculture. It took twenty the eight the intro in the report. It took steady slightly lower nate in March first in March could in December one. aww At some point forty fifty people. The quarter inch means down take the MIC report in many technical working thirty eight second. The Bird feeders the way to think of sixty the sixty seven cents tapping you for this morning with equally birthday waited. Take twenty hours tonight. Lingering for fun state overnight reports of Incheon circumstance today five seven hundred captured yesterday. Were most of the fifty s to low sixties the overnight the hours with Dr Daytime highs will be epic system over the next twenty four hours. A moving next precipitated expecting specifically in this coming up early for mostly from that system will be at number thirty is expecting in the fifties and you want the first half of next week excited cycles lifted principal with reading elsewhere.

Incheon Department of Agriculture
Both Men and Women Must Prepare Their Body Well in Advance If They Want Children

Babes and Babies

07:50 min | 2 years ago

Both Men and Women Must Prepare Their Body Well in Advance If They Want Children

"I am a full time working mom of girl after battling endometriosis for many years I wasn't even sure if I could have children my name is Theresa Theresa and I know hey everyone welcome back to the miraculous Mama's podcast podcast I'm your host Elizabeth Joy and if you're joining us for the first time welcome we are a podcast that believes in empowering women through storytelling an education in we're so glad that you are here we have an awesome episode for you guys today but before we hop into that I have a couple of snippets to share with you I know a lot of people are doing or looking to go that route in some people's insurance covers it a lot a lot of people don't and it can be a super expensive thing to invest in but I've heard from a few of our listeners that if you you order the drugs from Europe it's actually fifty percent cheaper I thought that was very interesting and kind of cool because the pharmaceuticals in the United States states are just highly outrageously priced. I know you can get diabetic medication from Canada for like ninety percent cheaper than here but yeah yeah you can order. IVF drugs from Europe I know somebody who actually flew there for the treatments and then somebody who ordered their medications from there and I thought that was super interesting so if that's a route that union spouse really want to go but you haven't been able to afford it or didn't think that it was an option because your insurance doesn't cover it and it's super expensive expensive maybe do some research and look into that because there might be an option therefore you also I am going to to be finally starting video series on trying to conceive an preparing your body for pregnancy it's been man I feel like it's been and five months for me so far of getting in a healthy head space but also preparing physically I did the hormone testing with Dr Patrick Flynn and I found out that I'm at risk for breast cancer my hormones are off found out that I had a parasite in my guts and that I had these food allergies I wasn't aware of that were kind of making everything harder it was making my hormones like it was making it harder for them to balance out because the strain and inflammation in my gut in the same with the parasite so it's kind of all interconnected and so many people I think it's hey like I'm ready to get pregnant now and we're just going to start trying but I would encourage you to look into the things that affect your hormones look into you preparing your body and starting to take a good prenatal and supplements and eating the right foods beforehand because there is just so much that goes into that but not only for you but for your spouse is well there's tons of research out there now that shows when men drink when men drink a lot while they're trying trying to conceive your baby has a forty four percent chance increase of being born with a congenital heart defect and if they're smoking and increases your chances of miscarriage miscarriage and even heart disease and stuff like that leader on in life so there's tons of research out there and I feel I feel like we've been misled we've been told like Oh when you're ready to get pregnant just start having unprotected sex and that's just really not the case even even when it comes to birth control like you think you can just get off birth control get pregnant but it takes the average woman who has been on birth control eight to eighteen months to get pregnant depending on why she got on birth control if she got on just to practice safe sex or just practice pregnancy prevention Incheon that's one thing but if you got on birth control because you were having heavy periods or they were irregular or anything like that that's covering a symptom up that your body's trying trying to tell you so getting off the pill that's going to come back and sometimes it takes your body a while to start to oscillate again so it's not even necessarily eighteen months it's eight cycles of actually ovulating in having a normal cycle after birth control I'm so excited 'cause we're going to be having a couple of episodes in the next month month addressing these issues which I'm super passionate about and I'm really getting into because I just feel like why why are we being told oldest information like widened somebody teach us that when you go on and get pregnant there's steps to take toward it at one of my favorite comparisons is like you wouldn't go route and run a marathon without training in the same is true for pregnancy you'd need to train beforehand you need to set certain habits in you need to get your body prepared to provide vital nutrients there's actually a seventy year long study happening I believe it's in Ghana about this community where babies born in certain seasons are much healthier than babies born and others and the reason is if they conceive in the rainy any season the mothers are eating a diet of rich leafy green vegetables and getting tons of vital nutrients and that affects the development of your baby in the first week after conception it's so crazy I encourage you to check out the documentary the nine months that made you it's so fascinating that tells you step by stop what's happening and what's affecting that but the babies that were conceived in the dry season those foods weren't around and they're born with out the ability to fight infections as well as the babies who were their mothers were eating dark leafy Greens in getting those really good supplements and nutrition so it's it's so crazy because it's things that you don't think about and of course there's Times where you were on birth control forever and you've got off and got pregnant the first month or you weren't necessarily trying and you got pregnant pregnant nearly Oh crap I was on vacation drinking eating whatever I want and it's like but our bodies are also in place to protect that baby and to nourish rush them our bodies when you conceive put your baby I so that's also true of so many people I know and and that's also what this information is for or it's never to look back and feel guilty or ashamed of anything it's only to take that information and to look forward and to say okay are we having having another baby how can I prepare my body how can I provide the best vessel for my child what is my partner's role in that how can he help because you think about it the woman you give up drinking and hopefully smoking and other habits for nine months while you're creating this life in your breastfeeding and men don't have to do any of that but studies are showing now they do so it's not that much of a sacrifice to ask your partner are to stop drinking and smoking six months before you start trying to conceive because sperm cycle is ninety days so and that even if they do you sperm analysis or get checked in it says oh they have enough sperm or whatever it's not telling you the health of the sperm it's not telling you the quality of that which our bodies are super super smart and don't want to accept the sperm that isn't as healthy and wing our bodies reject the ones that are miss shape door have a bad morphology sell our bodies are here to protect us and so there's so many different things go into

Europe Theresa Theresa Canada United States Elizabeth Joy Eighteen Months Nine Months Forty Four Percent Ninety Percent Fifty Percent Seventy Year Five Months Ninety Days Six Months
"incheon" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"We'll have more on the game with the elected or not coming up with that Hey if if you're not here that sound yet you probably will be pretty soon moisture from two passing tropical storms in a Pacific low pressure system could mean a whole lot of rain in the valley today the primary threat gonna be look like rain three that morning with his arms afternoon and early evening the primary it's going to be damaging winds and large hail and even real out. week isolated we trade or to do yeah tornado that salary hopper with the National Weather Service let's bring in our he TA our senior news reporter Jim cross here to talk about this has been watching the weather here since the nineties you your your messaging everybody in Arizona's morning news yesterday and actually on Saturdays well updates all through the weekend but to me the most telling morning Jim I got from you is that something you said to me when I walked in this morning you put out sandbags at your house and when Jim Ross puts out sandbags is like pay attention it's rare yeah I've only had it a couple of times last twenty years but the storms got some potential I mean it really has some serious potential we have some folks already couldn't wait a little bit specially in the northeast valley but there isn't there some scattered showers and lots of places when a re expecting to get the heavy stuff well it's the brunt of it's expected the Safran I mean some places are going to see rain this morning they are mainly the east valley my will to carry a maybe around South Mountain tortilla flat canyon lake Maricopa the heavy stuff is coming in this afternoon it looks like tonight is going to be one or maybe the most concern I think they're concerned about all of that tonight they're expecting winds of sixty miles an hour. ale Incheon diameter more more each some rainfall rates possible anshan hour or more and the thing I got my attention this morning was that could spawn a couple of weeks tornadoes all yeah it's it's like a monsoon storm on steroids yeah that's not good you any starter on the T. word around now and leave we haven't had anything for what three months almost next to nothing yeah least at sky harbor and most of the valley and now the size do something in the closing stages now of course it was fueled by in part by hurricane course at the Pacific front coming across too yeah so last time I checked we were almost an inch and a half below average is that right Jim somewhere in the neighborhood actually were very close to two now wow okay so yeah we we don't want to make it all up in one day now but it's very possible we could I mean if it hits the right spot sky harbor I mean it it could probably easily erase it so really the take away on this storm is be prepared especially for the afternoon commute it's just might take you a long time and then you know there's a lot of people have no idea how to drive in the rain and again like we have to remind everybody every time we have a storm maybe not of this magnitude but.

three months twenty years one day
"incheon" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"We'll have in one of them New Mexico girl make movies is in phenomenal program, and then Flamenco dancer, extraordinaire, EMMY, grandma, AMI will be here at three thirty find out what she's been talking about somebody that can't stay put their can't stay put. All right, doctor. The book is amazing. And so I would imagine the the signing and the reading on Sunday, you'll you'll read Bill you'll talk about your experiences, and and to Acuna, and they'll be Nevo chanting in the background is people come in. And I can chant to bears a prayer song. I if people wanted I can. I can channel like a medicine man song and. Do it now. Okay. And then I'll show hypnotize people. They might run up the roads. We don't want that instantaneous healing. L show slides color slides of the time on the rest. Okay. Your life out in at Incheon Lear out in the middle of nowhere. A lot of this. And I mean, this is a lot of the issue of practicing medicine any kind of healing. I'm sure it's the same. Same problem to medicine men have had for from Linnea is how to get to the patients. How how do they get to you? I mean, you know, horses slow and walking slower the occasional cars to did you try and set up a clinic or mostly it was I'm gonna go out. And I'm going to meet people where they are actually a schoolteacher teaching. And then I came back. Many years later is a medical doctor to serve the Navajo people in Cuba, New Mexico. And so it was inter clinic Yuban establish clinic. Family almost moved to Cuba, the nineteen sixties. But it was Cuba the island. I thought we were moving to Cuba, New Mexico, and I cried for.

Cuba New Mexico inter clinic Yuban Acuna Incheon Lear Linnea Bill Nevo
"incheon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Culture. Logo would say the name of the people sons and daughters of yet right from Incheon to the modern India sivy have forgotten history. The great beats that people have my host rotten Sharda is one of five million RSS volunteers. They march. And salute a Safran orange flag. The color of robes foreign by Hindu monks. But they do more than morning calisthenics. The has also runs summer camps where cadets trained with rifles and bamboo batons. It goes back to nineteen twenty five when India was still ruled by the British Mohandas Gandhi was agitating for independence, a doctor named Katia head give our broke with the pacifist Gandhi. And founded the RSS where Gandhi preached nonviolence, the RSS emphasized military discipline and Hindu scripture. This is the most the house we out of the lease where his was started seven people, please it it started with seventeen men in the founders living room says are assess member Samir Goethem gives me a tour the house in the central Indian city of nog poor is now a museum. So this is a visitors book. Right. People from all over India. The Newseum leaves out some parts of our history though, like how the group initially opposed. The idea of a secular Indian constitution and called Christians and Muslims internal threats to India. One of the most famous are assess members was not on good say better known as Ghandi's.

Mohandas Gandhi India Incheon Samir Goethem Ghandi Katia head nog
"incheon" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on Triangulation

"If like the millennial generation they are not that are at at either women not better at that of these old bits of that's the problem because we don't we don't know we we're not blind to our own blindness. We don't realize that that that lease these mutations exist as if you design a product for someone else to us you have to take that into account. Off for these people. Don't talk about all that talk about emotion. Anybody in this is more fuzzy because we'd onto spend less, well, how this works. But I give away what we do understand from it. And I give some examples of what we mean for making games than making games, and we're engaging and fun. But I always like warn people like be careful. I mean, it's still I mean, this is not a recipe. These are ingredients that you can use and to make up your own a successful recipe for making games or any anything else that you produce as going to be used by human and humans interacting with it. So it seems like part of what you do in a applying cognitive science to video game design is perhaps to acknowledge that we're blind to our own blindness is, but in part to keep us that way by designing things in that make us believe a we are good. Multi-taskers even though your giving us Hinson clues that help us multitask during the game. Do you agree at the example, like to use the magician's magician snow, very, well, limitations? So our brain in terms of perception as Incheon memory, they use misdirection of attention to make you look here in they do something else, you're on you, don't see it. This is held the magic operates. So this is really what it is. If you want to make some magic heaven in in a video game has to be kind of magical because you have to guide players through out sometimes very complex games where Lilith systems, and they have to learn a lot of stuff that you don't want to overwhelm them. But you won't you don't also want to make them feel that they're, you know, being tutorial is in and they have to do one thing after the other because that's boring. So you have to find the perfect balance to make the magic operate. So you can guide players without them really feeling. Their guide us. So they feel that they are figuring stuff stuff out all by themselves, and is really just like magic when the magician just makes you feel that something's levitating or that the card is changing is just looks magic. Although you knew that there's a trick. But you you fail to perceive. It. Do you feel it gamers are in on the trick? Or they're being tricked somewhat by you know, or does it vary based on the situation? It's not. I mean, it's it's the if she used the term being tricked at age, it feels like you're you're being many related in a bad way out the promise that people don't necessarily understand that any design is going to influence you to do some things or some other thing if something as simple as seeing a handle on the door is influencing you to grab this handle pool the door and sometimes action needed to push the door by the design in influencing a to act in a certain way, because you you you Haas other things are working. And so this is how it works in games. We have to understand the codes. And how people are gonna owner stand signs in in feedback in. The game through that. They're gonna be influenced in and t do a certain action in. We just wanna make sure that vacant understand intuitively the design. It's more about it. You know, as any anything that you're using software new night. All the software is as horrible as I don't anything's not intuitive at all. It's the same thing with what we're trying to do with games. We just trying it's not about tricking blazes about making sure that everything's gonna feeling twitted. And there's not gonna be any frustration for them when they interact with the game that are gnawed by design. There are going to be so noth- frustrations..

Incheon tricking Lilith systems Hinson Haas
"incheon" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

06:23 min | 3 years ago

"incheon" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"We this before. I'm not so. Not so. Sorry that I'm here. Ms so cute. It was a nine Incheon. Sorry. You. No. This is his only get off radio Robin lands production stock. Tune. Down these. Inside. To me. No. Whole clo. Don't don't patron. Cusack. If you..

Incheon Cusack
 Does Monsanto's Roundup cause cancer? Trial highlights the difficulty of proving a link

The Science Hour

03:57 min | 3 years ago

Does Monsanto's Roundup cause cancer? Trial highlights the difficulty of proving a link

"For much of the time since the active ingredient glyphosate came into use in the nineteen seventies have been kinds of arguments about whether. Or not. Actually Cosma genyk research. A lot of it funded by Monsanto suggested it isn't the US Environmental Protection Agency says that glyphosate has low toxicity for humans. Then the European Food Safety authority agrees. But the international agency for research on cancer has described the chemical as a probable Costner gem. So you can see what a confusing picture. This is all these agencies with different views. So the California jury last week, it really had quite a job trying to balance all that conflicting evidence say, why is it so hard to say for sure that something like lifesaving definitely causes cancer or definitely doesn't cause cancer. Now, this is the problem of operational, epidemiology as road in peace has been hearing from Richard Burks Stevens of the university of Connecticut who has worked on IRC panels and these looked at a whole load of evidence. We cannot do experiments and people for anything that might cause harm obvious. Really. And so we have to observe -ation Lebanon Biaggi, but observations me be Andrea can be very persuasive on very strong cigarette smoking and lung cancer is the best known. Example of that. The problem about epidemiology though is it's actually very easy to do a badly. There are so many ways bias and confounding and other problems can slip into a study. So international agency for searching cancer bites these panels of experts, it's a widely divergent group and they go through each of the studies, whether it's Yep, Biaggi that talks collagen and really get into the methods. They wanna know how is this study done is credible estimate of the potential hazard uninteresting secrecy a RC determined that glyphosate. I think the wood was a potential costs in Incheon Lee. That's not the case with smoking where a huge amounts of evidence was built up by looking at what happened to smokers. Yes, smoking took decades. Because the big tobacco intimidated the rest of scientists by saying that association has not causation because there's never been around my trial smoking and smoking rats do not get lung cancer. Then we finally realized that this observational evidence, it's a matter of the jury deciding and the jury is often an expert panel of scientists. In this case, the allergy is there's no other viable explanation for these results than cause and effect. Now, smoking is a class one carcinogen according to the IRC. It is a cancer hazard to humans. Glysophate was labelled a to a a probable, human carcinogen. What that means is that there is credible evidence, but it is not beyond a reasonable doubt. Is it a question of doing continued studies? Is it trying to find more people who've been using something like roundup to be able to say, maybe there is an excessive cancers. They're all. All that clever ways of trying to work out if that's a connection. Well, the important point here is that the poison is in the dose and we add things to our food supply like iron iron causes cancer in rats if you give enough iron to rats. So it's a matter of cost benefit round up as a very popular product. It serves a real purpose and it's a benefit a lot of people, but it contains chemical called Guifa Sade, which may increase the risk of cancer and the i. r. c. does not address risk. It only says that insufficient quantity, this agent could cause cancer in a human. So the risk has to be dependent on where the product is dues, how it's used. And those are the things that go into risk assessment.

Lung Cancer Environmental Protection Agenc Glyphosate Monsanto Lebanon Biaggi European Food Safety Authority Barry Marshall Incheon Lee Richard Burks Stevens California Alzheimer Costner Glysophate University Of Connecticut Europe European Food Safety Guifa Sade Andrea
From laboratory in far west, China's surveillance state spreads quietly

WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

02:20 min | 3 years ago

From laboratory in far west, China's surveillance state spreads quietly

China Hugo Restall Xinjiang Marco Rubio Florida Beijing Allama Chinese Communist Party Incheon Jong Tabet Mary Kissel Sam Brownback Asia Pacific United States Russia Richard Gere Senator India