35 Burst results for "Ince"

"ince" Discussed on Denver Real Estate Investing Podcast

Denver Real Estate Investing Podcast

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"ince" Discussed on Denver Real Estate Investing Podcast

"Appliance repairs. Three hundred bucks Repairs maintenance other. Which is someone else that i had to hire in Was thirteen hundred dollars. That'd be captured under five percent reserves. Appear i would correct. You're more cat. Okay yelm yep Yeah and we. We haven't had any big cap ex type stuff in the three years that we own the property because like i said we pretty much. We replaced all plumbing. All electrical Redid the floors nuclei ince's new cabinets. New every thirty much everything. So yeah all right so before. We go back with the correct initial down payment. I mean you're looking at about twenty six thousand dollars in cash flow according to the spreadsheets at pretty close to your pretty close. We did so that this was our our twenty twenty numbers which was a little down but we did twenty nine thousand dollars in profit. Okay yeah so we're close enough here for definitely for drinking and podcast math All right so. I mean twenty six thousand dollars. A year is phenomenal flow now. Excuse me let's come back and talk about this district pentecost because us made all in you'll be that for twenty two hundred thousand dollars down payment and this repair cost. Yes i know for a fact that your costs were quite a bit north of here just a little bit. What happened there Well i think part of it was inexperience Not knowing what i should know and part of it was me trying to make this the the best place in steamboat. And the reality is it's a small duplex. It's a mile from the mountain. It's never going to compete with the properties on the mountain. that cost. he'll a thousand dollars night to rent so wasn't quite thinking through exactly who my guest is. And if i had probably could have saved myself you know fifty thousand dollars right off the bat and my realizing that this is i'm catering to guys like me. You know at the time i was. What thirty one. Years old I have a wife and We just wanna come up and ski. Want a nice place..

ince steamboat
"ince" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

08:02 min | 5 months ago

"ince" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

"So if i've got through that i could get through anything else and i will. I will fight it and so it met in means a lot to do pure and i broke it down into seven chapters seven poems per each chapter because seven is a there is a spiritual number immed- spirituality and so i wanted that experience this book for pure everything from the book cover to the colors to the title to the breaking down of the chapters to poems. That were chosen to the fact that i don't even believe in number so i had to have a bonus chapter the fact that i was able to have so many ups and downs. Like you know laughs and smiles in go through the pain and in the trenches all through this one book i was able to do that and Like you said sometimes we skipped over the evidence that makes us you know. These are things that make us. They make or break who we are. They added to our character. And so we can't skip over those pieces and so i hope that that poem inspires other women to not diminish or say all i did this and it wasn't that big of a deal because it is a big video. Iran is not. Everybody can do that. Not everybody can be strong like that. You know and so. I hope that that poem can inspire woman to focus redefine who they are and remember who they are every single day wonderful so we are in a strange year. Twenty twenty one is strange. Twenty twenty was strange. There's been a lot going on and you released your book last year. And so my guess is that you will be focusing on that a little bit this year as well but i'm curious about what is next for you. What are you working on. Tell us where you are in your own artistic journey so right now you know. I'm a poet in author. But i'm also a playwright producer theater and director. So i do all of these things. And so right now focusing on my playwright talent and what i wanna get out there. I'm working on his piece called cried. Pray put on lipstick really explores what it means to cry. Would it means to pray enemies to put on lipstick how we feel about crying. How we feel about praying or what it means to have some kind of higher power idea and also how we face the world. That's the whole lipstick part. I've been working on this piece since last year into this year I'm part of the drama to skilled. I'm doing the end of play program through the dramatists guild right now. So that's for the month of role you right into. You have a complete keys by the end of the month. And so this piece kinda carried over. So i'm working through you know rewriting. We focusing all that kind of stuff all the technicalities of it to get through my second act. So that i have a full length play and i hope to produce it. I mean i really do deals with four women surrounded by four women. It deals with gentrification colorado zone mental illness societal issues. That some of what. We have experienced everything from the pandemic to the racism to police brutality. All kinds of stuff. There's a little bit of everything out of those four categories in this play. It means a lot to me so powerful piece and is based in brooklyn new york. I really think that this is another one of those pieces that can inspire people and say. Hey we got through that you know. It was crazy but we did. You know we're still going through a lot of other things painful but how how do we. What do we do to face those things. What do we do to Empower ourselves in overcome. Those are definitely takeaways from this play. I'm very excited about it. I really am. And i was part of the give. It lakes Programmed through the warehouse performing arts center which is based in on cornelius north carolina and We did it. Virtually because of the pandemic of force so it was a lot of coaching. And help from playwright. Nicole calmer who has a lot of experience in a lot of great tips and and just as a good person to work with as far as Helping to define those aspects of what you really wanna say what you really wanna get out to the world through your play and oh it has been very beneficial to have that program to have gone through in commendatore. There things like that. So that's what i'm working on. That is so exciting. I can't wait to see where it goes. And i look forward to the day that it can happen in person as opposed to virtual. I mean there are nice accessibility aspects of a virtual theatre. I feel like. I've seen more theater in the past year and a half than i had prior to that. Because i just couldn't get to those places so i am grateful for it but i'm also really looking forward to that in person experience when it's when it's safe to do that. Oh yeah 'cause there's nothing like the live feeling the that the room is just nothing so totally. Get it i do. I understand but it is gonna interesting that in the midst of the pandemic we've found some real creative ways to get out there and now the internet is just everything is just broken open now so that is a positive that is definitely a positive. Yeah yeah absolutely. Is there anything you'd like to talk before we wrap up today. Think i got it all out. Jamel able to talk a little bit about everything. I will say The book is available at amazon in is also available on our website which is an y. I productions dot com either way. It'll be great if you could definitely get the book. And i hope that people will find it a treasure for them a treasure for their bookshelves and will share with others. Great i will put those links in the show notes so people can click right in there. Thank you so much for your work for your time today. For your wisdom for your vulnerability. I appreciate it so much. Oh you welcome. Thank you for having me. Then you know that artists soapbox turns four years old this year. If you've found value inspiration commiseration or just laugh. Please become a patron and help us do all the things we hope to do for you. Thera links michaud notes about ways to support artists. Soapbox or you can go directly to patriotdepot dot com slash artist.

Nicole calmer amazon last year Jamel today michaud second act this year seven chapters four women each chapter seven poems Thera four categories brooklyn new york cried one book colorado zone four years old dot com
"ince" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

07:26 min | 5 months ago

"ince" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

"Stuff in addition to poetry. Naima today ins is an emerging. Playwright who signature is distinct through the medium of the spoken word and huma has been writing and performing spoken word poetry for over ten years. Her play men always leave had two productions in the triangle area of north carolina produced by the carey players in two thousand nineteen and the women's theater festival in twenty sixteen. Currently she is working on another full length. Play titled cry. Pray put on lipstick. Aim is also a published author. Her most recent publication pure. A book of poetry is a poetic memoir. She holds two degrees a master's professional studies in arts and cultural management from pratt institute and a bachelor of arts in theater studies from suny purchase. College amo is originally from brooklyn new york. Enjoy the episode. Hi how are you this morning. Thanks so much for making some time for me. hi. I'm great today. We are going to be talking about pure book of poetry written by you. And i'm wondering if you could start us off with an original poem. He wrote in that piece absolutely song. I'm gonna start off with a poem. Called she smiled here. We go the day seemed to begin with the stretching of arms that pulled at the sides of the ribcage. The day was right. The water glistened as if to have stars in them. She saw her reflection chasing. the salty. Waters clemes her tongue and lightness her skin. She smiled feeling that beats earned that lifted the golden tones in the melanin that clothed her. She listened to the call of the spirit beyond the surface of anything tangible acute ear. She had let her heartbeat. as bright. as the sun rays that touchdown to highlight her footsteps. She smiled taking into account the drops of tears that ran away with the depths of the sea. There were no more sorrows here missing you tomorrow's or beckoning the bag of a hug or hand tug at a loss that wounded the soul. She smiled standing corrected by the several detours that kept her wilder about the man cries. It seemed to fall on deaf ears to the rejection of anything that seemed downright human. She was leaving it buried. She smiled no more waiting for calls from imaginary friends. No more waiting for soften rough hands no more doubting self-loathing in powder light fears. That just seem to keep our dusted. No more drowning. In the guilt of days not worth lingering holding onto a shadow that had hopscotch in the background. She smiled unhinged. She smiled open loud. Lack of floating in the air like the rain of songs smiled. She rightly so brightly 'til her cheeks hurt. She kept the smile wide so our son could join in the joy. She radiated like upright wayne which reflected in the see that greeted her words were heard cleansed and preserved as all feelings are worth the knowledge ing but none of us should keep our souls in bondage exhale release smile just as she did smile. Thank you so much for writing and for reading that piece. Oh you're welcome one of my favorites all right so we're gonna be talking about pure which is the book and she smiled is a poem in it. I think i wanna talk about the poem. I though if that's okay because people just heard it. Yeah you mentioned. It was one of your favorites. Talk about why. It's one of your favorites and if you remember. Can you tell us what was the inspiration to write that. Offshore is one of my favorites because of the purity in it. My heart is just really on the page. With what would that poems so. I really love it now. The inspiration behind it. As i was going through a divorce which was really hard and i also have a very tough feeling about men in my life for you know if they're going to stick around if they're gonna lead because unfortunately i didn't have a good relationship with my biological father as much as i had with my stepfather so i felt that i wasn't special and this was one of those times where i felt that it took me a lot to just smile in this time. I was struggling also with the onset of mental illness. I had a breakdown. Didn't realize that. I was having a breakdown so that was really hard and then being diagnosed and so there was a lot going on at that time between two thousand eighteen n. Till about i would say mid two thousand nine and it was a real struggle for me so this particular poem. I went to the ocean. And i took some things with me that i felt like i needed to release in let go of. I wrote a letter and i released into the ocean. I've been buried those things that i thought that i needed. Release from myself. After this whole sort of ritualistic experience that i had i was inspired to write this piece. So that's where she smiled comes from and that's why she's one of my favorite. My gosh that is a beautiful story. So if i wanted to do a book and i were you did you. Did you write all the poems first and then say this is going to be a book or did you say i wanna write a book. I'm gonna write poems like how does that work for you. Well i did have some of these poems already because this. This book is a poetic memoir. So i'm taking pieces. That were very very monumental For me in my life. From the time i was younger too. You know where. I am now all of that. So this spans my life in a sense and so Some of the pieces. I had a lot of them. Aren't wrote many of them. I wrote for this book. As i was developing it because i could go back to those places in think in really feel i really wanted to allow myself to feel and have a raw experience with this because i felt like i had something to tell the world and felt like my experience could inspire.

north carolina tomorrow two productions Naima over ten years brooklyn new york this morning two degrees pratt institute one two thousand eighteen first twenty sixteen today two thousand nine one of those times women's theater festival one of thousand nineteen favorites
How Breathwork Affects Your Brain And Helps You Experience Transcendence

My Seven Chakras

05:06 min | 8 months ago

How Breathwork Affects Your Brain And Helps You Experience Transcendence

"Have you ever heard stories of people coming out of meditation or breads work journey or even from plant medicine ceremony and talking about this profound sense of connection and unity and oneness this experience of feeling connected to everything around him and drowns ending beyond separation. Have you experienced that yourself and to really understand this scientifically. We need to understand the term default mode network. You see the demon. All the default more network is the name given to a network in your brain that has been shown to be crucial in normal everyday consciousness. That is when you're out and about your shopping. You're having a conversation and aimlessly browsing on your social media. Feeds the demon helps us function in the word and when it is added speak activity level is linked to mental processes such as our awareness of ourselves that is our ego construct our relationship those around us and how they perceive us and our relationship to the past and to the future. That is what happened why it happened. What could have happened. What will happen. What won't happen and questions like this. Does that sound familiar now when you are focused on a specific dusk such as solving a puzzle. Are snowboarding down. The mountain are trying to catch a moving ball. That's usually win the d. m. n. is at its lowest activity level. Now since we're talking about the brain year the default mode network has been linked to many mental conditions. Let's take the example of depression. When the demon is hyper active it can lead to excessive self reflection and creating of narratives and stories that are inaccurate or excessively negative. That's because the or active demon is always comparing our present state with something that happened in the past or projecting months or even years into the future. Another interesting thing is that the demon is intricately connected with chronic. Been being such a subjective expedience and often dime connected with an underlying emotion or memory that the person keeps going to again and again and it's hard to quantify pin because different people might have different reactions emotional connections and dollar ince's do they're being but when a person with chronic been dense do ruminate and think about there being. This tends to increase the severity of the pain and is correlated to an over active d. m. and so. Are you seeing how all of this seems to make sense. What if there was a way to turn off or turn down the activity levels in your default more network so in my research so far. I've come across a lot of studies about the effects of meditation and psychedelics on calming the d. m. n. Meditation has been shown to reduce the activity in people. But here's the catch in people who have been practicing for years together. However there are some forms of meditation such as johnson dental meditation. Meditation that actually increases the activation of demon with. She is pretty interesting right. I'll need to learn more about that now. I did come across. Many articles that suggest that psychedelics namely ceelo siobhaun contained in the magic mushroom has the quickest most profound effect on calming the and creating what is known as ego. Disillusion or the ego death. I'm sure you've come across that term before. But how does it work so just imagine that each part of your brain bleeds it particular instrument. One part is playing the cello. The other partly as violin clarinet won the flu and so on and normally each of these instruments are playing individually unbeknownst off the other once silla sivan enters it is as if the master conductor of the orchestra who was knocked out of consciousness suddenly gains consciousness and wakes up and starts guiding the orchestra and so now there is a communication between different musicians sitting in different parts of the stage who were initially compartmentalized. But now they're playing together and there's a crescendo. And what you receive is beautiful music.

Ince Depression Violin Clarinet Silla Sivan Johnson FLU
Proteas: Celebrating These Botanical Shape-Shifters

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:24 min | 8 months ago

Proteas: Celebrating These Botanical Shape-Shifters

"Fond of as we're speaking. You have a bunch pictured behind you wonderfully illustrated on the wall but the proteas. I have to say those paintings by a friend of mine. Vicki thomas and she's one of south africa's most acclaimed botanical straight. That's awesome absolutely wonderful person. Carry on all right. Shout out to vicki. Thomas amazing i can seem from here. They're great but you know this is a group. That is a little strange. They're beautiful most of the time. Some of them are culinary interests. A lot of people will be most familiar with them for the cut flower industry and their use in different floral arrangements but in terms of a group of plants. The proteas pro. Dac as a family. Really kind of encapsulates. Everything you've aimed for and more and unlike flagship species they're not getting nearly the attention. They deserve for the plate that they're facing as a family of plants. In a modern world they are a real bench of wackos I mean lynn. A cult them protea or called the jenness protea protea. Because of the greek god. Protease protease was a shape shifter so lineas such will this plump family comes in such a huge range of different weird shapes and forms in not justice flowers but its foliage and its fruits and all the rest of it but there's only one name for them knots the proteas and some of them are crazy and they have crazy names to i mean there's a there's a genus of pro. Tac out there. called megahertz. Sia megahertz probably one of the best plump names. I think that there is and they produce these crazy flower heads. They're not flowers there in or conflicts ince's to be more specific about it. They have these amazing floral brax. The king protea the national flower south africa is is a conflict essence so hundreds of individual flowers surrounded by these beautiful pink or red floral brock switch. A modified leaves banks is the same huge heads. One of the most flourish in fluorescence in the world is a species of fanciable granted. The bull banksia has up to three thousand individual flowers in the end in a single head. But they don't do things by normal standards than nearly always bird or mammal pollinated rather than insect pollinated. They don't use a micro rizal relationship. In most instances. There are a few that. Do they do crazy stuff with that chemical makeup and the way that they use chemicals in their in their systems particularly the way that these phosphorus they are almost completely made of licnen and that goes for the flowers as well as a the warden the leaves you know. This plant family is yeah wacko to me. Just like people. My favorite groups are just the wackos the one offs the strange ones. That are just doing things. A little bit differently than the rest or sometimes drastically differently than the rest. And i am so foreign to most of what this family has to offer. I mean i'll remember going to the huntington for the first time in going. Wait a minute there trees

Vicki Thomas South Africa Vicki Thomas Lynn Ince Huntington
"ince" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

02:00 min | 10 months ago

"ince" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Sure, Ince's and I know that something you up your clients with you look at where they're at. And what policies they haven't say. Well, hey, you've got this and this and you don't need it. That's not really gonna help you. But this would you know, in the long run, cost you less or be a better investment for you, right? Um, that's that's where a really working with somebody that you trust and a good advisor can really help you because we're going to sit down with you and really uncover What keeps you and your spouse up at night, and I'm telling you often times, especially when you go through something like covert where we have, you know, relatives and friends that we know that has passed away. Unexpectedly, You know, Tony three years ago. Did any of us see this coming? You know, at an alarming rate, or are people that are a little older? Uh, They have a pretty high percentage of passing. And so we don't know. You know what the future holds for any of us, But we can. We do know if we're prepared or not. And this is just one little thing that you can do for your family. And by the way, we'll talk about a little bit later. Give a little tease it also help you, you know in retirement So life insurance, unlike what a lot of the movies or the TV show shows portray it. It's actually a very good thing, and it's something that you know. I get tickled in. I'm the furthest thing from somebody. It's gonna just hound you and Dougie. I can't stand that. But I'm going to give you the fax and I will let you make the decision yourself and Maura importantly, you know, Tony. There are so many insurance companies because, remember in the very first statement, I said, it's It's a basically It's a bargain between you and the insurance company. It's the right track. Well, that insurance company is very important who you pick..

Tony Ince advisor Maura
"ince" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

02:14 min | 11 months ago

"ince" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"My friends are other way. Go stupid, Mr Ince on the table just so beautifully secluded in the game booth, you You. You. I ain't your friends and named me too. I'm told I'm girl. I'm too Does the heart grow by my hand and turn it up in tow attention you You turn it up and throw attention. Mr. Tuesday, they came back to me and I'm going after that ship is more like oceans. They can fit me in a Trojan out of pocket. But I'm always in my bag yet. That's the slogan Mr Who's all They're pulling up with emo chick that's broken. Distract Congress trap music, Everything shipping my friends of mine, but we got down here we go stupid, Mr taking on a table just so Do be saluted in the candle Rodeo rodeo. You You hate goes friends and a Rico I'm doing, uncle come through. That's that girl. Bummer Ethan, turning it up in total attention. You know, music everyday to my friends, But we go to college music everything. Wait. Change. Forget You.

Mr Ince candle Rodeo rodeo Mr Who Mr. Tuesday Ethan
Supreme Court Rules New York Cannot Limit Attendance At Houses Of Worship Due To COVID-19

Here & Now

04:54 min | 11 months ago

Supreme Court Rules New York Cannot Limit Attendance At Houses Of Worship Due To COVID-19

"Some religious groups in new york are celebrating last night's rare late night. Supreme court decision blocking an executive order from new york governor andrew cuomo that restricted attendance at religious services in their neighborhoods because the pandemic ultra orthodox jewish organizations in brooklyn and queens and the roman catholic diocese of brooklyn claim. That cuomo single them out. The state pointed to the recent spike in covid nineteen cases. And then there was that alarming ultra orthodox wedding last week. The two hundreds not wearing masks. The court's decision was five. Four with its newest justice emmy coney barrett considered the fifth vote. Emily brazilan staff writer at new york times magazine and fellow at the yale law. School is here emily. Thank you for taking a break from your thanksgiving thanks. You are welcome. Glad to be here. And we should say the to litigants the ultra orthodox jewish groups and the catholic diocese were already not subject to these restrictions. Because they've been lifted there's a color system for restrictions in new york and Cova cases had obey abated in their area. But what was the argument from the court in blocking even targeted restrictions. Well the corpus arguing that new york hadn't shown that less strict measures would be enough to protect public health. Which is a pretty cursory kind of way of thinking about this. You can see the concur. Ince's by justice gorsuch as justice cavanaugh. That some of the conservative judges didn't like the idea that essential businesses which were permitted to open a new york included stores but did not include houses of worship. And i think the odd thing about the majority's analysis here is what it's comparing so the majority behaves as if people going to stores are the same as people congregating in a house of worship even though it's very unusual in store for lots of people to be sitting together or certainly singing or chanting together for a long time. That's all in a church or synagogue or a mosque and we know that that is a riskier activity. So there was no discussion of the science or scientific public health considerations in the majority's opinion. And what about chief. Justice john robertson. The three liberal justices dissenting. What did they say. Well chief justice. John roberts says there's no reason for us to decide this right now for the reason that you gave earlier new york had a lift these restrictions for now because the krona virus spread is not as bad in the city so these restrictions said that in the red zone the highest risk new york. You could have ten people in a house of worship in the orange zone. You could have twenty-five people but the catholic archdiocese in the docks synagogues that have sued. They no longer are subject to those restrictions and so she's jeff roberts was making a kind of traditional conservative judicial modesty Moved here in which he said. Look if they're subject to these restrictions again maybe they will be proved to be unduly harsh but at the moment. They're not so we don't need to step in here. And this is a classic example of a judge saying you know what. Let's leave this in the hands of public. Health officials not have judges step in to make these decisions. Unless it's absolutely necessary will be clear. What does it mean. I mean be clear. Only because i'm not able to figure this out. Temporary decision made on an emergency basis by the way when ruth bader ginsburg was on the court roberts sided with the liberals and the decision was in favor of restrictions that was when california had restrictions in place. So obviously there's been a tilt here but what does this mean for other states for new york when it comes to restrictions on houses of worship in the pandemic y- i'm kind of scratching my head about that too. I mean it looks like what the court is saying. Is that if you have businesses open you have to treat churches and other houses of worship just like those businesses but without paying attention to the greater risk that the church that you know religious service can entail and that's very strange to me because it seems so at odds with the science and what we know about the spread of coronavirus. And so you're right. This is a decision. That's a temporary restraining. Order against new york. The merits the kind of larger case is still to be thrashed out the lower courts and so one hopes going forward that there will be more attention to these apples to apples. Comparisons and figuring out what the state really needs to do to protect public health and mall many have seen the video from the acidic wedding in brooklyn this month. Hundreds packing a synagogue. No-one wearing masks mayor. Bill de blasio said or organizers will find fifteen thousand for violating restrictions. And so we're keeping an eye on that to see what happens. There might be any kind of consideration of

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Roman Catholic Diocese Of Broo Coney Barrett Emily Brazilan New York Times Magazine Catholic Diocese Justice Gorsuch Justice Cavanaugh Justice John Robertson Cuomo Jeff Roberts Ince Queens Brooklyn Supreme Court Yale Emily John Roberts Ruth Bader Ginsburg
"ince" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

The Unstoppable Woman®

03:51 min | 11 months ago

"ince" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

"Don't you want that insurance against failure. What if you knew that you couldn't fail. Wouldn't that be amazing. Well if you cultivate the habit of persistence you will not fail. We'll they'll be temporary defeats. Will there be challenges will be bumps in the road mountains in your way absolutely but you have to learn how to move mountains and this requires persistence. You must cultivate persistence. Hell goes on to say no matter. How many times. They are defeated. They finally arrive up toward the top of the ladder. Sometimes it appears that there is a hidden guide whose duty it is to test men through all sorts of discouraging ince's those who pick themselves up after defeat and keep on trying arrive and the world cries bravo. I knew you could do it. The hidden guide leads. No-one enjoy great achievement. Without passing the persistence test. Those who can't take it simply. Do not make the grade. This is an absolute truth. Hundred percent no exceptions there will always be challenges in life data the hidden guide. It's there to encourage you to grow but it requires your persistence in that growth. The thing that's in front of you. That's challenging you right now. You have choices you can grow from it. You can become more. You can take it as a throw down the gauntlet. I will step up to this challenge. I will figure this out. I will grow through it and become more. That's where success comes from a war. You can say this is too much for me. I quit. I turn around i stop. I'm defeated those are the choices. Which are you going to choose sure enough. It could just be temporary defeat. It could just be six months. It could be just two years. It could just be five years but we want to close the gap time. How long are you going to stay. Defeated mentally emotionally and stopped taking action. Stop being persistent. How quickly can you pull yourself up by the bootstraps now. This is not an argument for suppressing your emotions or just putting a smiley face on you want to feel the fields and you want to problem solve so that you can move through and become more not just stay at the same level in grinded out so grinded out has a couple different meanings. I use it in both ways in this case. I'm meaning like you're just hitting your head against the wall you're not actually growing but grinding it out is sometimes what's required to move through the challenge and this is a positive grinded out. This means you know what. I have to learn the skill set and i have to do it over and over and over again and i need to to build that ability in myself and it's going to feel like a grind in this initially challenging for me. I haven't learned it yet. That's persistence that's growth. So are you going to be someone who can take it and is going to.

ince
Martha MacCallum Discusses the "Unknown Valor" of Iwo Jima

Dose of Leadership

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Martha MacCallum Discusses the "Unknown Valor" of Iwo Jima

"Martha McCallum. Here you are on dose of leadership I can't believe it welcome to the show it's great to be here Richard Thank you for having me big fan of you obviously in in your work that you've done and obviously a big fan of of the book being a primary ince unknown valor, and what prompted you to write this I think I know the answer this I see say but I just I'm curious about why you got so passionate about World War Two about that generation and specifically you would Jima. It was a personal connection when I was growing up my mom used to occasionally take out letters that were written to her and to her father by her beloved cousin Harry Gray who had been killed at Iwo Jima when he was only eighteen years old and the grease from his death just sort of was there never went away it wasn't something we talked about. All the time obviously but it was very real and when I read the letters, they're so beautiful and he was such an eloquent eighteen year old and wrote great informative letters that had a lot of information them about what was going on and they would often when I did pull out, dust him off and read them I couldn't really get through them without. Being brought to tears. So, and of course, I never knew him but his mother, my aunt, an was someone I was very close to and his sister my aunt Nancy also somewhat I was very close to end became got to know on such a deeper level through the writing of this book which grateful for. So when I started to think about writing a book I. Sort of couldn't get around the subject it was it felt as if it was calling me and it was a story that I needed to tell and I also knew, I wanted if I was going to spend the time and effort writing I wanted it to be a real book of history a book where I would learn a lot. So if I was going to take time away from my work and my personal life to dedicate myself to this, I wanted it to be a inexperienced. That would pay off for me. You know that would be a lot. So it did that in spades and honestly by the time I was done I thought if this book doesn't sell more than ten copies, it will still have been worth it to me. You know I I it resonates with me because I became friends obviously in the marine. Corps and we look at Iwo, Jima with sacrosanct and I've never visited the island. You're fortunate if actually put your feet on the ground there and I've flown over a few times when I was in the rink was a pilot in the Marine Corps and we'd fly over. You would Jima going back and forth from Okinawa and stuff. And it was weird when every time we'd fly over it in, we'd all be talking and joking that. But when you fly over it, they're just be the stunned silence every time we fly over you a German and to give you these chills just because if anybody studies at knows the stories in particular that how many people sacrificed their lives and were injured, it's just phenomenal thing about the numbers in the short amount of days where on such a three square mile or piece of dirt you know it's just. It really is it's almost as if it's a piece of the moon race loading in the middle of the Pacific and I completely connect with what you're saying. Of course I have never served but I was on this flight that only to a once a year it's A. It's to you know a memorial slight to honor those who were lost there, and it is a memorial that has Japanese dignitaries that attend and American. Veterans that attend and their families in a few reporters and people who are interested get to go on his flight. So I was really fortunate to be on it and there was this amazing commodity on the flight and we had all traveled a lot I flew from Newark to Tokyo. And then Tokyo to Guam and then Guam alternate late to gene on the day of our trip there, and it's a day trip. You go in the morning couple of hours on the plane fly back that evening and the Japanese government has complete control over Gina. They have since the sixties. So they dictate the amount of time that Americans are allowed to be on the island, right which in and of itself is sort of an interesting situation. But So it's all very regimented when you land, they take your passports away. They put them in a bag when you're ready to go they give them back to you. And you can leave. But when we were flying from Guam to Jima and the plane was obviously only people who were all on this sing of our mission and we had first class about five, I believe. A woman veterans who were on a couple of from Tarawa but there were five I believe you Jim Veterans a couple of who had never been back. So we're saying sort of camaraderie everyone's joking around a little bit talking to each other with all get to know each other over the last few days on Guam and some of the things that we did together before that. But as soon as the pilot said, okay, you're going to see what Jim now coming up on your left as soon as we dip under these clouds. And as soon as we dipped under those clouds, there was silence across the plane and I looked over at some of these veterans looking down on the island through the window hadn't been there since they were seventeen eighteen, nineteen years old and you could feel that flood of emotion come over them. They saw it and I will never forget the dramatic approach to that island landing on it. It's still steaming as a volcano in different parts of the island. So it's it's smokes while you're looking at it it's kind of a surreal place.

Guam Iwo Jima Jima Tokyo Martha Mccallum Jim Veterans Harry Gray Ince Richard Marine Corps Japanese Government Nancy Okinawa Tarawa Gina Newark
"ince" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"ince" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"A ton of money. It did actually about to be rich rich. If you don't like shopping anymore, I will do that 1000 bucks and waiting by the phone. Next on friend Angie, go. You know, I have friends in a way to go until Obama done. Tornado Go Attention. Don't turn it up, Pinto Attention being your Birkin bag hookup. Someone ran down this hole inside that by your lips and I like the sweater. She had remember different when it should be to victim my pens. Wei, go stupid, Mr Ince on people just loaded in the gate room. One more line of superhuman fool you You and me. Go on, girl. Go bum. I don't turn it up in tow attention. Pinto attention that you know, this ship is more like they can fit me in a Children out of pocket, but always in my bag. That Logan, who's all there with emo chick has broken down that they be my friends are all nine. Wait, go stupid. Just the thinking on table so loaded in the candle. One more line of superhuman folk. You ghost friends and me to go on, girl.

Pinto Mr Ince Obama Angie Wei Logan
"ince" Discussed on Casting Actors Cast

Casting Actors Cast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"ince" Discussed on Casting Actors Cast

"Don't act anymore, but I loved acting them, because I really felt great that it was that I could invest my creative energy into playing someone else. But the downside of that is the more I invested in trying to play someone else. My acting work became more presentational. In other words I'm showing you how I am going to play this part. As. Opposed to. Investing in being that character. So instead of showing you, my character, I was simply as an actor. Presenting. Those choices that I made. And you know what it doesn't work for roles that need to be authentic. It doesn't work because you are simply outside of yourself. And that leads us to this conclusion. The more connected. You are to your true self, the more authentic you are. And that actually can make for even a better actor. I hope that makes sense. Because I think that many times we just don't embrace and trust the story that we're telling. Because it's not connected to our own enough. Our story is only as good as our life experience and our awareness of that experience, so let's talk about three steps. That you can discover your authenticity so this'll be helpful, not only in your acting, but in your day to day. You know we're living through this corona virus We're getting all kinds of dismissed mixed messages about how to be safe in how to be secure, but also we are all going through a lot of what I consider self discovery. Were investigating who we are based on the situation we find ourselves in. And so, I think that there are some steps to self discovery that if we put a structure around those steps and week come to a greater understanding I believe quite strongly that we can apply those steps into the acting war. And, so I'm asking kind of take a leap of faith with me now as I give you three steps to what it is to being authentic step number one. Really do some self exploration and ask how your life. Experience! Will relate to the character that you are playing. So. Let's say you're working on a character. You're working on a monologue. You're working on a scene whatever you're working. Maybe it's a a self tape audition. How does your own life experience jibe with the characters experience? And so just simply taking a look that I relate to this character in the following ways or I understand this character because I, too have had similar. Ince's so really evaluating that require some self exploration, but that also requires your ability to understand that character. You're going to be play, and if you just simply spend some time in your head with that, you've already taken a really excellent first step. It's not hard. It's not meant to be hard. It's not meant to challenge you or overwhelm you, but it is meant for you to be introspective and then objective objective about the character your playing. Step number two. How do you handle adversity? And does that help or hinder the work? Let me give you a quick example. If when confronted by somebody, let's just say for the sake of discussion. Somebody that you're in an argument with somebody that is is letting..

Ince
Finding Success With Kevin Hart

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Finding Success With Kevin Hart

"Kevin Hart has officially reached. Rock Star status. Selling out venues across the globe now he is expanding his dominance off the stage. He has starred in three films and Tacoma the entertainer of the year at the N. Double ACP image awards. Kevin invited me to his home in Los Angeles on a rare day off. excited. On this way after you. Hear all that stuff is custom chandeliers. WHO. Can I look at this at this rate. Almost spy ish, like very nice, very lax, but not too much. How deep is the pool? kid-friendly Gift From and Kevin from all to? There if not no, you about five and a half. That's good. That's perfect preface journey as you can stand up and stand up can save. That's great so now that this has been your year, the stats are you've had three hit films to in the top ten former movies in production right now. A hit television show a huge following on social media. Because of the way you were raised. It feels like what to you because there's some people whose head would be blown off by now, and we would see it rolling down the hill. For me, you know what? I believe hard work pays off you know. When you say has been has been my year. It's my time. Hollywood has wave making everything seemed like overnight success Oh my God. Where did this guy come from all this kid? Who is he look? It's a massive star. Eighteen years in the business. You put ten thousand hours. I'll put in my Tom I got I got dues that that have been paid and paid again and pay one more time after that I stayed shooting my dreams, and by doing that eventually came true, but it has there has to be something. I won't say special about you. Because I believe we all have the same human abilities possibilities. Not Everybody can do the same thing, but there has to be something. That is different because there are lots of people who try and there are lots of people who want it, and there are lots of people who have the desire. What was the difference? Do you think for you to difference to me? was I paid attention to what people did before me whether it was right or wrong? Everybody's successful as a for now. You laid a blueprint You know I can go down and Lis- from. To actors entrepreneurs to self-made Mogul Jay. Z, look at Tyler Perry. You look at Puff I mean. You're looking at people that start off with a small. And that vision manifested in something beyond expectation, so what I did was from the people around me. My Mentors Eddie Murphy Chris, Rock, prior. We're all on the wall to wall all so you surround yourself a surround myself with a constant reminder of whose great. Constantly come down steps every day. I look Richard Bill. He's great. He was great. I see Chris Rock. He was great I it's a constant reminder. What am I trying to achieve I want to be great, so that motivates me, so things separates me is my draw my driver's other people's success. It's so interesting because you get compared a lot to Eddie Murphy because not since Eddie Murphy has anybody. You recently brought Roka's record at the Nokia, theatre. In Two thousand eleven during his laugh at my pain tour Kevin's. Ince's. At L. A.'s Nokia theatre were record breaking with over one point. One million dollars in ticket sales Kevin Surpassed Eddie Murphy's record. I don't care what I achieved and is there I? Don't care what financial number they put aside any accomplishment. That I how many tickets you saw how many people feel can't. You can't outdo with Eddie Murphy did I'm I'm sitting here so solid? I believe back. I can't I can't do that

Kevin Hart Eddie Murphy Eddie Murphy Chris Nokia Chris Rock N. Double Acp Tacoma Richard Bill Tyler Perry Los Angeles LIS Hollywood Ince L. A. Roka
"ince" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"ince" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Sixteenth as the date for this year's draft Ince's clubs can begin talking with free agents two days later regarding that trap early entry candidates have until August seventeenth to declare the lay out of the how many people are on the field and the people are close to each other and can we actually just in some areas of the field and keep people apart Dr she said that football teams would need to follow the plan and MLS per bottle formats for consider not playing at all never was ever spoken or Lee said to me in conversations that they were going to move this season cancel this season all that was never even discussed at a news changes by the day regarding your health regarding covert nineteen the NFL advising players to refrain from private workouts this after ten franchises reported positive cold nineteen test for at least one player the NFLPA is also said it's working on safety protocols for training camp slated for a late July so they have some time three members of the Buccaneers have tested positive for the corona virus at the team's training facility and the team is closed affected areas of the building all individuals who may have been exposed have been notified and are following the established protocols for me Phalaris moving forward the NFL hasn't been leaning toward a bubble biodome approach I feel like the sheer numbers make that difficult and though they appreciate Dr falsies words let's be honest this train is moving right now regardless of what's happening nationwide everybody is speech around the league believes the training camp will begin on time in late July and then you know you have a ramp up period of a couple weeks of conditioning football activities that could take the place of a preseason game or two but I will say after talking to players they're probably more shook by the uptick in positive test they were seeing in the game of football not only within a fellow players with college football players one player pointed out to me look what happens if you're three days before a game your whole receiver room goes out with total bid because they were sitting in the same room together how do you even play the game and so these are some of the questions being asked by a lot of players they're waiting on the leave to bring a more firm strict protocol day to day operations like a proposal then they can look at and see where things are at NBC's Mike Tirico is on goal can we go regarding adjusting yeah just doing it to the virus as the news changes always wanted to replace a basketball for hockey at all this but will it come up to this point everything has come off as planned withdrawals and with NASCAR and B. one indycar race at Belmont looks like you'll do the same tomorrow well we don't know if there's going to be a big stops I think it started out there so we have we talked about one of the series of positive tests come after that NBA seasons restarted down there in Orlando what what what what happens what happens if if three guys test positive during a playoff series and you're down to one in a best of seven how does that how does that play out all those things are definite what ifs that are a little bit closer to reality than some of the what ifs we throw out so again I hadn't been thinking football we know exactly what's gonna look like this is crazy for all those different right now I think we've got a lot of answers between now and then and for both college and pro football guys I think how things go hockey basketball could be huge answer to how far they're gonna be able to take this interview given season started the situation say about stated CLA program it does seem as though the number of the players on this team are concerned as they get back twenty three Clemson football players tested positive before the nineteenth yeah we mention the LSU players being placed in quarantine while Kansas state is pause all voluntary workouts for their football players heather did it earlier on a sports center the chance for schools to evaluate how well their protocols work as of today schools that can push through these positive test will do that but this is also a chance for schools across the country to evaluate how well their protocols are working that being the contact tracing and also the isolation but the question is how many positives are too many I asked Dr Matt Wisler Notre Dame's team physician that question he told me there's not a magic number but if the positive tests continue to increase that means your plan probably isn't working and it's time to take a step back so where does that leave college football with regards the confidence of having a season in the fall here's more dinner Oklahoma athletic director Joe Castilian may have phrased it best when he told me that he is optimistic but also realistic look behind the scenes the power five conference commissioners are continuing to work on the hypotheticals if there's a delayed start to the season a shortened season whatever it might be now big twelve commissioner Bob Bowlsby did tell me he expects football games to be played but that it would be an interrupted season meaning that there will be some programs that have outbreaks and can't handle it but pay attention to this pre season six week plan it just got released because that's going to be the first time when everybody's really back out on the field again and that's when we'll find out just how extensive the coronavirus impact will be all right we have an update from fight night no storm the NHL reportedly testing positive for Colbert nineteen that.

Ince
"ince" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"ince" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And hopefully it won't be near really is a hard on the economy because there is something called unemployment sure Ince's didn't exist back then and so the hope is and that's why Congress keeps writing these trillion dollar giveaways yeah so that they can keep people of float and we won't they'll be of the bounce back it might not be a a sharp bounce back like at the presence of hoping for but it will be you know a return conflict more quickly than the depression so what we're gonna try to do is in the new is it the one they're gonna be voting on tomorrow I know it's about eighteen hundred pages to three trillion dollars it's got all sorts of give aways in there and part of it is also included would be the government would pay what about eighty percent of your salary right as it was well so this is a little of this a little confusing to those that some of those those regular business hours early in this in this upper okay so let's just set this up there right now it's the house Democrats to put together a plan yeah and it is the three trillion dollars and it and it goes to it they want to cover for every worker now there are more radical plans on both the Republican and democratic sides like for Mila giant Paul once the once this card launching to cover all the workers that is getting some traction but it might not hurt you know looking about at the bill that's getting that's going to be voted on tomorrow okay just as of yet okay a little side one here she is we need to stop mass unemployment the federal government under this act would provide a three months up front grants that would cover wages but also benefits for workers up to a salary cap with a hundred thousand so that employers who are suffering a revenue loss or shut down because of cold in nineteen can continue to keep their employees on payroll the grant would also allow maintenance costs for businesses because we know that they've got fixed costs like rent and utilities and they need to be able to pay those fixed costs in order to keep the business going the money would flow stray right from the treasury to the business because remember every business files a tax return so would be very easy to calculate a lump sum payment and then used both treasury and cable companies to disperse the money and when she says a grand what does she mean by grant I'm trying to find out I think that means I think that's just that's giving it away it's like I I grant means you don't have to pay it back it's not like a loan I think it's just straight out money and the and the the idea of the argan behind is that it would it would keep people employed and they be it their insurance would you know they wouldn't we wouldn't have to dole out the unemployment stuff because it would be covered by the insurance employer based insurance plans already in them it might even be she climbs of the costs will be less than the six hundred sixty nine billion already allocated to grants in grants to businesses so this is this is like beyond this is like beyond what even in Nancy Pelosi has has agreed to which a lot of people see as a a straight giveaway but there are fascinatingly a Josh Hawley is going to be one of these rising stars on the conservative side and the Republican Party also is suggesting something very similar and it gets back yeah you know about just getting the money just why we taking all the stuff you just give the money straight to the workers just give them give it to cover their their salaries to we get through this thing so the economy doesn't have to come back so this is what it was once seen as a rare very radical kind of approach actually has people on both maybe extremes one could say of both parties thinking this the way to go and guess who's beaming right now Andrew Yang sort of started this all universal basic income arguments in during the campaign for the democratic nomination he was saying that everybody was supposed to get a thousand dollars a month that's right yes just the straight out and and now and that was that was a pre pandemic I don't know if he's adjusted his figures with pandemic but I think it's important to acknowledge that so tomorrow that whatever gets voted on it's just getting bored on the house democratically controlled and I'm sure from I think I might have seen the president say something like well that if it gets past that'll be dead on arrival but this is just it's the first movie then the Senate Republicans will come back with the with the counter move and then they'll create the kind of work something out out so maybe for millage I appalled idea can hook up with Josh Hawley's idea and maybe they'll be up something more along those lines when you ask about eighty percent jump what Hollywood's duty once a model is on the British approach which is yeah it covers like eighty percent of somebody's salary up to a certain amount I can't remember now it's like fifty thousand dollars or something yeah so these this is all transfer tax because there's only one way to pay three boys to pay for this you raise taxes on those the pay taxes you inflate this away because we don't have this money right where you just sort of decided to increase doesn't walk away from entirely so option three doesn't work inflation is possible that's a horse in a tax on everybody when you inflate those dollars so what we'll do we it will be a redistribution tax so you'll take it from the twenty or thirty percent to pay federal income taxes you'll be taking from the rich you increase taxes on everybody the payroll taxes will go from six point two walked out I don't know nine point two eventually at some point everybody will have to pay on this because we've already written to rubber checks for two trillion dollars right was the first one two trillion or one truck although I think it was I think we're over I think what the **** one of them was two point two trillion okay so I think we're at our we have four trillion because another one passed I think we're four trillion plus this thing might go as well let's say it's not as were six trillion dollars it's really interesting because all the folks at the crazy show she was on the on the far left for saying Hey we want to get this green new deal thing going and they were throwing numbers around enjoy even Joe Biden said about ten trillion dollars look at this three months I'm going to write a check for six this is great what a great way to run an economy the philosophy the decline is that if this keeps the economy sputtering at least recommend them you know cold dead cold that it would be worth it that it's got it would cost us more to let the economy di and then try to revive it this is meant to kind of keep people of floating right get money S. spending things also yeah there's a there's been a real change on some people's philosophies about how bad our deficit can be all you know the the debt it's like on both on both parties is like yeah that's not really a concern right.

Ince Congress
"ince" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"ince" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"I don't think that I started out that way but I think that by yeah you know relationships that we've built in coverage hadn't Ince's we've all shared it has happened to me naturally and maybe it's over the top I think also my sarcasm adding to the mix and weighs on identification sarcasm meaning that I will talk crap about anyone that I meet yes and that's a but it's in a funny kind of way sometimes right and so then that I don't know it just like it maybe it's a bad mix I enjoy it sorry we failed out right right what we're doing defend myself but you gotta go all do KT real quick okay go ahead the sounds that sounded disgusting so like outside I would say I can trust Katie ten out of ten that you talk trash about about me when I leave the room three time I trust Katie I think eight out ten work stuff it's it's high I mean you know everyone for Africa's ever forget stuff but the two is that talking trash or like I think she's agreeing with me something but then something happens later it'll say the complete opposite so that she's being nice to me that's right I don't know also see agreed to or like some say you should do some some site yeah that be great as soon as you walk out I'm never doing also me about the house so that's one part beta tends good and what about how much do you think she trust other people to attend now yeah I know that she knows I think people should first meet she does but she gets to know people in so we're talking level two I think ends I mean not friends but that you know well I don't think you trust them I don't know what you first with the first and first impression if she comes across if somebody comes across like a bull she definitely trust her life with that new stranger yes that she does with us absolutely all rights were quickly how much you trust Cape Town I'm adamant believer in not giving trust I don't I want out jazz like three right now right now and if you don't trust Katie all right we don't know each other all that well but yeah all right very good how much do you think she trust other people maybe three I love making cement I think I have a problem trusting everybody more than I should every single person aha I would say for Katie maybe at eight math okay eight eight a half and then I honestly do think she trusts everybody one yeah okay we've got you what you've all had your fun with me I'll be the only one getting my feelings hurt we're going to go around the rest of the room and talk about how each and everyone of you are trustworthy and how we view you expect your aid charity.

Ince
"ince" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"ince" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Well despite lenses sure Ince's yesterday that they were gonna pass the to field trillion dollar economic package to get this country out of a depression they did not once again but Democrats Democrats like stress voted against it because you know they don't wanna give corporations NE a young Democrats now when they hate capitalism they hate corporate America even though corporate America employs a lot of people and your point yesterday was we found out some little statistic you plucked off of Google there that a lot of people work for small businesses well you know what I found out when a lot of those small businesses deal with corporations their vendors for big corporations so those small businesses in many ways are dependent on the health of corporate America and Democrats would rather see that health eroded and destroyed because they don't believe in corporation I don't believe in capitalism none of what you just said is true but all else fails you know zero a total that well okay then let me can I talk about it give me thirty seconds as always start the clock it's not true that Democrats only capitalism and what they hate is a just a corporate giveaway that they're just gonna stick in their pocket if they know you know what they call the you know a corporate slush fund they just don't want to just hand out **** nilly to corporations they want to make sure it's going to the right people so you know I don't blame I don't you know I don't even blame one side of the whole you gonna blame them for holding you're not gonna blame them for holding this up you don't think we need to get this money out there now we're gonna get it today okay Niles road which is a yesterday I said we're gonna yesterday what is the moral in dollars the same bat station and I'll say the same thing we're going to get it today get it today it's going to happen I'm not opposed to making sure the corporations just don't get the money and they you know shop in the bank or they buy back their stocks I don't think the president wants that either but there is you have to admit land there isn't any antipathy towards corporate America on the part of a lot of Democrats then the Sanders maybe Liz well barring AOC Ileana sorry it's four I believe Nancy Pelosi probably has dialed a number for corporations I don't remember that even though Schumer I'm sure take plenty of the campaign money from the school I will say this is not the time for finger pointing on both sides are doing it you know we have some interviews with both Schumer and McConnell and I let's start go ahead finish what you're having I'm just gonna say let's hear what Mitch McConnell has to say about democratic obstructionism absolutely marvelous obstruction going on the other side while the public is waiting for.

Ince depression
Princess Cruises cancels all sailings for 60 days due to virus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Princess Cruises cancels all sailings for 60 days due to virus

"The first cruise ship lines to cancel cruises have done it princess cruises will cancel all cruises until may tenth Ince's has eighteen ships Viking cruises which operates seventy nine vessels as cancel all of its river and ocean cruises until may

Princess Cruises Ince
A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

Unorthodox

08:52 min | 1 year ago

A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

"Have two of the biggest rabbis and Phoenix here with US tonight. Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko. It's the president and Dina validate me Josh and Rabbi Pinchas. Illusion is the founding rabbi of Congregation Beth Safina in Scottsdale Arizona. Come come welcome rebuttal. Don't usually have two guests because things can get really off the rails so we'll see what happens here rabbis. I'm GONNA call you. We'll we'll we'll figure out what we're GONNA call you but let's start with this question for both of you. Why isn't this Jewish community different from all other Stephanie Loud Mark this is why all the people who don't touch the MIC? Don't have problems every house. That better josh all right there we go sorry Stephanie. So let's start off because there's like no spoilers here because only spoilers so rabbis. Why is this Jewish community different from all other Jewish communities? Are you guys even Jewish? You're letting each other speak. It's an excellent question you went on to. I twenty all right so I think for two main reasons number one. It's a community that has just been founded really in the past. Few decades other communities are centuries old. This community is quite new and therefore its future is still very much ahead of it. I think that's why many people are really attracted to the potential of the community year as I was when I first move you thirteen years ago. And it's buzzing with excitement that's number one number two. I also think that it's a community. It's quite diverse and it's diverse in its culture it's diverse in its levels of observance of background. But it's not just the diversity that is attracting and that is quite unique to Phoenix. But it's a unity within the diversity truly feel that we're a united community which can't be said about Kish Committees. That was speaking about before in other places so those are the two main things that I see almost immediately like musing. Yeah well you say when. I was thinking about moving in the middle my seventh year. The two points that people shared as to why I shouldn't consider it. They said it's an intellectual wasteland which is totally untrue. We have people coming out to our learning events every night interesting ideas. And secondly they said it's a moral morally passive community very private very individualistic which is also completely untrue. When we have various activists campaigns people lined up lined up to show support. Who said that? And should we beat them up here? Do you want the crowd here? That can go after them. We the J. Crew here I want. I want to address the thing that you just said. So I'm kind of two minds about the activism angle. There's a part of me that thinks that it's really beautiful and essential for community of face to be very involved in you know social political elements and feel this kind of moral calling and there's another part of me that is a little bit kind of taken aback by how dominant this political discussion. Become just you know. Want to go to show just to hear the Torah just to be together with Jews and worry about that later some other place. How should we be feeling about? Its connection being social justice and question so Rambam my monitors in the third section of his guide for the perplexed. Says what's the purpose of all this stuff and answer is the welfare of the body and the welfare of the soul by which he means the well. If you have to know a little play there which we do. The welfare of the body means just state and the welfare of the sole means the perfection of the intellect so basically the goal of Judaism view is our inner life and our outer life which is to say the inner life is our ritual or beliefs or spirituality stuff. You're touching on and the outer life which he comes to say becomes the priority is that Jews should be on the front and center of fostering the Jus- -ociety and so I think we have a problem. Today I think that The traditional segment of Jewish life prioritizes the parochial and the traditional and not the universal. And I think the more liberal segments of Jewish life prioritize the universal and less of the less attritional and this middle ground of saying yes we care about the world we care society and we care about Jews. That complete package is what we're GONNA do. You agree that he taught us to call them. Yeah that's pleasure. No NOPE BRONCO. Way Back like twenty minutes back calls me peony so all my friends do so no problem. I I would agree with that. I would say though that needs to be a healthy balance of course between the two because if almost like Mark Twain said some people are so open minded that the brain spill out. Sometimes we were so much in open that we forget the message. And so we have to be steeped in the roots of Judaism very much so and yet not forget a calling to go to the outside point out also that if there is an emphasis in Judaism on which side counts the most. It's the outside if you think of the idea of Mitzvah. Most of the six hundred thirteen meets vote are outside oriented. They deal with the world that don't really deal with the internal world. I can only think I don't know maybe you can take more of to mitzvahs on top of the mind that deal with the inside. Prayer Torah study but otherwise everything else really deals with the outside so there is. I do find this emphasis on. Tacona LOMB on trying to rectify the world of course with God's light and with God's message but on the other hand also not forgetting where we come from forgetting to be a steeped in our roots as possible. Something we talk about a lot on the show. Is this idea that a lot of juice today don't necessarily feel like they can just walk into a synagogue and be welcomed or would even feel comfortable. There would even know how to get there. What do you think is the best way to connect with Jews? Who Don't haven't necessarily found their place within the institutional Jewish world thank you. They should go to the valley. Bettman rush to go ahead twenty. I was first before you go second. I'm sorry what did what are these. Mutations Paul Ince Geneva come on these guys could pull off a Juku. They've got the organization got the intellect coming the trail be stealthy. It's a fascinating question and I think that was a really good at alien one another. It's true and I think that the percentages of Jews were not engaged. Not because they're disinterested because they've been alienated is also very high and I think the challenge here is to embrace pluralism which does not bracket are absolutes but creates space for other absolutes. That means that for those of us who are really fervent beliefs. We learn how to create space for others. And those who are more relativistic and actually don't hold. Views are able to cultivate those in our space. I'm worried about those on the margins. I'm worried about single folks who have had had trouble finding partners and we were the people of Color feel alienated those of lower socioeconomic status who feel alienated Those who are converts all types of marginalized Jews that I think are. Establishments can do better being inclusive those with physical disabilities or and really a whole host of others. And I think our community is very good at embracing those who naturally fit in. I would agree also. I think it's an excellent question because he hit it right on the now. I think the biggest challenge we have is rabbis is to make Judaism not just relevant but also accessible and I would say that the lenses I try to wear as rabbi and I think that all Jews should try to wear is the lenses of what my rabbi teaches in his book. We Jews the STEINFELDT He came up with the idea that he was the first one since then. I've heard it many times. But he came up with this idea. That Judaism is not a religion. I don't approach another Jew because of religion nor do I approach another job. Because he's part of my ethnic group. Judaism is not an ethnic group. Judaism is also another nationality. We don't have to live in Israel to be Jewish. What is Judaism? Judaism is a family. I approach another Jew. Because he's my family and yes you could have two Jews and seven opinions but as another Aba of mine taught it's one heart and we can't forget that we do have one hot. We we are part of that. Same family what unites us is much greater than what divides us as the CLICHE goes. But it's not just a cliche it's the truth and therefore not do is better than me. We all have the same soul. No Jew is wiser than me. No Jew is deeper than me. I think every Jew in a way is a part of God and you can't add measurements to divinity to the infinity God is God and Jews that reflection of God he has that Jewish soul and together as a family. That's what unites us. That's what we celebrate. There's that great bit in Michigan where they say that you know. Why did God make us all descended from the same couple so that nobody could say you're better than my father is so so

Phoenix Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko Josh United States Beth Safina Rabbi Pinchas Arizona President Trump Stephanie Kish Committees Mark Twain Jus- -Ociety Paul Ince Dina Israel Michigan Bettman Juku
Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

Fresh Air

08:10 min | 1 year ago

Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

"Let's get back to the interview. Fresh air's Dave Davies recorded yesterday with science writer. David common about the new Corona Rona virus epidemic which broke out in Wuhan China. Kwame ince's the corona virus is just the latest example of how were increasingly contracting dangerous. Viral infections since from animals in his book spillover published in Twenty twelve kwame attractive viruses spilled over from animals to infect humans with HIV West S. Nile fever anthrax. Bola and another from the corona virus family SARS severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China China. You know you're right. That as scientists tried to track down the source of the SARS virus back in two thousand three and four. They focused on this practice in southern China of eating and in some cases raising wild animals. Not kind of things that you typically think of as food or or where we don't want to just explain this trend and how it figured you're into this yes There is a vogue. There has been a vogue for eating wildlife wild animals when I was in Southern China researching searching the book only briefly. I got to see some of these markets. Where all form of wild animal were on sale A lot of the trade by the time I got there had gone underground because it was suppressed after the SARS outbreak but then it gradually came back and it had been allowed to continue in you again and proliferate win this new virus began but if you go into a live market and you see cages containing bats stacked upon cages containing porcupines stacked upon cages containing palm civics stacked upon cages containing chickens and hygiene is not great and and the animals are defecating on one. Another it's just a natural mixing bowl situation for viruses. It's very very dangerous situation and and one of the things that it allows. Dave is something that we haven't mentioned. I think so far and that is the occurrence of of amplifying hosts hosts that are not the reservoir host the permanent hiding ground of a new virus but represent intermediates between the reservoir of our host and the human population for instance those horses in Australia. From the point of view of a horse they were ultimate hosts and they were being killed by this virus but from the human point of view they were amplifier hosts the virus got into them it multiplied abundantly it caused them to froth and Chauque and bleed through their nostrils veterinarians and trainers. Were trying to take care of them. They amplified the virus. So that One trainer in one stable form and got very sick from that virus in the case of this new corona virus. One of the questions is was there. An amplifier host in that wet market where these cages are stacked are called wet markets white wire called wet markets. Well assume they're called wet markets because the animals are alive alive rather than butchered and in dead and refrigerated They're also wet. Because there's there's water flowing everywhere. They usually have seafood as well as as wild mammals and birds As I said hygiene isn't great. Animals are being butchered on plywood. Boards blood is flowing down into the gutters in the water and there is just a great Liquidity Mix in these markets at at their worst now when scientists were trying to track down the origin of the SARS virus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome which was associated with the virus in in the early two thousands. They eventually focused focused on something called the civic cat What is that? That's right the civic cat is not really a cat. It's more accurately called the palm palm civic the civic type of mammal that belongs to the to the family of Mongooses But it's a it's a medium sized animal and and it is both captured from the wild for food and captive bred and raised for food And it was the first big eggs suspect of In the SARS outbreak It was found that some of the people who got sick very early on had eaten a butchered civic and so in the civic head though the the antibody for this this virus right and they and they tested him civics and they found they found evidence of the virus. They found antibodies. Antibodies or fragments of DNA A. R. N. A.. In these civics suggesting that they had been infected with the virus and That didn't prove they were the reservoir host but it made them the number one suspect until a couple of Chinese scientists did further work and they established that in fact virus was not living permanently in the civic population in the wild or in captivity. It was it had a different reservoir host it was living in bats and it had passed presumably market somewhere it had passed from a bat into one or more sits and they became the amplifier host. Right and the the Chinese government I think decreed that all sits in captivity would be slaughtered. Right that's right. Thousands of sits in captivity were butchered an an electric electrocuted and and smothered and drowned In this I panicked blind reaction in China to the SARS outbreak. Now when you were looking at you actually went to China with and spent some time in the field with people who were investigating this right. Tell us tell us about that experience. I I went. I went with a fellow named Alexi. Kamara was working as a researcher for a group. That's called ECO health alliance based in New York A group of disease scientists who study see these emerging viruses these emerging pathogens in animals around the world. They generally have cross training in Virology Veterinary Medicine Ecology combinations nations of skills so Alexi was one of them Alexi and a number of Chinese colleagues and I flew to a city called Gua Lynn In the province of Guangdong southern China and we went out climbing into into caves that caves in the karst mountains the limestone stone mountains and hills outside of the city of Gwynn Looking to trap Various different kinds of small bats insectivores bats not giant fruit bats Small bats at lived in these caves including Horseshoe bats which is a particular group of bats so that Alexi and his colleagues could draw draw blood samples and test those for Looking for the SAR SARS virus that point or or any other virus that suspect unit. Just describe a little bit of what what it felt like to be trapping bats and these caves well. It was a little bit claustrophobic. It's not for everybody. Had Castle Castro. We climbed through. We climbed on our bellies through a very low hole to get into one of these caves. We had we had to squirm down and then and up through this whole to get into the cave and then the cave opened out and Alexi and his Chinese colleagues had essentially pillowcases and butterfly nets. And that's how we caught these bats. The Bat started flying around and they would catch them in butterfly nets and they were wearing gloves and and they would untangle a bat from a butterfly net and then Drop it into one of these cloth bags that were like pillowcases. And in this case as I recall they they would tire tied the knot often then handed to me and I would go over and and hanging on sort of a clothesline. So that the bad dangle and we were doing this I don't know if we were in there for a couple of hours oddly enough. We were not wearing masks of any sort we were not wearing with the called. Personal Protective Equipment has met suits or anything and and described this in the book. I asked Alexi. Why the hell

Alexi China Sars Kwame Ince Dave Davies China China Wuhan China Bola David Australia Writer Respiratory Syndrome Chauque Guangdong Southern China Personal Protective Equipment Kamara A. R. N. New York Castle Castro Virology Veterinary Medicine E
"ince" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"ince" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Nation insurance agents stock brokers and registered investment advisers and that the three have three different sets of regulatory requirements and obligations and consumers are unaware of all the above so explain what the landscape as yeah so what the insurance agents when they give you advice for small that's regulated at the state level in sure Ince's regulated at the state level in states typically are interested in just making sure insurance companies are there to fulfill their obligations to their policy holders but not there there has been much movement in terms of what would you give advice on insurance it's got to be in the customer's best interest or at at a fiduciary standard anything like that there's a little bit of movement we saw New York recently they passed a best interest standard for everybody giving advice on insurance and annuities actually the insurance part of that goes into effect tomorrow but for the most part there's no such requirement to that in insurance recommendation be in your best interest move on to brokers brokers historically been held to what's called the suitability standard meaning the advice I give you must be suitable for your needs but it doesn't have to necessarily be the best recommendation or the recommendation that's in your best interests and it also only has to be suitable for you at the time I give you the recommendations if your circumstances change a month for a year later a well no obligation to come back and revisit all your circumstances change you retired you got an inheritance you got married you got divorced you had kids anything like that that happens in life no there's no requirement to go back and revisit that recommendation angry and sleep made it may I wonder contribute to the fact that mention on last week's program survey came out with this annual survey that I remember who does it but then they rank the occupations in terms of their honesty and ethics as perceived by consumers nurses ranked number one engineers and physicians and pharmacists are two three and four without over eighty five percent say that they are honest and ethical stock brokers and insurance agents twelve thirteen percent say that they're honest and ethical which is I think consumers are onto it I think they recognize you know this person is really trying to sell me something right not necessarily trying to serve me and that is their job to sell you something their sales people as opposed to the third category mentioned registered nurse from advisers their job is to advise you in your best interest to understand the totality of your life and your financial circumstances and make recommendations that are in your best interest and the advisors and our firm element financial engines are all we are a registered investment advisory firm and under our licensing with the SEC we're required to act as a fiduciary in the client's best interests I hasten to add that being an R. I. A. doesn't convey in education level or skill set it's just a regulatory requirement we have we do it anyway because it's the right thing to do but we're required to do it I think it's also fair to say that most you might even tell me all of the financial advisors who are here at this conference are also registered investment advisers that's correct but it is a small subset of the entire or investment advisory community you've got hundreds of thousands of stockbrokers you've got more than a million insurance agents there are relatively speaking aren't all that many registered investment advisers there are thirty thousand registered investment advisory firms in this country so compared to the numbers you just threw out of brokers insurance agents it's very small now some of those firms you have one of the larger firms in the industry have the largest thank you all are just not one of have perhaps hundreds of it by three hundred twenty American hundred twenty your most have of course the other small shops Waffen a one person shot off in a one person shop maybe one to five so there are far fewer registered investment advisors out there than brokers or insurance agents and not as well known I mean these because most are very small firms they don't have the marketing budgets that the big boys have the big box brokerage firms have in the big insurance companies so do not seem to Superbowl ad from an advisory firm and therefore consumers are hearing about them very much and even if they did they don't recognize the distinction they don't realize there is a regulatory difference between an insurance agent a stockbroker and a financial adviser and all three might at one point or another be talking with you about a new lease or life insurance or mutual funds or stocks and bonds and you don't know that there's a regulatory difference in their behavior their obligations to you as a vendor and so what difference does it make which one I high what makes a lot of difference as you know but I agree that consumers you know a lot of this is really legally use kind of things when you use a word like fiduciary and that's hard for a most consumers to understand you and I live it high so we understand it but there's a huge difference in the standard as opposed to you know one of those groups are two of those groups their job literally their job is to sell you something an insurance product a mutual fund the stock something like that that is their job that's how they get paid to sell you something and often times we see very high commission levels in some of those products and some of those very high commission levels tend to get sold a lot and that creates conflicts of interest why is this person telling me to buy this product is it because it's good for me good for them very valid question and if I'm leaving my employer let's say and I have this for one K. balance that I have accumulated and I don't know what to do with it and I go to consult with someone about what to do with it and that person has several products on the shelf one which pays a maybe a four percent commission of one pays in the seven percent commission one pays them a ten percent commission and maybe their kids tuition bill just came in the mail yesterday yeah human interest tends to win out and so well so you the product that earns them higher commission and by definition if it's paying them higher commission inherently it's going to have a higher expense and cost do you often which is going to be I'll use the word head that's not what they would say they would say it's fully disclosed in the prospectus on page forty seven in the four point type yeah written by lawyers to be read by other lawyers correct it's not in the glossy sales literature it wasn't a high let it slide in that free lunch seminar you went to the home page of the website exactly and so this creates a a challenging environment so in the face of that what action steps would you recommend consumers take to help them make sure that the advice and services they're getting or those that they're truly sick I think to ask a couple of questions would be wise to someone approaches you about financial advice for let's say a friend referred you to a financial advice provider ask that person how do you get paid what your conflicts of interest how do I know your recommendations are going to be in my best interest questions like that are you a fiduciary that's a simple question again most people don't know what a fiduciary as but if a teacher is someone is legally required to act in the another's best interest and that raises an interesting element out of the answer but it was really simple it's it's yes or no I are you with sherry yes or no and if they are at the answer's yes they should be giving you a copy of their former ATV a federal disclosure document that lists all of the important information the FCC feels you want to know about your adviser so they can either give you this form where they can't and if I can't that means they're not really an RIAA right but it goes a step further there are a lot of advisors who are what we call duly registered as they are register both as a broker sometimes also even as an insurance agent for the Tripoli licensed right as what was being licenses in our a a which means you have to wonder are they always acting as a fiduciary or only some of the time and at what part of the interaction I have with them are they acting with the white hat as opposed to a black cat at what point are they acting in my best interest and what part of the acting as a sales person and I think those questions should be asked and it comes down to two if they meet with you and ask you questions about your situation are they advising me to open a brokerage account which is not subject to future standard for advisory account as wearing there are a half or the white hat as you referred to it then their fiduciary but it does get really confusing when the same person has two hats on their shelf that they can wear gets doubly confusing for consumers what steps are being taken by the regulators clearly they're fully aware of this situation the circumstance yet at the state as well as federal level you've got the SEC and federal what's going on in the regulatory environment to help level the playing field create the protections for consumers that we're that we need one of the things we're seeing is this regulation best interest that was finalized by the SEC last year it goes into effect June thirtieth of this year where every consumer existing clients and future new clients we'll have to get a two page disclosure document saying among other things I'm a fiduciary or I'm a broker or and here's my conflicts of interest in her so I get paid and the SEC is mandating that this disclosure document be no more than two pages because if it's a hundred into ages they know will get read right second thing they did as part of that role was they said if you're not an adviser you can no longer call yourself an adviser this is gotten very confusing in the market place as well if I'm a broker I call myself an adviser because I kind of sound like a registered investment adviser fiduciary trouble as with all those dual registrants you talked about they are advisors the registered as advisors so they can still call themselves advisors yes he's he's really trying to make this clearer for consumers but consumers still need to take responsibility for themselves their own situation axles question and a lot of consumer groups including the consumer federation of America and others are unhappy with the SEC's regulation B. I. best interest because they say it doesn't go far enough it creates confusion more than clarity in a lot of areas and there's hope in many circles that the SEC will strengthen the regulation what's your view of this you're right in pointing out the consumer groups have been generally opposed to this I work closely with barb Roper on a lot of issues who heads the consumer federation of America people at a a RP and other consumer groups as well they felt this rule should have been stronger and better defensive consumers they're actually a couple of lawsuits against the SEC a on this regulation best interests seeking to overturn it and have them come out with something that stronger you never know how lawsuits are going to turn out but there certainly is some opposition and thought that it should be stronger and so what it means for us as consumers as you pointed out is don't assume that the government is going to be there to help you they're trying but in the meantime the burden is on you you're the consumer it's your money at your life so savings treated as such well said that's good try sees managing director at TD Ameritrade institutional thanks so much for.

Ince
The Most Helpful Response When Your Child Gets Hurt

Janet Lansbury Podcast

11:52 min | 1 year ago

The Most Helpful Response When Your Child Gets Hurt

"Hello Janet Hope you are well. My son is almost two. Who in your advice has been so helpful to us? I found a few experiences recently with another child pushing or hitting my son when I'm not close enough to prevent it. I'm watching him from no more than five feet away. which seems close at the time but so far when something happens as I'm watching his face and body language after the incident he it seems a little shocked but fine however the adults who are closer to him will quickly react rushing to his side saying things like are you okay? This is happening while I'm I'm coming towards him and by the time they're with him he so upset and emotional. It just happened so fast I can tell that. It's the reactions from the adults that have really really upset and scared him. I basically just pick him up and let them cry until he's done because I'm not sure what else to do. I hope to prevent this from happening again by being closer. It's so hard to guarantee that I will always be able to prevent incidents like this and I can't control other people's reactions I question for you is in those instances ince's after the pushing and reactions already happened. Would you handle the situation any differently. Any thoughts you have. I would be honored to hear we appreciate you. Okay so thanks for all those kind words of appreciation. I love this mother's instincts. It sounds like she is observing in tune in and really seeing her child so she's getting a very accurate perception of what's going on with him. We have to remember that children take take in situations much more slowly than we do because they don't have that easy frame of reference for what happened there just learning about everything in their world and what goes on and I'm sure she's correct in that maybe at first he is she says shocked but shocked is even too strong a word for what the children feel sometimes. It's just surprised. They are startled. So something happened. Ouch but it sounds like it didn't hurt a lot. And then he's absorbing thing adults who out of their concern. These instincts people have are positive of course but they're rushing in indicating to him that something upsetting just happened and that's kind of scary all this energy around him like something very wrong there. So then he's responding to that and getting upset upset so yes this mother is spot on in what she sees here. The only thing about this experience that I might eight adjust a little for this parent is where she says she basically just picks him up and let's them cry until he's done because she's not sure what else to do. If these people were very close in hovering around him yes might pick him up but I recommend always being careful about picking up because when we swoop a child up it can indicate to them that we see this as an emergency as well that we see something. They need to be rescued from so I wouldn't do that unless people were so close in in his face that really. That's the only way I can extricate him and help him to process and have a moment around this what I might might do if I didn't feel I needed to pick him up. Right away is on my knees next to him or squatting down say something like wow. Yeah there's lots of people concerned about you right here. And I would be looking at him acknowledging that open to his feelings that he has a right to have needs to express grass. I would just be there for him to let him share with me while I'm also acknowledging what's going on and his feelings around it but if everybody nobody was really all over him and I couldn't get any space or with him than I would pick him up and say let's go over here. I want to bring you closer back and then we would go. Wherever you know was comfortable and then I would at that point do that acknowledging to whatever feelings he had and then when he seemed to recover? That's when I might say I saw what happened. Another child came by pushed. And if I had seen where where that came from I might say it seemed like you were in his way or her way or it seemed like they were running around and they pushed. I don't know why or it seemed like they wanted the toy that you had so they hit you. I would give that information if I had it so that my child could have a chance to understand and what happened here and interestingly children actually do seem to understand that other children's sometimes hidden push because they have those impulses themselves. This is what I've noticed working with groups of toddlers for many years and they forgive because they can on some level empathize with that. And that's not to say that. I would expect my child to do that but I wouldn't come from a place of saying that child is bad although although what they did is wrong. I wouldn't demonize that child because what that can do is actually make our child feel. Oh there's a lot of judgment going on here and when I do those things I'm going to be seen as bad instead of a child with an impulse. That got away from him or her so these are all reasons just for us to dial back and tried to regulate our own emotions around these incidents. There are a lot of reasons that we might react. Act more emotionally like these people around the child did. Maybe we see young children as very helpless. We don't see capable person person there or maybe we've just had a really rough day and if this happens to our child especially it's like the last straw you know just hurts us senate and it triggers something in us or it could be that we want to show that we care and we feel that that's the to do it or if it was our child that did is something wrong. We feel guilty. And so we're kind of overdoing it. All those things make sense and they happen but these projections objections and emotional responses that we have are something to look at so that we can give our child messages of basic competence a feeling that he is safe in the world. Yes we'll be there to protect but he doesn't need to be rescued and overprotected again. This parent who wrote this note to me has very very healthy instincts. That's because she is. It sounds like practiced observer and and that's one of the many reasons observation is such an important practice for parents. It gives us a chance to understand the situation and clear away a our own projections around judgments around it which all get in the way of understanding it so now I want to offer some basic guidelines for as as I said any incident where child gets hurt even just a little bit hurt falls down etc first of all. We're going to move close to prevent more from happening to keep her child safe. So if that child that pushed was still there. Now I'm ready to block it. Just this his parent wasn't right on her child. I don't recommend being right on top of children giving them that distance that they seem to want allowing them to move away from us in a situation and choose to be that confident explore leaving their secure base. That's important to trust so no. We're not going to be right on top of our child. If we see that there's some action around that might end up hurting our child or we see see a child who seems very regulated that might be harmful yes than we would move closer for sure and if our child is using equipment that never used used and they're climbing we want to be there ready to spot as needed but this parents instinct around that was right so sometimes I hear from parents friends who have unfortunately misinterpreted this advice as just not supposed to do anything and so I just hang back and let my child. I'll work it out or gets hurt. That's absolutely not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about being very observant. Not Sitting back and and just letting things be but seeing clearly and coming into the situation from a place of Atonement and definitely keeping my child safe and the other child safe. So we're GONNA move close and the speed at which we move is going to be based on the urgency of the situation relation in this situation that this parent describes it. Sounds like he was going to be kept safe because adults were around him. So my sense that would be not to add my own urgency to the situation by running in because he had enough about urgent energy around him for sure and it. It wasn't an emergency situation where I needed to come in and keep him safe right away so I would walk in. I would stride in to where he was as his mother. Says we can't control what other people do but we can control what we're adding to the situation and as the parents we we are the most powerful for sure what we feel is going to be felt by our child other people can get him wound up that at least it's not gonna becoming from us so we move closed that's number one number two we tune in and we take our cues from him. What are we see on his face? If a child falls let's say they may not even need us to go in if they're just tripping and falling down so we might check him out check her out from whatever distance were at what kind of expression in my seeing their. Did this hurt badly or was it just a surprise. What am I seeing here? Taking my own worries out of the picture if I can just seeing there I might say well I saw that you you fell are you okay. I'm going to tune in. I'M GONNA ACKNOWLEDGE IF my child was crying or if I saw that it was a bigger fall out it looks like that hurt and now going to be coming closer. My goal is to be responsive rather than reactive. Third thing I would do is Knowledge whatever feelings my child has in this case with the adults around him. He's upset I would say yeah I see either lots of people around you. There concerned or if he was reacting to being hit or pushed and he was getting upset around that then I I would say oh. Ouch you got hit. That really hurts. I might ask if he's okay but I'm not trying to talk my child out of their feelings or tell hell him he's okay getting to cry about something or be upset about something helps us to feel better and move through it. Feelings are healing and and then the fourth step that I recommend is where we say what we now and this is when our child is starting to come down on his own own so he's able to hear this and this is also another reason not to swoop children at bad situations when they fall down because because then my child has totally disconnected from what just happened. They've just been rescued into this other place. They don't even know how they got

Janet Hope Senate Ince
10 Steps to Launching a Successful Podcast

Podcasting Tips & Tricks with Lyndal Harris

14:12 min | 2 years ago

10 Steps to Launching a Successful Podcast

"Step number one is creating the a strategy. Now this is not a small step. It's not a step that's going to take you ten or fifteen minutes. It's about sitting down and gnashing out your purpose knowing who your audience is knowing if they listen to podcasts. Knowing what message you're going to share with the world how are you going to share. That message is going to be interviewed. You through stories or monologue are you going to do solo shows that educating people using case studies etc etc so really when you work out that pace up front the rest of it will fall into place. Sorry that first step as I mentioned is not going to be a quick fix step. It's it's something that you really do need to spend some time particularly if your podcast I lines to a business which has mentioned a few times mainly my clients and my listeners have a podcast launch their business so you really need to work out how that is going to work at the top of your funnel and how it might work to get people people into your email list. Hey might bring them through your funnel so that they are interested in your products and services. The one thing I have found here is where clients lions. Don't have that clear lawn. Meant podcasting becomes a very big chore. A big project. That isn't really working for them. So if you get this point clave upfront or if you sit down and spend some time now if you already have a podcast working out if you need to change tact to make it funnel title into Your Business then it's something that helps you with the next steps in implementing your podcast launch. The second step to talk about that is choosing a podcast title and creating a tagline. So when you're looking at doing a title there's a few different ways you can name the shy after yourself you. You can name the Shari after topic that people are looking for or you could name it. Something really quirky this a few different things to think about he. If you are. We're going to go with the quirky style of name. Then I think it is very important to have clear tagline because people are not going to be searching on your quirky night. Most of the time. If you're going to name the show after yourself. I think that works well if you have a following I think if you haven't got a following in your starting from scratch touch than that might not be the best way to do it but perhaps using a word or a couple of K.. Words in your todd might be a better way. If you're launching launching to know audience and wanting to grow remembering down the track you can actually change the name of your podcast but there's a couple of steps within this step that I think you need to take and that is google searching as well as going into apple podcast directory and searching the name in there as well as has possibly even looking if the deny name is taken. Because you don't want to get everything ready get your out work done right this amazing description get everything ready. Ready to launch his Shari to realize after you've launched his show that there's already one out there called that Oh very similar or there's already a business name out there with that who it could very easily come and ask you to change your name and if they have tried mock you will have to change the name of your shy suspending. A A little bit of time there can be really beneficial so that you know that you can move forward with that name. Now having a tagline a lot of the high seas days Ask for a tagline again. That can be really short and really specific. It could be telling people what you're going to talk about. It might be telling people who the main audiences ince's but Cape it really clea and this is where you can wave in some k words as well obviously not keyword stuffing this section nine step number three is getting your cover. Art created neck creating a cover it needs to be to a very specific dimensions. Otherwise is apple. PODCASTS will not accept it so you need to actually get a cover art created that is between fourteen hundred and fourteen hundred pixels up to three thousand by by three thousand pixels if you are looking to do this yourself. Canvas does have An option as well in their cold album art and ye can go in there and use that to play around with but if you create something at eight hundred eight hundred you won't be able to upload that into your hoist waist and submitted to the podcast directories. It'll come back with an era so just be really mindful of the size of it. Now when we're told me about the design of it something you want to keep in mind is that most people are looking at the Thumb Nile on a device like mobile or an IPAD. People might look at it on the computer screen and when you start creating it it looks messy when it's on your screen that when you're looking at it on a mobile phone it's a thumbnail size and so with that in mind you want something that really pops out if someone is looking through the lists and you want something that has not got too much wording on it. Because if I'm looking at on on the phone I can't read what you're tagline is or if you've put a couple of sentences explaining what the podcast is about so really Cape it minimal. If it's a business as miss podcast you might decide to keep it aligned with the branding of your business so using the same France or the same colors or the same imagery But just think about something that will pop out when you're looking at it on something as small as well. Fine step for is rushing your podcast description. And now you'll podcast. Description is super important is what people look at after the name of your Shari and can have a big impact on whether people actually want to listen and subscribe so here is where you want to craft it really carefully include some keywords. In he waves the main again don't use it as a place. Nice to keywords staff but think about what people might be searching because it is what will potentially show when people are searching for certain things things in the podcast directories so choose your words carefully. Maybe ask a few questions or identify the audience that you want to listen to the Shari but make sure you spend a little bit of time. Crafting a really good podcast description. Now a little word of advice here is Don. Have a look at podcasts. That you really enjoy Oy and go and have a look have I've written description or perhaps just even search through some of the podcasts that you subscribe to and just the different ways that people arriving them because it is a Cape Cod of your podcast for especially if somebody's new to you or in your new in your audience. Then they may well look at the name of your podcast. Then they're going to look at the description to say if they wanted then go and have a listen to it. Creating creating an intron altro is step number five. So creating an intro at troy now this is something that will do a whole episode on in itself self and in fact quite a few of these steps will have their own podcast episode in future. But when you're looking at creating your insurance at tre it's about getting a pace of royalty free music music and blending it with Voice Iva so a lot of people in the past tended to get a voice of oddest on whether it's through an agency or on Fava and get them to record it but I am finding now with the Solo podcasters. It's probably more common now for the actual podcast. A true record that voice over element and then blend it together with the music now. One one point of note he is remembering that your intro and Atra is part of your podcast branding. Sorry really make sure that that music AAC is aligned with your brand but is also aligned with what your audience would expect. I have listened to podcasts broadcasts in the past where the music is tar surely not aligned with what I thought the podcast cost is about and you do feel like there is a real disconnect this. Sorry if you don't want to or you can't find something on the music sites then you can always get somebody to create a bespoke piece of music for you. That might be more in alignment but just take into account found that your personal taste in music might not be the best music to choose your podcast intro. Step step number. Six is choosing your recording platform and device. So he now at step number six is where I start to say. That the software and the microphones and the the equipment is something that you should think about can say that the first five steps on even thinking about which microphone and a lot of people get dotted. Did on that first question of which microphone. Should I use but I think you really need to be looking at some of those steps. Step one two five. I nine nylon down the branding and the strategy and the description of your podcast before you even start to look at software equipment. I would suggest that you do some research coach when you're buying your microphone and find something that suits your requirements. Because there are different microphones that are better in different types of spices spices. So you really want to think about where you recording are you in a room that has carpet and curtains and cushions can soften the echo or. He's he's sitting in a tiled room with Florida sailing gloss windows with a very high ceiling which will obviously have a lot of reverb so you just need to be mindful about way Eh. You'll do most of your recording. Some people are out on the road recording since I need to have different. Equipment and different microphones again. I interviewing people all the time going to interview in person or you're going to do it over a platform like zoom. Aw then Castro something like that so really be mindful about that before you just go go out and go looking for a microphone to stop podcasting now when it comes to software. There's lots of different suggestions. Some of the editing editing platforms that you might want to look at the garage band or density. Oh Gosh there's a Darby addition this. Sorry many different editing editing programs that you can use their good ones to start off with To actually record interviews you might want to look at Zoom. You might look at then. Kosta or squat broadcast or something like that Bay mindful when you're recording an interview that you won't use paces software that can split the tracks per person because does it just makes the editing a whole cleaner if you've got two tracks unfortunately skype don't offer that in their recording at the moment sorry I tend to sort of veer away from recommending skype. Because it doesn't have it in its inbuilt platform if you do use a third party record with skype then that Martin allow you to have those split tracks but just the skype recorder doesn't at this stage step. Seven is to download a piece of software. A cold or phonic when you edited your episode together year. He's a pace of software called phonic which it's an automatic audio I post production tool and it just levels everything it gets it to the right bit right. It gets it to the right volume for podcasts. And it can level level tracks if you've got a guest that's quieter than the highest etcetera etcetera and it just finishes it off at Polishes at the end. Sorry than that step is download off organic step. Eight is to create your hosting account. Now there are a whole range of different heists out usually I will sit sit with recommending. Someone like Washer Omni Studio. Lipson pod Bain. That's just to name a few but the way that podcast works. Is You sign up to a host and you integrate that. RSS Feed you. Get through the host with the different directories like apple podcast. Google podcasts spotify. STITCHER radio I heart radio all the other directories where you have your podcast appearing. And then all you need to do is upload h episode to Your Hosting Account Count and that will push it out to the various directories step number nine is submitting your podcast to the various directories. Sorry it's it's you. Set up your hoisting. And can't you sit up your show details and your artwork and you description and you've uploaded the first couple of episodes and then you want to submit it to apple podcast awesome stitcher and spotify now. Google podcast is a slightly different process. So you might just want to Google how to get your podcast on Google podcasts. It costs And you can google any of the directories that you want to get onto all you might find really helpful resources in the help and support section of of your host cell look that up and lastly step number ten is post your podcast on your website and share it everywhere on social media because that promotion pace is super important. When you're launching your podcast? You might decide that you want to do little tasers. You might do some days of videos. You might let your audience know via email marketing that you're going to release a podcast shortly but the promotion is super important now. There's a lot of talk about how to get into the charts and everything on apple podcasts. And I can tell you that. The charts are based on the activity within a seven day period. Did and so if you have a lot of people subscribing within a seven day period and listening to your podcast then you're more likely to be pushed up the charts that way

Apple Google Shari Spotify France Skype Thumb Nile Todd Ince Voice Iva Florida Castro Fava Kosta
Vitamines and Vitamins

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Vitamines and Vitamins

"In nineteen twelve a Polish biochemist Casimir funk published an article all about food substances that could prevent diseases such as Berry Berry and scurvy. FUNK's analysis showed that these disease preventing food substances might might be members of a family of chemicals called AAH means these substances were vital for a healthy diet so funk called them vital AAH means or vitamins vitamins spelled like vitamins but with an e at the end that was nineteen twelve by one thousand nine sixteen there was evidence that these disease preventing running food substances might not actually be what chemists call means the name vitamin was thrown out in favor of the names fat-soluble Hay hey and water soluble be only those two types were known at the time in one thousand nine hundred twenty another chemist wrote that the names fat soluble able a and water soluble B were unwieldy he suggested dropping the e from the old word vitamin and calling the substances ince's vitamins whatever the substances might turn out to be the name vitamin would

Casimir Funk Berry Berry Ince HAY
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Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

01:24 min | 2 years ago

test

"Brian Good Morning Komo how you doing excellent and you know the we talk a lot we talk a lot about the regional programs and Maryland millions last week and they got the Ohio people this week and you know go back to the end of the Press Kyle season we had the two year old and Pennsylvania obviously people are taking advantage of the opportunity to to race in Pennsylvania and drop their foles absolutely and as you know the great news it came out this week is that Pennsylvania's up twelve point five percent in mayors red when I look at the number because I did a a you know report myself of say how come we're only twelve point five percent well there was a is a mix up with the uptown Charlie Brown I looked at him he had one mayor Brady actually had seventy three Mares Brit and they straightened that out there apparent elitist mix up the jockey club so that was straightened out yesterday so be add his seventy two on there we're actually twenty four percent over over last year and actually I think we're we're probably going to be up a little bit more net whenever he says everything said and done but you're right I mean Optical are are are GonNa go where the program is the is is the best and I think one of the most important the things is the collaboration we have with the horsemen groups at at the retraction Pennsylvania you know they they're very good about helping Pennsylvania program and You know we paid out over thirty million dollars eight years in a row looks like we're going to be had that number again this year so a lot of good things happening NPA the advantage for those that you know the track this kind of information and it's ebbs and flows I mean there's there's programs that a that have had trouble all you have to do is look at New Jersey and whenever there's uncertainty mayor owners breeders whether they're breeding to race or breeding commercially. They're going to go where they can plan ahead and nobody wants uncertainty and ah that that really has been the continuity and there were some there were some concerns about the the money that that comes toward the the breeding and racing in Pennsylvania that bloomer those those fears were allayed though and and you know the state stands Harrisburg understands the benefits of supporting the program given what it does for the farm community and all the trickle down economies correct we three years ago we put the Racehorse Development on in a trust Why don't sweat say we legislate Peter's put it in a trust and so people are now confident that that money is going to be the air because you know like you said you know commitment is in for a year your commitment coming in it's probably five or six years and the getting some you know some more running in you know you're seeing that with the with the new standards that are coming into Pennsylvania I mean with the opportunity the Warriors Reward Uptown Charlie Brown's doing Doing fantastic uncle Lino peace and just this we just Dr Solomon at Pin Oak Lane form Just ince contract for Normandy in Beijing becoming in another tap it so you know things when when people are confident that you know programs on the right track you know you'll see you'll see that by you know the uptick in the Palm Mares bread and and home owners coming in the mid Atlantic we talk we talk on a regular basis this summer and into the early fall with with Alan Norman and the match series and we had a Lotta conversations about Virginia and the the reboot of of racing there and there's you know there's really kind of an inter- intertwined network really for for people that that race in the mid Atlantic I mean with all the the various program awards that breeders and again whether you breathe a racer or you breathe to sell it folded in Delaware certification and Virginia certification and then if you dropped your foal in Pennsylvania Oh my God it oh you I've I've said this a few times can you can literally win a purse and all the awards could be seventy five percent over and above what you want is a purse right I mean you can you can look at that horse was bred by peasy Patterson and Vicki so we call Paul who WanNa Delaware certified the stake a young won a couple of stakes in Pennsylvania a bread I mean you just you know you can't ask for anything better what run down the awards we haven't talked about this in a long time what are the percentages and are they structured well Both breeders and owners benefit from the plan are free your award for maiden made races is fifty percents are a breeder that's horses twenty five percents so we're taking care of them to any other races the Breeder Award Forty Percent Twenty Percent for others owner bonuses up to forty percents at parks and twenty percent of pen and thirty percent at Chris Kyle we have hundreds of restricted races every year we just put in a waiver of Maine claiming So any maiden want us I'm sorry not any meaning Clinton but at at Penn gene maiden claiming race it's twenty five or higher you can waive the claim if you have a PA at parks it's the maiden claiming twenty where you can waive the wave the claim when we wanted to we wanted to give our breeders and opportune unity to get back some of that money that they put out and they're harder time and effort before the horses eligible declined because as you know in Pennsylvania decent Pennsylvania bread boom that's suckers gone and we we also have have discussed you mentioned call Paul who's competed at the highest level but the the string of Pennsylvania bread great at stake with there's and Breeders Cup runners winters I it the whole program has has just gotten better and better given the quality of bears that the state has attracted and these are successes that kind of feed on on themselves and you mentioned Pinot there's there's any number of people that that understand these dynamics and are going to take advantage and that's why the mayors are showing up and it's a boon to a farm operators in the breeding operators absolutely I mean we're we're breathing we're seeing an increase in the number of foles and also an increase in the quality. I mean we have Prince Lucky running tomorrow and a bold ruler we have mirth that pre entered in the the only American her while we have daddy is a legend who ran a nice racer yesterday a tune-up for the matriarch stakes so you're seeing you know you're seeing this happen you know to eclipse award winners last year Shamrock rose and Bella Unique Belvedere before finest city year before that so you know we're just you know we're we're we're we're

Pennsylvania Brian Good Maryland Charlie Brown Bella Unique Belvedere New Jersey Brady Ohio Five Percent Thirty Million Dollars Seventy Five Percent Twenty Four Percent Twenty Percent Thirty Percent Forty Percent Eight Years Three Years Six Years Two Year
"ince" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ince" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Von Ince's greedy landlords are intentionally keeping thousands of units off the market in other cities in Vancouver in Paris in Washington DC and in Oakland they have all instituted a form of an empty homes healthy LA's first step is to get a count of how many units are empty any penalty for landlords would have to be approved by voters the news is brought to you by my count choice dot com a man who claimed Kevin Spacey sexually assaulted him in Malibu has died the man who worked as a massage therapist as he was attacked by BC two years ago while giving the actor a massage the men filed a lawsuit against Basey who has been accused by more than a dozen guys of sexual misconduct the lawsuit may be able to be continued by the man's a state sales been denied for American Airlines mechanic in Miami accused of messing with the plane's navigation system before a flight to the Bahamas the man told police in July he did it out of frustration over stalled contract talks and won in overtime to Turkey says prosecutors told a judge today Abdul Majeed a lot he has ties to ISIS federal prosecutors said the FBI found an ISIS video on a cell phone the judge denied a Lonnie bond concerned he could be sympathetic to terrorists the rigs flight was canceled after the crew noticed problems during take off preparations. median Sascha Baron Cohen is asking a judge to throw out a ninety five million dollar defamation lawsuit filed by a Senate candidate Alabama accused by several women of sexual misconduct the lawsuit stems from Colin series who is America in the episode with more Cullen played a fictitious former Israeli intelligence officer who played who claimed eight security one could detect header files. so it is this still the jacket yes more ended up losing a special Senate election in twenty seventeen he's running again in twenty twenty lawyers say more signed an agreement waving all legal claims and the show segment was satire protected by the.

Turkey Colin Senate Washington officer Cullen America Alabama Sascha Baron Cohen Lonnie bond FBI Abdul Majeed Von Ince Bahamas Miami American Airlines Basey BC Malibu
Possibilities and Advantages in Machine Learning With Jonathan Ross, CEO and Founder at Groq

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:09 min | 2 years ago

Possibilities and Advantages in Machine Learning With Jonathan Ross, CEO and Founder at Groq

"Listening to me. Dan Vigil with Jonathan Ross of Brock Huron a industry Jonathan. I wanted to start us off with a first topic. Just not up a term that I'm almost certain our audience isn't intimately familiar with which is software defined compute. Can you define that and thanks for asking so the word software defined has been used a bit in hardware art where in particular networking and recently it's been used by several different companies for describing what they're doing with accelerators and the reason they talk about this this is there's a conception that when you're building custom a six for machine learning that they may not be considerable or they may not be programmable what it really means is for machine learning in particular since it takes quite a long time to build a chip two to three years and the machine learning models are changing so rapidly that oftentimes you're unable to build a chip as quickly as the researchers are coming up new techniques new machine learning models yeah so yeah and so to be to be able to build something that people wanna use have to make it very flexible and so software defined really just means that you're making a device that will be adaptable to what coming in the future in so adaptable what's coming in the future. Obviously he's very open ended because neither you nor I have any precise idea of what that it is. It sounds as though this is an unschooled perspective here my good man I know a decent amount about GPS and about a at a conceptual level that we need to sort of get a sense of what kinds of algorithms what kinds of use cases what kinds of essentially processing might happen on this chip and build something that we believed to be adaptable there we're to that by itself is very vague definition but I may have gone wrong. Can we go a bit deeper into kind of what that implies sure and setting up a level. One of the things often happens when new technologies become available as people start to take advantage of what's available an example is people used to use very sparse sparse machine learning models they would deploy them across a large number of servers. Amazon treat a lot of other companies and what happened was they. I started getting devices that were capable of working with denser compute which I'm not even GonNa try and define but one of them happening with people started using that denser answer compute and so when it comes to software defined this element of flexibility where you can you can do what you want. You can take these new techniques comply him but it also means that researchers can experiment and see what they can do with these devices and come up with things themselves so for for example. We've seen that GP use have been used a lot from Shema earning. The reason is they have a lot of compute density but their memory bandwidth is very slow and this has been a bit of a problem people thought that this would prevent very expensive machine learning models from continuing to get performance gains as you tweet but what happened the researchers started to take advantage of that extra compute power and what they would do they would do a lot more compute per memory access so in terms of the flexibility. It's not just that you're able to support things that the NFL researchers have been doing in the pass. Yeah it's also that they can explore in in make better use of hardware that you give them okay so better. You hardly give them in. You're you're talking about in terms condense compute. I think to myself when I think about. Gps I think about use cases. You're referring to maybe different hardware to be better for different use cases. You know we have a bunch of vision data data. We heard it through as many neural networks as we can and as many as we can and and that sort of setup seems to be adequate for that kind of processing. Are there any maybe discreet cases where you can talk about different kinds of software defined compute that might be even better than sort of this just brute force as many layers players as we can hurl into that thing search. EU kind of approaches her way that we can make this tangible to say okay. Here's a discreet instance in the business world where the software defined game. It's better than Jacobs sure. I've got a I've got a great example so one of the unique features of the hardware that we're developing is that it takes advantage of something uncalled batch size one. Would that basically means. Is You remember playing the game twenty questions growing up really really roughly yeah yeah yeah so the way the game works. Is You have twenty questions. Someone has a item in mind person in mind and ask questions where you get. Yes or no answers until until you figure out what that item is. Oh Yeah. Is it an animal Yada Yada directly okay now. I was talking about the density of the compute you and one of the things that limiting for the hardware today is that good use of it oftentimes you have to run the same program at the same time on many different inputs so imagine you're driving down the street and there are three stop signs but to get really good performance you really have to run on sixty four stop signs in order to identify them and and get that good performance so if you have only three it cost you the same as if you had sixty four well now imagine you're playing the game twenty questions and you have sixty four inputs that you're trying to guess and so those questions have to be very complicated because you're not guessing what is one item is. You're guessing what these four items are and so one of the things that unique about the partner that we're building in the software defined hardware aspect of it is that it's not built for any particular model you can change the kinds of models that run on it and you can take advantage of the smaller batch size but breaking taking your models apart and instead of playing the game of twenty questions on sixty four different items at the same time you can do it on one item at a time which makes it much less expensive so now you ask is it animal vegetable or mineral and the answer isn't always yes because you always have an animal vegetable. Oh and mineral got it okay and now a way that that might translate into. Let's say right now. As as you speak we have leaders in insurance. We have leaders in and pharmaceutical. We have leaders in banking. We have leaders in heavy industry. We have leaders in a great many sectors tuning in with their ears to this episode. Do we have some sort of individual instances ince's where this sort of animal mineral all present dynamic might translate into better performance whether it's lower energy a faster processing than a crank in themselves full of as much videos they can buy one thing that you're trying to make a determination for a potential insurance clients so you're GonNa have a bit of information mation about the clients but if you run a model that has to take into account every possible bit of information about that clients then it's going to be a very large model but if you can look at a little bit of information you have like what information you actually do have about the clients and then Hiccup. Ekka model that sort of right sized for that problem it gets less expensive and it also gets more accurate. Another example would be if you're trying trying to build an anonymous car and driving down the road. You might identify that something is a treat or you might identify something as a sign of some sort. You may not know that it stop sign when you then are able to run a very particular model on that object right so you got. Maybe two hundred objects in the scene but you have. I have three signs. What it means. Is you can run a sign. Classify are on those three signs in its very specifically trained just to identify what the signs are. You can imagine also in strategy when you're trying to make predictions the for example the way that the also go model worked as the game evolves. You can actually really use different models or if you believe that there are several different ways of the game could have all you could use several different models some with more aggressive play styles with with a less aggressive play style what it really does is it allows you to just try a whole bunch of very different things on the same hardware without having to have have custom hardware each of those different things got it and so obviously this has given the fact that we don't exactly know what algorithms rhythms what kinds of approaches are going to work right so having something that's potentially malleable in that regard might be useful because who the heck knows what. Algorithms are going to be hip and popular for natural language processing in four years. When you look ahead into industry you look out into the world and you ask yourself where software defined compute sort of gaining traction might be one side but I realize a lot of. Ai Hardwares is in what we could describe exceedingly nascent phase so maybe tractions too strong of a

Dan Vigil Jonathan Ross Amazon NFL EU Brock Huron Ai Hardwares Partner Jacobs Ince Three Years Four Years
Perovskite LEDs begin to shine

Science Magazine Podcast

08:47 min | 2 years ago

Perovskite LEDs begin to shine

"Now we have Robert Service Steph writer at science and he's here to talk about perofrmance gates which I'm sure I've heard once a week for the past five years, the word, Perov skates. They have a lot of education's. And in this case, we're gonna talk about their use in LED's in light emitting diodes, but I typically hear them associated with solar energy, right? Bob rewritten, quite a number of stories about fraud, Skype in the past, and prostitutes are a large collection of materials that share a common crystal structure, and these materials have been exciting and very exciting for the research community in recent years, because they've proven to be very efficient solar cell materials. So they're really good at absorbing sunlight and then converting that energy into electrically. But we're, we're talking about LED's, right? What this is kind of the reverse you feed energy, or electricity or form of light energy or something into. These materials, and then they convert that into specific colors of light that they emit. And so this is what LED's do LED's are very common in the modern daily life, our lights have our TV's have are made of them are cellphone displays have LED's what's an LED it's not Ross guides right now. What's in there, right? So there's quite a number of different materials that are used in LA days. There's a whole class of inorganic compounds that are commonly used in lighting fixtures. LED lights would buy from Home Depot. For example, I believe would be made with those materials, whereas in our cell phone displays and in many TV's that have LED TV displays many of those or Ganic materials. So those are nice because they can be processed differently. They, they have different advantages than were at sort of entered this whole picture, is that Ross guides are really simple to make that use very commonly available. Starting materials and then they can be processed very easily at low temperature. They don't require being grown under vacuum hood or anything. Right. Very complex. And so it opens the door towards making very large area lights or larger displays with bronchitis. That would also be quite cheap. Whereas the other ones are more complex manufacturing process for solar cells. Yes. That's correct. So, for example of Liz silicon solar, so you have to grow the silicon ingot and then which is a purified silicon, and they have to slice it. And then arrange it, and so with props guys, you can basically just brew up a liquid solution of the starting materials than spread it out over surface. And then you heat it up, very gently in materials crystallize out of that process is actually a description of the crystal shape. It could have many different components in this crystal is that how they would make a display. A out of process that was different colors. They use different minerals within the same display. Yes, in short, if you want to make visible light display, right? And you wanna develop the primary colors red green and blue and then by combining different levels of those colors, you can make the other colors with rainbow with Brodsky's you tune the color based on the chemical composition of the props guide itself. So they actually have a different recipe of the product for green than they do for red, and then they do for blue, you know, the idea would be to make individual Nanno size components of one recipe. And then organize them in a way that makes pixels for display and one of the papers that we write about as a paper that came out last week in science advances, and it offered a way to make a pretty sophisticated display using rod sky. And they, they first synthesized their different recipes for the different colors of. The Prague skylights, and then using advanced three D printer to not only make different pixels of the different colors, but then to orient the Nanno crystals or the nanna wires in this case within each of the pixels, and so the nanna wires omit their colors better in one direction than they do another. And so those light waves oscillate with a particular favourite orientation and that's light polarization. So when you have polarized sunglasses that screen out a certain polarization as the same idea here. So light is getting omitted in a preferred direction than they use filters to select which colors of light. They wanted to see. So if you say you had products that were gonna shine red, and they were oriented with their nanna, wires facing horizontally, say, well, then you just turn your polarized or so it to horizontal then the that light would come through, and you could see it while it was at the. Same time it was blocking the other colors. And then by just turning the polarize or you could just tune whatever color you wanted to see very cool. Okay. What are some of the major advantages of using parasites in LED's, the main advantage of profits and Ellie dis is the prospects for making cheap large area, lights and displays the other thing that you've seen with processes. They've caught up inefficiency. They're, they're doing really well on the solar side has something similar happen with their ability to emit light in the LED format. The answer to your question is, yes, that's exactly what is happening now is that the a really catching up to in this case, the organic LED's by reaching that milestone, that reaches a level of performance. That is a commercial standard. What is the target efficiency for taking trinity turning into only, and where is Pasco technology along that spectrum, there's different benchmarks for different applications? For fishing Ince's. So the, the lighting technology that is used in light bulbs in homes like that. Those can actually be really quite efficient. I believe some of them around fifty percent. And then they go up from there, even higher that's really quite impressive. And, and if you've ever touched a regular incandescent light bulb, you know how hot it is. The reason is a regular incandescent light is extremely inefficient. Most of the energy in an incandescent light is converted into heat, which is why you burn your hand, if you touch them. But if you happen to touch get close to LED light in your house, they are not very hot and that's because most trinity has been converted into light. So for perhaps gates, ideally, you just wanna go as high as you can because that makes them more cost effective. It also means that if you're creating key that can have other problems that can cause breakdown of the devices. So if you're if most of your energy is going in from electrically into light than. And that's really good for the lifetime of devices as well. But certain applications can tolerate lower efficiencies. So, for example, the old led displays the organic light emitting diode displays TV's those are around twenty twenty five percent efficiency if, if I'm not mistaken there. And so certain applications can tolerate Laura officiency, if they can reach an application that the inorganic can't do or that maybe they'll be a different form factor. Maybe they'll be might be able to do it over a much larger area, which the inner Gannex can't really do easily, so there's different numbers for different applications. Why in a big issues with the process on the solar side end now on the only desire is there, not that stable, you make one and then it kinda doesn't last at last days. That's been true with both of them the solar cell manufacturers in. Researchers are really getting pretty good handle on this. Now, they're they've come up with a whole slew of technique. To make these things more robust. And also to encapsulate them in protective materials that than keep them from interacting with air or humidity in the air, which part of the things that really caused him to break down. It's still earlier days on the LED side. So I think they're still trying to get a complete handle scientifically on why these things exactly are breaking down. The other thing I would just add that the organic vitamin, there's twenty years ago, face the same problem. And, and so the research community at that time really had to grapple with how to get those materials to have a longer life. And just by virtue of the fact that we now use them all over the place. That sort of shows you that they made steady significant progress in doing that. And so there's a lot of hope that, that will happen as well with the LA days, but they have to

LA Ross Home Depot Fraud Robert Service Writer BOB Perov Skype Bronchitis Ellie Dis Brodsky Prague Pasco Laura Officiency Gannex
Planes grounded after Ethiopian Airlines crash

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Planes grounded after Ethiopian Airlines crash

"Suffered more groundings of its most important airline as operators from Brazil to South Korea. Idolised seven three seven max planes following second deadly crash in five months. China became yesterday. The first major market whole takeoffs and landings of Boeing's latest single model, but groundings of quickly cascaded around the globe. Singapore barring all takeoffs in amounts of the state move, followed by Australia. Elsewhere in Asia, South Korean carrier has followed suit and to add on's in Latin America also halted operations of the plane now that zero risk approach by airlines and aviation. Authorities contrast with. Sure. Ince's by US regulates the airline that the aircraft remains airworthy the Federal Aviation authority administration while the came out in support of the aircraft saying the plane remains at safe to fly and the reasons conclusive evidence linking the loss of the Ethiopian three seven jets over the weekend with that line at plane which crashed late last year. But the similarities between the two disasters has really spooked airlines and passengers really this quad similarities between the two incidents in both cases their lines. The aircraft's crashed just minutes off the takeoff as the pilots failed to maintain control.

United States Federal Aviation Authority South Korea Boeing Brazil Singapore China Ince Asia Latin America Australia Five Months
Let's Get Real About Netflix's Cash and Spending Numbers

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:56 min | 2 years ago

Let's Get Real About Netflix's Cash and Spending Numbers

"So how do you go about running an Oscar campaign? Well, Netflix has done something very sensible. They have purchased the the abilities of miss Lisa toback. Now, she worked for Harvey Weinstein Miramax and some others. She's been going since the nineties who is a skill. Strategist. Now, she's not alone. There are other people that do the same job. But she is one of the best insofar as that she knows how to play a marketing campaign to the right people to the people who vote it'd be who are taste makers who the people who can influence and change minds so Roma's campaign specifically, I mean, I care let's tales of kind of huge parties. Roma seemed chocolates put yourself in Roma kind of blue screen who would Ince's your wouldn't want to be in Rome. I wouldn't want it to be. But I mean, there are a lot of there are a lot of. There's a lot of glitz surrounded a huge. It's massive now. Number one. It's it's a it's an art house film is made by a popular director who has was one before it's black and white. And we keep thinking what would Rome it'd be like if it was color. Maybe we wouldn't be talking about it. But it costs fifteen million to make 'em. Netflix has spent probably twice that. I'm promotion now that is unusual insofar as most production budgets will just be doubled. For example, for something cost ten they usually spend ten to market it. But they've doubled the production value to push the Sout, which I think's very important now, what would make somebody vote for film as opposed to not voting for a film being mollycoddle. I don't know about you. But role much hawk it wouldn't make me vote for it. A big party would make me vote for but thinking that other people like this, film may change my mind. I mean, this is is the height to believe is a good film. It's a good film. Yeah. It's it's not it's peculiar of having. Arguments with a about it with people, technically, it's it's lovely. And don't forget that that choir on had his his Oscar winning a Chievo is cinematographer helping him on this. Although Chievo was busy with something else. So it looks amazing and it plays into a lot of his Geist of of Latina's of native people of the the sort of underclass, I suppose, but also love and family. Let's take a little bit of a closer look at toback and others Liker. I mean, she is very much behind this particular campaign. And yet, of course, she is associated with with Miramax and Harvey Weinstein that doesn't appear to have damaged her. I think because she left she left she left. She left Harvey before everything got really, really bad. I think there were probably some notes going on. But she is such a highly price specialist and also I was looking at her her social media. She doesn't she's not one of these people that screams in your ear or yells in your face. She's a very very gentle very subtle behind the scenes, almost I dare I say old fashioned Hollywood publicists, she is subtle. She knows how to work the ropes, but the important thing here is a net. Flicks knows this that if they win best picture it's a game changer. It changes Hollywood forever. Well, let's talk about the. Because the way that net. Flicks films are distributed different. They have a shooter window than traditional movie companies. So as you say this model is successful. It does change the way businesses run. Just explain to us how that distribution model works. Well, it's generally a studio will make a film, and because of of of laws that are fifty or sixty years old it cannot own its own a theatrical distribution, meaning it can't own cinemas. So it will put it out into cinemas. And then later it will go onto streaming or DVD's now net.

Lisa Toback Harvey Weinstein Miramax Netflix Roma Oscar Harvey Weinstein Ince Harvey Director Miramax Geist Rome Hollywood Liker Sixty Years
"ince" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"ince" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

"And so they are unavailable. So they suddenly became available, and when analog got turned off in a lot of places, and they went to their now being used for the next generation of LT, for instance, so suddenly you can say, oh, I can build a radio at a particular power and complexity in this band and do something really cool that I couldn't do a different band. And so that's part of it. The other thing that's happening is that I think that that the ability to build very purpose. Or or or Jaama tree specific antennas is going up much easier. There's some I don't know if people are literally doing three D printing of antennas this point. But I would imagine that they will if they aren't doing it yet. But they're interesting. So you're saying printing, the three D, I guess shape that way doing the wave guide as a three D printing, kind of interesting so complicated shapes. So we're already already seen dot four antennas are being laid out on bore PCB boards as part of in process where you can't do that with a wifi antennas. You've gotta have a physically different thing from it. As far as I understand anyway. So so suddenly, there's there's people doing things, and then we have synthetic aperture rate antennas that become the needed a lot of CPU power to make it happen. And suddenly, it's. It's cheap enough to do. Right. So. I mean, the whole concept of having a synthetic aperture a radio in the nineteen eighties. It was just like oh my God. Yes. But you know, we would need like six supercomputers to like process the data from it. And did a now I think you can do it in a mobile phone processor easily. Which may be explained synthetic aperture. So that means instead of having an antenna that is a single wire or tube. You have a whole bunch of tubes. Spread over some amount of space perhaps inches perhaps could be even meters of space necessarily yards along, and you can actually steer the antenna doing us by changing the phase of the different pieces of it. And so you can point the antenna in the direction you want by pointing it that means that the power only goes in the direction you want which means either more power in the one place or more interesting is you can have higher bandwith with a less amount of power because you're not wasting power telling people that don't care about you. What's going on? Right. Right. Okay. So so in the media layer, I mean, a good takeaway. I guess is you need different you need different radios because you need different frequencies, and you need different free. Because you're going to different use cases, you're gonna different geometry's different this Ince's. Is that is that a good takeaway? Yeah. Exactly. And you know, the the the. The thing about it is that you don't if you doing the internet of things, right? Then don't have the same media for all uses all the time..

Ince
"ince" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"ince" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Instances because you are able to predict win spot instance, is going to disappear and so win win you can detect the spot Ince's is going to disappear or when it might be about to disappear because like you said, you don't have this SLA from the cloud provider. The cloud provider can grab it from you at any time. If somebody's willing to pay a higher price than you for that, instance, you they're gonna take it away from you. But you can preemptively schedule another spot instance, and put the application onto that instance. And when the cloud providers ready to take it away from you, you can just route the traffic to that fresh instance that gets spun up so when you are trying to. To detect when that's going to happen win the spot instances going to be taken away from you. What are some signals that suggest that the instance might disappear? That's a good question. So basically are women algorithm to transit background and always creating a forecast based on historical. These appearance of instances our kind of predicting how the the next win the next eruption will happen. So just something which is very important to mention is that when you're using different compute types on eight of US still there like it's called encore elated markets. What do I mean by on correlated markets, for example, if you purchase m three medium and m four medium, that's a different type of hardware. So the fact that Amazon is running out of capacity of m three medium doesn't mean to Amazon is running out of capacity on m four medium in what our plows from donnas in the background. We're looking at 'em free medium. We're looking at a trends of 'em three mediums. And we see hey, this is right now Monday, eight AM in the morning and usually at eight a m. A ten AM in the morning, something usually happens in terms of like these appearing of instances. So we're like about seven fifteen or even before were scheduling, you capacity to lunch into that cluster in will schedule that from an uncoordinated market from a market. If we understand that the will be capacity at this time of day based on historical data, and then we can safely go through that interruption revision of instances during the time that we were short of it's gonna happen. So there is a machine learning in the background that always fixes that. But that's like on the on just so under served as just to explain what we do behind the scenes are you continuing to ADA rate on those machine learning models or like how how rapidly as the market changing. Our is are there models as good as they need to be today? So it's always changing because Amazon is always ending you compute hardware. So you need to.

Amazon US cloud Ince ADA
"ince" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"ince" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Spot instances because you are able to predict when a spot instance is going to disappear and so win win you can detect the spot Ince's is going to disappear or when it might be about to disappear because like you said, you don't have this SLA from the cloud provider. The cloud provider can grab it from you at any time. If somebody's willing to pay a higher price than you for that, instance, you they're gonna take it away from you. But you can preemptively schedule another spot instance, and put the application onto that instance. And when the cloud providers ready to take it away from you, you can just route the traffic to that fresh instance that gets spun up so when you are trying to. To detect when that's going to happen win. The spot instance is going to be taken away from you. What are some signals that suggest that the instance might disappear? That's a good question. So basically are women algorithm to transient background and always creating a forecast based on historical these appearance of instances. We're kind of predicting how the the next win the next eruption will happen. So just something which is very important to mention is that when you're using different compute types on eight of US, so they're like it's called encore elated markets. What do I mean by on correlated markets, for example, if you purchase m three medium and employer medium, that's a different type of hardware? So the fact that Amazon is running out of capacity of m three medium doesn't mean to Amazon is running out of capacity on 'em floor medium, and what are? Applause from donnas in the background. We're looking at 'em three medium into. We're looking at a trends of 'em three mediums. And we see. Hey, this is right now Monday, eight AM in the morning and usually at eight a m a ten AM in the morning, something usually happens in terms of like these appearing of instances, so where like about seven fifteen or even before were scheduling, you capacity to lunch into that cluster in will schedule that from an uncoordinated market from a market. If we understand that the will be capacity at this time of day, they some historical data, and then we can safely go through that interruption revision of instances during the time that we were short of it's gonna happen. So there is a machine learning in the background that always fixes that. But that's like on the on just so under served as just to explain what we do behind the scenes are you continuing to Asia rate on those machine learning models or like how how rapidly is the market chain. Aging is are the your models as good as they need to be today. So it's always changing because Amazon is always ending you compute hardware..

Amazon US cloud Ince Asia
Shelter provider for immigrant kids surrenders 2 licenses

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

Shelter provider for immigrant kids surrenders 2 licenses

"The nation's largest provider of shelters for immigrant. Children has surrendered to voice Ince's in Arizona. That follows a state investigation that found the organization didn't have fingerprint records for some employees. The health department investigation began last summer when several reports of abuse at the shelters in Arizona became public.

Arizona Ince
Nepal: Nine climbers killed in Himalayan storm

NPR News Now

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

Nepal: Nine climbers killed in Himalayan storm

"Have retrieved the bodies of nine climbers who were killed in a snowstorm on a mountain in the Paul NPR's Sushmita Patach reports from Mumbai. This is the worst mountaineering disaster for that country. In recent years, five south quoting lime buzz in four Nepali tool guides were killed. When a while in storm swept their basecamp on nipples Guja mountain on Friday, rescue helicopters had spotted the bodies on Saturday, but we're unable to land due to bad weather conditions, demand, flying, Kim Chang ho was among the dead. He's the first South Korean to scale footing of the world's highest summits without supplemental oxygen, South Korean, president moon Jae in has expressed his gondola. Ince's the bodies of the five South Korean climbers are scheduled to read sold by early Wednesday summer and fall. Are the peak

Nipples Guja Mountain Sushmita Patach Kim Chang Paul Npr Ince Mumbai JAE President Trump