2 Burst results for "Inari Glinton"

"inari glinton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"inari glinton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's TED Talk daily. I'm Elyse Hugh. Negotiations. Ugh. They stress me out. But they don't have to be contentious, says organizational psychologist ruchi Sinha. In her talk from our video series the way we work, she reminds us that we negotiate regularly in our daily lives, and she offers some great tips for the next time we go into a negotiation at work. Support for PRX comes from WGL energy's public sector department, providing natural gas, electricity, and renewable energy solutions for cities state and federal agencies. Meet your agency sustainability mission at WGL energy dot com slash public sector. Now what's next, a podcast from Morgan Stanley helps make sense of life during and after the pandemic. With nearly two decades of experience reporting on culture and the economy, hosts inari glinton meets people who are looking for solutions to the cracks exposed by the pandemic. From how we care for our children and the elderly to what we do with shopping malls, these are stories of everyday people trying to figure things out and where they're finding hope. Search for now what's next wherever you listen to podcasts. When we think about negotiations, we think about being tough, we're charging like it's a battle. Brandishing our influence and our power moves. But a negotiation doesn't have to be a fight. And loses. Think of it more like a dance. Two or more people moving fluidly in sync. We constantly negotiated with. We negotiate for higher pay, promotions, vacations, and even greater autonomy. In fact, every day, we negotiate just to get our job done. And to secure resources for ourselves and our teams. And yet, when we go in with the wrong mindset with our fists up ready to fight, we aren't as successful. You know why? Because negotiation is not about dominating. It's about crafting a relationship and relationships thrive. When we find ways to give and to take and move together in unison, and to do that, you have to be well prepared. First, do your research. Figure out whether what you're asking for is realistic. What is your aspiration? What do you want? And what will make you walk away from the table? This might seem obvious, but too many people don't think it through. Let's say you negotiating for a salary in a new job. Some people, they determine their ask based on their past salary. That isn't a good yard stick. You may end up asking for too much or too little. Instead, find out the range of what is possible. Look at industry reports, websites. Talk to people in your professional network to find out the lowest average and the highest salary for a similar role and then make your ass closer to that upper limit. Build a solid rationale for why you are above average and thus deserving of that ask. Let's say you're negotiating for something less black and white, like the ability to work from home to care for an aging parent, you need to study your company's policies on remote work. Ask yourself when and why were these policies developed in the first place? Doctor trusted mentors. To understand how working from home might affect issues that aren't on your radar and think about how changing to working from home might actually affect others in your team. In fact, make a table, summarizing the parts of your job that can be done remotely, and the parts that require face to face interaction. This may sound like a lot to do, but when the person you negotiating with sees that you've done all this homework, you're more likely to get that yes. It also helps you avoid being lied to, while building the person's respect. Second, prepare mentally for the negotiation. Asking for things can get emotional. They're real and complex feeling at play. Fear, anxiety, anger, even hurt. It's essential to have strategies in place to manage those feelings. One strategy is to adopt a mindset of defensive pessimism. That just means that you accept obstacles and failures are likely in a negotiation. So it's better to put your energy in imagining the ways to overcome those obstacles. That way, you're ready to respond when you face it. Another strategy is emotional distancing. That is the idea of being less attached to any specific outcome. I know it's easier said than done. We all feel emotions like anger and hurt. When a core identities are being threatened. When your manager may be challenging a truth that you hold dear about yourself, like you're a hard worker and you deserve this. Try and avoid thinking of negotiations as the ultimate test of your worth. Go in knowing that your requests might be met that it might be denied. And that none of this is a measure of your wealth. Also know that if you feel yourself getting upset, hurt during a negotiation, it's okay to step back. You can leave the dance floor and move up to the balcony. Just say, let me think about this a little more. Could we press balls and continue this tomorrow? The third and the final way you can prepare for negotiations is by putting yourself in the other person's shoes, taking the time to anticipate the other's needs and challenges. What pressures May they be under? What risks would they be taking? Do they even have the power to give you what you're asking for? What ripple effects might yes mean. When you make that request, look to balance assertiveness about your own needs with a concern for the other. As you lay out your case, use phrases like I'm asking for this because I know it's good for my team that I want to achieve X and Y goals and I know this is what will enable it. Arguments like that show that you are ambitious, you know what you want, but you're also care for others. So many of our negotiation missteps, they don't actually come from disagreements, but misunderstanding the other person. So it's important to listen well. To ask why? And why not? And you will surely find unexpected opportunities for win win solutions..

TED Talk Elyse Hugh ruchi Sinha WGL energy's public sector dep inari glinton Morgan Stanley
"inari glinton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"inari glinton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Inclusive workplaces and communities. Hey, it's Adam grant. I host work life, a podcast from the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist, and the show is about how to make work not suck. In the upcoming season, I'm sitting down with some of my favorite thinkers, leaders and achievers to rethink assumptions that we often take for granted. Today I'm talking with longtime PepsiCo CEO Indra nooyi about what it means to be a great leader and a great mentor. Find and follow work life without him grant. That's me. Wherever you're listening. Support for TED Talks daily comes from LinkedIn. Let's pretend for a moment that you're about to launch a campaign. It tested well, your entire team is happy. Everything is going according to plan, except for that one thought in the back of your head. How do I ensure the people I want to target will be in the mindset to receive my message? The answer? LinkedIn. Because when you market on LinkedIn, your message reaches people who are ready to engage with your business. And that means your advertising campaign will work as hard as it can, as soon as you launch it. Do business where business is done. Get a $100 advertising credit toward your first LinkedIn campaign. Visit LinkedIn dot com slash ted-talks. LinkedIn dot com slash TED Talks terms and conditions apply. Now what's next, a podcast from Morgan Stanley helps make sense of life during and after the pandemic. With nearly two decades of experience reporting on culture and the economy, host inari glinton meets people who are looking for solutions to the cracks exposed by the pandemic. From how we care for our children and the elderly to what we do with shopping malls, these are stories of everyday people trying to figure things out and where they're finding hope. Search for now what's next wherever you listen to podcasts. We all have our biases. The set of assumptions that we make and the things we don't notice about people's race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, appearance, another traits. They come from the part of our mind that jumps to conclusions that we might not even be aware that we have. I really can't tell you the number of times people assumed I was the receptionist. When I was an executive at the company. That kind of bias gets in the way of good collaboration, performance and decision making. It creates an invisible tax of resentment and frustration. The more frustrated we are, the more silent we are likely to be. And the more silent we are, the less we may be able to do our best work. The good news though is, bias is not inevitable. So here's how to disrupt bias in three steps. The first step is to create a shared vocabulary. Sometimes buy a shows up in big embarrassing gaffes, but more often it comes out in the little words and phrases we choose, which are packed with assumptions. In meetings especially, these often go unnoticed or even worse, people notice, but don't know what to say. That's why we recommend coming up with a shared word or phrase that everyone agrees to use to disrupt bias attitudes or behaviors. Examples teams are using our bias alert, stoplight, or even throwing up a peace sign. Leaders often ask us to give them the right words. But the best words are the ones your team will actually say, not the ones that leaders impose. So talk to your team. My very favorite is the one that you recommended tri air. Purple flag. When someone says or does something biased, we'll say purple flag and maybe we'll even wave a purple flag. It's not a red flag. It's a friendly purple flag. It helps us become more aware of our blind spots. Purple blood purple flag. Thanks for pointing that out. I've been noticing lately, I use a lot of sight metaphors that often portray disabilities like being visually impaired and negative ways. But I'm committed to doing better I'm working on it. I am too. Another great shared vocabulary trick is to ask members of your team to respond to bias with an I statement. And I statement invites the other person in understand things from your perspective rather than calling them out. Like, I don't think you're going to take me seriously when you're calling me honey. Or I don't think you meant that the way that it sounded. Usually, when people's biases are pointed out to them clearly and compassionately, they apologize and correct things going forward. Usually, but not always. That brings us to the second step. Create a shared norm for how to respond when your bias is pointed out. When my bias is flagged, I can only be glad that I'm learning something new if I can move past the shame. I hate the idea that I've harmed someone. And when I feel ashamed, I rarely respond well. So it's really helpful to have that shared norm, so that I know what to say in those moments. We recommend you start with thank you for pointing that out. It took courage for that person to disrupt the bias. So it's important to acknowledge that. Then there are two choices on what to say next. When I get it, or two, I don't get it. Could you explain more after the meeting? The other day, you and I were recording a podcast. And I said, HR serves three masters and you ate the purple flag. I knew what I had done wrong. Why was I using a slavery metaphor? We hit pause. I thanked you, and we re recorded. It was no big deal. The thing I love about the purple flag is how efficient it is. Flagging the bias didn't prevent us from getting the work done. In fact, it helps us work together more honestly. It's even harder when I don't know what I did wrong. Once I asked someone out to lunch, out came the purple flag. I had no idea why. So I was relieved to know what to say next. Thank you for pointing it out. But I don't get it. Could we talk after the meeting? Afterwards, the person reminded me that they were fasting for Ramadan. It instantly made sense to me, and I discovered something that I could be more aware of. But to get to awareness, I had to move through shame. It was hard to say, I don't get it. The shared norm helped me listen and learn rather than getting defensive. The fact that there was a norm at all, reassured me that other people are making similar kinds of mistakes and that we're all learning together. Disrupting bias may start off feeling uncomfortable. But with time and consistency, we can build the stamina we need to push through it. When it becomes routine for us to notice our biases, all of a sudden, they feel less threatening. It's hard to break bias habits, yet we can change the pattern with consistent effort. We've got to be patient with ourselves and with others. Patient and also persistent. Yeah. Which brings us to our last step. Once a team has come up with a shared vocabulary and agrees on the shared norm for how to respond. The team should commit to disrupting bias at least once in every meeting. If bias isn't flagged in a meeting, it doesn't mean there wasn't any bias. It just means either nobody noticed or nobody knew what to say. When we are silent about bias, we reinforce it. And it can't be just the targets of bias who pointed out. Observers and leaders have got to speak up. We all have a responsibility. By.

LinkedIn Adam grant inari glinton Indra nooyi TED Talks PepsiCo Morgan Stanley Ramadan