19 Burst results for "Imran Ahmed"

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:53 min | Last week

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Blow everyone. . This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO of the business of fashion and I am here with my friend and colleague Tim Blanks editor at large of the business of fashion, , and usually around this time of year timid I do a debrief on the fashion week has gone by and it's usually been informed by some of the chats the Timman I have. . In the back of a car shuttling from one show to another in in all of the fashion cities. . But this has been it goes without saying a fashion season that was very different but we wanted to continue our tradition and as it's been such a unique and unusual season maybe it's even more interesting to talk about the fashion season that's gone by so. . Cam Maybe, , we could just start with. . The decision that both you and I made not. . Any physical shows season in what what led you down that path because of course, , there were some things you could have gone to here in London but in the end that didn't transpire. . Well, , my husband Jeff is very high risk and we have been so extremely careful since March. . That it just seemed the sensible decision to extend vet caution and keep on extending it until we know there's not some kind of. . Remove as much as remove as many random elements as possible from alive I I feel. . Schizo being out of the House for all the months I found it <hes> so. . Wasn't even the novelty I just found. . The options that we would given. . If we wanted attending things in person, , we could zoom with design is we we could dive we can do deep dives into collections I ended up quite seduced by the virtual option I have to say. . Come on a room. . That's a surprise because you know at the early. . Onset pandemic, , we were talking about Sasha <unk> demonstrating graying potentially. . Some shows never happening again. . You know you're quite pro fashion meets Elliott. . and Pro fashion shows because fashion shows have been my exposure to fashioned for my entire time working in this industry and I was definitely on the side of. . You know that way of that way of encountering fashion, , but this has been an education in. . So many ways a pop aside from the fact, , I've actually you learned to use technology and in a way I never thought I would I would ever be able to. . It doesn't kind of. . Terrify me Oh bull made whatever. . You know the as so many people said, , and it didn't matter whether there were people like me who just sit and look at things or whether they will buy as you know people who have whose bread and butter is the touchy feely side of the industry seventy people were saying the. . The ability to go back and look at things and to have to think of something, , and then be able to go back and see whether it was what you were thinking of old. . To cross-references and to. . and to be entertained as well. . I think the difference this season as people really really got their virtual presence together. . You know we've had a couple of. . Dummy, runs , <hes> that went. . Wildly convincing. . And I think this time there was so much thoughts and creativity and ingenuity applied to new ways of doing business that <hes> anyways. . Bringing us to the world that that it was a very, , very different game I felt. . Yeah. . You also got to spend. . More time with the designers because. . So much more I. . Mean that was a mixed blessing in a way because normally it's three minutes backstage a few questions and he whiz off and do your review, , and now it was forty five minutes zooms and so you having proper it reminded me actually it's funny. . It reminded me of. . When I first started covering fashion and I would go backstage interview designers and and people weren't that many people doing it in those days when there was a handful of camera crews and and you would end up in these. . You know half hour forty, , five minute conversations in depth with you know it was a novelty for you to be told to. . It was a novelty for them to be talked to, , and you would get people. . You'd have these extraordinary conversations that would then be brutally truncated into like a thirty second sound by something for the for the broadcast. . Meanwhile, , the these conversations floating around in an archive somewhere at this, , this is in a funny way. . This is what it was like that. . You would be having quite you. . You'd be having talks with people and so when you went to write about the collection you when you're approaching collection a whole different level of insight I think you know it's so in a way, , it was more time consuming and even though I wasn't kind of car with you driving from place to place flying from city to city all of that. . It was more time can I was sitting in my room it was more time consuming and Matt sense that and more sought consuming and more and ultimately more rewarding in a funny way. . I guess.

Tim blanks Imran Ahmed CEO founder
Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:53 min | Last week

Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

"Blow everyone. This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO of the business of fashion and I am here with my friend and colleague Tim Blanks editor at large of the business of fashion, and usually around this time of year timid I do a debrief on the fashion week has gone by and it's usually been informed by some of the chats the Timman I have. In the back of a car shuttling from one show to another in in all of the fashion cities. But this has been it goes without saying a fashion season that was very different but we wanted to continue our tradition and as it's been such a unique and unusual season maybe it's even more interesting to talk about the fashion season that's gone by so. Cam Maybe, we could just start with. The decision that both you and I made not. Any physical shows season in what what led you down that path because of course, there were some things you could have gone to here in London but in the end that didn't transpire. Well, my husband Jeff is very high risk and we have been so extremely careful since March. That it just seemed the sensible decision to extend vet caution and keep on extending it until we know there's not some kind of. Remove as much as remove as many random elements as possible from alive I I feel. Schizo being out of the House for all the months I found it so. Wasn't even the novelty I just found. The options that we would given. If we wanted attending things in person, we could zoom with design is we we could dive we can do deep dives into collections I ended up quite seduced by the virtual option I have to say. Come on a room. That's a surprise because you know at the early. Onset pandemic, we were talking about Sasha demonstrating graying potentially. Some shows never happening again. You know you're quite pro fashion meets Elliott. and Pro fashion shows because fashion shows have been my exposure to fashioned for my entire time working in this industry and I was definitely on the side of. You know that way of that way of encountering fashion, but this has been an education in. So many ways a pop aside from the fact, I've actually you learned to use technology and in a way I never thought I would I would ever be able to. It doesn't kind of. Terrify me Oh bull made whatever. You know the as so many people said, and it didn't matter whether there were people like me who just sit and look at things or whether they will buy as you know people who have whose bread and butter is the touchy feely side of the industry seventy people were saying the. The ability to go back and look at things and to have to think of something, and then be able to go back and see whether it was what you were thinking of old. To cross-references and to. and to be entertained as well. I think the difference this season as people really really got their virtual presence together. You know we've had a couple of. Dummy, runs that went. Wildly convincing. And I think this time there was so much thoughts and creativity and ingenuity applied to new ways of doing business that anyways. Bringing us to the world that that it was a very, very different game I felt. Yeah. You also got to spend. More time with the designers because. So much more I. Mean that was a mixed blessing in a way because normally it's three minutes backstage a few questions and he whiz off and do your review, and now it was forty five minutes zooms and so you having proper it reminded me actually it's funny. It reminded me of. When I first started covering fashion and I would go backstage interview designers and and people weren't that many people doing it in those days when there was a handful of camera crews and and you would end up in these. You know half hour forty, five minute conversations in depth with you know it was a novelty for you to be told to. It was a novelty for them to be talked to, and you would get people. You'd have these extraordinary conversations that would then be brutally truncated into like a thirty second sound by something for the for the broadcast. Meanwhile, the these conversations floating around in an archive somewhere at this, this is in a funny way. This is what it was like that. You would be having quite you. You'd be having talks with people and so when you went to write about the collection you when you're approaching collection a whole different level of insight I think you know it's so in a way, it was more time consuming and even though I wasn't kind of car with you driving from place to place flying from city to city all of that. It was more time can I was sitting in my room it was more time consuming and Matt sense that and more sought consuming and more and ultimately more rewarding in a funny way. I guess.

Imran Ahmed Tim Blanks Schizo London Sasha Editor Jeff Founder CEO Matt Elliott.
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:18 min | Last week

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"To the podcast around this time of year, each season Tim blanks is sit down for a chat to recap the fashion season. That was it's a tradition that we wanted to continue again this year in this very unusual season even though neither of us have attended a physical fashion, show all season, but it was an interesting season for technological innovation and creativity. Here's Tim blanks inside passion. Blow everyone. This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO.

Tim blanks Imran Ahmed CEO founder
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:10 min | Last month

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Welcome to be Oh F- lives. . Today we are talking to Lulu Kennedy, , the Godmother of British fashion who last night celebrated the twentieth year of Fashion East, , the initiative that she started two decades ago, , which is probably had. . As much impact on the course British faction as. . The Great Fashion Colleges <hes>. . It's like a it's what what do they call it fan baseball. . You have the team that produces the you know shapes <hes> young players that can go on into the major leagues. . Have a sort of. . Home team will feel seat or something like that. . Anyway. . Let's. . Kind. Of . thing. . That's what fashion aces so so great to talk you congratulations. . Anki. Yeah. . . Mid Twenty S. . What did that Guy Twenty years you twelve when you started doing? ? It's actually quite it's quite shocking in a way and. . Put off to the last minute kind of even dealing with it. . Because it's just been, , you know one of these tons. . But exhibit. . A reminds me when I turned fifty I, , just Kinda put it to the back of my mind is just. . Beginning. . I think that's where Jiang otherwise you might feel at wellness under pressure I just didn't really want that. . But it seems to me that that that. . You'll ability to deal with. . Pressure and the overwhelming elements of the fashion world. . A, , I've been the things that you've to me of. . Its voice felt like an incredibly stable nurturing. . Supportive. . person in the in the fashion world and and I. . Often thought you haven't really had the do that you should have had been I I feel trumpets should've been blown a lot longer and harder for you monitor it yet I'm. . Okay. . Thank you. . I'm always much happier just lacking around in the shadows in the background, , I'm. . Yeah. . I'm not really I don't I bring front of House I'm putting on the talent the talent the focus is like, , of course it's lovely very kind words people saying I'm writing. . As we turned twenty and I really appreciate it. . But I I'd WanNa <unk> make about me. . The. . Yes pretty incredible. . The, , rest of the world can do that. . In twenty years ago, , tell me about how fashiony started what <unk>? ? What was the original concept on? ? What were you responding to at that time? ? So I just moved back to the from Naples and I was working not gotta remember line and was. . Just. . Chatting to this guy at turns out here insists incredible alantic <unk> Lane Katrina Bryan he's not coming on. . Help. . Me Decide what to do that this incredible space <unk> I was just how cools after one day I wanted to come back lucky I did back on to you. . And that was very typical to make I was kind of not really sure to I wanted to stay. . To be honest I had no fashion background training navin experienced doing <unk> but he got any house was staying in Renton renting his big industrial experts warehouses for fashion <unk> I I'm <unk> seminal. . United line-up. . Them fully gowned tonight. . That was my first door adult. . Yeah. . Mind violent mind was blown and I. . I was living in shortage <unk> gotten all these incredible characters. . <hes>. . Because of the time it was <unk> MT waistline <unk>. . It's incredible creativity because with. . So. . There are laws nine these incredible fashion designers but without any real kind of context. . I just need you. . I need and. . So has the jazz and people who in France. . Could you could you hustle warehouse and that is honestly how it started weakening to my boss knock on his door hang my friends talented. . You'll love. . Could we just borrow warehouse show Katie Grand Styling and he was like he's Already know, , but she's always the punch. . Very Fun. . Honestly, , this is my very naive very on A. . Without a plan kind of just wondering my. . I wanted to be doing, , which was helping my friends, , and that is honesty how it started in sounds like making it up, , but it just started from. . Knock, , on the door. Hey, . , can I borrow house an anti loved it. So . much the fashion we helped lint. . He was lying these kids were amazing and I want to give something back. . This is a big property owner developer. . It's very much as it was when you put. . It. . Just became his pet project. . It was enough to do to give back I. . Guess you just don't really find patrons.

Lulu Kennedy Tim Blank Imran Ahmed founder and CEO Bela London editor
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Hi this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business fashion and welcome to the podcast. . This week our editor at large sits down with the American designer Michael Kors discusses his plans for Fashion Week September in fact Michael Kors won't be doing a normal show at all like some of his counterparts in Europe including salary in Gucci Michael is questioning. The . efficacy of the current fashion show drill calendar, , and so he's decided to present in a completely new format launching globally on October fifteenth on the brands social and digital platforms. . He talks to Tim blanks about all of this including the confusion around the nomenclature various seasons and how he wants to clean up to. . Here's Tim blanks with Michael Kors inside fashioned. . Hello everyone and welcome to the live today with told me to micro-costs from New York. . Hello Michael Hello. Bear . Ray to cedar great to see you and we are doing this instead of actually seeing each other in September. . Yes. . That's that's that's the God's honest truth. . Unfortunately, , what are you planning to do in September when we would have been seeing each other? ? Well I have to tell you long before. . The pandemic. . I really kept thinking to myself. . I'm screeching in next year to my fortieth anniversary. . So it. . It has been time me to sort of reassess think about things and I and I just after forty years Tim I've seen that I really think the system has certainly been broken. . We can't always just do things the way we've done them in the past. . I fake. . You, , know everyone I think realizes that the whole systems mixed up doesn't make sense. . So I certainly have my wheels turning about that prior to the band. . And then of course, , being in lockdown, , you really start to analyze and I go back as someone who has been doing this for so long and once in a while back to the future is a good thing. . And you know for many decades the New York collections were after the Paris collections ended. . In fact, they , were a week after Paris ended. . And I think we never <hes> whenever inundated the consumer with too much information just as in September. . Here, , in the states, , we have Labor Day, , and it's you know the world opens up again hopefully, , right? ? At why are we confusing the consumer? ? And the press with a new season when they haven't even absorbed the one that has just arrived in the shots. . Adjusted it makes sense to me. . And you know more than ever of course where people are they're not planning months and months ahead. . You know we really are living in a time where fashion is very much always has been though it's about the emotion that you're in. . So. . Are you starting to land your wardrobe in May I? ? Don't think so I don't know who you are. . You don't have a life. . So I thought to myself. . Well, , we used to do this after Paris it allowed or journalists and retailers. . And consumer to have a breath. . And then. . In October, , it really became the perfect moment. . To show a new collection without cutting off the previous collection that had just arrived shots.

Michael Kors Tim blanks Gucci Michael Michael Hello New York founder and CEO Paris Imran Ahmed Olson George Floyd murder Bear Ray Europe editor
Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:59 min | 2 months ago

Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

"Hi this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business fashion and welcome to the podcast. This week our editor at large sits down with the American designer Michael Kors discusses his plans for Fashion Week September in fact Michael Kors won't be doing a normal show at all like some of his counterparts in Europe including salary in Gucci Michael is questioning. The efficacy of the current fashion show drill calendar, and so he's decided to present in a completely new format launching globally on October fifteenth on the brands social and digital platforms. He talks to Tim blanks about all of this including the confusion around the nomenclature various seasons and how he wants to clean up to. Here's Tim blanks with Michael Kors inside fashioned. Hello everyone and welcome to the live today with told me to micro-costs from New York. Hello Michael Hello. Bear Ray to cedar great to see you and we are doing this instead of actually seeing each other in September. Yes. That's that's that's the God's honest truth. Unfortunately, what are you planning to do in September when we would have been seeing each other? Well I have to tell you long before. The pandemic. I really kept thinking to myself. I'm screeching in next year to my fortieth anniversary. So it. It has been time me to sort of reassess think about things and I and I just after forty years Tim I've seen that I really think the system has certainly been broken. We can't always just do things the way we've done them in the past. I fake. You, know everyone I think realizes that the whole systems mixed up doesn't make sense. So I certainly have my wheels turning about that prior to the band. And then of course, being in lockdown, you really start to analyze and I go back as someone who has been doing this for so long and once in a while back to the future is a good thing. And you know for many decades the New York collections were after the Paris collections ended. In fact, they were a week after Paris ended. And I think we never whenever inundated the consumer with too much information just as in September. Here, in the states, we have Labor Day, and it's you know the world opens up again hopefully, right? At why are we confusing the consumer? And the press with a new season when they haven't even absorbed the one that has just arrived in the shots. Adjusted it makes sense to me. And you know more than ever of course where people are they're not planning months and months ahead. You know we really are living in a time where fashion is very much always has been though it's about the emotion that you're in. So. Are you starting to land your wardrobe in May I? Don't think so I don't know who you are. You don't have a life. So I thought to myself. Well, we used to do this after Paris it allowed or journalists and retailers. And consumer to have a breath. And then. In October, it really became the perfect moment. To show a new collection without cutting off the previous collection that had just arrived shots.

Michael Kors Tim Blanks Gucci Michael Founder And Ceo Paris Michael Hello New York Imran Ahmed Europe Bear Ray Editor
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:05 min | 6 months ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"A lot of pressure right now for you. It is it is lot of picture you know raising boys to not just pay wages to work. That is appreciated from the government and unaffected as well but truly telling him run. I can't see these days. I just K. I hope that yeah. I hope that we can help. Get the word out. Koponen about everything that's happening and if you need anything please get in touch with us. You know you have a direct line to us because we WANNA do whatever little weakened do to help get the word out. So that's you know. We can ensure that the industry plays its part to help Address the situation that it has created for these workers. Of course. And you so much I know that you are since I know you since I spoke with you are you guys are amazing addressing the cause he should win Album and pence. Doing this podcast. Once again okay. Thank you New Stay say this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion. That's the latest special edition of the Buick. Podcast this time coming from Kona actor in Dhaka Bangladesh If you wanted to follow some of the information or websites that Koponen has shared. Please check out the article. That's linked to this special podcasts. At BUSINESS OF FASHION DOT com. See Your next time if you've enjoyed this episode. Don't forget to subscribe give us a rating and you might be interested in joining the business. Fashions Global Membership Community B. O. F. Professional are members receive exclusive deep dive analysis. Regular email briefings as well as unlimited access to our archive of over ten thousand articles. Our IPHONE APP by annual special print editions and the online courses and learning materials from be off education..

Koponen Imran Ahmed founder and CEO Dhaka Kona
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:02 min | 6 months ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Always opportunity in a crisis and it depends on your mindset. It depends on your actions and it depends on your ideas. When was it that fashion really became important from a business perspective to you? Tim Ahead this show which basically showed fashion not just as runways but as this industry all of these different types of people who made the industry tech and even when I was eight years old. Watch you not show. There was something about it that fascinated me but I never considered that as an option for me as a career. How do you manage within yourself now? Being part of the institution that you always wanted to be up against the glass. I don't ever want to lose my memories or experiences of exclusion in my past because they've defined the point of view that I've developed and they also remind me that other people also feel excluded. Hi this is Imran Ahmed faster and CEO of the business of fashion. And welcome to the PODCAST. This.

Imran Ahmed CEO Tim
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

11:24 min | 1 year ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"In this book isn't about fashion fashion is a way for me to speak about bigger topic this idea of sustainable stain -able fashion. It's been around for a long time but for some reason it's in the Zeitgeist anthem yet and it's transcending fashion. It's transcending business. It's everywhere. It's everywhere so we need to break as consumers are habit of buying for the sake of buying getting bored tossing it treating close as disposable at there. Is this notion out there. That are new generations care about this stop but when it comes to purchasing decisions they're going to the same company. How do we change the hell. That's why I wrote the book hello this is. Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business fashion welcome to inside fashion this this week on the podcast. I sit.

Imran Ahmed founder and CEO
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Educates kids anymore is just one discipline. It's the whole idea of transformative education, as Incan, if you will have to create totally new schools, how do you see the future of materials when it comes to skins, my question is, if I have a bag, which is made out of his biotech letter which can be produced on big scale. Do I still won't meaning it's less desirable because it's not not troll. It's fetishistic. Hi. This is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion this week we've been talking about the best fashion schools in the world on. And as part of our overall exploration of fashion -education. I sat down with a legendary figure in fashion, and someone we.

Imran Ahmed founder and CEO
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Uh-huh. L LA's place where everything is coming together. Traditionally this industry that was based around film is not becoming film, and fashion and music and arts LA is about that trade of images and the production of images, and you know, since the emergence of social media culture were all in the image trade algae, Inc. We can see more this kind of cross pollination VC's can look at San Francisco and say, we're not gonna do that. But we're going to ask you invest in companies really going to try and fulfil social mission as well. As a business. I think it would be game changing. Hi, this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion. And welcome to the podcast today. We share another conversation from west which we recently held in Los Angeles, which has been a source of some of the most innovative companies on the planet, think Disney and Snapchat. But more recently, entrepreneurs from abroad have been choosing to move their businesses to LA, creating a really interesting convergence of technologies, ideas, and creativity. So to explore why different industries or colliding LA we spoke to three really talented entrepreneurs who've chosen to move themselves and their businesses there. There is rich Pearson. The co founder and CEO of head space Damian Brad field, president of we transfer and Bettina cork executive director Freeh's LA. They were in conversation with Rojo Silva co-founder of second home who is also setting up his first US outpost in Los Angeles. So here's row hunt. Bettina Damian enrich IPO f west. I'm slightly obsessed with this topic of convergence. You know, what happens when different ideas and industries collide and come together, and I could definitely blather on the stage for the next five hours on this topic. But luckily as saying we have three great entrepreneurs who you can share their thoughts and ideas on this on this important topic. And you know, I wonder Damian whether Ricky kickoff with you. We transfer you build tools that help people share ideas started off normally as technology business tells a bit about how you at we transfer work with other industries of disciplines. And and why you do that the thing that most people don't know about we transfer that she is the most interesting thing is that we have an advertising model, it's food screen image in the background if any of us a desktop novel and an LA everyone's on the phone. But if you haven't used a desktop still you'll see we transferred his massive image in the background and most of our revenue comes from advertising. So he spent a lotta time working with luxury goods industry and working with companies and technology from adobe to video and moOcom those guys. And then the most exciting part is thirty percent of advertising would give away to support project so artists photographers musicians anything really that sort of interesting and ESP. In the the charitable space or projects around social course gun reform. We're doing a big project the moment about homelessness in LA. And that's piece is really interesting thing about we transfer and where we connect on multiple levels with everybody really see million people use us use tools gonna come back especial Nestle Chinese Dame but Tina Tina wrongs freeze off air LA hours. It's just been a roaring success in the city in the world. I guess is one. Why people I think right? The welds family insular at times office hang out with officers. Tell us about some of the things you did it freeze to open out the the conversation and bring about convergence. Well, my background is really convergence within the art world. I've been lucky enough to wear many hats, working with different organizations from four and nonprofit galleries and museums to directly with artists and freeze was this moment where we could really experiment with how different kinds of collaborations can result in. New forms of art patronage freezes strategic partners endeavors. So just with that. It was so interesting to kind of see how these different cultures interacted and bringing an art fair to Hollywood to a city, which is just really in the past ten or fifteen years become conscious of how important it is as an art destination. You know, there were so many conversations and kind of sustained relationships that have been built that I think will continue to place freeze at the center of the convergence between different creative fields in LA. A rich had had space show Low's v us head space did just this morning leading meditation at again started off as a technology business. Tell us about some of the ways your trying to think in a more into the splinter ways you as you grow. We actually started off as an event business. So we go on events in and my co founder used to be Tibetan Buddhist monk. So the convergence of two and a half thousand years of Tabet and Buddhism to an event to an app was quite transition. And I think those three world you wouldn't necessarily imagine Khanna coming together. I think the irony. The fact that we go close to fifty million people on the phone and the phones the thing that's causing us. A lot of our our stresses not lost. But I think what's being Tikhon. Interesting is how that started to transfer into places that in in a

Los Angeles Bettina Damian founder and CEO co founder Imran Ahmed San Francisco Tina Tina US adobe Damian Brad Disney Bettina cork Rojo Silva Khanna Snapchat Freeh co-founder
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Uh-huh. Your customers will tell you very loudly when you're doing a good job. And when you're not doing your job of hitting your mission. Good Americans would about the community. What does that community main to us may hold us, absolutely accountable? But every decision we make your own very different businesses. Yes. The director consumer business model is the sign, but the thing that strikes me that linked three businesses together is the sense of purpose beyond just making money. Business needs to be a force for good. It's not something you tack on the in business can make a real impact and customs demanding them. And that's been Alvin from the beginning. Hi, this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion. And welcome to the podcast this week. We go back to Los Angeles. Where b o f recently held its second annual B O F west summit the word on everyone's lips in the world of consumer entrepreneurship is direct to consumer. These new kinds of businesses have changed the way consumers spend their money in force traditional players to rethink their business models and practices. Social media and affordable off the shelf. E commerce tools mean it's easier than ever before to start a retail business, and this has given rise to direct to consumer companies that design sell and ship their products themselves bypassing middlemen. But building a direct to consumer brand is no easy feat. And in this panel from B O F west we explore the entrepeneurship journey from aiding the business model in finding the target marketer. All the way through the scaling and fundraising with three very talented entrepreneurs. Tim Brown, the co founder of all bird. Dhs the sneaker that took over Silicon Valley ama- agreed the co founder and CEO Denham labeled. Good American and Hillary Kohl's co-founder of wellness brand, hymns and hers. So here's Tim, Emma. And Hillary with our chief commercial officer, Nick London at B O F west. The first thing to do a lot of questions to off-side. This is going to be fun. But the first thing I'd like to ask each of you just to talk a little bit about the market opportunity to each of your businesses is focused on if I can start with you for good American. What's the market opportunity that you're looking at and I spent the fast all the last fifteen years in the fashion business, and I think what was really apparent Tomase that the large majority of women that happened today at the larger end of the size spectrum really ignored by the mainstream fashion business. And when I decided to stop good American. I was actually pregnant with my second child in for any women have had babies things start to change when you have your second child. And it made me think about the way the fashion media has such a huge. Has a huge impact on the way, you feel as a woman, and so as I was founding good American when I started to think about the brand it was really rooted in this idea of shouldn't there be more options women, and I think that will I started to say was that the fashion industry was really at this old kind of point where what was happening in social media with the body. Kind of positivity movement was really not being reflected in fashion, you'd see a little bit of diversity in some campaigns, the odd thicker woman would be thrown in. But it really was done as tokenism it wasn't reflected in the collection. So I really said about creating a range where it was based on entirely different body shape. And I like to call it the body, shape or popular culture, this idea that you can have curves and still be beautiful. And so good America was ready down on that or created on that basis, and it was incredible because we had such an amazing reception. Right from the beginning. Most of the people would have heard me say. Before because I love it. You know, we sold a million dollars worth of denim on our first day. But it really taught me something that there was a huge Nayed for different type of product in a different type of image. And so we just haven't looked back since amazing to more about you for for all birds different market opportunity. But nevertheless, very big one is sure I saw it come out of the addict long professional sporting career and stumbled into the industry and found this enormous category. That defaulted to making shoes out of NAS materials ensure an opportunity to use materials and direct to consumer business model to choose a different way. And my co-founder, Joey why won't goods on the first much twenty six thing. And San Francisco, you have Tim about two hundred and fifty people offices and UK and recently launched in China and had three fun years voting business that believes that the fan. She industry road Lii and more specifically the industry needs to find ways to make things and that is in some ways the problem of generation, and that we need to we need to do that now. So it's an exciting journey would be on and sort of shimmer about grant and Hillary over to the market opportunity for him. And now hose, of course. Yes. So we were looking at the health and wellness space. In the wellness space is a four trillion dollar industry and quickly growing. And when we looked at it we saw virtually nothing in the men's space. There were two it seemed like there were two different sterotypes was this affluent guy on a beach in linen pants and the other was this, hyper masculine stereotype and everything's red. And neither of those types fit the people that we knew in our lives, and then compound it onto this society is told men that it's weird to want to take care of yourself. And in fact, there there is incredibly common conditions, and you can't take care of yourself. So we're all about teaching guys that actually weird not to take care of yourself. And conversely on the women's side. There's an oversaturation of messages around wellness, and how you should be taking care of yourself and all the expectations and assumptions about your journey through there. And so we noticed a real lack of proactive productive tools that addressed legitimize supported women's health care. And similarly to the opportunity that MSI there, these people who are getting overlooked in the retail, and fashion space there these people that are getting overlooked in the healthcare space and being told that they have all these options, and really they're just being given scraps until this is what you get and too bad. And so now we've been able to create a pot farm over the past year and a half. We've been one of the best of the fastest growing Zeke businesses of all time where we have hundreds of thousands of men and women who are able to access FDA backed medical grade products access to a doctor who's licensed in your state from your phone from our network over one hundred and forty doctors and products

Hillary Kohl founder and CEO Tim Brown co-founder co founder Imran Ahmed director Los Angeles Dhs MSI America FDA chief commercial officer Silicon Valley ama Nick London Denham UK Joey
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Okay. Well on that slightly more serious note. Thank you. For your thoughts on autumn winter twenty nine thousand nine hundred I'm Imran Ahmed, founder and CEO of the business of fashion here with Tim blanks. Our editor at large we are saying farewell for this season. And for this week on inside fashion. Please tune in next week or more from us. If you enjoyed this conversation, please leave us a review on your favorite podcasting platform share with your friends. We are proud to tell you be OS podcasts have now received over two million downloads all around the world. So clearly, you are enjoying these conversations. Give us your feedback. Tell us what you want here about. We are here to vote the issues that you want to hear so with that little plug. I am signing off. Thank you. Thank you. If you enjoyed this conversation, you might be interested in B O F professional our global membership community from the business of fashion Buick, professional members receive unlimited access to all of our articles daily members only analysis, the Buick professional iphone app by annual print issues and all of our online education courses as part of your membership. For a limited time only, we are offering podcast listeners an exclusive discount on an annual of professional membership to get twenty five percent off of your first year. Click on the link in the episode notes select the annual package and enter the special invitation code podcast twenty nineteen at the checkout. We hope you enjoy it. And don't forget to tell your friends..

founder and CEO Imran Ahmed Buick Tim blanks editor twenty five percent
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and this week on the Buick podcast. We look back at the fashion season. That was I talked to Tim blanks are editor large about saying farewell to Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel and Fendi where there were emotional Oman shes to one of the greatest fashion designers that ever was. We also discussed the explosive second collection from sleep man who moved to abortion while look at selene, and we talk about the cultural impact and fashions reflection on social issues that were being discussed in and around fashion week. So here's Tim blanks. Inside passion. Tim blanks. You just poured an entire well. He's an Espresso shot into the glass, a double Espresso shot into a glass of water cold water. Why did you do that? It's my make Colo. Anyway, I guess you needed after the fashion month gone by all that coffee. You set it. I was the season. It was it was it consolidated everything we've been saying about fashion for the last little while always lead to Paris. But this is curious situation there that the fish of the days at nine thirty in the morning. The law shows at nine thirty at night. In on a on a few days felt like it was nice city at night, anyway, which which makes a very very long days quite tiring. Because it feels that there is so much more in Paris than look fresh as a daisy. Thank you. That's one does modern science. My homemaker cola. You know, we we had quite a. Quite a season. There was a lot that happened off the runways as well with the passing of Karl Lagerfeld. The regular racism scandals that were you know, erupting in different places. But let's start with the shows and talk about some of these kind of deeper issues bit later, I missed the comedy also show 'cause I had to record a podcast 'cause I'm so dedicated to our podcast, but it was your top show of the season. Talk to me about mass show. You know, that you said it was devastating. I thought it was I thought it was overwhelming. I thought that. Raica will right Kawakubo used to regularly nail the site guys. I guess you'd call it. And I feel that I feel that her interests kind of went elsewhere when she's to that stretch of shows where she was was she wasn't really doing close to as she had other things on mind. And then she reengaged with that process. According to an interview I read with ho Susannah Frankel last season and the season was back that will not back Ford to. A presentation that just seemed to really put us right where we are right now under the under the luring cloud of climate change and in a world of increasing conflict in division. And she did it by I felt she did it with with by using these sort of emblems of very high society of their very civilized society. You know, the dress codes of of the icing centuries in Pontiac as in and and we'll list sort of Lasorda of silhouette ideas, you associate with with court dress almost and then using these incredible industrial fabric site will rub. Oh, and and play with her and so on but making these beautiful beautiful shape set look like to me like that being drowned in an oil spill and then. The was the whole staging of the show is much more car graph than a shows. Usually are there was a big open space a squarespace actually of that narrow runway that so small, and usually I mean for years everybody was on the same level, and this was very tightly ID and very very enclosed at felt like a, you know, one of those courts at the minds used to play kinda pro baseball with the heads of their enemies, it felt really closed in like that really intense..

Tim blanks Karl Lagerfeld Paris Imran Ahmed founder and CEO Oman Raica Fendi Lasorda Susannah Frankel editor Pontiac baseball Ford Kawakubo
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"To get the inventory, hold that inventory. And then sell it later. So our you're from finance background. So I know you've been thinking about this. How how how do you how do you kind of balance those two? You know, you said you said something interesting at the beginning around private-label or own brand and the amount of time it takes to invest in. But if you put it in the right environment, and you've already created that environmental really cut appointing the whole thing at the outset than I think, that's what we saw in. What we did with with layer with our own brand. Granted that it's very pulse through thinks about the woman it gives her the right, aesthetics and functionality and all of that. So it's doing all the right things. But it's also put in the right environment. So could you see a day when the own brand business could be bigger than the wholesale business? Talking about my strategy in for five years, and I'm not going to get that way. But I can tell by. Let's just say that it is an integral part of the business. It's not an afterthought. And it's definitely not just a nice to have it is part of the business that we put a lot of thinking a lot of time into it is needed out there. And and that's how we look at it. And if there's one final message that you would like to share with our listeners about modest fashion because our listeners for the podcast, they come from all over the world, they represent every facet of the fashion. You see what is the one thing that the wider industry needs to understand about this space? I think that the one thing is that it's much broader than you think. And that probably what you stereotype it to be is one facet of it. It's which is generally, you know, as Muslim that is one part of modesty. But there is a broad array of women who dressed this way for multiple reasons and law. Fashion, and that can be just as cool and stylish fashionable as anything else that you see out there. Okay. Well, thank you for taking the time to illuminate our thinking on this opportunity. So fascinating for me sitting here where I do to see all the different facets of action that are changing, and it's really interesting to see how the growth of the market in the Middle East that arise of the women's movement and the growing need for providing things that enable people to be who they are are kind of coinciding in your business model to to kind of catapulted to to growth and success. And I wish you all the best. Thank you. Thank you for your time. Thanks to all of you for listening. I'm Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion, bats all for inside fashion this week. But you can always be sure there's more to come for us next. Next week. So please, stay tuned. If you enjoy this podcast, leave us a review shared on social media. Put a comment in to our apple review section. So we can share this podcast more widely with all of you around the world by.

founder and CEO Imran Ahmed apple Middle East five years
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"No. So why does this industry need a dedicated plot form for modest fashion? We need to create something amazing for this woman. Who has not been spoken to it's not about the lack of availability of product. It's the fact that this woman has to go through hundreds of products to find what it is that she's looking for. How did the brands respond to your pitch in the first incense? We had seventy five brands coming on board with us just on the basis of the concept. When you see the response of customers, the people that matter really, and you see the way this resonates and how they come back to you. You just know that there is something there, and that you know, the funding will come the growth will come. It's it's about just, you know, focusing on on the right things. Hi, this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to inside fashion on the B O podcast every now, and then I come across an entrepreneur who really makes an impression on me. And that's the way I felt the first time I met gives land Guinness, the founder of the modest now for those of you have been following the rise of modest fashion. You may have come across his land, and her pathbreaking website and ecommerce proposition, but as Len explains in this conversation modest fashion has expanded far beyond the idea of traditional or religious dress in the Middle East. It is now an aesthetic movement that has moved beyond the idea of religious dress to incorporate a more conservative aesthetic that has become popular all over the world. And it is an industry that gives LAN says it's worth billions of dollars a year. But how do you go after that market who are the customers? And where is this market going in the future? Here is the founder of the modest..

founder and CEO Imran Ahmed Middle East Guinness Len
"imran ahmed" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"And a lot of them are either booster or take down some nice mix of both. Sometimes there'd be reporting into names. There'd be some made up reporting, but a lot of it was a common theme that that undergird a lot of it was we are going to take down the existing publications. We're going to take down timing. We're gonna take down the New York Times, and even though readership is fifty thousand people, we had outsized influence and it was very much against them. David Goliath asymmetric thing was up part of the appeal of what you were doing. I don't think so. I mean, I think what people were coming for and it was very much built by word of mouth. There was an Email newsletter from the beginning that people would share was just a different perspective. I think charm setting yourself up as oppositional to the existing trade publication wasn't sat up as a trade publication business at all. It was just a project for the first six years. There was no business, my thoughts. This is interesting. I'm just writing what I think. And I think in an industry that sometime. Has suffered from a media environment. That's very much you know in the pockets of the big brands is very hard for people. You know if your businesses based on on overtime thing to, you know, be critical. So teas that a little bit because it is what sort of getting it. Right. So when you say in the pockets of big brands, do you mean that designers the advertisers and they're often the same if you think of the big fashion magazines? Those traditionally not made money from subscriptions. They've made money from, you know, very, very big advertising relationships with the big fashion Brown's through talking about a vogue or publications like that that are both getting advertising from people like Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren or whomever and then deciding to showcase their work. Yeah. So the I mean, and, and it's perfectly valid model right works. It just means that that content you create is going to be, you know, almost by definition complementary and sell. Laboratory and you know, it's not the contents not there to take a kind of objective position on the industry. That content is there to help sell and position the brand or the products of those brands as desirable. And that's what you know. You don't have those relationships, you're outside that world. And are you constantly saying, because that's not the case I'm going to curb out my own space where I mean critical or it was a wish I wish I knew what I was doing the time, but you have to remember, I didn't know anything about fashion. I didn't know anything about media and I didn't know anything about technology company. Yeah, this was just a, you know, the mindset at the time was like, I'm enjoying this and people are leaving comments and I'm getting into like a dialogue with these people and they're all over the world. And there's this clearly other people who are interested in this intersection between the creative and the business people know who you are. I didn't really make it about me like it wasn't called Imran Ahmed blog, the business of fashion. It wasn't anonymous. It was. It wasn't. Anonymous, but also wasn't, you know, it wasn't like putting my face all over the place. When I think of the tech blogs like you knew Michael Harrington was Fahd or Malik. People were identified with the publication even if they're face, wasn't on hundred wasn't called was called gig, right? Right. But, yeah, like pay content and tech crunch. I guess this was kind of in the same order operated when really it's really one person's viewpoint. Even if they start to hire staff, it's very much reflective of the way they think about the world care Swisher and wall Mazar. We're gonna be getting of of the all things d days. Yeah, I think that's a fair analog. And so when you're building this, what made you think, oh, this could actually be an standalone business that would pay my rent and maybe one day employ one hundred people. Sure. So what I was doing at the time to earn a living with, I was an independent consultant. So I was thinking of the business of fashion as my version of McKinsey quarterly. So when I was at McKinsey that this publication or they'd put out their ideas and it would lead to..

McKinsey New York Times David Goliath Imran Ahmed independent consultant wall Mazar Ralph Lauren Swisher Brown Calvin Klein Michael Harrington Fahd six years one day
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Uh-huh. What does influence mean to you? An influence, sir, really relates to more of the every day person and inspires them. Can you talk about the Power of media today and how how you see it working as someone who's really benefited from it? I think that Mike career came about at a time when social media was just starting, not really there, and I took advantage of it and I figured out how to use it to my benefit. What's most important lesson learned about being an entrepreneur do? What fits your your soul, if your, if your brand is going to be you and you're going to be starting a business, that is what you love to do. You have to really work hard and wanna be there. Hi everyone. This is Imran Ahmed, founder and CEO of the business of fashion. Welcome to the bureau F podcast this week on inside fashion. I sit down with Kim Kardashian now. Most people around the world know who came crashing by now. She has more than two hundred million followers on social media and has become known in some places as being famous for being famous. Well, I wanted to get the whole truth and for our latest special trindon called the age of influence, we are exploring the growing influence of ordinary people everywhere. Anyone now anywhere around the world can build a following grow a business or affect change, and Kim Kardashian has done all of those things in spades. The other big part of this new printing is our first special report on the business of beauty. The beauty industry is set to hit five hundred billion dollars in the coming years, and Cam has built a business that's expected to over one hundred million dollars in revenue in its first year. So when thinking about the intersection of influence and beauty, Cam seemed like the ideal person to speak to. But before we begin, I also wanted to tell you about. Oh, west. Our first major event on the west coast of the United States, which will take place on June eighteenth at Westfield, century city mall in Los Angeles, Cam will be joining us there as well. So if you're interested in learning more about this event or our special printed edition police, check the description to this podcast and all the links that you need will be there. So without further ado, here's Kim Kardashian inside fashion. Hello? Kim about Tian. It's been a long shooting day. It has been, we'll thank you for doing all those pictures. They look amazing chorus of so much fun. I love working with Ben. He's he's really good. It's my first time meeting him. So as we've been discussing, our new print edition of UF is all about influence and the age of influence which is around us in all of its different guises. And it ranges from activism to consumption to design influence seems to be shaping everything in the world around us. And this issue also marks are official entry into covering the beauty industry. So you're the perfect blend of influence and beauty. The two major forces that are are really an important part of this issue. So thank you for taking time to chat with me today. You're welcome a wanted to start by talking. I about influence and it's a word influence an influence this word that we hear so much Amadeus. Yeah. What what does influence mean to you? I really think that. It's a proud description when someone mentioned fat. You know, I think. These days people really. Get inspired by so many different people like an influence can be so broad, someone that it, it takes it from like. If you're talking about like a fashion icon. Yeah, there's like this iconic status, but then there's like this influential. I'm just talking about in fashion. It can be beauty. There could be a beauty icon. You know, there's like a beauty influence or that really like it's so fascinating to me that I don't know how these influencers come to life or it's so inspirational that you can be working. Like I'm talking about the beauty influencers. You can be working in your home in your bedroom, and there's so much social media, these channels that you can connect with so many people. And I think an influence her really relates to more of the every day person and inspires them. I mean, the influencers, all the different beauty influencers and fashion influencers. I mean, I love to look at their accounts to see what they're doing and giving their reviews on things, and I take them to heart. So I think it's such an honor to be in that category of. Fluence or the other place where influence seems to be having a bigger and bigger impact is around activism. You know, there's so many, I saw the other day you were participating in the March, you know. And I think there's there seems to be a spirit of activism in the air, and you see all all sorts of people really taking the causes that are really important to them to influence isn't just about. You know, things that may seem superficial to some people like Udine fashion, but also about really important issues that are shaping the world that March was really moving. It was really special to go with my husband and we brought our daughter and and my husband's dad and just to have. These like three generations, they're all wanting the same thing and all you know when we were explaining to our daughter, why we were going and what we were doing and she, she totally got it. You know it was and just to even see it was very hopeful. It was a very hopeful day that you felt like you felt it in the air that these kids were going to become our future leaders and that they are going to take over and you like for the second felt this sense of hope just come, you know, with, obviously there's really unfortunate situations, but it was. Yeah. I mean, you're right. All of those new kids that were up there and that were speaking, they are the most amazing influencers. Influencers also get a bad rap. And sometimes you know, people say that influencers are famous for being famous. How do you respond to criticism like that? I mean, so if they are famous for being famous, what does that matter? That's that like I never got that many people said that about me all the time. And what do you do when you're just famous for being famous? Well, okay, we'll I'm here, doesn't matter. You know, like that title just was stupid to me. Always. They are there. You know, if they are famous for being famous, they're still important. People are still taking their advice. People are still paying attention to them whether they are, you know, speaking about fashion or beauty or activism very important.

Kim Kardashian founder and CEO Imran Ahmed Cam Mike career United States Udine Los Angeles Ben official Westfield five hundred billion dollars one hundred million dollars
"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"imran ahmed" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"A new hello i'm imran's ahmed founder and ceo of the business of fashion i founded the business of fashion in two thousand seven after working as a management consultant i knew i wanted to break into a creative field but i wasn't sure which one or how i might do and i got an idea and started meeting with young fashion designers have diagnosed a problem that many fastened companies identified around the same time designers were bursting with ideas but were often disasters as this esteemed today across all channels and including social media the business of fashion garners over ninety million monthly impressions and our website alone receives over one million unique visitors amman from over two hundred countries and territories around the world b o f is a global community and we are very proud to be a part of and one of the best parts of my job as a things we learned the conversations we have from this community which is made up of a huge variety of people make the fashion industry tick or who have lessons to share with us from other sectors and disciplines that intersect were slashed i am endlessly fascinated by these people many of whom have become the experts i turned to when i'm trying to understand how we can help the boft community navigate all the change in our industry and in the wider world and this podcast will explore the conversations that happened on the business of fashion as well as the impact of fashion house on the wider world in these episodes you'll hear stories from some of the most important fashion designers an introduction on how to start a fashion business and here talks from our annual gathering voices will also have unscripted indepth conversations with some of my favorite people from fashion and beyond you'll hear real stories from these experts to will educate you with their expertise and inspire you with their personal story all you need to do to get started to subscribe today we'd love to hear your feedback so please let us know what you think and what you'd like to hear mara thank you for listening and.

founder and ceo consultant social media imran boft mara