35 Burst results for "Imperial College London"

"imperial college london" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 5 months ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"High obviously but it's great to see it's coming down COVID deaths 7 day average down 7% to 1100 We're going to talk more about COVID we come back with Graham cook Imperial college London infectious disease professor this is Bloomberg This is a Bloomberg Whatever you're funny peacock's got it exclusively Stream classic sitcoms like The Office Parks and Recreation and two and a half men Plus catch peacock original comedies like AP bio and save by the bell For all your exclusive comedy phase go to peacock TV dot com and get started Before and after the pandemic Is it driven by politics or by science That may be how we keep track of our lives from here on out What do you think the political effects of that impatience will be And through it all there's been Bloomberg We begin on Capitol Hill the most accurate business world and healthcare news before and after The fundamentals do not justify this price action Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com Bloomberg the world is listening The world's financial decision makers connect on the Bloomberg terminal The buy side and the sell side together Collaborating across markets in countries in real time sharing ideas negotiating trades and forming an influential network of over 325,000 financial professionals that helps power global markets isn't a time you join them request a demo at Bloomberg dot com slash professional Money billet A.

Exposing the Ignorance and Evil Behind the Pandemic with Alex Berenson

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | 5 months ago

Exposing the Ignorance and Evil Behind the Pandemic with Alex Berenson

"Yes, so let's just start there. I mean, February 2020, you were like investigating marijuana and other things and then the virus comes and you just decided, I'm gonna start looking into this and I started to come across your stuff on sub stack where, you know, Aaron gin, who you might know is another guy that was really into it in the early days. And I was so outspoken about the lockdowns and I was we were really into it because I really had nothing else to do. Everything was locked down. And I'm by no means an expert, but just my common sense instincts that something's wrong and you are so informative and so courageous early on, walk us through that because you probably never planned to be center stage of one of the most important medical issues that humanity's ever faced. No, I certainly didn't. And, you know, I was working on a book about really about U.S. drug policy that would have been and I hope to write one day still a follow-up to tell your children sort of broadly about this, you know, the epidemic of legalization, the sort of very broad campaign to legalize drugs that we've seen and not just cannabis, but really all drugs that we've seen in the last ten or 15 years. And so I was working on that and then of course, you know, like everybody else, I saw the videos coming out of China. I think we were all pretty nervous back in January and February. And then in March 2020 and I talk about this in pandemia, I've read that Neil Ferguson report the imperial college London report that said, oh, if we don't do anything, 2 million Americans will die, but even worse, if we do, if we do mitigate a million Americans will die and we need to really lock down our society. And, you know, within days that started to happen in New York and California and everywhere else, and then and then amazingly to me, Neil Ferguson totally changed his prediction. Ten days after releasing this report that really shocked the world and pushed the United States and Europe into Loch Ness, he basically said, oh, you know what? I was wrong. I was wrong by 95%. Did I say 500,000 deaths? I'm at 20,000. Okay, so look, the science or the data was evolving very fast around the coronavirus. Back at that time. And everybody's got the right to look at new data and change their views. But what was shocking to me was that the media was not willing to acknowledge what Ferguson had

Aaron Gin Neil Ferguson United States Imperial College London China California New York Europe Ferguson
Britain tightens COVID rules as world on alert over omicron

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Britain tightens COVID rules as world on alert over omicron

"Covert nineteen cases from the new variant are emerging outside of southern Africa where it was first identified this very it is spreading around the world with two cases so far identified here in the U. K. British prime minister Boris Johnson announced new measures aimed at containing the spread of the Omicron variant many countries are imposing new restrictions on travel from southern Africa including the U. S. we were so slow to act on delta and the whole world it's such a high price for it Danny Altman is a professor of immunology at imperial college London let's try and be forewarned can do it properly this time so I think I could probably is warranted the good thing is that we have monitoring systems around the world to detect these variants very quickly the world health organization's Maria banker cove already scientists are sharing research with us information with us so that we can take action open questions include the effectiveness of current vaccines against Omicron and whether it causes more severe disease there's been no indication of that so far I'm Ben Thomas

K. British Prime Minister Bori Southern Africa Danny Altman U. Imperial College London Maria Banker Cove World Health Organization Ben Thomas
UK researchers: jabs breaking link between infection and serious illness or death

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

UK researchers: jabs breaking link between infection and serious illness or death

"An ongoing study of the pandemic in England finds at the cove in nineteen vaccination program is beginning to break the link between infection and serious illness or death the latest results from researchers at imperial college London reveals that could nineteen infections dropped by about sixty percent in March as national looked on measures slowed the spread of the virus people sixty five and older least likely to be infected as they benefited most from the vaccination program which initially focused on older people the study also finds the relationship between infections and deaths is diverging suggesting that infections may have resulted in fewer hospitalizations and deaths since the start of widespread vaccination Charles Taylor this month London

England London Charles Taylor
Oxford's Vaccine

Kottke Ride Home

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Oxford's Vaccine

"Good vaccine news just keeps on coming on the backs of really promising news. From the pfizer. Biontech and madonna now oxford astrazeneca have announced the preliminary results from their phase three trials which showed overall seventy percent efficacy as reminder madonna and visor biotechs. Vaccines both currently show around ninety. Five percent efficacy but seventy percent is still very solid. That's about where dr fauci had been saying. He'd be very pleased to see. But i overall seventy percent. Because there's a weird quirk of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. That i as someone who is not an immunologist. Don't quite understand but hopefully we'll get more information on it in the coming days. Here's what i can tell you for now. The vaccine like the pfizer biontech one would need to be distributed in two doses however the first dose just needs to be half a dose for some reason. Doing a half dose on the first injection makes the whole vaccine overall more effective than if you got to hold doses quoting stat news. The preliminary results on the astrazeneca vaccine were based on a total one hundred. Thirty one covid nineteen cases in a study involving eleven thousand three hundred sixty three participants. The findings were perplexing to full doses of the vaccine appeared to be only sixty two percent effective at preventing disease while a half dose followed by a full dose was about ninety percent effective. That ladder analysis was conducted on a small subset of the study participants. Only two thousand seven hundred forty one a us based trial being supported by operation. Warp speed is testing the two full dose regimen. That may soon change. Astrazeneca plans to explore adding the half dose full dose regimen to its ongoing clinical trials in discussions with regulatory agencies spokesman told stat in an email and quotes and quoting from the new york times. The oxford scientists said they were still trying to understand why the vaccine was more effective at a smaller first dose. The first is supposed to prime the immune system while the second is supposed to boost its response while it seemed counter intuitive for a smaller i dose to be more effective. They said that strategy. More closely mimic. What happens with a real infection. End quotes peter openshaw professor of experimental medicine at imperial college. London explained to the associated. Press that vaccines. don't work. Like normal drugs where a higher dose produces more effects. The immune system is more complicated. Openshaw also notes that if indeed people do only need half a dose for one of the injections that's great news because it will be even cheaper to produce for more people. This was the vaccine candidate. That i was most excited about early on because it seemed like they kind of had a head start quoting the new york. Times astrazeneca's macos vaccine is designed to genetically altered in a dinner virus found in chimps. So that it harmlessly mimics the corona virus and provoke an immune response vaccine deploying. That technology has never won approval but the approach has been studied before notably in a small two thousand eighteen study of an experimental vaccine against the virus that causes middle east respiratory syndrome or mergers that viruses related to sars cov two the novel corona virus that causes covid nineteen so when covid nineteen emerged the team of scientists at oxford's jenner institute that had been leading the work on similar corona viruses. Had a head start once. The genetic code of sars cov two was published in early january. The oxford team sped to adapt their platform to the new corona virus and begin animal testing and quotes the other win in oxford. Astrazeneca's corner is unlike the pfizer. Biontech vaccine this latest one does not require any special refrigeration just standard storage and transportation temperatures of two eight degrees celsius or thirty six to forty six degrees fahrenheit and it can be stored for up to six months. The moderna vaccine requires cooler temperatures of negative four degrees fahrenheit but then can be stored at normal refrigeration temperatures after thawing in can be stored as such for a month. The pfizer biontech vaccine. Meanwhile requires dry. Ice to store at negative seventy degrees celsius or negative ninety four degrees fahrenheit s- that makes the oxford astrazeneca vaccine much more appealing for areas without the infrastructure or funding to sustain the pfizer. Biotech cold chain. And with that in mind. Astrazeneca is applying for early approval wherever it can as well as an emergency useless stained from the world health organization so that it can be made available in low income countries they plan to produce three billion doses next year and are committed to providing it at cost around the world through july. Twenty twenty one. The vaccine costs around three or four. Us dollars significantly less than the others late stage. Trials are continuing in the us. Japan russia south africa kenya and latin america and further trials are planned for other european and asian countries. So definitely more good news but watch this space for more

Astrazeneca Oxford Pfizer Biontech Dr Fauci Madonna Peter Openshaw Openshaw The New York Respiratory Syndrome Jenner Institute Imperial College The New York Times
"imperial college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The BBC World Service very soon. Hello and welcome to Maura less on the BBC World Service with the program all about the numbers in the news and in life, and I'm Tim Halford. We've been living with a global pandemic now for over eight months, and this week, we thought we'd revisit the question of how deadly the diseases The mortality rate the mortality rate for the virus. The death rate was remarkably high. Reporters like to throw around the words death, right. But it turns out that the phrase Khun mean very different things. People aren't always clear what they're talking about, and it makes a huge difference. There's the crude mortality rate that's simply what percentage of the population have died. You can have a disease that's 100% fatal. But if not many people catch it. The crude mortality rate will be low. Then there's the case fatality rate. That's where you take all the confirmed deaths and all the confirmed cases and work out how many deaths there. Our perp say 100 cases. That's a bit like the old joke about looking for the keys under the lamppost, because that's where the light is. The case fatality rate is easy to calculate. Just divide one easily accessible number by another. It could be quite misleading. Lots of people have had Corona virus infections without being tested. Indeed, during the first wave, it's probably true that the majority of infections were detected. Now deaths from Cove. It might also be missed because of insufficient testing, but probably not to the same degree. That means Mohr deaths divided by fewer cases on the case fatality rate makes the disease look much more dangerous than it really is. More useful right toe workout. How deadly diseases is thie infection fatality rate, where experts estimate how many extra people are infected on top of the confirmed cases. And compare that to deaths. We often think that the infection fatality re or the case fatality rate, as fixed both across tame on DH, you know, between different countries. And that's just not the case. This is Dr Hannah Richie, researcher at the online publication Our World in data at the University of Oxford. The infection If you tell it to me, or the mortality risk is very dependent on The age. So depending on the age profile of different countries across the world, you have a very different invasion fatality rate. Okay, so for for teenagers extremely low, and then for all the people by different Yes. Oh, increases quite steeply, Especially towards older It is so if you're in your forties that would rise to 0.15% and then for the over eighties is almost one in 10. So 10% of over eighties that catch covetable. Unfortunately day from it, so 600 people in their forties who've got it and you would expect one of them. To die. But if it was 600 people in their eighties you'd expect 60 of them to die. Yes, that's quiet. People often call this one magic for what the Afar is across the world. And assume that that percentage of infections and every country will be the same that will result in the same percentage of deaths. But because we have very different each profiles across countries, your eye afar is very different. So to give you an idea, So the Imperial College London looked a range of geological studies, which tried to estimate the Afar. Recently concluded that usually lower income countries across the world have much younger populations. So they're the population. Wei Dai Afar comes over around zero point too few percent. And if you contrast that with higher income countries, which tend to have much older populations that rises toe our 1.15%, But it turns out that even a single infection fatality rate for a single country could be too crude. Often, the infection fatality rate will be quoted as ah Population weight estimate saw in the UK, for example, what percentage of people in the UK that catcher will then die from it? But this is often a pretty poor measure of the individual risk as an example in England Covert 19 cases have been going up since the summer. At the end of September. There was a huge spike on what happened in September, students went off to university. They intermingled and covert 19 spread. This is Dr Daniel Howden at the University of Leeds in the UK Or some university soul over 1000 cases and this cause of a large spike in cases around about the end of September, the start of October, But despite which Trying to fizzled out raised to be quickly. It's not this nor cases anymore, but that big increase wasn't sustained. It's kind of like a sort of cruise ship outbreak where what's happening? There's lots of people are in fact in each other. It stays largely self contained and then feeds out very quickly once lots and lots of people have had it. So although England's case number had a large spike from students Deaths increased more slowly Case among younger people. Or much, much less likely to end up in hospitalizations end with debts compared to all the people Since about the 10th of July in England, there have bean Certainly over 100,000 cases among people under 30. There have been two deaths. So the case fatality rate, if you like that would emerge from them is very, very, very small percentage. This just shows the complicated nature of working out the connection between cases on deaths in a population. One thing that we can say about this virus is that it surprised us quite a lot. And even predictions that have Bean issued a projection scenarios that have been issued with the kind of best of intentions and possibly even based on the best evidence have ultimately, bean completely invalidated by reality. Although the age profile is the most important thing affecting someone's chances of dying from covert 19 we have some heartening news due to bear achievement, their understanding of the disease in the progression. We think that if you catch your likelihood of dying from is probably the best estimates I've seen in 22 30% lower than they were back there really early and the pandemic thanks to Dr Hannah Richie and Dr Daniel Howden. And just before.

Dr Hannah Richie England UK Dr Daniel Howden BBC Afar Bean Wei Dai Afar Khun Maura Tim Halford Mohr University of Oxford Imperial College London University of Leeds researcher
Britain to evaluate data for potential vaccines

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Britain to evaluate data for potential vaccines

"The checkout of Britain's coronavirus vaccine task force says data value aging the efficacy and safety of the two most advanced candidates should be available in early December Kate Bingham has told a parliamentary committee the dates on the two vaccine candidates developed by Oxford university and AstraZeneca and Pfizer and B. O. N. tech should be available by then after that the vaccine candidates will need regulatory approval Bingham says if the developers get that we have the possibility of deploying by year end well being check talk one of the scientists behind another vaccine developed by imperial college London this is possible several vaccines will be needed to stop the pandemic Charles Taylor this month London

Kate Bingham B. O. N. Tech Britain Astrazeneca Oxford University Pfizer Bingham Imperial College London Charles Taylor
COVID Can Age the Brain by a Decade, Study Suggests

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

COVID Can Age the Brain by a Decade, Study Suggests

"Of some people recovering from covert 19 may age 10 years. That's according to a study of 84,000 people by researchers at Imperial College. London, Experts say it's important to further investigate the extent to which cognition is impacted within the weeks and months after the infection. And whether permanent damage to the brain function results in some people. That's of

Imperial College London
COVID-19 immunity may only last a few months after infection, study indicates

Mark and Melynda

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

COVID-19 immunity may only last a few months after infection, study indicates

"News researchers in Britain's a Corona virus immunity May only last a few months at Imperial College, London, say the number of people in Britain with antibodies that may protect against the Corona virus Dropped rapidly over the summer. Once the first wave of infections was brought under control. They say it's more evidence immunity may be short lived, a study found. 6% of the British population had antibodies in June, but by September that prevalence was down to 4.4%. In London. Simon in Fox News, Senator

London Britain Imperial College Fox News Senator Simon
COVID-19 immunity may only last a few months after infection, study indicates

Frank Beckmann

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

COVID-19 immunity may only last a few months after infection, study indicates

"Now saying Corona virus immunity might only last a few months. Scientists at Imperial College London say the number of people in Britain with antibodies that may protect against the Corona virus Dropped rapidly over the summer. Once the first wave of infections was brought under control. They say it's more evidence immunity may be short lived, a study found. 6% of the British population had antibodies in June. But by September that prevalence was down to 4.4%. In London.

Imperial College London Britain
U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

PRI's The World

06:07 min | 1 year ago

U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

"Vaccine Trials are happening all over the globe today. The UK government announced funding for phase. One of something called a human challenge trial for a corona virus vaccine. The process will require young healthy volunteers to be infected with the virus in an effort to speed up vaccine testing a company called H Vivo and Imperial College London. Have the contract is set up the first part of that process. Here's more from the world's caroline dealer the idea itself sounds wild intentionally infect people with the very virus returning our lives upside down to avoid. People hear about these trials. Many people's immediate reaction is, how could it be ethical but Oxford bioethicist deb Yom row gic says, it's possible if certain conditions are met one of those conditions is that the expected benefits of the research outweigh the risks. In this case, how many infections could we prevent if we developed a vaccine sooner? For example, in a typical clinical trial thousands of people are injected with a test vaccine and sent out into the world to see if they still get infected naturally that's happening now with several corona virus vaccine candidates, but Andrew Catchpole. The, chief scientific officer at H., Vivo the company launching this human challenge trial says that takes time normal traditional trials involve many thousands of subjects take many many months to complete in human challenge trials, which HP VO has been running for decades. A small number of healthy volunteers would be intentionally infected with the coronavirus after getting jabbed with a trial vaccine to see if it works. What happens is because everybody is given the disease, you're able to determine efficacy in a matter of weeks. These types of tiles have been used for centuries and in the recent past have. Sped up the development of typhoid and cholera vaccines. The agreement announced by the UK government today is just for the first step of this contract to manufacture and test Raina the virus to use in trials it still has to be approved by regulators and an ethics panel. If it is between thirty and ninety volunteers could start being injected with just the test virus, not yet any vaccine as soon as the beginning of next year so far nearly three thousand people in the UK have signed up to volunteer for a challenge trial. One of them is allaster frazier ORCA. White indefinite convinced. The Human Josh all has essential to advising Ovalles, scenes, population way more quickly lift on them on opinion the risk is small enough to travel participants that we need to take that risk frazier ORCA put off going to university for a year to work with one day sooner, a nonprofit group advocating for human challenge trials and signing up volunteers. He says the Tom Channel some of the fear of living through a pandemic into something that feels productive grandma custos. My Dodd might catch his out his risk. So kind of on a personal level the. Volunteer volunteers will be paid somewhere around five thousand dollars insurance cover healthcare costs. For any complications they will quarantine in a special nineteen dead unit at the Royal Free, hospital in London for an expected two weeks after virus exposure. Again, Andrew Catch Paul from h Vivo. A first priority was doing these studies is the safety of the volunteers. So for that reason, we go very strict criteria about those who. Will be eligible to participate. Volunteers must be between eighteen and thirty healthy with no pre existing conditions. But there's a more controversial criteria that scientists are wrestling with right now whether to exclude volunteers of color because there is data suggest that there is a potential for increased risk. The UN says Kobe nineteen is disproportionately affecting racial and ethnic minorities around the globe including in Brazil the UK and the US. K. Government figures, black men in England and Wales are more than two and a half times more likely to die of cope in nineteen than white men. Some of that is explained by socioeconomic status in pre existing conditions. But Dhillon David Kumar, a physician and professor at University College London says it's more than that. They're also other underlying causes racism discrimination for example, being an underlying cause which are not easy to count foreign. Announces such as this Dave Qamar said, he's the health impacts of racism and xenophobia. He says, well, it's important to note that raises a social construct, not biological. The effects of racism in tells in ways that can be hard to identify. So you can't hold constant the discrimination someone's face throughout their life. You can't hold constant the environment someone grownup in the levels of air pollution kinds of housing that they've lifting throughout their life. So. There are differences in outcomes amongst racial groups. David Kamar isn't familiar with this specifics of this study proposal, but he says he can understand the reason for picking volunteers who are at the lowest possible risk for getting really sick. Charles cordray chief officer for the Caribbean and African Health Network sees it differently. It's really disappointing people of Color. In clinical trials that's partly due to legacy of racist medical experiments. By white doctors and kwok-wah dray says the idea of excluding people of color from this trial would add to the distrust mistrust and the lack of trust has come about as a result of decades of sometimes how we need to respond so quickly but what is meant is that there's a whole section of people. Fair much. whose voices are not being head HBO is still making a decision about whether and how to include people of Color in the first phase of this trial when they're testing out the safest way to infect people with the actual virus the company hasn't designed protocols yet for the actual vaccine-testing in hopes quickly follows the volunteer criteria for this stage of the study will be finalized and handed over to UK regulators and an ethics panel by

UK Andrew Catchpole Imperial College London Chief Scientific Officer London Kwok-Wah Dray David Kamar Frazier Orca Typhoid Royal Free Caribbean Hp Vo Dodd University College London Tom Channel UN Dave Qamar Dhillon David Kumar
Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

Coronacast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

"Say Norman. Let's talk about a place, which is now imposing a five Columba travel limit You can't go to the body shop anymore he conquered the beauty salons jeans I'm not talking about Victoria I'm talking about I land and it looks like pices in Europe adopting some USTRALIAN stall approaches to curbing coronavirus. Yes. Because despite all the complaints about lockdown in Victorian has unnecessary M- should. Just. Let it go climbing from some sources and how in complaining not letting up quickly enough lockdown is actually all you can do when it's getting out of control I mean as a Stralia being used as an example to the world or is this just best practice? No matter where you are let's talk about Ireland for a moment, which is a country that's got a smaller population than Victoria bending how you define. It is right about five million people in the past month if at seventeen thousand cases past week seven, thousand by yesterday twelve, hundred cases in a single day. So. That's getting pretty worrying from them and they they're locked on looks remarkably similar to victorious yet they're going into heights lockdown of his six weeks well, in Victoria. That wasn't long enough. Do you think they might extend it? Well, it's hard to say and it goes on modelling the Senate got more cases and more virus circulating and as we've said. Before on Corona, Cast University of Sydney modeling showed that for every day you delay lock tone when you're out of control, it's a week at the other end, which is one reason why Victoria has gone on a bit longer they try to ring-fence thirty six suburbs. It didn't work and that delayed things by a couple of weeks and we've probably shortened it by lot. At, the end effect on that but that's engine. Now the sorted out and the hopefully, we'll get done very levels, but it depends on how much virus there is around week or so ago a senior person at the W. H. O., the World Health Organization was saying lockdowns shouldn't be the primary way that countries control Khurana, virus, and that sort of headline went out. And I think a of the new Scott got in it because we are seeing countries using lockdown and it can be effective. So where's the? Where's the nuance here? So that's certainly not what was being said last week courting the World Health, organization and we for Monday's synthetically report I interviewed Dr Dave Navarro. Who's in fact, the same health official he's professor of public. Health. Imperial College London and his Special Envoy to World Health Organization on Covid Nineteen, and he feels that he's been misrepresented his view is that sure down is not the first thing that you do. It's not your primary means of control. Your primary means of control has to be testing and contact tracing and quarantine in isolation of the people you find in that process. However he does say that you can get to a point where locked is the only thing that you can do and you should use that lockdown to improve your contact and testing regime. And in fact, if you look at Victoria, that's really although in the first wave, that's what we did as a nation back in March we got our act together in terms of contact tracing. There are still deficiencies in Victoria and they have used the last few weeks to get much better and so the contact tracing regime now in Victoria is fantastic there. quickly, the locking off mystery cases in super-quick time, and that's what you've gotta get. So then fighting the of used that time well. It's not that they're against lockdown. It's just that it has its place. and. When you when it's out of control, the way it is in Europe you've actually got to be able to do that another problem. And, I don't know what they've done in Ireland here. But the problem is the borders and it was a really interesting study the other day looking counties in the United. States and showing that cross-border flow was a very important factor in both the sustenance and the growth of SARS COV to infections. and. If you don't control your borders and you still got people coming in from outside, it's very hard to get this done and on control it. So so really European. Countries are trying to do this with one hand tied behind their bank. Britain and Ireland could control their borders because they're islands but it's harder for other nations exactly and can we just come back to smoking before about Australia and we are doing the numbers that are coming out now looking really really promising do how close are we to having zero spread here in Australia, we're almost there new south. Wales still has cases popping up Victoria might get there before New South Wales because they're still in lockdown and those extra few days of Lockton make make all the difference I think New South Wales it's going to be really hard but they're. You know they're getting on top of it too. I think we're going to be very, very tiny sprayed, and maybe in Victoria, they'll get done to zero spread. And that will make it much easier to open things

Victoria World Health Organization Ireland Europe Dr Dave Navarro Norman South Wales Wales Senate Lockton Imperial College London Corona Scott Australia Cast University Of Sydney Lockdowns Official W. H. O. Britain
UK to infect healthy volunteers in vaccine research trial

The Daily 202's Big Idea

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

UK to infect healthy volunteers in vaccine research trial

"British scientists. This week are launching the world's first human challenge trials for covid nineteen they will infect healthy volunteers with the virus in the hope of further speaking the way to a vaccine. Research which is being led by Imperial College. London is a gutsy gambit given that people will be submitting themselves to the virus with no surefire treatment. The virus can kill volunteers will be given a laboratory grown strain of the virus will been quarantined in a secure unit the Royal Free Hospital in London they'll undergo daily even hourly tests. The initial phase of the study will seek to determine the minimal amount of virus necessary to cause an active measurable infection.

London Royal Free Hospital Imperial College
UK to start controversial 'challenge' vaccine research trial

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

UK to start controversial 'challenge' vaccine research trial

"British researchers the beginning of controversial experiment that will infect healthy volunteers with the new coronavirus to study the disease in hopes of speeding up the development of a vaccine the approach called a challenge study is risky but proponents say it may produce results faster than standard research imperial college London says the study would involve healthy volunteers between eighteen and thirty years old Peter open short code best to go to all the study says deliberately infecting volunteers with a known human pathogen is never undertaken lightly however such studies can be enormously informative research's will aim to determine at the smallest level of exposure needed to cause the disease then study how potential vaccines work in the body Charles the last month London

London Peter Charles
"imperial college london" Discussed on AP News

AP News

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on AP News

"British scientists are reporting that the rate of coronavirus infection across England has jumped 4 fold in the last month and even higher in regions like north west England and London that's according to a larger government commissioned study that randomly tested tens of thousands of people in the community but the researchers also said that the damage does not appear to be growing exceptionally at the moment Paul Elliott chair of epidemiology at imperial college London who led the study says that some of the recently imposed measures in the UK including banning gatherings of more than 6 people may have helped slow the spread of Kobe 19 and it also says about one in 200 people across England are infected with the coronavirus and increased from about one in 800 people in early September there is shockingly London

west England London imperial college London UK Kobe Paul Elliott
The Latest: Virus infections jump 4-fold in England

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: Virus infections jump 4-fold in England

"British scientists are reporting that the rate of coronavirus infection across England has jumped four fold in the last month and even higher in regions like north west England and London that's according to a larger government commissioned study that randomly tested tens of thousands of people in the community but the researchers also said that the damage does not appear to be growing exceptionally at the moment Paul Elliott chair of epidemiology at imperial college London who led the study says that some of the recently imposed measures in the UK including banning gatherings of more than six people may have helped slow the spread of Kobe nineteen and it also says about one in two hundred people across England are infected with the coronavirus and increased from about one in eight hundred people in early September there is shockingly London

West England London Imperial College London UK Kobe Paul Elliott
UK to test vaccines on volunteers deliberately infected with Covid-19

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

UK to test vaccines on volunteers deliberately infected with Covid-19

"Considering launching Human Challenge trials where healthy volunteers are purposefully infected with Corona virus and obey the speed of development of a vaccine. Studies could begin in January. The trials will be run by Irish company Open Orphan with Imperial College. London As thie academic lead high marks

Imperial College London
The rise of vaccine nationalism  should we be worried?

Science Friction

05:13 min | 1 year ago

The rise of vaccine nationalism should we be worried?

"So hell, we end this pandemic by making sure everyone in the world gets access to treatments or vaccines could determine how we respond to the next one. The world's wealthiest countries, Astrid your amongst them have already BRCA deals with pharmaceutical companies to preorder more than two billion doses of corona virus vaccines that's according to the Journal. Nature those deals, of course are contingent on with the vaccines, a proven safe and effective, and that's big eve. Streaming, problematic calypso chocolate do is director of global health policy with the Santa Fe Global Development and professor in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at imperial. College London obviously governments of wealthy countries heads to. Ten had to be seen to be acting and I totally appreciate the urgency over at all and I had the opportunity to talk to officials here from the UK government also from a European Commission. Now that set aside I think there's a number of issues with the current approach which ignores effectively the effectiveness questioned. The performance questions we're buying things were assuming we'll work. and. That means that goes are now shouldering the bulk of the risk. And they're shouldering the bulk of the is the commercial risk as well without being able to negotiate really on the price these things do come out scrambling is inevitable in my view economists professor I'd Hollas as President of incentives for Global, health, which aims to build a health impact fund to finance new treatments especially for neglected diseases but on the rise of Covid nineteen vaccine. Nationalism. He says one country that started off the United States has been explicit America first policy. In other countries the citizens were unlikely to be happy with their governments. If those governments came back to them with deal that said, we're just going to allow off the Americans to be vaccinated first, and then we'll take our turn along with all the citizens of the rest of the world. It's just became politically unfeasible. To do the right thing. So I think we're having the worst of every world. Really. So were engaging in a sort of an arms race where everybody's trying to out beat everybody else in buying things that we don't really know they will ever materialize or even if they do whether, they will work with the right product. So shouldering the risk as taxpayers effectively, we're doing it in a very bilateral fragmented fashion. So this undermines countries that are not as wealthy, and certainly the middle income countries have been left out of this conversation which I think is extremely problematic. So goelz plan says a global health community to support the low income countries through Garvey and effectively philanthropic subsidizing any successful vaccine doses. But then there's the vast majority of the world's. Forest people are living in very crowded conditions leaving middle income nations live in Nigeria Favila in in Brazil Brazilian cities, they live in Mumbai this country's middling concern necessarily going to qualify for this subsidy, but also not wealthy enough to engage in bilateral deals and behave the way the United Kingdom or the US are behaving been scandalous. I. Think that we haven't talked about these countries if the missing Middle Mrs add on a vaccine. What's the picture for the pandemic and getting on top of it? They will be disastrous for sure it will be disastrous. What will it be looking at situation where income countries close the borders a game where people are not admitted were basically sees. Stop people from moving around. We stop goods from moving around it. It's going to be absolutely disastrous situation is is certainly not desirable by what we want to have is as sensible efficient allocation of vaccines around the world. So. That the people who need to get back stated first everywhere get vaccinated first, and then we gradually progress in each country. Not instead vaccinating people who were very low risk in rich countries while people are at high risk in middle income and lower income countries are left unvaccinated that doesn't make any sense for the world is aside from the moral calculus here of yes. H Nation has an obligation to their own citizens. They also potentially have an obligation to the rest of the world because his biological imperative here isn't they this is a global pandemic. Yes. I'm mean one of the risks of course as if the viruses left to spread among people in lower income countries. At some point, it may mutate into a new form which existing vaccines don't offer protection against. So there is there is a reason for people in high income countries even people who don't care about poor people to say, let's just make sure that everyone gets vaccinated on a timely basis.

Professor United Kingdom United States Santa Fe Global Development Department Of Infectious Disea London Journal Director Garvey European Commission America President Trump Nigeria Mumbai
"imperial college london" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"We hope to finish this pandemic before. Uh, less than two years, especially If we can pull our efforts together, and with national unity, global solidarity that's really key. Now he is pushing for the planet to get ahead of Cove in 19 in less time than it took to stop the Spanish flu back in 1918. And there's a new report out this week. Detail ing What covert Khun do to your body, Your CBS's Elise Preston. New research finds blood clots and lung injuries in patients who have died from Cove in 19. London, Researchers looked at 10 patients and found all head injuries to a lung and nine had a blood clot in at least one major organs such as the heart, lung or kidney and that report from Imperial College London If you want to learn more 50 wait. Let's get back to Wall Street with Bloomberg business, Not a bad day and rode a not a bad day at all. An unexpectedly strong uptick in a monthly measure of manufacturing and services activity for my H s market and the strongest month to month jump the measure of US home resales ever. Help set the stage for a big gains on Wall Street. Close out the week and for the NASDAQ and S and P Records now, added 191, NASDAQ Rose, 47 S and P 500 gained 12 Among all the ways we hope to witness life, getting back to normal At some point, here's one. We'd rather not see Giant banking company Wells Fargo had paused layoffs back in March because of the pandemic, but it's now resumed them. Quietly ending a moratorium on layoffs or what the company calls, quote, job displacement activity and rode a Bloomberg business on W. B z Boston's news radio. We.

Cove Khun London Bloomberg Imperial College London Elise Preston US Wells Fargo Boston Giant CBS P Records
"imperial college london" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:14 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on AP News

"Scientists at imperial college London we'll start immunizing people in Britain this week with the experimental coronavirus shop becoming the latest entry into the race to find an effective vaccine to stop the pandemic officials say 300 healthy people will be immunized with 2 doses of the code of the 19 vaccine candidate developed at imperial which is being backed by $50000000 worth of government funding so I thought this kind of this is only been tested in animals and in the lab we produced much higher levels of antibodies that would normally be seen in infected people about a dozen vaccine candidates accompli in early stages of testing in thousands of people and no guarantees any will work with this increasing hope the least some could be ready by the end of the year Charles to lead as well London

Britain Charles London imperial college London $50000000
"imperial college london" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Have here we have an optimistic forecast my friends at Morgan Stanley one of the same yeah this is their view of the entire global economy and they say they have greater confidence in their call for a V. shaped recovery this in light of recent upside surprises and economic data and policy action the experts at the investment bank say the world economy is in a new expansion cycle they predict output will be back to pre pandemic levels by the fourth quarter well someone will get it right so it's nice to gamers out there someone will get it right all right hurts is going offer shares to investors willing to take a real gamble yeah a bankruptcy court has a rule that the rental car company can go ahead with the planned to raise cash by selling new shares hurt says the stock sales could bring in as much as one billion dollars and help resolve the massive debt that drove it into bankruptcy but the company is promising to alert buyers to the risks that their investment could turn out to be worthless well of marginal families right you could have a very profitable fourth quarter that's true happens all right the first coronavirus vaccines might not offer full protection what we know well they may not knocked down the disease one expert professor Robert robin rather Shattuck at the imperial college London says early vaccines could come with limitations they might keep people from getting really sick or dying but they may not keep patients from catching the corona virus other experts worry that such vaccines might lead to complacency in lockdown weary nations and actually lead to a surgeon infections everybody has a downside it's all right our future stand where Sir they are still lower of moving around a little bit lower levels right now the S. and P. futures are down fifty six nasdaq futures are down one hundred twenty two dollars futures down five hundred thirty seven from Bloomberg I'm Jeff Bollinger on news radio seven hundred WLW.

Morgan Stanley Shattuck Bloomberg Jeff Bollinger professor Robert robin imperial college London
"imperial college london" Discussed on AP News

AP News

14:23 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on AP News

"Which is prime minister Boris Johnson said that might never be a vaccine for cabin 19 despite the huge global effort to develop one the government is giving an additional $2000000 to be such as working on separate vaccine trials at Oxford university and imperial college London however despite these efforts Johnson writes in an article in the mail on Sunday newspaper that's quite a vaccine might not come to fruition the U. K. business secretary Alok sama echoed those sentiments in the country's day the virus briefing to sponsor the tireless efforts of our scientists it is possible that we may never find a successful coronavirus faxes Johnson is shama also said that the government is supporting research into drug treatments to help people recover quickly from the virus and looking at new ways to keep the virus at bay such as testing people who have symptoms and tracing their contacts Karen Thomas London

prime minister Boris Johnson government Oxford university shama Karen Thomas London imperial college London secretary Alok sama $2000000
European leaders are blunt: A vaccine won't come soon enough

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

European leaders are blunt: A vaccine won't come soon enough

"Which is prime minister Boris Johnson said that might never be a vaccine for cabin nineteen despite the huge global effort to develop one the government is giving an additional hundred and two million dollars to be such as working on separate vaccine trials at Oxford university and imperial college London however despite these efforts Johnson writes in an article in the mail on Sunday newspaper that's quite a vaccine might not come to fruition the U. K. business secretary Alok sama echoed those sentiments in the country's day the virus briefing to sponsor the tireless efforts of our scientists it is possible that we may never find a successful coronavirus faxes Johnson is shama also said that the government is supporting research into drug treatments to help people recover quickly from the virus and looking at new ways to keep the virus at bay such as testing people who have symptoms and tracing their contacts Karen Thomas London

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Government Oxford University Shama Karen Thomas London Imperial College London Secretary Alok Sama
U.K. announces human trials of potential coronavirus vaccine

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

U.K. announces human trials of potential coronavirus vaccine

"Haven U. K. the health secretary has announced a dramatic step forward in the search for a coronavirus vaccine Matt Hancock says that two British projects making fast progress the vaccine from the box the project will be trialled in people from this Thursday in normal times reaching this stage would take he is so human trials altered university and imperial college London up being given more than forty million pounds in total by the government more than a hundred people reported to have died from the virus in UK hospitals on Monday that is a sharp increase from prior days yeah the fact that total brings in what have been necessary reported in previous days over the

Secretary Matt Hancock Imperial College London UK
"imperial college london" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on KOMO

"The promising projects being conducted at Oxford university and imperial college London commuters time eleven forty seven and the federal government's trying to set up the next round of stimulus money and some people say they're getting extra money and I don't know why calls cutting tops that explains what to do if this situation should happen to you technical problems come up and the IRS is not immune as it tries to quickly pop out checks to people as soon as they can especially people who needed but I'm hearing from people who have a nagging feeling that the IRS put too much money in their bank accounts well I know there's an error someplace and I Jane wants to keep her last name private but she's concerned she's not the only one to get more stimulus money then she should she knew immediately that something wasn't right tries a little surprised to see the balance and then I realized that I received a double payment so the twelve hundred dollar stimulus the IRS says it's delivered more than eighty million dollars in economic impact payment so far but not without a few snags top concerns include payments to the wrong account payments to dead spouses and multiple payments with no explanation the Internal Revenue Service says it's working to identify and resolve the problems telling komo news the IRS is aware of the various questions and issues and will be providing further guidance and updates on our website to our partners and to the media Jane's concerned that other people who get extra payments will spend it and then have the government come back for the money don't put yourself in a position to where you have to repay Jane says she's just fortunate that she can she's able financially to sit on that money until the IRS figures out and corrects what the mistake is I couldn't really get anybody to give me definitive instructions and advice for those of you who are getting extra payments or payments for spouses who died two years ago mixed information but generally speaking I am told that when the government makes a financial mistake they eventually figure it out and then they come back and get the money so if the money's not there it becomes up to you to figure out how to come up with the cash one more thing before I go if you get your federal benefits deposited directly from the federal government say social security or railroad retirement veterans apart on retirement and you don't have to file taxes pay attention if you have children who are eligible dependents for the stimulus money you must register to do that and you must do that by nine o'clock Wednesday morning otherwise you're not going to get that money for the dependence until you file a twenty twenty return next year that's almost Connie Thompson it's eleven fifty hello George business update time you Jim just go with your money now conventional negotiators have reached a deal that will provide hundreds of billions of dollars in new funding for small businesses hurt by the corona virus pandemic Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer said he expects the Senate to pass the relief bill this afternoon and said to the house which would likely will run on Thursday reports indicate the measure would send about three hundred ten billion the dollars more to the paycheck protection program which last week exhausted the three hundred fifty billion the Congress originally allocated for it it's also set to include seventy five billion dollars in assistance for hospitals a twenty five billion to expand testing for the virus across the country television traffic reporters in many cities including Los Angeles and Dallas have been noticing an uptick in traffic in recent days as the U. S. slowly begins to reopen its economy cast but he says overall gas demand rose twenty five percent Sunday from a week earlier that's your money now all right we're still struggling big time on Wall Street the Dow off ha six hundred seven point this out over two and a half percentage points the nasdaq is off three point one percent of two hundred seventy point drop so far today and the SO P. five hundred is up three percent off eighty three and a half for the day that's your propellants Durrance business update homeowners there's never been a better time to permanently.

Oxford university imperial college London
Coronavirus: When Will It End?

Science Vs

08:14 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus: When Will It End?

"In the US? We've been hearing all kinds of different dates at first president. Trump was saying that we could be back to business as usual by mid April. I would love to have the country opened up and just raring to go bicester and it was clear that wasn't happening. We will be extending our guidelines to April thirtieth since then all sorts of dates have been flying around they forbid may at the earliest one way is extending its shutdown to June seventh and some politicians. Just throwing their hands in the air. Everybody wants to know one thing. When is it over? Nobody knows that outside the US. We're hearing that. Some places are the end of this like just this week. Wuhan the epicenter of this outbreak lifted their heavy restrictions. Tonight seventy six days later Wuhan ends. This look down around. Sixty five thousand. People have left Wuhan on trains and planes within hours of that lockdown ending residents of finally free to do that. Move simple things the streets once more on. Today's show is China really done with this corona virus. And what does this mean for the rest of us? How long could it be until we get our lives back to help sort through these questions we? I called up Dr Swap Nil Michele at Imperial College London and he told us well one of the tough things here is that a lot of countries like the. Us Cut a light stop. It has become very difficult to contain it now right. It's almost like every country. It was old. None of this should be fine. We should be. They should be fine but then suddenly after two week everybody or should we are not in a good state to find out if we can get into a good state swap null and his colleagues a building models based around what we know about this pandemic and these models are reaching high places where it is. The Boris Johnson started taking this pandemic seriously once he saw a model from swap mills. Colleagues showing. How many Britons would die if the country didn't take measures to stop it. How did you feel when Boris Johnson took the model of you know of your colleagues and that was what inspired him to change? Refilled ridiculed? The was the first thing and refund tangled. At least they have agreed to us now. And you'll have something that might help us to literally save people so we've been vindicated. Recently swap nells team started looking at whether the measures that countries are taking to stop this corona virus. All these social distancing is actually working and putting us on the pop out of this. They created a model which looked at how quickly this virus is spreading and the death rate and then they looked at eleven European countries places like Italy Spain France and Germany. They then created a couple of scenarios one. What if these countries had done nothing business usual and then to what actually happened off debates social distanced? So what did they find? It was very much evident that the steps like social distancing Stopping schools having a lockdown has helped to control Perriman. It flattened the cat yes. It has quite undergo so for example. According to swap knows model by starting these measures in mid March Italy averted almost forty thousand deaths by the end of that month. The model also calculated that social distancing save lives in all the countries to now. This is a model but evidence from the real world is starting to show something similar just this week. The World Health Organization in Europe said that they're noticing these trends countries that put in strong restrictive measures like Germany and Spain. The seeing drops in the rate of cases and deaths compare that would say Sweden who've been more lax. They're now seeing a fresh surge of cases so on the whole the countries that have done lockdowns flooding. The governor is happening but we still need some bank. How much more time? When does life go back to normal? So when will it end is is literally a question that we really don't have much idea on right now so you had to bet like me and my friends. We will all guessing when we thought we would go back to our normal lives. What what do you think so this is just what I think we might have to be under a lot of measures at least up till June Gin. At least at at least right it does not at most at least right okay. So if we don't really know when this will end what are the clues we should be looking for to know that we're heading out of the woods friends over at the general podcast talked. Dr Anthony Fauci. He's part of the Corona virus taskforce advising the president even know who he is anyway. Edry says that we need to start looking for a drop in the numbers. You have to see a really steep decline on a day by day basis. But you don't WanNa see a little sore tooth up and down up and down. That looks like it might be trending down. It's not like it's trending down. It's got a light steep going down. And when you see that then you could start thinking about that but you gotTa make sure you're absolutely going in the right direction. When Anthony Talks about numbers going down he's talking about new cases now. That can't tell you the whole story though because testing in America has been so higgledy-piggledy that it's really hard to know if we're capturing all the people who just got infected so there's other clues that we can look at to save almost out of this like you can look at hospitalizations or the death rate. Now Anthony says something to keep in mind with the death rate is that there's a two to three week lag between someone getting sick and then dying so are the last thing that stop when the deaths stop. Then you know you're in good shape in Wuhan new cases and deaths had been dropping consistently for about five weeks before China lifted the restrictions over here in the US. It's early days and in many states cases and deaths are still on the rise but he is a promising sign in New York. The Governor says that hospitalizations slowing down. Okay so once we have more good signs like this and you infections and debts are definitely going down. We might see things. Stop to open up but Anthony told the journal. That won't mean that life will go back to normal right now. It's all physical separation. Six feet distance. No restaurants no bars no sports events when you gradually come back you don't jump into it with both feet you say you know. What are the things that you could still do and still approach normal? One of them is absolute compulsive hand washing the other one. Is You don't ever shake anybody's hands. That's clear I could see in certain places people saying. Hey we're going to get back to normal but guess what we have a restaurant that has two hundred seats and that's too much as a big restaurant. Like big restaurants has fifty seats. We're going to only let twenty five people in at the same time. Anthony says we'll have to be on the lookout suitcases pumping back up. And that means we'll still have to keep outdistance or maybe we have to forget about basketball for a little while only played ping pong in our case. It's more than six feet apart. I can. He didn't suggest that one. But bottom line is it's going to be gradual. It's not going to be all

Dr Anthony Fauci Wuhan United States President Trump Boris Johnson China Germany Donald Trump Basketball Imperial College London World Health Organization Italy Spain France Perriman Italy Sweden Edry Europe America New York Spain
"imperial college london" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The headline in the U. USA today NYC hit hard sitting next up every city in America big city small city everybody is at risk experts warn experts have not showing in my opinion through this crisis remember we were told constantly were two weeks behind Italy well two weeks are up for review are we Italy the the group vector predicted billions of deaths for which reason the the bridge closed down Britain there's no modified it to twenty thousand twenty thousand way less than the flu what was the year sure wanted to want to read you something here then we will take your calls the of the mockery that we who question the the lock down receivers really this is par for the course for the left because they're simple things they don't understand that there are trade offs well let's see here right so this was the original here was the original one behind the virus report the jar of the U. S. and UK to action it wasn't so much the numbers themselves as you reported them imperial college London and what did they report what was the number that they reported two million American officials said the report which projected up to two point two million tests in the United States also influence the White House to strengthen its measures to isolate members of the public two point two million is now down to twenty thousand and he said well it's because of the it's because of the lockdown boy that was fast if I got to say why do so few deaths in Sweden where there's no lock them Sweden is really annoying the World Health Organization of today because of the World Health Organization you know the guy predicted a three point four percent death rate this guy's a fraud he's he's a he's a half for China the head of the the World Health Organization maybe maybe people will wake him to the of the of the left's adoration of quote unquote experts my whole life I realize you know what I told you look I'm very transparent I'm on the radio thirty five years what a waking me to how little science is often not always there are some great the scientists clearly but scientists run the gamut of honest a dishonest competent to incompetent lytic me motivated to neutral as much as any other group of human beings I don't know why people assume that if you're a scientist you're a better human being it is a joke it's somewhat of a joke it's just you know what it is the secular world meets meets priest that's what it is scientists all the priests because science is the religion so the scientist is the priest it's all substitute religious that's all it is what it comes down to that's why the religious are less or less how should we say intimidated that's the work intimidated by scientists it's not that we reject science it's that's that's the left to lie about us they lie about us every day but we don't we I don't know anybody who reject science but we don't battle delta scientists like you why the worshipers of the left that's the difference I mean I want what what that made me aware of it was I think it's very small thing but it's always small things that make people aware of that this a lot of this on two things that it the cancer groups that said that that lied about the likelihood of of women getting breast cancer and they admitted why they did it they wanted to scare women into getting mammograms so it's okay to life your scientist if you doing good they lied about secondhand smoke they live they live the Mayo Clinic and others sent out look it up now put Mayo Clinic cigar smoking cigar smoking is dangerous to cigarette smoking status is pure ally as the capital of the United States is auto okay that is if it's is it that is how entirely in corrected this but they don't care truth does not motivate many scientists get it experts are moved by what they're moved by also they're often idiot savants bay there were tremendous amount about what their expertise is in so the scientists are not sitting down and saying Gee we're putting thirty million Americans what's the number actually was the sixty million Americans I want to get that number there it just came out let me see here let's see where it is very important for me to read it to you did you just send it to me or did my other spells her no okay so let's see here oh boy hello I'll have to get it again those who sent it to me again the number the number that the forty seven million this is a thirty two percent unemployment rate forty seven million Americans out and that's for two thousand Americans have died thus far about twenty five hundred Americans have died the number went down today by the way vis a vis yesterday and the fourth after because of that I mean India closed down the entire nation of India based on how many deaths twenty nine by the way what is this are we gonna do this for every virus why not as George Friedman has spoke to last hours this this is this is part of like viruses a part of life that's called mature which were left there are antonyms where is this accurate the Charlotte do you think or or not Charlie your are you did you factor in New York let me see what they've done here very curious I see interesting city to remove basketball hoops from ten island courts because park goers weren't socially distancing that's really something basketball hoops will be removed from eighty courts across New York City including panels that Mylan this for miss that moment paper I guess we're going to do what is the chance of a kid getting a dying from the virus kids from playing basketball one of the chances one of the million though probably less than one in a million well I I I I I I've said it by whole life you know health braless I came up with that the thing health is really important okay okay yes indeed see what see what happens here Jeff in S. stock them hello Jeff if you disagree with that trump's extending the law council April thirtieth I would not have made to date well I would have said I want to see the numbers of people in America dying from the disease I want to see the efficacy of hydro hydroxy chloride Quinn and Z. packed and other things being used I would not have given a date I would have said that at the latest may first however depending on numbers bye I like my earlier Easter statement yeah thank god she is incompetent no I think she is preoccupied with the disease a president is supposed to be preoccupied with society okay you know what bothered him I answered his questions rationally that's what put them anyway it's great folks challenge me all you like so we may be wrong but it's a very severe stuff where yes this is very important correction in highlands ranch Colorado hi Gretchen I thank you for taking my call I love I love listening to you yeah yeah there's a there's an answer to this but a lot of people aren't thinking of and that is that people who are addicted people who have depression this is the perfect storm for that's correct hold on I I open my show talking about that I opened up my eyes I said if if the piece in The New York Times on the subject actually almost brought me to tears the Dennis Prager show live from the.

NYC America Italy U. USA
"imperial college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Heritage I'm sorry anyway I took a bag of Sylvester's brownish slow Josh to Chris Cheeseman at imperial college London you might think that's a bit of a weird gift that professor Cheeseman is an expert on re using waste materials his office is packed full of different kinds of rubbish and the cool things that can be made with that so I was keen for his opinion on this slide Josh love it yes well what I noticed about this is that is very consistent looking it might sound weird but sewage sludge ashes are really nice material to work with you can make nicer I think she can make light when I could get out of it the those things still just just don't extraction the first verse shows sewage sludge ash handles for stress levels which are pretty compatible with the sort of minerals which people mowing really yeah how hard would that be do you think to extract phosphorus from this incinerated ash I in the lab we we do it that with an acid extraction and it's it's it's very easy to do in order I mean honestly but the she's always in skating up to a large size but to be honest I don't understand why it hasn't happened I don't know why given that it contains high levels of phosphate why we know what extraction until it does seem a waste of valuable resource not to extract phosphate legislation might help the German government has passed a law that demands that phosphorus stop being recovered from sludge from twenty twenty nine and there are teams of scientists in Germany and Sweden who've developed processes that can do that but they yet to take the leap from the lab maybe one day they will but we kinda Sylvester says close the phosphor sleep it's important that we do something because unlike with oil and gas which we can substitute with solar and wind power we don't really have an alternative to phosphorus and yet if everyone's toilet waste was collected on the phosphorus recovered it could fulfill a fifth of our global demand for the element this real.

Sylvester Josh imperial college London professor Cheeseman German government Germany Sweden
"imperial college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It I get I'm meeting taken in Devon in southwest England at the site run by Rothamsted research she shows me a special field all the water that drains out of this field collects in the little galley to one side every fifteen minutes some of the water is pumped up into a little metal cabinet on please sign my friend's description here but one of the things we talk about studies the amount of phosphorus is coming off the field and we've got these cabinets that are able to measure in field the amount of phosphorus this confirmed the mentally weak we don't want the first first to leave the failed his online yet so it causes an explosion of life in the water as we get a lot of on P. and other plant life growing suddenly and now he can give off toxic compounds and eases the whole of the oxygen in the water as is being broken down and then that means it's not sufficient oxygen in the water for fish and other organisms that being in the war so sick pollution is a problem but it isn't the only problem you see the first personal bodies comes from the plants that we eat and a lot of the phosphorus in the plants create comes from fertilizers I'm the first person the fertilizers comes from mines mostly in North Africa and to put it simply at some point we're going to run out at the moment the use of force for us which is a key nutrient is predominantly in linea in other words we take out of the environment we use it and then we lose it this is professor Chris Cheeseman from imperial college London we lose H. predominantly into the city by the way we we don't recycle it at the moment this is an element you know so how can we run out of an element is gonna carry on existing in the world well yeah you know destroying it you're just making it to you're going from a concentrated source very small into to a very dilute source when he's in the oceans and very difficult and then to exploit you know using anyway so it's sort of losing it you know this is a big issue because if.

Devon England North Africa professor imperial college London Rothamsted Chris Cheeseman
"imperial college london" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on KOMO

"Wanted to know have you taken a look at some of these models such as the imperial college London model that kind of poses a very difficult choice whether it's shutting down society for an overwhelming the health care system is that something that we look at every month we replied on the very talented people and there's no better team than the people behind me and I will say that all of the people that have done those models are all in constant touch with the doctor Burks and Tony and everybody that you've been hearing so much from over the last couple of weeks we've looked at we've looked at many different models and the model we have is we want to save a lot of lives we want to save a lot of lives if we get to steepen the curve you're gonna lose a lot of lives perhaps unnecessarily no we're gonna find out if everything has a risk we're going to see but if people do what we're telling them to do what we're asking them to do you're going to see the saving of a lot of lives now Boris in UK yesterday you saw what happened it looked like they were going a different way but that he won a way of similar I guess several I don't know exactly but I would say we had a conversation yesterday similar to what we're doing so a lot of people seem to think this is going to be we are we are looking to save the maximum number of lives everything else is going to come back a life is never going to come back but everything else I kind of was going to come roaring back you don't know we don't know what it all know that day you somebody was asking about the day when we you know when we you know we don't know all of a sudden we gonna say wow that's looking good that's looking good that's looking good and we're going to be on the other side of the curve and that's the day that we look forward.

Burks Tony Boris UK imperial college London
"imperial college london" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is a Bloomberg money minute the pharmaceutical industry is racing to develop a coronavirus vaccine Johnson and Johnson Sanofi Madera and a novia among the companies involved but funding this research is a high risk proposition for the industry Caitlyn rivers professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health you likely will not have a vaccine in this calendar year and even when you find a promising antibody it's only the beginning once you get to that stage you're really at the foot hills of clinical development Paul Cohen is professor virus genomics at imperial college London you've got to produce enough doses go into humans firstly to prove that it's safe and then another set of new devices to start to do efficacy trials and is this stage that becomes quite slow because you gotta have good manufacturing process and you could be able to scale up in time scientists in the U. S. China and elsewhere are testing Gilead's antiviral drug room does server it was initially designed to combat Ebola Denise Pellegrini Bloomberg radio imagine imagine being denied an apartment because of your religion or your race because you have children or a disability it soon yes who has the power to stop this each of us has the power the law is on your side it's illegal for landlords to discriminate because of race color religion sex national origin disability or familial status if you suspect that you have experienced housing discrimination file a complaint.

Johnson Johnson Sanofi Madera professor Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school Paul Cohen imperial college London China Gilead Bloomberg Ebola Denise Pellegrini
"imperial college london" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"A clinic a startup spinal from imperial college London it's using CO two to make polymers what most of us call plastics used in the manufacture of a vast array of everyday household products housing insulation and things such as the installation of goes run a refrigerator mattress material and call seating and soft furnishings within automotive things such as for instance skateboard wheels can be covered by the materials which we currently manufacture utilizing zero six the company collects the gas from power stations and all the company Mrs within five or ten years he says the comic could be trapping huge amounts of CO two in the polymers it's making with talking about sequestering summer on about three and a half million tons of carbon dioxide each year which is the equivalent of taking about two million because of the road another British company called carbon eighties mixing CO two with incinerator ash and making blocks for the construction industry it claims it traps as much of the gas every year is two hundred thousand trees and makes money in the process much better than burying the CO two says Dr my habit in Bobby of the carbon capture machine that technology firm based at Aberdeen university in Scotland why would you bury something that can generate revenue and well ultimately we industries unemployment the common entrepreneur as a driven mainly by the desire to come back climate change but profit says in Bobby is also an important motivation we have a technology that could actually convert CO two into useful high value products that he centrally what we do we we convert carbon into money it isn't alchemy he says it's science sound engineering.

imperial college London Bobby Aberdeen university Scotland Dr million tons ten years
"imperial college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:28 min | 3 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up next next full Sudan's protested, but I know people surviving heart attacks than ever before. Thanks to advances in medicine. But that means people all then at risk from hot failure. Because their haunts don't recover from the damage, but a revolutionary new technique from scientists here in the UK could help involves a patch grown in a lab from some pool of stem cells, which then turns itself into healthy hot tissue. I've been speaking to professor Shawn Harding from Imperial College London who led the team that developed the patches, and she told me they look like they looked like a sticking plaster a thick sticking-plaster. So it's probably about two by three centimeters. Although we could make it really what have size. We won't and is slightly lacy appearance, but the thing you'll notice fest is it's lying the dish beating away already before you put it into human cells themselves beat from about. Out that seventh day off to we try to put things in stimulate the stem cells to become cardiac muscle cells. Then we put them into suspension, put them into a gel, which gels them down. And after a while few days, they connect to each other, and eventually become a sheet of beating muscle. And because they are attached to study bendy posts, what they do is, then they beat away and they exercise themselves. So we leave them there for a month or two, and then they've get stronger and stronger with the days as they get more, exercise this son's amazing and really a notes up to Missouri for many people who've suffered heart attacks. Just explain what happens to the hot when you do have a house tech, and, and especially if you have more than one basically cells die in the hot these, these cardiac muscle cells, and the right of, of replacement of these very low in the heart, just not enough to cope with a big sudden loss like that. So we what we need to put back in the heart is more palatable muscle. And so how cost effective might this bay. And will we see it anytime soon? We look you on this unwary Leonian academic labs. So what we've done could be if you put too big industrial-scale could be made much more efficient. We estimate that we've got some partners in our center. Nothing him presser. Chris Denning, who has a robotic system. And he estimates that he could make a billion Kadima sites, which is what you would need to match. What's lost in a heart attack for about eleven thousand pounds? That's probably about fifteen or sixteen thousand dollars say, yes. And of course, this once only treatment, and so in terms of what people have a hot disease now in terms of stance and valve replacements and things like that this is not an expensive treatment how many years before we could see this actually being used. Well, we need to do this in a way that's approved by the regulatory authorities, we should be able to get through that prices in a couple of years, and then we would be into the realm of small safety trials, so potentially within five s I think, so as good news, isn't it? Professor Shawn Harding from Imperial College London. You're listening to news. Live from the BBC with me. Rebecca says be now Sudan's military leaders say that counseling all existing agreements with the main opposition coalition and will hold elections within nine months, this after a bloody crackdown on demonstrators in Khartoum yesterday when at least thirty people were killed, and hundreds more injured earlier televised statement, was read by the leader of the transitional military council. General Abdel Fattah Elba run. The hall mile military council has decided the following firstly counseling what has been agreed and ending the Goshi nation with declaration of freedom and change forces. Secondly, a cool to general elections, within nine months from now with international and regional monitoring Thirdly, full me transitional government. Shaimaa is one of those who's been involved in this sit in protest at the military headquarters in Khartoum on and off ever since they began in April, she wasn't there when the shooting happened, but spoke about what happened to friends who many of my friends would actually there. And I was fully with them through the phone as they were trying to escape the shooting won't seems to have happened. It's obvious that this is the military council dispersing the sit in so they gained power, it was planned. It was obvious atlan, because one of them fifty cars full of folders, caring, heavy weapons and. Shooting directly at people, they enter the area, and they started shooting radically people, even after they shot people. They attacked hospitals, and they, they would with those under siege, and then they attacked the neighborhoods close to this area, where people went there to hide it was horrific because until now they would stop people in the street and ask them Laurie going, and then they would just start to whipping people in the street for no apparent reason. So is it clear exactly who fired on the protesters because the protesters have been there for weeks outside this ministry headquarters, and we understand that that have been even conversations and relatively good natured situation with the military that were based out that headquarters, but your saying that 'cause or military vehicles arrived with personnel military personnel, heavily armed with the same army over the maybe a different group. The people they were different. Normally in this area, people are very friendly, with the military like the official military, but there's this rapid support forces would says a unit. And now it's the unit inside the army, and it basically tribal power, which was set up by a vicious regime, and people recognize them for their crimes in that floor where they will just go and burn villages, and rape, women and kill people. But the besuited Jim integrated them with the military, and now they're units inside the military, and they're heavily armed this power. The sent their troops to fight any alongside Saudi Arabia. And you'll so they're different than the regular military that people recognize and deal with a lot of people have reported that they, they have heard them, speaking in French, and some of them, actually are Chadians. They're not. So. The needs because they come from that for area, which is the order area with Todd. And so you're saying that they fired indiscriminately into the crowd, and even attacked hospitals. I mean we've heard that at least thirty people have been killed, but the hundreds could have been injured. What, what can you tell us about the casualties, according to the central doctors committee? Now, the casualties are thirty seven the wounded are more than five hundred one of the main hospitals, which had one hundred thirteen injured people, which is in inside the scenario, it was under siege until two AM people could not get medications, water or food inside the hospitals. When the forces I into that area, they would just run over people because they wanted to get in the so they would just run over people really just using vehicles as weapons than. Yeah. What about you? I mean you've been positive protest movement. Would you go back on the streets now? Or is it just too frightening? Yeah. Definitely. Definitely. I would go back on the streets. It's actually the time where we all have to go out in the street because this is unjust. And this is horrible. And if you don't do anything about it, now, we'll just have to live in such a situation for their lives. Live under the mercy of those people love. No mercy. The transitional military council says it's going to hold elections in nine months time 'cause you'll group had wanted civilian participation in organizing any elections. Do you have any hope that those elections in nine months? Time will be democratic. No, not at all is clear now that they want power. This by the fact that they have been denying this for the ones the transitional military council saying that it scrapped everything that it's agreed with the. Civilian negotiators so far. How do you respond to that? It's, it's devastating. But also, I think everyone for me. And now that the is not there, they can just do whatever they want, and you sound really quite resolute in the fact that you're gonna continue protesting, g think of as well, share that view and have the same passionate commitment to it after all of this. Definitely if there's one thing that we have learned in this revolution is that were strong together and learn to trust each other. Because we've come a long way, actually we've lost loved ones, and we personally have been beaten and arrested. So there is no backing off. And that was shaimaa. One of the protesters, that's been involved from the beginning in Khartoum and Ferroviarai's reasons she didn't want us to use a full name during these protests in Sudan, we've been trying to get an interview with an here, the views of those on the transitional military council, which to Cova after moving president el-bashir shift from power. We haven't been able to secure that interview yet. But rest assured we keep trying. So what is the hope for diplomacy, whether that can help sort out, any international pressure to alleviate the situation in Sudan, let speak to Jim McGovern? He's United States. Congressman democrat from Massachusetts and chairman of the Tom Lantos human rights commission in congress. And as long campaign for human rights in Sudan, Jim McGovern, thank you very much for coming on the program. Happy to be with you just heard from one of the protest is it was actually quite. Fortunate that we could get through to her, because obviously, the internet is down in Sudan, at the moment, but she seems resolute, well, what did you think when you heard her? Well, I am. Aw of the people who have taken to the streets, who demanded that the, the, the military council seed power to the civilians in that country. I mean, this is this is a truly democratic movement. Moving of the people, and so my heart is with all those who are who are protesting, or demanding that, that Dan, turn the page and begin a new chapter in terms of respect for civilians. Well, the transitional military council has said it scrapping all the arrangements and agreements, they've come up with, with this villian people that they've been speaking to so far, but they do say that they going to put forward elections in nine months. Is there any reason to be up to mystic that those will be free and fair? Well, I'm not terribly. Domestic based on the lives that they have already told us. But look, I want to make clear that I think the United States Congress stands solidarity with the people should add. And, and I think that we'd he'd here in the United States and other countries around the world, we need to put pressure on Egypt and Saudi Arabia in the UA to, to, to respect the will of the shootings people. I mean that's what he's happen right now. And, and I, I don't trust the transitional military council to, you know, to have free and fair elections in seven months outta I don't trust them at all. We need to we need to demand action right now. Administration of President Trump has been keen to try and keep good relations with the Saudia with Saudi Arabia hasn't. I mean, what are the chances that said, I will be pressure put on them. You know, unfortunately, President Trump, you know, his decided to cozy up to a lot of dictators around the world, including the readership in Saudi Arabia. But maybe he can use that relationship to get them to actually do the right thing. And that is to respect the will of the Sudanese people. And so that's what I'm hoping because this is a horrific situation. The people shouldn't have suffered for so many years in such a terrible way. They deserve a brighter future. And yet to all those who have taken to the streets, demanded a better future for their country. They have my respect than my support being watching this really carefully over the past few months. We have seen generals leave in that time from positions of leadership. And that does seem to be a bit of movement, within various military forces within Sudan, because it it's not really entirely coordinated military is various elements to it. Is there anything that gives you hope that, that could be an alternative? Yeah. I mean, I think there could be an attorney. But again, I think what we need to do is. We, we in the address community are to right with that. Alternative is with that future is, is up to the people of should add to determine their future. Look President Trump's in the UK today, and he's talking about her wonderful. Global the global stability, I shouldn't by our post-war institutions is. But yet every chance he gets, he's undermining those two of ignoring some of the terribly behavior of some of the dictators and despots area like those in Saudi Arabia. So we need him to use our authority in our power to make a difference for these people in Sudan, and we need to do do it now, one of the things he should do is he could he could be conainer US armed voi- somebody with expertise in the Middle East, who could actually help exerts pressure..

transitional military council Sudan Saudi Arabia cardiac muscle president Khartoum military council Jim McGovern President Trump United States Imperial College London Shawn Harding professor UK congress BBC Chris Denning Missouri Abdel Fattah Elba
"imperial college london" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

05:29 min | 3 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on VUX World

"Part with. Amazon which was a great company, and I found that they had an opening for a technical evangelist, which I I I had already known about technical of Angeles. Because I I very much follow very closely the whole tech scene, and I was like, wow. This type of role exists in Amazon. Wow. Okay. I'm gonna try and apply for this. So I applied and. This goes a long way to show, you know, what sort of company Amazon, but I had nothing on paper to prove that. I would be a good evangelist. But they were willing to take a shot with me. And in the end, you know, everyone's happy so far. And yeah, kind of was able to try this new thing. And so far I was of it's been real. It's been really good. So. I would say the biggest fascination with voice kind of what like her mom said is not having to worry so much about the implementation details because building a good skill is quite technically simple. But the challenge is building a good experience natural experience. And that's where you don't need to have technical chops in order to do it. Well, you need to actually sit back and think okay? How would a human say this? How would a human interact with this? How would a human respond to a specific question? And how do we make it simple and hod we work around all the technological constraints that are inherent to something. That is just started. Right. So like, the whole voice assistance industry is relatively new. And we're still figuring things out as we go. And we're still launching tons of new features as we go, and we as the creators, and as the let's say the. People in charge of inspiring other creators, we kind of have to find ways of working around the current constraints knowing that these constraints may completely evaporate in the future as new features get released. So I would say it's just an exciting place to be in the the job is super fun. You get to meet a lot of new people. You get to do stuff. Like this like this podcast, which I'm sure if I was still on the business side trying to get books on kindle. I'm sure Cain. You wouldn't have invited me to this podcast. So. Overall. I'd say I'm it's it's been a great ride so far. Like, it might be interactive audio book. My my of my husband. Yeah. But you wouldn't have known me right to chew chew would have just been. Oh, cool. There's this book that I wanted on kindle on kindle, great. And that's that's true. We actually met first time we met was last year. Wasn't it? The C seeing a con event on Imperial College London. Right. And you were given the kind of Keno then that was the first time we saw each other. Yeah. It was. It was good good event. Just don't think we've got into how you going to development. What's your what's your kind of? If you get buck far enough. What what kind of what kind of go you in then? Oh, it's. Embarrassing. I made websites. You can see what I finger guarding at websites about the NBA power points. When I was eight nine years old moved onto Jeffrey websites about baseball and things like that. I think I had one about yoyos one point. Studied government, and and college internet on Capitol Hill for a little bit of realized definitively that was not for me and then bounce around a little bit until I got into the programming Gaiman realize it's rarely really where I should have been all along. So I think, you know, similar kind of stories as we're hearing here, but it may be a little bit longer. And and now that I'm here, I'm Hawaii holding on tights. Classic. You mentioned that one of the things that excite you most about voice about Amazon, Alexa, is it's not just about building something it's about actually create an experience. And you know, we're gonna talk about localization today. An internationalized skills is not something that mix not process a challenge or or or harder. If you need to create an experience in a different language. Absolutely. Absolutely. So. You know, when you build an app, you have your interface, which is let's say the the structure, and then you have the text which is just a clarification of that structure, or it's just almost an embellishment because if you use symbols effectively than you can kind of create an app without even writing a single word, obviously there are exceptions. But you get what I mean. Right with voice, the whole experience is based on what you write or what you want the assistance to say, or what you record a voice actor to say back. And so when you're trying to localize or adapt one experience in one language, you're not just considering the text that has been written for that language, but you're considering the whole backdrop of culture, and you know, inside knowledge of that culture and just style and tone. And context of that culture because the way I see a language is it's

Amazon kindle Cain technical evangelist Jeffrey NBA Imperial College London Hawaii baseball Alexa Gaiman eight nine years
"imperial college london" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:23 min | 3 years ago

"imperial college london" Discussed on KGO 810

"Of dollars of expense all of this in Switzerland. And France right now is the result of human beings moving around competing with each other with pencils and papers. And some of the excitement is they didn't even have computers are. Calculators? In fact, don't you say that left in nineteen seventy one was working with acetates that were smudge is that right? That's right. Yes. In those days when you gave talks you wrote your claim. On the project them behind you onto the screen and hope that you'll notice must didn't trip Swiss onto him and ruin them. And so nobody had heard of power point in nineteen seventy one. That's it forty years. Nobody had heard of it, and they had to do this and small rooms. And nobody quite remember. They didn't do a lot of recording that he didn't have digital in those days. And what you want an iphone four s would have done for that meeting. Everything would have been recorded. We wouldn't have to debate. Because part of the story of what happened in seventy one. Is they have different memories of what to have said. But let's go now to Peter Hicks because Peter Higgs is one of six people in one thousand nine hundred seventy four who are important to understanding the pursuit of the forces of nature. This is something to do with S U two times you one. What does that mean? Professor. Well, what it means? I don't know that we need to go into other than to say what he'd applied to the electromagnetic force and the weak false the one of radio activity three scientists Steven Weinberg Shelly glass shell adopted. Salaam, had realized that it was possible to make a description of those two forces in a mathematical way, which is cool as you to gross you one. In fact, there was a full person that John ruled who was Abdisalaam. Mm who mysteriously was the one that missed out on the Nobel prize this rule of maximum of free and one of the things in my book. I tried to understand quite what it was those three did. And he didn't all white was he missed out. But that was a mathematical idea that you could build a theory of these three of these two forces so long as you ignored one fundamental problem, which is that whereas the photon, which is the particle quantum of of light the thing that flits around and transmits, let's medic force. That's got no master tool the analogies. Carry a of the week full school the w the week. He's very very massive experimentally, but they had to ignore that to make their ideas. What they said. Well, let's pretend the WSB got no Massa tool and carry on. And they showed you could make a very nice mathematical description, if you shut your eyes to that fact, the problem was if you tried. Clues the mess not being zero. Everything went wrong you he didn't finish straight away. And it was Peter Higgs and five others in nineteen sixty four who discovered a way of getting mess into your equations without spoiling, the nice features the equations had and that became known as the Higgs mechanism though. He was only one of six that came up with the basic idea, and it was then seven years later, the tossed and Feldman showed if you married these two ideas together, namely, the Hades and Co's trick of including mass on top of the theory that glass shell Salaam, Weinberg and ward had constructed everything works so nine hundred sixty four Peter Higgs and colleagues all are looking at what you describe as a loophole in the theorem that it had been very neat about symmetry, the symmetry being hidden, you say electromagnetic and. Weak force. Everything was working fine except for there was this problem. And the the problem was when there was actually mass as opposed to massless nece emerging from this equation Higgs worked on it. The others worked on it together. But we need to spend a little more time with what they discovered because they discovered something called a bow son. That's what means Higgs close on. How to define a boasts on? Why is it important here? Well, that is really the nub question which is currently control the balance, and he's going to be have to be sorted out if Nobel prizes eventually get awarded for this business because saying there are only a maximum of free. Prize? And we've already mentioned there are six people who have within the space of a few weeks in independent groups Peter Higgs on his own that was Robert Browns and Francois Anglais in Belgium, Louis, Jerry, corral, Nick, call Haugen, and Tom Kibble who was then working at Imperial College London. But Haagen and around lake our American the most six people independently discovered this mathematical trick of how to get mass into the equations, so far so good. It was however only Peter Higgs who drew attention directly to a for the consequence of this idea that there would also be a new particle with mass which has been named after him expose on. What's the big deal about that? It is this particle is very massive. It's highly unstable holding theory, and if you could produce you to the next. And then see what happened when he decayed it can be K in various different ways do different ways. It decays would be why. You will compared with the way the particles, usually decay. It would decay into things that have massive more easily than those that had lightweight which is the reverse what usually happens. So the idea would be produced. This objects see it decays in his unusual way. If it does you proved the whole idea is what nature does rather than it just being a very clever mathematical trick that some mathematicians have founded a piece of paper that is why the Higgs Bozon is so important for us at the moment. It is the way of checking whether nature does it as well. As just us coming up with ideas. Both sons are must carry a force their force carrying particles there. The thing we're looking for. It's true that forces are carried by those homes, but it's not necessarily true. The old beaus homes carry forces, the Higgs, bows on is a different based in that sense. It's it's cool to on because of certain properties that he has. But it's not a false carrying objects in the way that we usually think of things I wanna move just a moment to that to the romantic here is this why when we use the word quantum physics. We say that you cannot be sure all the time that things are always moving. If you know, how is it said if you know, it's force. You can't know where it is nowhere. It is. You can't no it's four something like that. You can't symbol tiny say no both wear thing is and how Fosse's moving somebody said he's like a politician. You can never pin them down down there change, their ideas straight away. So the boatswain is like that. You can't nail it down. The Bose on like old articles, you can produce it. If the conditions are right, but he only will live for a fleeting moments, then decays. So you don't see it. You see the entrails office decayed? And by studying these entrails a bit like studying the skid marks an accident. You'll trying to work out what? And that's why in Sern right now. They're looking at the shadow the clue the entrails of the Higgs boatswain. That's what they're looking for. That's what they're looking for the what they are doing is the by smashing beams of protons the nuclear life Haji. Atoms. Each the head on the speed of light the energy that they have the energy in that collision is recreating in a very small volume for very brief moment. The sort of conditions that the universe itself would have experienced. We didn't about a trillion to the second off the big bang this series on correct? That was the e-p-o-c-h when the Higgs bows on whatever walls that gave mass and structure to because moss was around just say this word the phrase the gold particle. I don't think I'm unique. I don't know a single practicing particle physicist who uses that phrase. It's very misleading even for people who believe avidly in a gold. He's not editing tools to do with creation as such wants the. Expose on the whole business is about is how off to the big bang had happened. And I've no idea why it happened often it happens. What was it that gay structure in the universe? Rather than leaving the universe is a halt bland, an interesting place. So what turned energy into matter? What ten what turn the? That's why we're smashing protons together. Because we're trying to recreate that moment. That's right. We we we try to recreate conditions of very intense energy. And then seeing how the energy congeals into matter if you like and the way that they can deals into matter. It's predicted by theory that it should in some cases congealed into this objects goal, the Higgs bows on and we don't see it because it lives such a short time. We see we would see what it decays into the problem is there's lots of other things being rated and flying around in those experiments and your detector is recording data of trails of ephemeral particles. Thousands of them every seconds. And if you're lucky buried in one of these images, maybe one in ten thousand images each image of which is a thousand trails in it already. We'll be a couple of trials which off the telltale sign that they all the decay products of expose on. So it's like trying to find a needle in a thousand. Haystacks, I wanna turn to the professors closing remarks about why we exist at all why we're here debating this because it's print. It comes out of this conversation for the last hundred years, but a note to huffed. Makes his presentation in nineteen seventy one he publishes it in his thesis. He's very modest about it. But he has in that what you say could be the basis for another Nobel prize because he's got a way of solving not just the electromagnetic and the weak force. But the strong force to and he doesn't see it is that correct? That's correct. But he indeed any ceases has got the solution to the strong force and.

Peter Higgs Nobel prize Higgs Bozon Higgs boatswain Steven Weinberg Switzerland France Professor Salaam Peter Hicks Massa John Haagen Haystacks Abdisalaam Fosse Feldman Sern Imperial College London physicist