20 Episode results for "Immunodeficiency"

First AIDS report - June 5, 1981

This Day in History Class

07:31 min | 2 years ago

First AIDS report - June 5, 1981

"Creed an obsession lie at the heart of the feather thief, a page turning account of a museum, heist, that reads like a classic crime thriller, the feather thief dramatically recounts, theft of rare bird, feathers coveted on the black market. The man determined to possess them at any cost and the surprising history of commodity once worth more than gold declared absorbing by NPR and fascinating by the New York Times the feather thief is now in paperback wherever books are sold. This day in history. Class is a production of I heart radio. Hey guys, welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day. Today is June fifth twenty nineteen. The day was June fifth nineteen Eighty-one the morbidity and mortality weekly report published by the US center for disease control released an article called new most this new Monja, Los Angeles. The article detailed five cases of Numa, sisters Carini, pneumonia, or PCP, which is a rare lung infection. The cases were all in Los Angeles, and all of the men identified in the report as having PCP where young white and gay. This report was the first on what would become known as the aids or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, epidemic aids is caused by HIV are human immunodeficiency virus, HIV attacks, a person's immune system, as it spreads through the body, specifically attacking CD four sales, also known as t sales as the virus destroys these bills, the immune system has a hard time, combating disease and infection. Aids is the most severe state of the HIV infection when the immune system is so compromised that the affected person gets many opportunistic illnesses, there is no cure for HIV. But there are treatments that can help control the infection which reduced the presence of symptoms and the risk of transmission to people who do not have HIV, scientists believe that HIV was passed to humans from Tim pansies, that had a version of the virus called simian immunodeficiency bias or s I've E, H, I V could have been transmitted from apes to humans as early as the late eighteen hundreds and spread across the world sense, though, the virus had been in the United States since at least the nineteen seventies, it was not reported until the nineteen Eighty-one article. Local clinicians, and the epidemic intelligence service officer at the Los Angeles County department of public health created the report instant it to the morbidity and mortality weekly report for publication in may of nineteen eighty one. Before the journal published. The report the editorial staff since it to the CDC for review by experts and parasitic and sexually transmitted infections and on June fifth. Nineteen Eighty-one the article was published the five patients in the article all described as previously, healthy currently, or previously had cytomegalovirus and can Dida mucosal infection. In addition to new most sisters pneumonia, two of the patients died, the editorial note included at the end of the article stated that new most sisters new Monja is usually seen in people who are severely immunosuppressed, and that the occurrence of the illness in these five patients was unusual. It also noted that because all five men were gay, some sort of disease acquire through sexual contact with that hand and that a cellular immune dysfunction related to common exposure was possible the same day, a New York dermatitis. Called the CBC to report several cases of Kaposi sarcoma of very bare cancer that Austin affects people with immune deficiencies among gay men in New York, and California. And from there more reports of similar cases, popped up around the country just days after the initial report was published the CDC established the task force on Kaposi sarcoma and opportunistic infections to research risk factors and investigate new cases of the mysterious syndrome on July third. The New York Times published an article on the epidemic titled rare cancer seen in forty-one homosexuals because it seems like the condition was limited to game in it became known as gay related immune deficiency as the epidemic received more media attention the misnomer, gay cancer entered the public lexicon. But in September of nineteen eighty two the term aids was used to describe the syndrome for the first time. Though it was known that people besides men who have sex with men can get aids perception of aids as a gay disease persisted after researchers found out that HIV causes aids in nineteen Eighty-four H, I, V tests, or developed into nineteen eighty-seven, the first anti retroviral medication for HIV called A, Z T was released throughout the nineteen eighties, the number of cases of HIV aids increased and so did the number of deaths caused by complications of aids. After that the number of new cases, in-depth declined men who have sex with men, people of color, transgender women who have sex with men and injection drug users are at high risk for getting HIV. I'm Steph coat. And hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. And an additional know about the presence of HIV in the states. There's a long, standing myth that a French Canadian flight attendant was patient zero in the US as he picked up HIV in Haiti or Africa and spread it across the states. But scientists declared that this was not the case in two thousand sixteen. If he wants to learn more about history, you can listen to my new podcast called unpopular. It's the podcast that I host us about people in history who were dissenters are were rebels. And they challenged the status quo, and sometimes they were persecuted for it. You can follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook at T. D H C podcast. Thank you again for listening and we'll see tomorrow. For more podcasts from iheartradio. Iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or ever you listen to your favorite shows. Wondered how the smartest marketers cut through the noise. I'm Bob hitmen chairman and CEO of I heart media and on my new show. Math and magic. I'm sitting down with the day's most gifted disrupters when I did this people thought I was crazy. They're really no other rules, aside from, you know, no full frontal nudity gloves, there and do it. Don't like to follow the trend of listen. 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HIV infection Aids United States The New York Times Los Angeles PCP morbidity and mortality weekly New York pneumonia Kaposi sarcoma immunodeficiency NPR theft chairman and CEO morbidity and mortality CDC Apple CDC Los Angeles County
The AIDS Epidemic

Conspiracy Theories

39:10 min | 2 years ago

The AIDS Epidemic

"If you haven't listened to park asked newest show extraterrestrial you need to check it out. Immediately extraterrestrial explores tales of alien encounters millions of people claim to have seen alien life. But there's hardly any evidence to support it. Are we really alone in the universe? Search for and subscribe to extraterrestrial wherever you listen to podcasts, and please don't forget to rate and review. This episode features discussions of sexuality the aids panic and how the fear of aids was used to demonize the gay community. Listener discretion is advised as this history may be upsetting. For some listeners. We advise extra caution for children under thirteen. In the early nineteen eighties. The United States had a public health crisis. Thousands of young people were dropping dead. And yet the federal government didn't respond by nineteen eighty to nearly one thousand people in the US had died from aids and president Ronald Reagan still hadn't made a public statement. His press secretary Larry speaks wasn't interested in delving into the issue, but journalist Lester can solving was at a press briefing can solving asked quote does the president have any reaction to the announcement by the centers for disease control in Atlanta. That aids is now an epidemic in over six hundred cases, he referred to the disease by it's more commonly known name. The gay plague the press laughed consulting persisted. It's a pretty serious thing. One in every three people that get this have died and. I wonder if the president was aware of this to which the press secretary replied, I don't have it do you as consulting pushed on he continued to be met with jokes and non answers all around him the press pool laughed at the deadly epidemic. The nation was facing. The question is was this simply inactive negligence or did the government have deeper reasons for ignoring the aids crisis? Welcome to conspiracy theories on the par cast network every Wednesday. We dig into the complicated stories behind the world's most controversial events and search for the truth. I'm Carter, ROY. I'm Ali Brandenburg and neither of us are conspiracy theorists. But we are open minded skeptical and curious don't get us wrong. Sometimes the official version is the truth. But sometimes it's not today we're talking about the aids epidemic. This story is rooted in sociology as much as it is in the hard sciences aids, primarily affected populations the rest of the United States felt disassociated with or biased against which led to broaden neglect and government in action inaction so extreme that too many. It looked more like ill-intention today will be covering the official story of the aids epidemic. What it is where it came from. How it spread and? How government and media reacted to this tragic illness if you wanna listen to previous episodes, you can find them on your favorite podcast directory or on our website podcast dot com at par cast. We are grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do what we love let us know how we're doing reach out on Facebook and Instagram at par cast in Twitter at par cast network. And if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening. It really does help us. Over the past forty years. Our understanding of the aids epidemic has been muddied by a social and political climate that blame the sick at the time. The disease was dismissed and referred to as the gay plague rather than dressed as the public health crisis that it was the conversation about aids absolutely filled to the brim with false claims public disinterest, widespread fear, and of course, conspiracy theories that may or may not have merit however to get to the bottom of the conspiracy theories, you have to understand the disease on a scientific and cultural level this week will start with the basics the ins and outs of HIV aids. And the political climate that existed in the nineteen eighties next week will break down whether that same political climate led only to damaging mistake. Or whether it also actively sought to promote HIV, let's start with HIV human immunodeficiency virus. When HIV I hit. It wasn't called that it was a disease that had no name and was often mistaken for other illnesses. Many early patients were diagnosed with cancer called Kaposi sarcoma or were told they had a strange case of pneumonia. Our understanding of HIV stems from the research of Dr Robert Gallo in the US, and Dr Luke Montagnier in France both independently worked out that HIV is a retrovirus spread through bodily fluids retroviruses use RNA's their genetic material which allows the virus to infect and modify the genome of a host cell. You can think of Origny as a messenger and DNA as the message to continue the metaphor HIV shoots the messenger. And delivers its own message. HIV moves through the body to infect CD four t cells, which then unknowingly replicate the HIV virus before being killed all that science makes for some pretty bad news, put simply CD four t cells are crucial part of our immune system in HIV uses. These cells to replicate then kill them CD four t cells recognize an incoming threat to the immune system, and deploy response team without these cells young previously healthy, people can die from simple cases of pneumonia. This is one of the reasons HIV was so mysterious you don't technically die from it. It weakens your immune system until you die from something else, which gives further context to Dr Mathilde crims two thousand five certian that the aids crisis was a one of a kind pedantic they said be unlike others who. Peel, mostly the young the very old this kid's people in them, respectively as previously healthy young people were dying from diseases that typically kill the elderly or children because their immune systems were completely depleted. So if this disease was targeting, so many young people, why didn't it get more attention sooner. Why was the spread not a bigger deal from a scientific angle? The answer is simple. It's a disease that spread quietly and slowly by the time. It was a full blown pedantic thousands of people had already died and more were sick HIV can go undiagnosed for years, in fact, in twenty fifteen there were more than one point one million people in the US with HIV. However when in seven don't even realize they have it when the HIV virus is I contracted a person may feel like they have the flu as the virus works its way into. Person sells it triggers and immune response from our good old friends the T, Sal, our body responds just as it does when we have a cold fever fatigue. Swollen lymph nodes. Then the symptom stop just like the flu of intially does. But unlike normal virus, the HIV virus is still there. The patients just don't feel sick anymore because their immune systems developed antibodies to suppress the HIV, they're not cured by any means, but they're managing to block the disease and stay healthy for now for decades. Even this is why it was so difficult for scientists to get a grasp on how the disease worked and why it was so difficult to stop its spread. So decades later the patient get sick again why because HIV is extremely sloppy at replicating itself. This means that every now and again a mistake strain slightly different from the strain. The patient's body has learned to manage breaks through and makes the patient sick again depleting further T cells, what was once around one thousand or more T-cells per. Cubic millimeter of blood is now under two hundred a dramatic change in our body's ability to fight off disease. And this is a Mark of shift in the individuals disease. This is where HIV becomes aids otherwise known as acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Aids is the last in most relentless stage of HIV marked by an extremely impaired immune system and a heightened likelihood of contracting, opportunistic infections to put it simply this is the point where simple diseases can now be killers due to a weakened immune system without medical intervention HIV will progress to aids within five to ten years. However, the time it takes for HIV to progress. In aids varies greatly from patient to patient, depending on treatment and other factors in twenty eighteen. Not everyone reaches the aides stage of HIV due to anti retro. Viral therapy that can dramatically change the lives of people living with HIV keeping them healthy and minimizing their ability to spread the disease. However, these drugs weren't available until the mid nineteen ninety s in the eighties. Finding out you had aids was basically a death sentence. So we figured out what HIV and aids are. But where did the virus come from? And why did it affect certain communities disproportionately? Why did so many people believe it was a gay plague? Well, it was predominantly affecting gay individuals. But not because there were being divinely judged for their sins. The correlation is due to other reasons. We'll look into those reasons right after this. What would you do if you had an alien encounter Carter? I don't know maybe try to grab a selfie posted to social media hope that they don't raise my memory on my phone. What if nobody believed you somebody would believe me the existence of extraterrestrial life is captured our collective imaginations for generations, those who claim to have had encounters certainly believe what they saw even if there's no evidence. That's why the parkas network is exploring these stories in the new show extraterrestrial they'll analyze possible scientific explanations and determine what really may have happened. You can listen to the first episode on the nineteen sixty one abduction of Barney and Betty hill right now look for upcoming episode spotlighting reptilian humanoids, Roswell and the nineteen seventy seven UFO invasion in Fort Benning. Georgia new episodes of extraterrestrial come out every Tuesday, be sure to search for and subscribe to extraterrestrial wherever you listen to podcasts. And please don't forget to rate and review. Mauling? I have some exciting news for you starting now you can listen to conspiracy theories episodes that are older than six months completely ad free exclusively on Stitcher premium. We're always looking for ways to improve the listener experience. We found an amazing partner in Stitcher to bring you episodes ad free six months after they're released again, this will only affect episodes older than six months. Nothing else will change will still be releasing new conspiracy theories episodes wherever you listen to podcasts for a free month trial, go to Stitcher premium dot com slash podcast and use promo code par cast that's Stitcher premium dot com slash podcast and use promo code park cast. Now back to the story. So we understand how HIV develops in the human body but discussing where it came from. And how it spread is just as important long before HIV was denounced as a gay disease it belonged to different community a community that wasn't human at all. That is the red capped Mangum bay in the greater spot nosed monkey in Africa. Lease monkeys naturally suffer from a disease researchers call s IV simian immunodeficiency virus? It looks a lot like HIV not just in name but in composition chimpanzees. Eat monkeys. And were in turn infected with a hybrid version of the virus as any high school, biology teacher will tell you chimpanzee DNA is particularly close to humans eventually became clear to researchers that HIV must have been passed to humans from s IV infected chimp's from Cameroon, doctor Beatrice Hawn. Explains. The New York Times in two thousand one quote, people each in pansies, we expect that transmissions occurred through the exposure to blood through hunting or preparation of meat, and quote, this theory is known as the cut hunter hypothesis. You may wonder how cooked chimpanzee meet might still be able to carry. The sl V virus into the human body. Well, it doesn't have to all you need is a bit of blood from the chimpanzee to make its way into the butchers mouth or open wound in order for sl to make the leap into the human species from there, the butcher becomes infected and in turn can unknowingly passed a disease onto other humans and till Morris into HIV as we know it now the retroviruses ability to mutate is integral to why HIV is so hard to fight. But this allows us to follow it spread throughout history. Well, many people believe that HIV was tied to a certain lifestyle. And originally from a single patient zero that couldn't be further from the truth. It's clear that s IV leap to humans through multiple different butchers. If you will evidenced by the fact that there are numerous strains of HIV. Some went to Asia. Others went to Europe, the differences in strains make it relatively easy to understand how the disease migrated, even if we don't know who in particular mood, it the HIV we are addressing today is the main variation referred to as the m strain this strain first appeared in humans around nineteen eight and while the disease, I popped up in Africa. It didn't stay there. And this brings us to Zaire or the Democratic Republic of Congo, a central African country with a history of migration in and out of the region. What we now call the Democratic Republic of Congo was colonized by the Belgians in nineteen eight when HIV was just beginning to emerge in humans after the Congo began to gain independence from Belgian colonial forces a large Haitian community moved in. But when the Belgian Congo became Zaire it. Prompted the Haitians to return to Haiti and with them went H I V in Haiti HIV spread even more quickly than it had before when likely contributor to the hasten spread of disease was a plasma center called HIMA Caribbean. They were discovered reusing blood tubing when collecting plasma donations against hygiene protocols. The company opened in nineteen seventy one and the same year HIV arrived in New York Hema Caribbean, exported sixteen hundred gallons of plasma to the United States every month as we mentioned HIV is passed through bodily fluids, including blood this. Immediately endangered hemophiliacs and other patients in need of blood transfusions around the same time in the nineteen seventies Haiti was a popular sex tourism destination for gay men prostitution is legal there. But there was. Was and still is a particularly elevated rate of HIV in the population. Though, it can't be said who I carried the disease to North America or whether it was a tourist or a blood donation. We can be sure that HIV arrived in New York City by around nineteen seventy-one. It wasn't until nineteen seventy six that had appeared in San Francisco. And that's where the epidemic really took off in the seventies. San Francisco was in the midst of the sexual revolution. It was a community built on free love and sex a place where gay people could outwardly be congregate in bars free of discrimination and parade down the street with pride. There was nowhere else. Like it. Even New York wasn't the same. The New York gay community in their leadership were more focused on a simulation on fitting in gaining their rights in respect and not being loud. This was a stark difference from San Francisco's Castro district. They were less driven to achieve the approval of the nation and much more focused on finally celebrating the fact that they had somewhere to go and feel free. This climate marks the before the aids epidemic. There was a long way to go yet. But there was finally openness celebration and companionship in San Francisco's gay community. But this also happened to be the perfect place for a sexually transmitted disease to spread especially given that sexual education wasn't what it is today. Using protection is only obvious to us now because of what we learned from the aids epidemic. There's another reason aids is always tied back to California whenever there is a discussion of the spread of aids. One name will always come up Gaetano Duga AK a patient zero. One thing was undeniable gay Tonto gall was hot he was widely considered one of the more desirable. Members of the nineteen seventies. San Francisco gay seeing what's more Gaetana was well traveled given his job as a flight attendant. He could go anywhere in the world. But he always returned to San Francisco. He loves the city and it loved him by his own account. He had hundreds of sexual partners a year and estimated having had around twenty five hundred sexual partners in his short life of thirty one years. Gaetano would always come back to the Castro district even in one thousand nine hundred eighty two when purple lesions began appearing on his skin and his doctor told him he was terminally ill with a form of cancer called Kaposi sarcoma. His doctors had let them know that what he was facing was likely terminal. What else was there to do? But enjoy the place. He loved. Gaetana had contracted. What would become HIV aids just as the disease began to truly take foot in the gay community? He came to be marked as patient zero or as the New York Post put it in one of their headlines, the man who gave us aids here had hundreds of partners. So doctor saw his name popping up over and over again as they tracked the disease. What's more a flight attendant is in natural profession for introducing a new disease to the United States. And he was gay before nineteen eighty five. It was believed the disease solely affected gay people. He was an easy target for the doctors and the media looking to place blame for the pedantic. All of a sudden members of the gay community saw their friends partners and heroes dropping dead. Imagine your healthy friends twenty and thirty year olds falling terminally ill with no explanation. The once thriving gay community transformed into one filled with sickness fear and confusion, they received little public sympathy. Many Americans didn't pay attention to what was happening at all more bigoted critics thought this is what gay Americans deserved in a way Gaetano came to represent the idea that the gay community was to blame for this disease that they had quote earned it through their own quote sexual deviance in most epidemics, people quickly try and solve the problem. But with aids the focus was on looking for blame. It's not surprising that scientists ended up pointing fingers at gay tone. The people wanted someone to blame as soon as science. Chested. There might be a patient zero the media honed in on this exaggerating the story for the public's ears. When scientists took a sample of Gatanzi blood HIV was certainly present. However, we now know the strain was the same as the one already present in men in New York, the strain that was present before Gaetano even began his career as a flight attendant. The patient zero theory was completely unfounded looking back. Scientists never really even suggested Gaetana was patient zero. If anything it was just a simple slip up likely, the story found its roots in nineteen Eighty-four study that examined forty game than with Kaposi sarcoma or other issues related symptoms and mapped out their sexual partners as it turns out, eight of the forty men had had sex with a nameless flight attendant, four of them lived in New York and four in California. But are nameless flight attendant was nameless. So what did they call him patient? Oh, standing for out of California. Now, I'm sure you don't need a pencil and paper to work out with the letter o. Looks like the entire patient zero phenomenon was due to nothing more than a misread letter. Oh and immense social bias since. There wasn't really an understanding of what HIV aids was it was easy for the media spent spread misconceptions that is when they chose to speak up for the most part the media barely said anything about the disease. The American public turned a blind eye because a gay disease was not a problem for the nation at large. Most Americans didn't even know any openly gay people it was easy to ignore an epidemic that for all. Most people knew was only affecting small segment of the population. The government certainly wasn't saying anything to clarify. What was going on either? And as we know Reagan's press secretary and the press were treating the gay community and their problems as a joke, all the general public really knew was that HIV aids usually infected gay men, and that it was scary. Well, we like to think that our social behavior reacts to our scientific findings. This been a lot of moments in history that baked differ often. It's our science that follows our social climate and perception of an issue's importance if US -ociety at large didn't care about the gay community new. Either with the US government, which meant there would be no funding for response from the scientific community. We just kind of crazy aids was beginning to make it self known as a terminal and spreadable disease affecting young people in the strongest healthiest years of their lives in nineteen eighty one. There were one hundred and fifty nine new cases of the disease reported by nineteen eighty two it grew to seven hundred seventy one just three years after that it had exploded to fifteen thousand five hundred twenty seven cases with twelve thousand five hundred twenty nine deaths, and it was all swept under the rug the nineteen eighty nine Dr Jonathan Mann director of the World Health organizations global program on aids explain that the disease was still growing exponentially in warned of inaction at the end of the nineteen eighties. The world's vulnerability to aids remains and is. Increasing overall the global epidemic is gaining momentum. Major barriers to more effective actions still exist and complacency about aids is spreading worldwide the World Health Organization believes that the world struggle with aids during the nineteen nineties we'll be much more difficult than it has been during the decade of the nineteen eighties. The World Health Organization predicts that by the year, two thousand six million people may have developed aids a tenfold increase over today. Luckily by the nineteen nineties anti retroviral therapies were invented which slowed down the progression of HIV stirring us away from the Berge in of history. Dr Jonathan Mann describes however his claim speak to the severe apathy towards funding HIV aids research and sexual education in the US. Think about an Ebola outbreak hitting the United States. It would be on the front page of every. Paper. Science would rush to address the problem. Now. Imagine it arrived. I in Alaska, a small subset of America that feels far away in the only attention it. God was a few paragraphs buried in the middle of paper. Basically conveying the sentiment that it only happened to people in Alaska. That's what the beginning of the aids epidemic was like it's clear that due to bias. There was inaction in addressing this disease. But does that inaction rise to the point of conspiracy? To look at that. We have to dig further right after this. Now back to the story. By the early eighties amid the misinformation about the source of aids. Doctors were onto the fact that it was a viral disease spread through the exchanging bodily fluids. The first cases were reported in a growing network of gay men but around nineteen eighty two. There was a sudden outbreak among haemophiliacs, the San Francisco gay community was a civic minded group of people blood banks new, they'd get donations. If they brought bands to gay vents. In fact, gay men gave between five to seven percent of all the donated blood in San Francisco around this time, which may have further spread the disease, the Hema Caribbean. Blood Bank mistake, which we talked about earlier likely also contributed to this spread. And then almost simultaneously doctors realized twenty Haitian immigrants had fallen ill. Despite none of them being gay or he will. Felix and HIV was also affecting heroin users who often shared needles the CDC began referring to what we know as HIV as the four H disease. It stood for homosexuals haemophiliacs hair when users and Haitians others called it grid, gay related immune deficiency, these derogatory labels are classic example of Liat took such a long time for HIV and aids to receive proper tension from the government and sad as the sounds if the sick parties were mostly game in drug addicts and black immigrants. What was the government's motive to solve the problem? It's not as if the people with money and political power were getting sick. However, it eventually became clear that nearly all bodily fluid could spread the disease, women and straight. Couples also began to fall sick babies contracted the disease from breast milk of their. Sick mothers, the only bodily fluid that seemingly could not spread the disease was saliva, which makes sense as it's full of antibodies and anti microbial proteins on October. Second nineteen eighty five American actor rock Hudson died of aids he was a movie star in Hollywood's golden age leading man who worked with the likes of Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean, he had an all American jaw line and celebrity status that created a bond with the American public who all felt they knew him he was their friend. And he got sick. And just like that the United States decided aids was a problem for everyone. Not just gay people rock Hudson gave the disease of face that America could sympathize with by nineteen eighty five cases of aids had been reported in each region of the world and the United States was finally going to address the public health problem. They had on their hands congress allocated seventy million dollars for aids research and Ronald Reagan mentioned aides publicly for the first time for the first time long after thousands of young healthy people had died, but at least the country was finally at the point where aids had a face average Americans would sympathize with along with rock Hudson. A suburban t- named Ryan white became a poster boy for the idea that so called good innocent Americans could get aids Ryan was a haemophiliac, and he'd contracted the. Jeez. From infected blood transfusions when he was just thirteen years old appearing before the president's commission on aids. Ryan shared his experience with prejudice. I came to target via white jokes lies about me biting people, spitting on vegetable these grocery stores and urinating on bathroom walls. Some restaurants through my dishes. I was able to troublemaker my mom and unfit mother. And I was not welcome anywhere. But poster boy sharing their experiences didn't mean prejudice was over just that the country had awakened to the public health disaster. They were facing prejudice. In fact, was still part of the disease. HIV awareness ads warned of limiting sexual interaction. Nobody was really sure on the specifics of HIV. So those with the disease were still pariahs the propensity to blame victims for bringing it upon themselves instead of considering HIV aids. A problem of public health. Then you'd it was fear mongering at its finest. In one instance, a Florida family was ousted from their church when three young brothers all contracted HIV from blood transfusions these type of incidents led president Ronald Reagan to finally start speaking out on behalf of HIV aids victims. Pasture. Ask the entire family not to come back to their church, ladies and gentlemen, this is old fashioned fear, and it has no place in the home of the brave but just because Reagan had finally decided to speak up about aids. Didn't mean the US government had moved past their biases. Well, private organizations aim to make sex safe again through educational campaigns that touted the imports of condoms, congress was doing the opposite in nineteen eighty-seven. President Reagan signed a piece of legislation that banned using federal money and preventative aids campaigns to quote, the legislation it promoted or encouraged directly or indirectly homosexual activities. Congress was willing to let people die from ignorance about safe sex just to avoid inadvertently encouraging being gay instead of promoting sex. Jewel education government campaigns focused on normalizing aids. And making sure everyone knew they were at risk. This has its pros and cons. It dulled. Some of the fear and bias toward gay people, but it also diverted money and attention away from the communities who needed most, in fact, although the government now had a six hundred million dollar budget towards fighting and preventing aids much of that budget was spent educating college students and heterosexual women were much less at risk even as the government began to work on saving American lives. It was evident that bias still ruled the handling of this epic. But how far does the bias go? We can clearly see that HIV aids was not given the proper scientific and public awareness attention. It deserved dismissed by the media as a gay problem or a black problem or a drug users problem, it was ignored by the press and the government until it was too late to contain the everyone problem and once media coverage and campaigns did start to kick in aids awareness campaigns were still full of fear mongering that led individuals being outcast from their communities instead of supported as for the government. They didn't want to appear as though they were aligning themselves with the gay community stepping in to fight aids was bad politics. But to what extent is this neglect aside effect of prejudice into what extent were these malicious targeted acts at what point does inactivity begin to look like a targeted genocide? If HIV was. Targeted act were any of its objectives achieved and in what ways do we continue to be affected today by past mistakes and biases women comes to HIV aids. There's a lot to dig through. We've given you a basic understanding of what it is. And how it spread and in theory. Wyatt spread but there are a few other explanations for how aids became an epidemic next week will look into the conspiracy theories behind the aids epidemic starting with a surprising theory that points to those at the top of the gay community's hierarchy on all. That's a twist at twist, but not without a strain of thinking we are unfamiliar with just a standing with aids. Patients could have been bad PR for the government. It could have also been considered unsavory for gay leaders, particularly those in New York who were trying to make a place for healthy gay people in America. So conspiracy theory number one. Gay community leaders suppressed media coverage and government response to HIV aids. In an attempt to keep their name clean gay plague would only worsen American homophobia. Then there's conspiracy theory number two HIV aids did not come about because of government complacency, but because of an overt effort by the government to spread the disease. This is a two parter when it comes to government motive, some people believe that the government was targeting gay African American populations specifically while others believe HIV was an attempt to coal overpopulation in general. And then there's conspiracy theory number three which brings us into two thousand eighteen while we now have drugs to prevent the spread of HIV and to slow the progress of HIV there still is no actual cure for aids. Many people have noticed that high profile or wealthy HIV positive. Of individuals like Magic Johnson seem to be doing surprisingly fine modern medicine is affected at keeping HIV patients healthy. But is it that good or does our government havoc? You're that they're not sharing with us. If they're not sharing with us. Why not who are they targeting will look at all these questions and try to get to the truth next week? Thanks for tuning into conspiracy theories will be back next Wednesday with part two of our look into the aids epidemic. You can find more episodes of conspiracy theories as well as all par casts. Other podcasts on apple podcasts. Spotify Stitcher, Google play or your favorite podcast directory. Several of you have asked how to help us if you enjoy the show the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. And don't forget to follow us on Facebook and Instagram at par cast and Twitter at par cast network. We'll see you next week until then remember the truth isn't always the best story. The official story isn't always the truth. Conspiracy theories was created by max Cutler is a production of Cutler media and as part of the par cast network. It is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound design by Kerry Murphy with production assistance by Ron Shapiro and Paul Moller additional production assistance by megi add Meyer and Carly Madden conspiracy theories as written by Andrew m Henderson and stars. Molly Brandenburg Encarta, ROY. Don't forget to check out the park cast networks newest show extraterrestrial which explores tales of alien encounters. You've heard the conspiracy theories about alien life. Now the truth when extraterrestrial aims to answer. The question. Are we really alone in the universe? Be sure to search for and subscribe to extraterrestrial where every listen to podcasts, and please don't forget to rate and review.

HIV Aids United States President Reagan Kaposi sarcoma New York City president San Francisco official Facebook immunodeficiency Carter Haiti America press secretary Twitter Gaetano Duga AK
 The fight against HIV: then and now  Science Weekly podcast

The Guardian's Science Weekly

26:49 min | 2 years ago

The fight against HIV: then and now Science Weekly podcast

"Uh-huh. The gods. in the early nineteen eighty s many thought appeti- mic's about to be thing of the past the decade started with the World Health Assembly declaring smallpox had been Radicati did, thanks to a global immunization campaign and Simla campaigns had greatly reduced the incidence of diseases like polio mumps measles in many parts of the world. And this led some scientists think there might be seeing an end to infectious diseases. But then in nineteen Eighty-one a new epidemic appeared. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or aids for short was first identified about eighteen months ago, the disease which is almost always fatal leads to a complete breakdown of the body's own natural defenses leaving the victim wide open to a rare form of terminal cancer, and lethal belts of infection. There was still of stigma within healthcare systems, people were treated quite horrendously in some hospitals, because they were known to have aids. Sadly after thirty plus years. There were still a lot of stigma surrounding HIV and aids, and we still don't have a cure, but there is hope a string of recent trials have been hailed as a big step to curbing epidemic. It's just taking millions of lives. Many belonging to gay men who are disproportionately high risk of contracting the disease. The impact of the aids epidemic on the gay community has been hugely significant, both in terms of the toll, it took on a generation of men and the activism that came in response to it, this month is pregnant, and so on science weekly, we want to look back at the history of HIV, the stigma, the misinformation and the role that science is played. We all say once look forward to the promising drug trials, and whether the UK government can fulfill its twenty nineteen commitment to stop new HIV transmissions in England by twenty thirty. If you're on the drugs, you on not going to transmit HIV infection to anybody else. So there's an obvious consequence of that, if you can get everybody with HIV infection on treatment, you will not only save their lives, but it will stop the transmission of the disease straight away. I'm haunted Devlin. This is science weekly. I'm at expire hook and I'm HIV prevention England program. Officer taken trust I started by asking. Alex HIV is HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus, and it's a virus that attacks the immune system of the body in particular, what's known as CD four cells, which form the immune response within the body, and it infects the cells, and during the replication process actually kills them and that can lead to someone having a week and demean system, an oatmeal, if left untreated though, develop a number of different conditions that can these notice as aids which is acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. What point made the transition between these things I will point to get counted his aides. So the different definitions of aids actually, is in the UK, which normally be giving someone an aids diagnosis when the CD four counts, the amount of the CD four cells immune response in the body falls below two hundred copies per milliliter of blood and also have to have what's known as an aids defining conditions, so something like PCP type of new Monia and various forms of cancer. And that sort of thing we often talk about late stage HOV now or advanced HOV, instead of aids in the UK, but it still term that globally is used a lot. When did the medical world, I became aware of the significance of HIV and aids. So HIV wasn't discovered a virus for for many years, actually, after they start to find people who were basically experiencing. Items of the condition, and it was like she nine hundred eighty one the an Oscar was published described gay men who had the same type of new Monja and had similar types of cancer. And essentially, they realized there was something going on behind the scenes that this wasn't just normal new Neo Anoma type of cancer in the population this something very specific. There was being transmitted we've in population, the initially was thought just to be affecting gay men, and they coined the time grid or gay related immune deficiency. And that kind of led to law stereotyping early days, that this was something that just defected gay men. There was still a lot of stigma within healthcare systems, people were treated quite horrendously in some hospitals, because they were known to have aids. And that's really one of the reasons why turn take into trust with that up in one thousand nine hundred two it was named after Terry Higgins and his partner and his phone's, wanted up the charity in his name in the UK to make sure that other people didn't have to go through the experiences that form, they could support people who were dying of aids today, come to be as possible. Teigen's was one of the first people to dive in age related illness in the UK. Following his death in one thousand nine hundred eighty Higgins's partner report Whitaker helped to found the Terrance against trust. At the time there was still much confusion, stigma Miranda aids acquired immune deficiency syndrome. What some people wrongly and shockingly called the gay plague or grit gay related immunodeficiency. Groups like the tyrant Higgins trust. And the gay medical association pushed back against this providing support to those with HIV and education. Those without it. Around the same time scientists were finally able to isolate night entity HIV is the cause of aids and demonstrated that it wasn't just gay men who were risk. I mean initially really was like hands on deck, but it was really difficult to determine what was happening. Lots of research was put into these people that were really really and suffering, quite horrendous conditions. And it really was just the determination of scientists globally around the world to pick about what was going on. And once the virus was discovered and attest was able to be developed they were then able to roll out and find people, of course, in, in the early days in the eighties as well. There wasn't actually any treatment because the wasn't yet the treatments, the government fakest on prevention to be Margaret Thatcher's health Secretary, Norman, Fowler, nausea, huge public information campaign in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven called don't aids. Although according to follow his PM was not natural supporter, you will have. Soon, the merger booklet which we got out which tells a great deal about juleps seeing some of the advertisements in the press, government can't stop you from getting aids. But most people could stop themselves this came following years of mounting pressure on politicians by gay activists and members of the scientific and medical communities. He will Nuys and lobbied around. One simple. Message this could affect straight people to. And while these meshes did leads to greater awareness of the disease, effective therapies didn't appear until nineteen ninety five when a combination of drugs was approved for use in the US. These were known as highly active antiretroviral therapy, or heart and a similar approach is still used today, unto retroviral medication stops HIV from replicating in the body, and there's a number of different clauses and they work in different ways. Some of them stop the virus muchly binding to CD four, so other stop the replication of the genetic material the viral, our Rene from being able to be replicated within the Senate self and others block things like proteins being made stops of arson being out to replicate Imboden, essentially produce millions more copies of itself. So scientists doctors have made huge strides in being up to treat HIV and people. These days are able to live a completely normal healthy active life. But nevertheless, a lot of people would prefer not to be taking a drug everyday life. If they if there was an alternative. Scientists to be working on in a possible tentatives to one cases really caught. People's imagination is the Berlin patient and if been updates and like tell us a bit about what case involved, why that was exciting in terms of potential treatment. Yes, the, the Berle impatient, where someone called Timothy Brown, who is living with HIV, but also had a very rare and severe type of cancer. And whereas h re-treatment and can stop to replication of the virus in bodily fluids, the HIV virus still resides in body tissues, and essentially, as a side effect of, by marriage. He underwent to treat the cancer that she found that they had been Radicati hid or repair within the the tissue as well. And essentially, he was killed he doesn't have to take HIV treatment, and he's longer. However, it's not something. It's people being able to replicate, it's extremely dangerous procedure people die from this procedure when they're undergoing because of treatment for cancer and put in perspective, the, the classes that we've had to a similar operation under God into someone who lived in London, MAURICE in the past eighteen months or so. So it's taken a decade to kind of find a second pass, where that's even similar circumstances around. It's not something that anyone living with HIV days day, could undergo would want to? At least to this treatment is rare and certainly not gains be what brings about an end to the democ. But one thing that people have got really high hopes about is therapy known as pre exposure, prophylaxis or prep, which was approved for use in the US into one thousand twelve. As the name suggests this is a more proactive approach, which is taken by HIV negative people. He might be at risk of contracting, HIV. Doesn't like a barrier methods say condom does. But it means that if any of the virus was against their body. There's enough with HIV medication in the system to stop it from replicating. So it can't get a hold of in the and the viruses century just dies. And we know it's really helping to reduce new diagnosis, whereas access to it in the UK at the moment that differs from between the different nations in England, your only able to access at the moment. If you bought yourself, online and important, or if you'd go access to the impact trial, which has different sites in sexual health clinics across the country, but I- spaces happened fitting up really fast into mom's been quite high to get on the child particularly amongst gay and bisexual men. Expose the status of HIV in the UK today. How many people do we know infected and what's the rate of diagnosis, how many new diagnoses although each year, so we know in the UK now that there are about one hundred thousand people living with HIV, and most of them are aware of this data? So they're being seeding care, and they're taking treatment, we do know about seven thousand eight hundred of those aren't aware their, their diagnosis. And these are the people that were trying to reach. Carrying out HIV testing and clinics, or GP's and community settings. We've seem quite a substantial decline in new diagnosis in the most recent years between twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen that was an eighteen percent fall in new diagnosis. And that's really down to effective HIV treatment and increases in HIV testing. It's heartening to hear the progresses ientist of made in fighting HIV, but despite these advances were over four thousand new HIV diagnoses in the UK in twenty seventeen. Earlier this year, the U K government announced it would try to Iran dicate new HIV infections, in England by twenty thirty but how so real the if we can get the treatment to all those people who are infected? We'll be back in a minute after the break. My name is Emma John, and I've never seen England's men win a World Cup. But since nobody else has either. I'm told I'm perfectly qualified to host this guardian. Cricket poke assed England currently favorites to win both the World Cup and the ashes on home soil this summer. So welcome to the spin podcast. I'm feeling giddy already. And if you ought to know that we'll be here for you all the way in the coming months to hold your hand. Holy beer. Or if it all goes wrong to just home. This message was brought to you by a cost. The voice from the guardian. Hey, do you have a one quick catch up on the knees headlines best thing in the morning while making breakfast, all getting dressed? Well, if you have a legal assistant Ogle home we can help with that. The guardian briefing is an experiment from the voice lab, which under team minutes brings you up to speed with what you need to know about the day's top stories, we'll make sure you don't miss a thing to listen anytime just say, hey Google speak to the guardian briefing. Welcome back to science Wheatley. I'm hunted Flynn. Before the break we heard about the huge progress in curbing HIV epidemic. In large part, this was thanks to the efforts of the gay community. The kind of solidarity which is being celebrated this month during pride. Even today, though there was no cure, and so much of the focus continues to be on prevention. And last month. There was a paper in the Lancet confirming that the drugs available today. Completely stop people with HIV transmitting, the virus to others. Many of hailed. This is the beginning of the end. I wanted to find out more, so I invited my colleague, Sara Bazeley infra chat. Sarah is the guardians health editor. This is a trial called the partner trial, and it's actually the development of a trial that began in twenty fourteen. So the first results from twenty sixteen and that was amongst heterosexual couples, so man woman, one of whom had HIV and the other didn't. And what has what has happened is that the person who has HIV has treatment retroviral treatment as everybody does or should have if they are reached with it, and that suppresses the virus so far in their body to such low levels that it becomes on transmissible. That's what the trial was proved and the first results were in twenty sixteen and showed that in ab- round nine hundred couples in fact, there were there was zero transmission? So nobody at all picked up HIV from the HIV infected partner. So the latest trial. The results of which very recent is the extension of that into gay couples you had one man, who was HIV positive, and his partner, who was not, and the man, who's HIV positive was on antiretroviral treatment, and the virus was suppressed to such a low level. Again, that in fact, no transmissions happened tool. So nobody actually got HIV as a result of sex with their partner, who was on anti retroviral drugs. The were a few men that were new newly diagnosed who are on the trial, which on face with you might start worrying that it wasn't completely effective. But why was that there were fifteen men who were infected with HIV during the course of this trial? But in all those cases, it was figured out that, in fact, it had sex with somebody else, not actually with their partner who was on, on the drugs, and, and therefore wasn't infectious. And how is the medical community responded to this study? Because I just gifts so much confidence in the idea that you able to stop the spread of HIV. Well, there has been huge Tuesday, awesome for this ever since the first results in twenty sixteen because of course, what it means is that, you know. You know, if you're on the drugs, you are not going to transmit HIV infection to anybody else. So there's an obvious consequence of that if you can get everybody with HIV infection on treatment. It will not only save their lives. But it will stop the transmission of the disease straight away. There will be no more virus moving about the planet. So the thought of that is phenomenal. And there has been massive enthusiasm in the medical community. Also most the campaign is clearly, the as activists everybody, so this trial, because it's four years down the line for five years down the line from from the first results people are simply saying, while, that's fantastic. And it proves it in finally, the can be no more discussion, it happens not only in heterosexual couples, but also in homosexual gay couples so you know we all their if we can get the treatment to all those people who are infected. The other. If is that we need to make sure that everyone who is infected nosy, infected remember how Alex, there were over seven thousand people in the UK who don't know. They've got HIV those people could be transmitting, the virus to others knowingly the, the other thing, everybody has been talking about his test, and treat. That's another mantra if you like what you need to do. So you need to have everybody diagnosed and in the U K forty three percent of people are diagnosed late with HIV, and that is when they've been obviously infected for some time in a maybe a year, maybe six months. But during that time they have been able to pass it on somebody else because they didn't know they were infected so they won't necessarily been taking precautions using condoms, and they certainly won't be on treatment, so relate stage diagnosis is bad news. And we need to do something about that. But there still. A lot of stigma around HIV, so people are reluctant to go for testing, and they rather assume fingers crossed, that they're not HIV positive, and it has been suggested actually by a few doctors that there should be absolutely routine testing certainly for anybody who goes to an STI clinic because if you're picking up sexually transmitted infections from Columbia to, to syphilis gonorrhea, you could also be picking up HIV so that would be one way of doing it making it. Absolute normal for everybody to be tested in curbing the HIV epidemic. The prep approach is kids sit at key by many campaigns. This is a drug that reduces the risk of someone becoming HIV positive, even if they have unprotected sex with someone who is how us Alex before access to these drugs is still limited in parts of the UK in the UK, the NHS, actually, has tried his best not to provide them for people routinely. Not in the numbers that would need them could use them. And the reason for that is, is, again, simply the cost and HSE England four to court case against as she providing them to everybody who wanted them saying that it wasn't their responsibility. It should be the local authorities to pay for it rather than an HSE England. So it was simply a money issue and an lost. But what they've done instead now is to launch a big trial in the situation of a trial. They are able to use the generic version, which is a lot cheaper. So at the moment, you've got quite a lot of people who are in the trial, and therefore accessing prep that way. But there are still people who are not getting it who would like to. It's restricting the sometimes those decisions are made on a per patient basis for that particular patient. It might not be cost effective, but it could save powerful. If you wanted to actually bring HIV transmission to, to an end completely couldn't will. Yes, I think, in this case, it's Rotherham. A close decision. If you like because it's a profit exits, because it's is not actually a treatment for somebody. So you don't do it on a one by one basis. Will this whole group of people who are having potentially risky, sex be prevented from getting a disease that would then cost the and it just an awful lot of money? So it's it's been it's a is a, a major decision that initials inland to make, you know, were they going to provide it to everybody or to nobody, and their decision originally was we can't afford to do this. So it'll have to be nobody and hopefully the literal will pick up the tab. It feels as they we now have the tools to end the epidemic, providing we diagnose people quickly. Suppress the virus. So it compu- transmitted, a make sure that those people who risk have access to prep drugs, all of which will be key. If the UK government's commitments end transmission of HIV in England by twenty thirty is to be met. But I'll Sarah Alex challenges remain. The government has stated it wants to end new transmissions by twenty thirty. I do think that is possible in the UK, but we do need to invest in our sexual health services. We need to make sure that we're targeting people who need to be tested, and we really need to reduce this number if no it's reduced dramatically the number of people who onto where they have HIV. But without doing so we still run the risk of that, as I big, new diagnoses. So. The sensually where stopping HIV from being nepotistic it walls, because people are taking the treatment, but in order to do that they need to know that they have is a one thing at the moment that you can see a major kind of sticking into of what's available three health clinics, or political sticking in, in his is one thing that you could get politicians to change to try meet this talk. What would it be the in the UK? It's definitely investment in sexual health services will seeing increased Monde more people want to attend connects. We know more people being turned away though. And this isn't just in general sexual health. We know STI like syphilis gonorrhea on increase, we really need to ensure that there's that money, within public health budgets, to support those services to be able to test people, and we also need to ensure that support prevention services from voluntary and. Will organizations also supported because we know that know everyone wants to go to have a test and it's important there is a different range of options available. We're really lucky new K that things like HOV. You can actually do a test at home. Now you can get result within fifty minutes, and it's those kind of interventions have really paved the way to more more people taking HIV tests and finding out their status if they do have and being to access the treatment. Many, thanks to Alex Perry hawk and Sarah Bazeley for joining us this week. If you've got any comments thoughts or suggestions about anything you've heard send them over our Email is science weekly up the guardian dot com. If you'd like to eat more about the latest research on HIV will include a link to some of Sarah's writing in the episodes description on the guardian website. The program was produced by gray Jackson. I'm hunted Flynn until next time goodbye. For mobile put costs from the guardian just go to the guardian dot com slash costs.

HIV infection UK HIV Alex HIV England aids partner immunodeficiency deficiency syndrome government US World Health Assembly epidemic cure Flynn Sarah Alex Sarah Devlin
Healing, not Enhancing

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

Healing, not Enhancing

"Before we can really celebrate breakthroughs in medical technology. We must know what is praiseworthy. And what is not? But the Colson center, I'm John Stonestreet. This is break point and the nineteen seventy six made for TV movie, the boy in the plastic bubble a then unknown John Travolta introduced Americans to a condition technically called x linked severe combined immunodeficiency or speaking of called it since the movie bubble boy disease children with bubble. Boy disease can't fight off infections like the rest of us can because their immune system doesn't work properly by Travolta's character. Mini who suffer from the condition live in sealed sterile enclosures that protect them from being exposed to the infections that could kill them in the movie Travolta's character somehow develops enough immunity to risk leaving the plastic bubble in search of true love, but many of his real world counterparts aren't so fortunate. At least they weren't a recent article in the New England Journal of medicine announced that doctors might have found a cure for bubble. Boy. Disease doctors at Saint Jude's Children's Research Hospital in Memphis used an inactivated form of HIV to introduce genetic changes into the patient's bone marrow cells, these changes fixed the bone marrow. So it starts doing its job pumping out all three types of immune cells seven infants with a condition, which is caused by a genetic defect were treated between two thousand sixteen and two thousand eighteen six of them were able to leave the hospital within four weeks and the seventh is apparently on the way to join them for parents of the estimated thirty to forty children born with condition each year. What happened in Memphis is nothing less than a miracle. Children who are virtually certain to die sometimes by the age of two. Now have a chance at life the same week the results at Saint Jude's were announced we learned that Isreaeli scientists had succeeded in manufacturing a three D printed heart made from human cells while it doesn't beat and is the size of a rabbit tart, it's a potential first step. And what was previously the stuff of science fiction, printing, human organs for use in transplants? See everyday twenty two people in the US alone die while waiting and organ transplant being able to manufacture them from human cells instead of just waiting for other people to die would save thousands. If not more lives in addition to giving hope to people suffering from life threatening illnesses. These stories offer a chance for us to discuss the right and wrong uses the biotechnology several times over the last few years. I've talked on break point about the pitfalls of technologies like crisper, the gene editing technology used by Chinese scientists to genetically modify to embryos last year. I called the criticism of the scientist faux outrage. Not because I approve to what he did. But because his critics, including those who invented crisper knew this would happen and still did nothing to prevent it. So how do we know which of these medical advances in biotechnology is moral in which is not where do we even be? Begin to draw these moral lines. Well, here's a suggestion. We have to distinguish between healing and enhancing. What happened in Memphis is definitely healing. The goal is to keep these infants from dying similarly attempts to manufacture organs for transplant seems rooted in a desire to heal the one could easily imagine a scenario in the near future in which printed parts outperform those were born with what then should we allow humans to upgrade see the use of human creativity? And engineered to heal keeps with our status as co creators with God. Obviously the difference between our creative powers and God's is literally infinite, but part of being created in God's image is the ability to use that creativity to care for creation, including ourselves in contrast when we use biotechnology to enhance humans even to create superhumans were attempting to usurp God as creator, we seek to create ourselves in our own image. Instead of conforming to. God's intentions for us. So far what happened in Memphis in Israel doesn't cross that line between healing and enhancement. But as fast as technology advances these days, we can never stop asking the question for breakpoint, I'm John Stonestreet.

Memphis John Travolta God John Stonestreet Saint Jude severe combined immunodeficien New England Journal of medicin US Research Hospital Disease scientist Isreaeli Israel four weeks
30. Volume: Behind Closed Doors: The Different Sides of Self-Isolation

Psychology of Entrepreneurship

22:11 min | 1 year ago

30. Volume: Behind Closed Doors: The Different Sides of Self-Isolation

"Nefarious man like the brain works and fucked up. The mind is one of the most deceiving manipulative pieces of equipment. Flesh bodies on hers. I never have trusted my brain. You are the decision maker. It's wrongly if this is your first volume while this is a weekly series where I go inside. The Mind of an entrepreneur hottest athlete academic to decipher. What is the psychology of our decisions? The entire world is quarantined. Right now do cove nineteen and we're all struggling with that in different ways. Some of US may be enjoying the slow paced work from home schedule. All being able to home school the kids instead of getting them up on willingly at the crack of dawn. Some of US Studying projects you've been putting off. Monceau finally reading that book we heard about three months ago but some of us are just trying to deal with the anxiety and feel the unknown by getting through each day hour by all. Suppose Minute by minute however evil some of us are dealing with things others con even imagine. You probably know someone who hasn't immuno-compromised condition. They can be as common as asthma or diabetes or as severe as cancer. There are categories that are considered high risk. Such as being over age six gave five And then being immuno-compromised it's sort of a subset of the people who are at high risk so somebody who is immune compromised may either have an inherited disorder. They may have an underlying condition like diabetes or asthma that puts them at greater risks That may be taking medications that actually suppress the immune system or they may have actually an overactive. Immune system that impairs. Its function like an autoimmune diseases. People WITH IMMUNE COMPROMISED IMMUNE. Deficiencies are at high risk. For a few reasons one is that they may not have the typical symptoms that somebody has for example. They may not mount a fever. Which is one of the hallmark symptoms of having corona virus infection? In addition they may not be able to fight office while the infection when they get it so they may be more susceptible to more serious than factions or more serious consequences of the infection. It should be something that people in our age group. Just Act as if like it's a be they could get it there. Anyone close to them to get it not just their grandparents or somebody in the abstract. Like it's very it's a real thing for some families. Isolation isn't a new concept people who were born with primary immune or Pi Disorders may have been living most of their lives this way and now they're grappling with watching the rest of the world experienced isolation for the first time and everything that comes with that one amplify team members. Karen has a son that was born with severe combined. Immunodeficiency otherwise known as S C. All bubble boy disease. Remember that movie from the seventies with the teenage John Travolta playing a boy who lived his life in an actual bubble. Yeah that's actually a true story. Based on a boy with this disorder Grenz family lived in complete isolation for the first three months of Jude's life while they were waiting for him to have a life-saving bone marrow transplant. A common code. Could have killed him as he had no functioning white blood cells to fight of germs or infection. Every single day was filled with overwhelming. Feel while trying to keep it together for their older son. Shane who was seven at the time. After three months of living at Louis Children's hospital and the local Ronald McDonald House in Chicago. While Jude received chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant. They were again in isolation for an entire year as he's new immune system grew and developed going through isolation again a second time this time along with the entire world has brought up all sorts of triggering memories and instances of PTSD for Korean at her family. And she's not the only one families of the immuno-compromised all over the world dealing with these issues. While not being able to find the supplies they need to keep their homes clean all being terrified of going to the store for groceries and possibly bring virus home all while reading daily posts on social media about virus being a hoax or a political issue used to damage the reputation and image of other leaders. It's not just families that experiencing different kind of fear in isolation domestic violence is a terrifying issue. The world is always contending with for those in unsafe situations at home. Isolation can be a matter of life or death in Chicago. Police soul and almost ten percent increase in domestic violence calls just for the week of March. Sixteen to twenty two alone. One happens during a stay at home order when it's not safe to stay home. We've uncovered a spike in domestic violence calls for service in the midst of the corona virus pandemic in Chicago. Chicago police data shows that from March sixteenth. To the end of last week calls jumped from two thousand eight hundred eighty two calls for service to three thousand one hundred sixty three calls last week. Cbs to investigator Megan. Hickey has been looking into the reasons behind the rise. In Megan. This is a significant from last year. Right Erica. It's a big jump. When we compare this data to the same period last year the volume of calls for the week the stay at home order was announced more than nine percent higher than the same week last year fast forward to last week. Total domestic violence calls peak to three thousand one hundred sixty three. That's more than fourteen percent increase from this same time last year when there were two thousand. Seven hundred and sixty calls as soon as the order was issued domestic violence survivors. Like CASSANDRA TANNER. Miller started speaking out about serious concerns about the mandate and how it could enable N- abuser to keep a victim from getting help. Obviously you understand the need for the stay at home order but as a domestic violence survivor you. You saw the writing on the wall. It creates literally a deadly environment. Where you're scared I mean terrified I mean I put myself back right into as soon as they mentioned that down it was like my heart sank because I thought to myself like the poor kids the poor wives or husbands who are stuck at home with your abuse or like this is going to create a a very very deadly if not toxic environment for all parties involved with no reprieve from that so how cities dealing with this uptake in domestic violence skulls. And what sort of help the offering to victims listen to. Trevor Noah off the daily show. Talk TO CHICAGO. Mayor Lori lightfoot about the creative ways the city has come up to offer help to those that are desperately need if it one of the policies you've implemented in Chicago Truly stood out for me and I. It was highlighted by an issue that I think a lot of people overlook during this time and that is people who are trapped indoors or in houses or in any type of abode with family members. Who made the abusive specifically women? We've seen domestic abuse rates skyrockets all over the world and you. You've launched an interesting initiative. Lift an Uber. Helping in this What are you doing? And why did you feel that you had to do it in the way that you did? Well look we know that. Domestic violence is a problem in the best of Times. And we concern about seeing an uptick. So what we did in In COMBINATION WITH UBER. Lift was a train me. On hotline workers where people were calling because they want to get out of a a dangerous or troubling family circumstance to give them a special code that they can use to order lift or uber to take them anywhere to safety. It's it's very simple and straightforward thing. But we thought that was really important. We didn't want the absence of a ride to be reason why somebody felt compelled to stay in a dangerous domestic situation The main objective of this project is to bring together entrepreneurs and creatives who share similar values. So they can find the courage to put out their authentic voice for the right people to which allows for them to make that impact on the world. Every great movement started with a memorable speech for access to full length interviews greater psychology of Entrepreneurship Dot Com and click the button similar to lightfoot approach. Bbc News Host Victoria W Shah subtly wrote the number of domestic abuse hotline on the back of a hand. Doing a news broadcast for those that my need as she went through a feature stories. She lifted her left hand to a face. Showing the number of UK's domestic violence help hotline and later tweeted a photo showing the number again. The hotline has seen a twenty five percent increase in Kohl's since the pandemic began. But you don't have to be going through a violent situation to experience negative ramifications from isolation people all over the world are finding themselves in new and unique situations that provider society never prepares us for when passengers off a cruise ship. Returned to Australia forced into a hotel for a mandatory fourteen day isolation period to protect others from possible chronic infection the first group of Australians forced into quarantine at Sydney hotels tonight back at home after fourteen days in isolation but the ordeal isn't over for family of seven at the Hilton. They now in a hotel turned hospital after two tested positive family members checking out of the Hilton Hotel on a stretcher and around the corner at the Swiss sedans door after two weeks being locked up in Quarantine. It really happy. Happy really happy. The Corona Virus rollercoaster ride continues forty eight new cases which is stable but among those a father and child from a family of seven in isolation at the Hilton. Thirty six cases have now been identified among the returning travellers quarantined in fifteen hotels across Sydney if anyone develops symptoms now. Quarantine her toes we. Aren't they undergo testing? And should they become a test positive? They are provided with appropriate assessment in back at the Swiss hotel. Fresh never felt so good. Need a quick story to help. Keep you in good spirits right now in some Lebanese one hundred year old wo- Veteran Tom. War raised over thirty million pounds for Britain's health services by walking laps around his garden in a report by BBC News. Captain Mall was recently treated for a broken hip and skin cancer and had initially aimed to raise one thousand pounds the NIH as charities together one hundred laps around is twenty. Five meter gotten with the aid of his Walker stating that he said about raising money for the sake of the nurses and the NHS we have because they're doing such a magnificent job. More family turned to social media to help raise funds and by the time he reached his one hundredth birthday on April thirtieth. He had raised well past his original goal and has since been promoted by the Queen to honorary colonel at the start of last week's volume admitted to having good and bad days union this isolation period. As soon as I got back to Australia on the twenty fourth of March I was quarantined. In my home. For fourteen days I decided to make myself a routine. And you used that protein to stay sane so I would wake up at three fifty nine. Am Gopher ten minute cold. Dip into the pool made myself of Uber. Matei and Black T. Showered did a sixteen minute yoga session before starting any of my meetings every single day which by the way my meetings starting early because of my calls to cities in North America so I decided as well that I would not get any take-out meals so since I've gotten back from the US. I've cooked all the food. I've eaten taking my dog out to the Pool Area. A couple of times a day and now after those fourteen days I've added a daily run by late. I'm experimenting but I'm creating barriers for myself. Depression and anxiety a Kalman consequences to isolation and the world is experiencing them on a massive scale. People who have never been drinkers are suddenly going through bottles of wine every week. Ex smokers are lighting up again and junk food is being delivered by the bag full. How do we deal with all these urges to mean unhealthy crutches things? I think we are going to see a big impact in that way and we're not really talking about that. So what are the unintended consequences of self of people? Self isolating of social distancing etc. There may be some things we have an expected like hall. You may go up. Which of course is directly linked to mental health? And we're GONNA be last knots linked as well or for people who already have a standing mental health condition. There's a number of things is absolutely imperative that they maintain contact with their healthcare professional and they get the treatment ongoing support that they need but at a more modern minor level less. Ask Ourselves. What are we going to do if we're all at home so we need to get up in the morning? China set a routine. That's crucial get dressed. Have contact with somebody else even for on her own so that was likely to be virtual or just even the old fashioned telephone so having that human contact early in the day and then finding a way to get some exercise. We're still allowed to walk around outside. Even if we're self-isolating go outside get some fresh air etc and then just say I think we have to be really careful our use of media so those are some practical bits of advice but obviously for people who have a long-standing conditions contact with the health service and still access to the medication which is going to be crucial as a piece of advice from mental health professionals on dealing with isolation east to establish some form of routine. Your routine obviously what mirror what your pre pandemic routine is but now the time for us to come up with a new normal. His former submarine Captain Ryan Ramsey explaining. How a simple routine and cleaning rituals helped him and his crew cope with isolation on at eight hundred four meter. Nuclear Submarine Roy Ramsay Alley speed captain of Ainu Serene Ages turbulent taking about one hundred and thirty thousand people in a nice full meter. Still achieve very this person's spice routine make sure you have a routine and stick to it sees you get into that reaching and you keep doing each step. Bit Days will be in two weeks will move into lungs may be an out of these can be sentenced outracing. The second thing is about strange it sounds about cleaning so you need to make sure that you clean and need a call yourself so with us since agreed saying they're not standards stayed off suggested. It's making sure that you give yourself some downtown. There's a lot of fun news going on a lot of information out there that's real uncertainty and you have to pull yourself away from that and says he prepared on and that. Jesus oh I'd say we will start seeing things that we really annoy us about family members partners. It's going to happen. You can see conflict coming. Speak Quite frankly. So you want to de-escalate because he can probably the last one in probably most communicate so just by talking to people in your house or if you're on your new was Co people out but socializing is going to be absolutely vital for US people out the seat see gas into the garden. You get experienced sunlight. You get your experience fresh which we really do on board a submarine go look through pastas throughout all of this with a bunch of best people out trying to sort of pull them out and we'd go you politics solution Help work for so. How do we help? Those who may be experiencing isolation in more dies situations our own reach out check in on friends and family even the low maintenance ones offer the run to the store or order some cleaning supplies to be delivered. Every little gesture could be a lifeline to someone's mental health and if you yourself are struggling you're not alone reach out. I promise you someone will be in. Touch will provide resources in the show notes for this episode. But don't be afraid to let someone know how you need help all that you need help at all. We're all in this together. If you like these topical volumes on certain subjects ride back and let me know what topics. You'd like us at psychology of Entrepreneurship to break down. We're having fun doing these so until next week. Happy isolating coming up on the psychology of entrepreneurship. I'd be kind of those trainer all because I wanted to help through that transformation by then to that to the other side of the pendulum and I can painted as a fitness model in London and Australia for my situation. It was not possible for me to go after the opportunity of building a business in Dubai and still having much is back insignias dry. It didn't work and so therefore are headed to make that decision and unfortunate that it worked out. I can figure out what is it that I need to move forward. How can you be confident that something you'd never done before fucking trance like riddle me that because I've got no idea how that comes out at the end of the day? This is a must amplify production special. Thanks to guest expert that has appeared on the show voiceovers editing and sound design by killing men guess research and content by Clegg Gould in Corn Castles Project managed by Kenny Benjamin produced and hosted by tvos for more episodes in listen Goto must amplify dot com slash p. her hey it's Kaley from US amplify. I'm the sound engineer for this volume of psychology of entrepreneurship. I'm proud of the team. That made this production come alive. I work as a part of a global team without studios based in western Brisbane Australia. If you're like a plug costing checklist email me at Keighley at amplify agency DOT media that's K. A. L. I. Amplify Agency Dot Media. We specialize in finding your voice. And making sure it's hood by the right people. If you're considering whether a podcast is a good idea for your business check out other show on should I saw a podcast dot com. I used to listening his little gift to you. For sticking around severe combined immunodeficiency severe combined immune civilian combined immunodeficiency similar lightfoot approach BBC new similar to lightfoot approach BBC. News hosts Victoria Dubbing Child. Dub Shall Victoria Dub shy. W shy doesn't sound right Victoria. Shire W shy faulk.

US Chicago Australia Lori lightfoot Immunodeficiency BBC Jude diabetes IMMUNE Monceau severe combined immunodeficien John Travolta Hilton Hotel Sydney Trevor Noah Dubai
First AIDS report / Pancho Villa born - June 5

This Day in History Class

14:15 min | 2 months ago

First AIDS report / Pancho Villa born - June 5

"At children's national hospital everything we do is just for kids are top. Ranked specialists are here for kids of all ages from babies who need help. Before they're even born to teens and young adults are pediatric experts. Work together to diagnose problems quickly and thoroughly and use treatments designed exclusively for growing children with convenient locations all across the dc metro area. Find a specialist. Today at children's national dot org slash stronger. The greatest diamonds in the world found at movies before you pop question visit movers. Diamond importers with a huge selection of quality diamonds at fair prices moves. Diamond is the region's first choice. At mervyn's you'll receive a free diamond education and no pressure to buy at diamond. Say you know value. Great diamonds and fabulous prices. It's the move way. That's why most was honored by washington. Post as best place to buy a diamond check out reviews at moves diamonds dot com again. That's moves diamonds dot com. Hey all where rerunning two episodes today enjoyed the show. Hey guys welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history. Every day the day was june fifth nineteen eighty one the morbidity and mortality weekly report published by the us centers for disease control released called new most this pneumonia los angeles. The article detailed five cases of new sisters carini pneumonia or pcp which is a rare lung infection. The cases were all in los angeles in all of the men. Identify in the report as having p- white and gay this report was the first on what would become known as the aids or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Epidemic aid is caused by. Hiv are human immunodeficiency virus hiv tax. A person's immune system as it spreads through the body specifically attacking. Cd four fails also known as tisdale's as the virus destroys these cells. The immune system has a hard time combating disease and infection. Aids is the most severe state of the hiv infection when the immune system is so compromised that the effect person gets many opportunistic illnesses. There is no cure for hiv but there are treatments that can help control the infection which reduced the presence of symptoms and the risk of transmission to people who do not have hiv. Scientists believe that hiv was passed to humans from chimpanzees that had a version of the virus called simian immunodeficiency virus or s. I v. h. I. v. could have been transmitted from apes to humans as early as the late eighteen hundreds and spread across the world sense though the virus had been in the united states since at least one thousand nine hundred seventy s. It was not reported until the nineteen eighty-one article. Local clinicians and the epidemic intelligence service officer at the los angeles county department of public health created the report instant it to the morbidity and mortality weekly report for publication in may of nineteen eighty-one before the journal published the report. The editorial staff sent it to the cdc for review by experts and parasitic and sexually transmitted infections and on june fifth nineteen eighty-one. The article was published. The five patients article all described as previously healthy currently or previously had cytomegalovirus and candida mucosal infection. In addition to new mo- sisters pneumonia. Two of the patients died the editorial note included at the end of the article stated that this new monja is usually seen in people who are severely immunosuppressed and that the occurrence of illness in these five patients was unusual. Also noted that because all five men were gay. Some sort of disease acquired through sexual contact with that hand and that a cellular immune dysfunction related to common exposure was possible the same day. A new york dermatologists card the cdc report several cases of kaposi's sarcoma a very rare cancer that austin affects people with immune deficiencies among gay men in new york and california and from there more reports of similar cases popped up around the country just days after the initial report was published the cdc established the task force on kaposi's sarcoma and opportunistic infections to research risk factors and investigate new cases of the mysterious syndrome on july third. The new york times published an article on the epidemic titled rare cancer seen in forty one homosexuals because it seems like the condition was limited to game in it became known as gay related immune deficiency as the epidemic received more media attention. The misnomer gay cancer entered the public lexicon but in september of nineteen eighty two. The term aids was used to describe the syndrome for the first time though it was known that people besides men who have sex with men can get aids perception of as a gay disease persisted after researchers found out that. Hiv causes aids in nineteen h. I. hiv test were developed in the nineteen eighty-seven the first anti retroviral medication for hiv called a. z. T. was released throughout the nineteen eighty s. The number of cases of hiv aids increased and. So did the number of deaths caused by complications of aids after that. The number of new cases in-depth declined men who have sex with men people of color transgender women who have sex with men and injection drug users are at high risk for getting hiv. I'm used coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today. You did yesterday and an additional no the presence of hiv in the states. There's a long standing myth that a french canadian attendant was patient zero in the us as he picked up hiv in haiti or africa and spread it across the states but scientists declared that. This was not the case in two thousand sixteen. If he wants to learn more about history you can listen to my new podcast called unpopular. It's the podcast that is hosted us about people in history who were dissenters are were rebels and they challenged the status quo and sometimes they were persecuted for it. You can follow us on twitter. Instagram and facebook at t. The h c podcast. Thank you again for listening. And we'll see you tomorrow. Did you lose your health insurance and are struggling to pay out of pocket for your medicine. Save up to eighty percent on your brand name prescriptions with planet drugs direct and get them shipped free right to your door. Not convinced yet at planet drugs direct. We've been serving americans for nearly twenty years and we have more than forty thousand positive reviews to stand by our word at planet drugs direct. We have one goal in mind. Saving you hundreds if not thousands of dollars while keeping you safe and sounds so. Stay healthy and save more than two hundred dollars per month by ordering your prescription drugs from canada. Get the help you need. At planet drugs direct dotcom and received twenty five percent off your first order with the code history or call eight three three eight seven seven four one zero one. That's planet drugs. Direct dot com with the code history for an additional twenty five percent off. And don't forget to follow us on facebook for an additional special offer. Stop skipping doses of your medication. Because you can't afford it go to planet drugs. Direct dot com. I love from my home. Smell good instances oils open windows to let the fresh air in. That's me all day but there are a lot of questionable smells that can intrude on those lovely sense especially when it comes to fabrics. I love a comfortable athletic shirt for hiking and exercising in but they do trap in all of the odor that comes along with that sweat into like from close to have a long life. So i need something that can get rid of all of those tough stains and smells. While making sure that the fabrics aren't harmed in the process oxy clean odor. Blasters is great at getting the sweat and body odor out of clothes so that they can look good as new and smell even better oxycodone. Blasters doesn't have chlorine in it and it's color safe. It's a small joy to wash load of dirty smelly clothes and see them come out stainless in fresh on the other side. So work your magic with oxy clean odor blasters and save visit oxygen coupons dot com now. We're a coupon is waiting just for you. Hey all i'm eaves and welcome to this day in history class. Podcast for folks who can never have enough history. Knowledge day was june fifth eighteen. Seventy eight revolutionary leader punch via was born in mexico via wasn't important and controversial figure in the mexican revolution and he celebrated by many as a folk hero in his young adult years via was involved in banditry he and other bandits and his crew would still cattle money from wealthy people. Later via what. Become known as a kind of robin hood robbing the rich and giving to the poor at the time for the as was the president of mexico diaz was a controversial figure while he promoted progress his policies benefited us and does or estate onerous and other wealthy people while they hurt rural laborers. The mexican revolution started when people began challenging the as gm in nineteen ten pm. Et presidential candidate. Francisco madero who opposed. Dss rule and promised to support the lower classes via decided to join it might have caused via was made a colonel in the revolutionary causes and he proved to be ineffective leader was elected president in one thousand. Nine eleven but via remained entangled in the political unrest when squall costco launched a rebellion against my dad. Oh the participated in the fight against the counter revolution. He gathered troops joined forces with general victoriano huerta but where at the end via suna fill out and ordered vs execution via was sent to prison instead but he escaped from prison. In december of nineteen twelve. A couple of months later where killed my nato and claimed the presidency via escape to the us for a while but he later went back to mexico informed his own military force. Call it the del norte. Or the division of the north. He allied with carranza and went up. Kits worth and via effectively commanded his growing army. Which one many revolutionary battles gained recognition throughout mexico but also in other countries. He gained a reputation for being brutal but also benevolent by one thousand. Nine hundred thirteen had become the governor of the state of two wild but a rivalry with carranza soon led the two to split and via teamed up with revolutionary leader emiliano zapata against karadzic power as the head of state in mexico in nineteen fifteen and via continued his guerrilla activities while cut it on so remained power. The us support cut it on site in conflict and via needed more supplies to fight cut on so in march of nineteen sixteen via let an attack against columbus new mexico though the us sent soldiers to mexico to look for via they did not find him in nineteen seventeen and nineteen eighteen via launched many successful raids but after cut it on sale was assassinated in nineteen twenty interim president. Adolfo delaware thought negotiated vs amnesty retirement. As part of the agreement the got hussien data entry huahua but in nineteen twenty-three via was assassinated when he was in his car some people remember via for his advocacy for peasants and his success as military leader. But he was often vilnai's in the contemporary press and he was known for his brutality. War jeffcoat and. Hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. And if you have any kind words you'd like to send us or any suggestions for future episodes. You can send them to us at this day. At iheartmedia dot com. You can also hit us up on social media at t v. i h c podcast. Thanks so much for listening to the show. And we'll see you tomorrow for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows it's been one year since stored floyd's murder business. Roundtable stands with millions of americans calling for policing reform. We urge policymakers to continue working together to pass. Bipartisan policing legislation. The time to act as now paid for by business roundtable the time for defense organizations to harness the power of the cloud is now discover how you can leverage cloud solutions to advance your mission. At part three of gd it emerged thousand. Twenty one registered. Today at gd i dot com slash emerge.

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Episode 25: Raif Derrazi  HIV/AIDS Education, Bodybuilding, and Evolving Out of a Victim Mindset

Habits and Hustle

49:50 min | 2 years ago

Episode 25: Raif Derrazi HIV/AIDS Education, Bodybuilding, and Evolving Out of a Victim Mindset

"We have such an important episode today. Our guest raped rasi is h._i._v. Positive bodybuilder and h._i._v. aids activist. You will be blown away away by the story of his diagnosis his rock bottom and his incredible journey of changing his life to one of gratitude positively rafe is on a mission to educate caters all and to undo the stigma. Our society has on this on this disease. Please stay tuned for this important inspiring and educational episode. Hi everybody welcome to habits and hustle. I am really actually quite excited about today's guests. It is rafe. We haven't had anyone like you on our show before before when what i find so interesting and <hes> just fascinating about him is that he is an h._i._v. Advocate and his whole platform is about gratitude self empowerment and basically turning a negative into a positive excuse the pun moore's <hes> and he just has a really great message and an amazing story that i wanted to share so thank you for coming on rubbing me. It's great to have you <hes>. I think what was so <hes> not just like i said interesting is that i think there's so much information that people aren't aware of at least being one of them about someone who lives with hiv and having not just a full life but now you're you're completely undetectable. You have a better chance of living till one hundred than i do and you know and a lot of other people so i guess let's start by telling everyone what is the difference between between h._i._v. and aids is they're h._i._v. Positive needs servants h._i._v. Is the virus itself. K. aids is a syndrome auto auto immunodeficiency syndrome and that's to get really technical. They measure your c._d. Four count your white blood cell count when it gets below two hundred then it's considered aids so it's it's just a marker of how well your immune system's doing on it okay so when someone says they're h._i._v. Positive right. It's not the ages when you're like when you when you get really sick and when you're actually like your bias depleted completely right and if you're anywhere on the spectrum are not wow controversy in their system so let's just start because you're a young guy so like raith is a competitive bodybuilder super healthy super looking. You would never guess in a million alien years by looking at you that you had h._i._v. You were hiv positive image and i think we were saying off off off. Line is is probably there's a lot more people who have hiv total then we would ever even and say what you were saying to me before those oh guys yes so. I have random people. Call me up. I had a friend recently who is like conservative straight guy from the marines called me up and said hey like like i just found out and so does my wife and we don't know which who who had it who gave it to who so it's like affects everyone yeah. It's not just someone who who is a gay person. It can be anybody anything like we're saying that's kind of it. Is kinda scary in a sense that a lot of people do carry it way more than people would think because because they think it's only segmented to one part of the population it's but we believe that because nobody's talking no one talks about it and it's still like you know it's still a scary the topic for whatever reason like when i knew you were coming on. I got a little bit nervous. I thought my god because you know because you don't. There's there's so much stigma total around it and that's what i love about what you do. Is that you basically. We're gonna talk about it in a minute but you literally have turned like what you're diagnosed with five six seven years ago right and you as a death sentence so to speak that my arm most people would think and you really turn it into a platform to like turning in your life around living your best life. You know to quote oprah. I literally thought i was going to be dead in three years. I was like okay. Is that the diagnosis they gave you know. I just didn't no anything about it when they told me so. Tell tell us about how it happens. You're you're go back to two thousand twelve right yeah so i was in eighty three and a half off your monogamous committed relationship with their man and i was just sick all the time and i got more and more symptoms. I had no idea why i didn't have health insurance that couldn't afford health insurance like flu like symptoms or why would have like weird skin rashes. My lymph nodes were swollen. I was exhausted all the time. I was losing weight. I couldn't didn't put on muscle if i tried yeah so and then i had been what really tipped me off that i had a sore at the back of my throat i thought i had strep and it lasted for months and it wouldn't heal so i'm like i gotta go see a doctor something. If i have to go to county and sit there for eight hours to to see a doctor i will so that's what i did and i never never suspected it would be s. T. sti and so did anyone say to you. Oh i think you probably have the flu. You probably have this. You don't have that and i just thought it was whatever and we just kind of going about your daily business rattling trying to yeah but i was getting to the point where i could. I couldn't really function very well and i didn't know why and i was getting down on myself because i'm like why we can't just operate like a normal human being find healthy before like this happen to you. I mean moderately normal normal person and then you're the doctor darrieux doctor and waited eight hours and she's like. Let's just do all the tests just to make sure i came back. A week. Later sat down into her office and we had we had a report at that time we were kind of joking and but the second time i came in she was completely somber stared at our monitor and then remember she breathed looked at me and said you have h._i._v. Maybe and it was like the camera just like live my whole life just kind of like oh my god. I'm going to be dead in three years this. Is it wow okay. I can't even imagine so just sort of bullying. I'm gonna give you ten minutes. Call somebody and then leave the office. I'll come back to your thing wow and like them what happens you know you tick for ten minutes and then more and then what what happens okay so the next week. I'm gonna need you to comeback. You're gonna go to the hiv clinic. The specialists are there. She was like don't be alarmed. Don't be worried because you're gonna see a lot of really sick. People and a lot of homeless people homeless people issues well. Why is that because of probably needle sharing and and just unprotected sex and just the whole slew being in that position now besides it having your boyfriend were you also having a lot of unprotected sex or only with him at that time at okay okay and so okay go on sorry about this and so ironically you my appointment to go to the clinic was on my birthday and so i went in an i was sitting in the waiting room by myself and this nurse comes by he's like six foot three tat's piercings big gruff guy and he goes. Hey you know what you're here right. I go yeah 'cause that'd be h._i._v. And he goes you got more than that. Kid you got full blown aids and then just walked away and i was like are you serious. Do you actually had aids not even just you had like iraq down to the depletion boneheads and then my doctor dr came in who went who came into seeming like it's your own house skinny were you wasn't like gone like you see in the movie was the skinniest i personally had ever been in my arms. You could just see it okay and you're still with the same guy though right yourself till date was did you guys break up oil broken up since no no no at the time together when you found yeah okay go toasted as well so both of you have aids now the cat he didn't he didn't have he had the same symptoms as you when he when you went to find like when you when you did have some some weird symptoms but like for example he had shingles randomly shingles breakout and we're like that's weird but whatever people get shingles when they're older. Maybe he got it young right so but he wasn't down as i was energy wise wow okay so. Is it possible that he could have bought it from you. It is possible and it's also possible that i could have gotten it from him. There's no no way we both. He told me he tested negative. When we got together tested negative so there's no specific specific way it was probably in the window period for one of us that it's not deductible. Wow so you think so. Do you think it could even lying to you that he was sure yeah. I mean after that. I found out that he was cheating the whole time or just like i don't know i just know that he was like all over. The internet. Talking is in had someone at our apartment while it was away shooting a web series for a week and holding that's when i was like wow okay then how did you take that and then turn it into something i've been like. How did you take you now. You have aids and now like you know cut to now even will very soon after become become mr positive polly and with the platform and headed a body builder and everything else would net then what happened so i definitely see the blessing in every experience variance negative or otherwise so what happened shortly after that was i was on the medication will how'd you get to the medication. Do they give you you told me out before it was a lot of options. Yeah okay okay so well. The doctor prescribes to me at that time she was like. I'm gonna put you on this and we'll see how it works. Was it supposed to suppress it was completely suppressed the virus so that they measure viral load which is how much virus there is per drop of blood and at that time it was like fifty two thousand copies per droplet in my body which is a lot okay and then within like six to nine months it got to the point where there was an undetectable amount meaning that the test can't detect the virus in my blood now is that normal is so if you take medication for people who don't understand is it. Could you just do matter how <hes> bad the you know. If you have a full out full blown aids you did did if you take the medic- start taking the medication couldn't go reverse itself itself absolutely and it will for most of the population undetectable segment that doesn't work for is that because because there are strains of hiv virus that have developed a resistance to medication so those people that can be more tricky and you might have to take a cocktail like what's traditionally go three times a day or something like that but for most people it will take care of you. So when did you start feeling a little bit better or can i get like would you taking the meds basically by the time in six to nine months when i was starting to feel undetectable is when i started to feel like myself again and what i was gonna say is that i went to a trampoline park and within ten minutes i broke my ankle and one of the side effects of the medication that i was taking was bone density loss which i didn't realize so i think that contributed to my broken ankle so i was and i was like getting ready to break up with my boyfriend at the time but at that point i was like doc i'm screwed like completely dependent and so i- he worked and i stayed at home and i was just in bed for five months and it was during in those five months that i noticed there was like are you familiar with hay house publishing yeah and publishing company so they were doing this like two week intensive where it was just like speaker after speaker after speaker for like six hours a day it was all free so i just immersed myself in that the secret the oprah and deepak chopra meditation series just everything dream boards vision boards goal setting everything just like went inside and just like revamped everything anything and that's when i realized this pattern of my whole life was that you know as a kid i i was the victim to a lot of really crappy situations nations but then i think i learned to use victim mindset to kind of get my way and get what i wanted as i got older and that that was the thing that crippled me and in getting aids was like v. like moment of manifesting true victimhood and i was like i got to change something the house to change and that's when i kind of made the switch so right. You're saying earlier like that. You're like you're always the victim really shitty child. What was your ah background so it was born in utrecht netherlands <hes> most of my family's still there. My biological father was very verbally mm physically abusive to my mom to the point where she thought he would kill her at some point in kidnapped me and take me back to morocco so without telling her family anything anything where we were going or anything no money. She took me and we came to the u._s. And then we just started. She was like a live in nanny in orange county and i was living with her and i went by a completely different name going by the name tim zimmer everybody that knows me in orange county since i was a kid knows let me as tim zimmer kidneys yeah 'cause to me was the most american name of and zimmer was the man she ended up marrying marrying a year later his his last name so i was never adopted but i just went right. She added marrying. Many zimmer says that was your stage names. Yeah he was an alcoholic and depressed very distant and i was just kind of dealing with all the trauma so i had a lot of issues as in school and i was picked on a lot made fun of and why people called me gave it i was weird. I didn't know american social norms ormes was the outcast. I was like i think as part of my coping. I was extremely extremely happy. Optimistic kid like i saw everything is the disney movie and like i believed in just altruistic things in that kind of separated me from a lot of the other kids. That's interesting percent. You say that because you have victim mentality but yet you had a very positive paulie was sick every month old and migraines pains and other ailments and wasn't going to school a lot because of it and it was like this weird duality of both things and then by the time i was in high school school. That's when i really started to deal with everything that i had gone through and coming to terms with being gay and it got to the point where it was doing drugs and alcohol and attempted suicide overdosed on like thirty pills went to a mental hospital for a week really really really well. It was like girl interrupted. Yeah i was gonna say exactly like that. Wow and then what ends so this was like the diagnosis as was like the icing on the cake so to speak it no way after that i got a church christianity. It was heavily involved angry after the diagnosis after the attempted suicide after i was trying to pull myself out okay so before you found out about all that you array trent you're trying to transition in your brain a little bit out of high school. I was really into church. Okay wanted to go to a christian university. I'm like i'm gonna turn my life around service to god super stoked about it. I was so involved in theater and then all of a sudden it was like okay. I gotta deal with being gay and then i had my the people that i looked up to church. We're like well. We love you. First of all second of all you weren't born this way and you can't change it so so we're going to help you be straight where you're going to do a weekly discipleship. You're gonna cut off this your communication with your first love and you're just going to uh-huh dedicate yourself to like celibacy and to god and i did that for like six months and then i was like i'm starting to get depressed again like oh. This isn't right and it was my stepdad. Who's like if you're not happy like. Why are you doing it right and i was like okay so i told my church that and i was like i'm gonna it. Just be me and they're like okay. That's fine but then you can't be part of church leadership roles you can't do theater and the university was like we can accept you because you're willfully we living in sin so it was like boom excommunicated start over find my identity again and it was just very very difficult and it was like i was the victim again well okay and then so that was basically the story in your head that's saying it was always like it always go back to the invicta and then when you got this diagnosis and then you're in bad for months and months because you were just not feeling good depressed at that point i would imagine i don't remember being depressed. I was just like this is an opportunity right away. You thought that like you didn't take a moment to be like oh shit. This is a death sentence. Oh yeah because the diagnosis yes when i broke my ankle when i was diagnosed. I was like yeah aw i've reached my biggest fear in life. This is the lowest of the low wow and then okay so then when you were in bed dams because you broke your ankle from the from the eh tackling okay and that's when you're like i'm gonna i'm gonna change everything around okay and then what did you do and and then from there so it got to the point where i was healing but i wasn't quite to the point where i was like. I can walk around and go back to serving waiting tables again but i'm like at the same time like okay. I'm making these realizations and here. I am living with somebody who cheated on me and betrayed. Hey trust in like why am i still like compromising myself to be with this person and i said to myself okay well. If you're gonna be true to yourself gulf then you can't just stay in this situation. You have to face. It doesn't matter if you still have messed up leg and it doesn't matter if you don't have a plan after just do it you got to do. What's right so i broke it off and i had nothing. My car had been repossessed. I didn't have a job. I didn't know what i was going to do where i was going to live so it was like literally minute by minute figuring out. What am i gonna do now. So i found this closet that i could live in for four hundred dollars a month in the valley through a friend that was living there and and i was went to my old job literally sobbed and cried and begged for shifts back. They had a new managers. I don't know you like why am i going to give you chefs and they just sobbed pleading. He eventually gave me a couple women more as time went on but i was taking the bus everywhere you know two hours from the valley ali to santa monica and back and forth and i'm like i gotta keep my health up so taking the bus to l._a. Fitness like if i can't afford anything i'm going to afford a gym membership at least were you not work before this whole thing. We will work out person or no. Did you work out. No i've never i've never benched dead lifted or squatted in my life so i wouldn't say that i was like so what made you decide to become a competitive bodybuilder like. I'm just trying to try to understand like so you get this diagnosis. Your life was like in in like you know taking downward spiral. You like get yourself back into a situation where to go cabinet. Take ownership. Would you like what what happens then like so you get. The gym became my therapy my sanctuary my arena right. That's where i got all my crap out. It was my catharsis. It was like where it went to go improve myself. I was like i'm going to not only like build myself physically but my mental strength to build in the gym by pushing my barriers absolutely this is what what i preach all day long so you just basically like fitness kind of saved your life in a way one hundred thirty eight percents in every way physically mentally spiritually everything because number one it gives you a structure and it gave you something like confidence because you saw yourself getting stronger again and so were there side effects. You're saved besides like the bone density. Is there any other side effects from having this medication. There were one of the earlier drugs called a triplet. I had <hes> i would wake up in the middle of the night in my whole body would be vibrating. I'd be hallucinating. <hes> i would get like hot cold flashes during the day. It felt like there was a cloud in my brain couldn't think clearly really get lightheaded dizzy. Yeah it was i was bad and then it got to the point where my doctor was like okay reef. You need to stop drinking because <music>. Your liver is like bad still work. You're still drinking it wasn't i was like i'm like i haven't been drinking at all and she's like okay. Well then. It's the medication medication can be really bad for your liver or it could be like wow i missed are there. Is there a lot but this particular one was giving really bad side. Thanks and then so they put you on another medication and that was fine and then everything went back to normal okay and now i'm on medication has zero side effects zero no okay. I heard that the bench is very expensive like thousands of dollars if you were if you were just a lay person going on the market to try to buy you keep averaged three thousand dollars a month so then how would it people do when there's no insur- when they have made in the u._s. Being the insurance is kind of in austria right now. Like what would you do if they don't do it. There is a lot of government subsidized in organizations that to help people to get on medications that basically if you're living in the u._s. There's no reason why you can't get medication. If you're under certain cap you can get you can get it for free free. Healthcare coverage premiums covered. There are so many options in the u._s. For sure so you can get like you can get the medication if if you need need it absolutely hateful. It's in the government's interest to make sure that everyone has of course absolutely so then like so now so you're able to. I'm so i'm so fascinated by that. If you can be that you can be that bad like where you actually have full blown aids and then you can reverse it. I like shocked to hear people not know that i i think i know so. Many people don't know that i mean when i was diagnosed with aids. My doctor literally said go home. Do not eat anything. That's not fully cooked including eggs. Take whatever she's like. Do not get a cold you could end up with pneumonia and up in the hospital and die. If you get a cold you are petri dish right now. You're completely exposed to everything everything wow but is that i mean if you were not on medication. That would be the truth. I don't know if i would be living right now. I don't think i would be i would be done. Do you think a lot of people have it and just don't know they have it absolutely and just a large proportion of people who don't know that they have it in the beginning. There can be no symptoms and then it just becomes like okay and then. Is there a precursor to it. I'm always curious like another like a different s._t._d.'s t._d. That's a precursor for like if you have like i dunno herpes or video or whatever it is. I'm just making up a. I believe certain things can make you more susceptible bull. I think i've heard syphilis. Perhaps is more susceptible so just because you have doesn't necessarily mean you have another that doesn't go donna and then like the fact that when you say you're undetectable like does that literally mean like i was saying if you and i had centers i know who never happened multiple reasons but i mean but like your beautiful thank. You know you're beautiful but that's a whole other story. Then does that mean. I would just without with no protection. I'd be define the one hundred percents here. Are you sure you like a million percent so last year the c._d._c. as well as w h world health organization countless amounts of experts in the field scientists around the world everybody. There's a consensus us now that there is zero risk of transmitting h._i._v. If you're undetectable i believe for six months or longer. Wow and how long have you been undetectable for years okay so you got it in two thousand twelve year. How will you in your twenties twenty seven okay so then what how long were you detect telling you did it take to become mondays about nine months <music> <unk> undetectable for basically for six year. I had a blip. I think a year after that where it was slightly deductible and then it went back to why why wh what was it could have been the medication that i was on or something. I'm not sure so are you able to do you have a boyfriend now. I don't have a boyfriend <hes> i i am open to dating at the moment but people scare today you because of it and i mean obviously you're open but you're on this podcast do alive other things. I'm actually surprised by how many people are open to it and that those that are hesitant after i'm able to talk to them about it and educate them a little bit then they're open to it. The percentage of people that are just like nope. Sorry can't do is small but i think that's probably a product of living in west hollywood in l._a. And it's exactly i mean like in. I and i think in the normal say that's not the right word normal but outside of your outside of your pop up where you live whatever like if you went out of town to minneapolis everything people would probably be more probably heard beautiful people would you would you be scared eric like since then have you had a lot of boyfriends that have not had any kind don't have h._i._v. Who are just healthy. I haven't had a lot of relationships obs- few small relationships in most of them were negative and they're not so when you have sex you use protection. That are no you're. You're totally fine aired. You know there is a little <hes> reticence in the beginning but you know that's something that we work through individual title basis. Can it be like can happen. I mean listen. There's also prep. We haven't touched on that at all. Okay tell me about the prep okay. So prep is basically an h._i._v. medication. It's travolta and it's something that you if you're negative can take as a precautionary measure. You take it once a day just like someone who has h._i._v. Take and then if you were to have sex with someone who is interview positive that that acts as a barrier. I think it's like ninety six percents effective really so that's like a double whammy so people <hes> who are in relationships with people who have the prep work if the person was h._i._v. Positive and detectable though that's exactly what it's for just okay okay okay. I thought it'd be okay and obviously for women's even but i would if i would be a good medication to have if you're in like you said yeah well. You say. It's not just in your community. It could be every live straight people. Have it a lot of people that so how do people it's still predominantly though from unprotected sex though forgot for the most part and then needles of course so if you're not like how how often is it though in real life if you don't if you don't share needles if you don't have unprotected did sex i mean is it was the chances of of the other route would be like blood. Transfusions organ winter transfers so it's not it's not like that and then there's people who children who get it through breastfeeding mother has h._i._v. I can get through breastfeeding speeding done. Wow so then like what what what can you not so basically just do whatever anyone else. I see you're totally normal. I guess at the beginning legacy deter you from living your life at all exactly and that's the muslim trying to get out there right. That's a so what do you how do you you spread that message like that platform of of what do you do day-to-day like give me a little bit of like what you're phil what you do to i'm kind of spread this positively so the number one thing that i realized when i was like going out onto the interwebs and like what what information is out there yeah i'm like there aren't really faces to this. There aren't people really talking about it. Openly and i'm like this is such a shame because i'm learning all this amazing stuff about it that i can live a normal life and i didn't know that and i and and nobody's talking about it so i was i kind of felt a moral imperative to start talking about especially since i've become he comes so comfortable with it so now i've created a youtube channel where have log and talk about living with hiv and everything related to it and examples like i just i just did a blog that was entitled issues a joke and it was about the fact that we as a community in order to help reduce <unk> stigma need to realize that we're at a place now where the medications so good and people can live so long. It's still manageable that we can start to joke about it like for example when people say oh just positive i'm like i'm always positive and not god. You can't joke about that and i'm like yeah you can get choked though collide i love it do some offensive jokes here and there to like offensive joe. I'll be like oh pissed me off. I'll be like well. I spit in your drink and i just gave you aids the god you can't get. Can you know you get it from sweat. Though 'cause that's a body body fluid so if you're just wedding on like a machine i sit on it now and that's the fear though that's what people are scared about from like a bathrooms no. Does it really survive outside of the body for for very long at all. Yeah okay so you have. This blog called h._i._v. Gimme another one that you i wanna. Do i done one on hiv dating. When's the right. When's the right time to tell. How do you do it. What do you say for me. I'm i don't put it on the apps. I don't put it on there because when you're trying to sell yourself as a human being you wanna put your best foot forward. Obviously it's not that you're hiding something you don't say oh and i have depression and they have diabetes sales rep everybody. You're not any different than any other. No one else says you know i'm bipolar eight me yeah so i give the person the opportunity to meet me in the flesh. I get a vibe on the energy who i am talk a little bit and then once we get a little bit comfortable it'll be like hey just like me positive undetectable. Do you know anything about it. Let me tell you about it. And how do you feel and can take it from there. Maybe scare when you say that i i i get a twinge of nerves especially. If i feel like i'm invested in this person's really amazing and they might reject me but it's just more important to me to be transparent and open than it is for someone to like me. Do your bosses at where you work do they. They obviously they know not jiji on obviously obviously the one of the only encounters that i've had was with the barber ironically. I'm barbara super cool and we like we talk for weiland island. I went <hes> multiple times and then one day. I got comfortable enough and i was just was like oh yeah i do like blogs and i was diagnosed and he's like wow that's so amazing in like you're so strong i'd never be able to do that or handle that and then radio silence he wouldn't respond to texts my calls and nothing really would not assuming after that wow that's amazing. I guess i can happen though right. 'cause people who don't have the right information. They're scared totally right and and people go. I'm gonna talk about role. Models people are like there's magic and go that was three decades ago like what happened to everybody in between where is everyone where people my age genus really funny and it's the first thing i said to you when you walked in magic johnson has it and he's a beast and he's like which is actually he's he's like is such a great inspiration for anybody with with with h._i._v. but in general because of how much she's done accomplish but you're right. I don't think there's oh and then ah charleston gene right besides those two. There's no real there's not anybody who has a platform positive or who. They're talking about it. Regular and making people feel comfortable relatable related our age yeah so true so i'm like i'll i will be. I will fill that void right. So what does that mean. When you say you will fill that void like would like besides you know learning to use gratitude for self empowerment changing from a victim the mindset like you basically are basically using your youtube your social media to be promoting that type of mindset mindset and i use my life story as an example so i'm extremely open about my sex life about right what i've been through the things as i overcome and when i fail so people can see that in relate and i'm just another human being like you but i'm like not letting hiv define me or constrict me and i'm grateful in spite of all these seemingly horrible situations talk about like you're grateful and spider right because when when i was diagnosed there was a point where i was like. Thank you god for giving me this. This is a blessing in a way because it opened my eyes to just realizing that i was living under autopilot under something else control and thank you for giving me the opportunity to take my life back so i feel that every day it means a dozen away feel like it was kind of the the light bulb go off because your life became exponentially exponentially better in a way afterwards right like of all the things. I've never been happier in my life. Isn't that crazy that happens like from something. This is a uh-huh at an amazing example of something really negative really shifting it to something extremely positive more to like. I'm sure that with people and billick nothing has to hold you back from being happy and living a fulfilling life thing. It's really is about mindset. Which is what this i hope and this is why like you know it's a great way to kind of like segue back into this because this is what this podcast and what i my message what i try to tell people or or talk about all what time it really all starts an end in your head you know it's all about your mindset and why fitness for you and for me in different ways it had was like a vehicle to kind of like really really kind of <hes> mold your met like your mentality to be strong and goal oriented and push. You passed with lots to your barrier. Obviously is hiv mind another one in someone else's another one but it's about your mindset and this is what you needed to do to kind of. This is what you needed to read leg kind of shake you into like a like a ah shift you until like a better life really so we don't even see as a barrier anymore almost as like a little friendly reminder inside me saying hey don't forget doc like tap into yourself and be true and like live your best life because i'm here. I'm here to remind you of that every day. That's a good one pill and i'm like this is a reminder see. I think that's what i also think is amazing. When i love a book that is that like that's authentic and real because you really do have something inside of you that at like that you really have some that that that could have gone the other direction and it does for a lot of people unless you really take hold of it and like really shifted and make an like do the positive steps to like live differently. What did you do like what are your habits and how so what. What are your habits. Would you do day-to-day like give me a day in the life of what you do your structure so i try my best every day to the wake up and matab up every day varies. It's all over the place with bartending hours but i do my best to kind of keep things as tight as it can but i try to wake up at like seven a._m. Do you have a you have a morning. Routine are basically <hes> typically wake up at seven a._m. And then freshen up and then i'll sit down and for a while headed gratitude journal i would write down ten unique things that i'm grateful for every day now i have. It's like passionate planner so inside that and go over like okay. What do i need to get done for the day. What are the goals for the week kind of my mindset going daily so you don't so you do use to do ten things. You're grateful for everyday. That's a lot of things this but for someone who's not used to thinking that way. It's crucial right tens a lot though keeps threes conceptual service to really good but you need to challenge yourself the cabinet like move move progress into ten. Maybe yeah i think at the beginning people judge themselves and criticize themselves look. This is not a good thing to be grateful for or this is just too generic. This is the wrong thing you just gotta. Let it flow and just like i'm grateful for the fact that i've breathed right now right amazing like taking away the judge of it and just start writing and it could be small little things you're grateful for. It doesn't have to be these grandiose big thing. Just gets your heart. Open your mind flowing tally. I like that okay what else then took my dog out do business and then usually like excited to get to the gym do that. Go the gym mm-hmm. You work out every day five six days a week and if you're competitive bodybuilder are you have you have you. Have you done so far in in that space when he wanted me like a pro you yeah i just got me pro qualification last year in a natural federation so it's tested wata tested <hes> mhm so lifetime natural steroids or any of that which i just felt like it was kind of important considering yes considering everything yeah so yeah competing right now. I'm getting ready for competition august twenty fourth okay now okay but you have to have you been in if you're done and <hes> i think like four one i in the last one which gave me the the qualification right so as soon as i cage i should be we'll be a pro foot- onstage. That's amazing so you now. You're right now doing that right now. You're training in dieting. Okay very hard diet are you doing. It's like my coach will formulated waited for every week but it's like i have four eggs for breakfast and agreements powder protein post workout banana and a shake and then then i'll do for lunch. Twelve ounces of potato sweet potato regular potato regular potato gives me an irritation the back of my throat interesting. That'll that'll do like grass-fed or organic beef nine hundred ten seven ounces of that and then broccoli and same thing for dinner and then there's supplements throughout the day. It's just the same every day and i was like honestly. It sounds like torture. I mean it isn't always at first i wanna make sure i mean like as you know i'm in the health and fitness world <hes> that kind of structure. It's not sustainable. This is when you're when you're training for very specific thing but you don't do but you don't do that after twelve weeks when you go like binge mcdonald's mcdonald's and in and out and you do so basically these so but that's the problem a lot of time to cooler so like structured and then i'll have six ounces of of a chicken breast and the broccoli the second day like you know go. They'll revert the other way just like in and out and then like they'll just balloon. We'll do for like a week or so and then i'll kind of super bowl well. I know a lot of people who are like competitive bikini models fitness people. That's obviously not my area of expertise is but i find that like these girls that i know they've they've lean out so much and they balloon up because of the difference between going back and forth like like that's what it's a program absolutely but i feel like that's a way a lot of it's like a mind fuck over there to discipline your social deprive you drive and then you like go to reward myself yeah exactly there's always a whole thing right now that like people don't like these thirty day challenges because they feel like again. It's a <unk> deprivation and anyway. We're taking another tangent here so get your kids are in the fitness world okay so anyway so then. Let's go back so that you have there. You go to the gym and then the body workout. Are you mostly strength hypertrophy. No karya yeah a little bit a little bit of cardio okay but i'm on my feet when i bartend seven eight nine hours straight and no break so i didn't say that though so that's like my cardio usually planning you got a lot of cardi the right wing and organizing and just normal day to day stuff in between you do all you know but that's because the what you're doing now with. I try to handle handle social media like i'll i'll spend certain amount of time just replying to comments indians and a lot of people reach out like reach out show many they have a thing where on instagram i post now every single day. It's called my daily motivation hashtag my daily motivation issue and i'll just put one message that someone sent me anonymously and i'll just put that up there really and it just in that motivates other people to see that too. I'm from morocco to and i i'm in the same situation. Turn and right so like you're saying because there's not very many people who are like us themselves as a platform to be that person in your spit in that space right like you said like i'm shocked italy magic johnson thirty years ago or like turned crazy. It's amazing and i feel like i'm well equipped enough to handle handle also the heaters as a lot of haters though winter. There's a lot there's certainly people out there who are just so anti so. I guess is so. Is it important to have a very structured daily routine when you have h._i._v. Or not taking the medication like i guess this is where my confusion is rightly. Can you just do it can just go like all you know balls to the wall. Do whatever you want if you're taking them at as long as you're on the medication or are you still like the combination of the medication. The healthy lifestyle like what's the use of of course my bias is yeah routine but i would say when you're not undetectable. That is the crucial time where yes everything you do matters in homes taking the medication at the same time of day every day <hes> being healthy exercising all of that to help support your immune system to actually you know what i was. Curious can new exercise too much because if you advocate that's also like a havoc on your immune system absolutely sometimes and cd four that measure of your white blood cell county that'll fluctuate naturally depending on your immune system and if i'm going ham and the jam and my adrenal glands are depleted central nervous systems depleted that'll affect my immune. The system will go down <hes>. I just don't freak myself out about i go. That's just something that happens. When you were right up the monitor that any pro athletes yeah right and so it's cardio we owe considered good or good for your heart but <hes> because weights is that harder on your immune system or is cardio or does it matter just the amount amount the intent in terms of the intensities so are you able to hit training often yeah just listen to my own body and i'm like if i feel like my brains fried and my and i feel like a live wire then i go okay. I need to like chill out a little bit but like you're saying <hes> drinking drugs stuff stuff like that you don't. I guess because you gotta be careful more tender g drink juice drink or drink soc. I don't drink a lot. I don't like to drink a lot okay but i do drink socially but if medications can be difficult on the liver. Is that something that you're not you don't live so fricking in clean like like a like a priest no but i need a shot of vodka to get through our shift and you're okay with that. They can make a change but but i'm saying like if someone was taking the medication or like not really exercising and eating shitty you know does it is it does it affect that efficacy of what happens i think it could and for example like if someone was on a trip that one that really messed me up if they're drinking alcohol than they're they're screwing up their system for sure right but a lot of the newer medications now are so so easy on the body in very nontoxic while while out is there any kind of unique rituals that you do be set with all my major is like i'll do like after i'll create affirmations for myself whenever i need it so much of what's difficult oh for people as their self talk in your head. You just don't even realize on autopilot gotten so tired. I wanna do i wanna do i wanna do this. You don't even realize you're saying that to yourself okay so if i realized that i'll just go like okay. What's affirmation okay. Just it's the next the next moment the next step just get through this in the moment. This is good for you. It's teaching disciplines teaching. You hard work. It doesn't matter what other people are doing are doing if they're not working as hard as you. This is for you. This will pay off in the long run and it just kind of changing that mental tape all right so so far. I got yeah. You got you the gratitude you do. The passion journal was different payment passion journal gratitude that one's just that the name of the planner out you should use my you should use the morning joe. You should uncomfortable. I wanna have i said. Did you look through and okay. So what would you say you think your biggest accomplishment dennis. I would say it's just is changing the mindset from what i would say someone who is a victim to someone who's a leader. I feel like i'm a leader now not just in my own life but into the world. I'm trying to be in trying to be an example right. That's what i'm so proud of working yeah so how often you've logging weekly. Now i'm trying to do more. I'm also working with aids healthcare foundation. They're like the world's biggest nonprofit for h._i._v. services. They brought me on recently. That's why i can work halftime at the bar. I'm getting paid have lost which is great so i'm also creating more content with a scripted content for them. I'll be in the parade with on on sunday so i'm planning on taking my shirt off and the only living with hiv. Because how many people do you see like that you know because issues it's hidden. So how do you know so. I think the visibility of seeing someone like in really great shape living with hiv. Maybe on the back like positive in thriving or healthy or something like that. You're a cool awesome and thriving so great. You know it's amazing law. I mean i it's a best of luck to you you because of the arts and inspiration. Where do people find you. I know that you're on youtube but which your handle on social media it's my first and last name rafer rasi <unk> r._a._f. D. e. r. same thing on instagram. I'm really active on instagram stories with the motivations and all the good. I like in a follow. I follow you but before you okay well. We follow each other <hes>. Is there anything else you wanna add like. I'm looking over like your staff. I mean i recovered a lot. We covered a lot yeah. Okay well. Listen now. You guys know how to find rafe. He is definitely an inspiration and he is prime example of like turning a negative into a positive bum and you should follow him because of his motivation and just because it's all around good goodness of guy. Thank you so much for coming on. Thank you <music>.

youtube flu rafe tim zimmer hiv morocco joe immunodeficiency l._a rasi orange county disney hiv clinic instagram
Episode 6: Wendy Larsen

We Are The Runners Show

1:05:16 hr | 4 months ago

Episode 6: Wendy Larsen

"Hey everyone welcome to. We are the runner show. I'm your host stephanie. Foster on the we are the runner. Show i will talk to runners whose life journey will leave. You inspired encouraged and ready to get out there and crush your own running goals. These are the stories of the everyday runner. The runner taking on neighborhood laps at four. Am before work. The runner on the treadmill while the kids play across the room and the runner striving to gain speed endurance. And stamina. these are your stories are stories whether you're four minute mile or a fifteen minute mile. Let's run this together today. On the we are the runner show. I have the pleasure of talking with wendy larson. Wendy is a marathoner. Several times. Over a hand cyclist. A rare disease advocate and she has a passion for run disney. We talk about her journey as a hand cyclist and she was so gracious to share both the triumphs and challenges that she has experienced as an athlete. I don't wanna give too much away. But wendy may have had a course encounter with one of america's favourite elite runners at the new york city marathon. I'm excited for wendy to share her story. So let's get started. Hi wendy welcome to we. Are the runner. Show i it is so good to be here. Thank you so much for having me today. I'm excited to talk to you. Yes this is gonna be fun. I've talked with you offline before. And i have completely enjoyed it and i've learned so much so i'm super excited to share everything that i have learned and share that with everybody before we get started. Can you just tell us who you are where you're from and what you do so what. My name is wendy larson. I am a hint. Cyclist hint cycle is a type of racing. Milteer and i am from the houston area. Actually the suburbs of houston and on voter to galveston been houston. Bet were still considered Houston so you'll often hear me. Refer to myself as being from houston but yeah. I'm a hand cyclist. I do a lot of marathons and half marathons in just love it. That's my main. If we can just start out from the beginning and how you got involved in running and really just take us through your running journey. So first of all but something that i could spend hours upon hours talking about. So i'll give you the abbreviated version of that. So i do have several rare diseases. When is a connective tissue disorder that when affects my mobility of most in makes it difficult to walk and ryan and all of that. I also have a rare primary immunodeficiency disease. Which means that. I was born without a fully functioning. Immune system actually get my immune system from weekly plasma in fusion's that come from plasma. Debtors immunoglobulin us. So all my life growing up. I had a lot of what issues with my joints. I was in and out of the hospital. Ally of and try to do sports in the doctors would tell me i couldn't do it. I needed to quit. My joints were two weeks. I wasn't strong enough. that might joints. Couldn't handle it. And so i do something and then get injured. Get hurt and doctors would tell me to quit doing it in that kind of how my whole child went in two thousand six. I was in a really really bad car wreck. Almost i almost lost my leg and it took about fifteen surgeries to reconstruct my right leg. I was in the hospital for three weeks. I had to be cut out of the car. Life flighted the whole nine yards. And so after my car. I couldn't walk for a long time. It's me about a year to learn to walk again because they had to do muscle grafts. I've lost missed. The muscle in my right counts was torn off so after all of this when i was finally getting released by my trauma surgeon his parting words. To me. when we were talking about my long term faulkners is. It was along the lines of well. You might be able to walk again. But you're never going to ryan or run a marathon or anything like that. For whatever reason it just kind of kicked in and i just i think i'd had enough at that point. He and i decided you know what i am going to ride in. I am gonna run a marathon so without a year and a house after the car wreck. Once i had gone through a year of physical therapy and everything else i decided just to start running and it took me a long time to work up to a half. Marathon is started with the five k. K. and i finally did finish my first half marathon in two thousand and yet and that was on my legs at the time. I was ridiculously slow because my knees in my legs were in such such bad shape and there is stuff that i just with my legs that i was never gonna be able to. I just wet. So i was one of those. Back of the pap runners super super slow barely barely staying ahead of the minimum pace requirements races. But i got out there. And i did it and i crossed the finish line and i ran for a number of years but i the connective tissue disorder that i have it's or stainless syndrome. I do have a severe case of a end. It is degenerative and so it continued to worsen and worsen to the point where my knees were dislocating. I couldn't couldn't maintain my balance. I was falling like so it just became really really dangerous for me to even continue to attempt that so in working with my physical therapist because all of this time in probably for the rest of my life i'm still going to be an audit physical therapy constantly working with mike physical therapist in physical medicine and rehabilitation doctor in two thousand sixteen. We made the decision that i should try him cycling. They thought that that might be a really good fit for me because my upper body does a lot better than my lower body so i switched over to hand cycling and it was just amazing. The first time. I ever got on hand cycle. I just immediately knew that is was what i was meant to be doing and fell in love with it. I did my first full marathon on the cycle in. I think it was january. Twenty seventeen so a little over four years ago and said i have just never stopped since then been going strong. And i've gotten to the point. Now where i fall fight for the boston mirror. Fine doing really well in this ort in just love it absolutely love. It will not only. Did you qualify for the boston marathon. But you have a fifty minute. Cushion between fifty. Yeah yeah for ya or this year. Yeah pretty exciting. I've i've got a nice cushion for this year. I don't know if that will be in night because the boston marathon does give priority to disabled military veterans or their hands cycle injuries. And i am not a military veteran. So i don't know i have a really really good cushion but i don't know if that's going to be enough with limited entry. Who knows what. We'll just have to see how it plays out. So is there a way to sort of. I don't know if plead your case to our is it not. Is it hand cycles. Is it the push ram what are is that are they taking one over the other or is it just. Strictly there are two different categories in most marathons mistresses. There's the hint cycle category and the fish category. So we're not competing against pitchman. Athletes for those fights were just competing against other athletes for those spots. So they'll have a an allotment of spots were pushman for hands cyclists and we don't overlap. Those are two different race categories. Okay can you tell us the difference between the two sure so most races or are going to have both pushman racers in hint. Cyclist is two categories of wheelchair athletes. So the big difference between pushed ram in hand cycle is how we are powering ourselves so in a hand cycle we are in a cycle that resembles a recumbent bike and we are actually peddling with our arms instead of our feet. So we're new recumbent position kind of laid down and then we pedal just like a cyclist would pedal with their legs were peddling with our with our arms appreciate Athlete is both devices. Have three meals so when in front to the back but the push rim there actually wrapping their wheels in pushing now. So it's more like your regular everyday wheelchair bay you're leaning forward you're pushing your wheels you're more upright typically in a push from racer we're laying down. Were more recumbent. Some people do better with the shrimp. Some people do better with a hint cycle. I am one of those that i can't do shrem racer because there's not very much back support. If any in those and you have to kind of lean forward in order to propel yourself a lot of issues with my spine. It's very unstable. And i have a lot spinal cord compression going on especially in my lower spine so my neurosurgeon will not let me in a picture right sir. I'm happy to be in the hand cycle because it does give the back support. I'm able to lay back and take some of that pressure off of my core in my lower back in us more just my shoulders and arms to propel myself and i don't know if you just said that spot aren't there their knees or their legs. Excuse me are tucked. Beginning of most of the time for the racers their knees tucked their are kind of tucked up under. There are some that their legs are down a little bit more most of the time there tucked up under them and that is another thing that presents a problem for me because my knees are very very unstable in dislocate so putting my knees up in that position would also be very problematic. Okay so your son again. Our straight there straight out in front of me. I've got like support. So i actually actually have extra leg supports under my legs to because if i don't then my knees will actually hyper extend even in that position in pop out of place so got extra leg supports to put underneath my legs to keep them straight. So they don't. I br extend and dislocates but yes straight out in front of me. Okay and can you touch briefly. I know this is been a big part of your racing journey. Achilles international and what exactly they do for you and and how they help racers marathoners though i do. Yeah so achilles. Internationals fantastic organization. It is world wide in. They have chapters in different cities around the world. The headquarters in new york city in what they do is. They advocate for people with disabilities to participate in mainstream sports primarily. That's in road. Races marathons half marathons by peyton pay. They also do have a branch called try achilles where they do triathlons but they have this amazing organization that pairs disabled athletes with local guides. All in tears local training programs to give us the support that we need to get started in the sport in the to actually participate in all of these different races because quite frankly it took a lot of years war road races to begin. Accepting wheelchair athletes in achilles international has been a big part of that of getting wheelchair athletes and he and cyclist into the different races in really going out and proactively advocating for us to be part of that community so when i first got started in encyclopedia the way i did when i had heard about he cycles and i talked to my physical therapist and all about it i went home and i just do gold. He ends cycle. Houston in the first thing that popped up was killian international houston chapter so i contacted them. I said i was interested in hand. Cycling gave him a little bit. My back story. I immediately got an email back and they said come out and join us of our practices. They brought a loner in cycle out for me to try out and that's how it all took off. It was having that guidance in that support from achilles that has really really helped get me. Doing what i end. That's great and i think there's there's probably to what you just said. They gave you a loner hand cycle. There's probably a huge misconception that you can walk into a store and oh there's a there's rows and rows of hand cycles than it's like okay. I'm gonna go by this today. And that just isn't the case. It is not so he end. Cycles are considered a type of wheelchair and it's considered a medical device and you can't just walk into like a bike. Shoppers sporting goods store and buy. They have to be custom ordered. Sometimes you get lucky with us twin by. It's hard to find eastwind in. It's hard to find us twin with the right measurements so in the us. Probably most of hint cycles that you see on the road come from a company its top end. We'll chair out of florida at where minus from top end end. There's it's like getting fitted for a wheelchair you have to send them your measurements. You need to decide how much clearance you're going to have between your fork in your seat. Hell wide the seats. Going to be how wide your cranks are going to be. How long the crank pedals are going to be. So they're all very And they don't keep any in stock so everything has to be special ordered in it can take months and they're also very expensive and this is not something that insurance covers so there are a lot of obstacles in the way of doing this. I am extremely lucky. Very lucky that i have been able to pretty easily find my way in the sport. Get my hands on the right type of equipment in all of that because there are lot of barriers to entry for ms disabled people to get into different sports because we do require so much specialized equipment but we can't walk into a running store in. Just buy a pair of running shoes. Go out and get on the road so yeah it can be difficult to get started. I actually just ordered a new cycle in january. I still don't have it. It won't be here for about another mile so you have to also plan ahead in. This isn't just because of the covid. Pandemic and i know right now. A lot of bicycle shops are really backlogged. But this is all the time because this is manufacturing time that it takes to actually manufacturer each hint cycle custom to order type of thing. Wow now you were saying that insurance does not cover these. But you had mentioned that grants and things like that are available. Yeah so it takes homework. You have to do your homework. You have to put in the time in the research but there are a lot of organizations out there that do offer grant money for disabled sports equipment and they'll also sometimes help with travel funds to get two races that sort of thing so challenged athletes foundation is a great win. I just got grant from them. Team catapult another really. Good one that. I've gotten breakouts from in the past. And they will help with some of the cost of some of the equipment now a lot of times. The equipment is so pricey that you have to get the grant less you have saved for years or you have to do no gofundme as you have to get this brand plus this grant less this grant so it takes work. It's not going to fall into your lap but it can be done bit. Insurance doesn't cover this kind of stuff you know. It's just like for somebody that's an amputation. Health insurance will cover their walking lag but they need running blade in order to be able to write health. Insurance is gonna cover that. they're walking lack. Health insurance will cover if you're lucky if you're really lucky they'll cover your everyday wheelchair. But they're not going to cover racing chair and if you want to compete compete you know he can be looking at ten thousand dollars or more for a competitive hin cycle so it's not a cheap sport and we don't have the options that bodied people do as ours. Getting our equipment. So yeah it's it's tough but if you're willing to put in the time and work and effort it's doable now. I imagine it's not just the hand cycle. You need imagining a helmet on hassle. Civic kind of shoes that you have to have or so. I wear my everyday regular. She's now the elite elite like paralympic. Cyclist will have special shoes. Send you know the suits that are tight fitting to reduce the drag improve aerodynamics for me for someone competing at the level i do we just use whatever shoes. We have on hand typically. But you do need. You need cycling goggles. Because one of the things people don't think about it until you're in that position you're not thinking about is we are down really low are drive. Train is on the front instead of the rear. So that bicycle chain that we have on our hands cycles. It is throwing stuff straight back into our face so that road. Dirt road grit. Where when you're on a bicycle you're up above and is slowing behind you on a hand cycle. It's doing it right in your face so you want to make sure you have really really good cycling goggles to protect your eyes because you are going to get road grit and grime thrown in your face. Altay long my husband always makes fun of me like if it's been the least bit wet ch or mad or montreal's that have the least bit of standing water. I commend covered head to toe with like dirt in my i. It's just a. It's really kind of entertaining sometimes. So so it's little things like that. The helmets the gloves all of this things. Add at stuff like the cushions cushions out on my hands cycle pretty regularly. Because i need that cushion in that support for my back and my hips and people that are disabled bit. You know have some sort of paralysis or any anything like that. Have a lot of issues with different pressure source so we have to make sure we have something that is very supportive. that's like a higher end gel cushion. That sort of thing and those wear out quickly when you put as many miles in is ided so it's just a lot of things like that you wouldn't necessarily think about that. We're constantly having to replace an upgrade and all of that in order to continue to do our sports now this may be a silly question but optima head hand cycling. Then is it primarily pavement or dude. Is there ever light gravel type trials. So it's primarily paid midst of us are road cyclists by there are often an cycles are built to go through rougher terrain over trails. All of that sort of thing. I would love. Love love to have wine. But they're even more expensive than the road cycles. And i've looked intimate and i just i can't afford it and you know any grant money than i get needs to go to my racing inside call. I'm very outdoorsy. Done a lot of keeping a lot of stuff outdoors and i love to hike. But i just can't do it anymore actually yesterday. It's funny you ask this question. Because yesterday i was out on my ride. It was just an easy ride. It one of the parks. That i ride you. They actually have some mountain bike trails. And i always see these people going off of the regular pave hiking bike trail on the mountain bike trails. And i've always wanted to go explore them. But i'm always scared to you because there's so many mountain bikers and i don't wanna be in the way and i don't know if i'm going to get stack but yesterday nobody else around so i got the harebrained idea that i was going to explore. My husband bought freak twenty her guided us. So i get out on the trail in requested because our soil is pretty sandy. Step in this one goes along creek so it's very least very sandy soil. So i found out that you know reading. You have very slick racing tires and all of that that it is in fact possible to be pedaling forward in heavier heel turning forward while you're rolling backwards downhill now ohno so. It was fun though. It was fine. I oftentimes i. Do you know some kind of crazy things like that. But i wanted to see what was back there. It always looks like so much fun. It didn't work out so well. I did not get myself completely stuck. I did not have to yell out anyone for help. It's a thinking man. I wish i had an off road in cycle with some really gripping mountain bike tires. It'd be such oh my goodness now. Can we talk training sure. He's i cannot even imagine what that so you know. It's a little bit different than what a runner or cyclists would do. But it's much the same in a lot of ways. So i put in probably five days a week. My hand cycle fortified days a week on meghan cycle. I spend at least one day a week doing weights in weight training sometimes two days a week and try to take one day a week of rest in. Some of those days are going to be long training. Slow endurance rides. Some of those days are going to be some interval training. Some of those days are going to be speedwork. I most trained for about two to three hours a day right now and i do try to do a significant amount of weight training because you do have to have a very strong upper body in order to do this particularly when you are trying to do hills because heels on hand cycle are just insanely difficult. I usually i describe it to people as trying to pull yourself up that rope in your elementary school gym class. Using just your arms. You can't use your legs at all so basically win. You're going up that hill. Think about it is just pulling yourself up rope all the way up a hill so it takes a lot of upper body strength in delight of training to do the hills. Yeah oh my goodness and so you had said the parking garages yet are your friends. I are so being in the houston area. It is why does a pancake here so we have to sometimes get creative with how we do our hill training so a lot of times. We'll go to empty parking garages when there's nobody there on the weekends. That sort of thing and will actually go up and down the ramp parking garages. That's one of the ways we tend to help train and then we have a couple of bridges here that had dedicated pedestrian walkway. Hiking bike walkway going over that have a concrete barrier between you and traffic and so i'll just go up in over. This bridge is just back and forth and back and forth. So that's you know kind of the options. We have here for hill training while now. This is crazy question. i guess. But it's drafting allowed. It is your goals. It is in most in cycles. Come with a drafting number okay. So the it's it's just a little extra piece of metal tubing that attached to the hand cycle and extends back in just behind your to rear wheels in that protects the wheels. So that when you're drafting or you former drafting line. If people bump into you by mistake they're gonna hit your drafting bumper instead of accidentally hitting the main part of your hands cycle or your rear tires okay. I talked to my husband about that a little bit and he is a cyclist and he was like. I'm so curious if drafting is allowed. And i might. I don't know i it is it is. It's you know it's one of those things depending on the race in his racing and a draft not her draft. Do you wanna take turns. And it's kind of one of the interesting things about racing. Is you know how the drafting lines will play out in. Who's going to be in the drafting line and that sort of thing so in sometimes in some races nobody asks everybody just goes off by themselves. Also right you had said that it can get quite competitive which i mean. Why wouldn't it right right right. Can you walk us through. That is far as you know. I know an upright running. You know there's all the protocols you know on you know coming through on your left you know. Just the different i must. Is it the same situation aweso. Typically you always try to stick to the right pass on the left as you would if you were running or cycling whatever you always wanna call out if you're gonna pass someone that you're coming up a pass on the left one thing that is different about hint cycling is we have a horrible turning radius horrible in fact i always tell people to car. White literally has a better turning radius than my hand. Cycled is and that usually puts it into perspective. When people hear that they're like. Oh wow that's because we have this win. We'll out front in our in the two in the back in our drive train on that front wheel so you can't turn it too much without you know messing up your chain and it it's just the mechanics of the bite so when we go to turn on of course we always have to swing outside in take this turn as wide as possible in order to make that turn so in. A lot of races were allowed to have cycling diets on a bike in. That's one of the things that are volunteer. Might guide will help with is when we're coming up to turn making sure that we have room to actually execute that turns safely so by in races. Typically we are going to start in front of the elite athletes and then corral in corral and that is to get us out in front. So we're kind of out of the way so that we're not as mixed in with runners so you'll typically have big group opinion cyclist in pushman athletes out front and then elites in the remaining the runners now with that being said i think this is the perfect segue into the new york marathon. Yes and you said. Hand cyclists then the elites than the crawl walk. And i mean i want you to definitely walk us through that but the best part of this story i mean. Does anybody ever want to get passed in a race. No if you are going to get past her the person that past you. Oh my goodness so. I'll let you tell that story but typically embossed enough that i don't get passed by a lot of elites. I almost never get passed by league emails. Sometimes there might be a couple of elite males that pass me Where i am today in my hands cycling. I'm not going to even get passed by elite males but a couple of years ago i would get passed by elite males not elite women with the how might pace-wise so the new york marathon and i trained in change in trying and train and was feeling really good about it and i had issues with my break at mile six and i have a disc right. The brake rotor. I hit a pothole and mike but rest actually down hit my disc rake in. It actually bent the rake browder and that was something that couldn't be paired on the fly. It was rubbing the brake pads the whole time. So i was super super slow. I decided i was just going to get it out and do what i could even with my break grabbing so i was really really slow. I decided i was just going to race. It in have sign all of that. So i started getting passed by a lot of people that i wasn't expecting to get passed by and as i was going over one of the bridges lo and behold the Lead pack of females passed by me. And when my favorite runners of all time does linden was in that pack in so here. I am all by myself on this bridge in new york. Of course. it's dead quiet on the bridges in new york. Because there's no spectators allowed on bridges so i got passed by the lead pack in sauve him in started yelling. Screaming goto has good as in. It was just so it was so different than any other race experience i've had in. It was just such a fun moment and memorable moment for me to be passed by them nc them actually running in the middle of the race up close like that. Because i don't get to see that bigly so yeah. That was a lot of five. That's not cool. Almost made almost made the bent. Break worth it. I think just for that moments but the story really doesn't end there. I met her a few weeks later. We did new york in november in san antonio rock and roll. Mira find a few weeks later in. That was just start. Fundraise will lower and behold go to the excellent realize they're the expert signing autographs. Does lindan. So i haven't had my new york jacket on that day and we went and got in line for autographs and all in got up there and i started planning with mike. Hey do you remember the crazy woman on the hand cycle and new york on the bridge is you have fast screaming and screaming. That was me and she said. Oh yes i do. Remember not i do so. It was a fun moments in the back that she said yes. She did actually remember me cheering because she's in the zone. She is not going to acknowledge me. I get into them sometimes. I don't acknowledge anyone around me. But i do hear what's going on. I just imbo in the zone. So they went past. She was in the zone. She was focused. No acknowledgement which i would never never expect but here we eat later. Yeah she did. She remembered me. That was awesome in the. She signed new york. Jack kit for me too. So very i know it was a lot of find. It was allowed to wear it or did you frame. I actually bought a second new york jacket online afterwards to wear there you go didn't frame it but it's hanging up in my closet and i don't wear it every day i it's like only special occasions. Do i wear that way so you make sure you kind of do that. Turn a yes. Everybody sees it. She signed it across the back. That's where there is the most raimo header. Sign it across the back. So gotta make sure my hair is saying you can see the autograph absolutely like why not. That's the only way to yes. It was fun it was a lot of okay so on speaking of the marathons chicago. Yes you are accepted into chicago into chicago. So chicago is one of the marathon's that has a very very small hand cycle yield by kind of a little bit late to the game in accepting hand cyclists that kelly's international spent working on for years so in the past up until twenty nineteen. They had had a very very small hand cycle field in. It was only disabled veterans. That were allowed in their hands cycle field. And i wanna say it was only by fifteen. They allowed which is a super super small member. And for twenty twenty bay. Achilles international was to get them to. Do i think it was three bibs for cyclists non-military in i got the first bed for a civilian hand cyclist for chicago so that was a really big deal hormone because i had really really been wanting to chicago for a long time. We love the city of chicago. So i got that that that i bid by was super super excited and honored that that that gave that bib to me and then it got cancelled because it twenty twenty right but i did. I was able to defer. I am registered for twenty twenty one now so we'll have chicago on october ten. That's mchugh honor. That didn't see. Why is it was a huge honor to be able to get into chicago. So you have congratulations to you and yes you will have to. Of course you'll update that on your social media. Because i will be or sure for sure so right now all the training everything is going in for the chicago marathon of xp race. That's my my big race of twenty twenty one so when the day is no. It's october ten so october. Eleventh is the boston marathon. And it's just going to say all these all these october. Never though it's crazy everything got me october so i'm going to fly to boston if i get in. My game plan is to race chicago. And then i'm gonna hop on a plane. Boston in boston will be my fun race. That's what i'll do the next day. I'm not going to try to compete. I'm going to take it slow. That's just going to of be my my victory lap. Hopefully we'll see quite But that'll be fun race. That i just go for the experience in then you know next year. Maybe try to race chicago or boston. Now are you though one of those people that say i'm going to you know put everything into chicago and boston will be that fun race but once you get in there. Is it really going to be just the fundraise or are you going to go full explode so i am totally. That person pushes myself beyond my limits. I have done that before. And i have ended up with though so i'm gonna turn really really hard because my doctors will shoot me if i do that again. And get wrapped again. And i i. Yeah i see do absolutely that. I'm gonna have fun. And then i'm going to push myself when i get there and get caught up in the excitement and you just want to go absolute i but i've got to take it slow because marathons on back to back days trying to push both of them bad bad bad idea so i yeah yeah i i am very very guilty that it is just now some races. I know when you read guidelines it'll say and maybe this is more on the five k ten k maybe half it'll say no strollers 'no wheelchairs. No joggers baby joggers. Anything and you had said this to me. Nothing with a wheel and i never. I guess i just didn't think about it but you were like that's very purposeful so i guess first of all there's berry berry you out there that say no wheelchairs. The vast majority of races are going to allow athletes with disabilities in a wheelchair. But there are some that do not end. It's usually because of safety issues on the course so big servers when it is not allow hint cycles at all period in actually talk to the race stricter about it and just because it would not be safe because there it's too steep. There are some very very sharp dropoffs. That sort of thing. So as much as i would love to do big sur. Do you know something like that. It is understandable why they don't allow hand cycles because it is a serious safety the vast majority even if they say no jogging strollers. No no skateboards that sort of thing. It does not apply to wheelchair athletes. There are some a few out there still will allow pushier wheelchairs but not he cycles but those are very few and far between most races have kind of gotten up to speed these days on what he cycles. Our cycles are newer to the game than fishermen racers are so most races out there. They're going allow shrimps now. They do also cycles. Okay and can you take us through. What your average speed top speed would be on some of these courses so my my average top speed on of course that has bridge or hill on going down is about thirty miles an hour on my crate yet cycle so you can see how there are certain races. That could present a problem. That's also why they typically start us first because especially the faster hand cyclist. They want them to control their speed and not risk running into runners. There are some races the new york marathon. For instance they have a minimum time requirement for cyclists. You are not allowed to finish. I think it's in less than an hour and a half. I am not in danger of finishing in less than an hour and a half. There are some mail hint cyclist out there that they can finish. Amira pined in less than an hour and a half the reason for that. Is you have some incredibly steep bridges in new york in some very long wins in. You can actually build up to some very dangerous speeds in some of them. You have a sharp turn at the bottom of as bridget's so they're trying to make sure that people control their speed in aren't endanger of wiping out they'll also and there are several races. That do this that will pick if you have a bridge at the bottom. they'll Hay bales you'll have to sometimes notice that in races. If you ever see hay bales at the bottom of a bridge that's further push A athletes in the hands cycle athletes. So that in case we lose control of our speed going that ill their hay bales that we crashed into your know sweat so my husband's favorite thing because he's a runner too and he always starts after he always looks at the bottom of the hills to see. Hey bails are still intact to know. Accidentally ran into any eighty bales. Are that close together. I mean that could be a very dangerous situation like you. I'll up situation. Perhaps you ever seen that happening. Usually we're spread out enough at that point and you know especially the people that are going those speeds. We know how to control our speed. We have enough experience to pay attention to what's going on round and make sure that we have room between ourselves and somebody else so i've never seen that happen. I i mean sure it could. But i haven't ever personally seen that or know of that in the races that i've now traveling to and from these races. You have shared this with me as well. Yes it can be tricky. It can be very tricky because airlines love to wheelchairs at goes to your regular day chair as well as your racing chair so it is a huge problem. Huge huge problem in this is not just for athletes and racing chairs. This is for everyday bill. Chair stu i've had my raising my hand cycle destroyed damage done to my day. Cheer pretty much every person i know. That's a field chair user that travels on a regular basis has stories about their wheelchair. Getting the irish d- and sometimes just completely destroyed to where they actually bend the frame. So it's a big problem. They airlines now do have to report any damage they have caused to medical devices in wheelchairs that largest went into effect about a year ago so hopefully some progress will be made to getting the airlines to take better care of our medical equipment but it is a big big problem so anytime you put your hand cycle or racing chair even your everyday guiltier chair on an airline. It is nerve wracking. Because you just don't know what condition it's gonna come off of that plane now. Are they going in just as the ham cycle itself or the wheelchair itself or they end some sort of case. So bay makes cases for bikes. But they do not make cases for him cycles or airline travel. There are people that might have made their own custom cases. But they just don't ask so you do bubble wrap it. I zip tie my cranks down. So that they can't turn the crank and then get all of the cabling all tangled at Zip my crates down. In everything gets bubble wrap might go through a giant. Roll up bubble wrap Signs all over it racing wheelchair use extreme caution buried fragile and all of that all you can do is just cross your fingers for the best in hope when they put it under the plane that other stuff is not slide around in sleight over on top of it that they're not gonna snap stuff went off of it so it's a it's a big problem when you bring your wheelchair onto the plane you typically what you do bring your wheelchair to the gate and then once you get right to the air coin were they take your wheelchair and they take down those steps incident directly under the play and i there have been times. When would we get back in. I am sitting there in the plane in the window. And you can look out the window. And you can watch the baggage handlers. Literally just tossing staff like out of the plane. It's yeah it's horrible it's horrible. It's a big big big issue in the disability community like us. Yeah well can. We make sharp turn on this interview about something a little happier than now. We talk run disney. Okay so i mean when. I run disney renan. Disney is sandwich fine. I have a really amazing group of runners but the wheelchair athletes three one ren disney and we go to these races in there just for finding its about community in. it's such a. It's such a supportive uplifting community. that's what i love about it. It's everybody's there for each other. Everybody is at different levels in different steps in there running career and different ability levels that we all come together over our love for disney and ren disney weekends just are the best. There's so much there's so much now. Have you participated in the dopey. I have yeah. I've done all of them. I've done all of them for a while. We were doing all of the races every year for a couple years there. I think we did that but now we are trying to do more than just friend disney doing chicago and new york and stuff like that. We can't do that. And all of the wren disney races. So we just pick and choose now. But i've done. All the renders disney race weekends at one time or another. So i i love them all the hardest thing for about dopey for me. Is those early morning. wakeup calls. Imagine i cannot even imagine especially the five k ten k half marathon so that's four days in a row s. Yeah and i usually set my alarm for when i am on race warnings for rendez easy because i have a lot of have a lot of gi issues with one of my rare diseases. So i have to be up really early in order to get calories in me before i start in. Give time for my various men's to kick in and all of that so it's it makes for razi crazy early warnings so that yeah that's the hardest thing about dopey for me. I can do the miles. It's early morning and that schedule. It gets me so. Do you have a favorite disney weekend or or race. My favorite was tinkerbell weekend at disneyland but those are no more. Yeah so yeah. So i think for the disney world traces. My favorite is probably wining dying. Okay because i it's got a little bit more of a laid back by and they have this after party at epcot words. Send you get to. It's during the food and wine festival and you get to see everybody after the race in the park is closed to everyone except for the runners. So you've got short lines all the attractions and the food and wine festival. Be sort out band and it's just everybody just kind of goes to have been some race. Weekends are a little bit were high strung marathon weekends. It's a bit more competitive. You have says some other athletes that come in bit are to raise. Princess is kind of a crazy when because there's all this rests in just kind of energy about trying to get all the princess. Merchandise senders Wind night because it's a laid back by yes. Well that sounds like a lot of fun. It is it's a lot of they're all they're all fine. I love all in. I thought it was interesting. You and i had talked offline. And i had mentioned something about a guest from episode to jocelyn henderson. We're like yeah. I know her this chocolate. Oh okay you know. It's funny because the run business community. You know we kind of start to get to know each other over time joscelyn's great. She's in a couple of disney group. Simon and she's when she's always been so supportive supportive. She comes over. Be before Races there's an athletes with disabilities tent. Where we go and we put all of our equipment. We leave our day chairs. We've got volunteers in that. Ten are volunteers. The volunteers for every single rice may have been for years so they know each one of us individually really. Well they know our knees they know our personalities all of that so we all meet up the athletes with disabilities tent and then inevitably. There are other people that we've come to know that come over on race warnings but joscelyn's one of those. She always makes a point to come over to. The athletes disabilities ten hangs out with this. Says hi you know it. It's just and that's what. I love about run disney. It's just the bible. It's the people that really make. It's the people now. You had mentioned that your husband's of runner he is all an ultra marathoner. I think he yup yup Minds though he participates i would guess and the run disney is so how does that work kind of you're doing yours race. And he's doing his race or how does that work. Yeah so he does his thing. I do my thing pretty much. He comes to the athletes with disabilities tent with me in the morning in usually we make sure we say hi to all of our friends and all before the races. That's another reason to get there so early. Because there's a lot of people that we wanna see before the race in talk to and say hi and photos with an all of that. But i start early in he goes in gets in his corral and then i never see him on the course. Because i'm so far ahead of runners. And i am the more competitive person. When he does run disney basically. He is only in it for the character photos. He loves to get his bed as so he stands in line for every single character. It has to get a raise eagle character photo. He'll run with friends sometimes in his fast. But it disney. He's not because he waits every single character so he'll be the one he'll likes sprint. He'll be running with a friend. He'll sprint ahead to the next character. Stop get in line than wait on the friend to catch up and then you'll sprint ahead. The next stop. And then afterwards. I'd just you know i hang out and talk to people until he finishes and i usually will go back to the finish line to see him cross the finish line. You know. we've got our marlins years. Volunteers are go with us to the start line. They meet us at the finish line so that they can help us. Transfer from mark cycle to our wheel chair in back again. They can get us anything. We need that sort of thing. So it's easy. We've got this routine down so well by now and we've got the most amazing volunteers that they're always right there on top of everything so doesn't bother me at all but you know he's over here and i'm over. They are with it now. Speaking of your husband. Can you just walk us through briefly. The role he plays an all of your races. Gosh so he is. He is definitely my biggest supporter and he is the wine that it's always there helping to my hands cycle in the car helping unload my hand cycle. We get there. If i need to arup tires. He helps me with that. He helps me find bathrooms. Because something a lot of people think about is there's all of these porta-pottys but there may be one that's wheelchair accessible and so we've not find that one wheelchair accessible porta potty. Or we've got to find bathrooms. That i can get into you so you know he's always there to help with that sort of thing. It's a light on him a lot on him so a lot of races if he will just be there are just as my support but some races he will be running to so we get there early. He helps me all situated after he gets me situated in i start then he goes back and gets in his corral. So yeah it's a light a he's constantly having For me all that now. I have friends that are not married. That don't have a significant other to help them and they manage there are ways to manage without it but it helps so much to have him be there to help with all of that and then i also have a volunteer Does all my local races with me in. He has been incredibly helpful over the years. He's got to really know me. Know my writing style. My racing style. He is on the course with me helps. Avoid potholes helps. Make sure i have clearance to return it. He makes sure. I'm the first person out that he is writing ahead to those intersections to make sure the police are paying attention and that intersection shutdown. Before i come through eight all of these little bays there have been times on the course where i have to make pit stop. It happens and he is able to help me get out of my hands cycle and it me to a wheelchair accessible porta potty. Or whatever so that. I can go to the bathroom if i need to go. I do have nobility. I can stand. I can walk. I just stand very long. And i'm a fall risk so a little bit easier for me to do that than somebody. That is completely paralyzed are actually. It's a lot easier. It's a lot easier. Wow well as. I just thank you so much for sharing your story. I think eye-opening. I think we've all you know when we watch an event and we see the hand cycles or the pushed rams you're always i think there's a curiosity and i just appreciate you sharing your story but before i let you go. Can we do a couple of rapid fire questions. Were okay so clearly clearly. You're pro at run disney. So who is your favorite princess. And do you wear the costumes. My favorite princess is kiana. I love tiana. Because the whole story of the louisiana in the bios end how the cajun cuisine played such a big part in her story. Is i relate to that. Because i'm from southeast texas in my dad on sundays would make this giant pot of gumbo in so i relate to all of that. I will sometimes dress up in costume. It is hard on hand cycle because we are so low to the ground and all of this equipment in. It's really easy for. Like if i were to wear a tutu or something it would drag the ground or get hung up in my chain or mike wheels. So if i wear costume it's more like a disney found in a real cost just. We can't wear anything on her head because we've got our helmet so it's tricky on hand like linford shar so typical meal the night before rise of a the night before race. I have a lot of gi issues. I'm actually working with a registered. Dietitian that specializes in sports dietetic. We're working on my nutrition so right now before the race i try to have just like world chicken breast potatoes and maybe like some green beans or something. I can't do a whole lot of vegetables. I can't do any free because it really messes with my stomach. So i just try to keep it really. Lean no fats. Nothing that might upset my stomach so yeah unfortunately has to be pretty boring. What about the morning of. So the morning of i will typically do like a protein methuen or a protein pancake that will have a mix of carbs and protein in it. I have a lot of food allergies in a lot of food intolerances but a lot of feed allergies so might diet is very very limited with what i can have so unraced mornings. I actually bring my own staff in will frequently get microwave ranking microwave protein muffin or something that i know is safe for me to eat now. Do you have a favorite goto gear for for like shirts and shorts or leggings are so i do. So my her favorite right now. Is i love the triathlon arrow tops from poor. That's how you pronounce it. I'm not sure see a you are core sports. I have a lot of issues. Because i have very broad shoulders in very large arms. So i have a lot of issues finding steph. It fit in. I have had issues with shaping under my arms. Because of the way i pedal in the way. My arms brought up against my side so right now. This triathlon tops. That have the sleeves. Or kind of my go-to now. Are there any ambassador program censure involved in a few so Embassador for the chevron houston marathon that is my absolute favorite race. It was my first half marathon my first full marathon. It's my hometown race in. I just love it because the whole entire community gets involved. There's so much support from volunteers. Crowd support along. the course. it's great because it's one of the only races. I know where there is an indoor area where you can go and stay warm before the race starts and you can go there afterwards. Also that's where they have an indoor breakfast. They serve so if it's bad weather you have all in this area out of elements. stay warm. But it's just it's an amazing race. I loved that scratch. Labs mid ambassador for them because that's one of the only brands of hydration and that my stomach can tolerate. They make some really really good product so for them as well and then team catapult. I do stuff with them challenged athletes. I do stuff for them. And of course achilles international now where can listeners. Go to find you on social media so my instagram is where i post most of my training staff end. I m at disney hand cyclist on instagram. My two loves disney and cycling. You could it be anything else. Exactly exactly well wendy. Thank you so much for joining me today. I appreciate it and honestly best of luck to you as you move forward especially your training so hard this year for chicago and you know. We're hoping and cheering you on for chicago amd boston. Just good luck in all of that. Thank you i really appreciate you having me today. It's been a lot of fun talking to you. Thank you thank you. Thank you for listening to we. Are the runners show if you enjoyed today's show. Please subscribe rate and review this podcast. I would love nothing more than to grow the show. So i can talk with more guests like you. The everyday renner. Also you can follow me on my new instagram at. We are the runner show. Thanks for listening.

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Episode 343 - The Truth About Marriage with Roger Nygard

Atheist Nomads

1:14:06 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 343 - The Truth About Marriage with Roger Nygard

"Nomads episode three forty. Three the truth about marriage podcast. You're about to listen to includes cursing and talking about who hawes please be advised. Welcome to another episode of atheist. Nomads Dustin and joining me in a little. Bit will be filmmaker. Roger Nygaard and like I'm GonNa say the starch. 'cause I guess probably shouldn't say it now but yeah he's somebody wanted had on the show for a long time and finally got him on. That was kind of holding off for him to get this film done. And it's done now. We'll talk a little bit about more about that before. We actually get to the interview talking about it before that. I'm I'm definitely liking not having to look at the news as much. It is definitely good for my my psyche and has allowed me to kind of go through some cabin fever which I am definitely feeling. It's it's tax season We have A site a decently sized refund coming up and that will help fund some around of of repairs and upgrades to our camper trailer. And I am so ready to get started working on that and get out camping. I am tired of winter. I want to get out. I want to go somewhere where I am disconnected from the outside world where none of that matters and I can just unplug and be bored. Yeah I want to be bored. I have gotten really bad at trying to be bored. But there is like honestly. That's one of my favorite things about. Fishing is the fact that it is just so wonderfully boring. That's still a few months off. Get of course much sooner but they'll be with the working on the trailer but getting out and Enjoying the outdoors is still aways out and with this this change in the format. One of the things I want to do is is start each episode with the new story that basically got the most I'M GONNA say strongest emotional response out of me and this one is is a local story. This one is about Boise's a refugee city. There's lots of people whenever you drive around. You will see bumper stickers on cars saying refugees welcome. We have strong refugee programs. We have one of the two major health systems. Here has a a major global health program specifically geared towards the refugees. We have a lot of stuff around town for refugees it is. It is something that that Boise really prides itself on but when we talk about refugees is not the subject of this new story and this new story is coming out of W. C. V. B. From Boston and this is about California refugees yes Californian refugees coming to Idaho as one wrote in too. Yeah there's one road into the state government As they were considering a change in vaccine rules strengthening the vaccine roles wrote quote. I'm writing as deeply concerned parents in California refugee who had to pull entire family out of the state to protect them from tyrannical government. I will not stand by allowing Idaho to become a socialist state. The next one quote I am a mother and I am a California referee refugee. I came here in search of medical freedom. That was Shaly Brindley a Berry Bay area native at a hearing at the Idaho. State Capitol Lou Manila left a public comment got a masters degree from Stanford but moved to Idaho quote for the freedoms of the state in quote. He told the audience that he would defend his rates quote with my life and my weapons. I don't care about the heard. I care about my family about my children. In quote these are people who are moving from California to Idaho because California enacted reasonable legislation to prevent stupid people from being stupid to protect their children and even more importantly to protect other children from their children. Because when you're talking about her immunity you're talking about kids with cancer. You're talking about kids with immunodeficiency disorders. You're talking about kids who just don't respond to vaccines because with most vaccines anywhere from five. To ten percent of people are non responders. Okay usually around five percent if you get much higher than that at the the vaccine is not likely actually beginning approved by about five percent. Just don't respond. We need high vaccination rates to protect people who just their bodies don't produce the antibodies. And when you look at all those groups of people who legitimately need the heard that's about five to seven percent of the population. We need everybody else to get vaccinated to protect them and herd. Immunity GOES TO HELP NOT JUST THEM. It goes to save babies who can't get vaccinated. We definitely had some concerns. When Kylie was a newborn about the various diseases that were going around then We had a active pertussis outbreak. In Idaho State continues to have really shitty protest outbreaks. Every fucking year so we were worried about that. It was a particularly bad flu year that year. So we were concerned about influenza. I was watching for measles outbreaks. Because unless you're super high risk they don't give kids the MR until year old. Because it's they're not going to respond to it very well and by not respond to it very well. I mean not produce very many antibodies but because of the fucking measles outbreak in Vancouver not only did Kylie get her vaccine on time which she would have anyway. She got the second vaccine three months later. That normally isn't given out until right before kindergarten and they have started bumping the second dose up to three months earlier. What that means is that pediatricians are looking at it and classifying. Basically everyone as being at pretty high risk because a fucking people like Lou Manila who would respond to a needle with a fucking gun. I mean God Garum. Yeah okay. I'm a little this one definitely got to me. People like to talk about how liberal California's and how Liberal Californians are and if you you talk to people in Conservative areas in places like Oregon. You'll hear them talk about all the California liberals moving in ruining their state. Well it's fucking California conservatives ruining the state that I live in now and yeah they're California on average is a lot more liberal than a place like Idaho but with like thirty five million Californians and about one point seven million people in Idaho if you took just a tiny fraction of the most conservative Californians and move them up here. It could totally transform Idaho into even more of a conservative fucking hell hole. That is the only new story. I'm going to talk about. Yeah we're going to go ahead and move onto the interview Before we get to the interview I do want to acknowledge that the language is largely gendered and Hetero Normative. I just WANNA acknowledge that upfront. The topic was marriage and when Roger got into doing his his research for his his movie the truth about marriage he pretty quickly found that for the scope of that film. The differences between gay and straight couples were negligible but the differences that did exist between gay and straight couples. Were actually like if you dig down into that. It's a whole movie by itself. So based on on who it was he was talking to and the researchers that he was at authors that he talked to a kept pretty standard. Hetero normative if that's going to bother you then you probably shouldn't listen but I I think it's actually pretty. It's pretty good and I know that Talking through with with Lauren. And we watch the before doing the before. I did the interview It's actually prompted some valuable discussions for us so I I do recommend listening to the interview. I do recommend watching the movie. It's well worth and we'll be back with the interview all right and I am now joined by filmmaker Roger Nygaard who just came out with a new film the Truth About Marriage. This is the follow up to his film. The nature of existence which came out back before atheists nomads is even a thing. Roger Welcome atheist nomads. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. You're the person who more than anyone else I would say has been on the list to be on the show since the beginning but haven't been on because I've been waiting for your new movie. Finally Yeah here. We are took eight years to get this one done because we had this little thing going on about eight years ago even pushing nine years ago with you're on chariots of iron quite a few times and I was starting to be on that show several times and it was kind of neck and neck. Which one of us was going to be on the show? More that was. We had some fun back and forth with that. I like I like holding records out. That's a good record. Have there's you know it's Kinda funny how it got to this point? Though I mean when I finished the nature of existence I would I did film festivals and people would invariably ask me and podcast to say okay. It was great. We loved it now. What's next and they didn't really have you know. How do you think what's next? You just gave birth the landing you WanNa think about getting pregnant again but you gotTa have an answer so I was at a film festival that Dallas USA Film Festival. And just as a joke. I said to the audience. Well I just did a documentary on the very nature of existence itself so I need something. That's even more inexplicable than that. Might qualify would be marriage and it got a big laugh And then I started thinking maybe that is a good idea. Yeah well and you did a really good job of promoting the nature of existence like I. I remember I hosted a watch party and then conversation with you over skype with a local group. That's now defunct here in Boise. And that was. That was a lot of fun it was it was really cool having people watching it and then we all got to chat with you. Well Yeah I mean my one of my goals in making my all. My projects is that I try to create something that will mess with people's brains a little bit and and stir them up and it makes for good conversation when they're everybody's Kinda freaked out a little bit by what they learned or saw or or digested. Yup and yeah and like I would've actually had you on as one of the first few guests on the show but figured mostly at the Early Times. Musleh centers would have been coming over from chariots of iron. Who had already probably gotten sick of you so time. You don't WanNa be over. Let's wait a year or two until the next films done and now eight years later. Thank goodness we're still alive but it did definitely makes sense. Once you know yesterday My my wife and I sat down and watched it and yeah you had people that you talk to while they're getting married and then followed up five years later. That takes some time at the Mike. Michael App Ted Style. Michael apted has been doing that with his seven up. Fourteen twenty one up films. It's been going on for decades. Yeah I it's a you know a parallel or just following someone's life and in this case for the truth about marriage but I started out doing is you. Everyone gets invited to weddings all the time. And sometimes they're fun to usually just kind of a chore you just go and get it over with. Its show your support. But I started bringing my camera randomly when I got invited. And I began interviewing the bride and groom asking him kind of tough questions. And then I banked footage I interviewed five separate couples over a few years and three of them made the final cut when I checked up on them many years later to see what happened. It was always a surprise. What happened to people? I really would be reminding old Woody Allen Joke if you WanNa make God laugh telling your plan maybe that's an idea for Me doing scheduling desks here and go back to some of those early ones and see how they're doing now and yeah. My Wife told me I needed to do that. But yeah well. Yeah who who who who is not in jail? Who Still Alive. Yeah like there are people who have been guests on the show that are dead so hard to contact right so yeah. Yeah that is bound to happen. Definitely just the ticks if you go long enough and like you interviewed you know if you started off with five couples. Statistically speaking the odds that one didn't make it would the relatively high and you did have one of those yet. The coin flip right. You got a fifty fifty chance over the lifetime but over five years it might take some people longer than five years to figure out. They made a mistake. But Yeah I've one out of three that were I interviewed them as they were getting. Divorced will end. The other two are kind of surprisingly still together. Well in was kind of funny was looking at it a I guess that the one. That didn't a divorce when you're talking to them as newlyweds guessing. They're going to. They're going to be getting a divorce. There was writing on the wall. Well Okay when you talk about the statistics. The coin flip a coin. Flip is skewed by people who have been divorced prior getting married again and then getting divorced again. Statistics bear that out. The it's fifty fifty chance first time marriage. Second time marriage drops the sixty percent chance. Divorce third time seventy percent chance of divorce so people get worse at it over time in the explanation for that. The theory is that. If you're good at staying marriage it take you out of the dating pool or out of the remarriage pool. People getting remarried are ones who failed one already so they're likely to fail again or maybe slightly more likely like my stepbrother. Who was divorced twice by twenty two? Well he is an achiever. His third divorce was done. I think thirty two and that was his last divorce alive. I presume he's alive. There's plenty of time to keep that number Iraq up more points on the board. O since then he just. He decided that he's going to be trained. Be More ethical about not being monogamous. And I've been happy. Yeah honesty up front. That's a really good policy. It's better to take your lumps up front because the longer you wait to be honest the lumps get bigger and bigger. Yeah Okay so walk you know because most of our listeners that this point haven't heard or having watched the movie yet. Hopefully they will after listening to this but walk us through the basic premise of the movie. I started out wondering why. I'm such a freaking failure. At relationships. My documentaries often tend to be a personal catharsis or a journey. An obsession of my own my own problem and trying to figure it out. I become the investigator with A mystery that I'm GONNA go solve the nature of existence. The mystery was. Why do we exist? You know what's our purpose? Which is what led me into the realm of religion and atheism. And exploring that Cole concept and coming to an acceptance and answer a place for me where. I was happy with what I discovered this time. My core question is or was why is marriage or relationships. Why why is marriage so hard for people? It's it's just if something was natural you wouldn't have to work so hard at it the clearly. There's something wrong if I was telling you a product. You came damage sales I I. I'm a car salesman. Walk into my dealership and I- you'd say hey wha- how is the product here? How are these cars? Well if I said to you these these are awesome. Everybody loves them. Everybody's getting one. You gotta get one. You'RE GONNA love it it's GonNa make you happy it's GonNa fill fulfill all your dreams and then if you said well. It sounds wonderful. I re- I I should get it. Is there any guarantee? And my answer was nope no guarantee and half of them break and the other half that don't break are GonNa take a lot of hard work to keep them going. You'd say you better go back to the drawing board because there's something wrong with your product although if you look at cars nobody's nobody's going to hang onto a car that long. There's another problem right if I said okay. You have one car for your whole life. You have one food for your whole life and then you go what but if you only get to have one woman for your whole life you're supposed to go. That sounds great. There's a disconnect right. There's something wrong here. Well and I focused on it from my perspective and tried to figure out okay. There's a problem. Let me solve the problem. And then that's the half of the documentary. The second half of the documentary was me trying to coalesce as long as we're now that we know why we're here. What do we do about it? What are some simple solutions that anyone can do to improve their relationships? You don't have to do it but only if you wanna be happier net and how did you pick the the subject matter experts that you talk to when I started out for any divide concept documentaries? It's kind of the same process. I'm obsessed with the topic so I get a copy of every book on the subject and I stack of books. Five feet high and started and taking notes writing my questions. Finding Data and research and I made a list of all of these authors and scientists and researchers anthropologists psychologists marriage counselor divorce attorneys who had written books and I got a big map. Put It on the wall push pin where they lived and I started to see where they clustered. Then I contacted. Everybody sent out emails. And whoever responded and said yes planet trip okay. These are the East Coast clustered people. And here's the Pacific northwest. Here's England as there was a guy in Spain and then I just. It took me several years to track them all down and collect footage but that was how I would begin the process of collecting the raw footage. But if there was just one in se Louisiana that would be less likely to actually merit a trip yet but analysis. Yeah right what's what If I'M GONNA spend the time and energy but if somebody really like there was this guy named Dr Robin Baker who was in southern Spain. There was no one near him but I really wanted that guy he wrote a book called Sperm Wars and the book was so mind blowing to me when I read it. It answered a lot of questions. Raised a lot of questions and it was very controversial when it came out because just in short he and his partner They discovered that men's sperm is all different. There isn't just one kind of sperm. When a man has an agenda. And there's the they're they're all shake differently. There's pointy headed ones double headed once coil tail straight tail short mid piece long mid piece all these different types of sperm and the next question is why is that and what they discovered when they mixed the sperm of two men's jacket together the sperm would attack each other and it was like two armies going to battle. So they're with the theory that they came out or that came from that was that women promote sperm wars within their bodies by collecting sperm from multiple donor. Because it's better because in that way only the best sperm will fertilize an egg. And what's controversial about that? Is that it it. It says it implies that promiscuity is natural and maybe it was at one time and so that's in his book he he explains all of the sexual behaviors or many of them that people experience from group sex homosexuality to regular vanilla sex whatever and why we do it why it happens in white beneficial or adaptive or not adaptive and It it takes all these behaviors that we might think of as extreme or or normal and explains why we do them well and that actually that ipod assists on on sperm. Battling that would help explain why humans have such low sperm viability. Like explains a lot of things he said. If if if there wasn't sperm warfare we wouldn't have the same. Our culture would be different. We wouldn't have the arts that we have. We wouldn't have orgasms. We wouldn't have the penis wouldn't be shaped the way its shaped everything that we take for granted or assume is why is it right it. There's a reason for everything. Inland Chimpanzees have like with Japan's ninety nine percent of the sperm or ninety eight percent or something like that or are capable of actually fertilizing egg compared to. Yeah but are you percent in humans one percent of the sperm will fertilize an egg? Very small percentage that is that is fascinating chimpanzees and bonobos share a common ancestor with humans. And so it's easy to draw parallels in behavior with humans but what they don't have is the evolution of our culture or cultures. What's changed radically? And that was part of what I discovered why humans are why marriage is so difficult for people is because what we were doing. One hundred thousand years ago is culturally is so vastly different from the way our culture is now that our culture be asked us to behave in ways that are out of sync with who we are as a species. So everybody's frustrated trying to reach these ideals that are virtually unreachable well that applies to basically everything in modern life in our culture. Yeah I mean living in a house as unnatural driving a car. The natural sitting at a computer sitting all day working on stuff is apt it. Our backs aren't adapted to that. But we pay a price. Yeah we their problems are side effects to these adaptations and it's no different in relationships So then you definitely did cover you know. Both the people are trying to look at the the biology and the evolutionary psychology sides of it and the people that are dealing with how it works in. Today's culture did you find a conflict between those groups or or did it all just the think it all flowed well naturally the the the comparison between biology and culture well between like the viewpoints of the the the biological you know like the biologists versus the viewpoints of the public speakers and therapists in the lake. That you had well. There's a lot of synchronicity between all the scientists because he the psychologists and the evolutionist are generally on the same page where there is a disconnect is between the scientists and the religious based marital theories. Okay because they have different background or different basis for what they believe. And you did have a rabbi's Yes yes the rabbi comes from a spiritual perspective would imagine and the rabbi believes that love and marriage is the joining of two soul and the scientists. Of course don't speak in terms of souls and in fact many of them the especially the marriage therapists. Find the idea of soul mate to be harmful to people. If you're if you're thinking in terms that there's a soulmate out there for you if you're not finding it. It's very very frustrating to say. The least where's my soul mate and from a logical perspective it makes no sense because what if your soul mate is born in Cleveland or in Rio de Janeiro or in Spain in Spain. And you you our your paths going to cross if there's eight billion people right. It's very unlikely statistically though it doesn't really make any sense it's it's really more of a wishful thinking idea. A ROMANTIC IDEA. But what the the marriage therapist suggests is that instead of looking at soulmate. Someone that you have to seek or that there's entity creating this Orchestrating chess is like a chess pieces on a on a board that are going to somehow accidentally bump into each other. Think about e meeting when you meet somebody making each other into soul mates over time through shared experiences and healthier way to look at it. Yeah Dan savage puts it as You find you can find happiness when you give up on trying to find the perfect ten and you find the eight point three that you can round up to ten. Am Getting an eight is a pretty good deal or even a seven or six and then round up to the ten right will the secret to happiness which I'm agreeing with him is according to the experts that is acceptance. I of yourself who you are and what you are as a species what it is you desire what you want what you need understanding yourself and accepting yourself and secondly accepting your partner for who they are the Godman John Goodman and Julie Schwarzkoppen. They told me that statistic that sixty nine percent of all relationship problems are never solved. There just accepted identified understood accepted. And you move on. You can't say no one's GonNa Change into something else you can't make someone change into something else What you what they might change behavior you might say they might stop doing something because they know makes you mad but if it's a type of thing that's really inherent and who they are. They're going to be resentful and overtime frustrated and eventually angry and it's GonNa come out in another way trying to be something they're not. There's a poly-amorous couple in my documentary. That I met live in Eugene Oregon and I found them to be a really high functioning couple. And it's not because they're poly-amorous it's because in order to be poly-amorous you have to be open and honest about who you are from the beginning so you know who you're getting. There's no surprises. And that was one of the. What the All the experts agreed that one of the ways to improve longevity and happiness in a relationship is for a couple. That's considering marriage to get premarital counseling because in that way they get to To understand each other and learn. What are the rules of this game? What are the rules of this relationship before you get into it? A lot of religious couples do better than nonreligious couples and not because of the religion but because the religion forces them to do counselling before they get married That's one of the main things that anyone can do or should do to improve their chances. Now from from the Religious background that I have. I definitely found that a lot of pastors required. Premarital counseling most of those pastors had absolutely no educational background qualifying them to do premarital counseling and most of the people getting married. We're doing it because they couldn't they were tired of waiting to have sex or guilty because already been having sex. That's not necessarily a good recipe to start now. You want someone who knows what they're talking about because they have experienced and what they're advising you ideally. But even if they don't just the fact that they get to people together to talk about their goals What are their mutual goals? In making this film the truth about marriage I also wrote a book to go with it. Companion book the same name the truth about marriage and at the end of the book. I put a personal priority statement that I created based on my discussions with some of these experts and the divorce attorney. I spoke with Lawrence blume. He suggested he suggest a couple of do a financial disclosure and a personal priorities disclosure before they get married be financial. Disclosure is something. You're GONNA get a divorce or in if you create a prenuptial agreement but even if if you want if you love somebody and you're you're planning to share your life with them it actually could be exciting to share everything you know about yourself including your financial background. But it's also good to know what you're buying. What are you getting here? Because you are GONNA get half ownership of your partner's assets but also their debts and so are you willing to bail your partner's death out and it's something they should discuss. Then you also get just the differences in state laws that apply to win joint ownership of things come into effect including things like debt and assets. Yeah yet a different kinds of property community property and communal property and each state may have a different definition again. Oregon Washington and Idaho or very similar Because they were the same territory but they the laws and of working out to where you have like by seven year. There's this gradual Creation of community property. So in the day you get married that doesn't exist. It only applies to what you buy after the marriage date but by seven wickets logical but then after seven years. Then it's basically full community property on everything right and one thing people don't consider they might say well. Neither one of us has a lot of money. But even if that's not true if that's true you don't have much in the way property your money. Maybe you have good credit. And that's a fair valuable My composer Billy Sullivan and Co producer on this film even married twice and the first time he got married you married someone who had bad credit and she destroyed his credit. You know not not saying she was a bad person but in some people just have a different point of view on how to treat credit in charging things or paying for them now or later. And if you don't if you're not in sync with your partner. In that regard year credit can get destroyed. Also because by the time you buy a house depending on the bank it's either an average of your credits or the worst credit out of the couple you're gonna be wishing that you'd run a credit check and a background check on this person that you were in love with at the time when you fall in love. The brain does a lot of things that that brings free will into question one of the things that had shut down your critical thinking frontal lobe. It deactivates some things that you might. You might normally be a little bit more cautious about. No I love this person in so it kind of shut down because Mother Nature wants you together. Wants you to reproduce for the next spend the next two or three maybe three or four to five six seven years together. Yeah and it's it's crazy to see some of those events can like reminders of your mortality can really amp up the biological clock so to say like the number of people who join the military and get married right before deploying Is Insanely High. The and like when When my father died Lauren and I'd been planning on on waiting a few years to have a kid and decided not wait at that point the reality the reality of mortality was very present it changes at flips a switch in your brain. There's another statistic that I came upon that. A lot of marriage proposals come after a separation or during a separation particularly when the guy is away from this person. He's in love with because being love is It's a physical addiction. There's a chemical addiction it's going on you get a chemical burst of dopamine norepinephrine and Oxytocin from being around your partner having sex holding hands hugging just smelling them. You get this constant renewal this constant hit of these chemicals. You're addicted to now. You go on a business trip for two weeks you go through withdrawal which is painful and it makes you crazy and you start love sickness. They call it right and then you think I got to make sure I never lose this person and you're not realizing that it's because you're addicted to a drug. You just think you know. Love is so strong that you gotTa Take Action and I can think of Some friends that did that. Yeah free will. Right is where we are designed to behave in certain ways their programs running in the brain and we the the best thing that that anyone can do is to learn about yourself. Learn about what you are who you are the species. What what motivates. You just become aware more self-aware both partners should become more self aware I think and then you can make better decisions about yourself and your partner and your future and the more you know about the the algorithms that are at work in your brain the the better you can handle them and be prepared for them and know that you go through cycles this too shall pass men go through cycles. Women go through cycles. Humans do. There's a lot of one of the another mind-blowing thing that I learned from Chris. Ryan who wrote the book. Sex At dawn is that the birth control pill has affected people's relationships radically in unexpected ways. Because when a woman is taking birth control pillars on birth control it it tells. The body makes her body thinks. She's pregnant all the time. And that way she won't ovulate and or egg won't implant and she won't be fertile when a woman is pregnant she is attracted to a different kind of man and when she's fertile when she's ovulating so if a woman stays on the pill she'll steak attracted to a certain type of man a more nurturing man who will stay. H- home and help raise the children as opposed to maybe more the bad boy. You know the guitar player. The the little more wilder sort of person that she might be attracted to when she's ovulating are fertile. And as a result some Lotta Times couples will be on the pill get married and then they decide we want to have children so she goes off the pill and they start working on trying to have a child and then suddenly she's not attracted to him anymore and they think well it's because we're we've been together too long or both really tired of been working a lot or or fall out of love and no you're just there were just attracted to something different and so what what Christopher Ryan recommends is that couples should go off the pill for a year before they decide to get married. I wonder how many marriages that would end up. Prompting certainly could affect them either either direction The the the chance of accidental pregnancies. In those years right well you know and then pregnancy changes the algorithms And it makes people think differently and feel differently. Because now you've you've got a this new entity that forces you to love it in mother. Nature's designed it that well. Yeah where babies give off fairmount. If you smell the baby's head you love that baby you feel protective toward it it it. It's such a strong drug which makes sense right because for baby to survive it. Needs you to love it and care about it and then or just want me to point out the than most women do go back on on birth control after having a kid. Yeah it will it also if a woman it doesn't matter part of what's going on there is that a woman when she's off birth control. She's a cheese her body. Passion is to bodies recognizing that they're a good match chemically and particularly on what they call the M M h see major histocompatibility complex. Which is the spectrum of the different types of immune systems that human beings can have a couple of hundred or one hundred or so different combinations. And if you meet someone who has an immune system that's identical yours? You'll feel nothing email you might you know. Maybe you'll kiss and go no spark you mean if you meet somebody who's immune system is the opposite of yours or further down further away on the other side of the spectrum you're much better chemical match and they discover this because there is something called. The T shirt study by a psychologist in Germany named Klaus Vatican took forty t shirts. Had men wear them the t shirts for a week without showering then took another forty women and had them smell the t shirts every single one and rank them according to how attractive it smelled and then when they compared their rankings with the each of their immune systems and the immune systems of the men? They found this correlation. The more dissimilar their immune systems the more attractive more powerfully attractive. They ranked the T shirt. That is just a bizarre study. That's one thing that's going on when a woman is not birth control. Her body is attuned. To sensing a good match and so she's attracted to a good match if she's pregnant she can no longer get pregnant so it doesn't matter anymore if they're a good match what matters is. Is He a good protective nurturing person? Who will stay and help her? Raise this child so the the criteria changes. Yeah but we're like. Oh the T shirts that is. That's that's a sample size of of forty right on each side. I believe it's been replicated since in any good study anyone should be able to replicate it beyond that sets. It's an interesting Correlation that that does point out a an interesting hypothesis. Here's another similar study. Where at a Strip club? The some social psychologists asked the strippers to keep track of their tips hourly over a month and then they took that and put it on a chart and compare it to their natural menstrual cycle and the tips that they received for men spiked to the highest level when they were ovulating and drop to the lowest level and stayed consistent when they were having their period. Somehow men knew when they were the most fertile. Wow and we're throwing more money at them. We're more excited by them at that point. Wow so here you know. They have apps that women can get on their phones. Attract your cycle so if you if if a woman wants to know when to get pregnant you the APP will tell you the best time because you're the most fertile. You're ovulating here. But it's also the best time to get what you want from your spouse or ask for a raise or manipulate somebody. Because they're going to be more attuned or more affected by your biological rhythm that's that's fascinating Now do you. The the film was largely Hetero normative. And I'm sure that's just based on the sample size of the books that you had available but you did have a Lesbian couple that you you interviewed. How did they care with all of that? I started to go down the path of doing a whole gay marriage aspect in the documentary. And I didn't do that for two reasons. One is that I realized that it doesn't matter gay or straight or otherwise. That's not what it's about what what works in relationships is masculine and feminine and so a gay couple. What works is that? There's a masculine partner in a Feminine Park. The same thing with a straight couple one is it primarily masculine one is primarily feminine and it can be. The man is the primarily feminine. And which is the case and maybe twenty percent of the cases but generally we all know understand or accept that men are on average generally more math more masculine. Of course so. It doesn't really matter. They gay couples and straight couples kind of want the same things at a basic level and interact and and and follow these same patterns. Generally so you found the the distinctions vanished. The more you looked at it. Yeah well yes. Because people are people and it wasn't about sexuality it was about masculine and Feminine Energy But the second reason is that there are really fascinating differences about gay marriage and it really deserves. Its own documentary. And so if you're GONNA ask me at the end of this this interview. What are you doing next it? Might I might answer. Maybe the truth about gay marriage net. Yeah like like one thing I I I learned recently on the topic was that it wasn't much of a of a thought prior to about the nineteen eighties because the way the laws were It logistically wouldn't have made sense. Considering the married women did not have credit. Only married men had credit and married. Women didn't own property it was the man that owned the property. It was illegal for women on property until very recently in the wall that changed. Yeah very very recently and it's shocking to think that some of that didn't go wait until the eighties. Yeah something's still haven't gone away. I think there's a something like six states still outlaw sex outside of marriage yeah I live in one. Yeah well they're not enforceable people. It is on the books though yeah. One of the historians I interviewed wrote a book called A history of sex. And he studied laws and mores and he found that cultures and societies the ruling structure whether it's a church or otherwise. They tried to enforce rules with respect to sexual behavior. Because what they're really trying to do is control poor people and prevent poor people from having children because the rich people were afraid they'd have to end up paying for all of these indigent children and so that's the basis. The origin of a lot of these rules is the control. It might come down to money. Who's GonNa pay for all these children? Yeah yeah that makes sense And then there was even just like in certain times in History. Marriage was only concern if you actually had property at need airs for. And if you're a president who has never gonNA have properties why bother correct and will like with the Catholic Church for a long time. They didn't have wedding ceremonies or vows and it was just if two people said we're living together. We consider ourselves married then. The Church considered the married no ceremony. They just happen to. They decided It's a this whole this. This gigantic wedding industry is a new phenomenon in human history. And also we you have to put things in perspective when people think about traditional marriage what usually comes to mind the nineteen fifties maybe into the early sixties. Has this traditional time. But if he that's a decade maybe fifteen years that's a tiny tiny slice in human history. Humans have been around for two hundred thousand years as a species. So what we've been doing for the vast majority of that time is more natural than what happened for this one decade period of time and when things changed is about six to ten thousand years ago prior to that humans lived as nomads in small tribes or bands of one hundred fifty or fewer where they shared everything whether it's food shelter sex child rearing. There's no propriety. Nobody owned anything except that they could 'cause they're constantly on the move dirt and every there was no if someone was Withheld sex from. It's from the tribe. They would be considered antisocial and be ostracized. It wasn't it wasn't a big deal. It wasn't nobody considered sex to be a big deal or something to a gale. Worked up about like we do now. Now one thing when you're when you're dealing with prehistory is a there's a lot of the sumptious that go into making bold claims like that So where are they basing that at the excellent question right when we weren't we weren't there? How do we know for sure? And you're right. We can't know for sure because this happened before any with living was alive to see it though the theory is I. Someone Answer. Apologised makes a theory Based on observations or maybe archaeological Observations and data. And then they look for existing tribes. That might still exist with those behaviors because there are many groups of people in the last fifty to one hundred years that have been studied that have lived in the same way for Millennia and they found a tra- tribes multiple tribes in South America in Mongolia in different parts of the world. That were still living this way. And so it bears out the theory. If some evidence that shows that the this theory has wait now and then yeah and if you look at the different migration periods and across that much territory okay. Hey we're really Where the big change happened. Six ten thousand years ago because humans discovered the idea of agriculture That's the big dividing line in human history up until then there nomad the now. Suddenly they can stay in one place and grow their own crops. They don't need to go anywhere and the idea occurs to people that will. This is my property. I lived here and these are my domesticated animals. These are my crops and this is my wife this. I own all this. Propriety is a new concept now. Now that you own all these things now you understand propriety. The idea begin to occur. Well I WANNA make sure that all of the things I own go are left or inherited by my own genetic offspring. So you have to make sure that your offspring is your genetics. No woman is. She knows because it comes out of her body. There's no doubt it's her baby. A man can't be certain unless he's practice what they call mate guarding. Which you see in the wild right. Where but if. He's off working in the field planting or he's out hunting or both. He's away quite a bit. How can you be sure that it's his child? And so the idea of marriage began to occur and it's a way to create a social fence around women and to try to control women's sexual behavior. Not Men's because men can't get pregnant only women can and so if you look at religious texts like the Bible the Torah for example You'll see that adultery thin but it's only really thin for women not for men right and we have the disadvantage that The tour of Bible in Koran were all written in a very geographically smaller true. They're all branches of the same tree by very similar cultures. Yeah but you'll find this Pervasively across human cultures. Yeah this idea of Virginity and Trying to prevent women or to control women's Sexuality Ancient Rome definitely had some of those concepts as well Ancient Greece did too and this is only of course discover agriculture at most ten thousand years ago so if you may have been around for two hundred thousand years that's only the most recent ten percent of human history has marriage as we know it then a concept so the vast majority ninety percent of human history we existed without it in much more of a communal environment where everybody shared Of course we've changed a lot in those ten thousand years. Culture has absolutely. We're still the same as we were if you took a baby today and swapped it with a baby from one hundred thousand years ago. They'd be identical in terms of of their potential largely so But would have still have a lot of of Distinctions particularly with the climate disease and Diet and those are just the true that different immune immunities and things have been necessary once we domesticated animals and lived in crowded environments in high population density. But as far as their instinct and intelligence et CETERA. There'd be virtually no difference though it'd be minuscule differences if even that. Yeah but yeah. The our cultures are rapidly changing constantly as our technology changes. And that's why we're continually having to adapt and feeling frustrated. Trying to find an that's why monogamy is the rule monogamy came about because what came after tribal sharing naturally was polygamy as some men generally became more wealthy than others acquired more land more resources more allies and therefore they could take for themselves more wise than concubine we got kings and Pharaohs and sultans with thousand or five thousand sometimes wives and see mostly concubine usually a small number of special wives. But when you've got someone who's got five thousand women all to himself that means you've got five thousand young men with no women which creates some very frustrated young men and it's not good for society it makes us very unstable and so at some point even the king began to realize. It's better for me if my kingdom is stable. So the new rule is one man one wife for everybody including the king and that's where monogamy came from so all of the Multiple sexual partners had to go underground. Which if and if you look at like Ancient Rome and Greece were largely monogamous while the Levant Middle East were largely polygamous then even that monogamous environment was probably more socially monogamous than actually monogamous. But they were also much more peaceful in those time. Periods is pretty peaceful stable societies until the Persian Persians in Carthage. Start Messing with them. Yes but that that kind of does hold hold that the the more monogamous societies. We're more stable and yeah Y- everybody's got an opportunity to get them in in if it's not enough they get something else on the side especially got a lot of money yes and you can pay to clean up the mess all right there. There was a little bit that that you touched on with How some of the the modern issues. That couples are dealing with weren't problems. One hundred years ago you talked to your even Talk to your grandma. Some yes in her when she was a hundred years old So what what would you say is kind of some of the big changes that have made things more difficult or make things easier. I did ask my my grandmother about love if she when she married my grandfather y first of all. Why did she get married? I asked her and she said well. That's what people did back. Then she was when she was seventeen. I think seventeen or eighteen. There was a knock at the door one day and there was a guy at the door that no one in her family had met before. And he said my name's Carlton Nygaard and I'm here to marry your daughter and She said when he joined the family. And did you ever talk about love? You did no. We never talked about that compatibility as far more important. You could be in love with somebody and if you find out if he doesn't wash his feet when you're in bed it's never gonNA work out. This whole idea of marriage for love is a new invention. That's about one hundred and sixty years old according to the historian in this idea that human their special. I have a birthday. My happiness is important. I am unique and special and I deserve happiness. That's a brand new idea. Human history. Several hundred years ago it was. I need to survive And that was the end of the list. What do I have to do to survive? What's the best solution in? The vast majority will just WanNa make sure that he didn't get killed by the Lord ruling over them. You need allies. You need to be have being. Someone's good favor. You need to win battles if they're conflict and you're better you can survive better when you have a partner. So that's one brand new idea this idea of love and so no wonder people get kind of concerned when this intense feeling that that is natural at the beginning of a relationship starts to wane over time which in the documentary. I ask people how many times is normal to have sex per week and the married couples all were generally around once maybe twice a week some were once a year but when I said all right what about when you were first dating and they all said once or twice up to five times a day when you're in that initial really passionate excitement. Everyone agrees that draw the passion drops off because passion turns to compassion because you have to switch to child-rearing and then people start to miss the passion or they think that something's wrong or but we're not designed to to have continual passion were designed to passionate designed to close distance between two good compatible Chemical matches could genetic mates and then you're designed to Seek a new mate or If you like in the old days and everyone lived in a tribe and everyone was meeting with everybody. Anyone any child could be belong to anybody. Everyone's working to raise the children together. It was a it was a cooperative venture and women didn't have to worry that if their husband died that they'd be destitute. Where would be able to take care of themselves? The tribe takes care of everybody so there was much more cohesion and less anxiety and Christopher Ryan who wrote sex at dawn. His new book is called civilized to death in his thesis in. That book is how we think that we've got this utopia but his argument is that if the yardstick is how happy are we? We've got things much worse now because hunter gatherers worked. Fewer hours had better. Health had a better social environment than we do now. Because we're all working more hours. Were more anxious. We eat worse or diet is worse. We have all these diseases that were unheard of in nomadic cultures. Yeah but the cultures had their own diseases. Far fewer and far more likely to starve. The the starving sing is a concern. But it's actually better for human beings to have Lean Times your body is designed to go through some lean times and put their longevity studies shows. But there's no better. There's a really big difference between having a complex agricultural society dealing with a famine where it gets lean and nomadic tribe who has nothing and they all starved. How generally how work? Because in this complex society they would put all their eggs in one basket or all of their feeds on three crops and if they failed they had nothing to fall back on whereas hunter-gatherers had hundreds of options for things to eat and if something was bullying one year they had plenty of other things in abundance that they could switch to cause eight such a wide variety of things in some cases. Definitely Work Aces. That didn't have have a lot of righty desert. Nomads and Arctic nomads. For sure Very low of the beauty of nomad if there if lean you move on till you find places which with of with abundant. It's hard to imagine what it was like one hundred thousand years ago when there was only maybe a hundred million humans scattered throughout the globe. Yeah put billions but I really think that The your friend there has way too rosy of view of the past the reason the population was pretty static at around one hundred million. Humans was because the natural environment couldn't support more so if the population went up. People Starve. And there'd be fewer people. You're not wrong that the carrying capacity of the planet is probably two hundred million without electricity and so Groups of people or tribes. Were they were aware of this. And they Their biggest problem was Infant mortality That's the one thing that we we've certainly got covered much better than they did. And so for Tila was important. They needed to have a lot of babies to make up for that. And there would be right. There'd be a climate change over the long term and so they'd have to move and unexpected events but they They survived quite well. We're here and they had a very long long run a good long run in a very stable one. The population was pretty stable for Brealey. Blong time and they'd lived into their seventies generally from archaeological digs were. They found bones. They lived approximately the same age that we do in their biggest problem with accidents. Oh it wasn't. It wasn't all that different in the eighteen hundred in the US. If you're a male who made it to the to you had a really good chance of making it to your seventies yet where the lifespan of humans dropped into dropped into the thirty is in the Iron Age and the Bronze Age because we were at the name. Dear of very unhelpful. Eating and food with them living and disease without having the science to help treat these ills plus warfare and Accidental deaths than sure but even aside from that just from Just from disease and malnutrition. Yeah Yeah but but but the even. Then if you're a male who made it to your chances of making it to seventy were pretty good. View survived infant mortality. If you're a female who survived to to you had a really good chance of dying giving birth so there was definitely some. You're you're not wrong about that. Yeah but if you look at generally human history from the beginning two hundred years ago until now it went from about the average age it's life expectancy was the seventies in the Iron Age. Dropped down to the thirty. That'd be absolute bullshit if if if it was life expectancy one hundred thousand years ago as in seventy s then. That's discounting infant mortality. Well it's hard to know how many babies were born one hundred thousand years ago. You're right but so what they have our bones to well. This person lived at this age. And and so. It's probably an estimated. Guess based on what they found because if you discount infant mortality in the Roman empire and colonial America the life expectancy goes way up into the sixties and Seventies. It all comes down to. How good are you keeping people from from dying? He made me. I'm dying right. That's really the big Nar. The first big hurdle. Yeah and then the next. Big One is diseases from Domesticated animals. Oh yeah the big plagues. Yeah I mean the majority of the diseases that we are familiar with today. Come from animals and onto gathering didn't have domesticated animals right all right. Well we are out of time. Where can people find the movie? The truth about marriage is with the best places to go to my website. The TRUTH ABOUT MARRIAGE DOT com. And then you can track down the video or the book. Ebd Blu Ray. Whatever it is that you prefer and did you find a big like what would you say the big big conclusion or is that something People need to watch the movie for well had in in the book and the movie. Both I did. Boil it down coil. Coalesced down into a very easy to to digest handful of of advice big that people can do immediately and instantly to improve the trajectory of their relationships. Everybody's doing relationships wrong is what I learned from the experts. Some less wrong than others. But I can give you a couple of examples of what you could do and should do. According to the two John Goodman a psychologist at the institute in Seattle he said that A relationship naturally deteriorate over time if you don't put conscious intent into it it's GonNa naturally get worse if you don't do a few things such as express gratitude daily. It's one thing you could do some version of thank you needs to be vocalized and and you can't do it too often but people stop doing things that they do at the beginning and so you have to make a conscious effort to do. Some things in other is listening especially for the masculine men are horrible listeners. The the right way to listen the feminine needs this. It's like a relationship vitamin but she needs or in the man when he's in his feminine is for you to come home. Put your cell phone on airplane mode. Turn OFF THE TV. Make eye contact and for fifteen minutes. Fifteen or twenty minutes honey. How was your day on? How are you how are you feeling how is the day and then shut up? Don't offer any solutions. Don't ask any or did not try to fix anything. It's not a consultation. It's just a chance for the feminine to sort of download the emotions that she's experienced during the day now by doing that. If You well let me if you if you don't do that she won't feel satisfied and she'll start to get frustrated and that will lead to conflict ultimately you in by the same token the the feminine or the Woman Who's ever in their feminine shouldn't get greedy and try to take more than the fifteen or twenty percent or twenty minutes per night. 'cause the male brain can only handle about fifteen minutes of emotional talk before. What the Psychologists call or John Gotten called flooding happened. A male brain will start to flood emotionally after about fifteen or twenty minutes. A female brain is much more designed for it and can talk about emotions for much longer period of time. And here's one more thing. I'll I'll the counterpoint. To that is what the feminine should accept and understand about the masculine. The man or the masculine goes through a cycle. It both want connection but feminine wants connection all the time the masculine also wants connection once he has it he begins to urine for freedom. And he's the Guy I gotta get away. I need time off. I gotta go play Golf. You Know John. Calls it going to the cave and so if he if you try to get in the way of that cycle. B B The mail going between connection and freedom. There's going to be frustration which will lead to anger and then conflict so need to allow him to orbit away because once he has this freedom. He's GonNa Start to miss her and then re urine for connection again and then return go through this endless cycle of doing so the best way to facilitate that is for the masculine one or whatever in their masculine to say honey. I'm going to play golf. And when you're announcing this disconnection also announced when you're planning to reconnect and I'm so looking forward to seeing you at seven thirty tonight for dinner when I get home so now she knows she. She's feel secure and safe. He knows that you're disconnecting when you'RE GONNA reconnect and you better be home when you said you'd be home or you better call. Those are some of the tips are e. How hard is that? The implement fifteen minutes of listening. You know it costs you nothing. It's an experiment. You can do try for a week and see if things get better. The website again is the truth about marriage dot com right correct for the documentary in the book All right well Roger. Thank you very much for joining us. It's my pleasure. Well have to do it again. A little sooner than eight years from now. Yeah Yeah Working on that next movie I know well. I know I got a lot of work to do. If you're looking for the website be sure to include the word the L. because truth about marriage dot com is a very different site than the truth about marriage dot com. I hope you enjoyed this episode Hope you like the the rant at the beginning as well as the the interview and Yeah definitely Would appreciate any and all feedback. We will be doing a live stream for patrons for episode two forty five and a bigger livestream for everybody episode two fifty and so that one's coming up in less than two months. I've been enjoying doing interviews I've gotten this is as of of Release I have done man this point nine days time. I've completed for interviews for the PODCAST. This is GonNa be fun. I think it'll be a nice healthier change for us and I do need to. Of course mentioned that if you want to support the show you can find out how at atheist nomads dot com slash donate or at patriotair dot com slash atheists nomads. And if you WANNA send us a message you can do so via speak pipe with the link on the website or email us contacted atheist dot com or leave us a message on the feedback form on the website. We PROBABLY WON'T BE GETTING TO FEEDBACK INTEL EPISODE TO FORTY Five. So get it all in before. They'll give us some questions to talk about for that would be. It'd be a lot of fun that APPs it up for this week so until next time. Remember not all those who wander are lost a thank you for listening to another episode of atheist nomads. You can find show notes and contact information at atheist. Nomads DOT COM. Follow us on twitter at eighty ads and like us on facebook at facebook. Dot Com slash atheists nomads? Please subscribe to the show. I tunes Stitcher or your podcast of choice. And while you're there feel free to leave us a review. The Music is courtesy of Sturdy Fred until next time. This is Ben. He atheists nomads.

partner Idaho California Roger Nygaard Boise Spain Lou Manila Oregon Lauren immunodeficiency hawes Dustin measles flu Stanford Boston
A Functional Medicinal Approach to Diagnosing and Treating Viruses

Ben Greenfield Fitness

58:51 min | 1 year ago

A Functional Medicinal Approach to Diagnosing and Treating Viruses

"Hi My name. Is Dr Matt Cook? Today I'm going to be talking about a functional medicine approach to a viral outbreak. And I'm going to discuss the history and biology of viral. I'm also going to discuss some approaches to staying healthy and some integrative strategies that patients can use to improve their wellness while they're Potentially facing the possibility of viral infection or the actual infection. I'm here to educate inform and I'm not going to recommend any particular. A treatment will be disgusting. Approach us that are going on and a variety of places throughout the world may be referencing. Some of this work Not all of it is FDA approved. And I'm not going to be mentioning this outbreak by name or the specific virus Because of a some Some Search engine rules that came up and. I just agreed to do this. And then also because the FDA and FTC's position that the only treatment for this supportive care and so this is just an open conversation that hopefully is going to foster a conversation over time. I've been interested in Brown. She actually for twenty five years. I did a research project in virology at in College Setting Feline Immunodeficiency virus which actually as a model for HIV. I ended up going anesthesiology. And I'm probably most well known for doing ultrasound guided injections I've Interventional pain and regenerative medicine practice where I do injections into the spinal nerves and have Interesting approach to pain. What happened is I actually began to have a lot of patients with complex illness and pains. Search me out and I started seeing a lot of patients with tick borne illness. Mike and Talks an illness. Lyme disease had pain and became aware of that and started taking care of these patients with complex on this and and certified in functional. Medicine really developed and interested in some specialization. In complex and as a result have had a lot of patients with viral infections that I take care of and have a even larger number of patients who have a host of problems and in chronic illness lyme that have a viral over light and so. I'm going to talk about my experience with these patients and my my thoughts on what might be a interesting approach to supporting the patients with integrative strategies if we look to the past in history the the usage influenza pandemic those role epidemic pandemic that happened in for January of Nineteen Eighteen December of twenty twenty and it was known as the Spanish flu had actually in fact that about five hundred million people around the world and Somewhere between seventeen fifty million people and possibly as high as many as as as many as one hundred million people actually died in in that infection and it was the first sort of huge pandemic. The defected tons of people as Kinda interesting because it happened around the World War One and because there was a lot of fear that it would affect the morale of soldiers Morella people. The word type sensors didn't allow people to publicize anything about it and so there was no public discussion of it in Germany. The United States or France and or the United Kingdom and so the only press. That was free to talk about it with in Spain and so the there was a false impression that Spain was harder. Hit than other places which is why it got the name Spanish flu so you wonder why why why was this pandemic so bad may have been because there was a whole bunch of soldiers that were sick and they were in large numbers of people concentrated in small camps with birds and chickens and pigs and and so there was a potentially a a an element of a perfect storm happening however that the virus did something that created an extreme inflammatory response that actually killed people in particular it killed many people who are young what we have now come to understand. Is that what happened? Is something called a static kind storm so the question is that a perfect storm is stored and that that virus has actually been studied since then and has been put into animals and has been shown to have a similar effect of creating this This huge inflammatory response in a small number people as a pandemic that in some people created a crazy inflammatory response now since then. There have been a couple of more infections that we're viral infections that led to an outbreak that had a similar inflammatory response. one was called. Sars and one was called mirrors and interestingly the these were quite dangerous infections to get Mortality rate from SARS was about nine point six percent and the mortality rate from merce was a three point. Four thirty four percent saw as quite significant the cyrus acronym stands for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and Moore stands for Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome. So we're going to begin to see that. There is a pattern of viral infections. That in some people create a very exaggerated response that can sometimes be fatal and it appears that has an effect on the pulmonary system or the lungs and so when when I break down sort of the patient groups that I'm thinking about who are getting these infections. Broadly we can think of patients as falling into one of three categories and the the majority of patients have a self limited illness and some may have no symptoms at all. And we're trying to figure out who those are and why they are In the case of this epidemic. It sounds like the. The percentage in this group is about eighty percent so eighty percent are going to get through and probably do quite well without much trouble. The next group is a group of people that you'd probably predict are going to have some challenge and these are immuno compromised patients and any patients with pre existing conditions so an example might be Patients who were taking steroids patients who are taking drugs that are designed to turn the immune system down so that they don't for example have arthritis or autoimmune conditions or patients that have fairly significant Heart or lung diseases and just a little viral. Illness was enough to take them over the top. But then this category too but then the third category which is pretty interesting as a group of relatively healthy patients who get a viral infection and then as the result of that they have an extremely overactive immune response to the virus and the term. That's used to describe that something the satine storm and it leads to something called. Sepsis and what happens in substances? Is that as a result of an infection. The immune system becomes over overly aggressive. And what happens in this case? Is that the. The virus actually acts on the epithelial cells. In the in the long at acts on the cells that are basically the lining of your respiratory tract. And then there's an extremely overactive response. That is so active that it has the side effect of killing a whole bunch of those south. As result of that patients get pneumonia and can have a fairly extremely compensated respiratory function and so. They began to have a very hard time breathing and their oxygen saturation can go down. And then what can happen then is that it can begin to affect not just alongs but can and begin to spread into the entire vascular System and it can begin to affect other organs and then organs when this begins to happen concert to shut down and so this group of people we wanNA think about why that's happening and think about some options to support them and then we'll talk about the other groups to as we've been talking about this number people have asked me how come the flu is always happening. In the winter it turns out that the flu loves a winner And so it. It exists in the northern hemisphere in the winter and exists in the southern hemisphere in in their winner. Interestingly and there's a experience that influenza influenced tend to be more intense at low temperatures than high temperatures in the tropics often there's very little In the in the way of flew flew type of illnesses. There's a question of how this infection is transmitted and clearly it's transplant transmitted and respiratory droplets. But it's also probably transmitted in any bodily fluid and there's case reports of of unsealed sewage relation pipes that actually infected people in different different parts of buildings and so it it it can be very easily aerosolize than so. There's going to be a fairly stringent approach to a maintaining cleanliness both for prevention and then for treatment. And we're GONNA list What have been printed from some of the health organizations in terms of what the standard of care is a in terms of in terms of those things? The presentation of this viral situation is often with pneumonia fever shortness of breath and when a chest x rays done what happens is people see on in both lungs infiltrates and the reason for that. Because if there is then exaggerated immune response. It's not gonNA act just on one long but is going to act on both lungs and sometimes people can have symptoms of gastrointestinal tract. They can have diarrhea. Sometimes it can be a symptomatic When people get a blood test often they're whip leads. All Countess Low. They can have elevated liver function and can present with a lab tests The shows elevated daytime irs the most common symptoms according to World Health Organization or a fever tiredness and a dry cough but Some people We'll have no symptoms if if you have a fever cough and difficulty breathing than the World Health Organization. Success suggests seeking medical care during hospitalization From one report the most common complication with pneumonia which was like eighty percent seventy nine percent acute respiratory distress syndrome which is the Pulmonary manifestation of aside kind storm was three point. Three percent and Shaq was one percent. So what we can say is. Overall about. Eighty percent of people will do quite well Twenty percent of people can have symptoms and of those most will do well and may have pneumonia but Recover but then there's a small percent that have this extreme sat kind storm reaction that leads to a relatively catastrophic pulmonary complication called air. Ds and Some of those people can end up with sepsis. Obviously if the people who are getting this were quite l. or had other problems than they may be more susceptible to illness but it can also happen to to people who may have been otherwise quite healthy so the question then becomes well. Why does this happen? And how does this happen? The these cells that line the your pulmonary track our primary targets for these types of viruses and they also seem to choreograph the set of kind amplification during infections. And what they do is they begin to turn on. Cell to cell messengers which were called Santa kinds and chemokines and initially what happens is they turn on pro inflammatory cytokines and when they do that. The effect of those pro inflammatory cytokines is to create a big immune response and the goal of that. Immune response is going to be to draw immune cells in and those immune cells will then fight the virus. And then everything's GonNa be okay however One thing that can happen is that these pro inflammatory Cytokines can recruit inflammatory cells. That then begin to have an overwhelming effect that can actually lead to the death of the epithelial cells and when that happens it can have the side effect of spilling out into the the vascular system causing hypertension and Sepsis and multi organ system dysfunction and so the result of this as it can lead to damaging of the ally which are the is is where basically we transfer oxygen back and forth between the blood and the lungs and can lead to fibrosis and scarring and And that can lead to dysfunction of the ability of the longest to transfer oxygen and so if someone in the sickest patients with us what happens is the often present with these infiltrates and a hard time breathing and low oxygen levels. Now I'm just going to take you through a small tour of immunology because I think it's useful to to understand this so that we can understand how some vitamins and supplements that. I'm going to talk about actually work. So he mentioned that there are a number of inflammatory cytokines. One of the the best known and most intensely studied at the pro. Inflammatory cytokines is One called Tumor necrosis factor. And it's a considered a central role in acute viral illnesses including in the influenza viruses including fever including EVOLA VIRUS. And it tends to then turn on other side of kinds and attends to promote a exaggerated inflammatory response. Now why is it that most people seem to do fine? But there's this percentage of people that have this exaggerated responds. I'm going to get into this over the next few weeks but there are a variety of reasons that are thought influences. One is actually Genetic influences so there are polymorphism or variations in Genetics that can affect immunity for example. There may be some people that make more of this the city county enough and it may be different from virus virus and so. I think over the next period of time we're GONNA learn more and more about this and so we'll help possibly give us some better ability to predict that in the future so then we have factors that can begin to drive the storm and one of the factors that drive it. In addition to said kinds is a molecule called Nuclear Factor Kappa Beta For those of you who? Because I'm throwing around some terms. You may not earn it before my acronym for this nuclear factor Kappa Bad. And so this is something that we're trying to turn off because in Subsurface it's been found that activation of nuclear factor. Kappa Beta can mix ups this worst and greater levels of activity are associated with a higher rate of mortality Morbidity and worst click outcomes in these patients and then interestingly inhibition of this tends to restore systemic hypertension and ameliorate Many of the side effects. That happen in Sepsis in general. There's whatever there's a bad cop there's a good cop and so then. We began to say well okay. We blocked an F. Cap. Maybe that might be helpful. Is there anything that we can turn on? That turns on turns out that the master antioxidants which is a transcription factor and our F- to think nerf is good and and what that does is it helps us to modulate the inflammatory response to stress. And interestingly there's a whole bunch of compounds that have been identified as a enough to inducer including so sulfurophane curcumin raspberry trial courses and wanted to just mentioned a little bit about the the status attesting. We found out today. That quest is going to be offering a test you can either do nasal swabs bronchial washing throat swabs and I just found out that our local hospital is going to be offering some testing what I would recommend. As is the people reach out to the local hospital and try to figure out what the strategy is in case you need to get testing? I found out that the gates foundation is actually working on a at home tests and I also wanted to discuss just some of the concepts of preventing implements. A one of the great advances in of all time in medicine is just the concept of handwashing. And I think that there's a lot that can be done from the perspective of preventing yourself from getting exposed And we'll be publishing some of the the guidelines that have been published by some of the larger health organizations so that you'll be able to have that to look at in terms of Treating patients there's going to be those people have mild illnesses and Obviously those people are going to be able to stay at home and there's a whole bunch of guidelines in terms of Mask wearing and in terms of handwashing in terms of standardization in terms of both for the patient and the people taking care of them that are worth paying attention to and then The same goes for people who are in hospitals and so we'll publish some of those things as well now. What I'm going to try to do is run through a variety of different treatments. And just sort of a high level to to give you a sense of what's happening if you're trying to calm down the immune system one idea is to give steroids and in previous viral outbreaks like this The use of systemic corticosteroids turned out to not have very many benefits in. There may have been some harm. So we're going to find out what happens with that. I don't think that that's going to be whenever highlight therapies from a high level. Imagine that one thing that we're trying to do is calm down the overly act of immune system but then And that's the concept around that term and called immunomodulating and then the other concept is is to actually use something that would kill the virus because if there was less virus than it might have less of an impact on the shelves and then Patients might be less susceptible to the side of storm. There's a antiviral call from desert and it's been used to treat a number of people in this in this opera again there's a NIH trial going on right now in the United States with us and so we'll be eagerly watching to see what happens with that looks like it's being given intravenously. There are some other antivirals. And we'll be looking to see if what their successes. But in general the Rim desert is not clinically available at least at this point another abroad. Category is the use of antioxidants and these include things like NEC which actually has antiviral effects and vitamin C. Closer is an not only. Do some of these antiviral effects. But they also have some anti-inflammatory facts and may be helpful for the storm. That is induced in severe influenza. In addition. And I'm going to go into this a little bit later. But there are a wide variety of plant derived and accidents polyphenols and flavonoids that have antiviral affects that a lot of our patients have used that I've got a fair bit of experience using over the years and I think that It'll be interesting to pay attention to those. Because those may be valuable adjunct of tools a for prophylaxis and prevention. And then be a for therapy. But we don't have that data to prove that so. I don't want any strong statement but just Pointing to that one concept. I mentioned that. There's a steady kind. Tanf there's many many many but one concept and intriguing substances to try to turn that down interesting. They won therapy. That I may be telling you about a little bit later Which is called ozone therapy? Actually there's some data that shows that it may turn down the NFL as well as other interleukins in so I will be suggesting some. The that may be provocative Tool to offer us at as part of our Philosophical approach big picture. What we're trying to do is turn off the bad guys in. Turn up the good guys to to balance the immune system to balance the immune response the bad guys kind of the we talked about the NFL. Nuclear factor captured Kappa. Beta as the other one interesting and capital is also implicated in host of other problems like inflammatory bowel disease arthritis and gas right US and and heart disease so it's interesting because of that but but many of the the favorite supplements that a lot of people are have heard of Many of the supplements actually hacked on. Nf abuse so it's GonNa be interesting to kind of be aware of that. And then the other thing that we're trying to do is up regulated activate and are up to which has this master antioxidant switch and interestingly ozone one of the things we've been talking about we're going to talk about a maybe an activator of our of two and I think that's GonNa be interesting thing to watch and we're going to try to share some of the science of that with you now. Then as we think of think of overarching strategies of how to begin to approach this. We're we're trying to modulate and balance the immune system. We're hopefully going to have something that can have some kind of killing effect like an antiviral and We're trying to manage subsets. But a I also would like to introduce you to this. This idea of a functional medicine approach to wellness Plato said that Depart can never be well unless the hall as well I would say this is true whether it's a person society at large the whole planet and our approach to addressing complex illness has been to to take a systems approach of looking at every organ system. Looking how it's working With the other systems and then doing testing to try to figure out how well it's working. Are there problems Do People have symptoms? That are either out of control or sub clinical. That may be making that organ system work not as and then do we have an opportunity to potentially affect that the classic example that you might be able to understand is that our entire immune system centered in the gut and what can happen as that people start to have problems as we age because the diversity of the microbes that we have in our intestines may go down. We may get infections with parasites or bacteria that can cause problems. Sometimes people can get something called small. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth leads to leaky gut. And when the gut becomes leaky and little bits of toxins and and Bacteria or undigested food get into the bloodstream that can cause immune dysfunction and that immune dysfunction can lead to problems and this is something that we see every day in patients who come in that have chronic infections and a chronic difficulty of fighting presentable viral infections or fighting lime disease and often. We'll see two people insane family. That had the same illness but the one that has five or six other things going on and their immune system is just not working very well at us. Challenging has all kinds of symptoms and the other person has the same test but they don't have any symptoms and there isn't it on Simpson's is because even though they got the infection their immune systems working. Pretty darn well and so our goal is then to try to dive in and figure out each and every way that we can start to fix all those little small parts and as we do that and optimize that we generally see that by increasing. Someone's wellness we can get them to start Feeling better and functioning better and so this is this concept of functional medicine incorporating things like exercise sleep decreasing toxins decreasing the toxins were putting into the body There's a lot I think that can be done from a lifestyle modification front and. We're GONNA talk about this in the days when we used to come but my philosophy is is that a systems approach to healthcare is probably the best way to optimize immune immune functioning any immune system at large now and relative rapid sequence eminent. Put some information. I'm just going to run through a some vitamins that I think are interesting. Vitamin C. Actually has been shown when given intravenously to help patients with organ failure and Sepsis and Right now There's a trial investigating vitamin C. The great thing about vitamin C. Is extremely cheap and there are some strategies that could be done to give vitamin C. Infusions two people and in a very cost effective manner which I think is is quite exciting. Vitamin D Someone appointed a pro survival molecule. And one of the things that it does is that helps the immune system dampen and excessive or chronic reaction so it has quite a bit of anti inflammatory potential We should have a vitamin D. LEVEL. That is in the range of fifty to eighty. Maybe ninety. A lot of people have a low vitamin D. level and if one has a low vitamin D. level there there may be a slightly increased stability to infection now as I run through Some some of the some vitamins. That have been well known in a in the for helping people with viral infections. Curcumin One of the most popular and interestingly To go back to what I was talking about earlier has been found in inhibit enough cap. Maybe another one Quercetin has antiviral effects but is also been shown to inhibit an Cabbie and it may Improve survival and decreased all damage in a mouse model of SEPSIS. There's some experience that probiotics can balance the gastrointestinal tract and may make people less susceptible to a shock and sepsis. I'm just going to run through a couple of companies but and and I'm not gonNA pick one over the other but I just want to run through a few of these because I think They're potentially provocative in terms of helping people. There's a bitcoin protocol ex-pm from apex energetics. And it has a a host of ingredients that are designed to be antiviral got vitamin A veteran. See Think Stragglers Mytalk Mushrooms and a pomegranate? And so there. There are some products out there. And there's a proximal a whole bunch of different companies that have a general antiviral approach. And I think that's that's one of them There's Life extension sell these these enhanced zinc lozenges and zinc Actually has been shown to have antiviral antimicrobial properties that actually prevents viral replication and. I think it's perfect to take it in your mouth because while it's there it's having an effect but That's where the virus comes in is in the mouth designs for health has a a course Corbett product. That's a one to one ratio. Of course it in and vitamin CS as a two for one Quicksilver makes a life of Somali Glutathione complex and and actually shown to inhibit Viruses Both in terms of inhibiting How they replicate and and by combating the reactive oxygen species that they create. But it's actually been should be quite helpful to the immune system in a variety of ways. And if you take vitamin D with vitamin A. Can prevent some of the toxicity from large doses and so A great way to get it is From from cod liver oil. Quicksilver has this product called the one Which really an amazing product that supports at are up to which is a master antioxidants which it it also has a whole bunch of antioxidants and it was designed to help the body use energy effectively and particularly in the Mitochondria which is where all of our energy is where energy comes from and One thing that I found is if you can optimize mitochondrial function in patients with chronic illness. They tend to do better. And so in this case what we're trying to optimize the medical committee cadre function in all of the cells This product also has some adapted. Jen's then it which I think might be which might be helpful and they've been shown to increase this thing. Tgif bid which seems to turn down the inflammatory response Laura Sidon is A product is derivative of coconut milk. That has some antibiotics foam effects and has antiviral effects There's a product from apex energetics. Tomorrow is a rich source of humanoids. We really like this product made from quicksilver. It's easy to take. And it has the precursor to any D which is one of the most important signaling molecules in the body and any D- helps Turn on the ability the Mitochondria to work But we've also seen it clinically to be quite helpful in biter. If you can turn on the medic hundred in your immune sauce then your immune cells have potential to to function better finally Corta Steps Royal Jelly Are some some Antiviral Amick Rubio Products Ronnie at microbe. Y'All and We've been Using a lot of a derivative of all of these called eloping That has It's a finale compound. But has antiviral antibacterial properties the next thing? I'd like to tell you a little bit about. Is something called Ozone Therapy? Therapy is A technique that comes from Russia in Europe. It's used quite a bit by natural pass around the world as well as More and more doctors. Nikola Tesla patented the first commercial ozone generator back in eighteen. Ninety six and ozone is a interesting molecule because it seems to have antiviral antibacterial anti parasitic and Funchal Effects. So as a anti microbial effect Also may stimulate are up to so it may have a role of modulating the in system and it also seems to decrease side of kinds and so there may be a role in cut of modulating. The in the exaggerated inflammatory response. The other thing that I think is is provocative and interesting about ozone is that it's an oxidative therapy. We were talking about antioxidants being good but what I have found. Is that a motif that involves a combination of oxidative and antioxidative effects can be quite helpful. In patients with chronic illness. The IT turns out that the oxidative effective on May have an ability to turn on an antioxidant response within the body which is interesting but then the other thing that happens with ozone is that ozone can actually have an affect on the virus and the effect that can have on the viruses that it a reduces it oxidises the self hydro groups that are on the virus and viruses need a reduced south hydro group to be able to enter cells and so then the concept is that ozone many block the ability of the virus to get into the cell by having this effect on the solve hydro and and there are some literature indicating that This is This is the case in a ball. And I've I had some conversations about this With respect to the current outbreak in and it appears that the mechanism is similar. The other thing that happens with those owners is that what does on Mixes with blood? What happens is that forms? Lipid peroxides and those lipid peroxides then can dissolve into the cell and then solid oxidation reduction reactions and that can lead to an increase in levels and that can have a variety of beneficial effects. Finally with respect ozone. There's a concept that I think is interesting called oxidative pre conditioning and it's analogous to a phenomena called schemic Pre conditioning The concept is that the oxidative stress leads the body to have a response and anti inflammatory response in reaction to that that can be protective. And so there's some experimental models of Liver Renal ischemia every perfusion where Rectal ozone was given and so I was an ozone anima and then that was absorbed into the bloodstream and that had a protective effect on later. on on a later insult and so then There is a hypothesis that I'm I'm proposing that that pre-treatment with ozone could be a beneficial thing to do before exposure to a chronic infection. Now how can how can you take ozone Whether it's a variety different ways You can get a generator. Patients can buy these or practitioners by these but then The ozone generators as hooked up to an oxygen machine and then it creates a mixture of oxygen and ozone it's by far mostly oxygen and a little bit ozone and so you can make an oxygen ozone mixture and then do an animal with that we just called rectal no zone You can do Asana where your head's protected you know breath any of it in you can do nasal insulation and then there's a number of techniques that mix it with blood. The traditional way of doing it was taking some blood out mixing the blood with gas and putting it back in this is called major auto. Hema therapy The next one and Dr Frank Shellenberger is kind of a the guru who figured this out and has been the most important thought leader in the House on world For the last forty years And and he has taught thousands and thousands of doctors around the world and we'll have linked to him. He's a very important person In this in this regard There's doctrine named Mahogany who is from Germany? And and he discovered an a concept. Which was if you could do that once. Why not do that ten times and and so this was coined high-dose on therapy. I actually have found that in general. I often like something this in between those and so generally I'll start very low. I'll work my way up often. We'll do one or two passes than three or four passes and then once were sure that people are can tolerate the oxidation response and that they're doing well then then we can proceed onto dark lodden coin. Toss on therapy And we'll Do some discussion with some of The important leaders I promised my friend Robert Rohan that I would mention him in this podcast. I I sort of love him. Because he in the dengue fever I mean in the Bala outbreak Went to Sierra Leone and actually treated some doctors and treated bunch of people there with positive results and some of the people that they didn't treat actually died And as I mentioned above that was quite a significant outbreak and and I just loved his attitude because he said Well if I get it I'll just treat myself which is which is like it's just such a great attitude so we're GONNA be talking to him and and going through his experience of what what he learned Tree treating these patients and all of the doctors that mentioning have fairly robust and long term experience taking care of patients with compr- plex viral illnesses with Ozone and so I think it's It's something to think about For the future. And that's something that needs needs a lot more Studying the final ozone technique that. I'll mention on dialysis and it's a technique where Blood is actually pass through a dialysis filter and then as an added at the same time and We have found that Patients who had to go. This therapy seem to tolerate much better than I'd ozone therapy and seem to respond well in the setting of infections particularly with lime disease and all of the techniques that I mentioned we re teach other doctors worldwide. How to do these techniques and so We're happy if you want to reach out to go through some of these techniques. In addition to that I think that the best company that makes generators Brin particularly for Patient says this company called longevity and they make amazing. There is the make amazing generators That can be used for all of the approaches except for the High Dose. Ozone therapy and and Recording I cut off but what I was GonNa say was is that you can. You can also do injections with those on. And and there's a whole world are on that that I'll I'll go into speaking of entire worlds of healthcare. Probably the the most interesting and exciting new field in. Integrative medicine has been the conversation around peptides Peptides are Baby Proteins It's a a small number of acids but they're they're big enough that you can't absorb them across Mucous membrane like your mouth. The the most common peptide that you've probably all heard of insulin and because it's big and you can't absorb it across your mouth you have to inject this is the case with most of the peptides now. There are there a variety of peptides In that come from every organ every part of the body But the part of the body that is the master controller of the immune system Is The thymus and so there are some ties accompanied from the thymus seemed to have a very powerful effect on the the immune system in one of them is called thymus and Alpha and a lot of line patients. A lot of people with chronic infections have been taking it and it's been shown to increase the ability of the body to deal with versions by largely and most importantly by increasing activities themselves that are called in case. All's and cases are part of immune system that actually goes out and fights infections in and kills them. There's another one called The host defense peptides l. thirty-seven which has antiviral effects and and suffice it to say that there is a lot to say around peptides at him. A dive into this in more detail. But it's useful for you know these. These categories exists. And then the next one that I just wanted to briefly talk about a little bit as a topic called exorcisms. Psalms are the secretions of stem cells. And it's thought that probably one of the main mechanisms of action of stem cell is to secrete excess homes in fact the person that came up with the name stems actually changed the name to medicinal signaling cell. And the reason he did that is he said some cells probably don't go and turn themselves into a cartilage cell in your knee. They probably are more likely to secrete excess homes that Send messages and communicate to other cells to have a regenerative effect. It turns out that X. Oems have this molecule. Tgif Beta three which calms down immune over activation and. There's an experience of using excess homes in ill patients and the experience tend to be that attend to calm down immune over activation tends to Calm down Autoimmune Syndromes and. I think that there is a possibility that it may be beneficial in substance. I have never treated someone in substance with excess homes but mechanistically. I think that It may make sense Interestingly the area that a lot of patients have received treatment for sexism's patients with COPD which stands for Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Copd is actually model for the type of Lung Disease Air. Yes that people get when they get the septic syndromes and I'm aware of a large number of case reports of patients who had copd who create either with Ivy X. assumes or with nebulizers homes and there were positive experiences with many of these patients. And I don't know of any negative outcomes and so so so it's a it's a opportunity for for for future treatment and interestingly exercise you can give Iv but you can also nebulizers and the idea of a nebulizer saying that treatment is quite interesting because it's very it's a very I think it's relatively safe and from a cardiovascular experience with these patients potentially a first place to think about trying one of the problems with Sepsis is that these patients are very sensitive because of all of the vascular problems to getting too much fluid and so then being able to do something where they could never realized in a trip and I think is interesting There's a another along. Those lines idea is a concept of Nebula Ami fluid aware of many case reports of people with severe pulmonary infections including COPD who had a positive experience that the final thing that I'm telling you about is that there was a trial that was just published And we'll to Using stem cells that were grown in a lab and then those stem cells in China were given to patients with this illness. And then what happened is is that they were falling. All of these people. had low oxygen saturation weakness shortness breath and pneumonia and they actually all did well and they did better than the people who didn't receive treatment in in full disclosure. I have a culture expanded stem cell program that we treat patients with in Mexico In a fall the legal and compliant manner This is not a United States company. And I'm not suggesting that this is a treatment for Sepsis or for viral illnesses. But we were quite interested in seeing this this research. I think it points to a possibility for a role of regenerative treatments Helping in infectious situations and mechanistically. It's interesting because when stem cells are given HIV. They float around about a lot of them actually get trapped in the lungs The concept is that they are trapped in along with they do is they secrete XS homes. And so it it. Mechanistically makes a fair bit of sense to me that that That treatment could have a beneficial effect on the lungs. And so here. We are what what are the next steps? These are difficult times. Most people are GonNa do very well. some people are going to require a new Nuanced approach but this is a problem. This happening at a global scale. Listening to this talk. I think the takeaways are that The people who get really sick generally have that kind storm. And we've got a variety of ways that we can start to Modulate the over overactive immune responses with supplements that are really beginning to Calmed down by a variety of different ways our immune response I think that there are some provocative Tools that maybe a lot of people in Western medicine are aware of but I think that are at least worth studying and thinking about An primarily ozone but then the regenerative medicine strategies that may have some beneficial effects. And then finally. There are entire new categories of therapies. That are beginning to come online. Like peptides that May Have Senators senator just effects with these other things at a at a high level. I think the optimal treatment is going to come from the combination of all of these strategies and And and in particularly in combination potentially with a drug that has antiviral effects. I think the exciting thing is is that as we get knowledge and information we're able to begin to take matters into our own hands Some people call this biohacking other people call it. Functional medicine other people call and wellness strategies The I think biohacking is a new term when I was in when I was in China. Twenty five years ago Studying acupuncture and Chinese medicine my first foray and integrative medicine they said that everyone went to a Chinese doctor and a Western doctor went to see their grandmother And interestingly a lot of the things we're talking about are probably reminiscent of something that our grandfather mothers might have said to us a hundred years ago But a lot of things we're talking about are at the highest level of technical sophistication that exists on the planet today. So I'm excited to continue this conversation and I look forward to learning more and getting better at taking care of these problems.

Sepsis Illness pneumonia United States HIV Germany Lyme disease gastrointestinal tract Dr Matt Cook Spain Immunodeficiency COPD twenty twenty FDA flu
Monday-The New Normals Are In Charge  And Impervious To Coronoa Facts. We Must Defeat Them!

CRUSADE Channel Previews

12:06 min | 1 year ago

Monday-The New Normals Are In Charge And Impervious To Coronoa Facts. We Must Defeat Them!

"Now get this the test said had been derived that had been created. To test for the H. I. V.. Human Immunodeficiency. Virus HIV, right at the test that had been developed was ninety, nine, point, four, forty, four, one, hundred. Accurate. Now, that sounds like, wow, ninety nine, point, forty, four, one, hundred, accurate. That is not an accurate test. It may sound like it, but it's nine. And if you run the numbers out per one hundred thousand. You'RE GONNA get. An error. A false positive rate or a false negative rate. Of. Six hundred sixty. That's what the ninety nine point forty four. Point, four, four Accuracy rate. As one hundred, thousand. So that's six, thousand, six, hundred per million. Now. If this thing is an actual info, infectious dynamo, there's just running around infecting anyone that gets anywhere near anyone that has it. and. You have that kind of an array plus or minus. What's what actually would happen? Well, you'd have a bunch of people running around spreading the virus. Now, that's a ninety, nine, point, four four. One hundred. Forty four. PERCENT ACCURATE? No company will even give a number other than we think it's around eighty percent act eighty percent. You'll guys are setting policy that is ruining people's lives. It has taken from them stealing from them all that they've ever worked for their entire life and their little small business, and it's based upon a test that might be eighty percent accurate and eighty percent accurate for what? SNIFFLES. Look the American Federation of Teachers Doing Look Look at all the usual suspects are doing with this. All they're doing is apply in the corona bug, a super, the Wuhan Super Corona Hoax Bug all they're doing is applying it to their usual suspect activities and then going like, well, we're union teachers are not going to go to school where. You know they're showing up at protest outside of school boards or what have you with nooses in Guillotine Zinzan your kids are GonNa, kill us as far more likely. You'll kill the kids. Then, they will kill you certainly when we're talking about the Wuhan Superbug because they're not gonna get it, and if they do get it, they're not going to sprint to you. Do you know why? Because they have great immune systems and their immune system has already beaten the bug? It's already defeated. This is a proven fact. And yet all we hear is urban legend in Innuendo. Stay representative tally. Way Of life has been turned on its head. Jobs have been lost. Ben. Is this shutdown and people find by health orders never passed by your duly elected representatives people cannot make their house payments. Schools are closed. People's mental health is failing police are being assaulted in into defunding, and we are denied access to healthcare and worst of all churches are closed but don't forget emperor faucher team says wear goggles. And Hook up with a stranger and let us banner drug has been used for almost forty years and banned doctors who speak out in favor. Of using it. Represents Represent A. Representative tally concludes this is the title of today's show. Why do you believe the dictator of disinformation governor the line. I might ask the same thing of my fellow citizens, Louisiana why in the hell do you believe this guy? He wasn't a good governor the first go around. He was a shifty demon crat politician wouldn't the hell makes him an expert and you know when you get up there and you watch these guys talking drone on thing with all these statistics that they just bombarded with thinking that no one can actually go to the source of figure out. That's not true which I do regularly and I published and I asked the newspapers and TV stations to cover it and to cover me you know what they tell me. Go Blank yourself we're not interested in the truth. We have lots of money to be made by celine mask advertisements. We have lots of money to be made by celine advertisements for hand sanitizers and what have you him, by scaring Jesus, Bell, data people so that they run to us for news coverage. You're watching the disintegration of what remained of the of the M.. S. M. mainstream media, folks, they are eating themselves in their own by the by a side note quickly. Did in the woman formally known as Ellen. She always looked like this is what was in their late fifties, but she looks like a little boy who? A little blonde haired boy whose what sixteen, seventeen years old. How's IT possible ADRENAL CORUM ADRENAL chrome. Play, gets I. Think like that like Haiti's I can't. What do we find out? About. The greatest most kind gentleman, caring and loving lesbian in the history of gentle konin loving lesbians. What are we find out behind the scenes? She's a screaming raw demonic tyrant. tyrant. Is, Ellen. Has Ellen's number. With the check that she cashed. would. Be. As Bob. With Lilith. Fair. The Demon Lilith. And Moloch in the boys. Satan called at Inigo. I gave you thirty years bitch. I gave you air then you wanted. Just. Like all the rest of them Weinstein and all you got to pay. Their she gonNA lose her show as O'CONNELL. You follow the story I'm not following this closely as you. Word on the street is it's possible. They're interviewing other people to take her place just in case it continues on I. Think they're just waiting for it to die down. Now, what about the other shoe that's about to drop with a oprah? Selling off her assets. And making it so that she flee if need be. Now. This is a This is the inside. Hollywood rumor about Oprah. Now the Ellen thing is pretty well, that's out there. They know putting that genie back in a bottle. Representative tally concludes state the Great State of. Ohio. The last legislator little are Republican left standing. People better, stand and fight for their freedom. This is madness and the intellectual laziness being shown is beyond alarming. Member when they said, we just need fifteen days to stop the spread. Here we are at one hundred and eighty days in and it gets worse every day they keep telling us it's getting worse and worse and worse and people are now wearing face shields in and you see people now driving in their cars by themselves with the face diaper on. We are losing our way of life and our republic but go ahead and strap on your face diaper. This is a real side of toughness. And rugged American individualism is the exact opposite of that. Then we have this from chuckles smuggles. Schumer on Friday and You're not going to cure that you're not going to solve the problem they still seem unwilling. To do what is necessary for a strong testing tracing and treatment regime? What is one of the biggest problems is the digital media founded you notice that he says Testing, regime. Where does the word regime come from? What's the root word? Reg. Actually in Latin word is REX. Adore the term regime comes from REX which means king. Show it is the domain of a king. Or maybe a dictator. We need a strong testing regime. Well, we know that the test are one hundred percent inaccurate and that no one should be relied on the test to do anything other than to get second and third opinions. If you think you're in at endanger and if you're going and healthy, you're not. But wait. Schumer does have a moment of clarity he slips up tells the truth what is one of the biggest problems facing us in the next month as the speaker mentioned schools opening up the school leave you don't open up the schools Raggi. Remember the economy significantly because lots of people can't go to work. Executive orders leave out schools altogether. All right. So he's bitching that trump did not put schools in an executive order but then again, the president is deferring he's being a federalist he's deferring the Governor's like you guys got to do that. I can't open or closed schools that's on you guys. But here's smuggled Schumer going like okay Yeah. We created an economy where mom and dad have to work so they can pay our taxes and so they can leave their little darlings at government run indoctrination centers and look we're willing to do a lot but we're not willing to let children be educated at home because that's the last thing. These people want they need your kids in gunman education camps, they need them in the camps that is not an option. You Start Educating, your own insurance, and all of a sudden they become critical thinkers and go like, Hey, wait a minute. Mess up to Mrs mcgillicuddy Taught Me by the by Rod DREHER HAS A. every once in a while dreyer comes out of his dementia. and Sa-, and write something that makes a little bit of sense as a piece out of the American Conservative magazine. Website He. Who is the the? The DOODO rabble-rousing teacher type. His name is Matthew are cake matthew he is also said his twitter account to private because he got so much backlash from patient with Matthew K basically says, as we know, I'm all for having a virtual teaching environment, but virtual teaching environment means that parents might be able to watch. And then Matthew are K goes onto ring the alarm bell by accident and say an apparent watch. Then they may see US indoctrinating their children and homosexuality and transgenderism and fascism and what have you and they might intervene. Citizen you. May.

Ellen Schumer representative Matthew K Executive Immunodeficiency American Federation of Teacher Wuhan Haiti US celine advertisements SNIFFLES Bob American Conservative magazine Ohio Rod DREHER twitter oprah DOODO
S2E08: Why You Should Study Immunology

Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar

44:52 min | 3 years ago

S2E08: Why You Should Study Immunology

"But once we clear, those bacteria or viral infections are immune system has to have a mechanism by which to turn itself off. There are Cajun's where the ability to turn off an immune system is that the fat, and when that turning off mechanism does not occur normally than our own immune system starts attacking itself. I'm Jane Grogan. And I'm scientist I've been at this for more than twenty years now. And I think perhaps the only thing better than during size is talking about the signs lucky for me. I work in a place where I am surrounded by some of the brightest minds in research. However, there's usually not much time to just sit and talk. And that's why I'm so thrilled to be hosting this podcast. I'm going to step away from my lab today and chat with a colleague about some of the cool stuff. We're working on especially as we try and lead these discoveries to new investigation and medicines. So grab your favorite drink get ready to unlock science brain. And join us for two scientists walk into a bar a podcast provide techniques and the people who want to hang out with. So what do you know about our new system while those a knee and the WT immunity and needs kind of neutrophils macrophages and they take care of bacteria without having seen them before. What he said all of that style. It's quite amazing that we can deplete all of our cells and still retain quite a bit of immunity. That's question without it. We would be dead in no time. Immune system. So yeah, we should be looking into it, more and more and more and more. Oh, good answers. I think we had some immunologists that snuck into that bunch. Welcome to the final episode of season two here at the Bob we've had a lot of discussion on this podcast series about the immune system. How immune cells communicate traffic along connective tissue and invade tumors in this episode. I want to take a step back in a simple question. What is the system? What's it made of where does it reside? How does it work here to help answer all these questions and more is Andy Chen, not only research expert on all things immunological, but also a medical doctor specializing in rheumatological diseases. Welcome Andy, thank you. Let's dive right in. So what is the system immune system is a defense mechanism by which we in all organisms have that protect ourselves from foreign invaders it, the most important aspect of the immune system is that it has to be able to distinguish. Self versus non self. Can you define what you mean by self a non-self? So the moon system has to be able to recognize foreign bacteria foreign viruses and at the same time not react with ourselves. And there are many diseases where the immune systems goes. Hey haywire in which it starts tacking our own self to cause different diseases before we get into some of those diseases. It might be worth just taking a moment to talk about the kind of cells of immune systems in previous episodes. We've talked largely about t- sales. But of course, there are many more cellular components to it to the moon system exists in many, many different species, they exist in plants in flies invertebrates and the complexity of immune system increases along the generic tree when we talk about the immune system, and we really try to categorize it into two major systems the. Nate immune system, as well as the adaptive immune system, the innate immune system is the ancient arm of your immune system, and it's meant to be. It's thought to be a fast responder system, and there two major components are cells of the immune system, and these include cells, such as macrophages dendritic cells neutrophils, and many others and these cells express on their cell surface or inside theirselves sensors that can detect bacterial or viral a DNA proteins lipids. And when they get activated those sensors then activate the cells to initiate, this NATO immune response, and the second component aside from cells that make up the immune system. And Nate to mean system are proteins. They're proteins in our blood that also can recognize foreign bacteria. And can actually the wreck kill the bacteria. So this is the complement system. This is the complement system now as opposed to the innate immune system, we also have the other arm of immune system called the adaptive immune system. This star. Toby bald about five hundred million years ago, it's not in invertebrates, but I developed in jaw fish, and this the adaptive immune system is generated to target specific proteins of viruses bacteria in the light. There are the adaptive immune system cells called lymphocytes. These are the t cells b cells and the like, and they have they develop specific reactivity against spectacular or viral proteins. Hey, wellington. Do you study the adaptive Annonay immune system or do you focus on one? It's impossible to study one without the other because it was so totally linked together. So the night system is more generic it's an immediate response to an invasion. It's kind of like the an alarm system an alarm will set off a response an inflammatory reaction. This inflammatory reaction is really important for instructing and shaping the adaptive immune response, the depth of immune response, like the t cells, and b cells come in as a second wave to fight invading pathogen, and it takes longer because the adaptive system developed specificity, Sir, Robin just being a general reactive response to a wound infection, the T cells and B cells Krit specific recognition of invading pathogen. And this is why we can also develop immunological memory, though, cells and remember that particular patent that they. Recognizing that can be cold upon when you get infection a second time, so the innate and the adoptive immune system, Andy how to direct with. Yes. So while I've spoken that these are two different arms of the immune system. The innate adaptive immune cells system actually have to communicate with each other to mountain a normal immune response. So again did Nate mean system is very rapid immune system. So for example, dendritic cells will see viruses, they will take up viral particles kill and then talked to the adaptive immune system by presenting. What we call presenting these viral proteins on the surface of the dendritic cells the activate specific t cells that recognize the viral proteins that are then presented on a set of proteins called the major histocompatibility complex on dendritic cells system is instructing the dept of immune response to. Indicate its size, shape and recognition. Absolutely. So the dirt excel's actually primes. The adaptive immune system initial response. And then the and then the adaptive immune response then goes on to expand its itself. So that it can now provide adequate protection against the viral bacterial protein, but both arms of the immune system, the innate immune system, and the adaptive immune system are required for us to maintain normal health. What happens when you mean system goes wrong, there the way I think about it is that a two different ways by which the immune system can go wrong. So there are there's an on one hand one extreme deficiencies immune system. So for example, just talk about deficiencies in the innate immune system. So if you're a deficiencies deficiency in these receptors, I talked about earlier these pattern receptors, then individuals with these defects actually have increased susceptibility to infections, the bacteria, viruses, and other. And other organisms because I cannot Leach this rapid, I mean response absolately. So there are children that are born with either the absence of these particular receptors or even in the machinery that these receptors activate and these children can actually die from very severe infections. Could you give a couple of exempt genetic examples there is a an enzyme Iraq four and if kids are born without Iraq four they suffer severe bacterial infections of the skin. It causes cellulitis of joints that cause a septic arthritis. They can have infections of the brain causing meningitis bone osteomyelitis as well as other organ abscesses, but this is very specific to that. Because those kids do not have to set the Bility's to viral fungal other parasitic problem, so is a very very specific defect in the immune system. A second example is that there's a type of innate cell. That's called natural killer. Cell natural killer cells are very important in killing infected viral infected or malignant cells. There are patients that are born with no natural killer cells and these patients suffer from very severe or disseminated viral infections such as herpes viral infections, chicken pox, pneumonia and about a fifth of these individuals, actually develop cancers that are related to viral infections. And then in terms of the adaptive immune response genetic deficiencies that are associated with diseases upped ability as absolute such a skit syndrome, so severe combined immunodeficiency these children have not cells or B cells, and they get very severe infection during the first year of life of severe bacterial violent fungal infections. And if they're. Left untreated. They typically will when die in the first year of life. So a good example actually, the bubble. Boy, he had a defect in one of the proteins that are required for a t and b cell development. But then they're also acquired deficiencies so HIV a great example where upon infection infected individuals get a deficiency of the T cell compartment. Conversely, you can get B-cell immunodeficiencies. There is an enzyme. That's called Bruton's tyrosine kinase. This enzyme is very critical for the development of B cells. And there are males that are born with defects or mutations into BT K Zayn that have no b cells, and hence, no plasma cells, and no antibody and these individuals need to be treated either with lifelong monthly gamma, a gamma globulin replacement or in more severe cases with. Marrow transplantation. It's always challenging the hear about to conditions that affects people particularly win the onset is at birth war in childhood. Can you talk about the difference between the immune system in a child versus in an adult genetic conditions that often result in a barren immune responses such as the skit defect. Points to how critical the moon system is underlying a life, and I will be and this is both in children and adults. And fortunately, it was some of these genetic diseases they manifest themselves in children a child when it's born doesn't have a memory immune response as we do as adults because you need to generate these memory and so children effacing diseases and infection all the time. You know, you drop your kids at daycare, and I come home with Snuffle -als and all of this helps to promote and develop every bust immune response. So when a young child count deal with all Snuffle 's and viral infections it can be debilitating. And in some cases, life threatening. It might be worth at this point just taking a step back and thinking about what's hits normal immune response and. Perhaps we can think about this in terms of the genetic requirements the environmental requirements with hockey little bitter already about what happens with immunodeficiency. Of the immune system. We talked a little bit about that. Now when we get infected. The immune system gets activated. But once we clear, those bacterial viral infections are immune system has to have a mechanism by which to turn it self off. Otherwise, all of us, become large lymph nodes. Right. And so there are Cajun's where the ability to turn off in immune system is that the effect and when that turning off mechanism does not occur. Normally. Then our own immune system starts attacking itself. So I'll give you a very straightforward example. It's probably one of the best examples of post infectious complications of autoimmune disease. That's rheumatic fever. So when children or adults get infected with strep throat, we actually generate a very robust immune response in part in antibody response against strip the group a streptococcus. And once we clear that usually everybody is fine because we turn off that particular immune response. But in a subset of individuals. Those antibodies that bind group a strep and clear group-based rep go on to bind proteins that are in the heart muscle and the heart valve and that causes rheumatic heart disease, the similar protein other. Proteins are also expressed in the brain and these anti strep antibodies can also cross react with proteins in the brain to cause a variety of different movement disorders. So this is an example of way, you'll starting to get self recognition. You get self wreck mission. So the antibody immune response initially was responsible. For clearing the foreign pathogen. Or in this case, the bacteria ultimately actually caused Z's and hence you have to then treat a lot of those individuals with medications that actually then suppress the immune system. And then what about in chronic autoimmune settings? Obviously, you're an expert in which logical diseases. Which cover many different types of diseases you from the joints to lupus, the skin that cetera. What is the kind of underlying basis for the immune system? Driving these diseases. Well, let me talk talk. I little bit about how Prodian the immune system is in terms of causing this. So there are diseases that everybody well recognized as caused by an abnormal immune system to these include diseases such as Terai uscis, which affects the skin as you noted rheumatoid arthritis with inflammation in the joints as with lung, inflammation, seal, EAC disease, and immune reaction to gluten. That involves injury of the lining of the small intestines type one diabetes where one gets autoimmune destruction. At the beta cells of the pancreas compromising the ability to make insulin. So these are well recognized over the past decade. Plus there are many other diseases that are now. Well, appreciated to be also immune in nature. So these include atherosclerosis, we're lipids and cholesterol, accumulate in the macrophages, the cells of the innate immune system to form, plaques and blood vessels. There's a huge growing body of literature now showing that Alzheimer's disease. Also has an immune component. These are these activated microbial cells that reside in the brain. These are the equivalent of the brain resident macrophages and even high blood pressure. High blood pressure in high. Blood pressure. There's evidence that there are variety of different immune cells macrophages as well as t lymphocytes that accumulates in the kidney and the blood vessels that may regulate the tone of the of the blood vessels. And there are likely many many more diseases that we will come to appreciate near future that are actually manifestations of an abnormal immune system. Now. Unlike the severe immunodeficiencies where we talked about these are primarily genetic deficiencies that usually present in the first year typically present in the first year of life these auto immune diseases, most of them that we've talked about really take years to develop. Okay. And in many cases decades, for example in rheumatoid arthritis. The typical age of onset is in the fourth to sixth decade of life and hence in these diseases. There are many factors that contribute to actually whether somebody actually develops clinical manifestations. And as you suggested know the way, I think about it there early three major components. The first is a genetic component. There are differences in our genetic makeup in our DNA, and those will affect how powerful are immune system. Is the second our environmental factors, and we can talk a little bit more about this in the third one. Of course are Mona influences. Jane, are these factors? They desert talking about some kind of baseline way of thinking about the immune system with they talk a lot about for example, a night. Adaptive immune responses as these kind of fixed boxes that interrelate with each other. And this is very true. But they're also influenced by many of the things that just each other within a given person. How old they are what kind of genetics. They have what kind of bacteria Gus previous exposure to infections even exposure to sunlight all other medicines to them Posen, maybe taking Khanal influence the level at which the immune system gets triggered. And we don't know all wounds for this. But this is what we're trying to understand. So these are like multiple factors that feed into kind of an immunological set. Yes. Let's talk about a disease that's called systemic. Lupus erythematosus was a classic auto immune disease. We called for lupus for short. So lupus is a systemic autoimmune disease in which a patient's immune system begins to tack their own healthy tissue. So they can attack the skin to cause rash joints 'cause thrice cause kidney failure. They can they can attack the brain to cause seizures mood disturbances and strokes lung to cause inflammation as well. As hemorrhage and blood vessel, inflammation that affect many many different. Oregon's of importance is that lupus patients all present differently. Right. So some individuals who just have skin manifestations gin and joint involvement, whereas other individuals might have brain or other major organs involvement, the cause of lupus is unknown. But it is likely there. Many different causes. So I wanna use lupus the highlight how the three different buckets, I described genetics environment hormonal influences in effects of development of Lucas. So let's begin with genetics in the general population the risk for lupus is zero point one percent. So one in every one thousand individuals. I agree relatives have a twentyfold greater risks. So implicating genetics precluding genetics. But. The concordance between identical twins is only about thirty to fifty percent so conscious beach in it. So it cannot be just six. And in fact. Twins might well have. The I almost the identical immunological abnormalities. So they might have these auto antibodies, but one twin actually clinical disease while the other one does not. So it's like there's a switch threshold or or point that is reached by one the other guts, right? So the second component that might Welk that's known to contribute to development of the hormone. All right. So here. Ninety percent of patients with lupus are women. It's actually true many of patients with autoimmune diseases in general female, well, many are. But there are also. Autoimmune diseases where there is a predominance of males. So for example, there is a disease ankylosing spondylitis where there's arthritis involving the spine as well. Some of the peripheral joints and in that disease ninety percent actually met. So how hormonally driven how these so let's go back to the lupus example. So as I said earlier ninety percent of women if you take childbearing years. The the ratio of female to male is about ten to fifteen to one. But in patients with lupus in the pre puberty. Age. It's only three to one. Female to male and post menopause is about eight to one so women of childbearing years have a far greater increase risk in distribution for for. So there's a clear evidence both in humans as well. As in mouse models of lupus that the estrogen to androgen balances actually, very important in dictating whether a patient will actually get lupus. In addition. There is some evidence that even suggest that the gender differences can affect the organs that are actually presented. So there's clearly a automotive component in lupus as well as many other autoimmune disorders. And do we have an understanding of of why this happens is this because of hormone receptor expression is this because of different components of the immune system being activated. I think at this juncture, the data is not absolutely clear club. There's only one 'cause it's known that enter the estrogen androgen balance is extremely important. And like, and it is well known that the estrogen androgen balance has different affects the immune system itself. So let me go to the third component, which are the environmental components. All right. So we know that there are drugs that actually can cause lupus like illness. There's a medicine which has been used to treat hypertension decades ago. And also another drug that's used to treat a cardiac arrhythmias, and it is has been described that there are small subsets of individuals that are that do not have lupus that when they take these medications will get clinical syndromes that mimic lupus, they will get all the data auto antibodies as well as many of the clinical manifestations, and when these medications are stopped over time those symptoms. Resolve. But it is also known that there are other environmental factors that actually can trigger lupus not caused lupus, but can trigger. So for example, in patients that have lupus, we know that UV light. Can trigger lupus flares. We know that infections such as Epstein Barr viral infections can trigger Ducasse we know the exposure to silica dust can trigger to piss in patients that have this disease. And of course, a major question in the field, then his how do these environmental factors actually trigger a cause lupus, and there are again, there are many, many different factors. But one of the very interesting areas in area of intense investigation is that well, we know that the coding sequence of DNA can dictate the risk for lupus. There are also epi genetic changes that are induced by many environmental factors that change DNA methylation or change how Pistone proteins Bindi and eight and these are heretical changes that can change the way that genes are actually turned off or turned on. So it's like putting. Bookmarks or blocks on days changes how it's read out. So it might turn a gene on or off or it might impair or change the amount. That's being made for example. Absolutely. And this. So this is an area that's been under very intense investigation over the past decade, or so, and what's intriguing about that is how these EPA genetic modifications and not just imprinted kind of environmentally individual. But these could actually be herited inherited as well. Yes, that's the epidemic changes. Very interestingly, just like the DNA coding changes are also inherited. So there they they carry along through different generations. So a lot more work is ongoing and needs to be done to further examine the underlying mechanisms by which these auto immune diseases are manifested. Both in the DNA side epigenetics side environmental causes hormonal changes on these will ply to all the various diseases. We spoke about that may be mediated by the immune system. Genetics. And what are these EPA genetic influences that you guys are talking about genetics? He's quite complicated. But a simple definition is. It's a study if the biological mechanisms that turn genes on and off so genetics. You think about the genes that encode DNA, and we know that this can differ between cells and individuals. That's why we look different from each other. And this is heritable. Epa genetic changes are also heritable, but then not modifications alterations in gene in self. It's modification of halogen is regulated and jeans often regulated or regulated by different proteins at land on that provide different scuffled function it either keeps a deny locked up. So it can't be accessed and transcribe or to be open and accessible, and it turns out the regulation of protein and DNA direction is something. That's also inherited. I think everything you have discussed really points to the complexity of diseases and the immune component underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases. Do you think that loop is for example, just focusing on lupus, we've talked about this is one disease or whether the fact that you've got different manifestations in different Olga NHS really starts to represent subtypes of disease. And is that where we need to push towards understand? Minolta Just's invariably in lupus rheumatoid arthritis asthma. We know that these are just clinical syndromes that we defined as a disease, but we know that there are many different causes. So for example in now's the asthma. We know that there is abnormally in constriction of the airway that results in a clinical symptom, shortness of breath. But there's evidence that there are different causes of asthma. For example, we know that a subset of individuals are are really driven by. I e which is an antibody that is a meet that mediates allergic responses. We know there is also a subset. That's driven by a t cell. Subset called TH to a mediated asthma. And conversely, we know they're individuals of the almost the identical clinical symptom Atallah, Judy and severity that do not have high levels and are not caused by t h two cells. Jane damning that two people could have the same disease, clinically speaking. And yet somehow be categorized or defined as having two distinct. Diseases is this like how you describe pathways feeding tumors instead of location and cancers. Listen, we diseases into a name because they have similar clinical manifestations. This is true of arthritis asthma. It's true, also Kansas. We don't know with certain tumors where they're coming from. And then what are the tree is it a setting up an immune response? And it may be in some tumors at this will be the same. But it may be in others. This is very very different. You can take a tumor like nonsmoker longhouse annoy me, and if you look across tumors in different patients, you can find some the darn heavy any immune cells in them some that having insisted system trips on the outside and some of them have loads of immune cells inside them. And we don't know if that's the chew has wave reacting to the immune system of this something inherently different about the immune system, that's making the immune system. Stop and start in different places. You know, one thing that I've really learned in studying these different diseases is it's very important not to get trapped by these sumptious around the disease and. Always try and understand the underlying biology because you can uncover new pathways, and perhaps a bitter understanding of a disease subtype. And if we can break disease down into these sub types shortly this allows one to probe for ways in which one could clinically go after some of these diseases. Absolutely. So in each one of these clinical syndromes that are caused by multiple different. Parts of the immune system. Our hope is that we can identify the various subsets, let me use infectious diseases as an example. Patient can have pneumonia. But if we only or stuck onto clinical diagnosis with diagnosis of pneumonia. We really don't know whether the causes doodoo bacterial pneumonia viral pneumonia aspiration pneumonia, which is not infectious. So to blindly treat the Monja with an antibiotic is not going to be helpful to the patient. So we really need to understand actual causation of each one of these patients subsets whether it be lupus rheumatoid arthritis. Asthma other diseases, and that is probably why for example, in rheumatoid arthritis only about thirty to forty percent of individuals actually respond well to any of the Eddie of the many approved therapies, and that likely is because there are at least three or more different major causes of for rheumatoid arthritis. So that's the challenge for us for the drug discovering drug development field, which is how do we subset? These clinical syndromes into patient subsets that are driven by a dominant major mechanism that we can then match it targeted therapy for that individual. So he began training as a doctor. And it was after you had completed your medical degree that you moved into more basic research could you describe a little bit. What you're interested in moving into laboratory science was and then actually what kept you seeing patients as well. So I think. My fascination with science and medicine was really to understand. The underlying mechanisms that initiated and continue to drive disease. I happen to choose the immune system because it was seemed very fascinating at the time. And fortunately for me, the applications and importance of immune system is now apparent in many different areas of medicine, not just the traditional room to logic areas, which is my area of clinical specialty, but pulmonologist with both as MMA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as I mentioned earlier in neurobiology with Alzheimer's disease. Multiple sclerosis. As well. As even in the area of on college where the area of cancer immunology is had a huge impact in the care of patients just over the past half decade. You I think of science laboratory scientists very imperative I think most of us do, but you just said something very interesting in terms of medicine is that there's an absolute way of treatment. There's also an out of medicine as well. How do you think do you ask different questions or do you have a different scientific approach when you thinking about laboratory research versus medical patient research? The general approach. I think is is the same. You try to identify the major problem, and then you assess the possible causes whether it's a scientific question or whether it's a clinical question. So just give you an example, if you numbered and see room and emergency room. Doctor patient comes in with chest pain, you immediately assess what the potential causes of chest pain. Could be and then you inquire to see whether the patient has any laboratory clinical or physical evidence of that would support any of your hypotheses now. At the same time in the laboratory, you identify a scientific problem, you have a scientific phenomenon and you assess to see what the potential explanations are. Now, there's a huge difference between the two because the laboratory you can at least have the opportunity to go back and rethink your experiment. Do it again on again. So in the clinic the scientific thinking is a little bit different. Because even though there is a potential cause that's very unlikely you still have to assess that very unlikely cause I if that cause is going to has the potential to have severe consequences on the patient in the in the near term. So I think the time dimension that's a little bit different between a scientific problem and clinical problem. But in both cases. What drove me into medicine as well. Science was my interest to problem solve. They're different problems. But use the same analytical techniques an attacking both sets of problems so taking that and thinking forward into the future. We've talked about the complexity of immune disease. There's a lot that we don't know. There's components of genetics. There's the set point of the immune system. There's protein hormonal regulators. There's environmental factors. Way. Do you see the field going in terms of trying to taste this pas, and maybe get to the point where a patient with a complex immune disease can present in an office. And there is a quick test to put them into a certain kind of some type. Yes. So I think actually I even take us further step back. I think the era of whole genome sequencing exists today. Folks are getting their DNA analyzed day in and day out. We don't necessarily know quite today. What to do with all the information? But I for that in the near future that that will become reality that when you sequence your own genome, you will know what potential risks are going into the future, though, it that's the genetic component. Then complex to whatever the environmental exposures that you have whether it be that you live in the area with very intense UVA new VP sunlight with your smoker other environmental aspects that you should one should be able to determine what the actual risks might be in terms of developing age related macular degeneration of development, Alzheimer's disease, and many others. Now. So that's sort of the. Preventive health, kind of envisioning of where the future of medicine lies once patients get disease because of the already existing undoubtedly further sophisticated tools that will develop we should be able to far have a far better idea of potential causes of a disease from molecular and seller aspect in a given individual. And once we understand better what the major drivers of that disease is we should be able to match that to a targeted therapeutic. I don't you get back in another question. Why count we treat a chronic disease easily with something that will retreat a an acute inflammation with? Why does the chronicity continued? That's a great question. You know? So I don't think we really have a good idea. Why? Despite effective therapies, a disease continue if we have a better idea of how what are the initiators disease or the continue instigators of disease to propagate the disease that might allow us to actually. Have more truly disease modifying there, you can understand the initiators of the disease and have a therapy that can abrogate that particular event, you might actually have a far better long term outcome without any without any immunosuppressive therapy. So there are many things that you know, there are many ideas that the field has of how to sort of restore that sort of homies stasis in the immune system to back to the normal checkpoint. And these are areas of intense investigation in diseases such as type one diabetes in seal EAC disease in multiple sclerosis. So. A lot of these treatments that you've been discussing and being used in the field. Monotherapy oh is the put in combination with very limited of the therapeutics, which is kind of quite different. When you look at on caller g for example, where you get a lot of combination therapies targeting multiple notes. Why this difference is up something that will change in the future? At present. The combination therapy has been challenging, for example, to the if you navigate one part of the immune system, you're marginally compromised. But when you begin disarming multiple arms of either the depth tiff or the innate immune systems you will now substantially increase susceptibility to infection. So in part is with the ensure that we're have to find the right combination of targeted therapies, which will be safe and will provide additional therapeutic benefit because that's really important to remember when trading chronic diseases. It's one thing to increase your toxicities if you can manage them for very short time period. But obviously, this is not sustainable when you're looking at trying to keep people on therapies for a long time that have these chronic diseases. That's absolutely, correct. Unless we come up with a cure unless you can get back to. V setting the system. So a bit of a Star Trek question ten twenty years out from now where do you think we'll be and where do you think young budding scientists out this should? Book to will push to in their own research. I think all of them should be knowledgeable. Well, I agree with this. But I think you know, the field is evolving, very very rapidly. Okay. In just thinking about what's happened in medicine. The last ten to fifteen years when not have predicted the ability for us to be able to whole genome sequencing in seventy two hours or less at this very reasonable cost. So I think it's hard to speculate. What technology might exist in a matter of even ten plus years. But I really do believe that you know, the things that we talked about that the aspects of sequencing one's own genome looking at certain types of biomarkers, depending what who what one's own genetic risks are. Will come to fruition and the sort of the holy grail would be to be able to better predict when one is able to get disease and be able to intervene at a appropriate time to be able to prevent the actual development of disease. Well, Andy, it's been a delight to talk with you today. I think you've really highlighted that immunology really underpins so many different diseases. But yet this so much more uncover about how they mean system is being activated and then instruct the outcome of these diseases. Thank you terrific. Thank you as an immunologist. I have to say that was a perfect way for us to wrap up our second season of two scientists walk into a bar. This spent such an enjoyable and exciting season with covered proteins chemistry, pharmacogenomics and immunology. It's been a real pleasure for me getting to know, my colleagues and diving deeper into the exciting. What did they do? With their teams, and it's been great working with my producer Wellington. Thanks wellington. For our listeners out there. I hope you've enjoyed listening to us over the past few months with certainly had a great time putting shows together we've had a huge Brown swell of support locally and worldwide. So thank you. I hope you'll keep spreading the word and tell you fellow signs fans about us. And as always always remember to like us on Facebook, and Twitter, and most importantly, if you have not already subscribe and rank is on I turns and now for me, it's back to the.

Diseases Lupus erythematosus lupus Andy Chen Alzheimer's disease autoimmune disorders Jane Grogan rheumatoid arthritis pneumonia Bob scientist osteomyelitis severe combined immunodeficien NATO rheumatic fever bacterial pneumonia wound infection
EP127: Hiv and Herpes

I Don't Get It

1:25:33 hr | 2 years ago

EP127: Hiv and Herpes

"The. Hey guys Ashley Lauren. And, and we thought huge. I don't get it that we've never brushed upon yet was dating and forming relationships when you have an STI now, my first question of the day, was, what is the difference s CD, because all of a sudden, the lingo, and America change over the past couple of years. People started calling them SEI's, and I'm like, okay, is it inappropriate of me to call STD now? This is the first time. I'm hearing us TI really. Yeah. Really? Always just thought they were all CD. I've always said, CD until now. We're educating. Yeah. Okay. So this is from expose STD, check dot com. I wanna read you the answer to this because I don't wanna like flooded up. But anyway, an infection is often the first step of a disease occurs. When either bacteria or viruses, enter the body in multiplying. The disruption of normal body function or structure, especially when signs and symptoms appear is considered a disease as long as the cause of it is not the result of an injury. So this means medically speaking, all STD's start out as s t is, as is that progress into disease is an ST, for example, here. So when that be like, HIV, maybe and then aids is the disease HIV would be this TI. I would assume so. But perhaps, we cannot confirm that. But that's what I would gather, what we gathered is like, if, for example, committeea if. If you have committee is an infection. It goes untreated, you inflammatory pelvic health, lamb, Tori, helping with disease the disease, right? Her TV to so many women have it. If you don't get the cancer is strand than you have an STI get cervical cancer than. Okay perfect. I love the we're doing this because I feel like so many people are embarrassed to tell a sexual partner or someone they're with or even their friends and family that they have gotten SEI, and I feel like if we get some people to come on and talk about it and make it normalize. It won't be as like embarrassing. Yeah. If you hear like herpes or something like who, don't touch me like that. So just chill. The fuck out. You know, it's crazy to me, 'cause Herbie I have friends with herpes, and that's the one that's so normal like you can get medicine, take it every day and just a normal life out symptoms. Out of all of them. I think yeah, it was so weird. When I actually put up our POS on our on our Facebook that I was looking for people who had an SEI. I was listening to Jared record his help dating podcast. And one of their emails was girl who had herpes and how she had to deal with it. I was like this is just too bizarre that you guys are reading this Email. I'm writing this pose out, but that was one. Yeah. And now we want to focus the entire podcast, episode on it. But bottom line is that girl at the Email said that dating with herpes was really no big deal for? Yeah. I think it's such a huge taboo, especially with Herbie's because like everybody thinks cloudy and gonorrhea is like oh you take z pack, and you're, you're, you're usually good. But I think herpes is like. Not careful, right. Well, we'll get into herpes. We're gonna start with HIV. Right. So I, I have a friend who she's a child life specialist at the hospital at hospital and she actually contracted HIV when she was twelve years old. I think she's twelve, but she's going to explain all these jails from a blood transfusion. She was because we right? Three was you. She was little. She was that young eighty she'll tell but yes, she had an issue. She had a disease and then it then she needed blood transfusions for it. And even those back in the eighties, I believe they still weren't checking thoroughly enough the blood that was going through these transitions. And that's how she got HIV. But now she's been married for ten years. And we just wanna see how she you know, how our life has been obviously, like having to tell people in her life that you has it, but also how she got with her husband and how he handled that information when you first. Got it. I want to just read what HIV because I never actually knew what it stood for. So just for everyone listening, HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus, and it's the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which is aids. If it's not treated, so once you get you have it for life, and HIV attacks, the body's immune system, which specifically the ST four cells, which means at some fight off infections, and that's what this. And just Jamie who brought down the on the phone right now. She'd also has a book about her experience for anybody who wants to download it or by bookstore on Amazon, whatever it's surviving. Itchy growing up a secret and being positive. All right. Hey, jamie. Hi, ladies. All right. We have a lot of questions for you. But before we pepper you was questions, why don't you give us a little background on you? What you've written. And how you contracted HIV. Okay. So the story starts way back in nineteen seventy nine seventy nine oh longtime ago. Yeah, thanks for pointing that out. Now. You're listening, ten years older than me. So I was born. With a cardiac defects that we didn't actually know what it was in the very beginning in. I as a baby just sort of had these crazy passing out spells, and my mom was like, like it would only happen in front of her. And by the time she got me to the hospital or would doctor. I was totally fine. I was due to do, and so they had no idea what was going on. They thought my mom was crazy, and I never presented in the right way. So finally, she was like, I know you guys think that I'm crazy, but something's wrong with this kid, and she's gonna die over the weekend. If you don't take her in my way, were you like painting that much. Yeah. Yeah. And like I was going Balu. And like it was freaky. I mean it was I was like going coma toast, just like in her arms. So how old were you, then I was a baby. Yeah. Like I was like, just learning how to crawl so is like, when I was starting to exert myself more was when I was visiting symptoms because it was my heart. After all, in, like Wednesday started to be more active. I it, it didn't quite work. So, so I got into the hospital, the doctors in the nurses, reliable this, this child is here because her mom is very concerned, and then all of a sudden I had an episode in front of them, they're like holy shit. So they realize that genuinely was something wrong with me and went in for cardiac heart cath that like that following day. And it turns out ahead this crazy tetralogy of below, and it was really severe. They're like, we don't really know exactly how she's been alive. This long one is a tetralogy flow tetralogy of full oh, in four it's four major defects in the heart, so. It's something it's like some vowel issues not enough oxygen was getting to my longs to my to the whole body. So it was it was just a mess. So basically, I was like my everything wasn't going through the heart as it was supposed to it was causing lack of oxygen, and it was causing me to pass out all the time. So once it ruins that they had I had this issue, it was good because we realized what it was. And then they're like, oh, oh, this is a major cardiac defects, and we could go in there and like fix it, and it'd be really cool because you'd be the first one that we've done this on my mom's like no, so the were they were luckily able to do a little bit of a time saver procedure and they did what's called a Blalock shun, and they took the artery out of my right arm and hooked it up to my lungs. So that it would buy me a little bit of time. So that was when I was like fourteen months old, and then I had good outcomes after that. I wasn't passing out as much and I was like functioning more, like a kid auction, and then so that bought me time in so that I could grow a little bit more and develop so that I would be stronger for when I would need this. Big open heart surgery. Okay, there's this. This product is a big thing in our house, especially with Jared, and I because it hydrates us and a lot of the times will go through the entire day. We're like, oh shit. I've only drank one bottle of water today. But I know that for my body weight, I need at least four, which is why I drink liquid IV. I just pop it into water bottle. And then this one water bottle with liquid IV Packwood. I've it actually makes it like three offer balls. That's how hydrated I'm getting. We also really like it because it helps with flight altitude sickness. It is really good with the whole. Jetlag as well because everybody's super dehydrated and they get off of a plane. So if you're traveler, good for that. And if you are to somebody who doesn't drink water six great for you. You don't have to drink as much. It's also non GMO has clean ingredients. It's so much better than those sugary sports drinks. And the reason why I personally love it us it is to avoid getting sick because I feel like I'm always you guys are always traveling. I'm traveling a lot. And so during cold and flu season, staying properly hydrated is actually one of the most important factors in flu cold recovery, and prevention. So liquid Ivy contains a hundred and ten percent daily value vitamin C, N, B, twelve which I love, and I feel like I really haven't been getting sick lately, because I've been drinking, like, what I've eat it uses a special technology that the others don't have it's called cellular transport technology is specific ratio of glucose, sodium, and potassium, that when mix with sixteen ounces of water helps your body. Absorb more water in nutrients than a normal drink would help put water into your bloodstream liquid Ivy is the fastest growing hydration brand. And you can find them everywhere, even Costco you can find them at all Costco's nationwide. You know, let's legit, you know, when you get lending Costco. That's true. I love look what I've and I know you will too right now. Our listeners, get twenty percents off at liquid, IV dot com. When us our code get it at checkout. That's twenty percent off anything you order on liquid ivy's website, go to liquid Ishak com and enter the promo code. Get it to get your savings, and start getting better hydration. That's liquid IV dot com. Promo code get it. Don't wait. Good hydrated today. So then in nineteen eighty two I had the, the major open heart surgery, where they went in there, and fixed everything, and it was by all accounts really successful. I went in. I came out, I woke up just fine, minimal side effects. I found. Back really quickly. I was supposed to be in the pick you for a week or two weeks by day three. I was like, okay. Hi, Lipscomb will now it was it was everyone was thrilled which just a wonderful repair in. So that was nineteen eighty two. So we go on living. Our lives is wonderful miraculous saying that we had this issue, but it got fixed now. We can go on. And when I was about eight years old, the medical community realized, oh, this was happening in Owen ahead, a blood transfusion during this open heart surgery. In nineteen eighty two and at that time, they weren't screening blood products. No one realized that, that was an issue until years later. And so when I was eight and we are realizing that HIV existed in aids was thing and they realize, wow, this is been out in the blood supply for however many years, and there is certain number of people who had gotten blood transfusions blood products in this time that were at risk. So they reach out to my family and they said, hey, she's, she had a transfusion during the risk timeframe, and it's up to you. If you wanna get tested if she's been healthy. It's probably fine. It's really minimal chance. She's actually contracted it, but we just need to let you know. And my parents were like, well, she's been healthy this whole time. I'm sure she's fine. We don't wanna put her through one more blood test. So they said, okay? We'll, thanks for letting us know. We're good. Wow. Nightmare. Not really. I know fine like I know like how you are now. So like it makes me feel better. But, like, just like if I were hearing this in the eighties in not in the advancements that we have today, I don't even know continue. But you Jay. Five years, fine, though, right? Yeah. Because it normally doesn't show up for a while. Yeah. And that was pretty. It was pretty, like it didn't have any effect on me. I was it was I wasn't symptomatic at all. And yeah. I mean at the time also they, they were like even if we found out that she was positive there's nothing we could do for her there. No medications for kids. So it was like will yeah, you could have this knowledge, but there's nothing you can do so. And I was healthy. So they had no reason to think that I was infected so two years. Go by I'm ten and we start to get I get these back to back infections with strep throat like one after another. I'd never had gotten sick like that before, all of a sudden, it was just just coming on strong, and my mom is very, very smart woman, and she was like. This is worth looking into. And so took me. And they're like, yeah. We, let's just do the test would, you know might as well just check it out. Meanwhile, all my cardiac stuff is had been great. I go I went in for like a yearly checkup, and it was fine. And it was great. So they went ahead and got me tested. And so that was when I was no, that was when I was eight. Sorry, that was when I was eight and they came the test, obviously came back positives, oiler alert, and they call my mom. My dad was working at the time in my mom's at home. They call my mom and they said, they're like can you come in to meet us, and she and she, like no one wants you to come in. If it's good 'til, they'll tell you good news over the phone. I can tell you bad news on. She knew like she knew what they were gonna tell her all the way to the appointment. Yeah. And I was not good point. Yeah. But she was like, oh my God. So she went. By herself. Right. I was at work. My sisters were in school. She just drove to the doctor's office, and he sacked him the office and looked at her and said, you know, she's got HIV the test was positive, and he was pretty nonchalant about it like not in a good way. But more like, yeah, there's really nothing. We can do about it. So and he was like leaning back in his chair, and it's just not the right way to deliver horrible news. It was a death sentence at the time. There is nothing. He could do so it's just I can't even feel anything right now. Like numbly. Yeah, yeah. He literally was just like she's got two years to live. So enjoy her why you have her. We crap. Yeah. So we, my mom took this news, went home, like obviously was devastated told my dad, and they were like well, there's nothing we can do we don't have medications. So we're not gonna tell her, let's just let her liver life, and we'll take it one day at a time, but we're not gonna freak her out, so they didn't tell me right? At first they told me that I had like a bug in my blood what is not. Well, that was like their euphemism for like they wanted to tell me something. But not they didn't really want to lay this heavy information on me. So, so for a while they didn't they kind of just glossed over it. And then a couple years later, I started I was this is when I was ten and they did actually start coming out with phase one drug protocols for pediatric patients with HIV in. So there was this. Finally, this like hope on the horizon, and could they could get me into this drug protocol in, it was very involved. You know you'd go it would be like every month going in for really intense testing. And it was it was a big change, so they were like, well, we have to tell her obviously what's going on now 'cause she's not stupid, and she's ten and she'll figure all this out when she sees like aids Moser's outer. So the told me and. When they said, when they first when they told me that I had the quote unquote, bug in my blood all I cared about was that it didn't have to have another cardiac surgery, and I was, like, okay, that's fine. Let's move on. Let's go do something else. And then when they came back into old me, well, this is HIV and this is the virus that causes aids. I was that's when I best when I actually got it and I was ten and I was obviously super upset and crying. And we, you know, I had a great support system, right there by mom and a few of the nurses, that are really loved entrusted with me at the time they were telling me this hospital. And so we kind of just sat together, and I cried a lot, and they cried. And then after probably twenty minutes we got up in or like, well, let's go to the gift shop. Then we just like walked out and skip down the hall gift shop, and that's kind of, like, that's kind of how we rolled this whole thing like. Yeah. Things things kind of suck along the way. But like let's go to the gift shop at the end and let's do something fun at the end. So then at that point forward, obviously my life completely changed in ice. Order had this double life start to happen 'cause this was in. So I was tend to this eighty nine and at that point aids was still super stigma. I mean it still is. But it was like to the point back then where it was dangerous. Tell people so we, we weren't open with it. We didn't tell people I am. My parents, always told me that if I wanted to tell people that we totally could they would support me, but I was afraid to I want. 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For you continue to questions do when kids a contract, it do they respond any differently than adults because your immunity is higher. When your kid it's a good question. I'm sure it's different. I don't know the physiology behind, like a pediatric patient versus in adult patient physically reacting to it. I can tell you psychologically. I think it's honestly easier for kids to deal with things that adults. I was still like learning who I was informing identity in this just became part of my life. It wasn't like caves. Yeah. I it's not like oh, I grew up, and I formed this life. And now all of a sudden it's different. So, but yes, busy logically. I'm not sure I know that they're the, the medication regimens are different. But I, I don't know the exact science of how one response differently versus the other. I have another question. If you never the surgery, the heart surgery, would you have survived? No, no. Okay. No, no. I would have passed out not woken up and down on when they told you that you had it at tanning, you knew what it was. Did they say? Like can they track the chances of it going to stage three and turning into aids or? Yeah. At that point, it was pretty inevitable that it would turn into aids. And it was yeah because they like the, the only Mets they had were just were like, experimental men's. And so I literally asked my mom, am I going to die? And she. She said, I don't know. And she said, I don't know about we're gonna be with you every step of the way we're gonna try to figure this out. Sounds that I wanted to know like a ten did you know, certain amount of years to live or not? Oh, yeah, no, I that, that age, I became too. I got in, in touch with the idea that I would probably not live to see high school. And like, I remember going out and two older sisters, and, and I was like okay, and then I got this news and they're like, okay cried now. Okay. Okay. Now, we can go and tell Heather and Kelly at my mom's like they've known for two years. I'm like, oh, I the last snow. But then point how I always add remount you're not too young, bro feel now, I think I'd be mad. About your family. I probably murder my mom couch. Speaking. Okay. So. When you're like on the playground. If you're like to get cut or like, you know, you fell if your bike or something your parents be like super freaked out that, like, nobody would go and touch you like so that it would get into any open cut, like how are your parents, dealing your blood being out there? Yeah. They would have they would tell me like this is how it's spread if something happens at school. You need to be really careful in like make sure that none of your friends go up there and get all up in a cut, and we did tell the school nurse that they were aware of that every school where I was but, but yeah, there were like just, you know, this is if something happens, you need to protect other people from your blood, and you need to take it, seriously taking sex education that they like, give you your own, like, I don't know, more indepth, not your own from the school, book your parents teaching about, like condoms and stuff. It was funny. I don't remember my parents, ever having the sex talk with me anti our parents didn't do it either. Yeah. I don't know. Maybe I blocked it out because it was so horrible. I on I don't remember it at all. And I kinda just grew up knowing like Olisa, how things were. And this is like there is never a point where I was like Kennedy have sex with his guide in will that be safe. Like, for some reason, I always knew that needed to be smart when it came to that, how keep it a secret jam. So I didn't tell any of my friends until I was in high school. And it was the my senior year. And we were I was literally graduating and I decided that was the time that I wanted to just come like come clean. I have formed really great friendships with my high school friends in these are people that I was in be friends with forever. And in I was like I can't, I can't live this double life. I want to be honest with them. And so, and I had already recorded the Oprah episode at that point. So I'm like, why kinda have to tell people now 'cause it's definitely gonna come out, so. Talk about so, so yeah, you were on Oprah on ninety nine seven right? The world. Yes. Yes. Yeah, it was for the it was the a world aids day special that she did, and it was one of the people that she had on the show visit that would I'd recorded that before I like made the whole announcement to my high school class. And I did this intentionally. They literally, we had graduation practice and then everyone was like, go get lunch in them. You have to come back to this assembly. All my friends relate to have to come back for this is so annoying. I'm like, I know this. Jokes on you. I mean unbelie and so. We got back and I like made the speech to the whole class, and then the next day we walked, graduated. And so I wanted to at the very end because just in case it didn't go well, I too. Everyone. Nice about it. Everyone was amazing. I was I was so floored. I'm sure there were people that were either indifferent or had negative reactions, but I never saw it and my whole like the majority of my class wind up to, like, give me a home, and it was like an hour of my entire classes coming up in loving on me. And that was you. That was like the best. That was one of the best things that, yeah, that was, I was so scared. I was prepping my pants and I was so it was. Yeah, it turned out so well, so by ninety seven you obviously made it to high school. Graduation, did you find a treatment that was working or is this still delaying because I guess we still haven't found a cure. So everything is still just a delaying. Yeah. So eh for since that I dreamt protocol for pediatric HIV beds. It's gotten. Better and better. So at the beginning, it was literally two drugs. And if one didn't work moved onto the other if that didn't work the you're screwed. And that was the really the issue because it's known that you're not going to be on an HIV med forever because the virus is very smart enemy dominant changes. And so the trick is you have to stay on top of it in front of it. And you have to always have something waiting in the wings. So over those years, it had really developed a lot, where I had gone from one protocol, to the next and had really good success, there couple the didn't respond well to and unluckily, there were others that I could hop onto after it, but it was really well controlled, and I never I had a couple of times where I was really sick. But for the most Friday, stayed pretty healthy in in it. I have really good luck on all of these meds are. So it's crazy. This is mind. Boggling, to me. It's actually truly truly. I don't get it. If I go. Oh to earth bar, and I get a green drink. I'm still not getting enough greens and vitamins for the day. All right. So our use ritual it's a vitamin that's going to give me everything that I need as a woman in a couple little vitamins, this is specifically designed for women you guys. It's a multivitamin reimagined from DC three. Not the Mighty Ducks from three to mega three rituals essential for women helps fill the gaps in women's diet. Because it shocking, you still have gaps even when you green Druze what's so amazing about ritual. Is that they have a no Najah design that's going to be easy on empty stomach. So you don't have to worry about feeling nauseous up. You take your vitamins, and you don't get that fishy aftertaste which is common with most omega threes. Which is why I love ritual. Because when I wake up first thing in the morning sometimes not like super hungry. But as with other vitamins, I'm always like, oh, we'll, I gotta eat something 'cause I gotta take my vitamins, and I don't want to be nauseous. But the great thing about ritual is gonna take it hungry yet. But they in fact, yourself eating because. Wait a minute. Exactly. So it's great because I basically wake up in the morning, I take ritual, it tastes, very Minty. It doesn't taste fishy at all or gross. And I feel like I'm starting the day off. Great. And I've been taking it for like two months now and better than ever got. We'll thank you. Laura thanks to ritual, better health doesn't happen overnight. And right now ritual is offering our listeners ten percent off, during your first three months, fill the gaps in your diet with essential for women. A small step that helps support a healthy foundation for your body, visit ritual dot com slash get it to get your ritual today. That's ten percent off during your first three months at ritual dot com slash get it. Jayme, I'm so we know the made it through high school, and I know you're married. So we'll get to that in a second, but I'm really interested in like mentally, like aside from the stuff that you're sharing with us, and that we can like look up on Kapiti I wanna know like what challenges did you go through mentally? What was maybe like your darkest day? How have you overcome it? And what stigmas do you want to, like, break people out there that may be get HIV and are really scared to tell anyone? Yeah. I think it so different back than than it is now. So today, I think that there's still is really a statement, and that there it's, it's so manageable. I mean, it's considered a chronic illness in on a tremendous seasoning, more, so it is so manageable. But I think people are still petrified at the thought of it, and it, it's a lot of the fear of the unknown where if you don't live it, you don't know that it's actually something you can live with. And so right now, I think that that's still. Will is a pervasive fear for people tobacco is younger. They're more fears for me like general safety, and keeping quiet. I'd had a couple of really tough days at the hospital, just going through a lot of painful procedures in one day in particular was just a mess in, I ended up getting like all these shots in procedures in lumbar punctures. And it was it was the worst day in I got a kitten out of it. So that was. But, you know, I, I was real, I'm so lucky to have had a really supportive family and access to health care, and really greats support civil on the way that I think so many other people have not been that lucky in had horror stories, but for me, I honestly been so blessed, it's been a really positive Dray. How has it affected your love life? So that is probably where it was most challenging for me. Because I was, you know, going into college when I was, I told my high school class, and I went into college, and you know, your sister's like big start becoming an adult in living your life end. I for me. I needed to tell people before I got intimate with them. And I like just for my own personal thing I just needed to tell people and so I ended up not having a lot. Of boyfriends, it's so funny because on your first episode you talked about this like we never really boyfriend girls. And I'm the same way like if I couldn't see future with someone I was out in so whenever I met someone in started to get interested in them. I always have the conversation of whom I wonder if this person could handle having this conversation with me, and that was a real litmus test for a lot of people because we didn't get to the point where I ended up having a conversation with a lot of people, and that was probably for the best 'cause they're bone heads in, in one way or another. What about have to people like, how do you have that conversation? Sil for me. I needed to do it sooner rather than later. So I wanted to tell people in the beginning of relationship, I would basically just say, hey, this is great. I really like hanging out with you and getting all feelings. And there's something that I need to tell you about me and my health history, and then I would go into I was born with a cardiac Deepak, blah, blah, blah, and in nineteen eighty two in blah, blah, blah. And then, and then after I would like say, all that I would like word vomit, all of this information on them, and then, and then it was kind of, like my process was, I would tell them, and then I'd be like okay buying. I was leave it up to them as to, if they like you can ask me any questions I will be here. I'm really NGO or else, they wouldn't be having conversation. And then it was like emotional Turkish of waiting. Oh many. Many were that's brutal guys like decided to halt it at that conversation, I had I only had one who was like, no I can't do this. And I was I was very selective about who told. But only one of them was like came back and just like I don't think I can handle this and honestly, like, I I don't I'm not mad at him. I didn't I wasn't. I was I was all I was heartbroken. I really liked him. But I wasn't like I can't say that I wouldn't say that do the same thing if I were his shoes, and it's sucked but there was nothing. I can do about it, and I just kind of moved on from there. And so I would always sort of emotionally try to make try like neutralize myself, after I told someone. And the reason that I knew like now that I'm getting into adulthood, and I met my now, husband, and one of the things that I knew of, like, oh, this is for real. Is when I told him I could not mentally dis- distance myself from him. And that like emotional purgatory was torture in. I couldn't let go and I couldn't like pretend that it would be okay if he wasn't okay with it. And thankfully, he was. Yeah, I as you really maybe TMI question. Did you sleep with more people in? Does your husband? Yeah. Okay. I did. And I would tell people and we would just be a. I know. Yeah, james. But I also. So it never turned to aid for you. Correct. But you're constantly dealing with being in stage one 'cause three stages. I don't know about the stage. Yeah. I'd I'm still considered HIV positive that if it if it were to progress, it would be aids. But, but yeah, Mike my the I do I go to Dr my document every six months, and I take two pills a day. It's super manageable. It's, it's like especially compared to what it used to be. It was really intense. Are there any symptoms or things that happened throughout the year two, you physically that you have to deal with? Yeah. The only thing one of the things has been impactful for me is some of the earlier meds, had a ton of side effects, and one of them, one of them had the side effect of light distribute, which is the diff admirable distribution of fat on your body. So I really thin face. And I was like based on genetics and the side effects of the meds. I'm like I've got like little chicken, legs and chicken arms. And face in, like I had a breast reduction, because my, my breasts were really big. So it it was that displacement fat that I've always been a little bit self conscious about, like how skinny my face loads, and I got, like I've done fillers botox, and all that fun stuff, which is helped, but that was the only long term side effect that I've really experienced other men's. I've had side effects during while I was taking them like a couple of them positive that stomach but other than that, but. The those early meds could be pretty brutal. Which is why a lot of kids like don't, don't take them. And they don't stay on them and their parents still make them stay on them because they're really brutal. And they're really difficult to take in than they end up not working. I know the medicine has progressed, but is there like a decrease in people contracting, HIV? Yeah. There is. Yeah. There is. Yeah. So, so when so there's a level called the viral load of how much viruses in your body in that affect how easy it is to transmit that. So with these medications if the HIV is under control, in that viral load, is lower zero, or undetectable than it's actually difficult to transmit, which is great. So it's, it's makes it so that it's harder to transmit sexually or through blood products. Or I know I drug use the other of I'm sorry, you can do under the other thing is that they've developed. Medications that they can put mom's on so that they can take medication during pregnancy. And then have the baby take the medication right after birth. And there's a point point zero two percent chance of them contracting to awesome. It's so low mazing drug. You're talking about prep because we live in West Hollywood, and we get on TV on TV about prep. So prep is a lot of what they will give a so you'll have zero discordant couples so someone is positive in someone who's negative. So they will have is something that you would put the negative person on to help prevent transmission. So that's not on it because we still maintain a safe flav style in, like, we there really isn't too much of a reason for him to. But if you are in, in messes for like super. Risky, if you were having anal sex, unprotected, that's a really higher risk. It's really low risk for to pass from woman to Amanda. My viral load is euro, Dan. I law. Yeah, in it's it's difficult. As stayed on meds. And I've been super like diligent with adherents in that's the key like if you stay on your meds near adherent to the med protocol nearly better luck on it for sure. But, but yes. Oh, prep something that they can if you know that you're in a risk your lifestyle, you have more risk to contract at you would take this in it would protect you how a little bit more. This has been so a device like, wow, you guys, don't I just got our soaps and Cologne bomb from Duke cannon, which is one of my new favorite sponsors that we have, I've never even heard of Cologne bomb. But I got it for my dad because he's been using this organic deodorant, and my mom is called me because she says that my dad's smells like shit now. Cologne. Bomb is so genius, because it's like a little tin, and you can carry it's very portable. And all my dad has to do is kind of rub it, how you would rub like lip balm. But like on your neck or other places, and it smells incredible. And I love the soaps from do cannon, 'cause they're huge and I love big things. Pleasing because they're Brown and tan, and his go at my apartment, and I love do cannon. Well. Five. Guys love bar. So apparently makes them feel more manly. Love bartha. You. I don't prefer on my own body, but like I like a man with bar soap. Is that weird? No, that's funny. What I what I like is like the names are kind of silly. They're funny down. There's one called news anchor palm aid, which gave Jared because he it's always okay, so because he, he liked gets cheap palm aid, or like he'll hairspray his hair, and I'm like, no. But this news anchor palm, it has been working really well for him so much so that I have been using it myself not even kidding. You is the past two days. I've slipped my hair back leg didn't like the have about down and put the its its slicks back, and it keeps those files as down, Pat way more than Harrisburg there. You're gonna stay classy San Diego and guys, it's possible that all dads want for Father's Day is a couple of hours of silence to watch the game. Or maybe he just wants a decent hug. But if you're not there to provide one, you guys can send him the best effort by ordering online at do canon dot com. You guys can send him your best effort by ordering online at do canon dot com. This is the gift that gives back. Do cannon is committed to giving back to men. And women's being our country, which is why also love it. And a portion of their proceeds directly support veteran causes. So my dad's AVI obsessed with this, but you could also get a target and TBS locations as of now which is very exciting elect target and CVS. Okay. So it's not guaranteed, but it is guaranteed that you can get a do canon dot com right now and you'll get fifteen percent off. So why even go to CVS because with the I don't get a podcast in our code, I d- GT ado, canon dot com, you'll get free shipping on orders over thirty five dollars. Plus you're going to get fifty percent off. These are the gifts that work as hard as dad does both fun and functional. No, dad will be disappointed with Duke cannons. Grooming goods before we let you go. Jayme. Can you just kind of go through, maybe a list of like misconceptions or stigma HOV? You can't get pregnant like maybe just break some of them right here so people listening now I. No, actually, the case like being in high school in the early two thousands. Even when we first learned about aids and HIV when I was in elementary school, fifth, and sixth grade, I remember them being like if you get it, you can't have kids, you know. But you just totally debunked that. Yeah. And that was the case back then because there was like no protection for that maternal to feel transition. So, yeah, I guess that would be a myth that you can absolutely have kids if you go on, if you get your regular healthcare eagle in the right meds, and you have the baby on the right meds, and typically would deliver via C-section versus vaginal because there's less risk of fluids mixing mom to baby via C-section so that it's yeah, that's absolutely possible. So jamie. Are there any other major ones or is that the main one I think the other major would be that it's going to end your life? If you get it, and it it. Doesn't if it's not to say that you shouldn't be careful but it's the importance of, like you just, just know your status. Find out what's going on. If you're infected if it's positive it is so manageable. There's so many support systems out there that it is not a death sentence in there's a break community of people that will support you throw it. So I think that's a huge one too. I love it. I love you, Jamie. Got more more. Good. Okay. It's not like a sign off. Expensive to treat and is covered by health insurance at hard to get health insurance when he went from your parents to your own. Yeah. Is still thank God, I have health insurance because the drugs are expensive, but my insurance covers it, so I just pay the co pay and a lot of us drug companies actually have coup like vouchers cards than incentive programs that you can get on eat, actually, don't pay anything for your meds. So it's super manageable that way in, but if you don't have insurance absolute like one of my meds is probably like a couple thousand dollars. Without if I if I didn't have insurance like a month you were able to get insurance. No prob. Yeah. Yeah, because I it but if I 'cause I work, so I get it through my work. But if I had you apply for independently it might be more difficult that would sure as hell a pre existing condition but it locally. I just get it through work in. It's been it's covered everything. That I need to be covered there, because of hip there's no, there's no issue with you working in a hospital. Right. No, no. And, you know, I considered I like who is this, a good career from usually go into just because I, I will be in the hospital, but honestly being in the hospital is a really controlled area, and it's, it's kind of a great place for me too, because we have we, you know, if people are infectious, they're typically on isolation. So it's, it's a relatively safe place for me to be. But they're certainly wouldn't be any, you know, situations where I would be putting people at risk, unless I wrong Grey's anatomy, and sleeping with everyone. That as we know it doesn't happen. Fearance in the hostile as a kid if to go into child work in the hospital. Jit. Did I? Times. I really enjoyed going there, because I really I love the people. They had pool stuff for me to do. And yeah, this, let's give him a shot. To give out of what hospital you were treated that when you're a kid. Yeah. I mean, I'm fun fun by me. I was. I went to NIH grow my drug protocols, and they had a really great support system there. So it was very it was it was a really loving environment. I got my days off from school with my mom would go to the clinic, and then we will go shopping, and go to Tyson's Norstrom shoe Saone. Team. I just thought of one more question because I've never spoken to someone until today that contracted HIV through a blood transfusion to me growing up HIV was something you got during sexual intercourse are there other, you know, ways to get isci from those two drugs drugs. Yeah, I drug use if you're sharing needles through blood transfusions through sexual conduct through our contact through blood products. So a lot of hemophiliacs who received blood products during the early eighties are infected because the factor that they're receiving to treat. Their hemophilia is, is like donated blood products. So that was a a that's another area can get it. But it's interesting, you bring that up because this is another point I kind of want to point out is that it's really different. And one of the experiences that I've had is that when I disclosed people in tell them. Every once in awhile, I will get the okay that you've got a sex way or drug way. Yeah. And then when I read I go on and tell them how I got it then they're like, only we're saying, and it's amazing how different it is. Deserved it. Drug to drug. Mean. Yeah, it shouldn't matter. And the just the like people will turn on a dime, when they find out sometimes and it, it makes so when you say it, I'm like, yeah. I could see people being. Yeah. But literally, you'll have people go from just like came bind to omega. You poor thing BUSTER, Har you you'd necessarily have to sleep around to get it through sexy. Your husband could have cheated on your husband, one person like you don't have. Right. You know it's also not wrong. Yeah. Yeah. Oh, yeah. I love there's been more of a -education buyer cast that we've done that we've done. Can't compare. Okay, you're right. You're right. You can say that I'm better than I'm doing. We've had some good ones when it comes to health, especially, but definitely I opening today, and I think we. Probably tire episode with her. You know, wait. I'm not the whole episode. We're talking two minutes of it. So that's a lot. You're the majority and you're doing a really great thing by talking about a lot of stuff that people don't typically talk about. And it's awesome that it's peppered into this podcast. It's really fun in about silly things that we can all kind of be stupid together. And like, actually, you know, me, I'm an idiot and soup, and, like I, I wear. Okay, people, she wears a wedding dress, every time, there's a bachelor or bachelorette premier where her wedding dress on the couch. A friend seen, you know, and they're like. Wait before we go. Can I can you tell us how you about your husband? Yeah. We met at random happy hour. It was kind of funny was after work. I was going out with friends, and he is a teacher in. He was offered the summer in my friends who I worked with with coming to meet us. And he was like at home on the stoop eating from like a pizza box like a homeless person, and she's like homedow- happy hour. And so we just came along randomly, and we met, and we got we like we sat on together. And we didn't talk to the first like thirty minutes because we both liked each other. And then we talked to in we'd like completely talk to each other for the rest of the night. And then we got my number he asked me on a date the next day, we went out that week and then two months later, we were engaged. Thirty. How old were you, then I was twenty five twenty five? Yeah. Jamie. You're so inspiring. We can't. Thank you for being brave and courageous and open about your whole life. I mean, it really is fascinating how it was like a secret and how you didn't even know it's crazy. So thanks for all that you do so much for being willing to talking to talking to us about this. And like, honestly the world like on Oprah. What about your book, which? So I haven't memoir and I'm a little bit biased. It's really good. And like I survive. So there's a spoiler alert but it's called by. Great. Is. Funny. Spoiler alert. It's opening because my husband didn't read it from start to finish for like two years after I promise dude. How do you know liver? It's called surviving HIV growing up secret in being positive, and you can get it on Amazon, kindle. It's a really cute title are I think Amy. Sprayed to talk to you, too. Bye. Bye. Jamie's awesome. She's. So keep her life is just so fascinating. That's insane. That her parents knew for two years and didn't tell her that. I mean, I guess I would do the same fide child. I think so you have to let them live as normal as possible until it starts not being normal because of treatments or visible reaction, she's normal the life. She's living. Now in how it really not a thing, not thing. If you got it, it's not a thing. Just get your medicine you can still get married still have kid, I know. And I think that it's nice to be called a chronic illness now. Right. And not a terminal. Yeah. Or yeah. Makes me feel better. I so scared to get tested. And I'm not saying, like I haven't heard anything. But if I do like is a nightmare. But now, I'm just like, okay, I'll live in Lovie fine. That's true. That's the one everyone's like, I don't wanna get tested. I don't wanna know. But now it's like guys get tested and you can have zero defects. A level zero levels. We don't give it to any others. Yeah. And also, that's look at the amount of progress, we've had since it, her high school nineteen Ninety-seven to now twenty some years later, and imagine what will be like, in ten years, right? Because even when I was in high school middle school. Right. You couldn't have kids still right now here in thirty, and it's totally different story. It's pretty awesome. Right. So who are we calling next of? Okay. We'll now. Our guys. Now, we're going to call two girls that have herpes and ask how they deal with that in their dating life. And what the misconceptions are there? If the most conceptions are like they are with HIV. We are in for I, I have friends of herpes guys in almost neither is worse. But I know that they just really go through it and mentally they literally feel like no one will date them. They feel like the word herpes is like an actual man repel are and I feel like I would feel the same way if I had it. So I hope talking to these girls, you know what I mean? Like shifts. Yeah. Yeah. People's perspective. 'cause that's you could live normal life and like saying it's like the most normal one. Anything other than just having the right people. Don't even get a lot of symptoms of it. I feel like so then why do we care so much? We just have these little because people are like, why are you here? You hear so much if it's on preventing you. Yeah, it's not eating you're eating your body, why guess because of the war? Right. Like that's why. Because someone maybe that your ears, the west wards are really honestly, a whole thing. Yeah. General worth different also treatable very treatable, just okay. All right. All right. Let's give her a call. We have anonymous on the line who has Herbie's. My first question for you is do you have to legally tell people before you sleep with them that you have these? I don't I don't think so. I only have looked into that. I, I honestly I haven't looked into that. No. But. I haven't even thought about staff minimum. Okay. We'll have maybe you, you haven't just been sleeping around probably. Will not like crazier anything but I do have lake szeswith condoms and stuff like that. So I try to keep it as safe as possible. So it's not like. I don't know how to say, but I'm not I haven't had like a serious relationship like you haven't really had a serious boyfriend or anything, so girl. Speaking, our language. Yeah. So something like, like, if I'm talking to a guy especially being a small town. It's kinda hard to be a front. Tell them like this is going on. So I just tried to be status possible. Right. That's the risk bided. Tell us how you got it and what to do. And. Yeah. So I have a s the two threats by the genital kind I don't have any issues with my mouth or anything like that. So good there. So I got it when I was twenty one like I'm twenty five for about four years. I was talking to this guy, and we're hanging out and obviously, like you were having sex, and it was unprotected. I was I don't I didn't really have unprotected sisal the second guy that I had done with done that with. And really, we're talking in hang out for a couple of months, we would this is TMI, we would have sex leg kind of often. So it wasn't like I have I've got it right away. It just doesn't. I never one time. We're having settled. Sorry, TMI. Yes. So, yeah, one time we were having sex and I just felt like a pressure, and I never had an CD before anything just like trying to go with the flow or whatever, and I just felt like a weird pressure in. It was like a pinch or something, it just felt weird. And I said, ow. And then he like finished with his business, and I was kinda confused. I was like, what is going on in the Salem to the bathroom din? My business and I was just kind of like in a state of where just happened. So yet the next couple days is weird. I felt like I had a rash someone to the doctor and, and had a CD tests before, but it was nothing like that had never had any other experience with ESI D or anything, so I was just kind of. In shock. So I went in there. She said this was gonna give me the normal tests. But then she said that she was also gonna test for her. I was like okay in kind of talk to me about it and stuff. And I was just. Like innocent of shock. I guess so she treated it like Clemenza and I. I was just like okay I was just in a state of shock in. It's like tell him anything I was just like, okay, whatever I'm gonna figure out what's going on in whatever she told me this combing back in a week. But the results in. Call me then it's good news. And then I was driving home from work. Like a week later, she called me. She said that, that on the other SAT tests were negative, but they're testing back positive, and I was just like what NC. Yeah. Like, yeah. So that means that you have herpes in. So I'm gonna tell me about the medications that she could send everything in our society. I was just in shock. This. Since I guess, like the rest of the drive home in it was like forty five minute drive. So, yeah, it was kind of shopping. So how long have sexes dude? And then develop symptoms. Let's say two months two and a half months. Okay. So did you ever end up telling him that you because, you know it was definitely from him. Yeah. For share with him. I wasn't having sex with anybody else. And it had been like a couple of before, had sex with anybody else. So I wanna know where you're like a media thoughts. Like so you're told this because I actually, honestly feel like guy knows aren't well-versed in her Bs. I kind of like the one their lease Verson just based off, my friend, that has it that is said that they just like to urge us, like, okay we'll prescribe this medicine here you go off in life. Like, did they give you any information? What were your thoughts like immediately? Look, she cheat at fifty treated it like your committee and then. When she called me, tell me that I had, it was like, well, you're gonna be put under medication. The it was like the didn't Erica. Valtrex. Oh, I think it's called a valid Cyclo veers on the hearts day. But yes, she said that I would be on that. And. Some research says that it's supposed to reduce Lloyd supposed to reduce outbreaks in stuff like that. But it's like fifty percent chance that you will pass it on or something like that. But she told me not to depend on our or not take it because of that. Okay. So I just like take probiotics and stuff. But. But are are the outbreaks they happen uncomfortable. Like, are they do you find them to be a statically not pleasing? You not even notice them to get out break. Yeah. How often you get him? Yes. So it was like that first time when I got it, and then it was like, and that lasted for a couple of weeks but sheet like the that you gave me just we'd do this. I just didn't feel it in on didn't really look. I'm not looking. But then I had it like a year later. But I guess it against you have outbreaks more when you're like super stress and stuff. So made sense, but yeah. Just thinking later, then after that, I honestly haven't had any honestly any issues don't really life besides like when you're trying to get down. Right, right. How did you mentally? And how was changed your life or maybe it hasn't? Well, it's really hard like I didn't have sex with anybody else for, like, I think of the year, and I didn't tell him a ten year question earlier, I didn't tell him 'cause like after that moment. I distance myself, but he also did like one eighty and accuracy of Super Bowl, which kinda used to side, left it, but I just didn't wanna tell him, but like of them talk to like a brick wall or something and families want wanna call them out and be like negate me asshole. Yeah. I was going to a couple years down the road 'cause obviously a couple years ago or whatever, but I'm out about it. Now pound worth it. Like I don't want you to find out. They gave this to me or whatever. So. But he isn't often. I just I just decided to ignore it. I hope he knows that he has it. Yeah. For sure. Like I know that he probably was having an outbreak in heat pressure. New because he was kind of weird about it when we're having section I was like, what Kate you only transmit when you're having outburts caution? I have. Yes. So I just more susceptible to it. When you're having an outbreak things like that. I have never had an experience where I pass it on to someone else. Like I said, I've been very careful about it, and I don't have any issues with outbreaks like those two times, and I wasn't messing around with anybody, anything, this sounds like it didn't it didn't really break, you, mentally. Do you have advice for people, maybe that are just finding out that they have herpes one or two? And maybe they're really down about it. You sound like you're able like you're fine in your cool at that. And it's part of you, which is I think how it should be. Do you do you feel like that or no? I tried to make peace or fit like I had a therapist, and she told me that it would just gonna have to be a new way to have sex like I won't have anybody like go down on me or. Have to wear a condom. And it's okay. I don't tell someone just to be safe. So, like I've, I guess it I not have confidence with it, but it took me a long place to get their mitts Leewards. Like, okay. Like this is a part of it as long as I'm safe than. I should be fireman. Did tell it took me a couple of months to tell my close friends, but I guess it just them from support from friends, you can go to support groups online, talk to therapist. It's a lot more common than people think. So that also helps take the edge off. Of the population like h the first one. Yeah. You're born with that. Yeah. I was you're born with. Oh, I didn't know you had that everyone type one or whatever that is on. Yeah, but you can get do you know if you can get to by someone with one maybe eating you out or like is that like you can't really ever begun down on again. Yeah. Basically, but Debbie dance. Yeah, that's true. Very true. But I, I don't know. I just haven't experienced like that in a long time. Honestly, I'm not working on it anyway. Yeah. I'm not own seal breaker. Yeah. Thank you so much for coming on and sharing some greasing. Say by. So we've looked it up. And if you have an STI, or an SDS that is uncurable that you are aware of you are legally legally have to tell the person that you are having sex with if you unknowingly. No. And give it to them, then it's not legal, fine or some jail. If you are listening to this I we would love to advise you to legally tell someone so that they can be healthy and get themselves ship. All right. We're gonna call one person to see her experience was is all right now, we have anonymous on the line, and she is going to talk to us about her experience, contracting, herpes, Hulo anonymous. We would love to hear how you got herpes if you know, so I do not know which kind of, like, feel really wild saying, a whom I was always very comfortable with, like, who I was having sex with wasn't like nobody sketchy. But whenever I moved I moved across the country, and I was really stressed as moving in with my boyfriend who I have probably spent about, like twenty days total with that is stressful. But so I was just kind of nervous and the stress of reignited, I guess it just kind of re brought up the harpies that I once contracted on. But so I was just in a lot of pain. And I, I honestly thought it was like a UTI because like use infection because I never even like a never even imagined that I was gonna be was gonna herpes. And then I went to the doctor, and I was so. So uncomfortable. Like I said, just urgent care after being here for all of like three days, I was like, okay, I have to go to a doctor, but, like which one do I go to? And so that was really stressful. Trying to find a brand new doctor that was kind of gonna do what I needed to do. And I didn't think it was going to be herpes. So I went to the doctor, and it was so uncomfortable to sit there and the room and he had to take a swab of, you know, like all that good stuff down there. And it was like I was sobbing, and there was another nurse in the room with me and shoes kind of holding my hand making sure k- and a couple of days later, he called me and he was he had the results and I was like, just don't tell me it's harpies, and he was like the. The. He's like, but it is. And so I kind of took a second. I was my boyfriend's out in the room, I was in the bathroom and I answered the call. And so he was like, but good news as its type one, which you can get contracted by having like, if somebody were doing performing or oral sex on you, so and it's not as serious as type to where it can just kind of pop in and out of your life. So tightly designer because I thought type one was the mouth type was genital. Yes from she got it from getting oral. Yeah, but you can say from somebody's like cold sore. Right. So then it's type one. It's not type two just. Yeah. So the type still like it's however you contracted it. I was shocked about, and I was kind of, like I, personally, I see her as, as herpes and not like type one or type two. Because for me the type one was an outbreak that a type two would have of. But luckily, I only had that one outbreak, and I haven't had anything since I've had to be extremely stress-free, which is extremely hard for me to be because I'm like running mild million miles a minute. I don't even know what I'm trying to say next. So it's always interesting on, but it was it was definitely hard. I got off the phone with him. He kind of gave me a little bit of like what's going to be happening next. So he was like I'm gonna send you a prescription for this medication. And I'll make you feel better. And I am a type of person that I love taking baths. So all I wanted to do is sit in the bath and relax than like, and I wanted to like sit there and not do anything like Salkin myself. And I couldn't do that because it was so. Painful out the water bath is bad. The bath is so bad for you. It's, it's just like just, basically, I would sit on the couch with my legs on the coffee table, but ask needed. Exactly. So funny, because my friend, come home from work he'd be like, how are you babe, and like, oh, telling him right, whenever I got off the phone. I'm sobbing, and he's like, well, what's going on, like herpes? Right. Exactly. High was. And I was like, no, it is. And I was like, but now's your chance you want. You want me out like it's early like I've been here for all three days, like I can go back home. I'll be good like I fully understand. And he was, like, why are you kidding me and a backstory to my boyfriend heat is like the most incredible human I've ever met my life. And he's like it's like I I've already decided that you're the one that I'm gonna marry so why it'd be one thing is he was on her. And he was like, well, you know, but like no, like you moved here because we're getting married like I didn't even like even if I get herpes to, like, we both have it together. That's how it should then what you want to hear. I you jump. I jump so that begs the question have you had unprotected sex with him now. Yes. I'm actually allergic to latex which might have been like my problem getting it. I don't know. But got it from a mouth. So I don't know. Got it from a mouse. So does that mean that if your boyfriend contracts that he's still has type one even though he gets it from genital? I think that's how it works. I still haven't like gone the nitty gritty because. For the most part, if I can like see, I can feel if I like have a bump, and it just feels a little odd, then I'll be like, okay, we're not gonna Bank today. You know, we're gonna hold off for a couple of days, but we're both very sexual people. So it's very hard to do that. But we do have unprotected sex in. It's been over a year and he still doesn't have it. How you outbreak of sorry, go ahead that run into the same thing. How often does he get tested? He hasn't gotten tested since we've been together. I think it's kind of like for him at this point is like, well like I don't really get it. If I get it, then I'll get it if not, then that's insane. But that actually good to you guys get tested Ashley more. 'cause you're in relationships like I feel like people relationships don't get tested as much as sexually active single people that got tested for winter games. And that's all I really need to know. Weren't you weren't you virgin for awhile? L look for you know what? We were talking about. The reality show anyway. No. I mean I don't have. I think I'm good to not forget tested again. Right. But you could sense of other thing. Media gonorrhea. And I know a lot of people that have HD two like. Like. HP than that Joan. So I've Honey. Yeah. Yeah. So it's just kind of one of those things where he's like while, I guess, like call it a day, and I feel so bad though, if I did give it to him, regardless, if he's like I don't care, so. Like the only had the one outbreak, which you say was, like really painful OB, would you call them, like blisters, or like pimples? Because I get pimples on their only occasion and it's easy. It's not. But whenever I got it. So unlike thinking back I was actually with my mom at hobby lobby. And I went to the bathroom like, oh my God. Like why does this hurt so bad? So it's like a mixture of pimples, blisters, but also what they don't tell you is like your vagina is like, giving out like Guei liquid to like your what's that word this Jeff? Yeah. Discharge but, like not only is the discharge like a brownish gray color. It's like I'm gonna get real disgusting because why not? But like the discharge is Brown in gray disgusting. But it burns I don't know what it is. So it's a yeast infection or UTI feel see even worse because whenever like the discharge starts touching the blisters like then it was game over. I was like somebody, put me in, like, just leave. I don't want to be part of this anymore. Well, what are some things that you do to kind of first of all? How many outbreaks have you had since the first one this big only had one. It's on a couple of weeks ago, I had like a bump that and the bones that start their hard in the hurt really bad, but they're not like pimples like you can't pop it. And if you try it just hurts even more on. So when these pain that pain, I just as stupid as it sounds, I try to be as stress-free possibly can't because that's what kind of ignites more outbreaks. So, like you literally have to be like, the most stress free person, and then also massage right? I just kind of sat there is a south that serious, whatever you're going 'cause I, I quit my job last month. So I had no job on. And I was just so stressed out, and I was like, okay, what am I gonna do, but the first time I got it? I it's like a small backstory that I won't go into any detail with, but my best friends in college, she was raped and the guy that raped her gave her Herbie's, and she had Herbie's type two. So she hasn't. Way worse way more often and like and that's difference. How many types are there more intense and more intense than it's more often there's medication that you can take control it? Like I have medication than I can take to control it, but it would only be whenever I have an outbreak. I'm gonna say regularly, then no. When you had the bump a couple of weeks ago, you took it, then I didn't actually just kind of like had to down incense on call tonight, because don't like taking medicine in general. I hate taking medicine. Bill. So I, I hate it. So I, I try to do everything power before taking medication. I even tried whenever the bump started before I even knew it was herpes. I try to put frankencense oil on it highly suggest you not. Like there's nothing that's gonna make it feel better. A lot of people. Try to tell me like a salt bath was gonna help like like the doctor even said he was like, go to your local pet store and get like ocean saw. And I'm like I go. But. It's not it's not like realistic things. You can really do for other than take the medication in calm down in like try not to be stressed out so I- every single time I like any questions I asked my, my best friend on my hate him or like our tag team over here like trying to figure it out. That's amazing have her like to, and I and I wish that it would have been opposite because then it would have been easier. Like I wish I got it before she did. I mean you win. You'll is so nice. I feel like the bottom line here is that people who are out there. Scared of getting her be scared of being tested in finding out. They have Herbie's. They eight sucks. When you have now break, but the outbreaks aren't often and they are relatively treatable case they aren't often if you have to they may be often, but not the billeting on your life. Right. If our nervous about telling like a potential boyfriend or partner if say fuck off than their out the one so keep finding actually another thing about my friend. She was starting to date. This guy was really, really into him. And like whenever they went to like, go have sex. She kind of told him the whole story, including the rate part because whenever she told me the story. I did you tell him that you are rates? Yeah. And he basically liked shunned her. He was like get out of my. You're discussing likes ever, like just leave that away get away from that like so far. And while it sucks for her the time I mean, it's easier to like she's dating a guy now who is incredible for her. And I couldn't imagine als, but it also sucks. Because even like I've been more vocal about it in the past couple of months on Facebook groups and whatnot. Just because I hate that there. Sorry. Okay. Start with I've been more vocal about it. Yeah. I just been more vocal about it with the Facebook groups and everything because I think that there's such a negative stigma against it. And I actually I shared my story on one of the posts, and I've had like a lot of girls reach outs. Maybe like, wow. Like I wish I could be like you and be more vocal about it because I have I gone dates like can't even finish the day because I just like, don't even wanna tell them about what I like what I have and how disgusting I am. Our it really does. It's really sad. And like I feel extremely lucky in it sounds so weird to say that, like I have hurt Beasley I'm lucky, but I am because not a lot of people find out after their dating like the love of their life, and they have to continue to find somebody that's going to be okay with that in, like, truly truly love them for them. I a lot of people see herpes on their like red flag. I have two more questions. What, what do you have to say to people, maybe that just found out that they have Herbie's or that are dating someone that just told them that they have it, maybe they're thinking of, like not being with them anymore? Like what do you want to say to those people? So to the people that just find out that they have it. You're, you're gonna be okay. I promise. It's deals like it's the end of the world like everything is crashing down. But it's not. It's just temporary in theirs. Thankfully, new medicine that you can control it with and. Just be a little less stressed out. And why did by two people? Maybe there are single that aren't as lucky haven't found their person what advice you have to them on how to have a conversation about this with someone maybe that they want to be romantically involved with. So I would say to choose wisely not only because most people that you're gonna tell are either gonna go blast it in shown, you or they're going to be so appreciative that you're even coming out and telling them, I personally think that the few people that I have told have kind of been, like, really. Okay. Okay. I'm there are some that are like, wow, I'm so sorry like that's like that sucks. And then the like the other people that are like, well, like it's okay like it's nothing whenever I went to a new gynecologist. I figure that you should probably tell your gynecologist you have herpes, and she was like, okay, that's normal like it was, nobody was nothing like I just came in with an extra toenail in like. That's normal. And she's actually, the reason why I've been more vocal about it and been so like opening up upfront about it, and also like be opened up front about it. Because if you're confident in what you have, and what you have to offer why does your little herpes matter all like you're gonna find that person for you? Everybody has somebody's been. Amen, since I love you the best person we could talk to about this, that's for sure. I'm very like blunt about things like I'm not it's taken me a while, but it also is a lot of the help for my boyfriend. He is my number one fan and like he's like, sue what? Well, thank you so much coming on your incredible. Grace, helping us normalized that thank you. Bye bye. Bye. So that was amazing. I'm so happy. I feel like so scared to get tested. Now. I don't. Yeah. Right. Yeah. I feel like people listening you shouldn't. And even if you have HIV or herpes or anything else, like it's going to be okay. It's not the end, and there's people out there that will love you think others literally Facebook support groups for everything. Like if I hurt Bruce would be in there. So join us a poker van, maybe, there's other resources in there to help you maybe learn how to start a conversation with someone. Because I'm sure that would be so hard for me being single, on, like telling going on dates with have it. So really want you guys to seek out that advice if that's going through now it seems interesting because I feel like the biggest after all these talks. It feels like the biggest issue is telling the people that you want to be romantic with but like the actual lifestyle having these infections is, is not like totally life. Altering is labeled or in some sense. But like the biggest deal is finding person who's fine with you with it. It's the pressures of society. It's like I don't know why the exist by cars are really freaked out by herpes for some reason they like how like a women are to how men that you have like L like something happened like a fraternity, or in high school, or if a girl has herpes she's discussing, he's not that guy then he's. Anyway. All right. Great guys. Leave us comments in the Facebook group. Let us know other things that you'd like us to help normalize and thanks for listening and subscribe to the podcast and Facebook group in the Instagram. And please watch. What now our reality show on YouTube, just if you're not by your Instagram you can't click my link just type in what now on YouTube by. This podcast is brought to you by we podcast network. Check out all of our shows, including the brain candy podcasts. I don't get it coffee condos, and let's talk about it.

HIV herpes Jamie Jared Facebook hospital at hospital Amazon Herbie I partner STI Costco Jayme Ashley Lauren Tori immunodeficiency America flu Ryan white Mets
Ep106: When Negative is a Good Thing Feat Janelle & Omo

WHOREible Decisions

1:16:56 hr | 2 years ago

Ep106: When Negative is a Good Thing Feat Janelle & Omo

"Hey, guys. This week's episode of horrible decisions is brought to you by adamant eve. For a limited time only, you can get fifty percent off just about any one item. When you select your one item at fifty percent off. You'll also receive three adult DVD's, plus a free mystery gift we all like mystery gifts. I know I do I like any gift for real Peru. And it's up there even gonna throw in free shipping on your entire order. So go to Adam and eve dot com and use code w d five zero at checkout that WD five zero that is WD the number five in the number zero, Adam and eve dot com. Don't forget to use our coat, and let's get on with the show. Hi, ho. Hi. Hey, welcome to the guy. Damn I I can do it sometime. Decisions. My name is easy. And is he girl Mandy aka that bitch. That's all I'm gonna say for now, y'all motherfuckers. We're actually going to talk about it for the key of the week. I'm so sick of like, even when I posted the guy that everyone apparently just keeps bringing up everyone is assuming that now every guy I deal with I pay and I'm like, that's not the case. I mean, it's tiny your own fault. I I mean, I like to do it. I'm into it. So for the king of the week is going to be very interesting. How we're going to talk about that got one little preface. I'm sure you know, from the title what we're going to talk about in this episode. And I want to apologize for the previous episode. We had we brought someone on that had HIV. And honestly, I think that I can only speak for myself. Sometimes I don't really consider the reach of our podcast and like how wrong Google can be. And I know how dumb then is now. So the two ladies that are sitting in front of us are came with a bunch of papers. It makes me feel like wow. Expected him to have a lot of answers which and that was the thing too. So for him he was born with right Ivy. So I feel like that it also delved into kind of a different experience from someone who may have lived. I don't want to say a normal light. But maybe an life without the disease, and then and then became infected affected. So he just knew how to take care of it. Right. He's like this. I'm okay, mama. Had like, you know, normal. Normalized because you know, it is something that is normal. You know, like you if you are infected with HIV, you can live a normal life. But like, you know, him not knowing the more clinical sites things, right. Why why interest in interviewing him because I didn't with a sex positive podcast? Like, I didn't want to you know, maybe have so much of an episode where it's like. Yeah. You if you have sex, you're gonna catch Ivy and die and then aids and whatever like, so I didn't even want to have that kind of relationship. So anyways, we're sitting here talking guys we are joined today with two special guests, we have genetic and almost Tayo on Mataya, boom. Almost Higham bitch. I got this. We don't call her OMO. But we got to nail on Omar you home. Oh, yeah. I mean, are you homo is she was talking about a girl. I work weird. That would be my Twitter name. You can find me on on Twitter cries mobile. You gotta you gotta change the name girl. And so I guess go ahead and introduce yourself to our audience. Okay. I'm Gino, aka one half of the Nigerian nightmares. Everyone knows each other as well. That's what everyone knows as at work. Okay. Were you were you born in geria-? I I'm a half forgotten. She's she's full. Yeah. Oh, I love this percent. Now that I spent two everywhere now, I'm like just let you I never been there. But I am okay. You're Ross in there. Interesting. I heard that you. Yes. I. Like partying on Victoria island, shoving. And yet it was an interesting experience. None I'll say I mean, I'm hoping that maybe over the years, they do maybe allow more people to experience it, basically, it's one of those countries where you do have to be invited. So because I travel so much. I wanted some sort of tourist Bill or maybe see if we can go like, let's do a tour bitch. No, they. Like, everyone says go to Ghana I go to South Africa. Yeah. They did. I. Cidre go if you like know someone that has family like I really wanna go with my friends and have like a crazy league turn-up experience. But I'm only going to be able to do that. Because you know, I have family because you have family that live there. So. Yeah. So I'm excited. What do you guys? Do. I guess go ahead. Let our let our audience know what you guys do while y'all are here. Okay. So we're both. We both work for the Ryan health network. I work at the Lower East Side location and. Yes, we're on. It's an alphabet city east third in between avenue c and d and our titles like worst, sexual health educators. So we do HIV testing in like at the center and also in the community like there's a huge mobile van that I have to drive in the summer. Like also, why contest all year end the so the ones that are just like parked on the streets, and you get all and get. So we'll go to west fourth or where else Tompkins square park. Have you ever been tested in the based also bring them to our school? I'm from Florida in Orlando eating, but not testing, really know they've done. Well, I mean are band goes sleigh queens college. Yeah. They. So also at Lehman as well. Yeah. I I did it at a music festival once like so funny story when I did it the friends that are with like bitch. If you have it it's going to ruin your. Stay here. The go-to afropop finesse. We could already be in Africa. Let me when I did it. Right. It's like I'm waiting for the results like ten minutes and the guy next week. He's talking like. Yeah. So you're from Florida. That's great. Twenty minutes is like it could be really Gary is like you literally sit there and think of all types of exp- like Justice. Everyone's always asking how do you read the tests and playing to see their minds, and I'm like, I'm not telling you how to read the task because I don't want you to freak out bad. And then when I got off the bus and was like confirms have HIV. I carried that paper around. It was like fucking radio. Up. You got your free people taking pictures of their results after like, sending him social media. On instagram. I'm clean. I mean. Yeah. Because we give letters because it's like partner for receipts because anyone could just say like, oh, I want to talk about I wanna make sure you remind remind me for later like the conversation when you do have it in a year and a mobile van, oh that'll be. You gotta wait girl. Does. Remember that question? It's a good one though, we're going to go ahead and start off kind of like how did our episode with the individual who didn't have HIV in. This was oh my God. What episode twenty six it was it was a while back. It was in the in the short beginning of horrible decisions. So I wanted to maybe start off. This would be our icebreaker for this episode. I wanted to kinda debunk some of the myths associated with HIV and one that I find to be probably the most interesting, which is why I always think I catch it. I used to think damn I swallow come. Yes. My swallow it note, and then apparently you can't catch it. So what he said what he said was correct that like that your stomach acids and the enzymes in there do like get rid of the virus. So it's hard to you're not going to get it. Once it's in your digestive system. It is true that like if you have a cut in your mouth, and you swallow seeming there is a possible chance that you can like you said on the show like it's like really rare like one in one in ten thousand. So I mean, there's a there's a chance, but it's not like super likely. So that's good to know. It's not considered high risk. And I hate talking about different types of sex in terms of risk because I think that kind of adds a stick to certain types of sex. You know, like, you know, a lot of people it's easy to get HIV through anal sex, anal tares, right? Terry. So that's why. With gay associate Chinese a lot of us women. I mean, we the only like the tip, but it still anal sex. I would love more dick. I just can't even with a lot of dude. I'm like, it's a. Fucking a tale out your ass. Don't you? But they're telling us little. Little force Limor. I didn't take it with the girth of like a real dick hand. Right. Could do the plug. I could do a little thing choice. Maybe a smaller dick Nicot, but like a skinny pencil dig nuts and sold dick your pencil. They like they look like a lot Brighton. They really do. Oh, you don't do those little one. Yeah. Like, the ones that start is like a triangle and get okay. Okay. Angela but plugs for her birthday. Why would I? Brandon. I mean vibrator. Oh, I guess I'm doing. From horrible decisions. You have a podcast called lip service. I can't get you book blood. I bought her before gift card. Well, that was classy. The anal rats. Beauty lenders. Look like pugs, they do a lot of the people. Docking. Do I love the shape of the beauty blender and every time I look at it. Because I have a lot of cute ones. My friend sends them to me, and I'm like, shoot plugs. We wanna ugly but plug I don't be but plugging in less what it did. Well, then they don't plug my filter. Yeah union. So another one of the myths that I wanted to talk about especially coming from Florida in heaven a whole bunch of them bugs. I did at one point us the thing that if a mosquito bit someone with HIV, and then came and bit me not shortly long after that. Maybe there could be some sort of transmission of the virus that way, right? That is also a myth, correct. That's a myth. It's not true come because HIV needs to it's a wholesale to live in to survive. So like, it it can only survive in CD four cells char-, like the human cells. So like, you know, even if a mosquito bites you, even if they get it. Animals can't contract they get HIV. So there are different types of immunodeficiency, viruses that other animals can get like there's sl FIV, which is feline cat rate is ship. Sti right? I don't know why like last week I decided to Google lab, but it's actually transmitted diseases for animals, we brought that up on the evolution episode. I would say I want to ask both of you. What is one of the myths that you hear the most often, and what is the answer to it? Like, what is what is one of the things that you hear the most regarding each? Right off the top there's shelter across the street from our health center women's shelter. And so obviously, it's a lot of women living in in general space. And then a lot of them are worried that if someone has period blood on the toilet, and they sit on it. Are they going to get HIV? I don't know like I've heard a lot. Oh, okay. That's false. Like, you're not going to be able to contract from that way. Because also by that point, it's it's airborne. You know? No air and like is like getting pregnant, right? What do you mean? Like, basically saying like you. Right because in order for it to survive it needs to be inside of a cell, which is the same. Like when girls like the Turkey based thing is is a myth, right? Like you. Turkey base. Turkey Basting is a total fucking thing that people do want to collect the sperm. Right. And you can do it with your partner. If you're lesbian or whatever what I'm talking about is men thinking like you throw your fucking condom in the trash can. And like a girl is going gonna like save it and try to well pregnant later, and she'll that's what I was referring to was them. Out of the condom. I mean, if it's already categorically Thompson, if you get condom as soon as the nego- put it into the trash and you freeze that so so say where I would have that same question with HIV. Is there a timeframe if you were telling me that the timeframe with sperm, and I'm thinking, it's the same airborne roles. Is there a timeframe framework technically, you could buy the period blood? If you sat on the seat, and you had to open sore like, I know there's a whole lot that goes into right? It can just touch you on your skin. And then now, you need to have an open or on your butt, or whatever, you know, what I mean like, so many factors. That's just not something that I would be concerned about. Okay. And then what's one of the most that you hear the most? I think I don't think I hear like a lot of myths about HIV itself. Besides the regulars like, oh, you can get it from kissing or saliva or whatever which is false. You can't get it that way. But I think. One of the biggest missile I encounter when I test people is that, you know, I always ask. Oh, like, do you want to get HIV test today and a woman, you know, in her fifties? We'll be like, oh, no baby. I don't need one of those. And I'm like, why do you think that you need one? And then she's like, oh, well, you know, I've been married for such and such so many years, and it's like the number of patients that I have who are women who have got infected by their partners who, you know, didn't know that they'd been infected for years because you know, they never thought to get tested. It's like, you know, you you don't know. And every it's everyone's responsibility to be getting tested regularly at least once a year. For being tested. Right. So if you're in a monogamous relationship try like you need to at least go once truly monogamous because you know, sometimes you're minority of my where we go anywhere wave monogamous. But you don't know what your is doing. But ideally, just like definitely go once a year, and then if you can go twice a year. And then if you have multiple partners try to go every three months. Without getting tested and not knowing you have it like, I guess where I'm kind of confused as like, you know, we assume the second you get it. And you find out you have it. You gotta jump on this and take care of it. I mean. Yeah. Could it be years? Like, how does it live near body? What kind of affects have while? You're not getting treated for you. So I mean, okay. So in the first two weeks, a select the I ten to fourteen days after you've been infected with HIV. So the virus enters your body a lot of people experienced symptoms of what's known as a cue HIV. So that's the time when the Asia acutely. Right. So the HIV virus multiplying dividing in your body. And you're starting to have a lot of like immunological symptoms. So like, you know, you might have inflammation in a lot of people describe these symptoms as like flu. Like, so, you know, you're going to you know, listen to the flu you don't list. Right. And we in the wintertime bitch got fined. Oh, my God damn ears start hurting. Now. I gotta go get ten. But this is why it's actually a really good reason to bring it up now because like because right? It is the wintertime a lot of people are getting the flu, and they might have these symptoms and think, oh, well, it's nothing, but it's like the flu. These symptoms and ten to fourteen days ago, you had unprotected sex with someone who status you don't know that idea. Go go go. Go trying to scare anyone. But he's. These. So I need to. This is I guess this is going to go ahead and segue us into RV nila. If you're listening to this episode, one of the reasons why I definitely chose to do this hit up Gene-o, even though Geneva hypnosis twenty eighteen and she's do say palooza, we'll buy. Hi, ma'am. Emailed. And I knew my you. I'm drunk. I'm like, yeah. We're. Go girl. Yeah. DNB girl. I'm I'm gonna bring you. All. Yeah. You know, some people sanitizing craze. No. Yeah. But she because y'all came at least with a nice, Email your Email. It was very professional. And I was like, oh, yeah. Yo got songs about sex y'all gonna have me on. To their own shit and be like Hello. Like screen time ours. No, we're not. That's my response. Sorry. So yes, Gino saw me do say grow. We're gonna bring you on. But one of the reasons why definitely wanted to have this. I guess conversation as you guys know, I probably spent the last month every weekend in Atlanta for twenty eighteen and I also used to live there. And so there is now the CDC has went ahead and put that Atlanta is now in HIV epidemic as far as they are now actually comparing Atlanta to third world countries. I I didn't want to go ahead and say, I put here is says that downtown Atlanta is as bad as than Bob way or Harare or Durbin said Dr Carlos del Rio court director of Emory university's center for aids research. Another thing that I also saw was a recent study released by the CDC shows that y y shows why funding is so critical. If you live in the southeast, you're more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than any other part of the country and in Georgia, the risk of diagnosis leads to one in fifty one. And so I definitely wanted to bring this to the forefront because Atlanta is a city. I hold so dear in my heart, and I do be fucking when I be in town. So we have a show in twenty-third. And I guess I'll stay home. So we we do have again our live show on February twenty third in Atlanta. But it's crazy to me though. It sounds like right. Yeah. Make out and suck a dick, and you can have sex with a condom on condom, dick fire worried about it. I really third world country in Atlanta. I'll pass. Yeah. That's that's a lie. I'm past. I kind of wanted to to bring this to you guys. You guys do a lot of y'all have paperwork goddamn, so stats are on. So can we go ahead and maybe delve into the epidemic? That's happening in Atlanta, specifically in the African American community, and I do want to also focus that this is not only men ladies this has it's it's not gender specific. This is for men and women. Of course, men do hold a higher risk because like we mentioned earlier with the anal sex. But like I do want to share with you guys, unfortunately. And I hate to discuss it. But there is a lot. Large download community in Atlanta. Which is why women now face these same risks because the men that you are dealing with may or may not be open to letting you know that they have partners that are the same sex. So have you got it? And I mean, if we say that then that's just kind of saying like all the gays are having it in Atlanta. But that's not really. It's really all stigma. Right, right. That's why I said it just feeling. It's always so victim blaming by like, you know, what? I mean. Right. I disagree. I think that that's why I worded it the way. I did. I thought I did a fine job with. Unfortunately, you did we do have that are open to letting us know that they deal with other men because unfortunately, we shame them for it. But like I was telling OMO in the in the lobby prep was something that I was considering at one point because I do deal with men who have openly admitted that they have experimented or dealt with other men as though to me, it's not victim blaming at all, but me, and and those men have had those types of conversations as well. So if we can delve into maybe some of the stats in Atlanta that you know, or what's going on in Atlanta. As to why this epidemic is happening. I mean, as you said like, it's disproportionately affecting communities of color, so you know, black and Brown peoples, but, you know, in Atlanta, specifically, it's obviously more African American, and you know, when you think when you think about the HIV pedantic, and how it works in the country, you know, impacts people based on race and socioeconomic status because then you can't have access to healthcare help carry. But then things like you mentioned the coma. Phobia. Unlike stigma also are associated with that. Because people, you know, who might be gay or queer questioning like might feel like, oh, well, I shouldn't get tested. You know, there's so much fear about getting tested in general. Yeah. And then you know, when speaking about like the types of sex that have carry a greater risk that I say in quotation marks, you know, there's so much stigma associated with anal sex. Because of the fact that the risk of you know, spreading HIV is higher. But in general like yet, obviously there is. Huge epidemic in Atlanta, but that apathetic mirrors so many other parts in the world and some of the parts in this country where people are going to have access to healthcare. So you know, there was a huge epidemic in DC about. They righty as well. And you know in New York there there isn't HIV epidemic. Here, you know, the the rate of new infections were rising. And now they're going down because of so many interventions, and that's part of where two genera, and I do, but because New York City has a three point plan to end the epidemic in twenty twenty. What's that sold at three par saw the first one is to get tested because obviously you need to know your status positive, then you can be linked to services. So that you're not spreading into other people in taking anti retroviral medications. So that you eventually get down to an undetectable level and undetectable referring to your viral load. So once you're and there's also something now, I'm the CDC ever leave in twenty seventeen. But they came up with you equals you which means undetectable viral load. Eagles untranslatable your likelihood of passing it onto somebody else is right, which is why it's really important for people when they do find out that they have HIV to immediately get linked to care to start taking their intellectual medications because when they're taking medication they're keeping themselves healthy. And if you have an undetectable viral than you can't pass it on to other people. That's why isn't really pill even for people. That are undetectable. Yeah. Yeah. It's a daily pill once you're if you're HIV positive you're always going to be on medication. Right. And then the third part of the the three point plan is prep. So have all the people who are HIV negative take prep, or if you're in a relationship with someone who's positive, which is called scientific term is Ciro discordant, but you can just say magnetic couple like one on one. You guys are in a magnetic couple. Then the person who's negative should be on prep. So that they're not going to contract it from their partner and the person who is positive there. Hopefully, they're taking their medications in there. And again that was something that we weren't able to really touch on much in our previous HIV episode because he was born with the virus. Brian. So prep would not have helped him. And so I do want to delve into that into the horrible decision. Especially considering I've read articles where they're trying to issue it in the AFC in Atlanta. So the CDC actually. The university of life. Morehouse film in Clark. And so basically, they're suggesting the CDC is suggesting that the youth start just taking prep like we fucking take vitamins typically, so like sorry, I kind of skipped around, and I just wanted to get back to you know, those single disproportionately affects like people of color. So it's like seventy three percent of new infections are black people. Eighty one percent of new infections are men, you know, and the majority it's like seventy five percent of new infections occur within the ages of twenty and forty. So, you know, like young people who are becoming infected which is why understand why you know, you see would want to give it out to college holder vitamins. Mention it is and then I also read as well wall. She's throwing those stats around. I think it's important to remember as well. The African Americans make up only twelve percent of the US and something that I read is that forty three percent of HIV cases are African American right? Right. So to know that is is pretty staggering and unfortunate. We're going to delve more further into HIV prep, some of the dope questions that we'd see has as well. But I kind of wanted to get into our king of the week. So for the king this week. I didn't really wanna pick an actual kink. I think it's important that as we do kings of the week mind, you this is probably above episode one hundred or somewhere in the nineties. We're fucking almost over one hundred uploads at this point. But I wanted to discuss the difference between a kink fetish. So I think we talk about kinks a, and again, I guess I wanted to look into this because I referred to me enjoying pegging as more of a kink that I enjoy partaking in. So I wanted to let you guys know the difference real quick, a kink turns us on or or is considered outside of the predetermined. Norm. For those of you who may have fetishes fetishes are more soda where you don't want to engage in sex without having this. Of course, it also pertains the fantasies and things like that. Yes. Oh foot fetish is people like like, they are they doing quote rates than so feed. This is how this is how they how they break it down kinks are like salt. They simply adds to the flavor fetishes are like the food itself without them. There is no meal. Oh, I like that. So there's a way to look at are people who have foot kinks. I think I'm Jason where you know. I don't think you can have a lot of fetishes. Will you have multiple fetishes? All the time. Like I mean, but for someone's do you all want to? So then I think a better way to maybe worried that how I've always thought fetishes as something longer lasting than it is just one type of thing like his king to me is just one piece of the puzzle that you could try or some just like, I don't know. Maybe like just calling it something, but fetishes something that you have ownership to like, it's your thing part of your identity. I have a fetish for San right? That's like that's my jam. I'd I would need it. I would data fetish. But you're you also would you say for the most part, you're always in some sort of the fashion Bedia? Some of course is a wide range, but your sub for the most part even without trying to be you're in a sub state when you're having sex. So even though you're not going through the whole narrow lady seven out of ten times. Yeah. So like with me, I brought this up, of course. Because of course, yet Peggy Bundy yawned gave me some great fungi names. I will say pegos sores Rex like, I heard it all. No, I've had some great. But for pegging, I will say even when it comes to my partners. I don't peg everyone. It's not needed. I will say when I may I ask everyone. I'm betting I will say I do like. I would say media. Som is also probably my fetish, but I'm more on the dominant side and to me having access to a man's, but makes me feel fucking in control and dominant as folk probably violating as well. But yes, so but do I have to pay every partner that I have. No like, I've been fucking the guy twenty four seven for five years never ever have pegged him. So funny. You're describing pegging this way. I just want the king. I went on ener who uprising and they wanted to talk to me about pegging, and I did not describe it in a dominating way. At all to me. It's very I was having a conversation with someone about that. They were like, well, I feel like I would never wanna peg someone because I liked to be submissive. And I was like I have you ever had any power. So here's the thing like power. But how that's what I'm saying. Right in one. And I did have right. I like that he really nigger ride me. And that was but I also felt like it was me giving him a different type of to me pegging is in the highest sense a'domino. Here's why I think that sometimes there's a catch twenty two with this. Because for me, I'm a submissive person that enjoys giving people pleasure. No matter how lay enjoy it. Right. We do sit here and say that you know. So the issue that men have with pigging is giving up their masculinity symbol, should he think masculinity is in their assholes? The problem with always describing it as like fucking the shit out of somebody in the it'd be it being like dominating is then men who are dominant wealthy interested. So for my experiences with painting. It's never really been like bent over shit. Like, it's always started for me. Like, I years. I never really even knew the term until I watched broad city was using toys like in their ass, but never bent. So once I actually had a strap on for my first time it still wasn't bit. Like where you on bought? It was like missionary. Yeah. Yeah. Thank god. Does AM he'll probably wide to me. Like, I prefer get on all four see them beds in those type of and those type of positions. I would say is is probably again that goes to my dominant side, but dominance Bedia Sam being being bent over one person has control yet. I mean, that's kind of power bottom power bottom. I feel like when he was riding. He became a power. Right. He was on top then home. Right. That was the bottom could bottom is. We get right type is someone that's giving the dick insert efforts is receptive. Right. There you go. So like I like them to look at you bring it we'd be like taking receiving bitch. Inserted here about power bottoms. It's normally someone that quote, unquote. Throws it back, right? Oh, I'll be happy. Definitely. Even when like during missionary I think, I'm always likes to fucking someone back. But how are you submissive Anna power bottom? So I definitely can switch right. Okay. But I think our bottom for me is just not necessarily a dominant side because I know how to fuck somebody back. Still like, you could basically talk shit to me to make me. Fuck you back. You know what? I mean, it's crazy to me. Because again, I feel like even the fucking back. I feel like plays back into my dominance. Like, I say power bottom. I mean, like, I'm I'm dominant like twenty four seven is very dominant the bid he fucking fucks the goddamn shit outta me. Literally, it don't be messy living. I say literally foot shit on. All right. The dominance in me like wall. He's fucking me. Very very hard is me taking the dick. And I sit here in pride myself in being able to take it all like again as my dominance part of it like, so even when I do say, I'm a switch. I feel like thinking of it that way I feel like at all times. I like to feel like I'm in control. So me taking the dick is me being in control. Even if he feels like he's more inconsiderable our bottom from Asia's, no one I can fuck back like that. Especially like having a lot of threesomes or like fucking girls, whether it be toys or straps like I've seen women that don't fuck back. Y'all. Mine. Oh, I'm pillow Princess when I really don't wanna fuck you like that. Yeah. Don't ever life. Like, what am I doing, Tom? But it's not you. I didn't it's not like I'm forced into fuck in his dude. It's just like I just need to get off like sometimes you wanna have sex. But you're thinking about somebody else all the time. How? You know, how awful it is to be here. Fucking. And then as soon as y'all are dumb fucking Utech, some the negatives. You wish it was fucking. And I'll be like that terrible. But we bitch beer bay recently talking about scissors. But he was into it. Like, I was like damn I wish I was supposed to be right now. Word and he was getting off at the. But that's a girl. Like, I'm talking about me fucking dick wanting another day point. I guess I wanted like, you know, like upside of mash, right? And I didn't want to hold new state. There you go. Actually what it was. Well, can you wondering I wanted to again to bring that up? I think we've had king of the week since we started this show. And I think it was very interesting when I saw that there the difference between kink and fetish, and again, so I want you to know that pegging is my kink. I don't need it. But it's you know, it's cool. If I could get it. So now, we're going to go ahead and get into our whole decision. This is where I guess you can maybe even we can delve back into. I guess I wanna focus on prep for this. But also the testing that goes on how you respond when you do get a positive result. Yeah. And we all everything. But I I find that like the most interesting thing for me when learning about, you know, new STD's, and like how people deal with them because I've been fortunate enough to where I've had partners. Luckily, I've never had it happen where I've had it too. But I had a partners I've had sex with text me, and I found out I got this or whatever. But I do want to know when you know, you're doing the mobile bus shit and someone has it. And how often does someone have it? Like, do you feel like you're doing like five? One hundred like every hour, you're telling someone they have HIV. Because we hear the word epic democ. And you know, what I'm saying? I feel like it makes it sound like. Let me. Work for like three year. You start off as interns, and then that leads us working we've been around this. Okay. And they might time. I feel like I've had four. But honestly, they were all really 2017. So rare that you've done that's a really. I five hundred thousand probably not no not w thousands hundreds of the injuries. Only only I had someone I hate like I hate doing testing just shooting just paperwork. The actual hundreds and only four people just like less than one percent race. But also, I think so how does it probability with that number that you just gave us someone that works there, especially in a neighborhood, like eight alphabet city, well, so Upper West side. So we have six locations and gino's and the Lower East Side, I'm on notice a difference with their neighborhoods. We also have a rook Lynn Bronx a year, and then we have a site in Chelsea. So then for patients, they're they're primarily, it's white gay men. But for me pretty much all of my patients are people of color, belco malleable. So I mean, yeah, it's definitely there's different demographics. Right. But I've only had one positive person. Like, even though I say that I've been working as an intern for about like three or four years here. I just started this position as a tester for about a year and a half. We you. We would have canceled his whole show. I'm telling you. Everybody in the NBA. Engineer. No offense. Everybody. It's confidential. So like, we're not allowed to go. You know anyone year you're with all we would have dinner right here on air. Then we should have did that that would have been cool cool. I hate the next time. Oh, it hurts. It does. Okay. So how was that experience? You sat here, and you got someone who tested positive for HIV. What was how did you tell them? Okay. So far away Paul. By the way, Paul is what the fact that we wanna be negative normally positive is a good thing in life. So I think it's weird that it is. Results. And it's there it's a positive for see that's I think part of it too. That like New York City has started to do this thing where it's called status neutral care, and like we don't care if you're positive or if you're negative. You know, like either result is a rose is a good result. Because you know, if you're positive than, you know, okay? Gotta take medication gonna. I like that because it's not a death sentence. And you know, HIV has gotten to the point where it's kind of like any other chronic health condition. Diabetes healthcare people who are healthcare heart disease. Sorry, people who have HIV link are living long long lives, and they're dying of other things like cancer not related to their issue, or you know, you know, related to their obesity every day, which isn't that? Right. It's an everyday thing if you're taking this vitamin, but it's you know, your medication your life saving medication than you are living a normal normal life. So let let's get back to that. Or? They have a really interesting story. Okay. So first off it was during I I do a lot of testing on the weekends. And we were at a church in the Bronx. So it was mostly so mostly everyone there spoke Spanish and they were undocumented. And so I went with my co worker she speaks fluent Spanish, I could get around like, so I just printed out all of the question. So I want but I wanted to practice because. Fash-? She legally. Oh, this one is she she knows me on a little bit. But so I just wrote out all the questions in Spanish. So my coworker. These are people who typically don't go to they're not getting regular health care service. Right because they don't have Insurance Crime documented, so it's really important for them to come to this event. So we were I think we must attested like ten eleven people each day. So when we're doing back to back to back like barely got breaks. And it's like, I don't I don't mind because I'm like, I want to do this like, I know him helping fingers. This thing Meghan creek, always fingerprint. So so this is like my last patient. We're about to be done for the day. They made us food. Like, I was looking forward to the food like. Now some beans. It was a lie. And it was funny because the people they were trying to learn English and Australia's practice, my Spanish, but we're getting through it and say. I love the show. This was my last patient. And and then I saw that her tests came positive. She was married. I think she was she was Mexican she kids. Everyone was there. So I had the wife and my coworker had the husband and the kids are just waiting in the little common area. And so I see a positive. I see see the line because we're able to tell if you're positive because you can see like a line another line. We'll show up a kind of wish we brought test that cool. But anyways. I mean, we would be like, you know. Anyway. So I see that she has a positive test result. And I'm like, you know, based on the questions in what she's saying, she's been married, they, you know, some in most married people are not using condoms, but she didn't say she had any other partners. So I'm like oh. So then I mean, I'm also starting to freak out because I don't know Spanish that. Well, and so we have a language barrier in how do you tell someone that they have this happened to me the other day, but like the lady spoke, not Spanish Asian Creole? So I was like I don't know what to say like language hotlines. Let's not like. You told me you do a test for someone and you gotta be like a wants to talk to them. Because I'm done them before. Yes. Yeah. And we mean counter like asking how many people did you have sex with all of that? Do you? Let them read it on your phone. Then I pressed the saying that says it, and I'm just kidding. Do that like in the center, and then I just typed it like some stuff like because I can get by. It's like how many people live with you. When like the questions that they asked some of them. But for the ones, I didn't know, I just typed it, and we got through it slowing USO. So her test results positive, and I'm starting to freak out because I'm gonna tell her obviously as well as it is. Yeah. This is my first one also. So I went to go get my co worker, and then she looked at me. She's like the husband's positive too. Oh, we were. So what did the husband say? Like, I didn't. I didn't really even see him or his reaction. But it turns out so the wife contracted from the husband and just depending on that. He I think oh, she told she ended up telling us, but I'll get into that. So she she contracted it from her husband, and this brings up a bigger issue if they were both undocumented, so they probably didn't receive proper healthcare and proper education about the disease. So I don't for some reason the wife thought that even though she knew she was positive for some reason she was just trying to test to see is gonna come up positive. I I'm taking my medication. Are you going to be able to tell from that that she was positive on medication? She was gone and got to test the kids know, we we didn't test the kids. Oh, well now, would you suggest if someone has HIV and they're living with key? Like, you're not you know, what? It's not a sexual relationship at that point should kids be taking medicine. How would that work? I think roommate the mother was not tested before having. I'm having the child than for sure I would test those kids and since they're undocumented. We're not really sure like what type of how could they receiving? I would probably suggest that those kids be tested. But in the in the US like all pregnant women receive in HIV tasks like, you know, that's just part of the standard care, and it's even I I want to delve into this because it's not only with pregnant women, but a lot of times any woman who's undergoing any type of surgery. So I gotta weight loss surgery, and because HIV does affect the white blood cell count. They want to they tested me for just about everything because that would dictate how I healed right now. So if any woman whether you're getting like, your tonsils like maybe not tonsils removed, but any any type of surgery where you're going to be hospitalized or put under anesthesia. Or were they're cutting into you. Of course, it's very important. You'll be tested for HIV in the in the hospitals. What are the ways you can get HIV that isn't sex? Okay. So yeah, I wanted to get into that to their six different fluids from which. Right. So breast milk. Oh, blood semen pre com sold they caught seminal fluid and impre- seminal fluid national fluid and rectal fluid, but wait that's aren't sex though. Okay. Right. Can you can you aren't sex would be the breast breast milk? Mother-to-child transmission, also like when the mother is having the baby like that that blood. There's a lot of blood going on there. That's another way that the mother can transmit it to the child, which is what it doesn't surprise me. Because I don't know if y'all be drinking milk, which there's pus and blood. Yeah. Mill watched I should've discussing so swell. I mean, it was disgusting. Thank god. We're like, we're the only mammals that drink other mammals milk. It's fucking discussing not milk. Twenty teen even ice cream b b like toasts drinking a regular milk. But I meant like breast milk like just watching it like come out and shit like that. So I guess it's what what you were. Get point would be. So I know that the HIV epidemic in New York happened specifically in the eighties because of the drug epidemic that happened. So of course, needle dirty needles. So maybe the tattoo that we brought up like if you get touted with dirty needles that were used on. We're sharing ladles asked that to be airborne. Would it not be able to get off of the needle like how does that? Well, I know with in terms of like syringes, if you're that's that's how a lot of people were. Oh, yes. And then that's why there's a lot of needle exchange programs and people can go exchange. Their dirty needles called works. I heard things about market street in San Francisco. I was born in San Fran. Just like kinda revisit as he family and like different places like where I grew. And while I was there on market street. Right. This is where like Bloomingdale's is like the most. If you guys have been like boozy like neighborhood in San Francisco, also where the most drugs are sold and done. Right. Connolly Atlanta, where it's like one pretty block. And then once you d block. New York to New York rich. I think New York, I don't think there's just really good. I've never seen like a gorgeous block where you can't see a homeless, man. Like, I've never been. I've never been to an area where I feel like this will happen. But yeah, yeah. I mean in queens, far out maybe not on the island. But if you go to queens nightside, maybe. Homeless people people like. Like right across Rajon. Hey, this lock like no li- like I was at a fucking Ritz. And it was like really like like, I never seen something like this not from like zero to one hundred like turn the block, and like I never saw someone shoot up in the street multiple people shooting up like that really. Like was jarring. So come to find out and talking to someone at the bar there later that day the hotel and he's like, yeah. Like, the the way it works is they have these safe zones where people can't get arrested but the big deal with the safe dome zones to stop the HIV epidemic. Is there are people to distribute? Save needles. Yeah. So they're basically so worried about the virus. Spreading like cops. Can't come to you here. You can come get your needles here and shit up. Yeah. I wanted to. A? So they have. Yeah. What does this is? I don't want to pull it def row. Yeah. Roll. Here we go here. I go shit. Shit like that all the homeless people were they also don't get in trouble for living in LA. I wonder if they do anything like that around their needle exchange programs are like really, you know, are huge part of harm reduction. And so like along with HIV, honestly, injection drug transmissions or like sharing needles HIV? Like, of course is a huge concern. But the bigger concern with that is actually hep C hepatitis C that affects your liver, and you know, once your liver is messed up. Yeah. That's your whole those shots in school. So you can get hepatitis a and b but not see. Oh, right. Right. Right. Right. Right. So we got some right. So he gets he from fucking. Yes. You can. But it's actually it's more rare than right? So HIV is easier to get through sex and hep C is not as easy to get through sex. Then on the opposite end hep C is very easy to transmit through like. Sharing needles is a little less likely. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Okay. I think they're like you can be a lot of people are cone -ffected, which means they have both you same time in that causes a lot of complications with you know, just like the body. We we do. I mean people he save me. Okay. Really fucked up after this. No, no, no, no. You guys are doing a great thing. I'm getting said we're going to turn it around. So. We got a song. No, no. Family. No family. You know, I wanna put the clip in for the family guy. You've got eight song. I like baked you remember. They were trying to find his nice way to tell a patient. They had aids or something. And so they like to this whole song and dance and the guys like in the hospital. Taibbi. Loan aids. Like that I got a Nick for delivering bad news. I don't know how to tell you this Mr Dini. So I'll let these guys do it. You have a tissue. I hate to tell you boy that you have a do bet. The mayor of caught it when you stuck dead pill feet NATO in here or maybe. Unprotected sex. It isn't clear, but was not as you have eight. Yes, you not HIV, but full-blown. Day. Be sure that you see that the says not a jive. He. Really? I'm sorry. I wish it was something less Syria. The. Fine. Out that you happy Taibbi. Like, I said before it could be a really good thing. Because then you can take care of yourself with Medicaid. Which is what I wanted to bring up. So I guess there's a lot of and this can tie in the end of it, though, the difference between HIV and aids and HIV become aids. And aids can you skip HIV and go straight to aids. How does that work because easy just got as out of nowhere and died like two months later? Okay. But apparently, that's a that's a you know, right now. All that time period. Do do you went take this over to you? Because they're both figuring out who will break is there. I mean, let's HIV UBA UBA. Can we not turn them into HIV and aids? Awful. What was it again? Craze Sita's, see look. Okay. So HIV human, which means it's only in humans immunodeficiency, which means it affects your immune system. Your immune system are all the cells that are cut up like little soldiers in your body to protect you from outside invaders like bacteria, and viruses, and you know, bad stuff pathogens. Niggers? But right and not and then virus, which means that it's a virus. Which means I need to live inside of a cell in order to to live. And so the cells that they tried to be various lives in our the CD four cells, which are form of T cell in your body. Gotcha, exactly. That does human is h that's why HP B's human Pap human papilloma virus. You'll always have a virus. Right. And so when back to that patient that I had we had explained to her. You're always going to be positive, right? So herpes virus? Yes. Yes. Okay. Yeah. That's you. And then with aids so that's acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. So that it's basically like in if you wanna think about it this way like someone had HIV they didn't they weren't intervening. They didn't receive antiretroviral the virus kept making copies and now bigger. You go your system long. Does that process? Take HIV it takes like it takes about ten years for if you are untreated in year. Yeah. But but for some people can take longer, but that's promising because that means like you have some time if you don't get tested and okay, right? So that's why it's important to definitely get on that occasion. Yeah. Exactly. Right. You get on like what are the probability of with? What is the probability of dying? Once you have aids. Twix because now your immune system is so compromised and most people don't you don't die of aids you dive in aids related, right? It could be. Right. The flu a common cold. Right. So once you have aids so aids is sort of a classification, it's diagnosis, and once you get an eight aids diagnosis, you never lose a diagnosis like from your medical chart. And so like the things that kind of classify you as having aids would be having like an aids the finding illness like Karpov sarcoma like different types of rare cancers or just simply like if you're if your CD four count is less than two hundred that so that means that you don't have a lot of a lot of viral, or you don't have a lot of cells protecting you in your immune system. Okay. Okay. That was a I like. I'll be honest with you like, I just got tested. What Anna finger prick what few weeks ago, we reported that episode? I just wanna get it again. I'm scared, right? Y'all y'all. Well, and that was actually one of my new you had protected sex. Okay. Otas. Can you? Remind us personal questions. But then I felt like we we we do that all episode where we talked about our goddamn abortions talking about can we haven't had unprotected sex. You haven't had sex in a while. I have with a woman, but it's it's like female to female transmissions, very lows suzerain. But that's like this. And I mean, bringing up women so a lot of the times when people think of HIV, they're only thinking of men in men having sex with men typically in women, especially black women are often left out of the conversation. Which is how we saw a fun part of our job. Let's light in the mood. To talk about sipping and spilling. So I'm going to die. This. Right. So that's what we we took over now after app show her name our names Akia Robinson. But she was also an interim with us and she wanted to start doing these events to to just empower black women to take control of their sexual health and nestled in after when she finished her internship. We were asked to take it on, and we just made it more sex positive more inclusive testing there, we don't do testing there. But we're going we're looking into that for because you know, we've had all the events wind down like ISA rain, the wind down. So we make it a fun way to talk about sex in for that does sound fun right for our last of it. You guys can come to next one. If you want over the last little we had Sam from inner hall uprising, she was our moderator. So so then we had people submit questions relationship questions, and then we just snuck little prep in pep in HIV testing related question. Can you? Into this with us. Okay. So prep stance for pre exposure prophylaxis. That means it's a pill that you take before you come into contact with HIV. So it's something that you have to take every single day like around the same time every day, it's kind of like birth control. But for HIV trauma and Vinny. He's been on our show started taking prep, and he was like, yo my body. Like, oh, he's like, I just can't wait for my system because it feels so weird this so yeah. I think it's like the only like twenty percent of people, though, really experience effects and side effects like nausea vomiting. Area. Yes. People said weight loss. I said I wish. So here's here's the thing that I wanted to ask pertaining to prep so going to Nigeria idea the yellow fever vaccine, everyone knows of the flu vaccine every during around this time of year. And so to me what I learned with vaccines that what had actually does is it infects your body with a whistle virus? So that your body. Can then fight the virus off which is weird is to me. It's kind of like, so it's kinda like, you know, I'm sure in the military and stuff the soldiers they'd be doing like practice, or whatever it's kind of like that. So they give you a little bit of virus. They don't and not all the time. They give you the full virus. In a lot of cases. They just give you like piece of the virus chopped up. So your body can kind of see pro. That's what it looks like doesn't do that. Right. It doesn't do that. Putting HIV into our prep is not putting into your body has to medications interested of being into Nafa year these medications are they basically stopped reverse transcription. I'm getting really medical basically. Topsy? -cation from dividing. It stops the virus from dividing. Gotcha no has been around. I know I heard about it in twenty fourteen so practice been I feel like I've just recently heard of prep the last two years so purpose FDA true Bata as prep was FDA approved in two thousand twelve but before that true vodka in the medication itself was FDA approved and has been around since like, the two thousands so prep with withdrawal. Oh with met with the commercials. They trae why? But still. Why would you advertise? They realize like, okay, this isn't working. And also we need to have commercials. But that question is it stronger in men and not women like it's not. So basically, you know, a lot of municipalities New York DC Atlanta. They were saying like there's this huge issue pedantic. It's affecting a lot of men. It's affecting a lot of young men. It's affecting a lot of young black black and Brown men. And you know, it's true now that like if current epidemic rates continue that like one in the lifetime risk of HIV infection for young black men is one and two for Latino men who has is one in four for men for men who have sex with men. I'm sorry, not not just like heterosexual men are all men, but it's for men who have sex with men the lifetime risk of getting HIV is one and two. That's really really scary. You know, and so they were looking at these statistics. And they were like, well, we need to do something about it. And so they were trying to like pass out prep lights vitamins. And I don't necessarily agree with that. Because you know, there's your log sure that you want right. And there's a long history of. What do you mean? Because it with with prep you need to your need to take a daily. So you need to. That's that's what's called adherents like general. Yeah. It's only going to work like birth control. We always say they're like, this is my Bertha. Joel it's only gonna work if you take it when you're supposed to also like people who aren't adherent depressed, if they're not taking enough of the medication, and then they'd be they come into contact with the virus, and they become infected then the virus. But they're still taking a little bit of true bottom, but they're not taking like enough medication to like for treatment purposes, then the virus can become smart and kind of get used to like true vodka. And then it can become resistant to that. I was going to add up the milligrams and shit like that so true. So true the two medications intrigue art bind. So it's always it's like two hundred to three hundred milligrams like I'll see that in. But if you've been taking prep for like two years, you don't need to bump it up. No, okay. But like, okay, it's true. In it of itself, which is the only medication that is FDA approved for prep purposes. Like prep is just kind of birth control. It's like the umbrella term, and then true oughta is like a form of prep. It's the only former prep of that we have now they're working on other forms. They are coming out with it like Joe allu- hoop an injectable to know like cities or countries with the lowest rates of HIV, just so we know where to travel. Actually. But I don't expect yummy like probably in the mid west where nobody lives. I mean, I think that's where you'd be surprised that like, then also, you know them. They're pretty dumb over a lot of other factors. Well, there's a map that I thought I did want to go ahead. And before we get into our home ale for individuals who may think that this is really pricey. That's a conversation a lot that this cost so much. You know, we reasons why you know, Magic Johnson is able to live because he can afford it. I was talking to OMO prior to recording as she actually said that it is free or very low cost to anyone with insurance Medicaid Medicare. They cover it. And then how much would it be on the high end if you don't have insurance if you don't have insurance, you are don't qualify for any assistance programs, and you can't get it from like a study? Because a lot of studies are doing upset he's giving you the for free. You know, if you can't get it any of those other ways than fifteen hundred out of pocket among a month. Yeah. Okay. Which is very pricey most people that most people qualify for some sort of right? The pharmaceutical company they have a coup. Pon like a copay coupon for people who have private insurance. And then if you have Medicaid, you're good stuff and also the manufacturer of the drug. We also offer like a program where they cover the cost of the drug completely. You get it for free as long as you make like under fifty thousand. And there's yeah. Oh, I'm sorry. I go, but just thinking of the price like so I went to Mexico. Right. And while I was there. I bought probably twenty inhalers there only two dollars, and it's not necessarily that I need twenty. But I always notice like there's so many instances where I went to Denver to visit dub forgot my inhaler. And was so difficult to have a doctor right me. Dr. Dr inhaler side to go on this website. Tele doc, find someone to call me pay fifty dollars for that employment. Just to get the inhaler like it was ridiculous just for beautiful just oxygen to breathe. So I bought all these inhalers have him. But Agra I noticed was another thing. My friends were asking me to buy. And then the next one I saw that people were buying like crazy. There was prep. Yeah. But was interesting about prep in Mexico is like this guy behind me in line asked for it. And she's like writing down something on this paper and hands it to him. And there was a place for people to go get it. So I don't even know if they sell it in their pharmacies. Blink. That's that might have been droves. Buyer's club? The name. No, just like zanex. There are certain prescriptions in Mexico, the do require prescription. So most don't which is why people have bind biogra- phetamine there. But prep, I do think may have prescription and the guy really needed it or wanted it. And so she gave him a place to go get it mean you like if I was in Mexico. I would and I was using prep for the purposes of HIV prevention, which is really the only reason why you'd be taking it. I would want to make sure that it was actually Pratt Pratt because sometimes you go to other countries, and they're pharmaceutical industry isn't as regulated. And sometimes the drugs aren't as affective. They might be expired, but the blah like, I would wanna make sure I know the real so I bought a little bit of birth control there too. 'cause it was like a dollar. And then I was like checking the packs and one of them expired in a month. Right. And to the oh you tick now, I'm sorry. That would not. Actually, all the time. Line chinatown. So it's like kind of you know, my brain. So all I did pull them out though. So it looks like fifty two percent, and this is dot gov, by the way. So we're not just googling again guys, you the south mates makes up fifty two percent of new HIV cases. Yes. And it looks like Georgia's highest then Florida, then Louisiana some of the lowest that I see probably like Utah. Hi looks like Utah, Wyoming is one jevon west. Midwest, bro. Let's see what else cabinet. Do. You wanna go there? Right. It six zero who Simone island somewhat. Oh, my thing is worried about the map when we know that like condoms are so affected ill saying that. But I am curious to know is that that's true. But you know, where it's reading the league. I want to go ahead and get into our home L now before we get into the home L. Can you guys? Please read your shirt because I think it's awesome. And I think this is also why I chose this. We wanna shot out Kayla Robinson from green box shop as free stuff. They'll be have the why be racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, when you could just be quiet shirts on the one that Frank ocean war like panorama. And then that's when she blew up. Yeah. Thank you. I did not know your name or Instagram Kayla just said to these girls and they walked in. I'm like I feel like I have short like this and she came to the zone, talking Miami and handed me some shirts I've been wearing them. And I'm like, I don't know who to tag box shot. I think there's super. Thank you green buckshot, check them out. So the home L for this week, by the way, guys if you guys want to send in your home L, you can Email us at horrible decisions at Jimoh dot com. So it says what's up fam-? I love the podcast minneap reshaped your organization, and we admire your perspective together. You guys make a dope team. Okay. So to the meat I met this edge off, Tinder, let's call her sour patch. I mean, she was right. The right mix of feminine and masculine energy sweet pussy. I couldn't ask for anything more. We've been talking for just a few months, but the chemistry was undeniable. She's from another state so she flew in for the weekend. We've seen each other on four occasions now shit. I thought we had a great time art exhibit movies pool. I mean, we. Tilling backstory, I'm married currently separated living in a different state for the last six months, and she's been single for five years. I probably could've started with that. Anyway. So on the last night, I ask her do you see this going anywhere? Her reply was a nigga shit. She said I'm here with you enjoying our time. I expressed that ideas, she likes right, right, right. That's all it is my express that. I just wanted to match where she is continued to get to know her. But I just don't know what's doing too much or saying too much. I haven't been single in a long time. I thought she understood hindsight, I know, she was like, I gotta get the fuck outta here. That night ended in cuddles. Then when I dropped her off at the airport. The hug was long and the kiss was sweet. She let me know when she got. She let me know when she got back the next day. I didn't hear anything which is normal behavior from her. I wasn't tripping. I just saw the following day. I'm blocked on social media and she blocked by number. No warning. No, nothing. I'm actually writing this on day two of her ghosting. She's not coming back. I'm not going to lie. It took me back. A little like finding out. You got sung by a b while he was trying to enjoy an ice cream cone during her visit. We may plan together to come to the live show in Atlanta. I've tickets now. No date. I think this will wrote me she was like yo cannot turn my ticket in for. Yes. You can. Yes. She wants to take a picture with us. Whoever is at the door, go up and be like, I'm the whole mail and then similarly newly ghosted, and then I think it's so I thought it was just an interesting letter that she sent in. Of course, Honey go ahead and holid- it's cold. It's a cold cold world. But I think it's interesting, and it just made me think that I don't think a lot of us. Say what we want in the beginning of things we let things roll. And when things start getting good, maybe we do start applying pressure to situations where the other person isn't wanting pressure. The other person doesn't want a relationship, and they're just enjoying your company. But unfortunately, when we enjoy someone's company now, we just want to be with them. And it's like can we be with you? Now, do we match. Are we going to be married? Like are we can you be my girlfriend? Can you be my boyfriend? And unfortunately, it does kind of scare people away often more times than not. So thank you for your home L wanted to just read that I thought it was interesting, and we will be seeing you in Atlanta. Honey, just know that so before we knew person here. Yeah. Oh, there's a ton of people. I did want to say that gay is fuck at our show where like they China eat really pussy like they'd be a black cry. Oh, no. Well, our fucking horrible decisions shows are honestly, I I haven't had like one live show. I've done in the last four live shows. Or any kind of CUNY of done where someone hasn't asked a fucked me on the my only my with. With their partners. Oh, we get a lot of like an shutout to blog melanin milk. She actually bought me. Like dominatrix lingerie for my show. We have dope as followers, but again before we before we sign off where in our listeners, maybe reach out to you. Or where can they get further information on prep and HIV if you can go ahead and drop that? Okay. So you guys can follow our page for anything prep HIV related. It's called at sipping and spilling. So sl p I n. Yeah. And then spilling SP L I N. So no, geez. And then my personal Instagram is Jay arizo. J A Y underscore e r a h h. Yeah. My my Instagram is at M O Momo underscore baloney, B O, L, O, G A. You don't alone baloney Balogh. No, the log log, no, that's. It's like my readers song. We all knew that right? Doing. GNA right. Yeah. Yeah. And again, we want to go ahead and shout to everyone who's coming to see us on tour Ford twenty we were in Houston to Twenty-three. We're going to be as high by Lanta everybody in Texas Ramey, like twenty they already to get all. Away for all y'all that I just want to say so Atlanta was not a show that we added a show to nor did we switch anything around. So, unfortunately, we are not giving you refunds because you wanna go see b k bitch. We go come out to be to K for that ad. Okay. We go see here and give you some for those that are just saying I can't make it anymore. I'm sorry. Just wanted to throw that out there. In the fine print. We're not accepting refunds. Well, I'm just saying also we had like thirty five dollar tickets. Randy from thirty five to fifty and b two K's like. Like up. Twenty five people. See they pay one twenty five hundred I. We talking about regular people who buy it. We ain't on the computer. Okay. Beyond say, she got tickets. This one I got for free. So I'm like, okay. I'm gonna bring scissors to the show mobile ticket mission with three eighty and guess what? I'm only one. Call away bid me. No dirty. At the Hulu Hulu theater here. Doing by the way of we're looking to be doing our New York show the same day at the beach UK. Yeah. Even cross four to stand very close to the venue. So you guys it'll be a pre-game. Yeah. If you're in Toronto y'all we did push that back to may eighteenth. And we are still working on Miami. And LA venues are sorry for the chained. But unfortunately, with you know, we we work out of theaters. And so if like someone books the week, it's it's very difficult with us to get one day on the weekend. And yeah, but I do want us shut out to our patriot listeners. So everyone that's hard. This next episode sorry. But for the rest of the puck is you'll have a small clip enjoy this also if you think that the episode you just listened to was great. Thank you. If you think you could have done something better to help out with it. Call us at the fifteen dollars here on patriot. After four months, we sent out merch as well as call listeners for outline feedback and for help you can pretty much produce an episode with us five dollars a month. You get three bonus episodes per month. That's gonna come out every Monday right after the show. So if you want some more go on patriot. And you'll have any episode waiting for you right now how this has been yet another episode of horrible decisions. Bye. Person I dated who was black before my current girlfriend ISIS. She had dated other Asians previously cuts. Happens to be what ever is available because in the bay area. I think maybe. Surplus of Asian dudes with a lot of as a whole lot of black women. You know, if there's a whole lot of black area is asking us to come. And they all black. Oh nice. I haven't seen in Kelly. They moved here together. How long you been together two years? Wow. Wow. Two years and your move cross country together. Now, let me ask you made some jokes that I thought were great about your parents asking or I don't know if it was true, but the color of the skin, right? How dark things like that color is a big thing. And you talk about that a little bit dating a black woman were lying. They were lying. That's how that's legit. My mom did ask how black is your girlfriend, and I had to show her a picture of ISIS, and he's only got that. Sue black. Let me ask you because we get into this. Yes. What was your response? Did. He clearly you've heard this because he doesn't said this state. Yeah. Yeah. What was your response to that? I was expecting it. Anyway. So I was prepared for it. We talked about this like I think on our like first day doctors. To get into the parent thing, the friend thing what you guys think that's going to be are horrible decision guys. If you you guys haven't pointed yet, but we're gonna go ahead and jump into vanilla we're going to kind of make it make it a little calmer. Her show vanilla is basically where we find an article or pick something that's going on the news current related to sex and go as you all know. And and actually we we kinda gotta talk about this. And I don't know how late we're going to be when this post, but as you all know our Queen. I she's not really are queens. Not beyond say bitch. My bad. Okay. Are Princess Cardi B broke up with offsets off the knob. And so there are no longer together. Did you see video now someone's that? Oh, while she's topless and doing a customer service voice. Basically, we mat-su Gabar. But I love when people do that try to sound Nisa best I called the other day screaming and she was like, well, ma'am. I'm really try to get this together for you. So I just thought that you've relax, you know. She was black. T mobile everyone. Sorry, the Indians pick up when I call for every all well, the thing is like most Ashley not a lot of them are Filipino though. Filipino knows got good English. They do, but you can also hear when it's like a Filipino trying to do, you know, your Bank Humam, ma'am for. Express. You're right. About they're all ages follows we will be friends. Anyway. So I wanted to talk about because we haven't had a couple of awhile. I don't think we've had a couple of maybe since the swinger episode. So before we get into these questions regarding the breakup, then you know, maybe the last straw. Are you guys monogamous? Yes. You guys are also this is going to be fun as fun. Are you a monogamous? Would you cheat together threesome? Shoot. I know. Issue. Got the home show break them up. We'll back cross-sector.

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Covid19 Part Four [S3E7]

Your Doctor's Orders

19:38 min | 1 year ago

Covid19 Part Four [S3E7]

"I Love Busting Myths. And today's miss are about potential cures for this virus. This plague the virus stars. Kobe to causes coverted nineteen today. We deal with myths about the epidemic myths on how to treat the disease myths on how to prevent the disease. The problem is some of those myths can kill you. My Name is Dr Terry Simpson. And this is your doctor's orders dedicated to busting myths and spreading science viral. Well-meaning nice fellow from China offered to send me some traditional Chinese medicine. He said that traditional Chinese medicine would cure Cova nineteen. His claim was that traditional. Chinese MEDICINE IS WHY. Wuhan became free of this disease. It turns out that eighty five percent of Kobe. Nineteen patients in Wuhan tried some form of traditional Chinese medicine. I covered eastern medicine in our podcast called the first vitamin back when this podcast culinary medicine but did this work for them clearly. Not so what's in traditional Chinese medicine? Can you tell me what it contains? No you can't. It's a blend of things by herbs. Spices rhinoceros horns and therein lies. One problem we don't know what that concoction they give. You has an traditional. Chinese medicine is unregulated both in terms of efficacy. And even more than that safety and point out the obvious. This is a novel virus novel meaning. No human being has ever encountered this virus before now which begs the question. How can traditional medicine cure something? That isn't traditional something. That's brand new to the world. Under the human species it cannot and does not traditional Chinese medicine is a scam there is no uniformity to what is in their concoctions. It could be. Tiger Penis Viagra. Further. There's been no testing to prove any safety. Efficacy dose or toxicity. Chinese traditional medicine is a scam based on the Naievety of its users is this camp and now for vitamin C. Everybody's favorite vitamin people are facebook. Page are trying to convince me that intravenous vitamin C will prevent you from getting this virus war if you get the virus intravenous vitamin C. We'll cue some why vitamin C. Always come up as a cure for almost any disease out there. We Know Vitamin C. Is necessary to survive without it. You will get seriously ill. Vitamin C is an antioxidant pretty powerful and as an antioxidant it will decrease inflammation which may be useful because in studies. Vitamin C has reduced inflammation in the lungs. So that all sounds good because it's lung injury that kills people who have covert nineteen. The problem is that Kobe. Nineteen is a different type of lung injury. There been prior studies on the effects of intravenous vitamin C in people with lung injuries. But a very specific type of lung injury in those studies the subjects had sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. A. R. D. S. Both of which are serious deadly conditions to be sure but neither of them damage the lungs in the same or even a similar way to how covert nineteen damages lung tissues and other studies of patients. Who are critically ill in the ICU. Before covert nineteen. I know there was a time but those people had some intravenous vitamin C infusion for another type of study and they compared it with a placebo. There was no evidence that vitamin C reduced organ failure or help the lungs recover. You know much of this stems from the myths about Vitamin C as a cure for the common cold. The most common virus that causes a cold is from the virus which is classified as a rhinovirus and in one extreme study some people actually agreed to be inoculated with that virus. He has volunteers agreed to have someone. Give them a cold in order to participate in a study about vitamin C. Let me give you a better picture. These nice volunteers agreed. Have doctor shovel nasal swab deep inside their nose all the way back to their throat. That's why was infected with rhinovirus. The one that causes the common cold now which subjects were given either vitamin C. treatment or a placebo in a randomized study was blind faith. Meaning the subjects didn't know which treatment they received. So how did it work? Well it turns out that daily treatment of two hundred milligrams of vitamin C REDUCED. The duration of their colds by half a day so only thirteen and a half days instead of fourteen days on average. Is that a lot. Well maybe vitamin C. Do the same for those who have contracted the novel Corona Virus Covert Nineteen to be clear. A rhinovirus has as much in common with the current of Iris. As you do with a lizard while both viruses can cause common cold symptoms. They are two completely different viruses and now taking high doses of vitamin C won't help prevent getting that regardless of what your health guru or TV doctor claims and by the way your body doesn't store vitamin C within hours. All of that excess vitamin C. You're taking we'll be reprocessed by your kidneys neuron. Now you just can't keep loading up with vitamin C. Throughout the day because your body processes about as fast as you can ingest it and again since your body can't store vitamin C well instead of taking a pill or a lot of pills or something. It's probably just better few tick a diet. That has plenty of vitamin C in it. Which means fruits and vegetables can oh Broccoli has a lot of vitamin C. Isn't that fun? Fish like Broccoli but there is zero evidence to taking vitamin C. N. A Pill for will help you ward off cope nineteen but you still can eat better and better and the other interesting thing is. The Internet cure says that people should get intravenous vitamin C so there's a local peddler of this Scam in my area and they're willing to sell you a two hundred milligrams of vitamin C by the for one. Hundred Twenty five bucks. There is no evidence intravenous. Vitamin C is better than taking a pill zero the only time we give patients intravenous. Vitamin C is when people are unable to take the medicine orally anyone selling intravenous vitamin C as a health benefit. Is Selling you a scam? Don't buy it and then there's hydroxy clerk. I think we're almost over this one now. But president trump has touted drug as a potential cure for covert nineteen. Now that would be nice. Hydroxy chloroquine is a current drug. And there's a fair bit of it around but does it cure cove at nineteen. Now it does not. We've seen two studies from France. Both of them have many many flaws. The data such as it is from these poorly designed studies does not equal the hype around this purported cure in fact the data again such as it is does not show any meaningful difference in outcomes between those who took the drug to treat. Cova nineteen and those that did not and then there's the added problem that hydroxy chloroquine has toxicity. Even at normal doses. It can stop your heart. It can cause you to go blind. Several additional drug trials trying or using hydroxy chloroquine and covert nineteen patients have been stopped because of the toxic effects seen in those patients. Oh and a lack of efficacy. The hype of Hydroxy. Chloroquine is quietly dying as we speak. And that's good because that allows those who really need the drug to prevent malaria or to treat arthritis or Lupus will be able to get the drug but it is not a drug to treat. Covert nineteen some. No chloroquine is at a scam. It is real medicine but it's a real medicine that has no efficacy against copen. Nineteen now disappear is a drug that was originally manufactured to work in. The fight against Abol did didn't work against a bullet that's been used at a limited basis kind of in a long shot or compassionate use for some patients who have cove nineteen and so far. It's shown enough. Promise that the company that makes the drug has started to produce from disappear in large quantities. Once again then one early trial at the University of Chicago patients who are severely ill with code nineteen went home shortly after receiving the drug when it would have been by all models predicted. They would have gotten worse. I know it sounds great then in another recent trial the RIM disavow didn't change mortality in any statistically meaningful way in patients with cove nineteen handed appeared to reduce hospital. Stay by about three days from eleven to fourteen fourteen up but again more trials are needed in the FDA has just approved disappear for use against Cova nineteen look at rim disappear much like we looked at as e t thirty three years account. Once human immunodeficiency virus was identified as the cause of AIDS. They began looking at antivirals because they had a hard time. Getting a vaccine. We still don't have a vaccine against HIV and the first one that came up was AZT. Hit had marginal benefit really isn't used today but it was our first drug and today. We have really good drugs to treat. Iv and someday we will have really good drugs to treat copay. Nineteen disappear is just the start now. I shouldn't have to say this but I do. Do not drink bleach or disinfectants. They will not prevent or cure. Covert nineteen right now. I have a patient in the hospital who drank bleach and lift but his life is miserable and the only way that he can get nutrition is from a tube going into his stomach because his asaf igus is destroyed and then there is Dr McCullough. A doctor let me put that in quotes who has recommended. The some people breathe a three percent solution of hydrogen peroxide. That will not work. Not only that but that will damage your lungs. And maybe kill you. What we need is a vaccine against the SARS Kobe to virus you see. The virus itself does not give a great immune response now anytime get a viral infection. You develop an immune response against the virus and that's how your body gets over it. That's how the infection is stopped inside your body but some viruses don't give a great immune response meaning. You can get the disease again. And that's not but and there is a possibility that vaccine may not be developed for a while just like I said with HIV and spite of years of trying we've never developed a vaccine against that retrovirus causes HIV with HIV. Non-aligned denied get a good immune response but the virus hides from your immune system. So it stays with you. Then it destroys your immune system but for HIV. We have as I said antiviral drugs. Another example of virus. It doesn't give a great immune responses chickenpox. Get it once you as a kid. Then the virus hides a nerve cells and later in life it's manifested as shingles thankfully. We have a vaccine against chickenpox. And then once you hit fifty you ought to get the vaccine called Shingle X. Two doses. There is some evidence that you can get reinfected with coverted. Nineteen I mean. Imagine going through all that hell being quarantined maybe even spending time in the intensive care unit maybe even placed on a ventilator and after all that your body may not make enough of immune response to Where you get the disease again. That's terrifying but right now we really don't know how much of an immune response happens with those who've recovered from covert nineteen and while it is likely there is some immunity. We don't know how long that immunity last visit a year two years a week. We just don't know. In fact there was some evidence of patients where reinfected with Cova nineteen only. After a few weeks they had recovered from the disease that is terrifying but I am cautiously optimistic that we will in time having a live virus vaccine against SARS copay to their number of institutions. That are working to develop a vaccine and as of this recording. There are six potential vaccines undergoing phase. One testing those first trials to see if they're safe and if they are and we'll see if they work a vaccine not only prevents you from suffering through and recovering from the disease but a vaccine will elicit a more rigorous American response. Vaccines are designed to give you a good immune response against this virus. Although at the virus changes like influenza does every year we will have to get a new deck. Seen maybe a new one every year or maybe a booster every few years my favorite vaccine. That's currently being tested. Comes from the Jenner Institute at Oxford England. They should have a million doses ready by September. They are betting that this vaccine will be effective. And if it is they'll be ready with it and if it is if they're back seen proves to be safe and effective by next Winter Kobe. Nineteen will be a bad memory. Wouldn't that be nice? It turns out what they are doing is taking a bit of the protein from SARS Kobe to virus and splicing it into Ad. No virus a different type of viruses actor in that adenoviruses will cause your body to make a whole bunch of that protein which your body will make. Antibodies Two and cure. It is worked so far in monkeys that technology by the way that technology of splicing protein in another virus was first done at the University of Chicago in the Kogler. Viral oncology. Labs of Dr Bernard Rothman many years ago and I only know that because I was there at my name is on that paper. Science and medicine were always fighting against scams we know that oral and IV solutions of vitamin C are no better than eating diet rich in fruits and vegetables. We know that a traditional Chinese medicine doctor in quotes has no traditional treatments for a virus that didn't exist in humans. Five months ago we know ingesting bleacher. Disinfectants will not treat or cure cove nineteen but can kill you and we know there will be more scams for now we wait for science to bring us real medicines and hopefully a vaccine that would be. We know a real solution. Thank you for listening to this episode of your doctor's orders and while I'm a doctor and a virologist your doctor or biologists and you should always seek the advice to a trusted licensed medical provider. But here's this doctor's advice until we have treatment or a vaccine stay at home. Wash your hands a lot and don't drink or breath or otherwise ingest disinfectants. This podcast is a part of your doctor's orders network. Dennis produced a distributed by our friends at Simpler Media. Production my executive producers the talented and masked producer girl from producer girl productions. You follow me for information and my snarky tweet on Twitter Bryan at Dr Terry Simpson. That is d R. Terry Simpson until next time. Don't drink the water for the bleach drink. The Scotch social distancing is done when you were out there smoking your pipe. I mean people will come close and think of it. The person who gave you that pipe was saving your life. That must have been one cool dude.

Cova Dr Terry Simpson HIV Kobe chloroquine University of Chicago Wuhan China respiratory distress Twitter Chloroquine Cova Viagra immunodeficiency Dr Bernard Rothman A. R. D. influenza
Rock Candy Ep. 110: A Bad Babe Playlist - Tampons In Space

Rock N Roll Archaeology

1:22:06 hr | 1 year ago

Rock Candy Ep. 110: A Bad Babe Playlist - Tampons In Space

"There's one at all so go to the doctor throat virus. Yeah you can basically talk to your doctor in all foreigners songs. Oh God so you doctor and be like I'm and they'll check in see. I got a fever of a hundred and three you as God Zach Fast. My paycheck and it's GIN GIN. Oh my God. Every foreigner song was like foretelling the corona virus. So what you're saying is foreigner knew what was happening. Werner time you and they didn't warn us. Well no they did but like not clearly. We did understand in the eighties. What all of these songs men. It's exactly I mean if they if they did all. These songs went after another but then they put like jukebox hero in so like a kind of a message through everybody off. 'cause LIKE. Oh but jukebox hero. That's I stars but also I guess stars in my eyes because I have corona virus Kubo. Nah Hero Got Star. Dolphin is is I. Don't get creding. Your is really sick. You got them flu is I'm going to say it and Y'all are gonNA say girl. Why'd you say that I haven't been severely sick since I was a child? Honestly me too so I don't remember what it's like to be super super duper sick and you know what now we're going to say. Oh I'M GONNA get shipped for this but guess what guys. I've never gotten a flu. Shot never get the flu shot? But that's for heard immunity but like okay sure but like I don't really get no herd immunity Israel so you could actually carry it but not end up getting it okay but like then if you are carrying it and then you get around somebody with immunodeficiency early old person you could end up giving it to them even though you never actually develop any of the symptoms but you can still be a carrier. I can be a typhoid. Mary is what you're saying. I I think I just persuaded you to never get a flu. Shot Yeah Yeah you did. That was not to go. I kinda like the idea of view point I really like is like you're not even an anti vaccine or you're just took it just. Don't get the flu shot. Sorry guys I not going to get the flu shot. Sorry I mean I got it that one weekend from birth that one weekend I was real fuck out Q. Day and they've got a flu shot and then we went rogue shit. Oh no that's your with breaking. It was really fun. It was fun. I also have access to Rage Room. Fuck into it so good. It's better than therapy and pay the extra ten dollars to break the TV. It's really bring your own TV. They'll probably let you break it. They really well. They're great. Find yourself a raider raise. Rooms are fucking fantastic. Take it from us. Welcome candy where we rage all the time. We're just bull burner. Bring your weekly podcast. Bringing is sweet treats from the world of music and stories entails and sometimes lovable playlists. Yeah and also bits of Foreigner Song. Yeah mostly we're just GONNA sing foreigner songs. Yeah Yeah you need to be okay with that. Yeah isn't though because you know what I WANNA know. What love is what you yes. That's really what he wants to the original lyrics and then he's like I can't say that guys can't play the song on the radio if I say that. So change it. But that's like respect. I AIN'T GONNA kick shame no well but that's not what we're here to talk about. All we're continuing women's celebrating women's history month by making our own little playlists because why the fuck not no. We need songs for these dark times. Yeah Yeah Yeah we do especially ladies guys. It's still hard out here for a bit. It hasn't stopped in the week. That's passed turns out still hard out here for it. Really is Allen. Knew what she was fucking talking. It is hard out here for everyone but it is definitely still hard out here for a bitch. We just have a bunch of men running for president now again. Old White men old white men running for president again and you don't want to spread the corona. Yeah for Prosperity Sake. Someday we'll look back on this episode. Make this is happening during P. I don't even know if this peak krona. Maybe this is beginning of peak current. We don't know I suppose. This is peak corona for the United States. Don't sit where it could get worse. It got worse in one day today. Got Worse I just. None of our bars are going to be opening really for Fuck Sake. What are we GONNA do? Don't know how am I going to socialize like I can't just be on facebook all the time off as April Cook like I've been trying to get off that shit I know so we need to find. We NEED TO BE CREATIVE. And find new ways of socializing. Yes but until then currently we can give you some sweet jams at least for the ladies to empower yourselves. Maybe to get you through a sickness. Maybe this type you see you. Don't get sick and I mean this is not FDA approved. So we're going to stop. The Corona virus were not. This is homeopathic at best at best I wouldn't call it. Homeopathic was CBO at worst at worst. Yes yes so. Let's talk about this a beer because we don't have bars anymore. He accents. We don't have bars so let's talk about this barely. Got 'cause we drink in a tasty lowly it's really fucking delicious for one. Is We have a really good beer this week. It's from artisanal beer works. I believe it's pronounced. Yeah you're right. It is artists anal. And it's called. She's Tart 'cause she is turn this girl's Tur- AF Yeah Louis it's it is a delightful sour ale and honestly artisanal beer. Brewer is local to us. Yes in Saratoga. I believe they're England's falls. Well I didn't even realize they're that far up okay. Yeah and Yeah they're a great local `boring they usually make some real good stuff to even. Their Pos are pretty dis. Oh no you're right it's Saratoga wrong. Sorry you're allowed but only once every one. This is yeah. It's a lovely sour. It's nice and simple but really delicious. Get if you find it nearby you if you don't come visit us in New York maybe league just by a bunch for you so we can support because I feel really bad. All of our local bars in our haunts are closing down. They're only available for growlers crawlers and cans and whatnot and grubbs hubs. So you can still support your local stuff guys but asserts because the people that are getting hit the fucking hardest right now because of this cove in nineteen bullshit are the restaurants and bars and their employees work really hard. They rely on their paychecks. Most of them are living paycheck to paycheck. Seriously don't have healthcare and they don't have paid time off so they're getting fucked hard so if you're going to support anybody through this support them yes as small business deserve it seriously. Like Fuck Amazon is an Amazon during the shit. Go down in the street out. Stop buying all the fucking toilet paper. You don't need that much toilet guys. Carotid does not cause diarrhea you real- It really was a fuck. You only need a normal amount of toilet paper. It's going to be fine. How like honestly if it's flu like you're GONNA eat that much less. Yeah what the Fuck. Need this much of the paper. Also if the apocalypse did come toilet paper is not going to be currency anything but toilet. Paper is going to be currency but toilet paper toilet. I think that signals we need to. We need to get out of it. Thanks for hanging for past ten minutes with our bullshit. Let's get into our shit so yes this week. We're doing a playlist episode GNASHING. I've come together with at least five of these solid champs that we I feel. We both agree. Are you know what I hear? And I'm like fuck. Yeah I'm a fucking woman and I look fantastic. I LOOK CRAZY. I am toughest fight the shit that I been through it. I'm still here bitch. I am still here. Yeah other than ever I have feelings. And that's okay and that's fine. You know the fact that I have feelings makes me even better. Yes malls Lima bad ass. Pitch have feelings and I could do whatever I want to go. Fuck yourself yeah I think mainly the the theme of this will just be conduct yourself. Go Fuck yourself yourself and on that sentiment. Now it's getting to the first one pick. My first pick is ain't nothing but a she thing by salt pepper from the same damping off McGrath. Then I'm a bit when you make them on who he will take things. So I'm thanking hanging seat. Anything Wonderful Love. Yes hot COP. She's a hot hot cop. Salt and pepper knew first-hand was like to be women driving full force into a world dominated by men. So who else would we turn to for? First pick honestly you right now and we've talked about before what talk to them again. Another money she thing was released in October. Nineteen ninety-five unaccomplished album of the same name. The album itself included a strange mix of big name female musicians of the ninety s and k including Sinead O'connor who had a traditional Irish Song Sung in Irish Annie Lennox Queen Latifah and Luscious Jackson. Who also did a strange song all in French. It was this weird. Do we made probably we make this playlists. We made of our guy when we were hot. Eleven years old. We were hot at eleven. But I don't think any kid is hud eleven. I didn't mean hot in. Don't touch kids. Don't touch shoulder just be able to get a chance to just remind the folks at home. Just don't touch children touching kids. Yeah the itself is truly something to behold and could dominate anything else. We have on our list but the title song is a feminist anthem. No matter how you it written by Cheryl James. The salt of salt and pepper. Hot Cop hot cop in the video. A feminist anthem is truly what she wanted this to be as mentioned in our episode about the group saw ended up truly hating their single. None of Your Business. Oh yes she about that. She fucking hated. It really forgot about that and she won't perform anymore. She has pepe performance by yourself. I Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. Most of these days would see none of your business as a sex positive FEMINIST ANTHEM. In its own right but salt as promoting promiscuity. Oh no she wrote eight nothing but a she thing to basically scrub the dirt of none of your business offer of her hands. Would you know she's doing that because she got roll? Jesus see Oh yeah. That's the only reason why she doesn't like knowing your business. None of your business is totally innocuous. It's completely sex positive. Yeah I mean if you WanNa meet somebody at the bar and focus on your house fine consent closely number one rule consent and that song one hundred percent promotes consent. Yeah we are two consenting adults who would like to have sex now by. That's yeah yeah that's that's fine. Totally fine Latin. I'm saying ain't none of that. She's saying fucking champ to. Yeah it is totally here. Most of them are yeah. I put them on the same fucking list but I guess nothing but a she thing is more like be proud of yourself as who you are not just about sex right. Yeah No I. I agree with that. The entire concept was hers. She wanted everyone to know that women can do anything. Man Can do and deserve equal pay equal rights and respect for it. Yeah and she wasn't afraid Tacoma out for the gasoline bullshit. Either Yup and you. Can you watch the music video? And see that they're doing things like fire fighting the crueler literal interpretation of their astronauts before think women were even astronauts at this point. I'm just kidding I think women were astronauts back then. It's just that they weren't actually allowed to go into space or something I don't know what are they gonNA do when they're on their periods. Don't you remember that like what four years ago and bedroom like? What do we never laid their other periods of? How many like pads do you need a thousand literally that we don't come on know every woman over here is like I never fucking ask lead once a month? Second of all the women really wanted they could just get some form of birth control. That could stop them from having their period they could like. I don't know how that would affect them in zero gravity kind of situation but still can't imagine it'd be that different than regular gravity situation gravity EST by saying gravity. I might have a better time with it if I were in zero gravity situation. When let's just keep it all in? Oh Yeah ooh I don't know about that. No keep it all in our. I'M NOT GONNA get into details. We should just move onto guys science. That's that's acute. Move the fuck. Every man. Listening to us is just squirmed in his seat. A little bit. Go God women bleed ones you guys? We don't like it either but you know what we also. So I know we're going to. I can relate to them I also. We just don't take like forty five minutes to do it like you guys like. I'm just you get it done. Get him get out the tate hemorrhage guys I think so you can him to get him raised by pushing too hard. Oh never mind them hemorrhoids. I've gotTA keep going to my first. Then Okay Oh we've been drinking before we serve. In case you can tell we title this episode hemorrhoids. Certain point. We'll either get all the listeners or none of the listeners. Hubei Preparation Age. Oh Pep age so my first pick is another classic indeed that I think everyone knows. It's the runaways Chevy You don't think yeah it's a good one. That's a okay. The song solid is fuck. But the more you dig into the runways I'm like Holy Shit or this is loaded. Yeah Well Cherry bomb. Yeah it makes sense for those. Not In the no the runaways. Where he highly influential seventies rock band comprising of all females It's where musicians jet and Lita Ford got their start. They paved the way for other females. Like the go-goes l. Seven whole so many other girl groups basically basically are like the slits and every punk rock Female bands that you can think of was probably influenced by the runaway. Yeah despite the fact that they were pretty much put together like a girl bands. Yeah they were Joan. Jett and Ken Morris or something. I didn't really care too much more his name. 'cause that dude is gross. Also stay tuned for next week. Wing nudge nine. Little little little people will taste. Small tasters pasties Cherry. Bomb is one of the first hit singles for these ladies coming in hat with an aggressive riff and growling vocals. That stopped listeners in their tracks. This was something people really hadn't heard yet. Also like not in the mainstream anyway so they were sexy teenagers so problematic. Yeah that's one of them. Like legit many may not realize it. This tune is being sung by sixteen year. Old Cherry Currie whose looks and voice may seem beyond her age but also play to that jail. Bait looked to garner attention from the rock loving masses. Yup because that was exactly what they wanted. They wanted this chick wearing a core set singing. I'm your Cherry bomb. Yeah if anything The runways I guess you could say we're really exploited. Oh we are. That's probably playing down a bit and even in their later adult years. It's interesting to see how. A lot of them very opposed. Oh handle what had happened. Oh yes I'm sorry. It was Kim. Fowley was their manager. Runaways manager him. Fowley wanted to shock. The World With this group of underage girls with the devil may care attitude and music to Piss your parents off with Song. Cherry bombs were in with this in mind but probably never would have happened if cherry picked Sherri Sherri I keep calling her chariots Sherri Sherri but. It's spelled Terry. And that's why I keep fucking up. Also we're talking about Jerry. Yeah excuse me. It's Sherry Curry. But this probably never would've happened if Sherry picked a different song to addition with because she cayman with Suzy quals version of fever. But the band didn't know how to play it so instead which thought this was a weird decision. They decided to take some time to write up an original song instead. Okay but all right. It ended up working because they ended up with the song. A Cherry bomb is usually known as a small explosive. That kids used to play with. But in this context it's meant to represent a girl who's looking caused a lot of trouble getting her parents all angry with promiscuous bad behavior. She'll your cherry bomb. Yeah she's so bad. She wears short skirts in courses ads but also she is sixteen like you guys. She was definitely very underage quite underage. The A lot of their story comes from arguably problematic place and Kim. Fowley is definitely not a good guy. In this situation there are accusations of rape and sexual abuse towards the women in this. Sorry at the time teenage girls in this group. God He's like almost even worse Lou Pearlman. You know I am coming this nation. Drink this much before the because I really liked the song and I'm kind of making myself not like saw the connotation our brain a little bit but okay if you were removed this song. Take the song everything I just said. Put it in a box. Put It on the shelf. Takes Shit store sell it just put together so it's all together so it's all together and get rid of it? But a woman in her mid thirties. If I hear this song and I don't know the background to it. I just think like yeah. I'm a fucking bad on when I was heavily buzzed at a bar. I'd be like yeah fuck in this song. Yeah like I'm hot. I'm here to cause a fuck and raucous. I don't care what you fucking cherry bomb. So here's the thing if you have like a woman of consenting age singing the Song Great. I think this is wonderful. You're twenty one or whatever and singing the Song Karaoke Ni- eighteen and older go for it. Yeah but like if you're under eighteen like I really need you to know the story about the runaway. 'cause it's got some issues. Sorry now I went into a meeting runaways. Mostly just got really angry but like that's the thing to being a woman is just like it's really easy to just like hairpin trigger us is easy and it's also kind of infuriating the kind of stories you get behind all of these really Girl Power Song. Yeah I will say though bringing it back to some girl power. Joan Jett did help Kim write the song and she even stated that. This is the first song that she wrote. That wasn't for herself. She wrote it for Sherry overall. Forget everything I just said it. Endure the circus. It is a good song all my degrees song drive to put your and as long as your age appropriate age appropriate you can listen to. Do you WANNA go onto the next one. He's okay so my next pick actually is a pretty fitting follow up to that God It's l seven's masses our asses. This is a really good song to scream in the car. When you're really fucking picture like someone cutting you off and you're putting the ARA so this song doesn't have specifically feminist message to it but it does have one that many women feel probably every day of their lives. People are fucking stupid. People are fucking stupid. I feel like God right now. Faulk ID do pid toilet paper paper that alone but anyway I feel like I feel like women feel this on a much deeper and much more frequent level than men do and what better way to let your frustrations out. Then my screaming the masses are asses along with L. Seven A little bit of back history on L. Seven. They're an all female band from. La that formed in nineteen eighty five by Danita sparks and Susie Gardner after bringing in Jennifer finch on Bass and deep lax on. The band played their own feminist infused punk around L. A. They signed on with sub pop in one thousand nine hundred nine which is how Kurt cobain became a huge fan of theirs. Oh Yeah Yeah. These ladies were pretty much out there on their own in the nineties. They weren't accepted into the male dominated punk scene they did it fit into Seattle grunge scene despite their connections to it and they weren't part of the riot girl movement either. Yeah I mean I feel like they are an inspiration to the riot girl movement but they never played a part in it and they were contemporaries. Yeah and they were friends with some of them but they were never really part of it right. They weren't in that Olympia Seattle scene. They were kind of always doing their own thing. Yeah which is great good for them. Yeah they had their own agenda which included being unabashedly outspoken. Pro Choice and proactive. And they weren't afraid to start a fight with challengers ice. The band had a big hand in organizing rock for choice. A pro choice women's rights group and Music Festival that raised money for legal fees incurred by antiabortion violence and women's clinic bombings. Oh so you mean the people who are pro-life but also I'm going to kill people because you're killing la. I'm GonNa bomb this planned parenthood because I think that you're performing abortions that. You probably aren't but I'm going to bomb all these women trying to get fucking basic medical care good job good job guys guys. That's Real pro-life via Elson continued to tour throughout two thousand one. Never wavering from the PUNK. Rock roots and causing a ruckus everywhere. They went noise. All of their albums are bangers infusing punk readiness with feminism and wit that remains unmatched. Today there are plenty of stories about L. seven that are fucking fantastic like Vanita at the Reading Festival after rain like made their made like a mud pit in the audience and like they weren't allowed to do a soundcheck so they had all these problems during their set in people got restless and started slee mud at them needed just ripped out her Tampa and blowing it in the audience. You remember the story Lake. Suck on that fuckers the stage They also made good thing. She wasn't space. It just would have flowed is a Florida flung into just would've stayed here pot in zero nine next album. The tampon gravity use tampons zero. They were all they also made a guest appearance in a fucking fantastic movie called serial. Mom that is John Waters Movie. Oh yeah they're saying. These serial mom is played by Kathleen Turner. She's a serial killer but she is also a very stereotypical fifty s mall. Her children are a very young ricky lake. A Baby Matthew Lillard. Oh and she just kind of like wreaks havoc killing people. It sounds like a John Waters Film. Ohio it's very John waters wonderful and they are a fake bands. They perform a song called gas chamber in the movie and John Waters made special leggings for them that had like camel toe. Oh my pronounce camel toe on their pussies and stuff. Their policies for the camel to somebody like gets set on fire on stage. Indonesia just takes a mouthful of alcohol and blows in on him. It is fantastic. We haven't seen serial mom you have to see for the L. Seventeen alone but seeing things to do on my second pick right which God. Maybe I'll also get problematic with those who fucking knows but my pick is song called. I do buy Cardi B. injuring CIZA. Finding much to find one. Do I do Vo Allied Idols with Guy But 'cause bad this is a gift from God Brokaw's good a job at a bus only on the policy so good I send my own. D'orsay safe that's a great song right. Yes I like Cardi B. Fighting me. I also used to love Nicki Menaj. This all like chat. Yeah there's all work this works for you except I have this thing because I like to sing along to these songs but can't say the N. Word like I just can not allowed I instead. I say neighbor gift hike it. I feel like that's kind of polite. Like oh they're my neighbor. Won't you be my name to be my neighbor like sure? You are trying to turn that negative into positive okay. We're like this is the best thing like what's more whiter than say that is also the whitest thing too and I'm like you know what let's just own it. I'm very white and I will not see the N. Word even in Irap so neighbor. A nice word very sweet. I might be turning into the serial mom. It's fine and also like but here's the thing and here's where I'm going to stop mom because let's just be honest with that. One Line is like gives me fucking every time pussy so good I say my own name during sex and I heard that and I was like Yup Yup in like this was like right after my divorce and I feel my oats again and I was like. Yeah you're like tinders thing tenders a thing pussy so good. I do say my own mentoring sex so boys out get ready if you were to ever see by Ole Tinder profile like all this girl. Who the fuck is this current? I've seen it. You made it. I made it was to do my own. Katya alias firm. That's not even a joke. Like they genuinely have like a year ago. Hey got you some Dick. He's a lot of Dick good place now. So this all worked out for the best. You've got recurring. Dick now have recurring chronic Dick Front Dick and again all the messages. Like I don't care about this and Dick's and yet he's still and then Tallinn's spe still somehow. Our demographic is higher with males. Yup No doubt so all right. Jim Extra Song Cardi B. Does have her own fair share of controversy. She sure does she like got some shit that I'm like. I don't know how I feel about this. Yeah what she herself has never claimed to be perfect and has owned up to all of our own imperfections. Like she doesn't run around and say like I am this perfect person or whatever. She's pretty much said that what she's done. That isn't great. She did because she felt she needed to to survive. I mean you know. She grew up lower income and had some unsavory jobs and did some unsavory things. Get through those jobs. I am not at all saying there. Okay I'm just saying there were reasons I guess. Maybe they're not great and there's no excuse but sometimes people feel like they have no other choice. Yeah and how they feel but yeah I mean. Sometimes I'm not going to blame them for that right but taking that aside you can't discount all the ways in which she has worked hard to get where she is now like girls busted her ass and she did it quickly. In two thousand eighteen. She was the first Solo woman to win Grammy Award for rap album. Yeah the first woman and on her own to win that and think about how many solo female rappers have come before her. Yeah that's like that leaked. If that gives you any idea what the fucking mountain that women have the climate in the music industry. Yeah there you go there you go. You're not going to have to wait too long to hear one of her hits on the radio once you turn it onto some pop station or a wrap in our and be channel. She's going to be playing. She's very popular and this song in particular is a solid Jim. Victory and empowerment. She's joined at the on mazing vocals of says a like God says wonderful. I honestly don't really know any CIZA just spotify and just fucking go through. Every one of her songs is a fucking head yeah. I've seen a lot of songs with that feature her. But this is not the music I normally listen to. That's okay but if I was to direct you to that music I would say yeah you you enjoy it yes sir and this song is completely autobiographical nature. I do sees Cardi B. Rapping about making it. This far into her career proving the naysayers wrong with lines like my little fifteen minutes lasting long as hell and taking a hold of her sexuality in a really assertive get positive way. Yeah I mean you know. She says his go swimming with his face was a lake. He Gung Ho swim with his face. Hilarious she's like. Yeah like all these men who are constantly rapping about strippers bitches and hosts she comes in. She's like that's cute. Why don't you get down there? Yeah get to fuck in worse at the fuck up should in mouth because you gotta put that Shit to use right now and like good for fucking her. I feel like not enough. Women are like that's cute. You know how much I suck your Dick Though bike. Maybe we could have a little. You know yeah like quid. Pro Quo Year. Maybe oh well but overall she's just proving that women can take charge of their lives in all aspects and this is from business to their art that they produce to the relationships in their lives and critics have praised the song for being a triumphant note to end her debut lp with she confidently displays her personality for all to see but also leaves it so this can be an anthem for all women who are taking charge of their lives in. Feel the need to be a boss. Ass Bitch I think this is a great song. Again you're just listened to it for yourself and you're like yeah for the record I'll bostitch bitch I think bad bitches is a gift from God we are. That's it so you go so yeah. How about you know well. I'm going to continue the trend of female rappers. Hell yeah seeing about their vaginas. Yeah this is the vaginas section of it is indeed it is so this is a song called my badge by Aquafina not even beating around the Bush burning saw the Jovic bitch make me a sales wins out of radio. Schick TURNS OUT EDGE WON BEST BADGE. Yovich won best supporting. It's related to wear your badge. Janet Reno Akwa Phen- genius. China is sounds better than a bitch. Vagit Janet Reno Genius Better Than a god the day. Just your mind with that one. That's the best song the you've ever heard. It's no good my life. I feel like a new woman. My God you have this new sense of like freshness to my badge and vigor. Yeah Yeah vaginal vigor. Vaginal vigor good. You think I tunes will won't block the episode of I call it no bigger. God I hope not right. Maybe just vaj vigor. Bad figure. That sounds weird. Yeah Allama eggers pattern figure it out anyway rolls off the tongue so you may be thinking. Wait a second. Isn't this kind of a diss track? Kind of in a way is but I argue that it's also a self love track. She goes back and forth stating a positive about her vagina than a negative about quote. Your Vagina yes. The person she's dissing doesn't really exist however she does exist and she's expressing how great her vagina and by extension herself as a whole is so she's not hurting anyone with this song. Other giving us all a dance smooth beat to praise our vaginas with like of course women should always support other women. Yeah don't fuck in be an asshole but you know sometimes sometimes you're just GonNa have that person that just it's not like somehow they wronged you like no long do right. Yeah or they're just like a like a fucking asshole and sometimes a person's a woman and this is a perfect song for that woman where you're like like you're a bad per year just a straight up fucking bitch. Yeah and I can use the song because you're just not a good person. Yeah basically and this is the perfect song for that. I love this song. It's fucking amazing song as my new best friend. Yeah and I can't wait to fuck in open all my windows glasses in the summer and just stare at people like but yo- Vaj but yo- veg- you check that out lately Mile and I feel like a lot of people know Aquafina these days more of or more as an actress. Oh see I've never heard of her really. She actually did a Walker Fina. She did a voice of one of the skis in the new dark crystal. Oh I'm watching it yet. Yeah and I think I would enjoy it. You really got to binge it and be fucking in it to win it for like okay. It's good but it's dupe but anyway Aquafina aqua or coffee fina was born Nora Lum in Stony Brook Long Island unto second one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. She started rapping when she was thirteen writing her own music with the help of garage band. Hell yes she goes. She like twenty three. No she is method shit for me. She is thirty two almost thirty. Two all right never mind. She came up with the name. Aquafina at age. Sixteen as a way to represent her alter ego people would see her and assumed she was quiet and unassuming teen. Because she's this little Asian Girl House. I was GONNA say that. But as soon as she opened her mouth she would realize she's trashy in vulgar like the rest of us love her yes so Aquafina and the super. Extra spelling spelled A. W. K. W. A. F. I N. A. eventually became her stage name when she was in college. And where did she go to college? Did she go to college? Suny fucking Albany to to. They don't have classes right now because current virus that is ax facts but also like shit. Yeah Yeah Wonder Shoes for the epic Fountain Day. She was pretty sure my God. Yeah that found day yikes bikes. She even worked for the Times Union newspaper for a little while earn you. Shit I sa- local flavor. I read a story about how she was fired from an office job after her employers found out that she made this video for my badge Could have been from the Times Union. It probably fucking was come on times. Union probably was but I'M NOT ENTIRELY SURE. Total rumor edge right now. So I don't know Hashtag. Rummage rummage through marriage eventually aquafina branched out into acting becoming the first person of Asian descent to win a Golden Globe in any lead actress. Category Shiver would she wait for? I think it was called the farewell. Okay Yeah I. I've never seen it and she's currently starring in TV show called nor from Queens. Which I have seen previews for ended actually looks really fucking funny all right so I kinda really WanNa Watch it okay. I'm excited for it. Also fucking love. Aquafina FANTASTIC. I feel like you've opened up a gateway to me. Oh You fucking love. This whole entire album is fantastic. I'M GONNA fall down this rabbit hole you all right. We're going to do that tonight. When we're done courageous let it go wash over you like a fever dream. Yeah speaking of fever dreams and dirty females. Let me go to my next pick. Which is oh boys. WanNa be her by peaches? Oh Yeah House. A pall malls close cost. Doll you Mr Salt. I have a bit of an attachment to the song. Why is that because I used to play Roller Derby and this song was altered in the film? Whip it with Ellen. It was about banked track Roller Derby. Also this is a very roller very when I joined. This was on the playlist. Let's be honest. This is on every Roller Derby teams policy. If it's not really a roller Derby team right. There's a good reason that it is a bit of a Roller Derby anthem. It's aggressively Communis with peaches singing over deep driving towards letting listener. No she's not here for your bullshit but you are certainly here for hers but is it a CDC because it sounds like ACDC but it's funny that you say that because she always had her desire. I desire to make her own girl. Anthony like she was always a big fan of the runaways and Bikini. Kill so of course. The both of these bands have amazing songs. Women Committee gas which is like I need to join their ranks with a song of my own so she makes boys WanNa be her and in two thousand eleven interview. Peaches discusses creating the song giving another strong voice to women and strong is because she wanted to give an AC DC. Ask Hard rock sound. She went in she succeeded. It does kind of have a choice does definitely. I'm sure took influence from that. I mean she and she credits to it too. She's she wanted to go for an AC DC SOUND. So if you hear that yeah she wants you to hear that in the same interview. She expressed ir at the lack of women represented in the electronic genre because she kinda dances the line writing. You really can't categorize for music. It's electrons but rock and it's Kinda got a touch Indian. Total performance are thrown in there. Y- you can't really put peaches in one category. Yeah enter persona is just as fascinating. She's always played with gender identities pushing the envelope. As far as the roles men and women are expected to play. She tries to throw of toxic masculinity by being sexually aggressive in self assured and she takes the dominant role despite her partner being male or female. She's got a girl with her. She's like I'm going to be the dominant one. If she's got a man with her I'm going to be the dominant like I am going to control the situation and you're GONNA be fine for it you're going to be here for it You know and that's kind of her way of saying we need to knock down these fucking bullshit gender walls that have people have created right in one of her albums father fucker. She's on the cover. Have with your father. She's like why do we keep saying mother fucker? What about Father Fucker? And then she dons a beard on the front of that. China's Larry having fun playing with these generals because she's so sick of it and this song is all supposed to help break down the gender expectations placed upon us. It's okay for boys to admire certain women and WANNA grow up to be like them. We fully condoned girls to idolize men in that way but still force boys in blue trucks because pink dresses will make them. Sissies Tonka you need a trunk. Dole Raj Dolls. Another little girl. Yeah this little groceries going off because she plays trucks like you. Yeah no no. It's not a right for boys to play with the dolls because in the agencies even today I see some of my mom friends who's like little boys had to come home from school crying because they painted their nails because they wanted to and the kids made fun of him. Yeah stuff teach your kid to be garbage. Gender roles are stupid. Go Fuck Yourself. And it's fine that target has Gender fucking neutral. I'll it doesn't fucking matter till your tits Rona virus on your tickets. We gotta deal with Corona Paper. He's a saint people freaking out about toilet paper towel. Wipe our asses the fucking same forty rolls of toilet paper so not only. Does the Sung empower women to be stronger? But what also men to break down their own barriers and strengthen themselves with the confidence to be tough as a woman. No yeah so this Fucking bad ass song for ladies all says bad as we've been talking for a long time and we should have done taken a break while ago. We should have done taken a break. Yeah Right Now I gotTa Pee. Yeah me too. Maybe more bears okay. We'll be right back and we're back we're back ladies doing ladies things being fucking ladies and using our space tampons. I mean I kinda WanNa know what space tampon would be though all right. So let's keep going at this list because we are Dragon Ace. What are you got up for us? Oh I have a real fucking Downer. Are you guys ready to sit your fucking asses down your fucking asses down because this is reasons. I drink by Atlantis. Morissette even thinking reprieve like they do. Nothing Yep yeah you can pause now because if I if I actually listen to it I will start crying because I ugly fucking cried. The first five hundred times I listened to this song I will still ugly cry if I had listened to this song. Like real good because buckets so honest and like I think a lot of still had it grossed grow. Oh No it. She's got journals and she's got it. You would know that if you listen to album. She has a lot of external. She aided Ryan Reynolds. If that doesn't make you write journals I don't fucking well for. Yeah like yeah. If anything will make me ugly cry in my living room it's fucking Lance Morissette. God Damn it cut down on the like Holy Shit. This is a heavy hitter. Not because it's got this huge story behind it because its lyrics literally punched me in the face. Every time I hear it and I ended up ugly cries calling you out into my beer in my living room every single time I hear it What strikes me so brilliantly about this song is how honest Atlanta's in the lyrics she so clearly lays down exactly how mentally incapacitating life can be. And how sometimes we don't know how to deal with it so we drink if that's all we have when we're going through some shit times than that's all we have. Guess what we've gone through some shit fucking I mean honestly the when you lay it out just like that. Yeah I shit I mean in the past year. How many times if it's just been like you know what? I don't know what else to do right now so I'm just gonNA drink exactly in. How many times have I just come home from a garbage day at work and was like I just need a drink or we've I texted you and been like I need a fucking drink? Let's go out somewhere or are you home. I need to drink man. You guys have had a really awful day. Let's fucking go out and drink and sometimes you realize maybe this is a problem for you this. I've got one word for you where I realized that was from August. Yeah I need to Fucking Stop Yup. I calmed down. We've come down. We've cut down a bit actually. I'm not getting drunk all the time coming down. Calm down a lot in the last year. So elitist has become very outspoken about her struggle with postpartum depression. And how bad it was for her after her last child was born. She has apparently also had problems here and there with alcohol describing it as a secondary addiction. Oh which I totally understand like she can still function she's needed. Yeah and like you're not going out drinking every single day at work wrong exactly but you're still probably drinking too much for the doctor to be like. No that's fine. Yeah you know what I mean. It's really really easy to fall back on the secondary addictions when you're mentally exhausted and just need to relax and detach from the world. Elladas has always been relatable and emotionally raw in her music. In reasons I drink is probably one of the most relatable song she's ever written she might be living a completely different life than me right now. But in theory we've grown up together in a way and this song reminds me that we all go through the same bullshit. The only difference is that I have no money and she. He's someone to manage all of hers even even the economic differences like we're still going through the same bullshit exactly. I might not be going through depression because I have kids in. That happens to me every time I have a kid. I'm still going through bullshit kind of on the same level. Yeah you know her his bringing people into life mine is because somebody left my life exactly and I think the same that we can take away from all these women's stories how problematic some of them might be no matter how not necessarily uplifting they might be is and I know in general human beings all go through bullshit but women can all relate this one aspect of we are put in this box and we are supposed to serve a purpose exactly when I get looked down upon because we don't have kids and we must be some assholes we walk a lines and we do say fuck a lot. Lot of people don't like the way they don't like it. No I mean you know. What's Rangers have told us how much they don't like saying fuck but guess what we're going to say it but yeah I mean I think every woman that we're talking about in us and everyone we are talking to right now can all relate to the fact that you're looked down upon for nothing. Kitchen looked down upon for having kids. You're looked down upon for drinking too much. Look down upon for not drinking. It's like there's no fucking happy medium and get it. Of course men have their things too. But this isn't about you right now. This is this is about us. Yeah and we are making strides and we are suffering. We did it. We take boys might not realize that we've done it but we have done. It happened but we are still haven't had a female president we still. We haven't even had a female vice president and I mean we still like I can look at corporations and see how they are ninety percent white men in a lot of these things. And and they're still pay gaps they're still gender inequality for Positions of power employments and I mean Harvey Weinstein just recently got sentenced. Don't get me started. Rv fucking wine scene. But that's the point is yes. We are making strides but it is still a snail's pace exactly in two thousand twenty should should be eighty years after we gained the right. No one hundred years. Sorry can't fuck and do math. It's been a hundred years since we gain the right to vote. Yeah and we still haven't had a female president but at the end of the day all women can relate to each other on a lot of these issues You know we still all have these things in condom common INCON- talking hate my mouth. I had this lovely thought in my mouth. Nice sentiment in your mouth. What did that was fantastic? All right So my pick for Exxon wants to keep going tweaking faulk. Let's just keep away. Well Fuck Garfield moments over my next my days in my my take is bad girls by MIA king well wouldn't again man. Van Dashboard Jay. I'm aware that I brought this song before in our mia episode but it is solid jam. That goes on every bed bitches playlist. I make yes or as it should and it. Should you want more history about the artist in question? You should go. Listen to our M. I. Episode from last year. And it's a solid one and I learned a lot about both learned learned things I like episodes. We both learned that makes me feel good and they actually brings back memories of the summer. I was driving around in my brother's jeep. I took the top off and I'm like well now. I have to listen to do this. Because is that a real story. Yeah so my my brother always chose jeep wrangler and he was way Using Qatar for the air force and his jeep home and that was after. I got my big accident so my car was totaled. I never car right before I moved Brooklyn so I drove around in his jeep. And this song had just come out and I'm like well. I know what has to happen and I kind of like this all sounds fee but also I picture is one hundred percent real. This is happening before I got married. This exposes US closed off Americans to some Middle Eastern Indian world beat sound. Yeah in the Sassy Est of ways taking this style of music and mixing it with mid Tempo hip hop shouldn't work. But am I a makes it. Work makes it flawless. She's a witch. She is a witch the best glitch. Oh my God she could just take over stevie next honestly if they could do a song together. Don't we don't even tease it? Don't even don't even imagine it's lyrics. Ma Explores women taking hold of their sexuality. Bad girls are the ones that do it well and creates the image of this bad ass. Babe who's change hitter chessmen? She bangs her hands on the dashboard. Because she's just fucking drive and not giving a Shit Am I. Don't give a fuck about. Nobody's she don't nothin' and this image can seem very freeing women especially of Middle Eastern descent. Who are taught to be obedient to their men and honestly still can't drive in some places at this point. She used Saudi Arabian women and they weren't allowed to drive. Still in twenty twelve in this came out So yeah no in the music video. She took this as a chance to swap generals and have women drag racing in the middle of the desert while men looked on them and cheered. Yes this video was both commended and criticized for taking on women's rights in Saudi Arabia. Some people said it didn't go far enough because women were still wearing hijabs and dressed like and I'm like who but we can get to that in our next pick. Okay Okay continue with yours. Are you done though? Now there's thing sit tight this okay. Wow this talk. It's like we've been doing this for over two years or something. Which but the criticism made me really angry because unlike it's never good enough is it. It's never fucking good enough like lily. Albers out here for a bitch. And she's a racist if they MIA does batgirls. She's not good enough. Because she made those women stay covered like they're gone set. You don't know if those women wanted to stay covered you don't know like Lily Allen. Half THOSE DANCE MOVES. She'd like relied on the dancers to come up with the like. I just fucking can't with here's what ain't no. I'm going to say something and maybe ship for this a lot of times. It's a pretty white girls who are having these complaints. Yet is no out their fellow white girls. It's I get like we need to think about other people. Of course we do. But I'm not going to tell a person of color. How do Hershey Fucking S. J. W. White Women with Pedestals basically with SOAP BOXES. That have a voice somehow through media that are saying shit like while it's regressive because these women are wearing jobs no it's not a lot of Muslim women want to wear their jobs because it's representative of who they are but like you can end. It's almost as dismissive of you can still be into your religion and still celebrate certain aspects of it but also be but women's rights and I have a right to be fucking drive a car and also. Why aren't you telling any basic white bitch? Who's wearing a cross necklace? Oh this is regressive. Because she's wearing a cross necklace. You don't say that you don't use us as mainstream so shut the fuck up until you actually know what you're talking about. Yeah over it so over again. Can Women Stop Attacking Women? That'd be great but also going back to my badge. Can we talk about my badge? Firmness though like in a way you can say that. That's a woman attacking another woman. Yeah I get it but you have to understand who. Aquafina is as a comedian. That's the thing is most people don't want to do their homework right. And we get for doing our homework. And I'm like fuck you. We absolutely fucking homework easy to do. Yeah and we're not just flying off the handle with stupid opinions that are made because of you know random done dumb facts that we read off of some left wing you look facebook or media pager whatever no we actually do our research and form our own opinions. Yeah so you're also allowed to have you are allowed Tammy opinion yeah and I don't think our opinions are hurtful either. No Yeah I hope not. Anyway I mean if they aren't even have a valid argument willing to discuss it. Then call us out on it. Sure like let's have a fucking civil discussion. Don't come out and be like me. You're vulgar and you don't. WanNa fucking come to us with. Go Fuck yourself also known. Tell us that we don't do our research on Warren's Yvonne when we do our fucking research on Warren's Yvonne or any of them or any of them maybe if you're going to come for us about talking heads and listen to the full fucking episode before you fucking Jimi Hendrix. I am over it. You know what next mother to call us out. I don't even give a shit anymore. I'm drunk and angry and its international fucking women's month so fuck off. Fight me literally fucking fight me so tell me what you were going to tell me. Tell me about your next seriously. The told me about your expert because this is a really good tight end because I picked by Mona Haidar Array. Let's do it. How long do hair is unique to get your life? You only oriented lease dead working you pop in and run your mouth like the treadmill vacation numbered with your fascination need that tape paper if you want education research off our so even if you you really need to get into this so her. Whole album is very female positive. She even has another song called good body talking about how everybody is a good body. Oh literally everybody is a good body. I like that. She is so female positive. It's amazing it's palpable. So good you probably haven't heard of Mona Haidar before don't interest me told. I hadn't heard of her until very recently but now is the time to educate yourself and believe me. Mona Haidar has some lessons to give you a lesson. Mona grew up in Flint Michigan. Her parents having emigrated from Syria. In nineteen seventy one being a person of color in America. Mona says she was always the little Arab girl in Michigan but called the American when she would visit Syria. She didn't really fit in anywhere so she turned to music. As a way to connect with people she started performing spoken word. Poetry at age fourteen at open MIC events eventually learning how to use storytelling as a way to express herself as a proud. Muslim WOMAN AND RESIST WHITE SUPREMACY. Harrap career was temporarily put on hold when a friend committed suicide in two thousand twelve after which she retreated to a spiritual commune and then got her. Masters degree in Christian ethics. Whoa yeah girls educated Interestingly choices to though Christian ethics yeah. That's what I said. And then I looked a little further and I read an interview with her and she explained it a little more so she got her masters in Christian ethics to understand more basically Christian imperialism in the Middle East. Oh Shit and kind of to understand. Why the Middle East is the way is now because of Christian imperialism. Yeah that makes sense. I'M NOT GONNA go around and say I understand a whole bunch of it but I understand enough the politics to see where she's coming from angle. That makes a ton of sense in makes more sense to understand your culture. From the aggressors point of view. Yeah and to understand what they were trying to do to your culture to understand why the Middle East is the way it is now right and any violence that erupts from it and the motive behind any kind of religious sect or group or any any group that has any kind of agenda right in the Middle East especially in Syria. Right now right. She met her husband at this commune and after they left they set up a stand in Cambridge Massachusetts called talk to a Muslim. Oh here she offered a way for people who normally wouldn't talk to a Muslim chance to do so and possibly change their outlook nice new suit a lot of people but most Muslims are not terrorists and Mona and her husband offered a friendly loving way to show people exactly that this eventually turned into Mona's music career. She released her first album called Barb. I'm not going to say this right barbeque Barbican but Barbican but Barbican in two thousand eighteen and filled it with socially aware tracts denouncing white supremacy and celebrating unity. His job. He not only confirms a Muslims right to wear her Hijab but shows that Muslim women celebrate wearing them. It's part of them and ignorant white people need to stop asking dumb questions about it. It is an ignorant persons responsibility to educate themselves correctly about Islam. Not Mona's responsibility yes. Yeah with seriously and even in the I I she talks about people who come up to her and say what does your hair look like under it. Isn't it hot? Doesn't it make you sweaty? Don't you not like it doesn't fucking matter? You don't ask those questions to walking route. Lucho ask those questions you just see it. Somebody's wearing it. Let him fuck him wear it. I feel really fortunate that I went to the high school I went to because I had I new Muslim women. Yeah I went to school at them. I was friends with them And because I did that at a young age it normalized it. Yeah and I said okay. That's just what you do that's fine. Yeah you're lucky if when you're younger you get exposed to it because you don't really question it and you're just grow up with it and you see them as people. And that's just how they celebrate their religion and that's just their culture in. You're not going to say you to do that. You're Muslim. That's how they do things that's fine. Yeah that's just what? I don't think they're going to do anything bad to me. So honestly maybe I'm going to show my fucking tits fraught second honestly. When I was a kid I still. I went to an extremely white school in an extremely small town. It was very isolated. We were pretty close to New York City so that was kind of a plus but also like she's right. It is your responsibility to educate yourself. Yeah we have the Internet now. Don't don't go on to like four Chan and shit and get that kind of misinformation. Be Smart about it and it also sounds like she is open to having that discussion. Yeah and and helping you to be educated. Just don't ask them questions. I stop being stupid right like let's just respect people. God fucking Damn and also listened to Mona Haidar because her entire album is full of positive messages body positive female positive Muslim. Positive everybody positive. Hey everybody everybody positive yeah. It's it's a really really good album and she's very talented. Yeah and the world is a better place. Because she's in it. I like it and I am going to jump the fuck on that. Yeah for sure. I guess I've we come to the end of the road. It's been a journey appreciate you guys being here I'M GONNA CLOSE IT UP WITH A. I think a pretty solid gets a cooler. Yes it is. Yeah and if you don't know it now you're going to know it naked. I love myself. Today Gingrich fell out of time. We'll talk to context older but a goodie. I miss much music him Really whips llamas. Ass. Listen to this song a lot on my winning player. Same I also used to watch biff naked videos a lot on much music when I had much music instead of. Mtv for a hot second he was like the Masculine Betty page of my dreams. She's betty page of a better. Yes better page vedder page. My God incidents. I don't think so dubious. Some of you may have not had the pleasure of listening to the stylings of one Beth. Torbert also known as biff naked. Another Canadian Gem. She's been around since the mid nineties and is still making music to this day really good for her pointing out some some little ditties here and they're good good good. I'm glad to hear an actually shadow to our friends. At muses the PODCAST. Our sister podcast on the network. They interviewed her last year. Really you guys. Do like biff naked. Please go check out muses. They have an interview with her from last year. It's great she seems like a wonderful sweet solid human being all of them. Yeah all three of them. Sweet all selling Canadian Goddess. Very Go. Yeah shutout to our Canadian goddesses. God I wish I was Canadian. Like I'd be so much more. Likable but biff. Naked has been a fighter for women's rights and very candid about her own struggles in life from getting an abortion to her fight with breast cancer. There is no subject that she deemed to taboo to discuss. Yeah she is pins or some Shit Canadian universal healthcare coming through the roof. But I love myself. Today is a jam. Offer fourth album purge released in two thousand one. There really isn't much I could find about the song particular but I also don't think you really need to dig too deep to find any kind of meeting. Oh it's a perfect end cap. Yeah I mean it on the Song I love myself today. That's pretty much all you need to know. It's apparent that it's about her coming up from the ashes from some bullshit situation. I mean likely a break-up but it's still feels general enough to apply to almost any situation whether you finally got away from that person gas lighting. You an abusive relationship that toxic shitty friendship or even your own self-deprecation. This song is the anthem. You play when you finally feel that freedom like I love myself and I respect myself And Go fuck yourself. I love myself but go fuck yourself. Exactly that's a good motto. Right it really is though like I wanNA make sure the Front. I love myself on the back. Fuck Yours Yourself. Every here for this like if you're here for this I'm not either so talk off. Well no I am here from I bullshit so we can either sit here and enjoy it with me or you can go fuck yourself. 'cause like I got a lot to offer if you're not here for it. That's fine. Kuti on thing he just love yourself man. I think that's that's that's kind of the perfect way to end this. Yeah go fuck. Also listen. Biff naked is like those tunes are solid. I'm GonNa say let's go. Listen to all of the people on our list because I think we ran the flock in gamut. Yeah we really did though. We tried everything from hop. Is that a shortened version of HIP hop. Maybe it's just hop. It's just I just like to hop yes hip hop to rock punk. I mean Electronica everything. Yup So yeah. All races all creeds and everything I mean we got a little bit everything in there for you. So we didn't even do that on purpose. Just happened I I was trying to run the gamut. You probably were too. I was a little bit. Yeah and then. Our candidates ran even farther than we ever expected. And thank you all so much for listening to our bullshit players. You can actually find it on our spotify. We do have spotify which we have. Not publicized along funding time. I always had a sign onto it just on spotify look for Rock Candy. You'll probably past but I mean we also have an account called Rock Candy and this is under bad bitches. Plus actually we did have honorable mentions a woman by Russia mother. Fucking I also gas lighter by Dixie chicks which just came out and he just came out. It's solid it's very good however ain't nothin. Mother she saying not on spotify could not is not it is very hard to find and I am sorry however you can find it on Youtube in. It's very good. It is the videos grades again. Sexy cop yeah. It's there so you need to know sexy sexy but if you guys are because like these tunes you want to hear more of them you can go search our spotify and we have all of them therefore you use that for sexy cop except for Sexy Cup. Sorry tried to do it. But thank you all so much for listening. Love you we appreciate. You couldn't do this out you but if you are really digging what we are putting down. Go visit our website. Www WW raqiney podcast dot com. And over there you can get more episodes comment on them if you got something saying and you can also email us if we got something wrong and you're like hey get something wrong or if we had a question you know how to answer it please. Over questions we have. We really appreciate it when you do answer. Them and Yeah you can also follow social. Meets there 'cause. We got the facebook the twitter and the INSTAGRAM's postings from time to time we try we try we suck it but we try. I mean you're going to be working from home so you might be better at it than I am. Not even working from home. I'm just staying home so you might be really good at social media for the next couple so please fucking entertained. Meanwhile after of God entertain me all right guys blow us up. Ash is going to be around. There's only so much yard work I can do in Beers. I can drink honestly. Yeah actually hitting her up. When she had a couple of beers might even follow. It will be entertaining and also. Please hit up our network Pantheon. Podcasts they are wonderful in lovely we really appreciate being part of such a great group of human beings so please support everyone from uses with their interviews and make it stop who guested on and they've guessed it with us and rock and roll archaeology a rock and Roll Iberian. There's just a ton of stuff to do literally from kiss to Weezer. You can find anything out now that we have they're still our friends lovely people they're the loveliest fucking human and I always feel really bad. Bad rescued weezer. 'cause I'm like Oh but there are. Fred's get it though they do they shit. We love that. They can't stand Dane. Yeah yeah they have more than every right to bad mouth shit they have carte blanche really and also if you feel like giving us your money in these hard times because I'm sure you guys they willing earlier your fucking rolling in and are just desperate to give it away. Oh my God you can go to our Patriot account it's Patriot Dot com slash rock. Candy podcast and you can give us your money and we will give you stuff in return you on it. We'll give it to you. It's GonNa be like coasters and buttons in a bonus episode every month. But that's what we're going to give to you so buttons so ins is what we're given to you get so many good time. Yeah so do all those things because what else are you doing right now? Nothing you're sitting at home. 'cause a corona virus. We might as well listen to us and get some buttons. We create for all of us. Will we time and I guess we've pretty much given away next week's episode but come by anyway hopefully we tantalize do enough for it. Okay Bye Party on party on Maggie. Party on a Ukraine is hands out there. It's five sounds I certainly against different song and sorry. All right could also go system origin. Sisters Urgent Sisters. My God guys corona virus. What it does everybody. This is Brian Regan host of the podcast side gym. Which is now a proud. Member of the Pantheon family of PODCASTS. I've been a freelance entertainment. Journalist for twenty five years now often end up in conversations that go off on tangents suddenly discussing someone's outside passion or hobby something you didn't know about and it leads to revelations about their character and about their life outside of their art. I've often had to cut those details out because the story had district word count or a specific focus so here the entire focus of the podcast is on their side. Jam Or side Gems for example. Alice in chains frontman. William duvall spent some time talking to me about reading history which led him into talking about his public school education and how it was so terrible in high school that he actually managed to get into a private school for free to his life could take a different course in this series of podcast. You're going to be hearing my interviews with musicians of all different backgrounds genres talking about everything from surfing to collecting antiques to stargazing. I hope you enjoy side jams. Please tune in regularly and I'll have a lot of interesting guests in store for you.

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Episode 178: Healthy Patients, Healthy Providers

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

22:06 min | 2 years ago

Episode 178: Healthy Patients, Healthy Providers

"Building healthy and equitable communities across the country is a tough challenge. But it's fun that public policy is opposition to address in the second episode produced in collaboration with the health policy research scholars program funded by the Robert Wood Johnson foundation. We look at research that can point us in the right direction and help us tackle some of the biggest hurdles to health and wellbeing in the US. Hi, I'm Randy Colley, and this is the scholar strategy networks jargon each week, we discussed an American policy problem with some of the nation's top researchers without jargon for this week's episode. I spoke to, to PHD students, I, I spoke with Christopher stolen off. Sqi Christopher is a PHD candidate in health behavior and health education at the university of Michigan and a Robert Wood Johnson foundation health policy research scholar. Here's our conversation. Christopher thanks so much for speaking with me today. Thank you for having me. I'm really excited to speak with you. So in his state of the union speech, Donald Trump vowed to radically eight HIV by twenty thirty which is obviously a huge goal to make sense of the problem. Let's kind of get onto basics can you just tell me a little bit about what each v actually is in. Why weaning to a radical it? That's a great place to start in. So let's think about the timeline of HOV throw history. And so it is a virus. The kind of enters your body really readily replicates, which essentially suppresses your immune system, kind of tax your own immune system. It's on kinda regulated. If you don't get treatment for it, it then progresses to something called aids, which is acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which is essentially fancy word for just all the other diseases that you can more become more susceptible. To because your immune system isn't functioning the way it should in it started to kind of come about in the nineteen eighties really early around, like nineteen eighty one is when we started to see the first cases of HIV United States, some today, how many people in America have itchy and who are these people have HIV? I appreciate that question. Because there's a lot of nuance behind that. And so, in the United States, there's one point one million people living with HIV, however, there's big disparities in who those people are. So as an example, we see that white individuals in the US have seen in eighteen percent decrease in TV heterosexual individuals have seen a thirty six percent decrease. However, when we get into the elder BT population specifically gay bisexual men. We see that they had thirty five percent increase in then even more kind of wild on disconcerting is the fact that. There was an eighty seven percent increase among thirteen to twenty four year old gay in black men. So you see that there's huge disparities in who's becoming infected so keeping that in mind advocating HIV is a pretty big goal. But in your research, you argue we already have the tools to make this happen. What kind of tools do you mean the treatments today are wildly different than, you know, when we first started off at the pedantic in the eighties when there was nothing. We didn't know anything so we now know we can get people tested for HIV of we can get those who are living with HIV on medicine to help them kind of control the disease. They sense become non infectious. So they can't spread the disease to others in this is what the literature showing us in research, on the other side, we have, you know, group of individuals who may be at higher risk of each IV, or might have a greater tans of being infected with HIV in, we have new. Called pre exposure prophylaxis, which essentially is a pill similar to electric at the birth control HIV in that you take this pill every day, and it's almost a hundred percent affective in preventing those who might be at higher risk from getting infected. What it does. Is it suppresses the viral load or the replication of the virus in their body to essentially become that when you go, get tested? They can't even detect whether the viruses in there. It's so low, that is almost like, not existent, into really allows you to live a long, healthy productive life on par with those who aren't living with HIV. And then kind of on the other side of that is also helps prevent HIV because if he receive your viral suppression, you actually don't transmit HIV to sexual partners you may have. So as everyone who should be getting HIV suppressing drugs, actually receiving that medical treatment, I wish that were the case of virtually we haven't gotten there yet, which is why I wanted to come on talk to. Well about this. So a mentioned before that there's one point one million people living with HIV, only sixty three percent of them have actually received care and only fifty one percent, have actually achieved viral suppression in the United States, indicating that there's a huge population that isn't really getting the care, they need not being able to live long, healthy productive lives with the use of medicine and you know, referencing back to those statistics. I know that it just before about who's becoming affected. We see that. It's African American populations Latinos. Gay bisexual men predominantly in so you see this intersection of kind of these different identities about who's ten of getting infected a lot of that's related to kind of the racialism in stigma that these populations experience. Can you tell me a little bit more about how and why these inequalities are happening or playing out in the real world for people with HIV that's a really great question? I there's a lot of data. Information. So in my work, what I try to do is understand through the review of the literature also doing some modeling which we won't get into because it's pretty in depth. But what I try to do is understand the complexities surrounding HIV in how all these things connect together to shape. One's HIV risk in just as an example of what that looks like is that we have the literature that I've uncovered in my work in that I'm using that shows that providers is an example, prejudge black patients as more likely to have sex without a condom as compared to whites you're talking about providers Bhai providers. You mean doctors nurse practitioners anyone who prescribes drugs? Those are the ones who can prescribe prevention in treatment regimens. So they're less likely to prescribe the kinds of drugs that treat HIV. Yeah, not just that, but also drugs, that would prevent HIV. So pre exposure prophylaxis doctors are withholding this from black pace. 'cause they're fearful that they'll decide to have more sex without a condom as compared to white individuals. So going back to the beginning of our conversation about Donald Trump's Embiid goal in a radical HIV by twenty thirty tell me more about what needs to happen to achieve ambitious goal like that, right. Yeah. That hits a big big challenge that we have to grapple with. So, you know, essentially is we've, you know, uncovered during this discussion we have the tools to reach that goal. So if we can get those living with HIV tested and on treatment, and suppress their viral load daily will live long healthy productive lives and also, not transmitted to others. If we can get individuals on pre exposure prophylaxis essentially their risk zero so using those two strategies, which are pretty novel. You know, forty eight only been around for forty years. We've made a lot of progression. So using those two strategies how do we? Understand Javi risk in a more holistic sense, you know, as a mentioned, doctors aren't providing prep to black individuals. So what does that racial bias bear? Where's it coming from? How do we address that? But we need to take a larger approach as well, because we're seeing that things like stigma leaving in states. So as an example, let's say you reliving in Massachusetts after the adoption of same gender marriage there, so, before the federal law takes place, what you see is that individuals living in those states that offer those protections had reduced mental health issues in. We've now seen that, like mental health is being linked to increase substance use increased decisions, not to use condoms increase number of sexual partners. So we see how policies can shape these downstream behaviors of individuals. So how do we incorporate that into our science into our policies is what I try to do? Christopher. I'm interested in what makes optimistic. Nick, like, obviously, we have all these incredible scientific advancements that are making a radical HIV a real possibility. But you've also shared with us. How deeply ingrained some of these stigmas bias, are that are preventing that ratification? So what is it? That makes optimistic about our ability to make progress the great question in a, you know, answer that in a couple ways. First of all, we're seeing reductions in HIV in the United States across the board. However, you know as mentioned, certain groups aren't receiving that benefit. So the question becomes, how can we work to reach those populations in a way, that's meaningful to them in one example, is of this is that the government of Canada, as example in their HIV prevention strategies considers poor mental health, a risk factor for HIV, and that they would prescribe prep to individuals suffering from depression anxiety, more. Than they would those who are not. So that is a tool in policy, kind of guidance and regulation that we could easily apply the United States. It would open up the number of individuals who we would prescribe prep for. And so that's why I'm a bit. IM Optimus -tic is that we're seeing really novels strategies in different places. But how can we apply them here the United States? And I really that's the only way that we're going to Chievo the goal set a Trump for twenty thirty. Christopher thanks so much for sharing your research with us today. Thank you for having me. I hope this, you know, help clarify some things for the listeners. Okay. So now that we've heard from Christopher, let's explore the other side of the equation, the health and will being of healthcare workers themselves for the second part of our show. I spoke with Yemen at Diaz Lynn heart. She is a PHD candidate in social policy and management at Brandeis university. And a Robert Wood Johnson foundation health policy research scholar. Here's our conversation. Yemen. Thanks so much for coming in today. Thanks for having me. So, typically, when we think about health, where usually thinking about the patients who walk into a doctor's office or hospital. But your research goes beyond that, and looks into the wellbeing of healthcare workers, and what it means for their patients. What could you started on this line of research? Yes. So I am a public health social worker by training, and as part of that work, I worked directly with families, and then through some of the research that I was involved with became a program director, which meant I was doing lot of employee management. And so I was a program director, I was a mid level manager in a pretty large healthcare system. And that meant I got to learn a lot about working with healthcare workers, especially workers who are really on the frontlines. And so I decided this was just really interesting to me, because I don't think healthcare organizations really know how to manage healthcare workers on the frontlines, especially workers that are doing work on social health related needs. So. So, again, not just medical care, like physicians also folks, like myself social workers, 'patient, navigators, community, health workers, what is their work like and how it we're gonna really able to meet the needs of those types of healthcare workers? So now that you've transitioned to studying this topic, tell me a little bit about your research and your findings this past year. I had the pleasure of having a small funded pilot study. It's a case study of a pretty large health system that has many different sites. And so the case study is looking at complex care management workers in this includes a community health worker, in nurse that are working together as a pair, and they're deployed to really try to manage the health of very complex patients in these patients, typically have some type of a chronic condition, like diabetes. That's not really well managed may also have some type of social risk, so they could be home. Klis, or they, you know, have been maybe unemployed and are not really able to take care of themselves. So, yeah, Pete me a picture of what it's like to be one of these complex care workers. What sort of challenges are they facing on a day to day basis? What is their workday? Look like the work is really fascinating. They typically meet up at their kind of home based site, and, again, this is all over Massachusetts, and they planned together who they're going to be able to, to visit that day. And then they'll go from one kind of home, visit or site visit to another, so depending on where they are. They're in a, you know, a rural area Massachusetts. They're in their car lot traveling about thirty to forty five minutes each way, just trying to meet patients where they might be. So they're really kind of tracking patients in real time. And they have a an assessment that they do they kind of figure out what the patient what's going on. And what would you like to work on what are your goals, so based on that? That initial visit. They will then you know, it's very patient lead, which I think is really fabulous. They will work directly with the patient to figure out what are the most pressing needs, and that could be a social need that could be housing. For example, this patient is homeless. It could also be hey, my medications are a little bit out of whack and I can't really get to my primary care physicians office. Can you help me? So it really depends. It's very differentiated for each particular patient. So they're traveling a lot. There's lots of variability there could be anything from lots of traffic to we showed up at this patient's home, and they're not there in. Could they be in their phones now disconnected so they can't reach them? So it really depends in some of the, the workers have about four to five patients that they might see in particular day in addition to that they're doing data entry their looping back and coordinating with other providers to keep them in the loop around with. Going on. So what if you found about the well-being of these workers in these really complex and variable environments? So we have we've done focus groups, qualitative interviews, and we still have an online survey that still wrapping up, what we're finding is that the nature of the work because it's so complex it ends up being a pretty high stress job. And this is, I think very typical what you might expect when you're working with complex patients, especially because not a lot of these things, the healthcare workers can control. So, for example, housing crisis has come up again, and again, again as one of these really difficult parts of their job. When you have homeless patients or patients were facing Vic vision or housing insecure. It's not really easy for the actual healthcare workers to get them house. They can do the best it can. So when you have all this, you know, this combination of different things than the work itself, does become very stressful. I think. I think one surprising element though, is that many of the healthcare workers, I interviewed really actually feel very satisfied with the work, despite the high levels of stress. They're experiencing. And so this is something that we want to understand a little bit better. Yeah. Looking at these high levels of stress. Have you found a relationship between the wellbeing of these healthcare workers, and their patients health comes? So that's definitely something that I hope to continue to explore down the line. But what we what we are really kind of trying to understand in link with this particular case study is that there's a something called the value profit chain, which is a theory, you know, I'm in a PHD, I have to think about a lot of, but the value profit chain is using in the service industries created by Heskitt, and it says that if you leverage if you treat your employees customers, it actually will create even more. More loyalty on the customer side. And so what I'm doing is I'm using this model to adapted to health. Go to say, hey of we treat our employees like patients, we think about their wellbeing in their health outcomes. How is that also going to add value to the patients? And so I think this aspect of focusing so much on costs. It's very important. And this is why I'm in the field but it's also missing this really core aspect of the dynamics between the frontline workers in the patients in. So how do you leverage that to really understand? How does that relationship eventually or somehow really improve health outcomes has been other research in, in different types of healthcare, workers, about the impacts of conditions on the job and individual health outcomes? Yes. So there are a couple of really interesting sets of studies that have been done. The nursing field does have quite a bit in. There's also quite a bit on on things like physician. Burn out and trying to understand how things like burnout turnover in jobs actually impact patient outcomes. But one thing that I am I've been really drawn to this concept of human sustainability, and it's a work by, by gopher Encino that talks about particular actual workplace, stressors that impact worker health outcomes. These are things like jobs that have really high demands or jobs were there low control. They were able to associate these kind of markers with poor health outcomes in the workers across different industries. So not just specific tells gear but what's interesting about that it does kind of help us think about what might be some interventions that or what might be some things that we're gonna zanies can do to be able to change trajectory for employees. Yeah. Kind of going off that point. What can or should be done to better support healthcare workers were experiencing these high stress markers. So I think they're. Are two particular things that stand out at this point. One is to be able to create a culture of well-being within the organization, so that increasing things like social support or building helping workers build resiliency through supervision, or reflective kind of group work on those things a buffer, the effects of stress that the workers feel in day-to-day basis. So sharing the kind of burden of what it's like to, to do the work and to take care of patients. Another thing is to, to think about how to shift away from just offering, you know, employee wellbeing things like for yoga class meditation. Those are really important in there actually really great. They do work, which also start thinking about shifting more toward understanding how the organization might actually propecia wait, these high levels of stress including how you might design the work differently so that the workers have a little bit more of. A buffer in day-to-day work practices so that they can actually do their work in a way that sustainable in healthy. Yeah. Let's talk a little bit of little bit more about that. What are some concrete changes concrete, like worker policy goals that were places can implement to really tackle this issue, one particular idea that comes to mind would be thinking about, for example, the amount of data that the workers have to actually input after each visit, and so right now, many of them are inputting data in about two to three different systems in part of that is because there's a medical kind of eletronic medical record than there's a state level record and all these things are really crucial for cost outcomes, and health outcomes, really understands show, the cost reduction in the health improvements impatience, but it, it is burdensome because there again, many of these workers are on the road all day. And then they're also expected to. Document everything that they're doing in two separate systems. So one thing would be to really think about integrating, the health system in a way that is capturing their work in a meaningful way. So they're not just duplicating a lot of the same data entry in two different systems that takes a lot of time and energy Yemen at thanks so much for coming in today, Inc. So much for having me. And thanks for listening for more about the Wood Johnson foundation and their health policy research scholars program. Check out our show notes at scholars dot org slash new jargon and tune in next week for conversation with Peter Miller on gerrymandering and the courts as always know jargon, is the podcast of the scholars strategy, network nationwide, association of over thirteen hundred. Researchers in forty seven states, the producer of our show is Dominic Dermot, and our sound engineer is J M bias, if you like the show. Please subscribe and rate us on apple podcast, wherever you get your ships. You can give us feedback on Twitter at no jargon podcast or Email address no jargon at scholars dot org.

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Bonus episode: Plagues & Pandemics

Blind History

21:44 min | 1 year ago

Bonus episode: Plagues & Pandemics

"This is a special bonus episode of Line History. We're obviously in the middle of the. Pandemic, and people are talking about that quite a lot, so we thought we'd look into the history of plagues and epidemics and pandemics, and find out what we already know. From the way human beings dealt with the stuff in the past with me, my co host on blind history. Anthony metre high aunt again you. You haven't got the played yet, have you? So fought seems like a misfit. Let's we still in lockdown. I hope you don't get the plague. Because while I was researching stories around the things that have happened in history, it's frightening to see how many people have been mowed down by epidemics in the past, and they of course had no idea of what the cause of this was. When now we have something of a semblance of knowledge around what causes people to? To die in their droves in those days they thought it was sin, and they thought it was planetary alignments and kinds of the stupid stuff, right there puck electic events, and that's actually grew Christianity cost. That's right when people are afraid that almo susceptible sip `table to propaganda and to messaging and they more plant. They do exactly what they told. Right. Yeah besides. Plank in one of the biggest catalysts for change in the world. It was demise of the Roman Empire. It's caused havoc across all sanctuaries that we can actually see. The I looked at the ten deadliest epidemics in history, and we can go into the detail of some of these in a moment I know you've got a few that you'll favorites in inverted comments. The third cholera epidemic was in eighteen, fifty, two to eighteen sixty. And that one killed as many as twenty three thousand people in Britain loan, but those a small numbers, because the Asian flu pandemic not so long ago in the nineteen fifties that wiped out something like one to two million, Chinese and other kind of virus that. In China. Then, there was typhus fever, which was in the will was, and that was spread by Lice, and according to the figures there, that was three million deaths in Russia alone frightening. Yes. Then there was something called the cocoa litz Lee epidemic in fifteen, seventy six, that was about a million deaths in the territory of new Spain, which is Mexico? And the symptoms were much like Ebola into a duck ton, jaundice and Nick nodules revolting sounds. Plagued Justin Ian which you're gonNA tell us about in a moment that was a deadly pandemic that affected the eastern Roman empire and especially Constantinople. We'll talk about that in a second, but that had some pretty terrifying symptoms as well. There was the end to nine plague. That's named FDU right. That's me it's. Well that's the other. Historian suspected could have been smallpox or measles took out two thousand people a day in Rome the death toll teddy to five million by the end of it horrible. That's up the third plague pandemic of eighteen fifty five, now that one was also called the Mudan plague, even though it was in history, and it was plagued pandemic that started in guess what country China correct of the next twenty years. Years it's spread to Hong Kong and port cities around the world. Buy Rats that carry the infectious fleas, responsible for the disease, caused ten million debts, and that was only eighteen fifty five, then, of course, the black death, which is my favorite one, the great plague the pestilence had a whole lot of names, and we'll get into those just not too, but that originated in Asia. Yeah, they'd be specific. Correct. All along trade routes to Constantinople in Europe where sixty percent of the European population in completely wiped out Tom, Jones. There are two others that I quickly when I mentioned the great flu epidemic in Nineteen Eighteen, which is also fascinating, and maybe has some lessons in it for what we're dealing with today that is recorded as the most devastating epidemic in history. Toll Somewhere between twenty and forty million killed more people in world. War One so and that's where they had social distancing separated. Right the interesting. How well that worked, but the HIV and AIDS global pandemic is worth a mention hit, too, because it's hard to determine exactly when and where it came about, but it is widely believed it originated in the Democratic Republic of Congo around nineteen twenty, and the first cases were reported somewhere in the nineteen eighties, eighty, one, eighty, two and then. It was cold. The human immunodeficiency virus HIV, and has since grown to pandemic proportions, resulting in an estimated sixty five million infections and twenty five million deaths, so there's one that we're through null and thanks to anti retrovirals. We've had some success in staying the death toll on this horrible pandemic, but it is one that we could not do this episode without mentioning so you want to start with the ones in ancient history and. And particularly one named after you, and then the Justinian plagues, what those all about a festival! The Egyptian mummies that found traces of smallpox. What they think is smoke bucks on these Mommy's I think it was thousand BC from one eighty eighty on woods was the start of the Kremlin of the remedy impact. It was driven mainly by this particular leg, which they believed to be smallpox, and this play came from a winner. Portia it was Djing the rain of Antonoff pious the Roman army on excursions, empathy contract to this and brought it back in Jerusalem at an actually was devastating hot destroyed the Roman. And later on the population of rum and created massive instability, which allowed the barbarians to tech, this opportunity jet tech shop the smallpox until we developed a vaccine against took up the great and the good. Emperors taken off nationt run the Marcus Aurelius. He was on the Danube. He was involved in battles to to keep the barbarians of ban he he succumbed to smallpox or what they call the mountlake. And Wasting secrecy and earlier times that people didn't live on top of one another, but it was actually hectic. If you looked as an example, a drone that was so massively cramped to give in small spaces in very poor living conditions, and these top of plays just mowed through the different communities. It was incredible. How and how sick people got end as an example non killed five million people. Yeah, because people think ancient Rome, was this clean lovely place, all polished marble and statues and. And Wide Avenues, but in the insulin, the suburban areas in the Soubra as they called it, people did live on top of each other in tiny little apartments county like the cities that we have today. If there's any thing that history can teach us, it is that living in cities with very dense populations usually is a perfect breeding ground for all kinds of ugliness and pestilence and disease and bacteria and viruses, and especially where animals and humans are in close proximity together in unsanitary conditions right. Percent to talk about the bubonic plague. If you want to get onto that one because I got a couple of things headed, tell you mean it had some horrible names. The great mortality, because cold, the pestilence, which sounds really horrible, seventy five to two hundred million people. That's more than even communism managed to kill. That's incredible, right? It's frightening mortality rate thirty to fifty percent of the people who bought the spawning plague died, so it's a lot more contagious and infectious mortality rates. A lot higher started off in China. It started in thirteen, thirty, eight by all records ended in thirteen, thirty nine said wasn't long the year and off of Europe's population a year. They were buddies piling up on the streets. They did have buddy collectors. Were busy twenty four seven, because there was so many people dying, and they would just they'd ring a bell. And they'd have a caught, and they just load buddy on top of buddy. And you went to allowed to have a fancy burial legend buried them in pits, and then poured lime on them or set them on fire, and you just knew that your your relatives who died during the black death were buried in some big pit. In fact, they keep finding black death graveyards in London, where they just pouring buddies on top of each other in a great big hall and discovering them up mostly you. You would know you had. It's when it was already too late. You would start breaking on toomas which cold booze and these gross big outgrowths. It looked the size of an apple or an egg, depending on how bad express and they would explode in the past, and then they would be thumbing of blood I mean. Can you imagine if you're a medieval peasant and you see someone vomiting blood? You think this is definitely God punishing people. This is the devil has taken this person soul right? It's caused by fleas on black rats, but actually it's caused by a bacterium called Yersinia pestis which lives in the fleas. And the fleas live on the rats and the rats than live with humans, so it's actually four different creatures that are affected in this chain. That couldn't be worse, fourth Christ of being bitten by one of these these. Apparently what happens, is this you cine bacterium it actually it blocks the fleas stomach, and then the fleas starts to throw up and it gets really hungry, because it's blocked at stomach side gets very hungry in its stop. Said becomes quite aggressive. And then the fleet throws up into the wound that it is made either in person or arete. Spreading all of this bacterium into the person, the rats. And it's so gross because this is talk multiplies, and then it spreads easily from there on because the rats and the fleas become increasingly desperate for food, and then they make humans sick, and you know what happens after that gross. At, its popped up again in other periods, it came about again in the seventeenth century, and people thought it had been defeated, but then it came around again, but one thing that two points at now. Let's your lineage. Each was heavily involved in the first leg played. Edward the. King Edward the third is supposed to have died from it sicne his son. The black prince died of the plague, and these were people who were the most powerful men in Europe at the time, so there was no way to defend yourself against it and people tried different things to cure it including trying to be happy and avoiding bad thoughts that didn't work. They drank good wine that didn't work. They avoided eating fruits, putting fragrant herbs beverages, avoiding lecherous, so there was much less sex. They went abusing the PLA because if you. If you the put. Your symptoms would worsen. Eating drinking in moderation, maintaining a household accordance with the person status, and so on, and apparently was brought to England by English soldiers, who just returned from Chrissy in pawtucket to Bethel's that we've highlighted in an episode of blind history, stuff up and actually stop the war. I think if I remember correctly or halted the war because it was just devastating, they reckon that the black death actually set your Becker one hundred and fifty years should. We might have been a hundred and fifty years further down the line. If the black death had not occurred. At the way the that lived in those times I mean. If you look at somebody's skew that, just chop it off while so so maybe it's all oriented. In villages. We joke about this now, but in in small villages, where there was an old woman living in our own, and suddenly the black death game to Tom, they would find this old woman today that accuser of witchcraft, and they'd burn her at the stake, and then people would carry on dyeing and go. Oh, well I think we were wrong about that woman, but it's too late now. Flat Impel at the same discussion often pal. Off a million. Six now. We think we got that wrong, but. If you WANNA ready begrudge dot to the things that they used to treat people during a number of these plagues the black death, but even in the ancient world they would feed people done hosting kyle. Deng Sheep Dung even human. That was one of the treatments and urine enough to drink a cup of urine and That would maybe make you feel a bit better. That's what doctors is a good idea. But maybe in a hundred years from now they're gonNA offer. For curious, yeah, well, I'm I'm I'm pretty sure that will be laughed at for the way we've reacted, but that's just my opinion. And I did think that bad smells could drive out the plague, so some of those things I. I still think if someone smells bad. Stay the hell away from them. It might just be carrying the pestilence. Enforce. Enforce the social distancing right and the second black debt I mean London. In Sixteen, Sixty, five with thousands of people dying, and that plague as if it wasn't bad, enough was eventually stopped because the great fire, of London, but everything down and as a result, a lot of the rats were. Killed in that file or chased out of town and stuff to death. That's actually one of the factors that contributed to the end of the plague of sixteen sixty five. If massive file out. There could be a good thing. In, this particular instance could was I, mean it's A. It's a fairly devastating cure for her otherwise solvable problem. It did happen a lot more recently though it happened in the eighteen ninety s in the United States especially in San Francisco, because there are a lot of people from China and India who settled in the United States in San. Francisco and it was during that pandemic that the real cause was eventually discovered the bacteria the Pistons bacterium along with the Cure. And that was when they started to make some serious progress, but I think Gareth. It's frightening. If you look at unsuspecting indigenous populations that Europeans were engaging with definitely the Spanish, which have massive devastating Phipps wapping at ninety percent of indigenous population of America's because they would bring a diseases lack mole, Fox and. Plague Measles, all those diseases that brought to the continent in ways the bay, immune systems were not at all safe APP to with it at made taking over all of us can't using tae-ji so much easier at the time, because everybody was sick and dot the worst one of all in terms of numbers of people killed was the Spanish flu, and usually deadly influenza pandemic that was from nineteen, eighteen to nineteen, twenty and infected, five hundred million people, which is a culture of the. The world's population, the death toll seems to have been anywhere between seventeen to fifty million, possibly as high as one hundred million, and to maintain morale will one senses minimized early reports of illness, and we'll tatty Germany a lot like what they did in Wuhan with a said. It's not a big deal. You can carry on traveling even the World Health. Organization said that the UK France. The United States kept mostly mum about its newspapers with free to report the epidemic's effects in Spain. And that's how it became known as the Spanish flu. History and epidemiological data inadequate identify with certainty, the geographic origin with varying views as to its location, but most influenza outbreaks disproportionate, kill the very young, and the very old, and the Spanish flu was bad, because it resulted in a higher than expected mortality rate for young adults, precisely the people who were fighting in the wall, but what they did. Mention was a immune systems with A. A low because they were living very close in proximity to each of fighting the war, living in very wet conditions in changes, and I say that that was the one of the reasons why the young assessment taken out so badly your and this of course was caused by the h one n one influenza virus. If that sounds familiar, because the swine flu in two thousand nine was the same virus, but was that from a pig. Biologist right as I understand what I've read. In terms of the scientific literature around this, they said it came from a triple reassortment of bird swine and human flu viruses for the combined with Eurasian pig flu virus. That doesn't sound gross to you I don't know what it's. Maybe it's worth referring to what worked besides quarantining in those days going through all the periods of history of people who survived often with ones who just had stronger immune systems that goes without saying a lot of people who kept themselves cleaner did a little bit better than the ones who were filthy, and there's a wealth component to that as well, but people generally had no idea. Idea until very recently of what the origin of these diseases were, and they had all kinds of theories in fact during the bubonic plague, people thought that Jupiter and Saturn had lined up in the heavens, and there was some kind of what they call them. A conjunction of the planets at that stage, and they blame that for the outbreak of the bubonic plague, which is crazy, but When you don't have any onces you jump to the next best conclusion, young man, maybe at work is maybe was stronger than the disease. Yeah I think some good ideas of come out of these plagues well when Europe was so depopulated, did kind of put a stop to a lot of stupid walls, and the big policies were forced to rebuild at home, rather than seek adventure abroad and tried to conquer territories, which they could no longer for. FOR TO KEEP IT obviously depleted the Treasury's of countries that we're collecting tax and the labor force was severely curtailed for technology to the foreign. It's actually driven technology while you look at this one that we're dealing with the moment I mean the way we're doing. This episode of blind history is only because when a to be in contact your in Capetown. I'm doug normally. We would do an episode in studio together. That's not possible in technology. To do no chance. And you know the things in the end the once again. This is not my area of strength but the. Airplanes in the sky, just think. What a difference make from pollution levels in other spinoffs of this incredible to see. Ya I. Don't know that there's any one of these that has a happy ending. Except that now. Of course, we've developed some scientific methods to arrest the spread of these diseases and to kill the bacteria responsible, and if it's a virus to sometimes cut down the efficacy with vaccines, but obviously what Fleming did in discovering penicillin was tremendously instrumental in helping us fight, bacterial infections, and to pasteurize things, and to be able to to clear disease out of food, which was also a major source of disease for a lot of people up to then. Humans on credible either coming. He Cups in the gets. throws at US while nature getting better at it, I mean in Bolas not to be messed with and the some of the symptoms of that it just it basically turns you into a big bag of fluid, and then that fluid leaks through is your is nostrils. Your backside pretty much anywhere can get out in. It's like your whole body into a soup. It's disgusting and you'd have a particularly unpleasant death and I think we're very lucky that that hasn't sprint intending changed into pandemic. Scrape together for you about the history of pandemics, and some of the biggest ones that's anthony and I could find out about. There's obviously plenty more to be discovered. The we thought this is probably the most relevant time to discuss the subject and I found it pretty interesting. And it's just so much that we've Lynch and read about and he street where the plagues relevant, and now we look into it. What a mess it roller! Blade specially, not living at. This is why we study history. We're interested in history. Because if you study history, you can avoid. Making some of the same mistakes, people in history did and save yourself a lot of pain and anguish and learn some lessons pretty quickly through other people suffering. Lined history is brought to you by Taylor blinds and shutters. Only episodes are available on the cliff, central dot, com, website and APP as well as apple podcasts, Google podcasts spotify or wherever you get your pud costs. There's an interesting story about how Isaac Newton during the the seventeenth century when he came up with all of his great theories in Principia Mathematica. He was actually quarantining himself in the countryside away from other people, and that's when he had some of his best scientific ideas.

smallpox China plague Europe London United States Pandemic Constantinople apple Tom Roman Empire King Edward Plank cholera Hong Kong immunodeficiency Marcus Aurelius
 The Wuhan outbreak: Science Weekly podcast

The Guardian's Science Weekly

23:18 min | 1 year ago

The Wuhan outbreak: Science Weekly podcast

"The The Guardian. The first reports emerged on year's Eve mysterious respiratory virus that should in fact dozens of workers envisages to a seafood marketing. We central China. The virus had similarities artists to SARS which killed more than seven hundred people when it struck the region in two thousand and two in the three weeks since then. The crisis escalated rated with the number of cases tripling in the past week and dozens currently in hospital in a critical state referred to as the. WE'VE HON virus. It infects affects the lungs and can lead to difficulty breathing. Fever coughing. Andy Monja. The city of Wuhan is now on lockdown with eleven a million residents barred from leaving outbound transport has been suspended head of the Chinese Lunar New Year holiday which normally sees millions traveling across. Ask the country to visit family and friends. Experts say that we now standard tipping point where we could either see. The outbreak brought into control all see it accelerate into a global pandemic so the the key information for understanding the transmissibility of the viruses. This is starting to come out now and over. The next few weeks will be the critical information. And what we're trying to understand. Something called the reproduction number. which is the average number of secondary cases that each infected person generates thoughts Rosalind Echo who models how diseases spread and had to mitigate epidemics? We'll be speaking to her later. In the episode as Rosalind Point Sounds for research is looking to understand a model the virus it still early days. The this week's episode. We wanted to find out what is and isn't known about this. New Corona virus outbreak to get to grips with exactly what a corona virus is earlier. This Week I spoke to Ian Jones professor of Viral Aji of the University of Reading the Corona viruses. One of of a group of what's called Arnie viruses and the garona viruses are normally identified by their particular appearance under the electron microscope. They have a fringe around the outside. It looks a little bit like the corona around the sun which is how they were first named. They're quite widespread in biology and basically szekely. If it walks swims or flies it will probably have a known corona virus associated with it so the average person will have had one of these public in in life. Yes they probably had about three or four actually especially when they were young they usually cause only mild respiratory disease and and unless you have a particular propensity to get sick from respiratory infections. Then you're likely to shrugged it off pretty much like a common common cold and we think that the new viruses beat onto didn't want the thought was respectively transmitted virus. Yes yes I think. That's the current understanding so the sequence of the virus was released just a week ago and the closest relative in the sequence databases as a basis or bat virus but the closest relative that has been seen previously in man was the SARS virus which emerged in two thousand and two which which alerted the world to the possibility that these viruses can be as so-called zoonotic infection. That is they can pass from animals to people and when they do that they tend to cause moderate to severe disease and therefore we need to be aware that that is a possibility that there's a threat level level that we need to assess when these things occur and to prepare for them whenever possible. In this case. We know that the outbreak seemed just also the fish market but it was one where there are also various wild animals being sold knowing that. How'd you go about tracking down the source? Now now that the sequence of the virus is known we can go back and look at what's presence in the animals that would have been sold in the wet food market. You're right that the only description early on was that it was a seafood market. And that certainly threw me for a while but once there was a recognition that it sold live if meters well then it provided an obvious root for virus to get from a natural source whatever that is to probably the handlers in the first place the people who are selling the produce and of course the people who then bought its emphasis it. The market generally because presumably fish. Don't suffer from these kind of colts and fleas while they have this type of virus but not this particular one and the jump as it were from fish to humans would be considered to to be far too great for it to be a realistic possibility that it came directly from seafood. So it's much more likely to have come from an animal which was being sold hold on the same premises. So there's a certain amount of threat here which relates to butchering wild animals without knowing whether or not they're infected with something whether or not blood splashed around and other body fluids but in the end the virus has to have enough capacity to infect human cells if it finds itself in that situation thorough virus to do that does it have to make any kind of further adopt -tations or changes or Kinda jumped from an animal to a person and immediately be ready to spur between people. The general rule is that the first jump is an accidental jump and the subsequent jumps are also accidental as you say they're just dependence on very close contact family members healthcare workers that sort of thing and that every time that jump happens it is increasingly difficult and so the natural situation is that the animal virus whilst whilst it has the capacity to just about get going into the first individuals that it gets into it doesn't spread efficiently through the population in order to spread efficiently. The general requirements is. The virus has to pick up some mutations. Those mutations will adapt the virus to growing in human cells as opposed to animal cells and generally speaking that would lead to more virus available in the respiratory tract and therefore more opportunity for it to be coughed out and more opportunity for its appear quiet by someone who's nearby said presumably. That's parts of why it's so important to contain it in the early phase of an outbreak to minimize the chance of it. Adopting and becoming stronger stronger. Exactly what well stronger I think is a is a dangerous word It certainly what. The epidemiology molecular epidemiology will be now looking looking out for is any indication that the virus is adapting to the human species whether it's picking up mutations that then become fixed in the genome because they give the virus an advantage in that species recent reports from Chinese authorities parties have suggested that the virus may be mutating as he and explain. This isn't unexpected. Flee for example mutates which is why we need different vaccines doc scenes each year yet with a threefold increase in the number of cases in just the past week and more than seventeen deaths. I wanted today from me. I mean just how worried we should be about the outbreak. I think it's important not to overreact. I mean the people who towards the end of their lives or have have serious underlying respiratory problems are. I'm afraid likely to die of a respiratory infection. That's just the way it is and that could be. Fluid could be a handful of any other viruses strikes particularly in the winter. So this is another of those. The thing we don't know is because it's a new virus just how it will behave going forward. It's clearly not in the human population already. So there's no immunity so there is the possibility that it could spread had widely but on the other hand being an animal virus. We would expect it mostly to be attuned to growing an animal cells. A not in human cells and that would suggest that the transmission may be quite limited. But we have to wait and see If you also knees start having these symptoms you go into hospital. How do you get treated is a case of managing the symptoms or? Is this something that you can just give like offices anti-biotics it was a virus the equivalent of that wipes it out. It's the former so at the moment. You're looking to stabilize the patient through the dangerous phase when they're finding breathing difficult before the immune system will get on top of the virus and hopefully eradicates there are experimental drugs particularly after the SARS outbreak. A number of these were developed they generally early inhibit the replication of the virus. You prevent the virus making more copies of itself and it therefore cannot pass onto any new individual but none of them. As far as I know have been licensed clinical use and once you've got the information the sequence of the virus and you've looked at Ondra microscope all the other things you can do. Can you create a vaccine for it for example Yes you can do that. On the basis of vaccination against corona viruses well understood stood if you generate antibodies against the external components of the virus particle. They are generally protective and there are lots of experimental studies studies which indicate that is a successful approach to preventing infection. But the more immediate thing you can do when you know the sequences to confirm That anyone presenting with pneumonia like symptoms really does have this virus and if they do then to isolate them so that they their ability. Let's see to transmit it to others is is is reduced as possible. Any other information that Chinese Chinese authorities and who trying to gather as new cases arrive Well I think the origin virus is very important. Clearly if it's jumped wants can jump again and so if we need to know where it came from and how it got into the primary individuals the second thing we need to know is the magic number called our Norwalk. Awards which is a measure of the infectivity of the virus in the human population. How easy does it get from the primary infected person to other people all right? So that's it. We're starting while you guys are very efficient. Luckily for US I found was set to his own. Fakers is looking exactly that's so my name's Roslyn Diego. Oh I'm an instant professor of infectious disease modeling at the London. School of Hydrogen Tropical Medicine. I started by asking Russell and about what we need to know to calculate the so-called magic. It's number the key information for understanding the transmissibility of the viruses is starting to come out now and over. The next few weeks will be the critical information on what we're trying to understand. Is something called the reproduction number which is the average number of secondary cases that each infected person generates so how many people does each person in fact and if that number is greater than one than the epidemic will increase and if it's less than one than the epidemic will decrease and so right. Now we're we. We don't really know what that value is and over the next week or two if we start seeing these epidemics or we start seeing outbreaks in other cities we start seeing seeing chains of transmission will get to know that a lot better. That's IT Paul. One after the break will be hearing more from Rosalind about how we can and start to understand exactly how infectious the knee corona viruses. Welcome back with increasing numbers of people infected by the virus epidemiologists around the world working overtime. To calculate what Ian Termed earlier the magic number this tells on average how many people each person with the if I ris- will pass it onto bearing in mind that there could be plenty of people infected. He didn't feel very sick or who haven't gone hospital. I ask Russell and how you figure out what this number is in practice. So that's what we do in our work as we take some of these unknowns like what are the fraction of people that are reported reported. What are the fraction of people with severe symptoms and we use as much data as we can for instance? If you follow as they're doing in China you follow a case and their contacts and you see how many many of those people get infected and then follow their contacts etc and so these kind of methods can help you understand the average number of secondary cases that each person infects but an important thing about all infections all pathogens. Is that from person to person. There's variation in the number of secondary cases that each person generates so for a lot of people that might be less than one or zero new infections. But there might be some people within the population that for a variety of reasons infect infect more people and that will bring your average up above one. You saying that there's a lot of different factors that come into how quickly something like this spreads. How do you go about collecting data? And what are you asking for. What kind of level of detail get information from hospitals say so the information and that's being collected inch things? When did the person get ill? When did they first seek care? How many people did they meet in that time window before? And we're really interested in kind of the epidemological details like that that are being collected and what we want to generate is a time series so that's number of cases per day that occur and that can help us understand if three production numbers above one or not because if the if you have a time series so the number of cases per day going along for a month if that number starts to increase that tells us the reproduction numbers above one and how quickly increases allows us to calculate how high above one is dispaced dispersed another factor in figuring out how many people have been infected is how severity and whether everyone who gets it gets very ill and graced as talks before or whether some people may just feel slightly not themselves. How'd she figure this out? If there's this kind of big pool of people who've got and and not really having strong Simpson's yes a great question so when you see a new virus you're likely at the very beginning to see the most severe cases so those people who've we've gone to hospital with the most severe symptoms may have died and have caused the health authorities to wonder what's going on but really it's like a pyramid with the most severe cases at the talk the moderately severe in the middle and potentially cases. The are much less severe even symptomatic at the bottom so we don't know the shape of that pyramid for this infection. We don't know if the cases that you see at the top are most of them or whether there is quite a wide base of this pyramid. And there's lots of cases and and that's something that we don't know right now and it really Is really difficult to calculate initially and it also means that. It's very difficult for us to calculate the case fatality ratio due to. This is the number of people that died from the infection for each infected case and so early in the epidemic. When you know you're only seeing the most severe ones and a lot of the people that you see you don't know yet the outcome of their infection and so it can be really difficult to calculate the case fatality ratio early on? And that's something that people we're gonNA focus on now to understand really how bad this this virus is based on earlier reports it looks. It's like this Ni virus could be affecting people less severely than saws the Korean virus that killed more than seven hundred people between two thousand and two and two thousand three. I wanted today from Rosalind whether we should be reassured by this information whether the still a possibility that if the carina virus is more contagious the outcome could still be very serious for the reproduction. Number at the start of the epidemic was between two win three so fairly high but the aim of control measures and the interventions that we do to stop transmission. Aim To push this number down so so it changes through time and we have the basic reproduction number which is the number of secondary cases generated in the absence of any interventions and in the absence of any immunity in the the population and then we have the effective reproduction number. which is the reproduction number through time at some people are infected as there's interventions and we try and install the epidemic and so that's what we're trying to push below one so that on average each person in fact less than one new person? What measures can you take tape to push that down and stop people transmitting it to each other so a crucial piece of information for understanding? How controllable this this and other viruses will be is to say how much of the transmission that each infected person does happens before they know that they're infected? Because because for something like the flu you tend to become infectious about a day before you get ill and so even if you said to people oh don't go out go see your doctor. As soon as as you get ill they will have done some of their transmission before that happened and what we don't know for this virus yet is if it's similar to flu or if similar to uh other infections where you don't start to become infectious till you know you're ill and in that case it can be easier to control because then people with symptoms may suspect they're infected affected and might change their behavior to decrease the number of contacts or to seek care as quickly as possible and presumably people's behavior can change as well and it's Chinese New Year coming up at the end of the week. There's GonNa be lots of people traveling there's going to be big family. Gatherings presumably the ideal conditions for tribes. AUSE missing this kind of virus. Yeah so directly transmitted viruses like this when people mixed together obviously they can spread it from person to person and so then I should have been advised is D- people should take hygienic. Measures for instance like coughing into your elbow. Knock going out if you're ill And now the Chinese authorities. He's of asked people not to travel from Wuhan which may slow things down. But it's really critical at this point. Do we know that they're sustained human to human transmission and if there is than these travel changes might have a bigger effect four influenza for example decisions can be taken to close schools. One could stop public gatherings things. And if you want you can close workplaces to try and decrease the contacts that people have between people but it's important to also remember the other effects that this House on society because not only. Does it cost a lot to do that. But those people who are no longer at school or work might mix together anyway then. It's less effective intervention. So there are things that we can do with SAWS Middle Eastern Spiritually Syndrome Ebola and avian flu all emerging in recent years. I wanted today. Hey with outbreaks of new diseases becoming more common or with better test. They've simply got easier to spot. It's hard to know whether it's become more common or we just know more about it now when people and animals interact. There's always the chance of this happening. Is happened throughout history. And there's things that do increase the risk of people and animals animals coming into contact through the changing climate. There's more interaction between wild animals and people where those animal habitats and where people live. Come closer together. There's also more people so there's just more animals needed for agriculture and livestock and for people's livelihoods now so there's more people in contact with animals than there ever has been however this is just something that happens. It's happened to SARS the flu virus. That happened in two thousand nine that was also from animals. It Bolla is a spillover over infection and even HIV originally came from seeming immunodeficiency virus which is an animal disease so as always happened since ause. There's been a few like an open mind so the possibility that a new respiratory infection could be a corona virus and so I think that open minded the policy is very important and the other thing to notice the cost. China has been afflicted by a number of avian flu outbreaks over recent years particularly. It's a guilty from so h seven influenzas and again. They are very well attuned now to being able to track back down where new infections have occurred and so determine what the sequences are of the agents involved. So it's been a very good way to handle title. What is perhaps occasionally an inevitable situation as recording the World Health Organization is meeting to decide whether to declare an international public health emergency? This is a fast moving story and the still so much that we don't right now in the coming days will be countless news. Reports updating the numbers of people and countries affected by the virus but it is worth remembering the behind every story. The doctors collecting information from patients hospital laps analyzing samples and scientists around the the world working to understand the nature of this virus and how deadly it is likely to is only three this collective global efforts that we can protect ourselves against dangerous diseases and be better prepared for next time one strikes. That's it for this week. Will include links to some of our coverage of the knee corona virus at the Guardian Dot Com. We'll certainly be watching any developments closely here at science. Weekly thanks to Gene Jones and Russell and if you have any thoughts or feedback feel free to sender's e-mail at science weekly at the Guardian Dot Com. This Cepsa was presented by me Hannifin and was produced by Matlin Finley for more po costs from the Guardian. Just go to the GUARDIAN DOT COM slash podcasts.

China flu Russell Wuhan Rosalind Ian Jones professor The Guardian Rosalind Echo respiratory tract Andy Monja Fever Rosalind Point immunodeficiency SARS World Health Organization University of Reading Ondra
Radio Free Quarantine #2: Contact Trace

A World Where

07:22 min | 1 year ago

Radio Free Quarantine #2: Contact Trace

"Warning this podcast is extremely depressing. If you are depressed right now do not listen to this. Podcast IT'S DAY. Three hundred eighteen on lockdown. And you're listening to Radio Free Quarantine. I'm on a writer and I am not bitter. No no no no no no. I'm not bitter. I'm not better known I. Am I getting back out? There is what I'm doing. It is Valentine's Day. I am single and I'm getting the fuck back out there and that is what I have to say. Okay here's the problem. Here's the problem. How how am I supposed to get back out there if I can't go out there right? How's that spouse to work? Oh Oh sorry. Tooting black-market Bathtub. Gin here can recycle all who killed me. Luckily luckily the coalition as an answer. It's called Tracer nowy obviously and it's the first dating APP for the recently bachelor ratified devore. Say Looking for love in the distant age now. I'm not being paid by any of the coalition companies to say this. But let me tell you tracer spars dating APPs go. Sox substrates or sucks. It really really really really sucks. Why will a all dating APP suck? We know this but be it's immunised. There's no other fucking way to say it it's fucking immunised and that's that and also see. I can't get a date so okay one more okay. But why can't get it because of immunisation that's why because the fucking immunization and that's that's that tell you that much sorry. I shouldn't be pulling that car to a huge amount of immuno privilege. I'm not old. I don't have a chronic condition. I have nothing that could remotely be considered an immunodeficiency literally. Just I smoked pot every day so my lungs are fucked up. So I'm susceptible thing is it says that on the APP not that I smoke pot every day. But there's there's a massive banner above my profile pic that says compromised right above the slightly smaller banner. That says UN acclimated straight so clearly. That's why I can't get a date and it has nothing at all to do with my personality. Can Tracer is the first APP that can access the data from the contact tracing software on your phone what you didn't download any contact tracing software on your phone. Well tough titty. Your phone was made by a coalition company. And there's a ninety nine point nine percent chance it was then contact tracing came preloaded into your last software update. If you recently got a new device built right into the hardware if this is news to you it shouldn't be apple and Google started work on contact. Tracing almost a year ago. The original idea was just to track infections and for people to share information voluntarily. While it's big tech so that wasn't GonNa last not only does your phone now. No your immunity status but also the immunity status of anyone who comes within six feet of you and if any of those people don't have antibodies it'll show you their name face age and susceptibility as well as anyone susceptible who's come within six feet of them and if the person didn't have permission to pop your distance bubble. There's a big red button that lets you report their transgression trans- trans- aggression to the authorities. Immunization Room is one of those words that I it just doesn't compute for the radical rate intersectional or Transgender O. A. N. that's one American news. Trump's clear favourite network since Fox went under sees immunity as a badge of honor a metaphorical medal of heroism for enduring the gauntlet of Kovic nineteen and coming out the other side stronger more American and of course whiter because over the past eleven months the word unactivated has become conservative. Media's loudest dog whistle and until a vaccine comes along. The only way to get acclimated is to get sick and survive. And you're more likely to be able to do that. If you're white period race and health are inexorably linked not as Owen would. Have you believe because of genetics? But because the distribution of medical resources is so tied to income inequality. Poc In this country die of corona virus at staggering rates compared to white people who are more likely to receive better treatment and thus more likely to recover it makes sense then that the immune are far more likely to be white than not. And that's not to say white people aren't getting sick is making damn sure. They are by continuing to promote corona virus parties and likening the resilience of the recovered bootstrap pulling capitalists strength. The founding fascist fathers. That's why corona virus has spread like wildfire across trump country largely departing the urban sprawl for greener pastures with fewer hospitals and populations who are more spread out and more susceptible to deadly propagandists spin but immuno privilege affects every single aspect of our society. Nowadays all it takes is one look at an American city block in the early evening where the rich white and antibodies walk freely after curfew while the rest are legally trapped in their homes to see that immune ISM is a problem everywhere even heard the NYPD is stopping people mostly surprise surprise people of Color and administering on the spot molecular antibody counts. You know what they're calling it. Stop and test fuck man. This is why I drink radio free. Quarantine Limited series presented by a world. Where new episodes every Friday? Until may twenty ninth you can read the annotated transcript of this episode and download the volume one deluxe edition for free at a world where dot com a world. Where we'll be offering free and beginner friendly podcasting workshops for listeners an creators every Sunday at four. Pm Eastern on Instagram live. This week's class which will be on April. Twenty six twenty twenty. It's called podcasting from `isolation and will provide a crash course in everything. You need to create a narrative audio from home without breaking the bank or coming within six feet of another human being tune. In at world where pod or click the instagram link on our website. A world where DOT com. Thanks for listening and stay safe.

writer immunodeficiency corona devore American news DOT NYPD Trump Quarantine Limited UN apple Owen Transgender O. A. N. Google Kovic Fox six feet eleven months