40 Burst results for "Immune System"

Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

00:59 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

"Obviously something's idea d say when it really is a violation like what's happened this week with nigerian and then to be a global response that is not global response has been in the past but she's just to invade and take oil So i've i've kind of bone immune system to the kind of expectations around what needs to be done in public and people just need to mind their own business there. Well i agree with you. Why agree with you particularly around these this this idea of perfectionism in feminism activism and. I don't know where the fuck it came from because we know the walls are not perfect. That's why his activism. So i don't know where it's coming from. I don't something that's still lingering. From being conditioned around perfection at what patriarchy wants from women to be perfect and be well so well groomed and put together and again perfect that we are placed by massive expectation on each other and on ourselves. By the way sorry is gonna say council ourselves so easily and on ourselves absolutely at the danger of that is one we we create idols. We create people that we worship and adore because we expect perfection from them and we don't. We don't allow people to make mistakes. Obviously you're informs evita. He should be making so many mistakes. Because that's why you'll leading we. I don't think we. I think the ballots needs to take backs to see human humane humanity in people which is imperfection so we correct idols if we don't Better grop around perfection and again. That's no good accountability. All of this. The individuals seeking. Perfection is a massive distraction from long term systematic change. We have to deal with the fact that all faiths in music in politics in in cultural payment and coach our family our faves. I'll going to sometimes be problematic because no one is perfect. We have grapple with that yet. I think technology algorithms. I'm gonna find that a lot more. I think i think in the kind of combativeness sensor platforms and and the like i just think..

Evita
When you feel like life is against you

Building Psychological Strength

04:58 min | 1 d ago

When you feel like life is against you

"Today. I want to open this episode by telling you a story that. I don't think i've ever tall on the podcast before. That's actually pretty amazing. Since i share quite a bit about myself on this podcast. But i don't think i've gone into detail about this particular story and i wanted to do so today because i think it is an interesting introduction into the topic that i want to cover For the majority of this episode so bear with me and listen to this quick little story from by past many of you know that i have multiple sclerosis. I was diagnosed when i was about thirteen years old. Which is extremely young. And i've lived with it for over twenty five years of my life. I've had a number of experiences as a result of having a mess. But one of them. That i wanna share with you. Today is the first time that i went blind. I've actually gone blind twice each time. Thankfully it was in. Only one i But the first time i went blind was in really interesting situation that i want to dive into a little bit today because as i mentioned it sets up. Today's topic really nicely. So for those of you who may not be familiar. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune condition. So my immune system is a little bit hyper vigilant and it attacks my body more specifically it attacks the mylan aided narves in my central nervous system he can think of mile unaided nerves as The wiring that's in your house. There is a wire with some Some insulation around it my similar to that we have nerves in our central nervous system with mylan around them. Mylan is the insulation that allows electricity or nerve responses to flow cleanly along a nerve instead of sort of Jumping over to other nerves or haphazardly firing around in our brain it allows those impulses to move more cleanly so when the violated gets scarred so multiple sclerosis actually means many scars when our mylan get scarred in our central nervous system it can cause issues and deficits and one of the things that i experienced was blindness. So this to give you some context. I was about fourteen years old. Or so and i woke up one day and i noticed that i was starting to see double vision when i would look way. To the periphery of my left eye. So if i looked way to the left my vision would go double the further to the left. My eyes would go and i thought this was really strange. But you know at this point in time. My ms was not regulated. I wasn't. I hadn't been on medication for very long and i was really used to things very strange symptoms happening and so i didn't think much of it now. Over the course of the weeks that followed it took about a month for me to lose my vision entirely in my left eye I increasingly had very strange visual effects. So the double vision worsened. I didn't have to move. My is very much anymore for that. Double vision symptom to happen. I also had incredible pain behind my i later learned. This was my optic nerve swelling up. Who knew that's thing. Apparently optic near itis is that it's called anyway. I had some pain behind my eye and the edges. If you think about the thing that i remember most is looking at leaves on a tree or there's a lot of detail right. Each leaf is very. It's a little tiny detail on the tree and they have very sharp and the edges of branches are very like sharp lines. those would almost. This is the best way that i can describe it. Sparkle kind of they were blurry and they were sparkly and it made it really hard for me to see detail. Those symptoms progressed and progressed and progressed to the point where i couldn't see anything out of my left eye. We're talking if i closed my right eye and completely shielded from any light. If i went into a room i didn't know if the light was on or off i actually went into the doctor side. Note this is just a funny story. i went into the doctor and they did What's called an eeg where they take this big electrode cap and they glue all these electrodes to your head. And then they have you do a task and they measure

Multiple Sclerosis Mylan Blindness Scars
Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on KOGO's Evening News

KOGO's Evening News

00:28 sec | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on KOGO's Evening News

"Morning news. Dozens of judges have now rejected those claims of mass fraud with Ted and Madonna. California's Unemployment Development Department has fixed the flaws in the system after prison inmates were able to collect unemployment. Benefits. Weekday mornings at five on news radio 600 Kogo. Hey, it's said here for balance of nature, You know, I have more than 10 servings of fruits and vegetables every day to give my immune system of boost and my body a lot more nutrients. How well balance of nature's fruits and veggies 31 different whole ripened organic fruits and vegetables. Round into capsules. You might have heard their testimonies on our airwaves. And those are real people who've experienced what balance of nature can do now. I'm one of those.

Unemployment Development Depar Fraud TED California Kogo
U.K. Grants Emergency Authorization For Covid-19 Vaccine

WSJ What's News

04:55 min | 1 d ago

U.K. Grants Emergency Authorization For Covid-19 Vaccine

"As we told you earlier. Britain is the first nation in the west to grant emergency use authorization for a covid nineteen vaccine ahead of the us and the eu clearing a shot jointly developed by pfizer the us and biontech of germany. It's expected to be distributed in limited numbers within days. The decision is of interest far beyond its borders. Let's bring in london based reporter. Jenny strasbourg jenny. Good morning good morning. Thank you mark jennings. Let's break down the news itself. What does authorization by the uk. Government mean and. How does this compare to. It's currently happening in the united states so the uk and it's pretty brexit transition period has taken the power it has to basically say look. We authorize this for emergency use. There's a pandemic we don't need to wait for the eu medicines regulator. We're going to do this ourselves. And we're not gonna wait for the european regulators to decide so this is not going to be the last authorization we're going to hear about. We're likely there's a lot happening in the in the us. With the fda in europe with the european medicines agency that oversees similar authorizations of medicines across europe. They've got hearings public hearings in the us and in europe coming up in december to discuss this and we could see more of these such decisions before the end of the year with that said distribution will begin immediately correct. The uk government is saying this morning that they expect to start putting shots in arms next week and so the uk has prioritised people. You know this is a bit morbid. But it make sense. According to essentially their vulnerability to dying so they've said look people in care homes the people who care for them who also could carry the virus to the folks in care homes. They'll be first and then you've got frontline. Healthcare workers the nhl of the uk. A the people who are caring for people on hospitals and then people over eighty nine groups that the work through. And you know there's only going to be so much vaccine to go around but they are going to move. You can be sure that the uk will move as quickly as possible. Will this decision influence or even perhaps speed up the process in the united states. You know our headline is uk. I right this is the first time. A western nation has granted emergency use. The uk government is saying eight hundred. Thousand shots will start rolling out next week. There's going to be major coverage of people in uk care homes and you know the workers caring for people the most vulnerable getting shots. You can imagine that's going to have an impact on a world devastated by this pandemic but you know in fairness like the regulators in the us and in europe have been moving very quickly. Like i don't want to portray this as like a competition among regulators. I think we need to keep in mind that they're all trying to uphold the standards of safety. Make sure this vaccine is effective. Make sure that manufacturing is up to quality standards and keep in mind. There's different manufacturing happening around the world. It's not a simple thing to make. A messenger are a vaccine. It's actually quite difficult task. And finally jenny. You've covered a lot of this from the start. What are the unknowns. What are the questions that you're still asking. You know how long until vaccines will will bring some greater sense of normalcy to our world and you know this is just the start. I think people need to keep in mind that we're not gonna just immediately stop wearing masks and needing to distance needing to take care of each other. This is just the start of a long process. The you know there are a lot of questions about like how long immunity lasts and how long the impact on the human immune system lasts from a vaccine. I think all of us wanna know the whole herd immunity. Will this help us be able to hug each other. What mean that people can see their loved. Ones can get on planes. Feel a little safer. It's gonna take time and also frankly developing nations and poor countries. I mean this. This is a complicated vaccine to store it. Long periods of time the requires very cold temperatures. You know the hope is that there won't be a division between rich and poor countries and that we can take care of the entire world and not just the was countries

UK United States Jenny Strasbourg Jenny Mark Jennings Europe EU European Medicines Agency Pfizer Britain Germany FDA London NHL Jenny Cold
Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

00:58 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Its what's called end chain forms means you get all of it. And the max. Stress speed provides all of these b. vitamins. There's another one called the complete b but the most important one is the full late came. Another one is called. took trying the took. Trainees the stabilized rice brand which provides fruteau old alito sacrifice. Fructose illegal saka rights. Which has these different types of sugars. But not sugar as you think. Sugar and it provides these antioxidants that are really really good. Mix into food. You can just put it in water and drink it down has a sweet taste you can sprinkle it on foods and things like out. It just makes sure that you are getting all of these specific types of antioxidant. That all goes hundred different times at antioxidants. The the daily a good daily people go. I wanna take a daily. They make this new daily one. Which provides everything you could possibly imagine. But you know doesn't that provide enough of the bees. Yes but no. That's why we want to take some extra bs. That's when we take some of the coral these things like that can so the the a daily multivitamin is great especially in these wholefood forms which provide the greens and all this other stuff. It's just a basis that provides for everything colostrum the colostrum the classroom which comes from cow. Colostrum provides twenty five percent of the g which is an immune system. So i wanna protect my baby from wanna give my baby a healthy immune system our. We also want to protect my baby from things that i make face meaning. Let's say you're a woman and you're pregnant and you catch a cold or something like that. Your body is going to be delivering less nutrients to the baby all your sick. Because it's just robbing peter to paul so taking colostrum For advanced dna support to provides growth factors. It's just an extra security measure of. How do i make sure that my baby is going to get the best..

Alito Cold Peter Paul
How Plants Fight Disease

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:51 min | 4 d ago

How Plants Fight Disease

"The microbial world and to my listeners. Probably the most. Famous interactions are the mike arousal associations or maybe some of the bacteria that form in the knowledgeable lls and help fix nitrogen but there is a wide spectrum. Oftentimes pathogenic interactions between plants and microbes. So what made you go sort of the pathogenic or at least like disease route with them. Tie back to where. I kind of realized that when they get sick they actually died and when they died. Then there's less moves go around the world that means prices will go up and that means people that are less fortunate probably not gonna be able to bottles plants or bottles products eventually and it just kind of tie back to where i wanted to katina help others. So it's still tana original passionate helping others. i'm just doing it at a bigger in a much broader implant. That's really cool. Yeah and thinking about sort of all of the threats we face with climate change and just habitat loss. And you know everything. We're going through society right now. Understanding how plants are going to either survive. Stressed out or die has huge impacts across the board whether you're an ecologist worried about conservation or the idea of like food security and just getting people with their right to have access to good food. All of this can tie back to plants on some level and really that stressor. It's not like they're all just gonna fry because it's too hot out a lotta times. They're getting stressed and dealing with a lot of other stuff. Which is where your research. A lot of your research comes in so you mentioned They have similar ways of fighting disease but not exactly because their plants. They're not animals and so let's think about how plants interact with microbes. Do plants have and immune system on a broad spectrum. Is it anything akin to like what we have so. Am i get some backlash for this. But i go hanley. Okay always been. That's always been this debate whether plants have immune system and i some people like to use it I don't like it at all. Okay just put a bad. That they don't have white blood cells. They don't have antibodies. They don't have this like adaptive immunity like we do. I don't really consider that as amused. Glance what. I like to call that. Halfway is planning needs. So they have immunity something. They have components that they made themselves the fan against grows okay but they don't really have that adaptive like components that you will call an immune system so i think If we want to go down with differences so plants and humans One thing they do have in common is they both. Have these receptor like proteins or something that helps them to chat micros. Okay so the way. That dataset microsoft similar invoke lanson mammals. The difference with the malians is Wadis components that water similar allow these receptors are intracellular and Mammals while plans are intracellular. So they stay outside of plant sale and they perceive those microbial related is cool now thinking about all of the different sorts of microbes that can cause an issue for a plan. I mean there's bacteria viruses fungi. I mean does the response. Sort of differ depending on. What's coming in or is it. Just kind of all lumped in and sort of the mechanisms of detection might have some variants. Or where does it begin depending on. What kind of micro talking about here. And i think that's what kind of Fascinate me about this. Feel is like Depending on what the pathogen is or what motive of affection is doing like you get a totally different defense mechanism front of land. So let's say bacteria for example That's half jello. So that receptor. Or the estrogen receptor of plants dakin that said a certain points of jello or from some better and when they detect that part of on they send like a sidney lynne halfway or finland was biased. Light through the plant sales down the activate a defense response or to defend ourselves against the pathogens. So that's like the plant site first response to it But bacteria what they have evolved to do as they had these small proteins or relatively small proteins call factors and these factors what they can do. They can kind of turn off that plants. Though plans they try and go for gel on. They'll try to turn the pathway on and a bacterial cells secrete of that. There's an plant sale and l. Shut off that halfway. Jeez yeah no and that allows the bacteria to continue to invade the vet the planned sale with some cases plant sales. They of all some of these Resistant genes components which are located intra zillur so when arafat their turns off there signaling pathways. You have somebody's resistant. Genes that can detect those offenders and entered on this really robust defense response to kind of just get rid of packaging and so it's just this back and forth on race between planning micros is kinda fascinated with and i'm so glad you said the arms race analogy because that's all i was thinking of is like it's like tit for tat. Every new thing that one develops the other one kind of has two counter end to think that you know obviously there are different players nowadays but this is something that's probably been going on. Ever since plants evolved are crawled onto the land with their roots. And to think of all of the ways. This has been going on through time. It's just this constant change evolutionary pressure to just constantly be going back and forth with these potential pathogens and the ways you can fight them. That is so cool. Yeah i mean it's still kinda going still going on to this day like they're still evolving is still trump

Katina Tana Hanley Sidney Lynne Dakin Microsoft Finland
Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

00:33 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on Animal Radio

"If there's more color change that you're noticing That's usually a temporary thing. Once they've weaned the puppies. Their hair coat does restorative normal Luster in its previous density. But the other thing is we know. Pregnancy can weaken immune system. So we do have to watch out for things like skin mites particularly demographics mites in pregnant dogs. We can see them break with infestations those and even things like ringworm So their immune system mural. They're feeding all those babies so it is certainly possible. We can get something out. That really kind of takes opportunity might be a set a situation where i recommend you see the veterinarian have a couple of quick skin tests done to see if that might be the situation For your baby there But it's not an it's just this other stuff it should be a temporary thing and and hopefully back to normal when those babies are often. They're happy homes. How many babies you got six Wonderful and is she being a good mom. Take care of those guys. Really good mom well. Hopefully that's like. I said all all you're dealing with there and make sure you get those babies into the vet. Six weeks is when the first puppy shots. We wanna be talking about doing as well as regular de worming so does all right just to you and take those..

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | Last week

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on John McGinness

John McGinness

01:29 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "immune system" discussed on John McGinness

"I believe it's three weeks apart. Although I have to double check, I think, 21 days apart again. There's two vaccines out there, so it's possible ones. But the reason is, is that Again. That's how the vaccine was developed and tested. And so in terms of being sure it's efficacious. Many vaccines do require more than one dose if you think about how the vaccine works. And in fact how this particular vaccines Thies to vaccines are on the verge of approval. Work is is that it's really prime ng training the your own body's immune system. Right? So it's a very natural way of doing tests, right? You train your own. Immune system to be able to fight off the virus. When you actually count encountered a real life virus, and how that Lisa Technology behind the fighter in the Madonna vaccines, which are the two that are first out of the gate. They actually contain a substance called are in a, which allows the cells produce proteins that are similar to the virus, but not the virus itself. So you're never being actually supposed to the coronavirus when you get the vaccine. S o. Your body will take this information from the RNA deal produce proteins that are Similar enough to the virus that your immune system goes. Oh, I can recognize this. So when the real coronavirus shows up in your body, it's already primed toe fight it into to kick it out of your body. And so that's how these vaccines work. It's really interesting, so different. I mean, now, you know, flu season and influence shots, and there's you know, it's just, you know, what do you say in just a few words to folks who just don't want to get a flu shot? Don't want toe you know, anti vaxxers, obviously very against this and to to know that this might actually be a requirement. Even Possibly to travel right? Well, uh, I think it's highly recommended. I haven't seen any specific requirement. Yes, certainly not in law about the flu vaccine. But getting the flu vaccine is a way to protect yourself against the flu. It can prevent the flu, but also even if you catch the flu, if you've gotten the vaccine, the flu will be a lot. More mild, so it won't be a severe. I think we also seen that with the covert vaccine. So they're saying it's about, you know, 90 some percent effective, But I think on the studies on again, we're way still waiting for the full information that would come show up after the approval. That even people who are vaccinated, they still caught coveted cases. They're much more mild than the people who, if they weren't vaccinated, got the placebo. They got lots sicker. And against because the way it helped trains the immune system to be able to respond there Anything. I should also point out, though, because they just just one of the myths about the flu vaccine, some people say, Well, the flu vaccine can actually give me the flu. Right. Um, And first of all the flu vaccine can't give you the flu because it does, uh, injected flu vaccine certainly doesn't contain a flu virus. Um, but also, it sometimes takes time after you get Vaccinated for the vaccine to finally kick in right so for the flu vaccine, we know that after you get your flu vaccine, it takes two weeks and if you were exposed to the flu before that kicks in, you can still get the flu. It's not the flu vaccine that caused it. And there's also going to be a little period of time after you get your coded vaccine after Get your two doses where you still have in the chief full protection because your immune system hasn't completed training cycle on. So just again. Keep in mind that even after you got your two doses, maybe a couple weeks before You're ready to say OK of a covert Jack's corroded by shows up. I'm fully now able to defend myself against it. And so again, that data will be coming out. Uh, you know, from the trials that were done, okay, much more to talk about. I hope you can stay on the line with us for a little bit, Doctor Pan, and now we have some questions, folks calling in again our number 916921 15 30. Continue the conversation here on the John McGuinness show right after this.

Flu Vaccine FLU Lisa Technology Thies Jack John Mcguinness Doctor Pan
Is the Oxford vaccine worse than the other ones?

Coronacast

04:09 min | Last week

Is the Oxford vaccine worse than the other ones?

"And we had some more exciting vaccine related news in the last couple of days. Norman the astrazeneca vaccine from oxford university has released results saying that. It's an average of seventeen point four percent effective which is less than what we were hearing about the other. Vaccines that have recently been announcing interim results from fifa and madonna. So is the oxford vaccine. Like the bad one or is it just the way they've crunched the numbers looking a bit different to the way pfizer and medina have crunched. The numbers and sean writes in. So we're getting the dot t. One thanks you'll have to force me to take that one advisor moderna. I'll be first in line stuff. The for'de astrazeneca one who trust the uk. Now anyway. thanks. I'm sean sean. Next time you say the question just tell us what you mean you a. You don't be the by bush. So here's the story of esther vaccine report. So this is the problem releasing by pressure lease and what they did. This press release was really naughty. They gave an average of seventy percent but it was an average over two separate trials. You can't do that. You can average two separate trials with different objectives different doses and so on and say was was seventy percent and you can only assume that what we're trying to hide wars that the food does trial. Which was the latte. The larger of the true was actually quite disappointing. Compared to the one thousand nine hundred ninety five percent results that pfizer moderna have been reporting for the amarnath vaccine where they get the average coming up. A bit is actually. What at first sight seems counterintuitive. So you try which the big what which is to fool does is and you've got a smaller trial where they did a half those to begin with and then a fool doors late about a month later and what the got with that one was ninety percent. Say to the to the other two. That's right but effective remember. This was affective in preventing covid nineteen disease. We still don't know whether prevents infection now said well. Why would a lure does one work well. It's actually quite conceivable that the lord does one is the better way of giving it because the vaccine works spy using a chimpanzee cold virus which has been inactivated sort of doesn't caused disease to carry the genetic message inside the cell for the sale to produce despite protein. That's going to generate an immune response in the body that will have memory to fight the infection. So that's how it does the chimpanzee vars whilst it doesn't develop disease in the person our immune system does recognize this virus and january. antibodies toured. So what can happen. Is that you give. The food does in the first. Does the body a gets. Antibodies to the chimpanzee vars. And then when you give the secon- does it doesn't work because your body's fighting off the victor really. That's right the train of the truck the text but if you want to call it the terms of the metaphor taking the phones of other words that blocks the driver from taking the from carrying the the vaccine into the cell so the f- the lure does wand doesn't generate a strong response to the chimpanzee virus but still pump primes the immune system against the vaccine against the spike protein. I should say so. The second vaccine does work so this is actually good news so could be. That is just as good and it'd be a nice one to be just as good because it's going to be a lot cheaper. It's going to be available in the developing world. Astros said that they're not going to take any prophets on it at least during the pandemic and transports in the fridge. So it's easy to transport and resilient so you can't average here so the sixty percent is completely misleading. Double full does pretty lousy half those plus four does pretty good and that director attention towards where it should go.

De Astrazeneca Sean Sean Esther Vaccine Pfizer Moderna Oxford University Medina Fifa Pfizer Norman Madonna Oxford Sean Bush Affective UK Cold
The Latest News On The War In Yemen

Monocle 24: The Briefing

09:14 min | Last week

The Latest News On The War In Yemen

"War in yemen has been one of the grimmer stories unfolding anywhere on earth for roughly six years now for most of that time it has struggled fool widespread and much more so this year as the rest of the world was preoccupied with the obvious. One of the reasons that yemen has been under reported is that it has been difficult and dangerous to report from monocle. Twenty-fourth beirut correspondent. Leyla moulana alone has recently been to yemen and joins me now a layla. First of all the logistics at this point of getting in and out of yemen. How do you do it. The logistics arch freaky and there are multiple ways now. there awesome flights operating into yemen. And on the way in the way it was done. was through cairo's flying into cairo. And then going into an applet. Who'd you in the south now the flights of neuron a few times a week. They don't necessarily ron time. All hugely overbooked. Of course with people want to go on another extremely expensive as what happened with us. Was that when we lost one can can you then looking out as well because these flights are constantly moving. So it's very unsure when you go in how exactly oh gutting be able to get out and in all case We had to change into a land route option and dry options country which took days because the flights simply went operational on the way out so not necessarily the stable of travel. Itinerary will clearly once in yemen which parts of it. Were you actually able to see so. I was in shabwah. Governorate which is in the south is traditionally very Very tribal governor. At and at the moment it's now the only southern governor this fact compete under the control of the central government it was until the end of two thousand and nineteen ponti occupied by the some transitional council which is the nutritional southern separatists of southern yemen. But they were pushed out at the end of two thousand and nineteen alongside the shabani elite forces which were essentially local mercenaries hired and backed by the united arab emirates. Who of fighting that. They had been fighting against al qaeda terrorists forces that they will push out the two thousand eighteen so it is now backsitting under government control but of course at still a lot of controls over the different parties that some things. That isn't the right decision. So in that part of yemen is life relatively stable and peaceful on the one hand is driving around the capital city act. They're all going up. There are shop opening people walking around. That does seem to be a bishop. Prosperity come back and stuff. People was antony there were jobs hidden now. We can't find jobs in other areas with coming his to work so in on that side of things know that building tourist complex building hotels that very hopeful that the level of stability having now even things like went scoreless Address the that level of civility means that they will have increasing prosperity. The problem of course is firstly that the country as many said to me is still seen as water but also there are a lot of problems with stability they currently have posited is because there is oil. it's one of the three governorates that has a lot of oil in yemen and the governor has made a deal with the central government that they get a twenty percent cut. That goes straight to the governor at so they can invest in rebuilding infrastructure analytical houses in the governor at. That's a great deal. But a lot of people in southfield they should be getting even more not so much of it should be going to the central government that trying to encourage more western oil companies to come back in as also lots of liquid natural gas that the moment there is just one australian oil company functioning on The moment there is just one austrian oil company who is currently can shop. Hope that increase was fired. You enjoy -tunities Very unstable as i say with the political situation still going around. They're all active. Frontlines from the nearest one is in marriage to the north. That's fine with the season is also still frontlines. The southern traditional council as well given everything you've said about life in shaw born those soins reasonably encouraging signs of some sort of return to normality. Does it feel like the government is itself a self contained country at this point. Is there much talk about trying to put yemen back together. So this is the big question with some people are saying shove what is the example of how of federalist yemen could work. You know in which the different governorates level tournament. A certain amount of money to run that own concerns are loyal to a central government and of course contribute troops to a central government. Which is what's currently happening. Lots of shift one young men going and fighting own the nearest frontline that the government has up in a way in tons for its relationship that they have on say. The governor is a loyal to central. Government has a good working relationship barron which she has been given this level of autonomous theoretically that is hopeful future. The problem is that people are fighting for different reasons. This is something people kept saying to me that you know there are some people who had the interest of the money interest of the oil. The pool of calls many people saying that the uae and the arabia of that those reasons. But then you've got some transitional council bay come from a long line of people who believe that the south of the. Nfl is completely different from the nose. Should be united and shouldn't be wrong from the north which causes where at the central government is based although i should say that most of the people who make up the central government actually are outside the country right now because he ended so constantly moving on stable But seth me they're southerners new feel wouldn't at shouldn't be enrolled in the as the south bend. Of course you have. The who fees. Who are the shiite iran backed militia. Who are still fighting in. How occupied a lot of the north of the moment. They are running at sanaa city at the moment still and they of course flight final ideology and copy one of my money as many people said to me that it's not just about these business relationships on the national resources so while the idea the united yemen too. Many people is hugely appealing. And so many people that saying can you with retired war. We want peace. We want elections. We just want to get on with our lives and have yemen stop being associated with the idea of this ongoing horrific war which the united nations is called the greatest humanitarian crisis currently in the world but whether or not that's realistic the number of political issues currently butting up against each other both in tunnel and the proxy wars being fooled by international powers is is another question is obviously not short of problems but it was also burden this year as every country on earth walls by the covid nineteen pandemic. Were you able to get much sense of how that has affected life in yemen or how yemen with the resources it has has been able to handle it so the area i was in has extreme yellow covid figures at least in tons of what's being counted now going in i thought perhaps they simply aren't being counted all covered up in some way. One of the arguments is of course. It doesn't really make sense for the government to be covering up coach. Vic is because it's one way of them getting access to aid. Amy because so much aid money to other projects has been coastal this year because it will bring directed towards codex but in the area. I was in shock whistle. The numbers are extremely loads. They do have a new testing center in the capital of. Its just couple of months old. That's incompletely funded and built by the saudis very center. It isn't getting much use because they don't seem to be that many people coming in now elsewhere in yemen. The problem has been much worse. Part of the reason might be that there is not that much movement in the south. Where's the north in ogden. In saana a further away from that is a lot of moving there and we. Stephanie seen horrific numbers of people really struggling particularly ibp comps. Where who's it spreads wildfire. Now i did meet with several people who said that in the prisons. The situation is getting much worse as well. I spoke a couple of prisoners families who said that they the dominant co code in prison and the conditions were horrendous. They were not being freed Unlike many prisons seeing around the world who've been given a thorough from prison while the coronavirus has been spreading shouts great concern. The big problem really is as i say. That was not much of it to be seen at the moment. But the very worried about Of course we know that in the summer does seeing that the transmission. I'll in the winter. Once that construe immune systems are the health service simply The local hospital is absolutely overwhelmed. Ready mary i was having a den. Gay deng massive outbreak which is affecting a lot of young children in particular from the rural areas. You have to travel hundreds of kilometers to get to the hospital. So although right now where i was as i say not that big a problem if it does hit in the winter and docs saying they're concerned about that. It would be really really devastating. The muslim needs right now. Layla milana allen in beirut. Thanks for joining us.

Yemen Leyla Moulana Central Government Shabwah Cairo UAE Southern Traditional Council Beirut Antony Al Qaeda Sanaa City Southfield United Yemen Barron NFL Iran United Nations
When Critters Bleed ... On Purpose!

Short Wave

08:36 min | Last week

When Critters Bleed ... On Purpose!

"Okay now so why did you get interested in this whole reflex bleeding thing well. I just saw this report by that guy. Sebastian hofer and i called him up and he told me that not too long ago he got a job at an island ecosystem research institute in the and so i was looking into what's around. What kind of animals are just scanning through the literature just to see what of questions could answer any read about. These local snakes called thunder snakes. That sounds very dramatic. Thunder thunder thunder snakes. Really it's just that they come out when it rains a lot. And i remember reading this from nineteen fifty five describing this behavior this auto hemorrhaging behavior in these snakes. And i just thought to myself. That's insane so there weren't any photos or any kind of detailed description. It just said. The snakes bled from their heads when handled so he did what most good scientists would do. I assume he went out on an expedition to fight snakes. Absolutely you know it. He absolutely did. He had a couple of colleagues went out looking under rocks flipped a ton of rocks until they finally found one and the snake made some defensive behaviors kinda rolled into this tight ball and it started defecating. And asking you know emitting this pretty bad smelling liquid and then sebastian applied a little pressure to its nose like just gently pinched. Its nose to see if they could trigger any bleeding from handling all right. Now you set me this video. And i'm watching a. It's like a little nose pinch. Maybe you know you pinch at like good. And but then boom the snakes is fill up with blood like immediately there are just too big drops of blood where the is used to be and then suddenly the is kind of clear up and then a drop of blood comes out of its mouth yes. Sebastian told me it was wild. Just because i've never seen anything like that. And just the fact of how quickly that i or the is fully flood with blood and then the blood exudes from the mouth and then the ice fully clear up again in just a couple of seconds. I was stunned. I was like this is mad. I mean that is pretty dramatic and you said other critters. Do this to right right some other snakes. You know the one that's been studied. The most is the horned lizard. That's a lizard that lives in the us in the southern us and what it does is pretty nutso. It shoots blood out of its is and the blood can fly several feet several feet. Yeah it doesn't happen that often but when it does it's so dramatic that it really gets people's attention. Indigenous people have known about these lizards for a long time. European scientists wrote about them centuries ago and for forty years. These lizards have been studied by wage. Sherbrooke director emeritus of the southwestern research station of the american museum of natural history in arizona and he told me at the beginning. He was just wondering if this is supposed to be a defensive response. Why would blood be a turnoff. For what is after all a bloodthirsty predator. Good question when you try to say well. Maybe a predator wouldn't like it depends on is going to eat these things you know. That doesn't make sense so That's that's where i started. So he began watching the lizards in doing experiments. And what he found that. The horned lizard wouldn't always squirt blood from its eyes when threatened by an animal. And what i found was with roadrunners with grasshopper mice with Leopard lizards with rattlesnakes with other snakes. They never squirt blood. They don't do it then so when do they do it. Do they squirt blood. He told me it's when the lizard is about to be eaten by something like a coyote. Or a bob cat and the reason is the blood has a distasteful quality to mammalian predators and it has to be. It has to arrive in the mouth. Okay so these lizards are not really trying to like hit. A predator from several feet away by sending streams of blood. Flying out of there is apparently not disappointing. It's more like a coyotes mouth clamps down on the lizard the lizard squirts out foul tasting blood. Way told me that when he goes out and handles horned lizards only a couple times. Out of one hundred. Will it actually squirt blood from its. Is you know he said. Humans aren't typical predator. So he thinks lizard is just kind of confused. It doesn't really know what to do and he told me he's actually tasted the blood no for a long time. I thought it basically tastes like my blood. I wish i was surprised that this took a turn to a scientist tasting blood. But i'm not look. This is science magazine science. So then you know after a while. Though he started thinking actually there is this kind of you know aftertaste. Kind of acid aftertaste that lasted for maybe twenty minutes. Or so he said it was really minor. But if he squirts the blood into the mouth of a coyote or a bobcat they have a really strong reaction disgusting immediately. They begin to celebrate quite a bit. They shake their head to all kinds of things like that to to they. They have different taste. Buds than i do okay. Okay so all of this kind of suggests that for these horned lizards. This is really a strategic specific defense that it's not just a random stress response. I mean you could imagine that if an animal gets like it's blood pressure goes up lead might just shoot out of a leaky capillary. Somehow i guess but this seems to be pretty specific defense move aimed at particular predators right and like i mentioned before. The horned lizards auto hemorrhage has more studied than any other creatures. Okay salikh what beyond reptiles you said. Some insects do this to ladybugs. Yeah actually quite a lot of insects do this. And if you're poking at a lady bug and some liquid comes out it might just seem to you like it was urine or feces or something you know in ladybugs it comes out of the legs underneath so it's hard to see where it's coming out. It's yellow you know so unless you know what it is. You'd have no reason to think. This thing is just bled on me. You know spontaneously was happened. And now i'm looking back and i'm like oh that was blood cool so i talked to michael nop. He studies ladybugs at the czech university of life sciences and he told me that reflex bleeding is a highly effective way for ladybugs to deter predators because their blood is full of substances that smell and probably taste awful two birds or small mammals and he told me that actually if a lady but gets attacked by ants the coagulating blood can act like a kind of glue that glues aunts mouth parts together during the attack. I mean that's pretty amazing now. But here's the thing. I don't understand about this doesn't a lady bug need. It's blood i mean like it seems like critters would be at a disadvantage of some sort if they went around anytime they got threatened. So like how much blood are we talking about. So for ladybugs. He told me it can be a lot like up to fifteen or twenty percent of all. Its blood wild. Why i mean for you that would be like if you lost a liter of blood like a couple pint blood so it is significant. And that's why he's been looking into the consequences of this. I mean you know he said bleeding could save a lady life but there are also some costs and we re better searching for physiological costs in our research he just published one set of experiments he and his colleagues forced young lady bugs to reflex bleed repeatedly like every day and then they studied them and what they saw is that the bugs immune system seemed a little weekend but the number of eggs they produced was the same their reproductive success was almost unaffected. You know maybe just some slight delays in the age at first reproduction but nothing major. So what i'm taking from this. Is that these insects kind of know what they're doing like evolutionary speaking. I mean do they filter the blood in any way to try to preserve the good stuff and week only just like the nasty compounds in it. His is actually looked at this and he told me that the blood that spontaneously comes out of ladybugs is exactly the same as the blood inside. And when i asked him you know exactly like what is going on. You're like is there an opening in the leg. He said no. Like somehow the insect is able to kind of injure itself to somehow create an opening in its skin or cuticle. But it's not like all the mechanical details of reflects bleeding have been well studied. It's still pretty obscure all right now. Well thank you for this mini tour of the world of auto hemorrhage

Sebastian Hofer Island Ecosystem Research Inst Sherbrooke American Museum Of Natural His Sebastian Salikh Michael Nop Czech University Of Life Scien United States Arizona
What is The Healthiest Wine to Drink?

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

04:01 min | Last week

What is The Healthiest Wine to Drink?

"Will. Hey everybody one of the most common questions that i get is what kind of alcoholic drinks will kind of wine. Can i drink. When i'm doing a low carb kito genyk diet and of course as a doctor. I recommend drinking a lot of alcohol. Obviously alcohol can have a lot of health problems however what. I was surprised to find out years ago. Is that wine. Actually if it's done properly if it's cultivated rights and fermented properly can actually be extremely healthy and this is great news. I means that we can drink in moderation and actually improve our health and so the wine that i drink. I'm gonna go over in this podcast. And i'm gonna show you why i drink this wine and so i think we've got to realize is that there are many health benefits actually drinking wine. These are well researched benefits lot of science out there about how it improves. Your triglycerides lipid levels. It reduces your risk of dementia reduces insulin resistance would actually can help improve blood sugar stability and insulin sensitivity which also get stress off of our blood vessels and allows us to have better circulation house. Control blood sugar which reduces our risk of heart disease cancer so a lot of good research. That's out there now. This drinking in moderation is not you know drinking a bottle of wine every day. This might be drinking like one small glass a day or Few times a week. Personally i drink wine probably once maybe at most twice a week Like maybe two glasses a week. Max and i do that we My family we celebrate a sabbath usually friday night which is really when jesus celebrated the sabbath and we'll oftentimes have wine will blessed and and drink it and we drink a certain type of wine that does not impact my blood sugar. That does not have additives and preservatives. And things like that. And i feel great drinking it. There's no hangover. There's i just feel really really good drinking it. And actually i've seen on. My continuous blood glucose monitor that actually helps control and stabilize my blood sugar levels as well. Now there's a couple of great benefits with wine great nutrients i should say one is resveratrol which is a poly phenolic bioflavonoids antioxidant. That's produced certain plants and founded foods drinks in particular. It's found in red wine right. It's called the french paradox. right and france. They drink a lot of red wine and people tend to live longer and one of the reasons is because of this compound resveratrol and that's really what got scientists to study at. They said there's gotta be something going on here and so they looked at the different compounds in red wine and they found reservoir trawl and they found that it has a great impact at improving. Might conjul health house reduce oxidative stress throughout the body to support the immune system our brain scan Keeps inflammation under control imprisoned circulation. So a lot of great benefits to it and that we find wine. We also have anthocyanins so dan in believe it. Spanish means blue right and So basically it's kind of a blue pigment or purplish pigment. And we find it in things like blueberries red onions grapes purple broccoli and cauliflower red cabbage cherries right these things. That have the kind of purplish war. Bluish sort of color to red onions. Other another example of it and so anthocyanins help protect against oxidative stress coming from radiation from the

Kito Genyk Heart Disease Cancer Dementia France Inflammation
Oxford's Vaccine

Kottke Ride Home

05:02 min | Last week

Oxford's Vaccine

"Good vaccine news just keeps on coming on the backs of really promising news. From the pfizer. Biontech and madonna now oxford astrazeneca have announced the preliminary results from their phase three trials which showed overall seventy percent efficacy as reminder madonna and visor biotechs. Vaccines both currently show around ninety. Five percent efficacy but seventy percent is still very solid. That's about where dr fauci had been saying. He'd be very pleased to see. But i overall seventy percent. Because there's a weird quirk of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. That i as someone who is not an immunologist. Don't quite understand but hopefully we'll get more information on it in the coming days. Here's what i can tell you for now. The vaccine like the pfizer biontech one would need to be distributed in two doses however the first dose just needs to be half a dose for some reason. Doing a half dose on the first injection makes the whole vaccine overall more effective than if you got to hold doses quoting stat news. The preliminary results on the astrazeneca vaccine were based on a total one hundred. Thirty one covid nineteen cases in a study involving eleven thousand three hundred sixty three participants. The findings were perplexing to full doses of the vaccine appeared to be only sixty two percent effective at preventing disease while a half dose followed by a full dose was about ninety percent effective. That ladder analysis was conducted on a small subset of the study participants. Only two thousand seven hundred forty one a us based trial being supported by operation. Warp speed is testing the two full dose regimen. That may soon change. Astrazeneca plans to explore adding the half dose full dose regimen to its ongoing clinical trials in discussions with regulatory agencies spokesman told stat in an email and quotes and quoting from the new york times. The oxford scientists said they were still trying to understand why the vaccine was more effective at a smaller first dose. The first is supposed to prime the immune system while the second is supposed to boost its response while it seemed counter intuitive for a smaller i dose to be more effective. They said that strategy. More closely mimic. What happens with a real infection. End quotes peter openshaw professor of experimental medicine at imperial college. London explained to the associated. Press that vaccines. don't work. Like normal drugs where a higher dose produces more effects. The immune system is more complicated. Openshaw also notes that if indeed people do only need half a dose for one of the injections that's great news because it will be even cheaper to produce for more people. This was the vaccine candidate. That i was most excited about early on because it seemed like they kind of had a head start quoting the new york. Times astrazeneca's macos vaccine is designed to genetically altered in a dinner virus found in chimps. So that it harmlessly mimics the corona virus and provoke an immune response vaccine deploying. That technology has never won approval but the approach has been studied before notably in a small two thousand eighteen study of an experimental vaccine against the virus that causes middle east respiratory syndrome or mergers that viruses related to sars cov two the novel corona virus that causes covid nineteen so when covid nineteen emerged the team of scientists at oxford's jenner institute that had been leading the work on similar corona viruses. Had a head start once. The genetic code of sars cov two was published in early january. The oxford team sped to adapt their platform to the new corona virus and begin animal testing and quotes the other win in oxford. Astrazeneca's corner is unlike the pfizer. Biontech vaccine this latest one does not require any special refrigeration just standard storage and transportation temperatures of two eight degrees celsius or thirty six to forty six degrees fahrenheit and it can be stored for up to six months. The moderna vaccine requires cooler temperatures of negative four degrees fahrenheit but then can be stored at normal refrigeration temperatures after thawing in can be stored as such for a month. The pfizer biontech vaccine. Meanwhile requires dry. Ice to store at negative seventy degrees celsius or negative ninety four degrees fahrenheit s- that makes the oxford astrazeneca vaccine much more appealing for areas without the infrastructure or funding to sustain the pfizer. Biotech cold chain. And with that in mind. Astrazeneca is applying for early approval wherever it can as well as an emergency useless stained from the world health organization so that it can be made available in low income countries they plan to produce three billion doses next year and are committed to providing it at cost around the world through july. Twenty twenty one. The vaccine costs around three or four. Us dollars significantly less than the others late stage. Trials are continuing in the us. Japan russia south africa kenya and latin america and further trials are planned for other european and asian countries. So definitely more good news but watch this space for more

Astrazeneca Oxford Pfizer Biontech Dr Fauci Madonna Peter Openshaw Openshaw The New York Respiratory Syndrome Jenner Institute Imperial College The New York Times
Is COVID-19 seasonal after all?

Coronacast

06:48 min | Last week

Is COVID-19 seasonal after all?

"Hello this is corona cost a daily podcast all about the corona virus. I'm health reported teigen tyler. I'm physician and journalist alter norman swan. It's tuesday the twenty four. Th of november cinnamon one of the questions that we've gotten a lot from people about over the course of this pandemic so far is whether it's seasonal and on one hand yes. The melbourne second wave happened in winter. But it's hard to really taes out. What's the difference between seasonality and a new virus in globe of susceptible people but in the states which is going into its wind up and also in in other parts of the northern hemisphere was seeing a really straight upwards curve a really scary looking curve. so what do we know about the season -ality or otherwise of coronavirus were joining the first wave. It was said that there was so much corona virus around swamped the effects of seasonality. Although most people expected this to be a winter virus a seasonal virus but they couldn't guarantee it and you just weren't necessarily seeing the effects of it on this week's health report podcast. I've been talking to chris maureen maher. Who's these of health metrics and evaluation in seattle and they've been doing global modeling now on the covid nineteen pandemic which has turned out to be pretty accurate so for the world for different countries and for the united states and they say that when they look at the big data they do find a seasonal effect and they. It's actually quite strong and the fascinating thing is that they predict that the virus in the united states will start to peak deaths from the coronavirus will peak roundabout inauguration day and tail off towards the end of january into february without any vaccine. You'll see a natural peaking and tailing off. We won't go down to zero but it will start to ebb away so in the joe biden was like trump. he would take four credits on day. Two of his presidency for turning around the pandemic. but it'll be natural. What's the driver for it to pay them. Is it that people interacting with a set number of people and you just kind of run out of context. How does how does that pay. Start to come down again. No it's obviously a little bit of an effect of natural museum that but even by january you still not going to see the majority of americans infected with the covid nineteen virus so a little bit of an effect because what they say. Is that even twenty percent coverage of immunity associated with some social distancing cooed tailing off. Now i think they it's simply how their virus response to temperature and although it's still in the middle of winter and pretty cold there are plenty of viruses that have most of their fates in autumn early winter and seem to die way in midwinter and influences a bit like that where influenza unistrokes tends to hit more in autumn than winter depths of winter. Not that we have much of winter. So yep they think it's seasonal tending often and if you are lucky with the vaccine the vaccine does prevent transmission then have an even more dramatic faked as the year goes through. Yeah i suppose they were some early nickname mention. It starts came out earlier in the saying that the virus survived longer at lower temperatures and in low humidity are. Maybe that's the season thing. But what does it mean for us australia. Coming into next year's winter if a vaccine isn't widely available by that time well if we've kept our international borders secure and we haven't had too many outbreaks and we're still social distancing to some extent when we need to enroll able to control then maybe not very much because the won't very much virus around but if there is a significant say outbreak from hotel quarantine for still doing it at that point. Then you could see a major takeoff and victoria. Tasmania parts of south. Australia would be vulnerable to that. So i'm trying to cross my mind that because we have talked about season on corona's before and i feel like we said that it wasn't safe no so will be wrong or is this just more information. I think you feel the wrong thing. T very different. I remember that people saying that probably was a season paper. You couldn't see it. In all the noise of an strength of the pandemic the pandemic was so strong it was masking a seasonal fake underneath the name what they thought was as the pandemic turned into an epidemic and the virus became endemic in other words. Steady in the community and keeping on recurring. Then you would see the effect of seasonality which might mean then you'd see a surge as the goats colder. I like that vision of memory. Yes yeah but no doubts kirk listeners. Who got a much better than either you. Army will fix us up. That's the lately and speaking of other research related things that we've talked about before and we now have more information about Antibodies on the only thing in our immune system and this nearly such out of monash university that shows that perhaps immunity to the coronavirus is long lasting than we feed. Yes so little bit of physiology. Here there are two elements to attack or threaten sweep elements to attacking a virus delicious. Talk of two of them for the moment. The first wave is really the antibody those chemicals in the bloodstream that attach to the spikes of the corona virus and stop it docking with tissues in our body and hopefully kill the virus as well and they're called neutralizing antibodies. now they'll come out of nowhere. They're produced by white blood cells white blood cells that produce antibodies b cells and some b cells have memory for the antibodies. They need to produce. It was a waste of energy then producing antibodies. All the time to a virus that they're not seeing but if avars enters the body they wake up and they say oh hello. I've seen this one before and they start manufacturing. Antibodies and this study identify found a way through using monoclonal. Antibodies to actually attach themselves to these b cells. Identify them they to twenty five people in march who had corona virus and follow them through to september looking at these b. memory cells and what they showed was that they maintain themselves in other words. You can still find b. Memory cells at the end of eight months so that suggests that the body retain the memory and the ability to produce antibodies to the coronavirus sars cov e to. This is not a peer reviewed study hasn't been published in a major journal yet but it is an interesting finding very sophisticated study and great needs to people who've had coronavirus but also for the quest for vaccine. That's absolutely right

Teigen Tyler Norman Swan Chris Maureen Maher United States Joe Biden Melbourne Seattle Australia Influenza Tasmania Corona Victoria Monash University Kirk Army
FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:19 sec | Last week

FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

"The experimental coronavirus treatment President Trump received has gotten a green light from the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA has granted in emergency use authorization to bridge general on for its antibody drug that helps the immune system Fight Cove in 19. It's a second antibody drug to receive FDA emergency approval.

FDA
FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

"U. S. health officials have agreed to allow emergency use of a second antibody drug to help the immune system fight covert nineteen the food and drug administration has authorized use of Regeneron that's the experimental medicine that president trump was given when he had covered nineteen last month the drug may prevent hospitalization and worsening disease from developing in patients with mild to moderate symptoms the FDA allowed its use in adults and children twelve and over the way at least eighty eight pounds and who are at high risk of severe illness from covert nineteen emergency authorization allows use of the drug to start while studies are continuing to establish safety and effectiveness shortly after Washington

Regeneron President Trump FDA Washington
FDA Authorizes Regeneron's Covid-19 Antibody Cocktail Drug

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:34 sec | Last week

FDA Authorizes Regeneron's Covid-19 Antibody Cocktail Drug

"Coronavirus treatment President Trump received has gotten a green light from the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA has granted in emergency use authorization to Regeneron for its antibody drug that helps the immune system Fight Cove in 19. It's a second antibody drug to receive FDA emergency approval. The number of people who have contracted the Corona virus in the U. S now tops 12 million, and researchers at Johns Hopkins University say death total more than 255,000. Health officials urging Americans not to travel for Thanksgiving and

Food And Drug Administration Regeneron U. Johns Hopkins University
FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:18 sec | Last week

FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

"Coronavirus treatment President Trump received has gotten a green light from the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA has awarded an emergency use authorization to Regeneron for its antibody drug that helps the immune system fight covert 19. It's a second antibody drug to receive FDA emergency approval.

FDA Regeneron
FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:51 sec | Last week

FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

"Food and Drug Administration authorized emergency use of an antibody drug to help the immune system fight covert 19. Antibody cocktail from Regeneron was used by President Trump after he tested positive for the virus. Dr. Celine Gounder is a member of President elect Biden's coronavirus task force. This is an important tool in our toolbox. It's important to understand, so this is being approved for patients with mild to moderate disease. Generally people who are very early in the course of disease. So there's these air, not patients who are on a ventilator. This is not a Hail Mary kind of treatment. The doctor tells CNN. This kind of treatment is not going to work until the country scales up testing so they're positive cases can be picked up. Early. Earlier this month, the FDA gave emergency authorization to a single antibody drug from Eli Lilly. It is also still being studied.

Regeneron Dr. Celine Gounder President Elect Biden Food And Drug Administration CNN Eli Lilly
Why Does It Take So Long To Create A Vaccine?

The Ten News

02:49 min | Last week

Why Does It Take So Long To Create A Vaccine?

"Right now. Scientists across the world to working on creating a vaccine for corona virus. A vaccine is something usually a shot that gives your body immunity to a disease. If you have immunity that means you are protected from a particular disease. Thanks to vaccines. We no longer have to worry about terrible diseases like smallpox. Scientists have been working for months to make cruel virus vaccine. What's taking so long. I want to be able to hang out with my friends. I got used to. I hear you. There are well over one hundred fifty grow virus vaccines that are being tested right now and the hope is that we won't have to wait much longer. There is a really good reason why vaccines take a long time to make in order to understand what's taking so long it helps to understand how vaccines work. The human body is amazing and one thing that makes it so amazing is the immune system the immune system protects you from all types of diseases including viruses like covid nineteen the problem with covid. Nineteen is that it is such a harmful virus. It is often able to overwhelm the immune system especially older people and people who already have certain other diseases. That's where vaccines come in. When you get a vaccine you're actually fooling your immune system into thinking. It's been exposed to something harmful like a virus or bacteria. The name used to describe something harmful that tries to attack. Your immune system is a pathogen. In order to defeat the pathogen. The body makes things called. Antibodies that are designed to destroy the nasty pathogen. But here's the cool part. You haven't really been exposed to the pathogen yet. You just got the vaccine. That will prepare your body if you do get infected tool to sum it all up getting a vaccine trains your body. It's a fight off a pathogen. Like ramona virus by preparing your immune system to fight the pathogen in the future. If you become exposed so getting the coronavirus vaccine would be kind of like giving your body. The corona virus playbook so it knows what to do if you actually get corona virus in the future. It kind of reminds me of that. One time i was playing basketball and my coach told me that there was a player on the other team. That likes to do a crossover dribble to the right. And then drive to the basket for a layup. It was a really nice move but thanks to the heads up for my coach i was able to shut it down to wait a bit for the corona virus vaccine to become available because scientists need to come up with a way to introduce the corona virus pathogen to our immune systems then tested the vaccine in animals. Then test it in a few humans to make sure to safe and to evaluate the perfect dose then tested in the larger number of humans to see how it impacts different people and make sure it's effective and then once it's approved hundreds of millions of doses needs to be made but once it's made you should consult with your doctor about getting the coronavirus vaccine so that if one day you become exposed to the corona virus you can shut it down.

Smallpox Basketball
COVID-19 reinfection 'highly unlikely' for at least six months, Oxford study says

Quick News Daily Podcast

03:09 min | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 reinfection 'highly unlikely' for at least six months, Oxford study says

"New study finds that people may be protected against the virus for months even years but a warning. The study that i'm referencing here hasn't been peer reviewed just yet but it is the longest and most comprehensive done to date. It looks fairly solid to me. But you know i'm not really scientists. The study comes from the la hoya institute of immunology and took place over several months. It recruited one hundred and eighty five people ranging in age from nineteen to eighty one. These people have recovered from covid and most had mild symptoms not requiring hospitalization. Thirty eight of them donated blood samples over the time span of several months. Now before i go forward. Let's remind ourselves how our bodies fight infections. They have some immune cells. The first is a t. cell which kills other infected cells and be sounds that make more antibodies as needed. And of course the antibodies themselves. This study found that. Antibodies were fairly durable. They showed modest declines six to eight months after infection but the amount that was found in each of the volunteers was dramatically different. So it's hard to say about that. The t. cells on the other hand only showed slight decay in the be cells actually increased which researchers can't explain. And that might be if you're looking at this unbiased. Might be a reason for concern so as to keep an eye on that so big picture when people are infected again with the virus your immune system recognizes it and kills it. The good thing about covid is that it's very slow to start doing real damage so your immune system has plenty of time to catch up and produce these cells and antibodies which helps in providing long-term immunity. This potentially means that we will not have to vaccinate against this every single year. Like a flu shot. This could be a one and done scenario. Which would be amazing. Like i mentioned in another story cova dues mutating very slowly compared to the common cold which is actually another corona virus. This low mutation could be helping this theory and it could make vaccines much more. Effective story also brings up. Who had sars are still carrying immune cells and then outbreak was seventeen years ago. Sars had a death rate of ten percent pretty much across the board across all ages. Covert is still under about one percent overall depending on the country of course in the quality of medical care. Another thing from a previous show. If you'll remember a while ago. I mentioned that some south korean guy was the first confirmed reinfection of covid. Which seems like it might go against this story. Well maybe his immune system was just getting ready to kill it again when he tested positive but these researchers say that the amount of virus that people are exposed to also matters so if they didn't get a huge viral load they may not be able to produce the same amount of antibodies and immune cells however with vaccine that variables taken out. Everyone gets enough to produce the antibodies and immune cells that are required so again. This could be a game changer. And really good news especially for a

La Hoya Institute Of Immunolog Infection FLU Cold
History of the COVID vaccine

The Economist: Editor's Picks

07:50 min | 2 weeks ago

History of the COVID vaccine

"The promise of a covid. Nineteen vaccine is immense. But don't underestimate the challenges ahead. Nine long years elapsed between the isolation of the measles virus in nineteen fifty. Four and the licensing of vaccine. The world waited for twenty years between early trials of polio vaccine and the first american license in nineteen fifty five marvel then at how the world's scientists are on course to produce a working vaccine against sars kobe to the virus that causes covid nineteen within a single year. And not just any vaccine. The data from a final stage trial unveil this week by pfizer and biontech to pharma companies suggests that vaccination cuts your chances of suffering symptoms by more than ninety percent. That is almost as good as for measles and better than the flu job with an efficacy of just forty to sixty percent. Suddenly a dark winter there is hope not surprisingly phases news on november ninth rouse the markets bulls investors dumped shares in florax peleton tech firms which have all benefited from the corona virus and instead switched into firms like disney carnival and international consolidated airline's group. Which will do well. When the sun shines again the oecd. A club of mainly rich countries reckons that global growth in twenty twenty. One with an early vaccine will be seven percent. Two percentage points higher than without there is indeed much to celebrate. Pfizer's results suggest that other vaccines were worked to over. Three hundred and twenty are in development. Several in advance trials most liked pfizer's focus on the spike protein with which sars covy to gains entry to cells. If one vaccine has used this strategy to stimulate immunity of us probably cantu pfizer's vaccine is also the first using a promising new technology many vaccines prime the immune system by introducing in fragments of viral protein. This one gets the body to make the viral protein itself by inserting genetic instructions contained. In a form of our anna. Because you can edit aren. Hey the vaccine can be tweaked should the spike protein mutate as it may have. Recently in ming this platform can be used with other viruses and diseases possibly including cancer on original focus so celebrate how far biology has come and how fruit fleet can manipulate biochemical machinery. For the good of humanity. There will be time later to worry about how that power might also be abused and celebrate the potency of sciences at global endeavor drawing on contributions from across the world. A small german firm founded by first generation. Turkish emigrants has successfully. Worked with an american multinational company headed by greek chief executive yet despite the good news too big question out about the characteristics of the vaccine and how fast it can be distributed. These are early results. Based on ninety four symptomatic cases of covid nineteen from among the forty four thousand volunteers. Further answers must wait until the trial has gathered more data. It is therefore not clear whether the vaccine stop severe cases or mild ones or whether it protects the elderly whose immune systems are weaker nor is it known whether inoculated people can still cause potentially fatal infections in those yet to receive jobs and it is too soon to be sure how long the beneficial effects will last clarity will take time in the next few weeks. The trial should be declared safe. Though further monitoring of the vaccine will be needed. The company's predict that immunity will last for at least a year. The ninety percent plus efficacy so high that this vaccine may offer at least some protection to all age groups while the world waits data it will have to grapple with distribution will be in short supply for most of next year. Although our any jobs may prove easier to make it scale than those based on proteins pfizer's requires two doses. The company has said that it will be able to produce up to fifty million doses in two thousand and twenty one point three billion next year. That sounds a lot but america alone has over. Twenty million first responders medical staff care homeworkers an active duty troops perhaps a fifth of the world's seven point eight billion people including two thirds of those over seventy risk. Severe covid nineteen. Nobody has ever tried to vaccinate an entire planet at once as the effort mounts. Ge's medical glass and stuff could run. Short worse visors shots need to be stored at temperatures of minus seventy degrees celsius or even colder far beyond the scope of your local chemist companies building an ultra cold chain but the logistics will still be hard. The vaccine comes in batches of at least nine. Hundred and seventy five doses. So you need to assemble that. Many people their first shot and the same crowd again. Twenty one days later for a booster. Nobody knows how many doses will be wasted so long as there is too little vaccine to go round. Priorities must be set by governments. A lot depends on them getting it right within countries and between them modeling suggests that if fifty rich countries were to administer two billion doses of vaccine that is eighty percent effective they would prevent a third of deaths globally if the vaccine was supplied according to rich and poor countries population. That share would almost double. The details will depend on the vaccine. Poor countries may find ultra cold chains. Too costly the domestic answer to these problems is national committees to allocate vaccine optimally. The global answer is kovacs. An initiative to encourage countries equal access to supplies ultimately though the solution will be continued work on more maxine some might survive in commercial. Refrigerators of those will work. Better on the elderly still others might confer longer protection require a single shot or stop infections as well as symptoms all those that work will help increase apply. Only when there is enough to go around. We'll anti vaccines become an obstacle early. Reports suggest the jap causes fevers and eggs which may also put some people off. The good news is that an efficacy of ninety percent makes vaccination more attractive. The next few months will be hard global recorded. Death rates of surged past their april peak. Governments will struggle with the logistics of axon nation. America is rich and it has world class medicine but it risks falling short because the virus is raging there and because the transition between administrations could lead to needless chaos and delays squandering lives. When a vaccine is at hand would be especially cruel. Science has done. Its bit to see off. the virus. Now comes the test society

Pfizer Biontech Florax Peleton Tech Polio Measles Cantu Pharma Kobe Corona Oecd FLU Disney Anna
"immune system" Discussed on Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

02:29 min | 2 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

"In month to in a variety of products again, different from month wants some are going to be the same. But then when you go to month three, you've got other items that you might not normally use that are going to support you in a variety of ways in supporting the immune system in a just taken it to a whole. `nother level into. In, not only effectiveness, but it's fun. They're beautiful. The packaging in what they've done is just again, it's just a whole other level and I not only are you going to be excited? You're going to be very excited to share this with your your clients and your new customers. I cannot wait to get started on all three months of this immune cemented. So simple it's so simple in what? People. Need is just simplicity and when someone can say, here's what I want to work on and I can say to them. Here's what we're going to do for the next three months. That's incredible. That's powerful. That's empowerment right there. Absolutely in another incredible part of this is how much thought and research and purposefulness went behind choosing each and every one of these products and how they're grouped together. I. Love that. Thank you for pointing that out. It really is true. You'll see that as you dive into the month one to two to three, there is a lot of strategy that went into which products will support your needs at which time I, love that. Great Great Point. Well, Nicole thank you so much for talking with us today for teaching us how to better support Armenian system and showing us some of the really easy steps we can take to make sure we're taking the best care of our mean system. Hey, thanks so much for having me. HERE'S TO A. Happy season coming up and supporting our immune systems. Thanks for joining us and congratulations on living a healthier lifestyle with essential oils. If you liked what you heard today rate review and subscribe wherever you listen. Also, if you want to try any of the products, you learned about go to Doe Tara Dot com or find a wellness advocate near you to place an order today..

Doe Tara Dot Nicole
"immune system" Discussed on Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

07:33 min | 2 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

"Here with us today. Thanks for having me. I'm so excited to be here I. Love This podcast. We love having you on and this is a topic that I think is at the forefront of people's minds, and that is our immune system. So can you give us a little bit of information about why supporting our immune system is so important? I couldn't be more to end thank heavens. Many incredible tools with Tara to help us do that. But. Why it's so important support our immune system is I learn and like many of you that are listening I'm sure you learned a lot it convention and I learned a lot about our immune system. I love how they dove into it and really expanded on it in ensure in simple terms, it's important to support our body's immune system because it's our body's natural defense system. Dr Oskoui four talked about if we didn't have an immune system, you know our bodies, we would only live for a short amount of time because they fight off you know all these dangerous things that are body really needs Armenian system to to protect us against. So I thought that was really interesting and We certainly need an immune system to not only survive but to thrive. You know in our lives. So it's really apparent how important having a high functioning optimal immune system can be to keep us are healthiest are healthy selves. You're absolutely right. It's one of those things we take for granted a little bit until we don't have it anymore. That's right. That's absolutely correct. So what are some things I can do every day? What are some lifestyle changes I can make to help support my immune system I mean if you all have been around. Or just new Tara we love a routine. We love and have learned that you know less is more in our essential oils, and in the products we use it's a long steady strain versus these massive doses and that's what I love about setting up a routine and what can I do? What lifestyle changes can I make to help support my immune system again can be really simple. I keep referring back a doctor Oh doctor ask because he says, you know wash your hands being aware is another great way to support your immune system. Going back to drinking a lot of water, you know it's recommended to drink half are bought half our bodies ideal weight in ounces every day, and you know what will boost your immune system even more is go ahead and add one to two to if you're drinking a large amount of water like myself every day a few drops of citrus essential oils, Mike favorite is. Tangerine. But this just helps our bodies flush those toxins naturally in allows our immune system to function you know at a high level, the function properly, another really great way to boost your immune system is movement exercise. It helps our bodies start to produce those happy hormones in that. Again, we everything is always so interesting how it goes back to to stress our emotions and how. Well, our body is feeling how well it is functioning really has a direct link to how how we're feeling emotionally. So when we're able to move our bodies around and get those happy hormones up, we feel better we feel better immune system can can be supported better sleep sleep sleep sleep our sleep cycle can wreck havoc. I want you to think back to a time Maybe you're cyclical like a lot of us this time of year that time of year you're like, this is a major I wanNA talk to accountants. You know we get the tax season and that's a great time to offer some immune support to them because they're sleeping. Poorly, their diet is wonky because they're working such long hours in this really really affects immune system if you've ever. Pushed really hard for something or had high stress. You'll find your body often after there will be a little bit of a letdown. It's really interesting again, if you'll notice what's your body's trying to tell you? So sleep wash your hands plenty of water diet. It said that anywhere between sixty to eighty percent of our immune system is found in our gut how healthy is your diet? What are we doing to improve our gut helped? Those are all little lifestyle changes that we can make. That really helps support healthy immune system. Absolutely I love all of those. So switching now to our environment that we're in every day, how can I create an environment that helps support my immune system? My brain I went to our new offguard. The environment I'm thinking of Preschool and Elementary School, in the gym and really. Exposed to so many different things throughout the day that we want to control the controllables, right? Right. So I love that we've got our on guard hand sanitizing. Miss that helps US control on the go interactions with threats or like I said, we have our new on guard wipes in my I sense of funny I sent some with my oldest is going to museums for wives or after recess from Salman like I was thinking like, oh, he can use throughout the week or whatever I used on my wife's Today. I'm glad they're going to sell I'm GonNa pack of fifty going through them. But I love that I love that he is able to create an environment that helps you know his system throughout the day. We're so lucky to have. The Fuser's were so lucky to be able and now you guys ANA convention. Hi, I'm promoting all the convention products because they're so good. We've got our own diffuser that we have a battery powered auction to take with US wherever it is were going. And so a drop avangard you know to help, cleanse and purify the air. That's a great way to create an environment. You know that is eliminating toxins in the era of just another easy thing to do hauer how're you're cleaning your household cleaning products? What are we doing with our laundry? However you you know we talk about products with toxins in threats in them even in our personal care, it's amazing. The changes that can happen just by little changes, little changes lead. To Bake changes and so to sum it up is creating an environment is basically just getting Tara products into your life is really going to help and I, think it's incredible like you said, it's those little changes that we can make every day with things that we don't think about like our laundry or our personal care products that are going to stack up and make a big difference. It's amazing once you start, it's a snowball you're like way.

Tara US Dr Oskoui Preschool and Elementary Schoo hauer Mike favorite Salman
"immune system" Discussed on Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

04:58 min | 2 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

"Nicole. . Thank you so much for being here with us today. . Thanks for having me. . I'm so excited to be here I. . Love This podcast. . We love having you on and this is a topic that I think is at the forefront of people's minds, , and that is our immune system. . So can you give us a little bit of information about why supporting our immune system is so important? ? I couldn't be more to end thank heavens. . Many incredible tools with Tara to help us do that. . But. . Why it's so important support our immune system is I learn and like many of you that are listening I'm sure you learned a lot it convention and I learned a lot about our immune system. . I love how they dove into it and really expanded on it in ensure in simple terms, , it's important to support our body's immune system because it's our body's natural defense system. . Dr Oskoui four talked about if we didn't have an immune system, , you know our bodies, , we would only live for a short amount of time because they fight off you know all these dangerous things that are body really needs Armenian system to to protect us against. . So I thought that was really interesting and We certainly need an immune system to not only survive but to thrive. . You know in our lives. . So it's really apparent how important having a high functioning optimal immune system can be to keep us are healthiest are healthy selves. . You're absolutely right. It's . one of those things we take for granted a little bit until we don't have it anymore. . That's right. . That's absolutely correct. . So what are some things I can do every day? ? What are some lifestyle changes I can make to help support my immune system I mean if you all have been around. . Or just new Tara we love a routine. . We love and have learned that you know less is more in our essential oils, and , in the products we use it's a long steady strain versus these massive doses and that's what I love about setting up a routine and what can I do? ? What lifestyle changes can I make to help support my immune system again can be really simple. . I keep referring back a doctor Oh doctor ask because he says, you , know wash your hands being aware is another great way to support your immune system. . Going back to drinking a lot of water, , you know it's recommended to drink half are bought half <unk> our bodies ideal weight in ounces every day, , and you know what will boost your immune system even more is go ahead and add one to two to if you're drinking a large amount of water like myself every day a few drops of citrus essential oils, , Mike favorite is. . Tangerine. . But this just helps our bodies flush those toxins naturally in allows our immune system to function you know at a high level, , the function properly, , another really great way to boost your immune system is movement exercise. . It helps our bodies start to produce those happy hormones in that. . Again, , we everything is always so interesting how it goes back to to stress our emotions and how. . Well, , our body is feeling how well it is functioning really has a direct link to how how we're feeling emotionally. . So when we're able to move our bodies around and get those happy hormones up, , we feel better we feel better immune system can can be supported better sleep sleep sleep sleep our sleep cycle can wreck havoc. . I want you to think back to a time <hes>. . Maybe you're cyclical like a lot of us this time of year that time of year you're like, , this is a major I wanNA talk to accountants. . You know we get the tax season and that's a great time to offer some immune support to them because they're sleeping. . Poorly, , their diet is wonky because they're working such long hours in this really really affects immune system if you've ever. . Pushed really hard for something or had high stress. You'll . find your body often after there will be a little bit of a letdown. . It's really interesting again, , if you'll notice what's your body's trying to tell you? ? So sleep wash your hands plenty of water diet. . It said that anywhere between sixty to eighty percent of our immune system is found in our gut how healthy is your diet? ? What are we doing to improve our gut helped? ? Those are all little lifestyle changes that we can make. . That really helps support healthy immune system. .

Tara US Dr Oskoui Preschool and Elementary Schoo hauer Mike favorite Salman
"immune system" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

03:06 min | 4 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Together. Join you and I have. Yeah, so so we have a lot of knowledge and expertise to share this morning, and because of covid nineteen, we thought a great topic for today's show would be foods and vitamins that will support your immune system. So that's what our discussion today will be all about, and I'm not sure if you've noticed this Joanne, but I feel like in the past few months pretty much. Everybody has become really concerned about their immune function, and what they can do to make it stronger. That's right. Good Morning. CASSIE, good morning to be here with. Always enjoy doing the radio with you and I always sleep really well the night before because I. Know that you're always so prepared, so it's going to be. Yes, it is so since the onset of the corona virus, and especially now with the recent rise in cases, the coronavirus cases, and the US many of our clients want to do everything they can do to strengthen their immune function. And actually I'm very surprised that more people. More people. Many people are listening to this information and asking about this information, but I also feel like. It's not given the credence because. Because of what we're hearing on the news and all of the other places. That immune function is so important and we really can do something about that. Many. People are looking for a magic vitamin or a magic pill, some kind of supplement and a rather surprised when I suggest a diet modification i. At nutritional weight and wellness. We often say you can't out supplement a poor diet. As a Dietitian I believe what you eat is one of the most important factors in having a strong immune system I could not agree with you more and I honestly find it so interesting that so many people are wearing masks everywhere. I've talked to people that are wiping down all of the food containers that they come home home with from the grocery store, I've even seen some people wearing gloves, and yet most of these same people aren't paying any attention to the foods. They're choosing to put in their mouth day in and day out there still eating bread several times a day. They're still having cocktails at their lake cabin every weekend. And you know it's not just us at nutritional weight and wellness saying this if you read the research ports is pointing to the fact that we need a strong immune system, tell protect ourselves from the krona virus, and at nutritional weight and wellness were well aware that we also need a strong immune system tau prevent against cancer and other autoimmune diseases. And I have a couple of statistics, I WANNA share with the listeners. This first one I think you'll find surprising. I know I did when I first came across this. Thirty eight percent of men and women in United States will be diagnosed with some form of cancer in their lifetime. Thirty eight percent so I. Want you to just take a minute and visualize all your friends all your family..

cancer Joanne US United States
"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

04:49 min | 5 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

"People who are either thrown in one of those two categories where they don't know that they have an infection or there have mild infections. Already evidence that they have longer term issues so at least within a couple of months have longer term issues for example within a couple of months. Yeah, so within the months that we've had to look at this. There's already people who show up were posse symptomatic, lowly symptomatic. And when x rays are taking their chance, they have those same. Same evidence of of viral pneumonia, so they're not expressing symptoms the way that you'd expect, but they have viral pneumonia. and. They test positive for Covid nineteen. So the an X ray. Image. It's called a ground glass opacity. It's got a very very specific kind of. Image. So. That has implications for what happens in the years out. We know There's recent reports.

pneumonia Covid
"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

"You could use for this kind of vaccine, so there's a bunch of those that are under consideration. For that kind of vaccine it does if it is successful than I would think. Don't know that I would think that you might still face the same issue of antibody titre drop-offs. He'd be looking at a regular vaccine schedule. That's happening. Every couple of years, maybe it depends on. How am I can't. You really can't say anything until you have like the trial results and you know, but that based on what we know so far I think that that might be the case. Then there's a couple of others where there's a one of the more complicated ones There's a couple that looked like this. And Madonna which has gotten a lot of attention is proposing something similar where you make human cells lake? The are aren a of the virus. And then that necessitates the event. It's being made inside you and union system sees it and says hey, this is a problem and therefore it sparks a response. I think the ideas is that. That would be constituent meeting like it would go on forever and one of the ones I was looking at involved using so. It's very funny that we worded it as an efficient Lynn viral vector, which probably means an HIV virus, if chopped the bad parts out of. And they put this code in or this virus some section of this virus, and then what you do is you make. Continually make this virus protein presumably to the end of your days in your immune system. Keep seeing it. therefore keeps making memory against it. That's the mechanism anyway very complicated. There's a lot of them anyway when someone gets now. My understanding is that there's been cases where people have. Gotten covid nineteen and not produced antibodies. Yeah and a little bit more at a date with that. They should be I I've heard a couple of different things that I haven't been able to chase down and one is that they don't bear. Is maybe less than lustrous antibody response. another that I've heard. Is people getting repeatedly reinfected in short order? That's that's the scariest possibility. So what we have to remember is that when people are looking at these things, they're relying also on tests, sensitivity of tests and timing. And appropriate sampling and so When the first stories came about this they were out of China and the the authors themselves had concluded that this probably had to do with people I've ever sensitivity of the test or people actually having had it and the test not having. revealed it for some reason or another that the wasn't sampled correctly or these people who really positive the whole time. It turns of the antibody response It's harder for me to comment on that because I. Haven't read that much about that, but. I? I would say that every single time you read about this. You have to keep in mind that these are all newly developed. Technology, some of them are well worn. Like the test, itself is a well-worn technology. It's been around for a long time. They just changed small pieces of it. That's also true technically of antibody testing, but it's it's important to keep in mind that there near Canby airs and the way so one of the things. That's really important. I think also the emphasis. Is it the major publishers for.

Madonna Canby China
"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

04:14 min | 5 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

"Late. or how responsible they were going to be for lake, trafficking it from one person to another and I think those early messages Kinda held. It's easy if you're sick of being home to rationalize. Okay, well, it's going to be the biggest thing And and it's my understanding that that there's no evidence that any any single human is less. Susceptible to getting it. It's it's just what happens after you get it where there's the individual right, so it's definitely progressing an in people differently I haven't seen any information suggesting resistance period like meaning that you get exposed, and you cannot catch it I've not seen anything in fact. I I've been digging through. A lot of corona virus literature, an I haven't seen anything on resistance in. It could be on just missing it because there's there's lot but. I haven't seen anything on it so. yeah, it's an issue what happens after the fact and there's. And that's important to how much you get when you're first infected probably determines quite strongly how you progress. So, even if you were going to think about people who are immune Issa, messing meaning that their immune system is aging, and therefore is regulating differently you, there's. Strange things that happened to you after the age of fifty, five or sixty were like. New Don't produce t-cells quite the same way Weird stuff anyway, it's not uncommon for example for people over the age of sixty two, not really develop a fever when they're infected with something that would easily develop feeder in a early to the development fever a twenty year old person. so there's this issue of progression what symptoms show up and then there's just an issue of whether or not someone recognizes her sick as a result right so there's all these things play into it I haven't seen any evidence of resistance. What I have seen from the beginning. Is Misconceptions around treating this virus? If it somehow inherently special compared to every other corona virus, we know about and other corona viruses transit between children all the time if if they didn't then. People with kids in daycare would be leading much easier lives. That's just how it is. Also the other thing, yeah, exactly and this is this brings me to the point that I wanted to make around antibodies a little while going I. think it's really really important. The information that we have right now on SARS, which is the two thousand and three, two, thousand, four, technically two thousand to two thousand and four. Corona virus that. Had led to outbreaks in China and in Toronto. And a couple of other places. I shouldn't say a couple of actually quite a few other places like I. Think it's like twenty six countries, but the point is. Virus, it was called SARS That's the most closely related thing to stars could be to that we that we know of, but that's in humans bat, whole family of viruses, which falls under Beta, Corona viruses, and there's a number of them including Middle East, Respiratory Syndrome and virus and a couple of others. The antibodies that. You raise up against these things, the specific group of viruses at least for SARS and..

fever Middle East Issa Toronto China
"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

05:10 min | 5 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

"People who. Think that maybe. That response is in a is in step with how bad the infection is, and but there's also this broader. A group of people who believe that the response itself is this massive pathological pathological response to these people to think about this in between, but regardless what we know is that the immune system starts to like is. Really engaged and and that this leads to bystander what we call bystanders to shoot damage meaning, so the target might be the pathogen, but the response that the immune system is undertaking to take that pathogen out is big, and so there's lots of damage that happens to non target. Items like basketball and things like that so anyway cloudy is a really important antimicrobial mechanism it clotting extremely important for capturing things that aren't supposed to be in. You're trying stopping from getting into you and in severe infections, we often see lots and lots and lots of clotting, so that symptom is not. Unique to cove it. It's something that scene in lots of different things and one thing about substance that I wanNA be clear bad. Is that the pathogen? It can be caused by any number of pathogens be caused by bacteria. Fungus influenza represents about thirty percent of the identified cases every year. It's also very hard to diagnose. That's another thing People come into the Er really far long bill. They might get a positive diagnosis, but sometimes it gets on home. And that's an IT's fast acting and kills people quickly the respiratory problems associated with. The the ones that require ventilation like our switches, acute respiratory distress syndrome. On nine terrible horrifying pandemic years about fifty percent of the cases of arts that coming to. A hospital annually or caused by substance. It's a lot of this. Stuff is also stuff that we already knew. in terms of WHO's being affected. We'd had thirty years data that show that minorities populations tend to be most affected by substance affects me classic. the classic. person who is likely to acquire and die of sepsis African American men's living in urban centers. And it's been long assumed the because of inadequate.

respiratory distress basketball
"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

02:57 min | 5 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

"What I was talking about was like fraction aided, and I think red blood cells are the things are kept the longest. When I buy! I've had to research by donated blood And I get the leftovers that aren't useful to anybody aftermarket aftermarket. What's the what's the? I get the imperfect right like the exactly like the the bruised. Keeney. Wow like at the grocery store when they have all of the meat going badly. I. Get the recent stuff the stuff that they can't put into somebody. So, at just because it's sitting too long or in some cases I can pay more and get something that might have been, but in most cases just a bargain basement stuff. That's not you know anyway. Add in those cases. It's twenty four hours old by the time I get. Thirty six depending, because there's overnight shipping so thirty six hours maybe. Well, if the, if the whole work area behind, you wasn't convincing enough that scientists don't have it made. You're working with bargain-basement. Yeah, it's true. I. So. I mean how. A couple of things All right I had like five questions. Come up in that whole thing so one. When you were talking about how kind of sneaky modern pathogens are. And and you you study the evolution of the Human Immune System. Do you think that any of the kind of snaky -ness of the pathogens that take off have to do with just? you know humans evolved be these fantastic toolmakers. We've stumbled upon this science stuff, germ, theory, and sterilization, and and we've we've done things to do. Outwit a fair number of of viruses and diseases, and perhaps that's That's changed kind of the the regular evolutionary arms race between between Halston and well. I think. So certainly the discovery antibiotics is changed the evolutionary arms race between us and an awful lot of bacteria right in the bacteria or gaming system that we happened to that they've been evolving for billions of years, and we found it and we're like great. We're GONNA apply. -Biotics now, and that's going to solve a lot of our problems in. We started applying. Applying them before we knew what we didn't know about them. which is that you know, they can be adapted to pretty easily, so I think. The the first mass market antibiotic is.

Keeney Human Immune System Halston
"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

04:07 min | 5 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on Here We Are

"Alive vaccine is what we produce generally as live attenuated, that means that the pathogen is alive, and it's in there, but it's been read to be either less virulent like not in a hurry or like less likely to hurt you or Not Going to hurt you at all Adrian And so an example of that would be polio. Polio vaccine is alive vaccine our, it's traditionally been alive vaccine, and then we have other ones that reproduce vaccines. These are vaccines that have one or some combination of molecules that have come from a half gin. And then. Both of them after that have usually sensors a lot of water. Be, clear, there's a lot of water that's usually involve, and then and they have usually some other. molecule that's in there. They know stimulates an immune response, so it's one thing to send a say poliovirus in the someone. And it's another thing for your immune system to see it. Most of the most dangerous pathogens are really good escape artists. They've come up with all kinds of mechanisms that upon entry into your body they start fooling and tricking the immune system, so one thing that is an important component for a lot of Xi's is a set of molecules that you know for sure the immune system's GonNa see simple come to the location, and all my God. Look through this this other thing here, too That's often something called lipopolysaccharide that comes from the outside of a certain type bacteria. But it can be. There's chemicals that do it, too. So there's there's a number of lake, just little chemical structures that people have made, and then you need to preserve it if it's a batch vaccine, so they'll be. There's a variety of different tiny preservatives that are used. They're all. Pretty safe and then You need to stabilize it, so that's separate and we stabilize vaccines with a broad range of products called excipient. And excipient often things like albumin, so you would be really familiar with. if you eat eggs in the morning, because the way to the is largely albumin where albumin does in in a body, generally that it keeps things in heaps, liquid things in whatever's holding liquid things so in your body right now your blood is loaded with albumin, and its main job is to keep your blood from seeping out of your arteries and veins. Gosh, this stuff. So, albumin is a commonly used excipient in scenes. It's used for stabilizing. It's usually human serum albumin, so it's collected from lead donations often and So that's another story but to keep. To keep most blood drive like organisms afloat so like the Red Cross and on any number of other companies. You have to sell off some of your product. WHO's most of its going to spoil? And the longest that any given serve blood component lasts. That can still be donated to somebody WHO's about forty five days before whatever needs. Bacteria was picked up in the process before it added dies, or whatever bacteria was in their spoils, it so It has to be sold, and its sole albumin is a big part of that is sold in massive bastions like gallons and gallons and gallons and gallons, and then it's purified tested. And near vaccine. Do you re so depending on your area? Is that a I mean? How does it all? 'CAUSE! I I'd be so I didn't realize blood could just go rotten. I like. That H-! How do you know you're getting fresh blood? There's just a the. On how long can last so like the the united the United States government under the Food Drug and Cosmetics Act has very explicit regulations for social issues in organs for how long that they can be health..

Polio vaccine Food Drug and Cosmetics Act polio Adrian United States tricking Red Cross
"immune system" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:32 min | 8 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on 1A

"Moment now. Why in the heck would you shift resources away from your Immune system well very simply. If you're being chased by a lion head cold can wait. So the most acute way people see this in their lives are the most common place is with the virus. Herpes people who get cold sores. It's the most commonplace virus it hangs out in your brain stem and for most of the time a healthy balanced immune system keeps it in check. But if you've ever noticed you out there the grandview and I'll just left alone. I have the same experience if I lose a couple nights asleep or get stressed I will notice a cold sore in my roof of my mouth or on the corner of my lip that is your immune system growing imbalanced and allowing the virus to come out of hiding. So how do you balance your immune system right now right now especially that so? Many of us are stuck indoors for many hours of the day right. Now you are stuck indoors. I stipulate to this. You're frustrated I stipulate to this but hear me on this. There ain't no lion. Don't imagine a lion that is not there you can breathe. I know I know it's stinky. I know it's easier is stinky award can use auth radio search stinky. Take that FCC. I know it's stinky you. You would love to take a pill vitamin C. And be done with it but these habits are not that hard breathing getting a little bit of exercise because when you exercise you release that sympathetic response that adrenal response that can dampen your immune system and get your sleep. There is no lion for many US right now as frustrating as this is we are healthy and safe in our homes. Feel that Mary writes to us. I know I feel better eating fresh veggies and cooking at home we keep up our exercise regimen as well. It cannot hurt. And here's a facebook message for Martin he says I'm going to go out on a limb here but I don't think all the day drinking helps to improve an immune when you say yeah. I say all men brother and I just saw statistic that is something like alcohol consumption up forty percent. Look I get that. That is a that that is an abusive genyk. Sugar filled experience And those are things as I mentioned earlier. That can get can lead to imbalance in your immune system. Hey take a deep breath for fifteen minutes it works. Let's talk about Immunity Matt. There are people out there who are just immune to Cova one thousand nine even though it's a novel Corona Virus. How can human beings be immune to something that our bodies have never seen before? It's such a. It's my favorite question. It's so thrilling. An End to answer that. I just want to briefly. Tell you about someone named Bob Hawke. He's a character in this book. He got HIV the night of Halloween. One thousand nine hundred seventy seven and never got a symptom and not only that remarkably enough. Tony Voucher is the guy who started studying him at building. Ten of the National Institutes of health and there are among us a whole wide range of immune system from those who will succumb to those who are impervious and within. That is some science that is I. Think the most mind boggling of the entire immune system. So I'm going to take a deep breath asked listeners to take one because I'm going to briefly tell you about a guy who won a Nobel prize but before I get too long winded. Are you ready for my quick explanation of how the immune system works? Yes go ahead. Okay all right here we go so look when you are in. Utero when you were are both as you're being born informed your immune cells do something that no other cells in your body. Do they do something magnificent? They rearrange at random. So that your body becomes stocked with a whole set of hundreds of millions of randomly programmed. Immune cells that can recognize all kinds of different life forms as of yet unseen. And this is really i. That's not clear. Let me just pause there. Because I'm going to tie it to Kobe but I want to ask you. Does that make sense what I just said. It does go ahead. Okay so you've got this array within you.'. Here's the thing we you've seen a virus or bacteria before those cells are available to you somewhere in there. There's your immune system says Oh. Yeah we've seen that before. Go get cell number one five six seven two and have it start reproducing itself so we can kill lock this virus or bacteria but when you face a novel novel pathogen. A novel disease all the sudden. You have to go find that one needle in a haystack. Immune cell that was mixed around in Utero and then it's got to get the factories up and running and so we have no experience making the response to this particular disease and that creates the challenge of getting up to speed fast enough. How do we take human immunities and make them into vaccines lots of ways to do this? Complicated conversation there are two main ways to do it. One is to create a what's called an attenuated. That's the term of art a weakened version of the disease that is strong enough to provoke an immune response and teach the immune system. Teach those factories to get up and running without overwhelming us. And I want to just say one thing about this. Eat is very hard. It's very hard to create a strong enough vaccine that provokes and immune response without making us sick. And the second way to do this is to find the way. The genetics of the this is much more modern. What I'm about to describe described the genetics of the virus and figure out its weaknesses and go after them and we're trying both of those right now. We have lots more to talk about with our guest Matt rectal regarding immune systems especially as it pertains to healthcare workers after a quick break. Stay with us. This is one eight.

Utero US facebook Bob Hawke National Institutes of health FCC Nobel prize Cova Tony Voucher Mary Matt Kobe Martin
"immune system" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:15 min | 8 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on 1A

"This is now we've been talking about how our immune systems can fight a virus that they've never actually encountered before with reporter and author Matt Rectal met. What would you say is the state of the American immune system you know? How good are we as a nation at just staying balanced? Well We. Are you know like a lot of things? There's a have and have nots here. And the haves are the people that are exercising and keeping stress low and sleep. Hi although limit. Let me cut that part and a second. The have nots are the people who are eating poorly and are overweight and diabetic and that is rampant and we understand that the diabetes is a pre existing condition that by definition imbalances the immune system and wait imbalances the immune system and so the processed food industrial complex is not helping here. Vitamin C. A lot of listeners are asking us how helpful that is yeah. I'm GonNa say that the the research is conflicting. There does not appear to be a magic pill here. I know when I wrote an elegant fence. My editors would've loved a magic pill book because they sell really well but the just wipe avocado toast on your forehead. You'll be fine but listen. Let me tell you there are four things you can do to balance your immune system and I'm not. I'm not going to go into those unless you want. But they are scientifically proven and they are available to you right now please do. I'm seeing a lot of questions asking along the same lines. Here's the most important thing is stressing sleep and their related and they both go through the same scientific mechanism so do me a favor quick. Can you picture yourself being chased by a lion? How do you feel when you're being chased when I'm being chased? Yup or your ancestors are being chased. How do they feel they're scared? They're they're petrified their adrenaline going up. And here's what's happening in that moment. This is called fighter flight..

Matt Rectal diabetes reporter
"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

08:12 min | 9 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

15:48 min | 9 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"And now push your hands together. These two fists and touch that helps to balance your mind and body. Relax your stomach feeling it. Soften inhale and exhale your nose. Relax your hips and feel yourself connected to where you're seated right now. Feel grounded and support it Relax your knees relax your feet? Beautiful notice any remaining areas of tension and gently relax. Those areas exhale through your nose to count of sex were to account that feels right for you per seven Perry Nice continue your meditation focusing on your breath and feeling your nervous system. Relax you can bring your thoughts to your challenge this week. Reflecting on how you'll reward yourself after this crisis you are so worth slowing down for Hello Hum Who Ooh ooh uh-huh.

"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

06:03 min | 9 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"Focusing on that enemy from within which is fear. Fear is a primordial response. That can be helpful when you are facing a threat of danger and uncertainty as we are now with corona virus but there's also the perception of stress and can result in a cascade of events that are triggered and driven by the sympathetic nervous stem and win. You're sympathetic nervous. System is in charge. It can cause a lot of panic and it can be difficult to think clearly and there is something called the fear psychosis that is when people everywhere are scared to death and it's aggravated or worsened. By what you read from People's summaries in the media and in the news now while it's important to keep informed and safe and to take precautions there can become almost an addiction to or reliance on these outside sources to determine how you should be feeling from one moment to the next. There is a branch of modern medical science called Psycho Neuro Immunology and this deals with how our thoughts and our emotions how we respond to stressful events how this impacts as physically especially within our nervous system studies have shown that our thoughts and our emotions can impact our immune system. So when you are meditating or if you're doing yoga can strengthen your immune system and I'm sharing this information with you from Yoga. Sharia Dr Nanda by Yogi Baba Noni in the role of Yoga in mitigating fear during the Kobe. Nineteen pandemic and he talks. About how when the immune function is weekend every micro gets a chance to attack as all our defenses are wrecked fear especially of the magnitude being experienced and expressed by all of us in this present. Time will totally destroy any chances. We have of fighting this devious enemy. So I want to share with you today a meditation technique. You can do as you meditate to help you calm and relax your nervous system and this is the Brahma Mutiara this mood. Rai is simple Mudra. To-do I'll guide you through how to do it right now. With your hands on your lap and your mom's uplifted tack your thumbs into the palm of your hand doing this with both hands simply folding your thumbs downward into the palm of each hand and then closure fingers from each hand over your thumbs and now touch your hands together so you are making this with your hands with your thumb tucked into your fingers touch those fists together with. Your palm uplifted. You can take a look at how to do this on the slow down guy that you'll find right here in the APP and this is a way to help you. Cultivate what Dr Baga Vanni considers to be psychosomatic harmony mind body balance and it's useful for managing stress and mood swings. So you can hold this Mudra to cultivate relaxation and to give you a sense of peace and balance so as you hold this notre hold it for however long you feel comfortable doing so holding it for ten minutes even can be a great way to experience. The benefits of this new DRA. Mu Dress are ways you position your hands and the way you do so because our hands and fingers have a lot of nerve indies and when you position them particular ways you activate certain corresponding neurons within your brain so you can try the Brahma Mudra as you meditate so go ahead now and settle yourself down with a straight spine gently uplift here is to keep your thoughts uplifted. Relax your.

Yogi Baba Noni Dr Baga Vanni Rai Dr Nanda Kobe notre
"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

02:17 min | 9 months ago

"immune system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"How are you doing? How is your challenge coming along? We are mid week through our series on summoning courage in a crisis as we watch day by day the worldwide pandemic of corona virus unfold across each country and there's a lot of uncertainty and confusion and things seem out of control as the virus spins out of control in some countries. And as you are considering where you are and how you will deal with. Maybe the corona virus is a crisis in your own life. Or maybe you're dealing with another crisis and as you manage your fears. I WANNA share this quote with you. It's by on naming who is known as a French. Cuban American who wrote essays novels and short stories she lived from nineteen o three to nineteen seventy seven and she wrote several books. One quote that I thought was appropriate for you is her quote where she says. Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage and so when you hear news media and people talking and your own research from reading articles and wondering how you should be viewing this crisis in your life or one of the most important things you could be doing right now is to.

"immune system" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"immune system" Discussed on Novel Targets

"The world of immunotherapy is full of chauvinist, uneven tesol cell fascist. What I like to say to people that know nothing about him. You -nology is that we would all be dead without the native Yoon system. This is noble talk. It's bring to life the science around innovative new drugs, gene. And so for Ps I'm Petri offered. Welcome back. We're talking about innovative cancer for peace that can stimulate innate immunity. We'll hear from Tom de Benji who I spoke to when he was chief scientific officer of a door of biotech. We're bombarded on a daily basis by hosta pathogens, and we had a wait for specific immune system to develop that pathogen itself would kill us before we could develop a specific immune response native system is the part that senses and response immediately to viruses, bacteria and other pathogens. I think of it as like the first responders to an accident. We have these nonspecific receptors that recognize. These different patterns on these pathogens and make this nonspecific immune response in contrast, the adaptive immune system in which t cells are a key player is where you end up with a specific response against foreign protein. Antigen this takes longer to develop, but you really can't view a two parts in isolation. The innate response shapes the nature of the adaptive immune response, if we want to increase the number of people who will benefit from cancer. Immunotherapy then we may need to look at the immune system. Holistically? I was inspired to think about the Curro graffiti of immune system from conversation earlier this year with Eric Vivier. He's chief scientific officer of a native farmer was formerly to retro assaulted him eulogy, democracy looney I've been teaching energy since twenty five plus years,.

chief scientific officer