35 Burst results for "Immigration Court"

Number of kids alone at border hits all-time high in March

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

Number of kids alone at border hits all-time high in March

"The number of children alone at the U. S. Mexico border has reached an all time high the U. S. government picked up almost nineteen thousand children traveling alone across the border last month the largest number ever recorded U. S. customs and border protection says the March total was about double the February total and easily surpassed the previous high of just under eleven thousand five hundred in may twenty nineteen the increase coincides with the Biden administration's decision to exempt unaccompanied children from being a media Lee expelled instead the children are released to sponsors in the U. S. while being allowed to pursue their cases for asylum in immigration courts my camp in Washington

U. S. Government U. S. Customs And Border Prote U. Biden Administration Mexico LEE Washington
Over 4,000 migrants, many kids, crowded into Texas facility

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Over 4,000 migrants, many kids, crowded into Texas facility

"For the first time the by did ministration has allowed journalists inside its main border detention facility for migrant kits the tour of the Donna Texas facility capacity two hundred fifty revealed a severely overcrowded ten structure with more than forty one hundred people crammed in Mostar unaccompanied kids housed by the hundreds in pods they get lice and health checks psychological tests and notices to appear for immigration court only those showing covert nineteen symptoms are tested for the virus with the recent migrant surge at the border the administration's been under pressure to be more transparent about the facilities and it allowed a handful of journalists in two from the A. Pete and a video crew from CBS Sager mag ani Washington

Donna Texas Facility Mostar A. Pete CBS Ani Washington
Migrants in “remain in Mexico” program will soon be allowed to enter the United States, federal agency says

On Being

01:02 min | Last month

Migrants in “remain in Mexico” program will soon be allowed to enter the United States, federal agency says

"As a Biden administration faces questions about the influx of migrants at the US Mexico border asylum seekers previously forced to wait in Mexico while their cases will be considered by immigration courts. Will soon be able to enter the U. S. Who two more points in Texas from Texas Public radio Maria Mendez reports a Biden administration is moving to dismantle a Trump administration policy that had blocked access to asylum seekers. In the coming week. The Biden administration will begin re processing asylum seekers at the available and let it reports in Texas. During the Trump administration. Migrants were forced to remain in Mexico while the immigration court considered their cases that left many living in squalid conditions and vulnerable to danger. Sister Rosemary Welch is with mercy ministries, the cartels Really taking advantage of the people, and that's why I'm so glad that people are beginning to come across because really, they should have been able to come across several years old sister well, she says she expects to see up to 500 asylum seekers in

Biden Administration Trump Administration Mexico Maria Mendez Texas Immigration Court Rosemary Welch United States
While Many Asylum-Seekers Start Entering The U.S. Again, Others Are Left Behind

90.3 KAZU Programming

02:07 min | Last month

While Many Asylum-Seekers Start Entering The U.S. Again, Others Are Left Behind

"Long, perilous wait for hundreds of asylum seekers stuck in Mexican towns on the US border may soon be over. The Biden administration has begun allowing some of them into the U. S to make their cases for asylum. Reversing policies put in place by former President Trump. But now, as NPR's John Burnett reports, even more migrants are surging to the border. Sandra Zuniga and her son Elder, are some of the lucky ones. They were among the migrants stuck in a camp in Matamoras, Mexico, amid the rats, snakes, mosquitoes and mud. On Sunday, Zuniga and her son walked across the International Bridge received a notice to appear in US Immigration court and settled into a cozy condo in Brownsville, Texas. It's rented by a volunteer who befriended her. You said the thought Yesterday you had the glory be to God Day I arrived. I spent the whole day crying to end up in such a beautiful place with my own bedroom and bathroom way past a great test on the camp. Some people even doubted the existence of God. We overcame. Zuniga says she fled Honduras with her son to get away from an abusive husband and violent extortionists in her neighborhood. They stayed in the camp for a year, Trump had suspended most asylum applications because of the pandemic. Biden has restarted the process, and Zuniga is among the early beneficiaries of the policy change. She taught kindergarten it a free school inside the camp. She recalled, when her students realized that their ordeal was finally over, won't mean Yo causes billing me you're on. There was a little boy who told me goodbye crying. He always asked me teacher. When can we leave here? He gave me a big hug and said through his tears. Last teacher we are crossing over. There's some 25,000 migrants scattered up and down the border between Matamoros in Tijuana. Many have been waiting well over a year to press their asylum cases in the U. S. Happy experiences like Sandra's have created high expectations and anxiety among the others left behind. US. Immigration agents are admitting some asylum seekers who've been stuck in border towns under a Trump era program known as remain in Mexico, but they're doing so slowly.

Zuniga Biden Administration President Trump John Burnett Sandra Zuniga Matamoras Us Immigration Court International Bridge U. NPR Brownsville Elder Mexico Honduras Texas Donald Trump Biden United States Matamoros Tijuana
Asylum Seekers Are Allowed Into U.S. For Their Day In Immigration Court

Morning Edition

02:29 min | Last month

Asylum Seekers Are Allowed Into U.S. For Their Day In Immigration Court

"Now, the odds for asylum seekers are long. But the courts are so slow that he may live in the United States for years awaiting his court date. So the Biden administration's new policy just changed. Manfredo is life. The story is different for other people behind him, including some people in the camp. He just left. NPR's John Burnett was at that camp this week and is on the line. John what you find Steve Well, the most infamous refugee camp on the US Mexico border is almost empty. A month ago, it was teeming with more than 600 migrants. And today there are only a few dozen people left. Now it's looking like a deserted shanty town. With all these colorful camping tents flapping in the Gulf breeze and no one's inside them. City workers are hauling out great piles of garbage and personal belongings. U. S immigration agents began processing the folks there first, in part because so much international intention was focused on this wretched camp with its snakes, mosquitoes and mud. Ah, so that explains why Manfredo was so quickly able to cross the border. But who are the people who have not been able to cross? Well, they're mostly Central American migrants have already lost their asylum cases. One of them is Donny Lopez Rossa, a 28 year old Honduran. Had been to the can't many times over the past two years, and I'd met with him before, and boy did he have a rough time? The first time I met him, he was lying in his tent recovering from a vicious mugging. His face was a swollen mass of bruises. Gangsters had tried to extort him. Barasa is still there because the U. S immigration judge didn't believe his story that he fled Honduras to escape the thugs there. And the corrupt police in his country. And then now he's lost his appeal so that ASA says the mood there is bittersweet. He says there's sadness because he and others were left behind. But there's happiness because so many have been able to leave and finally get into the US. Why is he remaining in that awful camp, though? Well process says he believes God will still deliver him across the border. If the Biden administration will have mercy on people like him who suffered in that camp for so long, and the camp has been there for nearly two years, and you know, close relationships have been forged in adversity. Some people fell in love, including PAGASA. Come in, come in, he says. I was with my girlfriend for more than a year. She and her daughter crossed the border last Friday. She didn't want to go without me. She cried and cried and cried, but I had to convince her that she had to

Manfredo Biden Administration John Burnett Steve Well Donny Lopez Rossa U. Gulf Breeze Barasa United States NPR Mexico John Honduras ASA Pagasa
Change In Asylum Policy Allows Some Migrants To Wait In U.S.

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:06 min | Last month

Change In Asylum Policy Allows Some Migrants To Wait In U.S.

"Do you have a humane immigration policy that does not encourage illegal immigration. President Biden is grappling with just that question. Biden is already facing criticism over decisions to deport migrants and open a temporary shelter at the border as he seeks to reverse the draconian policies of his predecessor to talk more about the challenges ahead is Doris Meissner. She is a senior fellow and director at the Migration Policy Institute. Hello. Hello. The Washington Post obtained an email from immigration and Customs enforcement, saying we need to prepare for border surges. Now, what do you make of that? I mean, what do you make of reports that there will be a surge of immigrants trying to cross the border now that there's a president Biden and not a president Trump I think there's no surprise that The numbers of people coming are increasing because it is very clear that the Biden administration is committed to reversing the policies of the last administration and to making it be possible for migrants who are claiming asylum and looking for protection to actually have their cases be heard. But of course, the issue then becomes a real difficult one for managing those numbers and putting the changes in place without Getting into an emergency situation. Yeah. I mean, does this administration have sort of the tools to deal with the surge? I mean, there's already concerns about opening Temporary shelters, especially for young migrants and range migrant Children. Well, there does have to be an infrastructure at the border for processing people, and so the opening of shelters Should be seen as a positive sign because you don't want to have AH humanitarian crisis on the border where people have no place to go, which is what we did see two years ago when the Trump administration was trying to keep people out. Are you envisioning Biden going back to the very heavily criticized under trump tactic of what was called catch and release that if you had unauthorized entries, you would process the migrants and then allow them into the community with the hopes that they would show up to a court date. I mean, that was virtually stopped under President Trump has a way of Dissuading people from crossing the border. What the Biden administration is envisioning is having people be able to have their case is heard but heard promptly the difficulty with the way in which this has been handled in the past. Is that the backlogs in the immigration courts are so long that people are waiting in the country for years before their cases get hurt, And that, of course, does lead to misuse of the system. And that does invite Future migration. So what the administration needs to put in place is a system where people are able to file their claims are able to get legal representation. Get a prompt decision. Those who are eligible to stay can stay. Those who are not do need to be returned. And I think that this connects also to the Biden administration's vision of working more aggressively, much more aggressively with the countries in the region because the administration recognizes that some people are eligible for asylum. Some people are not eligible for asylum. And for those people who are not eligible for asylum, the question is returning in a humane fashion connecting people with services in their country. Those services need to be built. There needs to be much more assistance and engagement with the governments in the region to reduce corruption to reduce violence. Very Circumstances that the people are fleeing, which are always a mixture of economic circumstances, more and more possibly climate problems that have ravaged these countries. And and governance. That sounds like a lot of what President Obama did with mixed success, and President Trump actually did work closely with Mexican and Central American governments. He applied. To stick more than the carrot. He forge deals so that they could enforce their own borders and curb migration. Among other measures. There is a sense that what President Trump did actually, if your goal is to reduce migration, unauthorized crossings of the border, it worked. There's no question that what President Trump did work. The issue is at what cost at what price and that's the price that has had to do with our values as a country with our laws as a country, and so the difficulty for the Biden administration is to develop a system at the border so that these decisions can be made promptly. It's the years and years of waiting That are the ultimate breakdown in the system that needs to be solved.

Biden Administration Biden President Biden President Trump Doris Meissner Migration Policy Institute Trump Administration The Washington Post President Obama
Biden Team Unveils New Asylum System To Address Migrant Backlog

Marathon Financial Group “Her Wealth Matters”

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Team Unveils New Asylum System To Address Migrant Backlog

"Announcing plans for tens of thousands of asylum seekers waiting in Mexico for their next immigration court hearings to be allowed in the United States beginning February. 19th. That points in California and Texas that well their cases proceed. White House press secretary Jen Psaki, the Department of Homeland Security will take steps to begin processing individuals who under the previous administration have been forced to remain in Mexico. Under the migrant protection protocol. I will note this news should not be interpreted as an opening for people to migrate irregularly to the United States. Only eligible individuals will be allowed to enter through designated ports of entry

Jen Psaki Mexico Department Of Homeland Securit United States White House Texas California
U.S. to start taking in asylum-seekers Trump required to wait in Mexico

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. to start taking in asylum-seekers Trump required to wait in Mexico

"Biden administration today announcing plans to change a trump administration policy that required asylum seekers stay out of the us as their case proceeds. This particular new policy for instance restores the processing of migrants at the southern border seeking asylum. Essentially doing away. With the trump era remain in mexico policy boxes. Jonathan hunt about twenty five thousand asylum seekers are currently in mexico awaiting immigration court hearings. Starting next friday admissions of asylum seekers will start slowly at three unidentified border

Biden Administration Jonathan Hunt Mexico United States
U.S. to start taking in asylum-seekers Trump required to wait in Mexico

Curtis Sliwa

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. to start taking in asylum-seekers Trump required to wait in Mexico

"The Biden administration today announcing plans to change the Trump Administration policy that had required asylum seekers remain in Mexico as their case. Proceeds about 25,000 asylum seekers are currently in Mexico awaiting immigration court hearings starting next Friday. Admissions of asylum seekers will start slowly at three unidentified border

Biden Administration Trump Administration Mexico
Biden signs orders to undo Trump administration's immigration policies

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Biden signs orders to undo Trump administration's immigration policies

"In other news president. Joe biden signed three immigration executive orders yesterday as mallory fall reports from el paso. The new orders don't include many immediate actions and instead mostly call on officials to review trump era policies. Executive order establishes a task force to reunite the hundreds of families still separated under the trump administration's zero tolerance policy another direct agencies to review and evaluate a range of trump era border actions like remain in mexico program which forces asylum seekers tweet in mexico as their cases play out in us immigration courts. A third order focuses on barriers to legal immigration including a review of the public charge rule. Which makes it harder for people to get green cards if they might use public benefits during the signing ceremony. Biden said quote. I'm not making new law. I'm eliminating bad policy.

Joe Biden Mallory El Paso Mexico United States Biden
Biden Suspends Deportations, Stops 'Remain In Mexico' Policy

All Things Considered

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Suspends Deportations, Stops 'Remain In Mexico' Policy

"Asking the Supreme Court to cancel upcoming oral arguments in case is about the border wall and the so called remain in Mexico policy. NPR's Joel Rose Reports Administration made that request in court papers filed today. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments later this month in the case over funding for the wall on the US Mexico border. And next month in the case about the remain in Mexico policy that forced tens of thousands of asylum seekers to wait in dangerous conditions in Mexico for their day in U. S immigration courts. In both cases, lower courts ruled against the Trump administration in the Supreme Court agreed to hear appeals. The Biden administration has already taken actions that could make both cases mood on its first day, the administration halted construction on the border wall and suspended new enrollments in the remain in Mexico program. Joel Rose. NPR

Mexico Joel Rose Reports Administrati Supreme Court NPR Trump Administration Biden Administration U. United States Joel Rose
Immigration Unit Added To Cook County Public Defender's Office, Chicago

Chicago Tonight

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Immigration Unit Added To Cook County Public Defender's Office, Chicago

"Immigrant rights advocates are celebrating the creation of an immigration unit in the cook county public. Defender's office this as public defender. Amy campanella is among counterparts across the country calling on the biden administration to adopt a ten point plan for immigration reform. One of the most crucial things is the right to counsel. It is really horrific when you think about this day and age that you can be detained. Your liberty can be taken. You can then be removed from the country. All without the right to counsel you. Don't you may not speak the language. You're on a video screen in immigration court. There's a prosecutor there. There's a judge there nobody to represent you a twenty ten supreme court ruling padilla versus kentucky ruled. The public defenders must give adequate advised to non-citizen defendants regarding the risk of deportation late. Last year. cook county voted to fund an immigration unit in the public defenders office.

Amy Campanella Biden Administration Cook County Padilla Supreme Court Kentucky Public Defenders Office
New York judge orders restoration of DACA, opens program to new applicants

WGN Programming

05:36 min | 4 months ago

New York judge orders restoration of DACA, opens program to new applicants

"For those fighting against President Trump's pushed in the deferred action for childhood arrivals or DACA program, A federal judge ruled the Trump Administration must start accepting new applications after years of trying to scrap that program. Currently about 650,000 people are enrolled in Dhaka, which allows certain young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as Children. Illegally live and work without fear of deportation. The Department of Homeland Security responded to the decision, saying, quote the Department of Homeland Security. Holy disagrees with this decision by yet another activist judge acting from his own policy preferences. Judges. Latest decision similar to his earlier inaccurate ruling is clearly not sound law or logic. We will abide by this decision while we work with DOJ on next steps to appeal. Meanwhile, a spokesperson for President elect bite his transition team said quote For the second time, a court has ordered the administration to resume processing DR applications. It's time to do the right thing on day one. President elect Biden will insure dreamers and their families have the opportunity to live their lives free of fear and continue to contribute to our country. Doctor program was started in 2012 when President elect Biden was vice president. So what does this mean for the future of those dreamers, the DACA program and the ongoing legal efforts to eliminate it. Joining us tonight to discuss those issues is c'mon necessary. Immigration and criminal attorney as well as an ice and customs specialist. Mr Necessary. Thank you so much for joining us tonight. Thank you for having me So first Friday's ruling does open the program to new DACA applicants for the first time since 2017 approximately how many people could now benefit from this Close to half a million is the projected number. I think the last tally was about almost 400,000 and is probably even more than that of people who haven't come forward at this is this is a great victory for people who are advocates of Dhaka. Alright and explain to us really, What is Dhaka and what does it do? And gives the opportunity to people who are brought here as Children, and they're undocumented. Here in the United States. They have a clean record. They passed the background checks there, either in school or they have completed school and they're of the sound age to now, go and join the work force or go to college, and this allows them to continue their education or to start a business or go to work. Legally here in the United States, and it provides checks on these people every two years to make sure they're complying with the terms of the with DACA. Okay, and you said close to half a million people could be impacted, maybe more, because maybe people that just had, you know, have not yet come forward would have all of these potential DACA applicants been doing since that program was suspended. Three years ago. And here lies up. Almost. You have some people who've had Dhaka and they've been renewing it. But for those people who haven't been able to get the benefits of doctor they've been unfortunately having to work under the table. Some of them have worked jobs. A lot of them have been unemployed. And there are some that haven't even been able to finish their education if they wanted to apply for financial aid, go to college because they can't get a social security number to go forward with the rest of their lives and You were brought here is 345 years old and they were never gave. You haven't been able to move forward. So one of them have been just hiding in the shadows and waiting to see what happens. And let's look at this from the other side, though. So for people who say you know what these families needed to come here and do it the legal way. What is your response to that? The kids didn't choose to come here illegally. You know, the parents brought them here. The Children are here. They're people that are Dr recipients that are probably in your community that in your friends, your circle of friends, your circle of business. And you have no idea where Dr recipients. There are people who have been here since two years old. You've got to high school with your Children have been high school with you even and you won't even know that they're doctor recipient. So you can't look at someone and tell whether or not they're undocumented out. This is an opportunity for people to be here. Their work, go to school and contribute to the economy contribute to society. And I don't see anything wrong with that. If people are gonna be here and they want to contribute and do better and make themselves better Why we? Why can't we tell them know? Who are we to tell him now? All right, And we did here. I I read that statement from the Department of Homeland Security. We know, spokesman Chase. Jennings criticized the judge's ruling. We know some states are asking that the program be declared unlawful They wanted terminated, so it's very possible that this is not the end of the story with doctor right? It is very possible but for me personally, I think unlikely. I mean, look, I've spoken to a lot of Department of Homeland Security attorneys officers with U. S. C. S attorneys that work in immigration court. Most everybody wants doctor here because it's it's amazing solution. That's not necessarily permanent sun a pathway to citizenship, but it closes out a lot of cases and loose ends for a lot of people. The people who don't want doctor here are just people who are anti immigration policy to begin with. Having Dhaka is such a positive has such a positive effect on society and for people that are here, undocumented that for the majority of people wanted here. All right, Mr some monastery, Immigration and criminal Attorney. Thank you so much for joining us and sharing your knowledge with us tonight. Thank you

Daca Dhaka Department Of Homeland Securit Trump Administration Biden Donald Trump DOJ United States U. S. C. S Jennings Chase
Millions of Americans Voting Early in What Could be Record Election Turnout

Brian Mudd

01:38 min | 6 months ago

Millions of Americans Voting Early in What Could be Record Election Turnout

"S elections projects is over 27 million of cast early voting ballots. That's about 20% already of the total vote count of the 2016 election. Another 55 fatalities reported yesterday to the States Coronavirus death toll awaiting the new report from the Health Department today yesterday more than 2500 new cases were reported. And for the first time in over six months, the Miami immigration Courthouse is open. It's back to business, but it's not business as usual. Is Uncle Sam resumes in person Deportation proceedings Today, masks are required. But Miami immigration attorney Tammy Fox is a cough says they've been given no information about other courthouse safety protocols. And she says other immigration courts that have tried to reopen have not been successful. These immigration courts that have reopened, have re opened for a day and then closed the next day, then reopened for a day, then closed for two days. There's no notice on their operation. There's a major backlog of cases due to the shutdown, leaving hundreds of thousands of immigrants in limbo, waiting their day in court. When did Grossman NewsRadio 6 10? Coyote showers, thunderstorms? It's all increasing with a large low pressure system located about 700 miles southeast of Bermuda. It is expected to develop into a hurricane. Leader this week. Tropical depression number 27, which will be named Absalon when it does take a look right now on Wall Street, negative trading across the board. Dowd just dropped 4.5 points in 28,602 NASDAQ off 6.5 points. Yes, and peace down by two more news at 11 30 more Brian Mud on the way I'm Natalie Rodriguez News radio. 6 10 w y o D fly from South Florida

Miami Immigration Courthouse Tammy Fox Absalon Cough Miami Natalie Rodriguez Dowd Brian Mud Grossman Health Department Bermuda South Florida Attorney
Miami Immigration Court To Reopen Its Doors Monday As COVID Cases Soar In Florida

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

Miami Immigration Court To Reopen Its Doors Monday As COVID Cases Soar In Florida

"Months at the Miami immigration Courthouse, the government's resuming in person deportation proceedings Today, masks are required. But Miami immigration attorney Tammy Fox is a cough says They've been given no information about other safety protocols. At one point, we were told that there's going to be like teams of judges where certain judges they're going to hear cases one week and another group another week, But they haven't told us how that's gonna work, so we don't know how to even move forward, and there is a major backlog of cases due to the shutdown, leaving hundreds of thousands of immigrants in the limbo. Awaiting a day in court. Florida, meanwhile, adding another 55 fatalities to the states Corona virus Death toll The Health Department reporting more than 2500 new cases just yesterday. It's down. 503 looks like

Miami Immigration Courthouse Tammy Fox Miami Attorney Health Department Florida
Behind The Scenes With Documented

Latino USA

08:55 min | 1 year ago

Behind The Scenes With Documented

"Magazine. Welcome to let USA thank you. It's nice to be here. Thanks for having us all right. So tell me how you get started with this idea to basically observe every single minute of the immigration court system so people would say that they would never let you in but you guys actually did it. So what was your aim? And why did you do it Max so we had been covering immigration courts since we started publishing which was in the summer of twenty eighteen and we had watched since Jeff sessions was attorney general back then and we had watched him issue policy decision after policy decision that had serious detrimental impact to the people who are passing through the Court System? And we knew this through data and we knew it anecdotally generally harder to ask for asylum and just being the court system. So what we didn't know is what it looked like and immigration court is very different from federal or state courts. You know. It's very closed off their court records accessible to the public. Even court hearings are hard to get into. So there's no real way of sort of opening up the hood and looking inside so we knew what happened and a statistical level but what we didn't know is what it looked looked like and what it felt like and what it was just like to be a person passing through and when you can take us back to that first week and that first day was there something that surprised you that first day. Muslim while the funny actually the first day the immigration calls were closed because of a snowstorm so they we showed up and there were dozens of people waiting outside with no idea why the costs have been closed. What is meant for their hearings People some people you know travel from Long Island and all over the state to come to these hearings to be there eight. Am You know sometimes waking up at four in the morning only so arrive and find out that the the hearing that they've been waiting for for years it's been rescheduled so that was a very good indication of the kind of chaos that The the reports were about. We're going to see over the coming weeks. So this is a pretty massive process right and there are in fact hearings hundreds of hearings a day. So what were the specific things that your reporters were looking for tracking tracking so we would tracking a number of different things For each hearing the court reporters collected the basic information. Yeah the name date of birth. The judge's name Damn Immigration Chinese name the Ice Attorney's name but then they are other factors like did they even have in. Its know we witness a number of immigrants who on represented in the hearings. And we know that that can have huge ramifications for their cases for detained hearings. We also wanted a monitor what it was like for Immigrants who are being video teleconference then one of the things that the trump administration's us a lot more than previous administrations is video teleconferencing of immigrants. Who are in jail and that technology causes a number of issues And there's been a law of malfunctions often leads immigrants spending longer in detention and then we mark the number of the major decisions attorney. General Jeff sessions made during that time making it so the People who are victims of gang violence and domestic violence could no longer use as grounds for asylum. You know changing the ways in which judges could manage their courtrooms preventing them from delaying hearings or terminating hearings or closing hearings. They thought were going on necessarily so we try to track all of those different things and see how they were coming together. Talk to us about how you figured out the issue of access and I'm wondering were there challenges from court officials. When they saw that you were in their courtroom Max. Yes so if the person whose case it is says you're allowed to be in there then it's okay but from the beginning they face just an immense amount of pushback from everyone from immigration judges to ice attorneys. People would do things like the ice attorneys would say to the immigrants. Are you really sure you want all the details of your case broadcast on the Internet and just sort of hammer at that point over and over and over until the person was just like no actually? I don't want you in here. Sometimes some of our reporters would get singled out by ice attorneys by specific ones. You know there was one who would follow our reporters out into the hallway and sort of like a cost them outside of the courtroom but all of our reporters were extremely tough and they just kept going back so all of this work. All of this reporting all of these collection of data and stories It's a lot to sum up. But what would you say are some of the main takeaways that you had when you entered the project? Yeah I just say the New York court historically was was a lot friendlier the immigration call system as a whole. Maybe not but the New York going particular. The judges the work that the system in place. You Know New York because one of the only cities in the country that has a public defender system for immigrants. This is unprecedented. Pretty much all around the country But that system and so many other systems that are in place neil to make them more equitable and and More similar guests the kind of due process rights that you might get an a criminal call which just piece by piece dismantled over the course of three years And it was pretty stunning to see that play out. And and the impact of that hat on on a number of immigrants cases in lives. And this didn't just happen overnight. You know it was a very concerted effort on the behalf of the Department of Justice to make all of these little incremental changes in policy and legal decisions that have amounted to this and now with cove nineteen and this pandemic and New York being the epicenter. The immigration system and the asylum system in many ways has just grown to a complete and total halt. The Department of Justice has halted all hearings for non detained immigrants. They continue to have hearings for those who are currently detained. So can you tell us what about those hearings and our courts able to make this happen with concerns about Cova nineteen spreading? Yeah it's It's a really fascinating time What's happening right now in the immigration calls because this unprecedented alliance is formed between three groups. That rally together on anything so immigration judges immigration lawyers and prosecutors. Who WORKED FOR ICE? Have all come together in this unified front to call on the Justice Department which oversees the immigration courts to shut them down during the pandemic And they've all come together because quite frankly they're scared for their lives. I don't think there's ever been a moment where they worked closely despite this the DOJ insisted on keeping immigration court hearings as you said going for immigrants who are in detention. You know that even includes children who are in shelters as while they also have to pay for their gracious hearings you know. I spoke to in a tiny. He said that she represents children. She went into twenty-six Federal Plaza during the pandemic With a group of children who had the hearing that day and the cost office literally spraying clorox into the air and some sort of way to try and disinfects the environment you know there is not really adequate protections or safety is put in place for the staff that have worked there and a number of course. Staffers have contracted covered nineteen. You know they've been caught closures because courts office have tested positive for the virus the DOJ has now taken up the policy of tweeting out eleven pm the night before to let people know that the court will be closed because somebody has tested positive and then reopening at a few days later with very little

Justice Department Attorney Jeff New York Department Of Justice USA Ice Attorney Long Island Federal Plaza Clorox Cova Neil
As Jails And Prisons Reduce Populations, Advocates Call On ICE To Do The Same

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:38 min | 1 year ago

As Jails And Prisons Reduce Populations, Advocates Call On ICE To Do The Same

"There is a growing fear that a corona virus outbreak will tear through the federal government's crowded detention center for immigrants immigrant rights advocates are suing and detainees are on hunger strikes restrain immigration and customs enforcement or ice released detainees before it can French humanitarian catastrophe NPR's John Burnett has our story at present ice detained some thirty eight thousand immigrants in a network of private for profit facilities scattered around the country they're held in close quarters in jail like conditions while they await their fate in immigration court detainees are getting alarmed in the past week guards have pepper sprayed groups of detainees at two detention centers who refused to follow orders in a protest of their crowded surroundings I look at the book bundle three M. two meals on the plan worked out of Japan there's a lot of fear because we're not separated just to go to meals we have to line up in front of three separate doors all jam together we can't maintain six feet between this Tony Augustine is a Mexican national who is locked up at the rich would correctional center outside of Monroe Louisiana he was rounded up in an ice raid on a Mississippi chicken plant last August because he's in the country illegally like the majority of immigrants in federal custody Augustine has no criminal convictions a number for them if you want to finance in the list we have two televisions one is to the C. N. N. so we know more and more people are dying from this virus that's why were framed the guards tell us it's all lies you can't believe the T. V. but we know it's the truth a spokesman for lasalle corrections which runs rich wood says it has implemented a pandemic contingency plan which includes intense cleaning and disinfecting the living areas and monitoring detainees for illness but some federal judges have ordered ice to release a handful of sick inmates in Pennsylvania a judge said it would be quote unconscionable and possibly barbaric to keep them jammed in with other detainees a growing list of advocates from Amnesty International to the congressional Hispanic caucus are sending letters to parties complaining that more immigrants should be released on bond representative Joaquin Castro is chairman of the Hispanic caucus we Richard Gerson home on cruise ships now on a navy ship and it's no different with people were confined in a closed space in our detention centers where the corona virus can spread very quickly vice reporting at least eight detainees have tested positive for covert nineteen inside lock ups in New Jersey Pennsylvania Louisiana and Arizona the agency says the health and safety of immigrant detainees it's a top priority and to that end visitation has been suspended at all jails to prevent contagion but what about the guards ice reports at least six confirmed cases among employees at five different detention facilities Dr Chris barber is professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health in a call with reporters yesterday he said during an epidemic guards can easily introduce the disease into the facility as they have that right Chris island in New York most of these facilities have three eight hour shifts every twenty four hours people are in and out of all the time going back to their communities families human rights advocates point to other U. S. jails and prisons that are trying to reduce their populations to stop the spread of infections California has granted early release to thirty five hundred inmates in county jails in Ohio Iowa and New Jersey have done the same so far ice shows no sign of following the trend John Burnett NPR

Federal Courts Begin to Adapt to COVID-19

Bloomberg Law

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Federal Courts Begin to Adapt to COVID-19

"And are any of the courts closed completely the only court that I know of that are closed completely our immigration courts there are certain immigration courts that are completely shut down in response to the virus that immigration court arch article three courts article three constitution that's where a lot of the through the district courts are that's where that federal appeals courts are they are the D. O. J. so they're under the purview of an office there several of them now a handful of them in larger cities have been closed due to that in a public health risk that they pose that putting a lot of people in the same room together a lot of people waiting room an inherently international population of people so those are the only ones I know of that are close out right other chords are nearly closed to the public and you know that really restricted access to the courts for people who are arguing their but I don't know of any court that has completely closed its doors and stops doing

O. J.
"immigration court" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"immigration court" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"Now there are another ninety two Americans right now on board another cruise ship that docked in Cambodia and we know that a woman who left that ship has since tested positive for the virus. That concern is did she infect any other passengers before she went. Jake Nick Wa. Thank you so much. Appreciated how confidential conversations between the therapist and the patient are now being used by the trump administration to keep undocumented kids behind bars. That story next. The wait is over coming to L. N. All new episodes of forensic files follow the evidence and crack the case forensic files to Sundays at ten only on H. L. N. Once upon a time this was the news. The Earth is flat devil Israel and that is everything that we record semi Dirk ages of Miracle Workers Anthology Suzy's and thirty nine thirty central on. Tbs International League. He ran for his life and he's been in. Us detention ever since his imprisonment extended because after he spoke confidentially or so he thought with a therapist notes from the sessions were passed onto immigration officials and used against him in a new report by The Washington. Post seventeen year old Kevin you say fled and was seeking asylum after. Ms Thirteen Gang members in Honduras ordered him to kill a stranger now while in US detention spoke openly with a mental health expert about trauma. And now that's even adding further to his trauma. Hannah Dryer of the Washington Post broke the story. She's with us now. Thanks so much for being here. We appreciate it so you write that this kind of information sharing is is legal technically but considered by experts to be unethical and it is the trump administration that changed these rules so these confidential notes can be used against the the patients in court. That's right so children who come to this country have always been required to see therapists at least once a week and that was for their own good because these kids are coming up with severe trauma and what's changed under the trump administration. Is that now whenever a kid talks about gang involvement drug dealing any sort of criminal activity in those therapy sessions? Which they've told are confidential. The therapist has to report that within four hours. Even if even if they're forced into gang activity or drug or any kind of gang activity without exception. So let's talk about Kevin and what he told the therapist and what the report said in court. He told the therapist about being abandoned by his parents and raised by his alcohol. Grandmother explained that after his grandmother died the gang. Ms Thirteen took over there shack with nowhere else to go to stayed even as gang members tortured rivals on his patio. The gang eventually put him to work selling drugs and then the report that was used in Immigration Court says youth reports history physical abuse neglecting gang affiliation and country of origin unaccompanied child self disclosed selling drugs unaccompanied child reports being part of witnessing torturing and killing including dismemberment of body parts so they're taking his trauma and using it against him. I mean. They're taking things that he told a therapist and confidence after she said this is confidential and yeah using it in open court and one thing that's important to know is that thousands of kids are forcibly recruited into gangs in Central America. That's a major reason that those kids come up and ask for asylum in Kevin's case. One part of the Federal Government has actually certified him as a victim of severe human trafficking. So he's a victim of trafficking for part of the government and the government says this is the Department of Health and Human Services says he's a victim of human trafficking. What's the other department? And then I says that doesn't matter. He sold drugs for this gang. Zane dress and he needs to be deported. You sold drugs in Honduras. Exact which they only know because he told the therapist that he did that. That's right that's right. And he found out that I knew that he had sold drugs in Honduras his first court date when he showed up and ice filed the notes that a therapist had written with the judge. And that's the only evidence against him what he confessed to in private therapy trying evidence against him and I mean I certainly must understand that. A lot of the kids who come here are forced to do these things. The criminal activity that they're part of they were forced to do or else they'd be killed. Well so ice says if the shelter is where migrant children are held are handing over these notes. They have to use them in. Open Court if a kid discloses that he sold drugs even if he was forced to sell drugs from Isis perspective. If they have those notes they have to use them so this is the one demanding the notes. Well it's the shelter is who have decided the office of refugee resettlement overseas. These shelters the has agreed to start sharing these notes with ice so it used to be that a kid would say something in therapy that might be shared within this child welfare agency that oversees shelters but now if it consulting and therapy it's passed over to ice some shelter therapists are now keeping two sets of clinical notes. You reporter or leaving things out. What happened to the therapist that Kevin spoke with the therapist? Kevin spoke with said that she had no idea that her report might be passed all the way to ice and used in court and she actually resigned after the story. She quit horrible story. Thank you so much. I mean. It's very well written story. But it's just a heartbreaking that this is happening thank you so much really appreciate it. It's a big week on. Cnn tonight is part. One of our live Nevada townhall CNN. Talking to Democratic presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders Vermont. Pete who to judge Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota Thursday night. We're going to talk to former vice president. Joe Biden Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts at all starts at eight. Pm Eastern both nights. You can follow me on facebook. Instagram twitter at Jake Tapper show at the lead. Cnn Our coverage on CNN continues right. Now thank you so much for watching. We'll see tomorrow..

Kevin Cnn Honduras Open Court Immigration Court Department of Health and Human Jake Nick Wa Cambodia Jake Tapper Washington Washington Post H. L. N. Federal Government Ms Thirteen Senator Bernie Sanders Vermont facebook US Tbs International League Senator Elizabeth Warren
"immigration court" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Eighty congestion from happy and all the way down to the maze. And then we are backed up to the maze. Metering. Lights are on at the westbound bay bridge. The case of all morning show continues now with Brian Sussman on talk radio five sixty case of oh gosh. With all the stuff we've been talking about this morning never talked about this. This was from over the weekend. Donald Trump was on Sunday morning futures. It's one of the money shows, and he's talking about over on FOX. And he's talking about the border and the immigrants pouring into our country at unprecedented rates, and by the way, it's interesting because now the mainstream media the elite media the established media's finally finally admitting that there's a problem at our border. New York Times read a story, entitled, quote, the US immigration system may have reached a breaking point. So right now. Immigration courts. Right. This minute immigration courts are handling nearly nine hundred thousand cases, let's just rounded up to a million. They're handling a million cases. And each one of these cases takes an average of seven hundred days to process, it's the better part of two years. So I'm reading some of the things that Trump was talking about he says it's like Disneyland down at the border. I think it's because there are just so many families. But we had this ninth circuit court ruling requiring that asylum. Applicants are allowed to go before federal judge. So you've got that. Then you've got something called the nineteen Ninety-three Flora's consent decree nineteen Ninety-three which legally prohibits detaining migrant children for more than twenty days. So what happens is these families have children? You can't hold them for twenty days. Then you've got to release them. Donald Trump said it's a system congress can fix and they don't get off their ass. Well, that's the real troubling thing here. Shame on the Republicans. Paul Ryan, Mitch McConnell. You guys had the house and the Senate for two years, plus a president who has all four border security got elected on that issue. And you did nothing. You did nothing. So Trump was talking about the fact that families are coming up to our border because they know they're not going to be separated from their children. But then it gets it gets disturbing really really fast because the border patrol, you know, they're holding facilities are past capacity. They don't have the staff resources to detain migrants. But they're talking about kids being rented. This is amazing. There was one case filed in federal court in El Paso, just this past month just this month where authorities accused Guatemalan man of having a fake birth certificate printed claiming he was the father of a teenager who crossed the border illegally with him. Authorities say the teen agreed to go with this man because he wanted to leave what Amal they were not related. And the problem is they couldn't confirm this kid's age. They know nothing about him. So there's actually a smuggling industry. They contend whereby kids are used and brought up through Mexico with these families to the border the families get across the border. The kids are then taken brought back to Central America and used for another family. Oh my God. That's awful. Now, the left will wanna make what we'll want to pretend. Now, the this can't be confirmed. This isn't happening. But I'm just telling you something the US department of homeland security is warning of what they're calling literally child re cycling. Kids are being rented that is absolutely sickening discussion. So. Sorry. We didn't have a chance to win pack that throughout the rest of the throughout the program who we've been at it for four hours. But I thought we get to that right now here on case before the for the rest of the guys get a shot at it. As the day continues on KFI. Hi, I'm Queen.

Donald Trump US Brian Sussman bay bridge New York Times El Paso congress Flora Mexico Senate Mitch McConnell Amal Central America Paul Ryan president twenty days two years
"immigration court" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The immigration court bat. Log grew by at least ten percent during the partial government shutdown as a funding dispute centred on border security left the nation's overloaded immigration system, digging out of an even deeper hole then before the five week standoff. The court backlog was hurt as court stopped. Hearing most cases and Justice department lawyers were furloughed more from Wall Street Journal reporter Louise Radnofsky who covers immigration policy. Louise, give us some numbers for the shutdown took a pretty heavy hit on several different components of the immigration system. The most prominent of which 'immigration courts, they had a backlog of more than eight hundred thousand cases, even before the shutdown began and the shutdown by at least one estimate resulted in twenty thousand cases per week, not being heard which likely added at least eighty thousand probably more like a hundred thousand to that backlog. Not even accounting for any new cases that came in during that time boy. So if you're waiting to appear in court in this backed up system, where are you are you in a are you still on the other side of the border? Are you wandering around the US because you have an appointment are you in one of these in the United States waiting for waiting for your day in court, and that is a matter of concern to people on both sides of the issue. There are people who say that that is not a particularly efficient way of getting up out of the country people who shouldn't be here and don't have a claim to be here. And there are people on the other side who would say that it's not really particularly just either to leave somebody waiting for years to resolve their fate effectively. And that they don't have the best shot at presenting their case in court either after years because cases, go stale and witnesses guy and various things can happen over a period of time that just isn't isn't helpful for anybody. So this is one of several rare. Agreement. People don't see the backlog is a problem where does e-verify fit into this e-verify is favored by some immigration hardliners people who who favor reduction both legal and illegal immigration as as more effective than a wall. Or physical barriers the border. They see that as preventing people from working in the United States. They have authorization, and that is the most effective measure of restricting illegal immigration in particular. So they're very very fun to be verified, which is a voluntary system used by employers was shut down during the shutdown and then. But that's not mandatory, right? It's not mandatory. But it is very prolific. For one of the better word. Stay prolific. Forty million cases were handled by system sickly. Yeah. That's a average about seven hundred fifty thousand cases a week. And shutdown went on for five weeks. So that the cases that might be resolved in time. But they certainly weren't result for the five weeks to shut down and people can really favor e-verify, you don't necessarily have a lot of faith Milwall is the best tactic for their particular causes would see this as possibly a trade off. They would rather not seen happen. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Louise Radnofsky, she covers immigration policy. Her piece is called shutdown compounds woes for immigration system. So now with the backlog having grown, what are the ketchup possibilities here? Besides never I guess well people whose hearings were cancelled Kant just get back on the docket. They may in fact end up going to the back of the line waiting for their day in court, which again has a mixed bag of consequences for everybody involved. The court system will be a gearing backed up and trying to. Gig out six in the next couple of weeks ahead of any additional shutdown, and there's gonna be a little work to do. It's unbelievable. So a phrase that you will never utter it seems if you work in that industry is well just waiting for some new paperwork to show up. Right that these folks are facing just years and years of paperwork. And it it really is a paperwork driven system in many ways as well. And so while I more automated system might be able to withstand some of the stress of of five week workload piling up. This is really a paper driven one and that stands to be a particular challenge as well. Thanks, Louise, Wall Street Journal reporter Louise Radnofsky who covers immigration policy, fourteen minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Louise Radnofsky Wall Street Journal reporter United States Justice department Kant America five weeks five week fourteen minutes ten percent
"immigration court" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"None of the proposals are likely to be in place for the current stalemate as seventeen congressional negotiators are preparing to meet for the first time today to discuss border security funding. The immigration court bat. Log grew by at least ten percent during the partial government shutdown as a funding dispute centred on border security left the nation's overloaded immigration system. Digging out of an even deeper hole than before the five weeks standoff. The court backlog was hurt as court stopped. Hearing most cases and Justice department lawyers were furloughed more from Wall Street Journal reporter Louise Radnofsky who covers immigration policy Lewis, give us some numbers. Cut down took a pretty heavy hit on several different components of the immigration system. The most prominent of which was the immigration courts. They had a backlog of more than eight hundred thousand cases, even before the shutdown began and the shutdown by at least one estimate resulted in twenty thousand cases per week. Not being heard which likely added at least eighty thousand probably more like a hundred thousand to that backlog dot even accounting for any new cases that came in during that time boy. So if you're waiting to appear in court in this backup system, where are you are you in a used on the other side of the border? Are you wandering around the US because you have an appointment. Are you in? Attention in the United States waiting for waiting for your day in court, and that is a matter of concern to people on both sides of the issue. There are people who say that that is not a particularly efficient way of getting out of the country people who shouldn't be here and don't have a claim to be here. And there are people on the other side who would say that it's not really particularly just either to leave somebody waiting freak years to resolve defeat effectively. And they don't have the best shot at presenting their case in court either after years because go stale and guy and various things can happen over a period of time that just isn't isn't helpful for anybody. So this is one of several areas of agreement where where people don't the backlog of the proper where does e verify fit into this. Is favored by some immigration hardliners, people who favor a reduction both legal and illegal immigration as as more effective than a wall. Or or physical barriers the border. They see that is preventing people from working in the United States. That is the most effective measures. Kicking illegal immigration in particular. So they're very very fun to be verified, which is a voluntary system used by the players shut down during the shutdown and then. But that's not mandatory, right? It's not mandatory. But it is very prolific. Better word. It's very prolific. Forty million cases were handled by system lots year. That's average about seven hundred fifty thousand cases a week. And shutdown went on for five weeks. So that the cases that might be adult in time. But they certainly weren't resolved for the five weeks to shut down and people really favor. E-verify goat necessarily have a lot of faith in the wall. The best tactic served for that particular cause would feed us as as possibly a trade off will not seen happen. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Louise Radnofsky, she covers immigration policy. Her piece is called shutdown compounds woes for immigration system. So now with the backlog having grown, what are the catch a possibility here, besides never I guess, well people who've hearings were cancelled kiss get back on the docket. They may in fact end up going back on the line waiting for their day in court, which again has a mixed bag of consequences for everybody involved. The court system will be gearing back up and trying to dig out six in the next couple of weeks ahead of any additional shutdown and there's gonna be a little work to do. It's unbelievable. So a phrase that you will never utter. It seems. If you work in that industry is well just waiting for some new paperwork to show up. Right that these folks are facing years and years of paperwork. And it really is a paperwork given system in many ways as well. And so while more automated system might be able to withstand some of the stress of of five week workload piling up. This is really a paper driven one. And that stands skips talent as well. Thanks, Louise, Wall Street Journal reporter Louise Radnofsky who covers immigration policy, fourteen minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. The clock is ticking. Every day you put up buying life insurance can cost you big time. The older you get the more you'll have to pay and a sudden accident on expected illness could cause your rates to skyrocket or even make you uninsurable. Beat the clock. Call selectquote now..

Louise Radnofsky Wall Street Journal reporter United States Justice department Lewis America five weeks fourteen minutes ten percent five week
"immigration court" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"There's new momentum in congress on efforts to help avoid future. Government shutdowns several proposals have been floated as congress deals with the fallout from the longest government shutdown in US history and negotiators face yet. Another funding deadline in two and a half weeks another shutdown looms if lawmakers and President Trump failed to reach agreement on border security funding before the current money. Runs out on February fifteenth Virginia democratic Senator Mark Warner the method running government shutdown Rickman ship must come to an end. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell says he's open to supporting legislation that would prevent future shutdowns as long as it has support from both parties I'd be open to anything that we could agree on a bipartisan basis that would make them. Pretty hard. To occur. Again. None of the proposals are likely to be in place for the current stalemate as seventeen congressional negotiators are preparing to meet for the first time today to discuss border security funding. The immigration court bat. Log grew by at least ten percent during the partial government shutdown as a funding dispute centred on border security left the nation's overloaded immigration system. Digging out of an even deeper hole than before the five week standoff. The court backlog was hurt as court stopped. Hearing most cases and Justice department lawyers were furloughed more from Wall Street Journal reporter Louise Radnofsky who covers immigration policy Lewis. Give us some numbers. Cutdown took a pretty heavy hit on several different components of the immigration system. The most prominent of which was the immigration courts. They had a backlog of more than eight hundred thousand cases, even before the shutdown began and the shutdown by at least one estimate resulted in twenty thousand cases per week. Not being heard which likely added at least eighty thousand probably more like one hundred thousand to that backlog dot even accounting for any new cases that came in during that time boy. So if you're waiting to appear in court in this backup system, where are you are you in a you still on the other side of the border? Are you wandering around the US because you have an appointment are you in in the United States waiting for waiting for your day in court, and that is a matter of concern to people on both sides of the issue. There are people who say that that is not a particularly efficient way of getting out of the country people who shouldn't be here and don't have a claim to be here. And there are people on the other side who would say that it's not really a particularly just either to leave somebody waiting for years to resolve their fate effectively. And that they don't have the best shot at presenting their case in court either after year. Because cases, go stale and guy and various things can happen over a period of time that just isn't isn't helpful for anybody. So this is one of several rarest of agreement people club problem where does e verify fit into this. E-verify is favored by some immigration hardliners, people who favor reduction both legal and illegal immigration as as more effective than a wall. Or physical barriers at the border. They see that is preventing people from working in the United States authorisation, and that is the most effective measure of restricting illegal immigration in particular. They're very very fun to be verified, which is a voluntary system used by the players was shut down during the shutdown and then, but that's not mandatory, right? It's not mandatory. But it is very prolific better word. It's very prolific. Forty million cases were handled by system Cisco year. That's average about seven hundred fifty thousand cases a week. And shutdown went on for five weeks. So that the cases might be dissolved in time, but they weren't resolved for the five weeks to shut down and people can really favor e-verify necessarily have a lot of faith in the wall. Is the best tactic for that particular caused would see this as possibly a trade off? They would not seen happen. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Louise Radnofsky, she covers immigration policy. Her piece is called shutdown compounds woes for immigration system. So now with the backlog having grown, what are the ketchup possibilities here? Besides never I guess well people whose hearings were cancelled cont kissed get back on the docket. They may in fact end up going back to the line waiting for their day in court, which again has a mixed bag of consequences for everybody involved. The court system will be gearing back up and trying to dig out in the next couple of weeks ahead of any additional shutdown and there's going to be a little work for them to do as unbelievable. So a phrase that you will never utter. It seems. If you work in that industry is well just waiting for some new paperwork to show up. Right. These folks are facing just years and years of paperwork. It really is a paperwork driven system in many ways as well. And so while more automated system might be able to withstand some of the stress of five week workload piling up. This is really a paper driven one and that stands to be a particular challenge as well. Thanks, Louise, Wall Street Journal reporter Louise Radnofsky who covers immigration policy, fourteen minutes now after the hour on This.

Louise Radnofsky Wall Street Journal United States reporter congress Senator Mark Warner Mitch McConnell Virginia Senate President Trump Rickman Justice department Cutdown Cisco five weeks five week fourteen minutes
"immigration court" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I became a subscriber right after that. What? Where are we today when it comes to women that look like the rest of us in magazines? Yeah. So I was also a sassy girl and one of the most exciting things about working in magazines today is the hope and kind of I think the interest for a platform like sassy again where you know, kind of like non mainstream voices are heard, and and kind of, you know, images of women that we can relate to you. And you know, I do I think the marketplace has fractured so much. I think there are so many different places to get the types of media you want, but I actually think we are a little early and celebrating how much the industry has actually shifted in terms of relying on certain, you know, certain visions of beauty and certain kind of stereotypical ideas of what it looks like. To be a woman. I mean, I think if you look at all the kind of most famous supermodels, they're still extremely skinny they, you know, have a specific type of knows specific type of hair. And while we are seeing more diverse images often you have to go out and find them yourself. You have to be interested Instagram tumbler, you know, and it's exciting to be teen vogue. We are very conscientious about that and kind of incorporating an elevating those voices, and I'd love to see more magazines doing that. What about your experience in essence with that? And it's preeminent magazine for black women in particular. No, we know that representation matters. And the way that representation is shows up also matter, so we're talking about tech different hair textures, different skin, tones, different ways of dressing, different ways of excess rising, you know, just that that personal style piece that you don't necessarily you didn't necessarily see all the time and more the mainstream publications. I mean, if at all there would be maybe one image. When one image of a woman with curly hair, quote, unquote, curly hair, and that's about as far as when that was really about as far as it went. So we understood at essence how deeply important. It was to make sure that we were hitting on all of the notes because it matters people want to be seen people want to know that there is that they're that. They're look their style is being acknowledged and being celebrated actually are black women looking for something specific in media that you think they're not getting today, particularly when it comes to magazines, and this type of content. I think it's a depth of understanding, you know, you it's not enough to say this lipstick shade is is great for this particular tone of Brown. Right. It's more and under deeper understanding of how diverse we are how diverse we truly are. And then and then delivering that message in a way. That speaks to who we are as as black women that has always been I have felt a challenge in mainstream publications..

Brown
"immigration court" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on The Takeaway

"So let's take a broad look across the country when it comes to the immigration courts and the government shutdown. What are we seeing what is most dramatic as the example of the story of Mr. OTS feeling shows is that the president shutdown is jeopardizing the lives of Silom seekers and other immigrants who have been waiting often for years for their cases to be resolved. And what that means is that asylum seekers who are worried about their lives at that. They could still be sent back to dangerous conditions in their home countries. They're still waiting in limbo and evidence in their case could go stale witnesses who are going to provide declarations and information showing the persecution in the violence that these people have suffered could be lost. And so this. Shutdown is really making the courts, not operational at this point and lives are going to be affected. People are really going to be hurt by this. What about attorneys how are they handling the situation? I mean, do they understand how the shutdown has effecting their clients? Well, we are still trying to figure that out and with fifteen thousand immigration lawyer members across the country. Will we are hearing from our members is that they're having their cases be delayed and take an off the docket and as judged habit or described the vast majority of cases in this backlog of more than eight hundred thousand cases, now possibly more than a million. If all the additional cases are added as the administration has planned to do. Those vast majority of cases, those are the ones that are sitting on the dockets in the non detained counter. These are people that are not in detention of any kind those cases are being pushed off, and they will have to wait typically more than a year in New York. We're talking about probably not having your. Go back on until two thousand twenty two or twenty twenty three. That's a few years out and attorneys are still trying to figure out what to do to make sure these severe delays don't hurt their clients as we mentioned in the introduction. There is a severe backlog of these cases even before the shutdown happened. We interview judge Ashley tab for who was with the national association of immigration judges. And she told us the following we need to be moved immigration court from the Justice department, the backlog that we're seeing now and the dysfunctionality that we're seeing now all stem from the fact that we have an immigration court run by a prosecutor. So it is absolutely indefensible to have a court that has that ability of a prosecutor to interfere an interesting and use the court for non Forsman perspectives and policies, you can't have the executive branch be responsible for the enforcement of the law. As well. As education of claims that are brought a result of the enforcement of those laws. Greg your thoughts on that is judge tab for correct is the lack of independence for immigration courts. Partly to blame for the backlog Ayla, the American Laura's -ation does agree with the position that the immigration courts can no longer be part of the department of Justice controlled by the attorney general, and it's true that the backlog of cases was already very large before this ministration took office, but policies that the Trump administration has implemented particularly under twenty general Jeff Sessions and his successors seem to be taking the same approach. Those policies have made worse they are literally preventing the courts from being able to operate efficiently, and the are literally hamstringing judges from being able to manage the dockets. So that they can take the cases that are requiring more urgent review. So they can make those. Visions appropriately in a timely manner. They're holding those up, and what's happening is that we are seeing that due process for asylum seekers, a constitutional rights are being affected here. Greg do they have any those those folks have any recourse, given the shutdown?.

prosecutor Greg national association of immigr government Mr. OTS Justice department department of Justice Silom president Jeff Sessions Ashley New York executive attorney
"immigration court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A college bowl game in Dallas, Jim hawk NPR. News, Wall Street futures are on the downside this morning following yesterday's record gains. The Dow added nearly five percent it finished one thousand eighty six points higher. That's the largest single day point gain on record. This is NPR news from Washington, and this is WNYC in New York. Good morning. I'm David I thirty eight degrees in central park, mostly sunny today, a high in the low forties as we were just hearing the partial federal shutdown is now in its sixth day. And as WNYC's Beth Fertig reports that means there's a lot of confusion about what's open, and what's not at the Jacob Javits federal building in lower Manhattan immigrants can apply for visas and check in with law enforcement, but the immigration courts are closed. Attorney Christian bonanza didn't know that he's planning to represent a Honduran family for free and their asylum case, but because he normally works in financial restructuring he needs to register as an attorney with the immigration court essential workers start to show up. So I didn't think anything would interfere with the courts, he says his case is scheduled to go to court on January fifteenth, and he hopes the shutdown ends before then rising sea levels could overwhelm low lying sections of Amtrak's northeast corridor in the coming. Decades. That's according to a new report by Bloomberg news. Reporter Christopher flails says Amtrak has studied the impact of climate change on the corridor and understands the risks knocking out storm poles power poles substations said let's see what we can come up with to try and deal with it. What they found was. They don't have many good solutions. According to Amtrak says raising or relocating vulnerable sections of rail would likely be expensive and impractical because of insufficient funding from the state and federal government. Amtrak told the Bloomberg news had already has forty billion dollars worth of basic repairs to make to its infrastructure spokesperson for Amtrak says it takes the risks of.

Amtrak Jim hawk NPR WNYC Bloomberg NPR Jacob Javits Dallas Christian bonanza Beth Fertig attorney New York Christopher flails David I Manhattan Washington Reporter forty billion dollars
"immigration court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Not take them back so returns could sit for a long time before they might be resold. The other reason is that so much of the stuff that we buy online is sent back as much as half of all clothing, shoes, outerwear and other apparel that is bought from Amazon and other Erie Taylor's ends up getting returned. This is NPR news from Washington, and this is WNYC in New York. It's five thirty two. Good morning. I'm David I mostly sunny skies today, a high in the low forties. I steady temperature through the day. It's forty degrees right now in central park. The partial federal shutdown is now in its sixth day. And as WNYC's Beth Fertig reports, it means there's a lot of confusion about what's open, and what's not at the Jacob Javits federal building in lower Manhattan immigrants can apply for visas and check in with law enforcement, but the immigration courts are close. Caused attorney Christian bonanza didn't know that he's planning to represent a Honduran family for free and their asylum case, but because he normally works in financial restructuring he needs to register as an attorney with the immigration court. Essential workers start to show up. So I didn't think anything would interfere with the courts, he says his case is scheduled to go to court on January fifteenth, and he hopes the shutdown ends before then New York City officials are trying to find out what happened to a sixteen year old queens boy who suddenly died during basketball practice. The NYPD says officers responded to a nine one one call to John bound highschool yesterday around noon and found Lenny Pierre unconscious and unresponsive he was taken to a nearby hospital where he was pronounced dead. In a statement, mayor de Blasio said he was heartbroken to learn of peers death. The medical examiner has not yet determined the cause a New York Times investigation has found that President Trump may have gotten a false bone spur diagnosis from one of his father's tenants in order to avoid military service during the Vietnam war for decades a podiatrist named Larry Bronstein rented office space in Jamaica queens from Fred Trump reporter Steve eater says for fifty years Bronstein told stories about arranging the diagnose. Noses in exchange for future help from his landlord doesn't match the the historical account that we've had and it builds on it and was soon. A family or something that that? I'm Dr Boston talked about over the years as a favor that he had done for the Trump Bronstein died in two thousand seven Trump has credited the diagnosis and having a high draft number four getting out.

Larry Bronstein David WNYC Fred Trump Lenny Pierre Erie Taylor Amazon New York Times NPR New York City Dr Boston mayor de Blasio Christian bonanza attorney New York bone spur Beth Fertig Jacob Javits NYPD Washington
"immigration court" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Us. So that we can make an even better resource in the future. Typically, not reporting hate crimes does not mean there happened. We need your help. Help us understand the reasons why victims don't report hate crimes. We also need to understand the barriers that law enforcement officers and agencies face reporting hate crimes to the FBI together. We can find ways to improve reporting of hate crimes, and that will allow us to more effectively target our resources for the places where they're most needed. Federal prosecutors said Sunday they're asking sessions to give them the green light to pursue a deck penalty case against the gunman in other news this morning here on America's First News. The Pentagon says it's sending fifty two hundred troops to the southwest border. Just a week before the midterm elections in which President Trump has put a sharp focus on Central American migrants and slow moving caravans, the number of troops being deployed is more than double the two thousand who are fighting ISIS in Syria. President Trump says he's planning tent cities to house the migrants, he told Fox News of any of them. Do make it to the border and apply for asylum as they are legally entitled to do the US plans to hold them in the tent cities until their trial in immigration courts. Halloween venue in Ohio that held a swastika Saturday the day a gunman opened fire at the Jewish synagogue in. Pittsburgh killing eleven said we screwed up big time haunted who in Pata Scala put out a Facebook promotional post that day referring to swastika Saturday. The owner says it's the traditional last day of the season. When actress paint swastikas on themselves and some on social media accused the haunted house attraction of antisemitism and Nazism set in a post Sunday that the attraction shows, the horrors of the world. But the owner Tim May issued a statement saying we screwed up big time pledging fifty thousand dollars to the synagogue and extending condolences to families affected by shooting in consumer news this morning, WalMart is rolling out.

President Trump Tim May US WalMart Fox News President FBI Pentagon Pittsburgh Facebook Ohio America Syria fifty thousand dollars
"immigration court" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Reasons why victims don't report hate crimes. We also need to understand the barriers the ball enforcement officers and agencies face and reporting hate crimes to the FBI together. We can find ways to improve reporting of hate crimes, and that will allow us to more effectively target our resources for the places where they're most needed. A federal prosecutors said Sunday they're asking sessions to give them the green light to pursue a death penalty case against the gunman in other news this morning here on America's First News. The Pentagon says it's sending fifty two hundred troops to the southwest border. Just a week before the midterm elections in which President Trump has put a sharp focus on Central American migrants and slow moving caravans, the number of troops being deployed is more than double the two thousand core fighting ISIS in Syria. President Trump says he's planning tent cities to house the migrants, he told Fox News of any of them. Do make it to the border and apply for asylum as they are legally entitled to do the US plans to hold them in the tent cities until their trial in immigration courts. Halloween venue in Ohio that held a swastika Saturday the day a gunman opened fire at the Jewish synagogue in Pittsburgh killing eleven said we screwed up big time haunted hoochie in Patah Scala put out a Facebook promotional post that day referring to. Swastika saturday. The owner says it's the traditional last day of the season when actress paint swastikas on themselves and some on social media accused the haunted house attraction of antisemitism and Nazism wanted hoochie set in a post Sunday that the attraction shows, the horrors of the world. But the owner Tim May issued a statement saying we screwed up big time pledging fifty thousand dollars to the synagogue and extending condolences to families affected by the shooting in consumer news this morning, WalMart is rolling out a program that allows staff to checkout.

President Trump FBI Tim May Fox News President Patah Scala Pentagon US WalMart Facebook America Ohio Syria Pittsburgh fifty thousand dollars
"immigration court" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Why would you tell a random foreigner joins your group as you're you're gonna walking north details of your life? So I'm not sure, but that really is a complicated. That is the crux of a lot of what we're seeing right now is that back and forth debate. I will say that they're certainly are cases. There certainly are cases where it is economic or family reunification, and because there are no pathways legally for people to reunite with their family members in the United States or to get a temporary. Worker program to to get a temporary guess for visa to go work in the United States either. The only way to it the only way that people can get in is often by seeking asylum. So there are people mixed in with the very valid asylum claims who do want to achieve these other things they want to be with their mother father. They want to be able to make money to send back to their their grandparents their parents and not all gets mixed in it gets murky and knots along the debate kind of recently has been centering around that point of how many of these claims are fraudulent now it is absolutely legal to make it to the US border into seek asylum. And a lot of the people will pass I think it's ninety percent of people pass the first apper credible fewer interview and be allowed to lodge their cases in in the court system and the immigration courts now from then on it gets trickier because some. Percentage of people won't show up. Some percentage of people will have cases that go through. And there will be a percentage that don't have cases that are there deemed to not qualify for asylum. And so it does get murkier at that point overall. A lot of these claims have not been viewed as valid for style. But that will likely increase with Jeff Sessions. His recent ruling that domestic violence should not be a particular social group that should qualify. People for asylum claims silent protection. However, there are amongst kind of there are many valid asylum claims as well. And so there is still a percentage now on asylum is well, it depends on where you are where you file your claim that's going to have a huge termination on whether or not your asylum claim is granted, for example, if you. File in San Francisco looking at, you know, two thirds of cases are accepted if you file in Atlanta. I think it's maybe under ten percent under five percent. And so you're you're really there's so many variables that go into these claims if you if you're a family that's able to get pro Bono legal assistance versus if you're unaccompanied minor representing yourself. So it's pretty complicated. But really the issue of Silom is where we should be focusing. We shouldn't be focusing on the border. We should be looking at how do we process so many people who are coming to the border? How do we and seeking asylum? How do we process the enormous backlog that we have it's growing every year in asylum cases, and how do we do? So in a way that's fair and that speedy, and that doesn't leave people waiting years and years to have their cases actually determined because that's the reality today. Stephanie loiter, thanks so much for joining us. Thanks so much for having the law. Fair podcast is produced. In cooperation with the Brookings Institution. Thanks this week to Stephanie loiter for joining us near hours after her return to the United States, you need to do your part to promote the law fair podcast, which has no promotional vehicles other than you. It's that five star rating. It's that tweet that share on Facebook. It's that talk about us at dinner party conversations were other people wanna talk about caravans new say, no, actually, we're gonna talk about the law fair podcast where there was the best discussion of the caravan. Our music caravan or not is performed by the one the only the Sophia Yan and this week as all other weeks. Thanks for listening..

United States Facebook Sophia Yan Brookings Institution Jeff Sessions San Francisco Stephanie Atlanta ninety percent five percent ten percent
"immigration court" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on PRI's The World

"And possibility that if return our clients will will die will die yes and if that sounds overly dramatic it's what horta garcia who's eighteen told me as he left the immigration courthouse one morning in the us alone and appearing before judge without a lawyer porta case says there's only danger for him in honduras where he's from was then when i'm in a more i me by i said i love he says gangs of threatened his life oh oh boy boy that but critics say the trump administration's immigration crackdown could make it harder for whore k and faouzi of others to get a fair hearing in the courts and many immigration judges are appalled by what's happening as a public servant as a judge i promised that i was going to follow the constitution i promise that i was going to follow the law that's ashley tab adorn immigration judge in la she says speed and toughness are being placed above due process and judicial independence and it's time for immigration judges to speak out i think everyone of us everyone at the judge is here to protect america and we do so by by honoring our oath by making sure that the rule of law is being applied and making sure that the judges are acting truly independently and impartially what you're saying is you're not another kind of ice agent in a robe absolutely i mean that's been our problem is that's the logical conclusion that that you become an law enforcement agent cloaks in judicial robe tablet or who's also president of the national association of immigration judges is especially concerned about a new policy of courtroom quotas saying america's immigration courts are backlogged with too many cases us attorney general jeff sessions has required that judges rule on a certain number of cases a year or face penalties what is wrong with that is that it's truly unprecedented we're not aware of any other judge across the country whose job is on the line directly for not completing certain number of cases in certain appeared of time what it does is it makes the judge and interested party in the case because now the judge has to be thinking am i gonna lose my job if i don't do this case quickly if i don't get it done within this year but even before trump things were tough for people in immigration proceedings unlike criminal defendants and other courts they are not appointed lawyer a public defender and legalaid can be scarce with few resources we have one printer we have our laptops that we bring in every day because we can't actually lock the room that we use so we have to carry our stuff every morning and that's it that's patricia ortiz again talking about how her nonprofits sets up a legal aid table in waiting rooms at the immigration court in la she says most immigrants summoned to the building can be scared and confused we see this all the time people don't really understand why they're even there they know that they have to go see a judge but they don't really know what it means they don't know what to expect and so they're really looking to us for guidance and guidance is needed more than ever an immigration courts has the trump administration enforces its zero tolerance policies if the numbers continue prosecutions of immigrants in the country without authorization will jump nearly twenty percent this year compared to last year judge tab adore doesn't think toughness and speed can coexist with justice there are days she feels spirited but she says she'll continue fighting for the independence of the immigration court it's i'm not going to give up hope i'm not gonna keep up fighting for the court judges and an are america judicial system i just refused to think that way right now because i think if you think that way then that's a defeatist mentality and i don't intend to be defeated for the world saw gonzales los angeles our last item today is also about the challenges of migration fought two months joe juarez a singer from mali we've had on the show before she's also an actress and that's what she was up to in two thousand one when she emigrated from west africa to france she was nineteen and left her parents and ten siblings to join a theatre company but times were different in two thousand one it was easier to pack up and move to migrate but now with borders tightening up and nationalism on the rise fatumata jawara has changed her thinking seeing the.

horta garcia twenty percent two months
"immigration court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Immigration court and chicago with my students a few weeks ago and we saw a case of somebody who was from glenview illinois and i was in a district of a democrat jinshik housekey and he was in there because the ice agents were just staking out this housing complex that happened to be associated with having a lot of latinos living there the ice agents were just following people around and asking for their identification and this individual actually happen to have been arrested and convicted for a misdemeanor battery in two thousand eleven so under the obama administration he you know dealt with the criminal violation and was released but it's the same person in the same arrest that now has triggered him being brought into detention and in he ended up actually being released on bond after being held for a few months on the immigration judge thought that the ramirez to his case and he likely will not be deported on but he had an attorney he had a strong family network that was able to show up in immigration court and speak on his behalf and you know a lot of people who don't have those kinds of resources are going to find themselves in a different situation so to questions i wanna ask you on that what the cost on that first of all of these detentions because we know that incarcerating folks are detaining people comes at a cost to us doesn't it that that's that's absolutely correct on sued the average cost per day of holding somebody in this case the conditions is about one hundred twenty dollars and you know the alternatives to that are in coal monitoring or just releasing people on their own recognizance and you know which is done every day in the context of criminal proceedings that don't have the kinds of in a consequences that deportation proceedings do is there anybody making money off of this is so yes i mean you know obviously the prison industry is making huge amounts of money off of this and.

Immigration court chicago glenview illinois jinshik housekey obama administration ramirez attorney one hundred twenty dollars
"immigration court" Discussed on Voices In America

Voices In America

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on Voices In America

"You know as his obviously the case most people fleeing torture abroad don't arrive in the united states with deep pockets of cash to be able to a lawyers and they can't work for the for six months they can't worked our money to pay a lawyer they don't have financial reserves and so they have to try to find a lawyer if they're lucky this has created a system i think this the been pretty well studied and analysed by a variety of academics where you can see that the immigration bar is unable to earn as much money as for example the federal criminal defense lawyers and so lawyers are overworked and overworked overworking overwork taking a more cases getting less money per case and then they're necessarily making mistakes and so you have a bar that's at a severe disadvantage compared to other legal bars in terms of being able to adequately represent their clients in east staggeringly difficult situations and so a lot of it then falls on the rest of the legal community enough to have fantastic provan organizations or public law centre on and legal aid or ease he'll you to fill that void and find lawyers and even they don't have enough lawyers they have to then reach out to the private law firms to get lawyers to take cases on a pro bono basis to sort of just come in and try to you know gap fill so speeches leap in an hell person hair at the person their hopes on there and it's the sort of adhoc quiltwork of lawyers around the country who were desperately trying to put their finger in the in the damn but this law holes in that ham and they're just on an of lawyers public council represents about four hundred people at the moment half of them are children from three countries in central america let's take.

united states law firms pro bono america six months
"immigration court" Discussed on Voices In America

Voices In America

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on Voices In America

"What staggering as that you can do it after seven years of the practice of law in any way his practice law no seven years is not enough to be judged was affected you can be a small smallclaims court judge in los angeles county after five years exactly and in other places it's ten years in california to be a smallclaims judge he even but when you stop and think what that means right smallclaims courts are deciding really the pettiest of are disputes rights someone's branch falls of your fence than it breaks the fence and you wanna get it fixed or you know someone steals your bicycle lemme just really the smallest of our social disputes and that's fine we put them before people who haven't had as much experience and perhaps it's training ground to get experience and wisdom as a judge in terms of the really solemn responsibility that the ways on you to decide cases but an immigration court these judges are deciding out of the gate what are genuinely life and liberty cases i mean they are people who have been here their whole life practically sometimes their entire life may but they may be here illegally so to speak because they were brought here at age two or three baby from from a foreign land or there people who are fleeing persecution and torture in foreign countries and are saying i need asylum because you send me back i'm going to be killed and those are grave grave cases i mean they're comparable to the cases that you for example tried in federal court where you have someone who if they're convicted are gonna go to prison for a long time and it's massively serious event the lawyers involved have to take it seriously or the judge or they could be executed yeah and so you have a massive architecture servants scaffolding that's been built in our court systems to protect people's criminal writes in terms of life and liberty.

los angeles county california seven years five years ten years
"immigration court" Discussed on Adam Ruins Everything

Adam Ruins Everything

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"immigration court" Discussed on Adam Ruins Everything

"Before you end up in an immigration court on that basis and so you either served your time or a there's been some other a result um from that criminal preceding the only peep the only a consequence of an immigration preceding is either that you are allowed to remain in the country with legal authorisation or your deported and because of that of there are no attorneys that you have if you cannot afford to hire one for yourself and there's enough numbers no jury there's a number of other really important absences of due process and so this is so go ahead these people are are these these folks are when they're in this immigration court they're not accused of a crime there it's a civil case where okay the decision is just whether they can remain in the country they they have to leave its so yeah the against the end yeah of course it's not a a criminal matter because of the end you don't go to jail they just your your made to leave the country the that's right that's right so the people us going back to your question you who've ends up in an immigration court and it's anybody who's accused of violating civil immigration laws so again these are people who are accused they they they uh some of them perhaps of violated the civil law and perhaps some of them didn't and the sorta the job of the court is to determine uh which is which who who can stay in who can go but they do provide the don't provide folks with uh with defense that's correct.