40 Burst results for "Ilya"

Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"The NFL coaching Carousel fires up multiple reports of Philadelphia, tapping the shoulder of Indianapolis offensive coordinator Nick Syriani as its new head coach. Previously, the 39 year old had worked with Kansas City and the Chargers all the quarterback carousel. Former Washington QB Dwayne Haskins will sign a one year deal with Pittsburgh, according to multiple reports. NHL capitals. We're going to be seriously shorthanded for sometime, coach Peter Laviolette says. Four players Alex Ovechkin, Evgeny Kuznetsov, Dimitri or Love and Ilya Samsonov are in covert 19 quarantine, and he believes they'll miss the next four games. Now, Ovechkin's wife says her husband and Orlov both have covert antibody. She said this in a statement on Instagram of Retweeted that post it D A V presto caps on the ice battle. Buffalo tomorrow in their home opener, NBA wizard You're dealing with an extended high Eight. It's now six games have been postponed. They had a working out yesterday nine today and practice with Russell Westbrook..

Alex Ovechkin Ilya Samsonov Peter Laviolette Dwayne Haskins Russell Westbrook Evgeny Kuznetsov Kansas City Chargers Nick Syriani NFL Indianapolis NHL Philadelphia Orlov NBA Washington Pittsburgh Dimitri
Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Hour is up. 35, the S and P 500 index is up. Five The NASDAQ's Up 85 Money news in 10 Minutes on w T o P sports at 15 and 45. Howard by Red River Technology decisions aren't black and white. Think red. What? Sports news Day Preston? Well, Hillary, we have some breaking NFL news today. ESPN is Adam Schefter reporting that Philadelphia is hiring Indianapolis offensive coordinator Nick Syriani as its new head coach. Previously, the 39 year old had worked with Kansas City and the Chargers. He will be the Eagles fourth head coach in the last nine years. Meanwhile, according to multiple reports, x Washington quarterback Dwayne Haskins has a new home. I'll sign a one year contract with Pittsburgh. NHL capitals get hard checked by Covert 19 coach Peter Laviolette says four players Alex Ovechkin, Afghani Kuznetsov, Dimitri or 11. Ilya Samsonov are in quarantine, and the coach believes they'll miss the next four games over, his wife says on Instagram that her husband and or love both have covert antibodies of tweeted that post its in Russian and English. For those who read both, and it's at De Avie presto, NBA wizards, maybe three and eight in the standings. They've also now lost six games to covert 19. They'll return to action at the very earliest Sunday when they visit San Antonio soccer D C. United picks Clemson Ford CA Marty Smith, with their first pick off the MLS super drafted out was a first run of their highest choice in seven years. Dave Preston WTLV Sports Breaking News on Double D T.

Ilya Samsonov Dave Preston Red River Technology Dwayne Haskins Peter Laviolette Marty Smith Afghani Kuznetsov Adam Schefter De Avie Hillary Alex Ovechkin Kansas City San Antonio Chargers NFL Nick Syriani Espn
Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Don't settle for less than a Honda 1 45. Let's see what's going on with Dave Preston Capitals will likely be shorthanded for some time. Mark coach Peter Laviolette says. Four players Alex Ovechkin, Evgeny Kuznetsov, Dimitri or Love in Ilya Samsonov are in quarantine, and he believes they'll miss the next four games. This after the four violated the league's health and safety protocol over his wife posted a statement in Russian and English on Instagram of Reach Way to the post It D A V Presto caps play Buffalo tomorrow in there. Home opener, NBA wizards were dealing with an extended hiatus. Now six games have been postponed and practices are finally resuming for head coach Scott Brooks. Ideal situation. It's great to be back, though I do miss the players, miss talking to you guys daily. Yeah, it's way. Have a practice in nine days. And I wouldn't even consider today a practice who has had a working out yesterday nine today. With Russell Westbrook Limited NFL Could Washington be going after Houston quarterback to Shawn Watson? That's a trade possibility. For more about the Burgundian Gold's options at quarterback and GM. Go to w t o p dot com Search HUDDLE. Dave Preston w T o P Sports All right. Thank you, Dave. It's 1, 47 traffic and weather on the way. Hi, I'm Christiane. You can catch me Saturday nights, talking sports at 15 and 45 this Sunday ahead of kickoff in both e A F. C. An NFC title games. I'll probably be on my phone setting lineups on Fanduel..

Dave Preston Peter Laviolette Ilya Samsonov Alex Ovechkin Honda Scott Brooks Evgeny Kuznetsov Russell Westbrook NBA Shawn Watson GM Houston NFL Dimitri
Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Including Alex Ovechkin violated NHL rules that gathered in the hotel room without wearing face coverings. It's not clear for Ovechkin, along with Evgeny Kuznetsov, Dmitry Orlov and Ilya Samson off will be available for Friday's game against Buffalo. Watch the football team still reportedly working on a deal to bring in Marty Hurney as general manager and the W T O be huddled George Wallace. This is still Ron's tea like this is Ron's deal. Ron still gonna be calling the shots. I think that is a big reason why you're going to see Marty Hurney here. I mean, he's he hired Ron Rivera hurting hired him in Carolina. Maura Wtlv Doc Top Search Huddle and NFL Network or 40. Martin, May you have played on the washer and 90. Super Bowl team and has been working the 40 Niners front office under consideration for a job in the Washington front office. Dave Johnson ever you tell the sports we've got warmer temperatures at least a little bit coming today. We've got the forecast for you coming up 9 47 layoffs are going on, and there's no need to just have a fantasy.

Ron Rivera Marty Hurney Alex Ovechkin Evgeny Kuznetsov Dmitry Orlov Maura Wtlv Ilya Samson Dave Johnson NHL George Wallace General Manager NFL Washington Martin Carolina
Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ilya" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Think red 7 15, now two Dave Johnson. Well plan was for the Wizards of returned to play Friday in Milwaukee. We know in this time plans change. That game has now been postponed by the MBA because the league's health and safety protocols yes. The Wizards did return to practice last night, but with only eight eligible players. And after nine days off head coach Scott Brooks, you just can't just start back up and gain speed. You have to be very careful. These guys are world class athletes, but they haven't done anything like when you're off for a while, Yet you have your buddies and play Dick That's like weekend warriors, and you don't know how that ends up a lot of time. So that's like tonight's practice was very, very, very, very light and the earliest questions might return to play his Sunday in San Antonio. Right now, Alex Ovechkin of getting his. That's all. Dmitry Orlov and Ilya Samsonov on the NHL's covert 19 Protocol related absences list, Not for a vase of tests but for gathering in a hotel room without wearing face coverings. Caps also fined 100 Grand. Not sure of the players will be able to play Friday against Buffalo. Former Carolina general manager Marty Hardy still reportedly in line to be GM in Washington, and the Wtlv huddle, depressed and what happens with a lot of people who come here who don't work out is they don't understand the territory already hurt. He understands the territory. Heard he started his NFL career in Washington. PR department, Maura wtlv dot com Search Shuttle Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes. Still, it could catch a vertical What did do some work on the side of practice. Dave Jackson ever you till be sports Up ahead on W. T O people go live to the scene of a deadly fire overnight. It's 7, 17. And now the small business buzz package by the UPS store. A lot of small businesses are counting on more government aid, but the vaccine rollout, maybe more important. Survey by small business network Elena Ble found 58% think a rapid vaccine distribution would have a greater positive impact on their small business than another round of government aid. Many small businesses. They're running out of time. 34% say they have one month or less of cash on hand. I've Jeff Klebanoff. Hi. Welcome to the ups store. Yeah, I'd like to ship this package.

Wizards Ilya Samsonov Dave Johnson Alex Ovechkin Washington Dave Jackson Dmitry Orlov Scott Brooks UPS Jeff Klebanoff Milwaukee Buffalo Dick Elena Ble San Antonio NHL Maura Marty Hardy NFL Patrick Mahomes
"ilya" Discussed on Hustleshare

Hustleshare

08:02 min | 2 months ago

"ilya" Discussed on Hustleshare

"Other side of also fuck this up. I'm i mean for me you. What we did is think hiring the right people for the jaw. And i think what we did. We never really hired anybody from like joe post or anything like that right. We hire people. We work with before right. Who were event organizers. Fiscal owners You know And they knew the job right. So i think in our in our case the challenges that you know not everybody can suck refi all his weekends by being some remote locations in the middle of people getting drunk while you're working and and data's does require some special people so i think we managed to find like special group and have them run the show so i think that helped a lot and again it took time right. It took i and it took a lot of personal dime so deli. Two thousand eight hundred two thousand nineteen added more than a hundred flights a year. Right shoulder likely every three weeks right so it does take time but you get there together right now. I understand the unit economics. So yeah and you said you had brought up market fit. What how did you based on your metrics and the unit economics that this now is the right path to go right because coming from logistics where you can't even generate enough traction especially if it's a business their supply and demand now i've seen you scale it. I didn't need to know the economics of no. You're doing well. What economic side. How how did you. How did you what did that look like. Well i mean there's two things right so i think one thing is that we came from a loyalty and anthem beat that space where we were making really little right. So we're making nyc fifty bucks per month for merchant right and of course you want to scale you get like you know we have like you. Seven eight hundred merchants but still. It's a lot of little money that you need to chase and leads the long tail right. So i i've while we were just like softened output chasing very little money right and and miss okay we wanna wanna make sure that the business actually generates revenue right and reset revenues important for us. Because you know. Funding doesn't come in. And reliant and This work out of you know events made sense because in terms of going back to us economic you know we. We're selling a hydra product at the end of the day right. It's ms bandwidth era fight chip and sometimes in markets that are probably less developed You know people understand more being hungry product. Sulphur product Because you know hardware you touch it. You feel it. It's a physical thing i saw. I i don't wanna be software is just like some right so they don't get it Especially in the early date. So i think what we managed to do as we managed to charge hardware and it was varying between wanted to box per person and that was known the large scale value events of people. And you imagine that that money why that's amazing. Now i want to also ask about competition. Because i know coming from the events industry that when one thing works people fucking try to do that as well. How did he keep competition at bay. Because i've seen again Big events. Like echelon i go to sean. It's still pouch nation there and whatnot and keep competition made. The biggest events are run by at the end of the day. But i'm pretty sure some people try to replicate and again go under your skin. How did he keep them at bay. I look many right so we i think. Throughout the years we had local players and international players are trying to do what we do. thing on on On local players some new players came in The rinat experience and opera. We've seen people running away from the events deployment doesn't work in the panic mode and just living stuff running away like superior you can do right because this is also much you're like when you're standing naveh crowd of a couple of thousand people shouting and you'll because your system is now in it to face this is for everybody but then what we also some international is the worst thing. This is just a sidetrack little bit. The worst thing. I've experienced. Because i did something similar but i was using our app right and we were just doing well but when there's just an influx you know there's one event that there was a stampede in some of my team. My my my team got ran over a good thing. They didn't fucking get hurt. But fucking stampede. Forty thousand people in china then holy fucking shit right. It's crazy. I can tell you i mean this is again sidetrack but in more than five hundred six events with donald with five years i can tell you so many stories read. Some of them will need to but I mean we've seen everything really good and bad things. Everything from i would say human trafficking to do unfortunately drunks and all that and people doing some things that they should not do in public. And all of it and i threw that what. That's one thing that. I got events that i carry it till now released prizes me anymore. If i see some crazy shared link. I've seen worship it doesn't faze me fucked up fucked up but it's fun it's fun. It's very addictive now. Okay going back sorry for right sidetracked a little bit so again. Competitors local players foreign players you. How do you keep them in. And then and then had and then we had a few international guys coming in from from europe you know a couple of them and You know trying to physically a push. Hard in this region because visit israel has a lot of advances. You know summer. Only year. A round right which is not the same case for europe or north america and i think the key reason why we want is that we are the guys on the ground right so these guys would come in flying doing event fly back right but from europe is just not sustainable right and you know we are always here always present and a certain point. They were burning a lot of more cash than we were interesting. I mean across base is not that much because there's a local stop and everything. This guy refined people from spain and all that and then Burning cash and they helped us open the market. For example there was one international guy flare open his body for us and then we went and you know all the clients migrated. So i'm competitions back now and it's validation to it's just a matter of healthy competition and also volume because if it gets really saturated and your barrier to entry is too low then eventually you'll see yourself in osiander only she had a price war and everybody loses right but if it's a healthy competition murder stood three players and there's enough fish to go around and For everybody to eat then that's good. Look i think eventually when i can give advice where listening to us. Look i mean whatever you built You need to kind of mind. Your mindset needs to be. I wanna be number one and number two whatever rights and you know you can be in the sector e commerce. Where in being number one means that you need to raise billions of dollars or you can choose the sector which is a bit more niche where you need less money to be one but i think you mindset should be always number one number two because he real number three number four.

europe joe post nyc spain osiander murder donald china israel north america
"ilya" Discussed on Hustleshare

Hustleshare

07:14 min | 2 months ago

"ilya" Discussed on Hustleshare

"Welcome the latest episode of they'll share. Podcast we are going international today because we're talking to a guy that actually met through parties You know When they were the one responsible to really change a whole ballgame of getting people in in big events way back in my previous startup couple couple startups ago. Which your spouse. But before. I get carried away. Let's welcome to the show. Ilia krabbe-style pouch nation. Thanks how're you doing. I'm good man. I was like what does that repressive press record. It's been a while. Since i last saw you and i can't wait to to catch up with you but before i get started i need to ask you the million dollar question. Ilya ill yeah. What's your hustle hustle while if you run a startup you know you're hustling every day so obviously now this year is. Hey that amazed you're hassle is still to survive this whole condemning maker right and obviously we are in the event space so we know that events are diverse. Wants to go in the last ones to come back so my really read it to survive that whole situation absolutely and again. We'll talk about how you then change at ballgame because you know of contact tracing and all that which stolley amazing. That's also the reason why i reached out. Wow pouch just keeps on pivoting into the right direction were most actually are most companies spanish. But before before that. I need you to buckle up my man because we're gonna ride. The hustle shared time machine. Right there in jakarta. But we're going to go all the way back. Because i wanna i wanna find out the your origins per se of how you actually built your career. So what have you. Where did you grow up and did you any have have any experience of being an entrepreneur hustling upper. Say early. In your life. While i just a few words about myself. Yeah sorry i marijn was born in moscow soviet union on that time it's a country that doesn't exist anymore but I grew up in today. So i lived in into about fifteen years so my finish studies there in milan. And then i started my journey around the world Lived in different places Starting from south africa. I was based in johannesburg for coupla. Lau wow okay. Yeah and then Then singapore Was based there for a couple of years. And then that's what brought me in the first place in southeast asia's was my ex consult job and then yup being in southeast asia since two thousand then almost for ten years right across different countries in the region. Now i've i've known i've had also interviewed several people that the had a similar Lifestyle i guess who was a well traveled and picked up a thing or two in every stop that they got into and again make them very very hard to adapt to change. Because if there's one thing about traveling moving from place to place you gotta be gotta be able to adapt quickly because if not you're gonna get Pretty pretty quickly but for you. What did each stop give you. And what are the the learnings he also took from each stop that you got before you decide okay. This is I want to stay. Stay put in this region. Well i think you know said this is probably very different. Stops i said from from. Russia tweeted it to south africa. And in your ride probably every time you change a place. You need to adapt pretty quick. You need to get to know people you need to. You need to serve live in you know and be happy and right so i think this is also what you know. Invention made me Brought into the enterpreneurship in choosing that career. Because that's my daily life. Anyway right so i probably travel lesson. Change less places nowadays But different hey. I opened my laptop with its ups and downs right. So so yeah i ever played was very different again. Different cultures are africa compared to it. But you know. I find that end of day. Everywhere you go you can find like minded people and as long as you open minded you know you get to know really really cool France and enjoy it so elliott. That's interesting because now you you you you you learn so many things but one thing i want to highlight. Is you stuck around. In singapore and being alive being in moscow being in johannesburg. You've been all around. But what made you stick around time. What what what is it about southeast asia that made you know Want to stay here for a long time. I said that's a very good question I was wondering sometimes myself. I think to two main factors is that one When i came to southeast asia i realized that You know the potential of the region and specifically you know when i came philippines indonesia those countries where you know Huge potential growth especially in the tech sector. Would i realize people are very dexterity But they're still behind lasers like china like europe and but the doctrine rate is extremely high. So that why. Don't the reasons which made me stay was that was extremely interested in in how is all gone awol the second recent. I guess it's it's eight as well right so point. When you're in your twenties you want to change Time and you know looking for that stability in your thirties. Slightly different alright. You'll you're looking for a place where you can you know. Kind of stay for awhile billion network. Build your relationship and grow as an individual In general right. So i think those are the reasons why i stick around. All right. sounds good now. I wonder stand because there's a lot of people that are been successful after your departure stint. That were forged. Bfa founder. since it's your right for you. What was that experience like. And did you when you joined. If i were you already decided yep all right. This is what i'm doing here is technically you know preparing myself to be an entrepreneur here in southeast asia and what what did you take out of that experience out of f i well. I mean honestly. I started mind to occur year. I was Was twenty seven years old. It was you know eight years ago right so time you know. I had a good experience in in consulting already but i had no idea about enterpreneurship. And you know general right so for me The first thing a renewed start something new to your research and understand and billionaire. Organic standard was all about. And this is where. I thought that if i was a good kind of i You know Getting together with the community and understanding. What's up about.

southeast asia johannesburg singapore south africa moscow soviet union africa Ilya jakarta Lau milan Bfa china europe France Russia moscow philippines founder. indonesia
"ilya" Discussed on Hustleshare

Hustleshare

01:35 min | 2 months ago

"ilya" Discussed on Hustleshare

"Today we're going to be featuring one of the biggest startups in wearable tech in southeast asia. And talk about that. We'll be having never founder. Mr ilya crafts stove of pouch before shares. How they revolutionized defense industry in southeast asia. You'll you'll share what it's like growing up around the world traveler in learning to adapt each that he visited and he's also going to show why he chose to settle in south east asia to pursue a career in entrepreneurship. Ilias hustle wasn't easy because the first version of pouched didn't pan out and he will also share how he thought back into the corporate world. Actually learn more things you can do couch again and this is where it gets interesting because how did a big pivot from doing rewards to events an illegal share how they were able to do that. In scaled that across south asia despite having a lot of competitors just like most businesses illegals share how they were directly hit by the pandemic hit how the coveted begin using the same technology but different use case for contact tracing stick around to the end because he also has a lot of tips on how can founders become more even keeled. The in downs of started playing. So if you're ready to learn to hostile behind pouch nation let's begin this up was Oh right.

southeast asia south asia founder Mr ilya Ilias
"ilya" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

03:29 min | 4 months ago

"ilya" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"It's <SpeakerChange> it's hard <Speech_Male> to avoid that <Speech_Male> unless you're talking <Speech_Male> about your kind of matlock <Speech_Male> lawyer <Speech_Male> or or <Speech_Male> the Gulf Coast Mississippi <Speech_Male> trial lawyer <Speech_Male> or what have you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> think many people would want <Speech_Male> to put on <Speech_Male> the Supreme Court <Speech_Male> <hes> regardless. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Know. The problem of <Speech_Male> rule by elites <Speech_Male> is really <Speech_Male> more one of how <Speech_Male> a question of how <Speech_Male> the culture and interacts <Speech_Male> with the politics <Speech_Male> and the types of <Speech_Male> representative we have in our <Speech_Male> political branches. So <Speech_Male> the judicial <Speech_Male> branch is different we <Speech_Male> don't elect them. <Speech_Male> I don't think we should. <Speech_Male> I think judicial elections <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> are a bad <Speech_Male> idea like the <Speech_Male> federal system of <Speech_Male> executive <Speech_Male> nomination and <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> Legislative <Speech_Male> confirmation <Speech_Male> <hes> rather <Speech_Male> than capture by <Speech_Male> by the elites <Speech_Male> or the industries, or <Speech_Male> what have you where you have <Speech_Male> different <Speech_Male> types of <hes> <Speech_Male> selection panels <Speech_Male> for state <SpeakerChange> judges <Speech_Male> and in some places <Silence> <Speech_Male> So, <Speech_Male> the the the the problem <Speech_Male> of Elitism <Speech_Male> or reactions <Speech_Male> there too <Speech_Male> I don't think <Speech_Male> <hes> courts <Speech_Male> are the <Speech_Male> proper targets <Speech_Male> of those kinds <Speech_Male> of <hes> <Speech_Male> those kinds of concerns <Speech_Male> I want <Speech_Male> our <Speech_Male> judges to be divorced <Speech_Male> from the <Speech_Male> rough and tumble <Speech_Male> and muck <Speech_Male> and mud of the normal <Speech_Male> political given <Speech_Male> take. What <Speech_Male> I want them to do <Speech_Male> is forced more of <Speech_Male> those tough controversial <Speech_Male> decisions <Speech_Male> into that muck <Speech_Male> and so that we have <Speech_Male> congress and <Speech_Male> state legislatures <Speech_Male> debating <Speech_Male> all those controversies <Speech_Male> rather <Speech_Male> than the Supreme <Speech_Male> Court <Speech_Male> let alone one potential <Speech_Male> swing vote <Speech_Male> <hes> deciding <Speech_Male> all of those <Speech_Male> issues I think it's preposterous <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to Echo Ben. <Speech_Male> Sasse at <Speech_Male> <hes> Brett Kavanagh's. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Confirmation hearing <Speech_Male> that there are more protests <Speech_Male> in front <Speech_Male> of the Supreme Court <Speech_Male> than in front of Congress <Speech_Male> right are <Speech_Male> our representatives <Speech_Male> are supposed to be the <Speech_Male> ones that are out <Speech_Male> clashes of <Speech_Male> values and policy <Speech_Male> differences <Speech_Male> spree court supposed <Speech_Male> to be deciding you know <Speech_Male> <hes> whether <Speech_Male> that actions legal <Speech_Male> or not or <Speech_Male> you know tweaking <Speech_Male> this or that? <Speech_Male> Piece of <Speech_Male> legislation that might have <Speech_Male> overreached, but <Speech_Male> it's not supposed to be <Speech_Male> this this grand <Speech_Male> Oracle <Speech_Male> <hes> but we've gotten <Speech_Male> where we are because <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> little by little decade <Speech_Male> after decade <Speech_Male> the court <Speech_Male> courts <Speech_Male> of <SpeakerChange> more <Speech_Male> broadly judiciary <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> expanded <Speech_Male> federal <SpeakerChange> and therefore <Speech_Male> its own <Speech_Male> power <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and thus <Speech_Male> become more of a target. <Speech_Male> So again, <Speech_Male> there's no easy solutions <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> a proper <Speech_Male> re-balancing of <Speech_Male> power including <Speech_Male> giving Congress, <Speech_Male> <hes> more <Speech_Male> power, forcing <Speech_Male> it to legislate <Speech_Male> specifically <Speech_Male> rather than these broad <Speech_Male> delegations, <Speech_Male> power <Speech_Male> <hes> and <Speech_Male> more federalism <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> saying <Speech_Male> that Congress can't just do <Speech_Male> whatever. <Speech_Male> There is a majority <Speech_Male> in Congress <Speech_Male> <hes> to do <Speech_Male> at that <Speech_Male> would force all of these <Speech_Male> tough decisions <Speech_Male> in other areas <Speech_Male> and only then <Speech_Male> will people <Speech_Male> start <Speech_Male> caring less. <Speech_Male> About. <Speech_Male> Those <hes> <Speech_Male> nine black road <Speech_Male> arbiters at <Speech_Male> one first <SpeakerChange> place. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think on that <Speech_Male> note we're going <Speech_Male> to. <Speech_Male> Have to leave <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> The book <Speech_Male> is Supreme <SpeakerChange> Disorder, <Speech_Male> judicial <Speech_Male> nominations, <Speech_Male> and the politics <Speech_Male> of America's highest <Speech_Male> court <Speech_Male> We were just so pleased <Speech_Male> to be able to have <Speech_Male> Ilya Shapiro <Speech_Male> <hes> with us for <Speech_Male> the last <hes> <Speech_Male> <hes> of our <Speech_Male> James. Wilson podcasts. <Speech_Male> Thank you so <Speech_Male> much. Elliot a real <Speech_Male> treat and we highly <Speech_Male> recommend <Speech_Male> you pick up a <Speech_Male> copy of the book <Speech_Male> on Amazon Barnes <Speech_Male> and noble and it fine <Speech_Male> bookstores nationwide. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's a pleasure to be <Speech_Male> with you and I'll <Speech_Male> add a

congress Supreme Court representative Gulf Coast Mississippi executive Elliot Brett Kavanagh America Ilya Shapiro Wilson
What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:26 min | 7 months ago

What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

"Venture capital doing to change. It's mostly white, mostly male culture. Nothing radical from American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm molly would. So for years, the venture capital industry has been pressured to be more diverse and inclusive invest in more women and people of Color hire more women and people of Color. In the past month we've talked with black startup founders investors about what it will take to drive real change in tech. And they said it'll take work from big silicon valley firms, and the big institutions that invest in those firms called limited partners or LP's. So we called big silicon. Valley, venture capital firm Ilya Fishman is a partner at Kleiner. Perkins I asked him what Kleiner is doing to improve representation in the valley. We do need to lower the barriers to entry and to connect. We also tried to connect new talent with tack in Silicon Valley and so we actually have a program called Kleiner Perkins fellows. We connect them with internship programs in our portfolio companies, and sometimes outside of our portfolio companies. When we started, the program was only seven percent female. It's about fifty percent female today we're about seven percent, Hispanic, and four percent black, and so obviously those are very early starting points, but hopefully we can achieve the same ramp on. Those measures of diversity as we did on gender diversity for program I. Hear you say all this, and it doesn't sound that different from what we've been hearing for. At least almost the twenty years that I've been in this industry. What would it really take to change this culture, would it? Does it take LP's like? Does it take your investor saying? We understand that you're committed to this, but you actually have to have a black partner before twenty twenty two. I mean I. Think ultimately this comes down to us all actually doing the things that we've talked about doing right for us. It's identifying amazing entrepreneurs and founders or executives can become those partners down the line. I would I would love for us to to be able to add a ethnically diverse partner I think committing to a higher by twenty twenty two. Yeah, it's it's hard for me to commit because I wanNA make sure that we actually executed on properly. I guess the question really is. There seems to be agreement that this is a systemic problem that needs systemic solutions. Do you feel like this solutions they are proposing. Are Systemic that they go deep enough. The fundamental systemic change starts with changing the types of people that are in technology and giving more access, and that's why I'm so excited about the fellows program, and that winds up being a feeder to everything else I think it's all happening i. wish it would happen faster. Couldn't you'd be that change I? Mean I hear you and I hear that you're doing these things, but you say you wish it could. Could happen faster and I feel like you're the guy man why my view is I think we are. We are making the changes, and by the way adding Carter's team is something. That's a very significant commitment. Right in general because these these relationships last decades I. Think you have my commitment that we will. We will look and we'll have to look, and we'll can commit to looking for diverse candidates as part of the process. Ilia Fishman is a partner at the venture capital firm. Kleiner Perkins according to at least one survey. Black people make up on the one percent of investment partners adventure firms. That's seven actual people.

Partner Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Ilya Fishman LP Silicon Valley Carter Twenty Twenty
What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:26 min | 7 months ago

What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

"Venture capital doing to change. It's mostly white, mostly male culture. Nothing radical from American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm molly would. So for years, the venture capital industry has been pressured to be more diverse and inclusive invest in more women and people of Color hire more women and people of Color. In the past month we've talked with black startup founders investors about what it will take to drive real change in tech. And they said it'll take work from big silicon valley firms, and the big institutions that invest in those firms called limited partners or LP's. So we called big silicon. Valley, venture capital firm Ilya Fishman is a partner at Kleiner. Perkins I asked him what Kleiner is doing to improve representation in the valley. We do need to lower the barriers to entry and to connect. We also tried to connect new talent with tack in Silicon Valley and so we actually have a program called Kleiner Perkins fellows. We connect them with internship programs in our portfolio companies, and sometimes outside of our portfolio companies. When we started, the program was only seven percent female. It's about fifty percent female today we're about seven percent, Hispanic, and four percent black, and so obviously those are very early starting points, but hopefully we can achieve the same ramp on. Those measures of diversity as we did on gender diversity for program I. Hear you say all this, and it doesn't sound that different from what we've been hearing for. At least almost the twenty years that I've been in this industry. What would it really take to change this culture, would it? Does it take LP's like? Does it take your investor saying? We understand that you're committed to this, but you actually have to have a black partner before twenty twenty two. I mean I. Think ultimately this comes down to us all actually doing the things that we've talked about doing right for us. It's identifying amazing entrepreneurs and founders or executives can become those partners down the line. I would I would love for us to to be able to add a ethnically diverse partner I think committing to a higher by twenty twenty two. Yeah, it's it's hard for me to commit because I wanNA make sure that we actually executed on properly. I guess the question really is. There seems to be agreement that this is a systemic problem that needs systemic solutions. Do you feel like this solutions they are proposing. Are Systemic that they go deep enough. The fundamental systemic change starts with changing the types of people that are in technology and giving more access, and that's why I'm so excited about the fellows program, and that winds up being a feeder to everything else I think it's all happening i. wish it would happen faster. Couldn't you'd be that change I? Mean I hear you and I hear that you're doing these things, but you say you wish it could. Could happen faster and I feel like you're the guy man why my view is I think we are. We are making the changes, and by the way adding Carter's team is something. That's a very significant commitment. Right in general because these these relationships last decades I. Think you have my commitment that we will. We will look and we'll have to look, and we'll can commit to looking for diverse candidates as part of the process. Ilia Fishman is a partner at the venture capital firm. Kleiner Perkins according to at least one survey. Black people make up on the one percent of investment partners adventure firms. That's seven actual people.

Partner Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Ilya Fishman LP Silicon Valley Carter Twenty Twenty
Army Deploys Video Games to Reach Recruits Amid Pandemic

America's Morning News

03:37 min | 8 months ago

Army Deploys Video Games to Reach Recruits Amid Pandemic

"Army recruiters unable to head to high schools and set up booths at state fairs because of the corona virus are turning to video game tournaments to reach prospective soldiers it's a story by Ben castling reporter at the Wall Street journal Ben what's going on one of the things that they are very good what they started using video game tournaments that wore out reach your potential recruits the army the twenty eighteen has has released been using using video games or that broadly is aware about reach twenty nineteen they have started an E. sports teams so there's an actual army team with soldiers who played video games all time and through that they have been able to to talk to more people remotely online and and it's gotten us thousands of leads by doing well I think did you say that they actually have done better with leads through some of these video game tournaments than say act actually setting up a state fair yeah so it one one cream d'italia in Syracuse New York had the day that the single the end of that that had the single most number of leads they've ever gotten from any of that was through a call of duty tournament which is the first person very popular first person shooting up a popular video game you know there's it doesn't your as many as many man hours to do service recruiting so you know think about if you're if you're going to like a state fair or setting up a booth at a convention or something you've got to go through all the set up you've got to take people on they have to man up the whole time university of game tournament a lot because a few people can really can really have a have a greater impact it with with less man hours going into it and he's been able to do that now it remains to be seen whether or not alternately this it was just a Darby Darby replacing your recruiter to local high school with the apple is doing virtual recruiting US is just another tool another tool in the army's not yet but it comes at a very opportune time because there's no one person or group of US court speak with been canceling reporter at the Wall Street journal's pieces gold army deploys video games to reach recruits amid pandemic while so how are you a video game recruiter with the U. S. army how does it work so the army had which I spoke with the with the defacto head of the armies of the army okay that took quite a video games full time and a couple years ago he was he was serving their creator he is a senior research I was serving as a recruiter Louisiana realized making a lot of connections with with potential recruits by talking about video games how does so how many conversations starts if you're online I guess competing against somebody who could be a recruit to say you you seem to be pretty good with that gun what's your name age and email address as well well the the the thing about the the army's recruiting effort with the city of games is Hey they don't want to they don't want to come off as just recruiters who were kind of we were at entered into these bikes senator Ilyas to to purposefully recruit a lot of a lot of the conversations come up organically what happened yeah he will be playing somebody who they're playing against we'll see that no longer playing you know but the person's profile your soldiers active duty they're part of the army U. sports team

Army
Live - Throwing Copper

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:42 min | 8 months ago

Live - Throwing Copper

"Hello everybody. Welcome to audio judo. I'm Matthew I'm kyle. Thanks for joining us today. Indeed Al How're you doing? I'm doing pretty good. How are you doing well? That's good it's good to hear. Superman does good. I do well very nice. Thanks thirty rock. We got some business I do. Oh good let's talk earlier this week. We were lucky enough to talk to One of my musical idols. Fish the ex lead singer of a progressive rock band from that. Was that still around now. But was very popular in the eighties Very continues to popularity in Europe not so much in the states The band's name was Meridian fish is about to release his final studio album later this year and he was gracious enough to join us from his home in Scotland and chat for about forty five minutes or so. It was great Since our timeline might be out of wack currently That episode mice most likely aired before this one did so if you are joining us for the first time to listen to this episode. I encourage you to go back. And listen to that one as well Gave us some great info about the current state of the music industry regarding re Corona Virus. Yeah and some other super stuff as well as well as cooking. Lovely lamb dinner for his mother while he was on the phone with us so that was a great interview. I really enjoyed it. That was fun is fun. Talk to once. You can understand what he's saying. I'm just kidding. That's surprisingly had no problem with that. Just a couple words yet. A Scottish before we had talked to matthew was like Ilyas a Scottish brogue in his voice and I was like okay. So I'm really going to pay attention. I picked it right up. I don't know how good I mean. It wasn't fancy than me. I guess that's good. Yeah there was only one time where I was kind of like. What was that word but that I think we both looked at each other. Like what the heck was that word but we got ammos great. We got it through context. I believe yeah also Again since I don't know exactly when this will be airing I'm not entirely sure where we will be. In the Corona Virus Saga Twenty Twenty. Either way the crisis it has affected everyone including independent artists trying to carve out a living back in October. We interviewed a band of Kentucky. Named the cold stares they're great ban really wonderful guys And this crisis hit them. Quite hard. Cancelled all their gigs. That they had lined up for the summer as well as putting a stop to some of their teaching gigs for the time. Being since most of those are done in person they put together a special t shirt that they are selling for twenty five bucks to help supplement their lost other. I bought a couple And if you'd like to buy one or just have a look at them Encourage you to go to their merchandise site. It's the cold stares dot square dot site. Anything you can do to help out would be appreciated that includes paying for some downloads. Listen their music or whatever but your independent artists out. There is most likely struggling big time so if you want to listen to them or you have one in particular that you enjoy listening to throw him a couple of downloads. Do whatever you to help them out because this is a very difficult time for everybody. Yes it is. That's all I have for old business. So this week's choice. Nineteen ninety four album throwing copper by the group live just so we're clear. This was one of my favorite bands from that period. And this record is probably my top fifteen. Those lists are always really difficult kind of weird to make. I'm not saying that this is one of the top fifteen records ever made or that. I even think this is one of the best top fifteen records that I could listen to. It's just one of those records that I go back to a few months and listen to us to have a permanent place in my multi. Cd Changer and it's one of those records at shows up in my top plays when spotify. Geezer your list at the end of the year. So was it trunk mounted multi play. Cd player it was. That's nice. It's very ah Nice. He had a removable one as well. That was an different car. But Julio that was a fancy with the little handle how Mr Rich Roller Rare. It's all it's all for the music so live. The band consists of four guys. Chad gracey on drums Chad Taylor on guitar to Chad's a Patrick Dole Heimer on bass and Ed Kowalczyk on vocals and guitar. They have been together since the mid eighties when they were all in their middle teens. Typical suburbanite garage band They were founded in York. Pennsylvania originally called public affection but renamed themselves live in the nineteen eighties right before they got a record deal. Oh they regularly played. Cbgb's in New York. Those concerts help secure their first record deal. Nineteen Ninety one nineteen ninety-one New Year's eve of Nineteen ninety-one to be exact. They released their first album mental jewelry. And that was the first I ever heard of them or saw them to be more precise oh I saw them and heard them for the first time on. Mtv's twenty minutes It was for song called operation. Spirit the tyranny of tradition and it was very direct for me when I first thought it caught me off guard. It was very jarring so I was at that time. Nineteen year old kid about three months away from meeting my future wife smoking. A lot of we'd drink a lot of beer very angry and confused about my life and prospects I've been raised. Catholic went to Catholic school and was jaded mad about a lot of things I had been raised to believe. We're true. My parents were devout Catholics. My was a permanent deacon in the Catholic Church which in Catholicism is as close as you can get to being a priest without actually becoming one more than anything because he had been married. I my mom also had a certificate in theology from the seminary which as close as you can get to being a nun without actually being one more than anything because she had been married. I pattern here. So they taught classes on sexuality and marriage so yeah it was weird. Oh boy that's very weird however that was fun as was very strange but they were not strict. Like you would expect. Yeah I had to go to church every Sunday But I still watch rated movies. My parents drank. They knew I did too so it was fine but I was angry because it all seemed like a big scam to me And I realized that we're kind of far afield from music but it's kind of relevant so when I was a kid I was really bought into this charade I was an altar boy sang in the choir played. Drums and a host of different events at the church went to Catholic school and I believed what I was being taught because that was what I was raised to believe but then I got into high school and I started forming the person I was going to become and began to think for myself I started. Look things look things differently right? I went to a pretty liberal Catholic highschool and in our religion classes which were daily especially towards senior year. We were encouraged at some point to explore different religions. I'm sure it was under the guise of comparison shopping but it opened a lot of is because other religions or spiritual practices made a lot more sense than the pomp and tradition of Catholicism especially like during Easter or something.

Matthew I Catholic School Twenty Twenty Chad Gracey Spotify Europe Catholic Church York Scotland Kentucky Julio New York Cbgb MTV Pennsylvania Ilyas Chad Taylor
Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:02 min | 10 months ago

Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

"Welcome to the PODCAST. Hi Everyone. It's great to have you on the show I've followed research for Your work for quite some time and I'm looking forward to digging into some of the new things that you're working on but before we do that I'd love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you got started working in machine learning okay so I was born in Vietnam. I did my Undergrad in Australia. And in my second year. My undergrad I started some project doing machine London with Alex. Mola a back in Australia and back. Then I was played with. Kodo methods Then I Did my PhD AT STANFORD. A on a lot of deep learning back in the day when deployed in whispers or very cool. And that's the route two thousand seven and around two thousand eleven I did a summer internship at Google and that was when Google Brin project was founded so when I was there that was a long and Jackie Naan Greco data was there and I. It was the sun so we started out small. That sounds cool. Yeah and then I did some of the Scaling Up Neuro networks with Google Britain folks and then You know at the end Up to two years did some work on machine translation with the media and Oreo VR. He's now did mine. Owner of Ilya is now at opening I and we develop sold end to end. Solution methods and Around two thousand sixteen. I started looking into more like You Know Auto. Mau Architecture search and more recently are looking to Malacca together with Otto may also look into Sent me supervised learning and it's awesome awesome now. You mentioned early on doing work with Alex. Mullah was he was this before he was at Carnegie Mellon was visiting in Australia. He was a professor in Australia. Yeah I I went to a university. In a small air. In the capital city Austrailia go Kendra. He was yeah camera and he was Professor Edward Research. So I thought I had. I have along Very interested in AI and machine learning and took me for that. I took a class data mining and so on and talk a little bit boring but the ability to actually learn. It's actually a super fascinating so I contacted him and he was moonlight co methods machine learning and we worked together for maybe a few years before he went to he went to America then. Cmu and Amazon. Okay okay so a lot of your. Recent work has been focused on this idea of You know automating machine learning and neural architecture surge to allow machines to find the best deep learning architectures in like. It's a little bit about how you arrived at working in that area. What some of the motivations were for getting started digging into that problem so I've been Along interested in this idea of self improvement machine should be self improving itself a machine learning and even and when I started doing co methods with Alex. I always ask him. You know how the Dakota bandwith and so on how some of the HYPOC Ramat does include methods decided and apparently they decided by using things like Cross validation on then where I work on. Koroma two narrow networks. My hope is to make the hype. Affirmative go away. But that's how is the opposite so if you look at the a Kabul Lucien neural networks at has a lot of hype privatised right like how many how many layers you want it to be and how many channels you wanted to be. And what are the some of the high assize apprentice since on a Coulda with all the training parameters? Yeah all learning. Dry and as researcher develop more and more techniques FAW EURONET. There's more decisions that you have to make. That feel like. This is like a problem that can be helped by a little bit of automation so So I I observe a lot of my colleagues who will when designing networks and I asked him about the principles of design. Your neural networks. And you started are having some really solid principles like Skip CONNECTION SO. The gradient can flow through the network concern. But as you tune the network Karen Hata do no longer have the principal is around. You know trial and error right you you try this a little bit and simply with better so you try that more so. I think that that is something that may be ready for automation so even during my Grad School. I already talked about trying this but I thought you know. Maybe we didn't have enough compute because training net already takes took me days so when I saw that new control. Units are are in thirty minutes. Something like that on on safer I thought. Oh maybe this is the right time to try this. So that's when I started doing this. Newer architecture search in two thousand sixteen. It's interesting that you know. Even with all of the compute resources of Google. You had to wait until the time was compressed. Enough in order to be able to tackle the problem. Yeah to get really good results. You want the networks will be really big and that will take a long time to train. Yeah and it's it's It's funny coming from me that we have so much resources that will go train in EURONET still taking a long time And so maybe talk about the the first steps in In that area. Did you jump right into neural architecture? Search or was that the you know a a an end stage or end result of this work where I I on some of the related ideas on and off since two thousand twelve like playing around with how to do. Better hyper profitable tuning and none of that. It's really published. Because I didn't have good results have pugh and so on so so I tried it on and off over the time you know every year I would set out some time to try this idea for a few months and you know and it didn't work very well because like a procurement song and then Two Thousand Sixteen. I met Barrett's off would as my colleague now at Google and he's very talented. So we say oh. Let's let's try at the idea of Jews in like a reinforcement learning to generate and network like a little layer in an network for for a ceasefire model. Seafoam motto. Is already at the time you could say that you know enough of you depends on how where you want to be but you from thirty minutes to a few hours and the seems like about the right amount of time to get this going and my prediction is that you have to train. Maybe either between from one thousand to ten thousand bottles and I did a backup our calculation and thought. Oh this might be the right time to do it but you know I have tried this some of these related ideas in much before

Google Austrailia Alex Mola Vietnam Stanford London Mau Architecture CMU Jackie Naan Greco Carnegie Mellon Faw Euronet Professor Edward Research Ilya Hypoc Ramat America Euronet Professor Mullah
Mythical Creatures Week Night Kids Choice

Chompers

02:17 min | 10 months ago

Mythical Creatures Week Night Kids Choice

"Start. You're brushing on the top of your mouth. Pick aside and make sure you're brushing the inside the outside and the chewing side of each tooth one breath first mythical creature comes from avery. Avery is a big fan of giants because they stomp and destroy things. We like giants at Chompers because everything they do. They do it. Big like the giant lumberjack. Paul Bunyan Paul Bunyan had a giant PET BABE. The Big Blue Ox. And then there's the giant in Jack and the beanstalk. He had a giant magic harp and goose that lays golden eggs switcher brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth. And don't forget. Those front teeth chompers loves UNICORNS and so do a lot of champions like Riley Chelsea Alison Theodore Arbor Ivy. Lana Emily Bailey. Beatrice and Violet Lola Lindsey Ilya Illinois Mary Reese Lauren Juniper Avery Adeline Molly Khloe may tilly and Abigail who? That is a lot of Unicorn. Love some of your favorite things about UNICORNS are. They're beautiful pink hair. The Special Horn on top of their head and they have magical powers Switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth. But don't brush too hard Max sentence mythical creature named Bob. It's a blue raccoon with red pointy horns. We'll look to BOB IN OLIVER BOOKS. About mythical creatures and couldn't find him so we think. Max Invented a New Myth. Which is something anyone can do. So what do you think the myth of Bob? The blue raccoon with red pointing horns is all about. I bet it's a good one swift rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and give your tongue of rush to if you make up your own mythical creature what would it look like and what would it sound like mythical creatures can be anything you imagine

Mary Reese Lauren Juniper Aver Paul Bunyan Paul Bunyan BOB Big Blue Ox Chompers Riley Chelsea Alison Theodore Avery Lana Emily Bailey Violet Lola Lindsey Ilya Illin Jack Switzer MAX Beatrice Molly Khloe Abigail Tilly
Washington Capitals at Minnesota Wild 4-3

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 11 months ago

Washington Capitals at Minnesota Wild 4-3

"Bloody a fight in the capitals and the flight capitals grew up the first goal but then scored three unanswered goals through well XO ventured a four two win over the Minnesota wild and the fight brother Dylan scrapping with Ryan Hartman after Harbin slash of the capital's Ilya Kovalchuk head coach Jon Gruden that's the stuff that you you can't you can drop all the places you want install video you want the one guys care for each other and they want to take care of their teammate that's when you got something that you

Ryan Hartman Jon Gruden Minnesota Dylan Harbin Ilya Kovalchuk
New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

10:09 min | 1 year ago

New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

"New York for its entire. History has brought people together of wildly different backgrounds and that might be different races or cultures or a geographic areas Irish people and Jews and African Americans and you know Italians but also different classes. You had the tenement girl and the rich playboy and everybody in between well. That's just a natural for storytelling. But when these stories were told by Hollywood what was distinctly New York about them could get flattened out for the mainstream. If you look today at a Marx brothers movies the first couple of Marx brothers films. They're throwing all these terms around. Mommy's Nora Nori. There is Jewish for free loader animal crackers in the coconuts where designs you know for a New York audience but when the Marx Brothers then do moved to Hollywood and they begin making films for MGM. There's no Yiddish in those movies anymore. Right they become the sort of universal. You Know Hollywood movie Marx Brothers that that's from forty second street classical nine hundred thirty three musical about the Broadway chorus girl who becomes a star that connick number has the busby Berkeley dance formations but it also has the skyline the elevated train street vendors and attempted rape and murder. It's a film about New York. Made in Hollywood that helped form what sanders calls the mythic city. That dream version of New York. That's a distillation of the real place. Forty Second Street and all those back stage musicals that were made all the homes that were about the putting on of a Broadway show. They were shot in Broadway theaters. They were shot in Hollywood sound stage theaters. You know there was just endless numbers of these amazing films which did not have a single frame except possibly the establishing shot the opening shot would be shot in New York as the credits ran by with music behind him in. May Nineteen thirty. Three paramount turned the Astoria studios over to its main creditor western electric that companies filmmaking arm Eastern Services Studios INC operated it as a rental studio for independent productions. Its output varied widely. The Scoundrel for example was set in Manhattan's literary world. Noel Coward plays a ruthless hated publisher. Julian place the woman he charms. Mary's then abandoned putting something happened. Man I do live. I hope you're playing folk killed when you're dying using it on. The homepage of the year does not think of human when he dies. He's condemned to damnation unless he finds one person on Earth to mourn. Him novelists writes Ben. Hecht and Charles MacArthur rotated but at Astoria. They also got to produce and direct. They won an academy award for best original. We don't be Marquette. Hulu your new. There was a series of Spanish language. Musical starring Tangos Star Carlos Gardell Tambien. A nineteen thirty. Three's Emperor Jones was based on the controversial Eugene O'Neill play main character was a black pullman porter who escapes prison to become dictator of a small island. The film could only have been made with independent funding. Then the studios were called to service for World War Two. The Department acquired the property in Nineteen Forty Two and the pictorial center of the army. Signal Corps moved into make trading and propaganda films. They expanded the facility and built barracks for the soldiers. The army used motion pictures in the war effort and turned to experienced filmmakers for help frank. Capra worked on a series of orientation films called why we fight one episode related to our won the Oscar for best documentary. Just what was it? Made US change our way of living overnight but turned our resources are machines our whole nation into one vast awesome producing more and more weapons of war instead of the old materials by the end of the war the ABC employed over two thousand people making movies over half of them civilians. All this work even brought new film techniques like multiple angles shooting and change film in even more momentous ways for five years American audience. It has been seeing newsreels. And it's someone you know. A movie maker said well you couldn't you couldn't bring in the enemy for for production meeting you know before. The battle and people went out with sixteen millimeter cameras. And these lightweight cameras that could go everywhere. They saw actual action after the war audiences and creators had developed a taste for this more realistic filmmaking. There was an appetite. For a new kind of filmmaking. That would be used more available light less contrived cinematography be shot with faster. Granier film be more shot on location and feel more like a took place in real place and not this kind of fabricated construct and be more adult this desire for realism meant the glossy representations of New York. That Hollywood made before the war wouldn't do director is like Ilya. Kazan felt their stories needed New York locations and New York talent. You don't understand I coulda had class. Gerber contamination could have been somebody by the MID FIFTIES NEW YORK. Filmmakers were more than just contenders. The Oscar wins for on the waterfront in nineteen fifty five and Mardi fifty six affirm. That excellence could come from outside. Hollywood New York is setting is capable of whatever mood or dramatic statement? You WanNa make architecturally in its light for talk about winter light as Mr Bergman did. New York's winter light image. That Sidney Lumet in the documentary film titled by Sidney Lumet. He grew up on the lower east side in nineteen fifty seven. He went from directing theater and TV. Two movies with twelve angry men. You're asking us to believe that somebody else did the stabbing with exactly the same kind of knife. Larger a million or one go onto make more New York classics like Serpico Dog Day afternoon and network. He died in twenty eleven. I'm not comfortable anyplace but New York when I leave New York for any other place in the United States My nose starts to bleed. Filmmakers at this time took full advantage of New York locations for their exterior shooting. When they needed a controlled indoor set they may do with whatever studios were available. Tv Or old movie studios the old Bronx by graph for example operated as a rental studio under different names until the seventy s the Astoria Studios. Meanwhile were still occupied by the army. There was some leftover stages from the twenty s and they reuse them and Sidney Lumet told me amazing stories of going onto these studios which he was in an editing room up in the Bronx. That had been Edison's old editing suite with an e draw you know kind of worked into the curtains E for Edison. These were the oldest movie studios in the world and they were using them in the nineteen fifties to make all those great early in mid fifty s movies like Twelve angry men and on the waterfront the city eventually recognized how vital New York and the screener to each other in nineteen sixty six mayor. John established the first mayor's film office in the world to lower hurdles to filming their Lindsay's film office streamline the permitting process and removed a lot of red tape for shooting in the city he even dedicated a police. Unit to location shoots then in nineteen seventy. The army moved production to different site and turned the Astoria property over to the federal government. This was not simply a movement of some soldiers because most of the people making the films were grips carpenters electricians and actress who were part of. New York's commercial motion picture industry so they were not at all happy when this plug got pulled in Astoria. The complex sat abandoned. For years unprotected and open vandals people would go in there. Rip The copper out of the walls and those people with a purpose then they were also just people in there for mischief terrible condition in the meantime you have this eyesore at the edge of a residential communities have halfway between the area and Long Island city. It's just getting worse and worse and worse. They abandoned cars dropped all around weeds growing through the sidewalk. I remember this very clearly. The film unions local community and the city got together to preserve the studio site. Save film jobs and clean up the neighborhood in nineteen seventy seven. They formed the nonprofit a story of Motion Picture and Television Center Foundation. They managed to prevent the studio from being sold off or turn down by getting the site on the National Register of historic places a process that normally took years.

New York Hollywood Astoria Studios Army Sidney Lumet Astoria Marx Brothers United States Oscar Nora Nori Marx MGM Noel Coward Long Island Eastern Services Studios Inc Manhattan Carlos Gardell Tambien
Kovalchuk Scores In SO, Canadiens Rally Past Devils

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:13 sec | 1 year ago

Kovalchuk Scores In SO, Canadiens Rally Past Devils

"Hockey Anthony by villi a second goal of the game coming over time the islanders topped the stars in Brooklyn for three the devils lost in a shoot out to the Canadiens five before new work the only shootout goal curse you former devil Ilya

Anthony Islanders Brooklyn Devils Canadiens Ilya Hockey
Capitals re-sign Backstrom to 5-year, $46M deal

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Capitals re-sign Backstrom to 5-year, $46M deal

"Capitals announcing just about a half hour ago they re signed Backstrom to a five year forty six million dollar contract of your member he joined the capitals in two thousand seven two years after Alex of asking that as they like to say the rest is history and it's been a pretty good history with Baxter and vets can together again Niklas Backstrom staying with the washer capitals this good news comes after last night when the capitals won with yeah Backstrom partner Alex of etching getting both goals to nothing win of the Carolina hurricanes Ilya S. M. sold off the rookie goaltender with his first

Alex Baxter Ilya S. M. Niklas Backstrom Partner Carolina
"ilya" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

09:47 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

"Of paper right that the documents that if if you're applying for insurance on your business the agent many times has has a lot of the details filled out and then you sign it and they and then you submit to carriers so what we traditionally used. When I was still in the game? We're called accords. And I forget what what all that stands for. But they were universal forms that could be submitted to any insurance company but they contained a lot of surplus fields and categories. And you know you couldn't the way I looked at it was if I send this to a customer and ask them to fill it out. I'm never getting it back because going to be so confused and half the time I myself was confused as to what I had to fill out. Does this take the place of the the old the court system could and I must say I must admit this. PODCAST is very different than any other podcasts. I've ever done you on the other. End Actually know the industry a little bit more out the typical questions I get asked as well. Why have the agent or can it be all on the website? Or why is it so complicated. You are digging Further which is Great H. This is where I spend most of my day because you've had personal experience with how confusing I loved us and to know that are listening. He got Full benefit of of What is happening in our space? Yes there is a standard It's called a accords and You know designed at a time longtime ago for This this kind of purpose but it's a little bit outdated And so we're left. What today is really a space? That doesn't have standards standards more more happening digitally less and less happening my paper so people are skipping accords. And we're trying to integrate as much of the court process says we can into it But what's moving forward is an API based approach so this is a type of technical integration between insurance company in the software to present only only two questions that are relevant. So that you're not looking at a form of supplemental questions actually don't have anything to do with that business or maybe a little off color for guide a person to it yet. Drive me crazy Josh. And if people are listening they don't know what a supplemental L. as there's the the court application right. There's the main application you have to fill out for anybody. Your insurance and then they would have an additional supplemental. It'd be two or three other pages of specialize this questions. Oh my gosh would just anyway. I don't want to get our listeners to confused over time. But that's exactly what we're able to solve through technology is we're able to have one simpler smoother Think of it as a screen or is near view process none intelligence so it's dynamic and based on your previous answer to a question a different subset of questions appear that are only relevant to you or that type of business so you don't have to get frustrated so you don't have to come back to it later so you can get it all done in one single swoop with a phone call or one meeting or one interaction with the customer then on the other side you know those same forms drive crazy those very insurance companies because the answers could be wrong or their omitted or using the way you answered it or they're left out exactly so we're trying to streamline it so that the right person needs to get it on the back end and more and more cases that's machine and getting the right inputs in Without frustrating everybody in the process. Yeah Oh boy I. I'm having flashbacks right now. Listening she doc money so all right so most of our audience are likely to be customers. I'll put it that way Ilya and I. It sounds like to me. I mean I'd like to get your take on this but it sounds like what they can look forward to. Is this actual far off land. We've always dreamed of where you fill out one sheet of paper you know. Maybe it's more than one page but it's it's one single form you sign it and the next thing you know you've got an insurance quote in the next time you hear from your agent you've got a a a quote or several quotes and you can choose from one and make your decision. It sounds like it's it's getting closer if not if we're not already there to that being the case. Exactly are approachable. Penguin has always been to remove the friction in the process. One of those Friction points has been interaction the back and forth your age and ask you a little bit of information you take some time to respond answer it either. She submits it and you go in that loop a couple of times. We're trying to remove those. Why not have all the information readily available to be asked So that the consumer or the small business owner can coakley get through it So that the agency has a comprehensive use so that it could submitted to the insurance company off the Algo pages something we don't use 'cause it's more digital on your screen but You get the okay now again. I'M GONNA use a little bit of industry lingo here so audience in insurance you have. This is what I remember anyway. You have standard markets and then you have nonstandard markets and basically the standard markets means Businesses says that are generally pretty safe bets for the Insurance Company so a law office is a standard market a a doctor's office as a standard market take a you know a cafeteria usually as a standard market but then you had non standard stuff so when I was I did a lot of nonstandard stuff and I I did things like motorcycle race tracks and You know these These these corporate finance firms and they were concerned about that. What what I'm what I'm getting at here? Elliott is if their agents listening to this or agency owners. And that's going to be one of the alarms is going to go off in their head. Well what about my nonstandard stuff it can we are. Are you able to address some or or dare I say it even all of that as well through this yeah today is an exciting time time. Bullpen when we have effectively Got The admitted market well-covered We have carriers products coverage types all well represented from the micro BOP in one business category in one state to You you know another example. More comprehensive solution in another state That's all done. Across the twenty thousand and change business categories across all coverage abridge types worker's comp. Gl commercial out cetera across all the a jurisdictions feel really great about that our next undertaking which we have been working on this year and putting a heavy emphasis on next year is in US excess and surplus and what your Suggesting adjusting and we actually see that a very large percentage of everything go store exchange and by the way our businesses and exchange we operate the largest small commercial exchange in the United States That's the number of businesses going in the risks that are being properly vetted and inbound through our our our platform what we see happening in our changes more and more in in a side. And we've actually been working with carriers that are either own Innis carriers barriers or have a specialty and niche Specialty products to try to digitize that product out process even more So you have a world now where you can get Rate back or you can get a policy bound to our platform in the excess and surplus markets. And we're doing that more and more we're automating declamations Printing out the proper forms are automated into the the print out of the proper perform for up David's And making that a more robust process so that Back in your prior life. It's you're that agent you can handle all that in one single swoop and because we're addressing the U. S. market or able to actually go back to our broker a wholesaler our carrier partners and get them to he used platform even more because of all encompassing tool for them. Yeah that's that's exciting because the way the way those non-standard market's always sounded to me was like the more you discover how much you know I know about it. The more you discover how much you don't know about it. You know. Just how many of them are out there. And who's willing to do. What and you know here in like in Washington for example but once the marijuana was legalized I started having people come to me asking? Can you help me get insurance coverage for my marijuana shop and I never really could make it happen. Happen for one reason or another but But needless to say you know it was A. It was a like searching for a needle in a haystack. And them to to be able to skip over a few of those steps I think for a lot of agents even more so today that would be a tremendous help. Yep Yeah Yeah. We're at a point and our evolution of the company where admitted and non admitted carriers are now being slaughtered in implementing. I an integrated into our application. So there's more options to users who tend to be the distribution agents brokers insurer tax that we work with a lot And now I've been thinking of this story and we're getting down on time here but I this. This happened to.

marijuana US Innis Josh Ilya business owner Penguin Washington Elliott David niche Specialty coakley
Capitals edge Hurricanes behind Kuznetsov, Eller

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Capitals edge Hurricanes behind Kuznetsov, Eller

"The Washington Capitals use a strong second period to earn a four three road victory over the Carolina hurricanes after a scoreless first Washington got back to back goals in the second by Richard politicking of getting his that's ought to take a two nothing lead after forty minutes Jordan stall opened the scoring in the third for the hurricanes putting them within one but goals by Lars eller Jake of Ronald for Washington gave them a four one lead Carolina would score two more goals the third to get within one once again but Washington was able to seal the win capitals goalie Ilya Samsonov made thirty eight saves in the wind Dennis **** Raleigh North Carolina

Washington Capitals Washington Richard Politicking Lars Eller Jake Ronald Carolina Capitals Ilya Samsonov Jordan Raleigh North Carolina
Oshie scores in OT, Capitals snap Blue Jackets' win streak

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Oshie scores in OT, Capitals snap Blue Jackets' win streak

"DJ she's goal three thirteen and over time with the capitals to a two one win over Columbus snapping the blue jackets five game winning streak the blue jackets took a one nothing lead in the secondary on Jacob Lillias first NHL goal but the capitals managed to get the equalizer in the third one Carl Haglund lit the lamp for his first of the season Ilya Sam son off at twenty seven saves on the night Alex of edge consistent on she's Golan after the game announced that he would skip the all star game for the second straight year Greg heist Washington

Columbus Carl Haglund Jacob Lillias NHL Ilya Sam Greg Washington
Sports Headline Updates

Howard and Jeremy

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Sports Headline Updates

"Show Jack Eichel name third start the week of third star of the week for the second straight week five goals one assist in three games last week Arizona trades for Taylor hall from New Jersey couple conditional picks and prospects in the kings of waved Ilya Kovalchuk the same speed Indianapolis last night thirty four seven two notes on drew Brees one he is now the all time leader with touchdown passes with the five forty one he passed Peyton manning he also set an NFL record with a ninety six point seven percent completion percentage last night hit on twenty nine of thirty passes apparently missed one running back from the chiefs claim trail Suggs off waivers and Josh Gordon from the Seahawks suspended by the NFL indefinitely for violating the substance abuse policy though those

Taylor Hall Ilya Kovalchuk Indianapolis Brees Chiefs Suggs Seahawks NFL Jack Eichel Arizona New Jersey Peyton Josh Gordon Seven Percent
"ilya" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

"He had a contract dispute. He had no chance with but the end of this year he's got an arbitration rotation case as you know what matters most arbitration numbers. He's going to have them. It's GonNa be interesting other things in the thirty one thoughts blog. I've got a couple of things as one gets you. Well let's focus on some of the things that are in the blog by the way. Did you take a shot at me. You know I initially had your name there but I took it out the cheese pizzas pizzas. Disgusting was that a shot at me. Yes it was like. WHOA WHOA WHOA? I initially had your name in it. I actually Google like people like people fight all the time about should pineapple beyond pizza. It's like there's big internet fights right is a hotdog a sandwich or is it should pineapple beyond pizza that that was like pineapple issue too. I so I figured like you know I'm not GonNa do pineapple because that's too obvious. Actually Google a worst pizza toppings and got people came out with like clam. I'm so I'm not a clam on their car. Pony I'm not I'm not putting that on there and then you know the one thing I could reason I do know cheese pizzas because I went through my vegan phase. So I was doing that too yes growing up it was I went through my scoff as my heavy metal. That'll phase. I did a year. I was more of a PESCA sectarian. Whatever the hell is carrying whatever they call them I just sit there and I'm like I've had the no cheese pizza for a year and it is disgusting? I initially had your name in there but I did take it out. That was in the in the area of the of the Of the blog log. We talk about Taylor Hall and the Pizza Lunch with the With the New Jersey Devils Organization in Calgary again here we go wash rinse repeat the same thing thing every week. Where is Taylor Hall at the Devil's just know what the situation is? I suspect that when they met the message was a bit more direct that I suspect. They told him he wasn't gonNA sign during the year. Because I think that's Darren Farris history but You know I don't know that I would suspect it. I don't know that I think the devils know exactly what's going on and you know we'll see I mean you know. We have the devils on Wednesday night hockey against Ottawa. They've started to show some life. You've been against Vancouver. Is a big big win. You know they got six hundred ten points on a on a tough road trip. I mean that's pretty good. You know McKenzie Blackwood at least started started to show that if he gives them league average goaltending they're going to be okay but took savannah while to get going. It took us a while to get going. He took Gu several while ago. Going the star Nagoya now I think the biggest question is that they put themselves in too much of a whole before they got there Speaking of Tuesday night. Did you watch Colorado Winnipeg. I'll let me go over my Tuesday night. Viewing schedule. I watch Canadians blue jackets. Then I watched overtime penguins rangers. Then then I watched the last little bit of avalanche jets. That game was kind of a blowout after a while. So I think I watched the shootout of Cody's blues uh-huh and I went to a back and forth between predators cannot and oilers sharks with a bit of Red Wings. Docs mixed in there Kale McCarthy. Yup so Larry Murphy Perfidy holds the way. How many screens do you have at home One two three three and then some have my ipod up to see I. I don't like that I don't like it either. I do one screen IPAD and if I have to use my computer or phone but I find if I'm watching more than two games at once. I'm not really watching I've got volume on one. And then I do a lot of glancing like I'll they'll be one where okay. I need to focus on this one because we have that team coming up on Wednesday night hockey or we're going to talk about them on Ice Surfing or I've got to do it on hockey central. So the maple leaf games since hat shows primarily a radio show in Toronto. Make sure you pay attention to that. But I'm getting better at glancing a lot but my druthers. I missed just watching a sitting down and watching one game. I really miss that Elliott's but Kim car new mechanism Eddie Murphy holds the record for most points by a rookie. Defenseman in the NHL. seventy-six Yup. Okay Kate like ridiculous number that's eighty one sees. y'All think he would have been paired with Dave Lewis is the conscience of that pairing was Dave Lewis. That's right earlier you go do whatever you want. And I'll clean up the mess. Back here. Kill McCarthy had eighteen points in eighteen games Gilman cars five goals and thirteen assists kill Macara are looks spectacular. Yes so far. This season Saturday on hockey night is a great nightcap game. For a couple of sidebar reasons one of them is killed mcharg versus Quin Hughes News Colorado versus Vancouver and. I would like to thank our sports net regional team in Vancouver for promoting that I believe during last night's game against Nashville that through the board of the two players. Here's our eight then. I liked that kilmer. Cars got a shot at a couple of things here that rookie points record and unlike Larry Murphy that year because he lost the the Called her to Peter Stephanie. Picking up the call there at the same time I know. You're right about Nathan MacKinnon. I want to get your thoughts on that. And by the way I know Nathan MacKinnon is not the the captain I left out the word alternate and thank you to the three hundred view. I mean direct messages pointing that out. you know I just like to. I don't like to use the word McKinnon Fifty five times in one thought so I try to throw other things in there and I it up. Sorry Mr. Landis Cog quick thought then on Kilmer car and Nathan MacKinnon. Your point about McKinnon is a real good one. I think that personally you could make the argument. That he's the best player in the game. He's dynamite right now. There is a GM and I pointed out. It's not joe sack but he always texts me about how McCain was robbed in the two thousand eight Eighteen Hart trophy ballot voting at so you know you watch them in the third period the other night against the judge and how good he was and he is looked up some of his numbers and Jim Nil. He'll keep guessing Like this is a great. That's pretty eighty five. I think is playing great. You know it's easier to play great when your whole team is there. But you're missing Landis Scott you're missing Rantanen and and he's really going and playing with last night. Was Matt Calvert. Yoenis Donskoy goes goes good players. I understand that I mean they're not the guys. Yeah normally with but like Matt Calvert a good player Suras Donskoy is a good player. And that's why depth the so important in this league like if you're Nathan Mackinnon you can to make it work with those two guys because they'll grow and create space for you all. Where did he go? Okay I'm going there. Yeah they were down their third string goalie last night and they shut out the jets jets. Yeah by the way I heard. Somebody Call Frank Coups France. ooh Last night. I was like who's butchering that name. And then it turns turns out that the how much actually out something that that's how he wants his name pronounced. Francis gets knocked out early Kmart safely barrels into Yup find.

Nathan MacKinnon hockey Vancouver Larry Murphy Kale McCarthy Google Colorado Landis Scott kilmer Matt Calvert Taylor Hall devils Darren Farris Dave Lewis Nagoya Yoenis Donskoy jets Toronto McKenzie Blackwood
Ilya Kovalchuk’s future with Kings remains in limbo after benching

Spittin' Chiclets

01:05 min | 1 year ago

Ilya Kovalchuk’s future with Kings remains in limbo after benching

"Ilya Kovalchuk Kinda strange situation at L. A.. This is the tweet from Elliot Friedman There was word this afternoon that. La is informed Ilya Kovalchuk he will be out of the lineup for the foreseeable future. He is welcome to practice. What the club? But he will not be playing obviously more details as they occur He is do a bonus on December fifteenth The hope is once the bonuses paid December another team might come in and try to trade form Base it seems like they're not happy with his play young kids to play and You know he might. He could be bounced trade. Any point I don't know this hasn't worked the way they hope. Put it that way. Yeah I kind of called it. It was just the guy who's got gotten older and played hockey in a league that it as good as it is over there it's it's not the same tempo not the same person so the contract was surprising to me and there was a lot of people that wanted the Bruins to sign him breath many of those memories but you also understand fans remembering the player that that he was when he left so. But we'll see we'll see what ends up playing but I mean why would you ever give up that money right. Yeah do whatever you need to do to just keep getting paid

Ilya Kovalchuk Elliot Friedman LA Bruins Hockey
"ilya" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Ilya sukar founded parse in twenty eleven to make cloud services for mobile developers. Parse was a newer kind of cloud provider called back back in as a service and it was built to simplify the complexities of amazon web services and the complexities of the mobile ecosystem during this time time facebook was in the middle of its shift towards becoming a mobile application company ads on the smartphone. We're not yet a proven business model offer facebook so facebook was exploring other business lines facebook decided to purchase parse for eighty five million dollars with the intention attention of building a cloud developer platform shortly after the acquisition facebook's mobile ads business started to see considerable success with the mobile ads business finding traction facebook shifted all of its available resources towards supporting that business model because of course it's very good to have a successful ads business and you don't want to drop the ball there in two thousand seventeen parse was shut down ilya joins joins the show to give his experience starting parse and selling the company to facebook and then seeing the company that he had built gets shut down as it became came an unfortunate casualty of facebook's advertising success. We talked a lot about the experience of building back end as a service company as well is what makes facebook special as an organization and how the success of facebook's mobile business happened to fortunately or unfortunately finally coincide with the post parse acquisition life cycle of parse the company. It's quite an interesting story about about the dynamics of an acquisition and ilya was a fantastic guest. I hope you enjoy it..

facebook Ilya sukar amazon developer eighty five million dollars
"ilya" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Ilias ucar founded parse in twenty eleven to make cloud services for mobile developers. Parse was a newer kind of cloud provider called back back in as a service and it was built to simplify the complexities of amazon web services and the complexities of the mobile ecosystem during this time time facebook was in the middle of its shift towards becoming a mobile application company ads on the smartphone. We're not yet a proven business model offer facebook so facebook was exploring other business lines facebook decided to purchase parse for eighty five million dollars with the intention attention of building a cloud developer platform shortly after the acquisition facebook's mobile ads business started to see considerable success with the mobile ads business finding traction facebook shifted all of its available resources towards supporting that business model because of course it's very good to have a successful ads business and you don't want to drop the ball there in two thousand seventeen parse was shut down ilya joins joins the show to give his experience starting parse and selling the company to facebook and then seeing the company that he had built gets shut down as it became came an unfortunate casualty of facebook's advertising success. We talked a lot about the experience of building back end as a service company as well is what makes facebook special as an organization and how the success of facebook's mobile business happened to fortunately or unfortunately finally coincide with the post parse acquisition life cycle of parse the company. It's quite an interesting story about about the dynamics of an acquisition and ilya was a fantastic guest. I hope you enjoy it..

facebook Ilias ucar ilya amazon developer eighty five million dollars
"ilya" Discussed on VS

VS

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on VS

"Much from that obama's blessing. I really learned a lot every time. I talked to even for like five minutes. It was so great to get to soak it all up for a whole hour or so. Yeah i know i'm really tickled by i a lot of what he was saying about being a refugee instead of like writing as a bridge between those suitcases for any look below you <hes> <hes> okay do it. Is there something prize under richer this bridge under your feet. Now look behind you ahead of you. What countries are you going to coming coming from. Well first of all. I love this presence exercise very grounding standing on a bridge between starshine buffers you you know i feel like the obvious answer is like koreans and like everyone else whatever right but. I don't actually think those are the two communities that i'm talking to. Maybe it's actually like the country of young people who are new poetry or like have felt shut <music> out of poetry for all the usual reasons and people who are really well versed in poetry like vokes who have the privilege of an academic background around imagery. It's the folks who are outside the tower and inside the tower are are the people that i'm hoping to bridge yeah yeah yeah and i imagine that you kind of feel the same way way right yeah yeah. What are your. What are your two countries that. You're bridging between i do. I feel very at home on your bridge. Well what i was thinking was thinking about it. As a important hoorah thing i think behind me or maybe beside me is an exhausted past that refuses to stop re animating itself as the president <hes> and ahead ahead of me is an abundant future that i'm always trying to reach for us yeah. That's so beautiful vision thing. You'd be smart pain but yeah you know i think i think that's a lot of attention to my work. Is the past sucks. Why do we keep on making it happen over and over again and when can unlike the future that i already kind of living with my family and friends santas fullest yeah yeah and i like the idea of a bridge between them as being able able to shuffle back and forth between them you know hopefully you with the privilege of mobility between them a privilege that like all should not be taken lightly. Thank you for sparking that little conversation. I learned a lot about myself truly truly cool well. Who else are you trying to thank on this year. Episode ilya brought him up in the conversations stations. I'm just gonna thank jeff shots for being an amazing editor. He's been editor of my work and for giving us a lot of collections. I think differ public is going to be a collection. That had very fast. It's going to mean a lot to a lot of people so thank you for helping usher this into the world actually in the same vein. I want to thank my editor jerry salerno. Oh yes silver hair icon platinum blonde icon truly like one of the few women editors of these like poetry presses. That's like really doing an amazing job at cultivating women queer and fam writers on that press on alice james shirley allen james like it doesn't need to be said we must say it is killing the game one of the most impressive poetry lists. I feel like an all of the publishing i agree and i'm really proud to be part of it so thanks carrie for being like so supportive supportive and like really fabulous. Make me feel cute cetera. We also want to thank the.

vokes obama ilya editor alice james shirley allen jerry salerno carrie jeff president five minutes
"ilya" Discussed on VS

VS

16:38 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on VS

"Of our bodies etcetera and so i've been sort of like wrestling with fat what to do with that feeling unfinished and i think the solution that i've come to is by writing the poems even if i don't think that they'll be in a book or you know since apparently this book is finished and also trying to wrestle with those themes in other mediums so also i've been like writing more pros more essays specifically and then a few like a little bit a fiction here and there although fiction is so hard and i can't i really struggle with fiction and then also some visual things it's also been adapting the poems that are in the book into different mediums to share them with the world and i think that's been a good way to allow me to keep working on it. Even it's been printed and maybe that has to do with the fact that like a lot of my work hours right now are having to do with like telling people that the book exists in like talking about where i'm going to be reading it and going out there and reading it. You know so i have. I'm i'm in that mindset <hes> so i'm trying to figure out how to use that mindset in a kind of like creative artistic way. I don't know what shape it'll it'll be but i think the next project is going to be about. I haven't actually written a lot in these last last two books about korea and about <hes> the division of korea and what that does for my identity and so that's been what all of my new poems basically gli have been about. It's been about korea and my grandma korea. My grandma yeah some kind of career exactly yeah yeah her korea. He is the one that i'm interested in. Oh that's title her career as a title yeah. It's really beautiful as good sonics are korea but yeah. I love the rhythm of titles yeah. Blood percussion is still one of my favorite ones. Even it's nate marshalls chat book. It was a chap book but blood percussion. Shen rhythmically is like what are the best titles yeah <hes>. We wanted to ask you about your role. In the world of poetry knocked somehow one. That's not true please just as a writer of poems but also as an editor and a teacher of poems and a champion <music> of poetry which i think that you really are a cheerleader for poetry. No i conversation yesterday number of poets who are a little bit of my age or a little older and we were actually taught in a you guys your generation. Yes you know mine way hi. You guys have a community. I never really knew them. Say i want to law school work in public dirt and i've got great. I'm dunes however however i always in the back of my heart father little newly <hes> like i don't have a community that i can call in the middle of the night underside phone to have some could france but i'm a favor you kind of diffuses structure of leaving others about voter for two or three years that you guys do have partly because i did not have that i was trying to talk to other poets in terms of translating slayton them often pose in my own doing intelligence just trying to have an ongoing education of a the whatever i do use folded into others but also listening and that's how i educate mataafa educated person and <hes> i i. I feel like it's working for me and i hope it is also even fountain to others. I like loading about new foil sunshine about bozo. It feels like hell to learn to do it does look a healthy. Thank you for saying that about the community athens. I think <hes> yeah. I don't think it's something we created created. I think it's a symptom of the spaces that raised us a lot of us coming. It's also some things that we created well. I think we harnessed it and i think we made it intentional yeah yeah but i think a lot of us are coming from spoken word backgrounds that necessitate community to be poet and a lot of the institutions that a lot of us even outside of the spoken-word rome have been filtered through like kuni mine and adam and comfortable doing all those places have shown us that of critical function of poetry is community at least for me. I feel like my understanding of poetry has never been allowed to venture too far into that idea of like the lonely hermit writer later that was a part of its sure you must go and ward over your poems and a land with no your home with survey because i'm i'm not i'm not writing right now. That's the thing so like. I'm always a little bit of a lonely hermit but i feel like i just get to like sit in the grass and get everybody else for a little bit. You know you go it to be the only hermit so that we can come back to the public square and be useful and someone reports never become gods the gut tho those will never see and you mentioned greece for the bhagat's the hungry to be with you but one thing that i think you do really really well is championing us as american poets think greater than our borders in terms of who we are in actually conversation with <hes> and who were in community with particularly with your work with poetry international you talking about the other day right but like we think that a polish poet representative polish poetry and i would certainly considered this thing. I'm trying to learn about my like sort of international community. Who are we speaking to that. We might not know of just start a little bit from the beginning of what you're saying. You know being a ver fees. You have divided intentions on the one side. I'm extremely grateful for my my family being saved ninety free on the other side. I'm extremely aware that other feminists are bumba justice bespoke. It's a double sided support support <hes> so part of my job of the ryder. I feel like i have to show what else is happening out. Yonder had this beautifully. I believe she said that the translator is somebody who comes to literature american literature for him as a metaphor f- i'm meteorologist looking couldn't mirror and she says translator needs to make out of the mirror window <hes> and opens a window and i think this is a great description but it's not just for one-star. There should be really honestly for any writer and the audience whatever <hes> is america is a country of many mirrors is like alice in wonderland. L. and our job is to opens the <hes> findus otherwise we are becoming more and more plant ivy she's vom. I'm big giant mirror visit golden share in front of it and no human sitting in that chair <hes> having said that to come back a little more your question life and the person who's going to say we drove it with with another. There are so many people to do the work a few years ago you the the projects that was called international ports and conversation did a number of anthologies saddam around the world. There were boys from the china say and it wasn't indication for me. Every single project is a project. I'm just i want to take the cloth you know and and see what we can learn and so what i learned from that book was a majority of at one about chechnya spoiler here in america classical chain us or if you know a little a bit more of a think about bad dial. The reports are the tienanmen square <hes> but that's been a long time ago. The sports of the ninetieth is lost by magical realism sign of them and you never really think about that coming from the foul sepharad belinda more doc wonderful and delicious bill import her involved in a more than she did a wonderful anthology sampling in this and were <hes> <hes> a number of posts from whereas to influenced you this kind of conversations <hes> climate davos you s- probably most usc hard working person in <hes> american both bowl to move he's doing for book. Fund is an amazing version of of one of the first and that was big in the seven checkbooks they put in a box and bridging the one checkbook fury sean as young boys from the african continent and that was the first time ever in this country and young poured from an african continent book uh-huh okay and climbing did that the many others right now excited about support reformer media and now you know i wish there because that's where ramp from and so many countries either go back conservative the roots become mcdonald's. You know an romanian seems to find this vile vile language between the western nearest and they're not diva knob their native ability <hes> subvention but there are also bring you in south western influences. That's <hes> you know. We got to choose a woman from lebanon who writes writes in french and it's being translated english by money than hacker who says i write an arabic through french. Hm and that is an interesting mix like karl that stood between the cultures together in an organic way. I write in arabic through the french the wonderful person many other positive or you can spend the whole covered the subject here now <hes> but <hes> they're put gas in order for international boston conversation and that might be the easiest place for people to stand. Thank thank you thank you so much. Do you feel sometimes as if you're writing rushing through english that same kind of way doug was unity savoys and daffy babic the core trying not to do that and daffy public seal. I'm sure doing that but it's trying at least in the first form and the last poem kabuki. I hope he does american for butter or phebus. What was the impulse to move away from trying to write russian through english. The one thing that i believe in from the beginning of writing poetry whereas styled i can play whatever i want <hes> <hes> but i have to be honest about dominant this fund and poetry use the <hes>. If i was just widen invention russian or right in your turn would be schoneman because i don't even watch and i speak in your now you you can look at my best to my cats. Okay sure i speak invite into my brother spoken about my mama was alive but i live divided live. That's who i am and i have to be honest about that and that is why <hes> i was dealing with this dilemma inviting death apartment so other antea questions definitely look at it'd be easy for me to just sit here and say oh you could speak so many different but then this borsa awesome majority perspective <hes> currently universe of fashion boosted video views view life. You've just happened to be alive that i had to find food. What part of the writing process us feels like translating or like. How are those processes linked. I mean i think we under we sort of understand how in doing the work of translation translation how writing factors into extra slow because it's like <hes> you know that you have so <hes>. I'm very lucky that of what went slaves to try to do you. How do you translate the era feed via. You know what i'm saying is. How do you translate more than the billy. Holiday holiday have seven juan watterson horrible. You know what i'm saying. I do yeah <hes> so either really not trying to slay it <music> but trying to compose samson and the same frequency what's on station is leave them tons it. You try to do what you can you know ryan from one country to another is not necessarily translate him. It is really justified. Union boss uh-huh and see how you can find the most fascinating music and brought us. It might be wanted my billy other. I wanted the.

korea writer juan watterson chechnya china america boston athens billy france samson ryan saddam slayton greece editor mcdonald lebanon karl
"ilya" Discussed on VS

VS

16:36 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on VS

"On the parameter so you found ways. It's a wonderful well then to just stay visit. Yeah we got to overlap summit the vermont studio center last summer two summers ago something i think that <hes> in twenty percents sometimes injury previous now and i remember you giving me some advice about navigating sort of strangeness in the poems like how to tether certain parts of the poems in order to allow for strangeness to happen in other parts and i think this is something that was on my mind so much as i was reading the collection of how you navigate the <hes> stranger moments in language george while keeping it so readable i guess <hes> legible throughout and not allowing that strangeness to keep the reader away. Can you talk about how you navigate strangeness and here you know sexual quieter from you to talk about about my own work talked about other push. It would be easier yeah but let me explain why it's hard for me to talk with my own worth. Let me talk about that. Pose a lotta emily dickenson or many other words. You can see how they create read their own language in my experience. It's exactly the opposite because i'm not a native speaker. I'm walton strangeness and my actual show job is to make the ball because if he wants to engineer service is gonna be strange though my job is to make those <hes> <hes> johnson but maybe if i just to make sense to actually honestly quick question if you talk about a great strange foyt after engineers emily dickinson you realize that shoes meeting up inlet landless accordion to confirm and she teach you you how to speak english language or gordon dickinson and then using coca and devices issues and then you realize while should only have <hes> ooh i don't know no more than five devices shoes then you start in the bologna tradition oh what about wedeman and she probably half and half you undivided that you like about this great dugway poured and then you then co ever since the tommy schools at newton evanston has actually just propaganda reports nowhere fusing really really deeply in two thousand since like the way you'd maneuvers enough for everybody knows but close the side of bench for the rest of the syntax and you realize file together gordon live from the oprah dickinson. Everybody's gonna talk starts in the buzzer debt. Of course a dash is of course also very deny survive when you must expect it and usually literally happens to have an idea to bring it to you to unionize you the music so in that silence you get hurt but i wanna talk about metaphors modify some seemingly isn't they should think about over the single most memorable line that you have from the boss to the logged gun without that particular divide there would be no emily dickinson was ever so stewart genius for her existence those device in the way you can argue the damage was the first american syria lists. You know what i'm saying. <hes> to engineers really has to do is what you find for <hes> um but it is a lot easier to talk but other polka fabulous jerry in that case so you know you talked about how for you. The project is to move from the strangeness into something that can translate for a reader. What does that process look like. Oh i just follows all of the joy ride a lot for what actually work and so i have a lot of boxes of lung bills that i hope is but that is just a building material published many books fitted but what's the point. I'm waiting eighteen until i have emotions or any kind of states of minds. Beachside language has more fresh <hes> <hes> and that kind of i hope for your question when you combine emotion and vote clarity visa language satisfation hopefully stange stern jr. You have the little marriage. Hopefully they make a baby shower above so i'm wondering we're talking about. Strangeness and i'm i want to jump back to something for any was asking earlier. I think it was about the city that is involved in the book and i want to ask about the relationship between location and strangeness in your work location yeah in place because when i think about your questions right i think differ public dancing in odessa both collections are so centralized in what land and what place clayson with city community means people does being tethered to a location give you permission to be stranger in language or is there anything about the lands in which you're writing that you find your or that your existing in that you're able to cold the strangeness of those places into your homes. You kind of told them about different kinds of forms you create a formative issue but whatever it is you make another to make soap union a union fan yes true but it can also be a person you can also do. A character could also be a breyer established is that you talk to god and then you can say whatever that you want to say. Oh don't want you to have some kind of <hes> view the radios as your who knows on bulletin from a point upon that breach but what you're breaches made out of what kind of weather what kind of human vote in kind have cat voted on that bridge. She's totally up to begin the real locations you use a stanch place for former me your society for a number of reasons but i'll talk about to number one <hes> the russian lumber spokesman yasser completely not likes watching lund but spoken in moscow russia is because it has really truly the only international place in the country. It was warm support so there's a lot the view of ukrainians bulgarians moldovans greeks and many other humans leaving at city that do not leave say in moscow use a laboratory. I battle even big cities so the language was extremely different. People brought their own speech and met the russian you much <music> formulas extremely liberated. I remember whether finding the book by isaac babel addressed writer opening the kitchen table and i was terrible both students and a fifth grade school the country is falling apart forget about the country defying the party's just smoke cigarettes and and <hes> finding isaac bubbles boop and if they will invention of this is how maman that's fake ones. I make dinner not how how might teach us fixing school. That's not how people spend t._v. And i didn't do the little shows yearly alive near an immediate and i'm making a moment that's stain down that is i support the way of village of the language and location by the second than would be san diego elliott but were just moving away from it. We soon entirely movin. Boarder changes changes all the time. I wanna i had students limited. Johanna commuters like i actually had a bad ones students. The the bad was for mutable walkout unabridged by ford to mexica took about the train gone. The like a regular public transferred you get out you can celebrate your mexican great. You buy ice cream back. Welcome back about four <hes>. Uh has you know there's your line of people but whether it's amazing this is not an aligned. He's alive the life of sewn phone. People are children foods their story as the big city in other people's shoes them before you know what i mean. There's even wanted to write a play about the lion will happen but it's still in my head. What is the language of that is definitely allegation and then thought into students who you have some of their families not legal in this country allied delivered here for generations and border move back and forth but few here the board is moving through us so what are the language for that also yields because i'm not going to have them in the book but those were experiences because of my life <hes> while the book was leading. I want to ask about the role of hope and the role of resistance in this book as a fable of people who are experiencing the invasion of their town and and the like a military presence. Do you consider this. A hopeful buck is a difficult question. <hes> i'll tell you about personal done more. The wetlands dourson asked him because maybe even more important college regions of book by <hes> of women name. It was a garland thompson who is great disability skyla <hes> who in her book and professors disabilities taylor talk about it shouldn't in this country in the united states should move from zero of the hospital does political minority and and that really made meals differently about millions. I think it's a great statement which is a great color and disability doesn't just apply to me as a fume burson it applies to every human has this country who doesn't have health insurance some of hospital to the rim of political minority not then the question for each one of us now okay so that is a very personal kind of <hes> moron elite level breath. I want you to turn the both and to make toughness into positive change but i'm also writer on on a half dollars. The fact that human beings deeply flawed and so the end of book of not exactly happy and if i made happy i would <unk> divided propaganda <hes> you hope maybe i hope so but i don't want to be <hes> standing here and saying the other hope because look around us too late empire and it's not a happy place and he's getting progressively uh more dangerous <hes> the lawyers dole was being fake in this country but now does is openly effect. What are your obsessions. The your europe so you wanna talk about it. Okay cool. This is is your podcast now. What our sessions right now you'll brooklyn both exactly the same time i believe in with so i would love to know what a europe searching settlement <hes> triggering question right now for me i just finished my next book and that was so turned in the final draft the other night that was so obsessed with friendship and intimacy and really exploring <hes> not only the texture of intimacy between people what friendship does so the self as a saving grace and i think you know a lot of that collection. That was the later part of the election. It also very much deals with how class and race affect intimacy how illness affects the body a good friend of mine committed suicide and so a big seed of the book was trying to write my way through grieving him and also like being a person who's dealt with suicidal thoughts just what that meant to have it as close in near the frame but right now. I feel obsession lists in poems a little bit and i'm a little worried about that because i've never not had a thing to work on of always kind of had the next thing right there as i i was finishing up the thing before and now i've been writing poems a little bit. Maybe i'm obsessed with like prose poems those offer <hes> in terms of you know what it somebody say the tyranny of the lion. I forget who credit to somebody. Putting the line side has been offering me something but i feel like my looking has really fought flat. I think with each book or each poem. Maybe we should've are teaching of ourselves to see again or you know how take in the world man analysis early site dependent but but i don't know how to see right now. I'm trying to find that and i'm trying. I'm hoping to take a little bit of time away from writing. I don't know how to see yeah but are you enjoying the most. It's not poetry right now. You know i love it. You know like i feel like i've heard a lot of poems written a lot of poems i like stories and nature and having like low stakes conversations with my mom and my grandma returning the monday miss it's i guess and i'm like that right now and i'm trying to give myself space to not be a poet. A little bit <hes> and to not have to pose is is the world i've had a friend once said the hardest form to ride over things to write about just sitting on a chair. That's it makes good boy. You really are told about the challenge and i think it's it's also a challenge. Maybe fighting a little bit less poetry more the career. You're of the poet. Is i feel like what i'm pushing up against right now. Is this sort of need to answer. What are you working on. What are you thinking about and i'm out of time. We're like i think i'm thinking about a lot of internal work. <hes> a lot of other things that you know i don't know if the largest job in my life right now is to be a poet and i'm glad to you know i still go out and do the readings i teach and that's a particular kind of joy rights. I guess maybe some of it is less so about the sessions of my own work and trying to figure out how to help my students unlock their obsessions and really start to take more risk inside of the work but for me right now i feel like for the last couple of years i feel like poet was like sort of like my like number one or number two jobs of what i was in the world. Maybe not even in the top ten right now. I'm not really supposed to be a poet. At this moment. Freak you out scares. The living shit the good i mean you're supposed to go hide <hes> that the beauty of blazes like where we are right now. It'd be making then that we're supposed to have a lot more community in a lot more corporate but you community. You're always going to be like five ten. People and <hes> ninety nine percent is being far over hiding in a book. Tom <hes> <hes> thank you for being honest obsessions ngos sessions enjoys. You know i also feel slightly slightly in orbit right now. I think you know my book is about to be in the world. It's newly in the world but it's been finished for a while. You know we know the gap between finishing the book and and then other people being allowed to start encountering and and so that like we are time displacement and and at the same time. I feel that i'm i'm not done thinking about about the book or i'm not done thinking about the poems i'm not done thinking about the seams of the <hes> of the book so technology and about being a soft organic feeling thing and what that has to do with the various technologies analogies of america and of.

emily dickenson united states gordon dickinson writer europe vermont studio center isaac babel odessa oprah dickinson george engineer san diego newton evanston johnson breyer moscow russia Tom
"ilya" Discussed on VS

VS

13:31 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on VS

"Believe the other people's house. How's this test but not enough. We oppose them but not enough. I wasn't my on my bed. America was fallen invisible house by the mies house by novi is about to get outside assan in six months of us to those two in house money. You know street money this s._t._d._m. Money in a company of money our great country of money but divas will happily blue dude on the that was the first poem that i ever heard you read at our first eight of the u._p. Oh two thousand thirteen hm years ago old noah yeah. I remember being moved to tears. Thank you thank you thank you elliot. What's moving you well on a personal level of all people who am next my moves me <hes> my finance passed away of them so that is moment in many ways and that brings me to more literary level. How do i express for this moving toward <hes> forums devices and <hes> i found now. I'm writing more pros now. This month is about a my mother. Per customer and i feel like i would vote. Finally those book so far doesn't seem to be quite the form <hes> but i still have to stay there have to serve a lot to say and so i'm writing masses personalises now on a level of ford reliant by line <hes> unil- loadin for what poetic devices combust explorer emotion it might be syntax at my mother for my b but whatever device this got more me other isomer declaration does the pros offer for a different kind of remembering than the poetry does or what particular kind of emotion that the pros gives you access to <hes> poetry couldn't while i'm for a time forever you nepal the camp <hes> saying that come back for more than they ever did before to ukraine and country changing so much so quick lou specialisms last fibers aboard begun over and over the time gonda not even if it might be the last time to go into a kind of immediacy that throw seems him to lend itself to. I found throws much easier too much. I love you have to live and for the for me personally. It's not like that for many of my friends so i don't want to claim any claims by in my life form has to do some radical change them. This might might be a book on bond with my belichick form but it got mark sampson for me. That's for fathers for throws more of daily occurrence. I still love love. Rosen luke rose but it is just a different kind of spilled home. We can you say more about why that distinction exists in your mind between like the salinas of pros vs y poetry seems to be this marker of this radical change slowing into opposed invasion therefore there was a poet phrase. It's a critical from beginning of russian poetry you would slow your heart upon the line and and so he's kind of sentimental but describe something to follow these your motion across the line and some real like you great pose <hes> james christopher smart <hes> beach pagan whoever does brooke <hes> they teach you how early tissue certain kind out of breath a certain kind of condition <hes> that you enter inside phone and that's a violent boom to enter another condition in some of the poets. I love probably quite extreme if you think about it salon <hes> middle passage behavior makes thank you such a modern finance. He should soon scribe. You know you need to prepare for that to live in that and now realizes too burst. I'll take for many other folks writing news a daily occurrences video practice and i fully respect that i had that for me as the more a margin of where i am as human every form got marks that makes me want to ask you how often you write poetry. Oh i heard that her box is a loop but <hes> that you say to boy italy ah often how often the poem foof whenever down right. It's a beautiful distinction. Can we dive into the book. I would love to dive into denver public if we can. It is first of all an astonishing collection but i'm wondering do you consider this novel. In verse. The fable bella faded talent. I come from eastern. Europe cubes are extreme minority. They are no great jewish allan this to <hes> until i dunno kafka of course but that's more western <hes> but there is a lot of trouble is a lot of town and for me into torsten often in that jonah is implicated listeners very much part of the narrative <hes>. There's kind of kevin chapman actor and for the narrative on that particular book was firm for for me personally to have listener listener be implicated. Coup is your imagined listener for this clause bolivar to finish suppose. I'm gonna start a little bit far but alan's huntsville russian pantex. My first book took only success so it was normal you know partly because they had great comfort of being in conversation the station into addition come to you us in ninety three. I published a book south four so alone to which the book nine years and it it was great but i had this proximity only nine survey. I wrote on vashem before the kids so i had this <hes> refugee so to speak but when i was done with it i was like well. It is my panther living in united stales subject third really you're the fact the refugee in a way i never had before and i had to find a way to speak to boss sides mess up and it took me forever however to figure out how to do that how speak to boys list notice that me and i realized that only in recent times just just trying to express what does it mean to you spoke about amberg in the library in your life when you move from one place <hes> so to speak to another my childhood bill for a bill deserve so part of me will always be with that but i'm also here and the book we really need to speak to that. Don't feel question. Does the blurb on the back of the book describes the setting of this book as being in any town or like. It's unclear where the setting is. Can you talk a little bit about what sort of place that holds in the imagination <hes> obviously fable offended. They'll baden <unk> wheel background. I live in san diego. Which is the place for was a daily fantasy. Understood people dragged away in the ice cars. I am come from ukraine and you already know about the politics that are happening so <hes> you'll see to the issues now. I'm going to claim here right now. Sometimes safm i i'm not i'm see exactly the other side that the book is about the silent majority so the book is trying to deal with that so in some ways. It's a story about we are places places about. It's still though <hes> enough fable right inverse <hes>. I'm wondering which impulses you found on yourself following or when they felt useful whether the impulse towards language because the way i think about a poetry collection or billing poems it is so much about letting the words you know show you point guide you to where they want to head but there is such a strong sense of narrative that i'm wondering <hes> winded sort of the need eighty to tell the story to complete the fable takeover as opposed to the need to rebel in the delight of like the strangeness and beauty of the language that you were creating your emergency the very very big long and you put your four hundred against it and instead beaten again boils go the marriage for a head of school l. deleted the wall is going to break about your by understood sponsors. I read exactly just describe michelle rydin lyric fragments and those i had to put them together in my experience a lot of people oh that question how do you <hes> people say many but it really comes down to two and analysis of the sculpture just just to say i write a lot and then god sculpture get a block of stone and then cup or it is like pension i have this landscape collapsed <hes> mhm but in this case i also had to make a story because i had to make sense of where i wasn't who what was the matter no life story going forward fund hewlett packard so full of fragments <hes> but having said that what what i did is i wrote a lot of poems untied fit them and then everytime store changing rooms and a dime a new bomb study to change but this is a wonderful thing gives you a private world happier world and wiping world anymore <hes> and by the private world you can go to live the way all formula that i really find your phone from horace nabokov user that many many people use that you i did your survey the beautiful beautiful you know but labor devices you <hes> <hes> then you break the heard only afterwards sushi similar. You know what i mean that may or may not be considered a narrative. Would you buy tried to. I think that's true. I think that's that's very true. I think this formula for like slam poetry as well which is like sort of seduced seduce them with language or even humor and humor break them t- similar. I love that <hes> i love how slightly sadistic and not just of <hes> the honor it was beautiful then to share they were hubbard and then if you're kind of what you learn from that hubbard's very generous ticket in the reader above above i think i had asked that question. I should also because i think selfishly a small seed of it. I feel like sometimes i've been on the road to starting to write. I don't think mine will be fairytales. Often lack doc future visions. I kinda not i don't wanna say novels but their stories right individuals with is a fantastic shopping in the bible but i but i feel well like i always language always takes over and then i lose myself. Maybe i need to revisit some of those things but i feel like sometimes i might. I know i'm telling a story and then i get halfway. Flame down the story and i'm like oh no. I'm in a poem yeah and but that's good though yeah it's ever bad. I like those pieces but there is. I think a couple a couple of things that i think i need to figure out how to limit the poetry so that the story can come out and maybe it's a drafting thing. Maybe it's draft the story and then draft the poetry on top. The poetry distracts me too much personally that i forget that i was ever trying to communicate something someone and now i'm just trying to give them a feeling. You know poetry of the time within a story by the financial jonah setups on.

ukraine hubbard America novi kevin chapman Europe jonah belichick Rosen brooke denver torsten united stales mark sampson hewlett packard alan san diego pantex michelle rydin horace nabokov
"ilya" Discussed on VS

VS

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"ilya" Discussed on VS

"How's it cool and i'm really good. You know we're still here at eight oh b._p. Recording a couple of episodes was and it is now day three and i'm not dead yet yes and as of this recording vanessa vandy matteo still contender on drag race in july. It will stay that way. Yes the top four but that's avenging matteo. Who's like such a weird magical creature like she's just like straight out of some fucked up fairy tales. That's like little red riding hood starring de vito love it. Do you have a favorite fucked up very very tail. Yeah fucked you up as a kid. I know what thoughts media yeah well. What did you do a little fucking mermaid. I don't know if i talked about this on the show before but like in four euro pre k. to send me to the two year old when we watch the little mermaid because i was too scared and then we watch state i'm pajama day in kindergarten and i just buried my head on the pillow for an hour and a half because i didn't know what was going to pop up and i was scared to your friends with kinds of power lesbian and now i'm first of all kinds of power lesbians. I identify earth as a personal icon right right. I was scared to see myself was the problem you know who else what's the tooth fairy. I did not like the idea that like some strange. Bitch was interned my window to come from teeth. I don't know if i ever really believed in the tooth fairy. I was like okay. I guess this is a tradition that happens but ferries not real come on. There's like a korean fairy tales and fables that i grew up with one of the most canonical ones is tonga goudie. Katie means frog okay. I don't know chung means by things backwards. Maybe so it's like it was groff well kind of right so <hes> so he was a frog kid who would always annoy his frog mom by doing doing exactly the opposite of what she said so she was like this is how we croker whatever we say kay google and he'd be like clued gay quick you know and should be like you know put this shirt like you know on the east side of the house and he put it on the west or whatever he always do things backwards like fuck with her and so she got really sick and on her deathbed she said i need him to bury me on the hill and not by the river bed because if if he bears me by the riverbed then my grave will wash away into the river and so she was like bury me on the river bed so that he would bury her on the hill <hes> he it was like grief struck and was like this one last time. I'll do it the way that she said. He buried her in the river bed and washed her grave day wash away. It's like a really intense ten story right and listen to your fucking. Thank you just don't ask questions you know but it. It definitely scarred the child good good good major stern you listen to ship. I don't know i like i like scaring children into obedience. Yeah yeah yeah yeah. He was fun yeah but i don't know if it was fun on the receiving no but like with me you know thanks to ursula. I learned the power of keeping my own voice. <hes> <hes> good for you. I'm just playing boyce's. Force will well speaking of fairytales. We we are really excited to talk to one of our favorite poets never her favorite living poet knight in shining lyric truly <hes> ilya kaminsky linski whose work we both encountered for the first time at our very first aid u._p. Merely babies and we wept and and learned about what was possible in poetry and we've had the incredible luck of being able to cross passes with ilia several times since then. I'm both as a sort of friend in poetry and ally in poetry mentor editor <hes> much buddy branch buddy. Yes says <hes> and so yeah. We're relied about his new book death republic. Go ahead and read it. If you have not yet so we're excited to talk to him about fables and fairy tales and what the lyric dust animate all those hundred sarah ilya kaminsky was born in the former soviet union and is now an american citizen he is the author are of a poetry collection dancing in odessa in the co editor of echo anthology of international poetry. He's a c._d. Riding award a landlord fellowship and a guggenheim and most recently india has work work has been translated into over twenty languages and we are so excited to talk to him today also just as a reminder <hes> elliott is hard of hearing and i say that just to say that if anybody out there listening or knows does anyone that is hard of hearing or is.

ilya kaminsky editor kay google de vito soviet union odessa chung Katie groff india ilia boyce elliott two year
Google takes another run at social networking with Shoelace

Latest In Tech News

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Google takes another run at social networking with Shoelace

"Google apparently can't quit trying to make new social networks you see Google has a problem never made a successful social network but you have to give him some credit for never giving up after the shutdown of platforms like or cut Google buzz who you remember that in Google plus and the shuttering of messaging services like aloe and Google wave it appears that Google is testing out yet another social network this one called shoelace. Nope not even kidding you devout by Google's experimental area one twenty product development workshop shoelace is a hyper local social networking APP available on Android and I._O._S.. That aims to connect people based on shared interests in specific events in in person activities in short shoelace looks like a social network that encourages people to spend. Less time on their phones the more time doing something anything in real life mostly how long this lasts for I'll have to see their shoelace users are able to create loops like the Luke's shoelace kit which are essentially li-listening three events that can be shared with others the APP decide goal of possibly helping people make a new friend or two conversely. If you don't have any of your own events to suggest us can designate their interest in a variety of categories shoe late will use to recommend a number of hand-picked activities the things you might like so you won't have any excuse for saying. There's nothing fun to do ever again. Unless you live out in like crack nowhere in which case it's like can make an event with me hanging out in the back burner fire. I don't know in like you have your own self and you invite yourself and go. You have a fire all by yourself <hes>. I don't think it's designed for that. Obviously I'm being sarcastic. Only mainly seems seems to be targeting cities in suburban areas for the most part but will have to actually see what happens as I was reading the article out thinking like you mean the seems to be a little bit of a mash of between like swarm slash foursquare and the meet up in we have meetings and events and you can promote them around in your local area okay but you don't get any credits or points for checking in so that Kinda defeat gamification purpose gazette foursquare swarm built on so we'll find out the article goes on to say users will also be able to create profile so they can share some tidbits about themselves learn about others in their crews and make it easier to organize and plan for upcoming events okay right there to branding naming should not have been crews for the group's. It should have been soul maids. Get it get it. You've read his article. WE'RE GONNA lose it. According to shoelaces listing on Google play store the most recent update to the APP added the ability to share loops using a hyperlink something that would make it even easier to spread the word about upcoming events. Unfortunately shoelaces currently only available in one place New York City so if you're listening from there in your from New York City probably have good shot testing it out Google says its goal is to bring shoelace to cities across the U._S. U._S.. In future Google is even taking requests for suggestions on places. It should bring shoelace to next and even if you do live in or near N._Y._C. Access the shoelace is invite only for now and while it's fine as it is to poke Google for past Ilyas in social networking space amid growing concerns at time spent on platforms like twitter facebook Instagram Youtube for that matter you do have a social network. It's called a youtube is having a negative impact on our lives. It's kind of refreshing to see social network whose main purpose is to encourage the people to spend less time on set network and more time actually doing things Yelich four squares form of meet up and all the other sites do already we have plenty of options to choose from. Please just add another one to make an even if shoelace doesn't make it in the long run and don't be surprised to see many of its features <unk> ideas incorporated into Google maps or another Google service in the future so that's all I'm going to say about that and if I say anymore I'm going to start the kick flips. Tips are something we'll find

Google New York City Product Development Twitter Ilyas
NASA ScienceCast 294: On the Cusp of Understanding

NASA ScienceCasts

04:04 min | 1 year ago

NASA ScienceCast 294: On the Cusp of Understanding

"On the cusp of understanding. Presented by science at NASA. Constantly shielding us from the sun's high energy particles is the earth's magnetic field. Many imagine this field as a circle slightly larger than our planet. But it's actually shaped like this and near our north and south poles. There is a cusp a point where two branches of occurred. Meet it's here that the magnetic bubble that surrounds us. Dips inward, creating a funnel of magnetic lines that touch down to earth this funnel allows the sun's high energy particles to race toward our planet and deposited selves in our sphere eighty two eight hundred kilometers above earth. We can even see the result. They create beautiful Aurora similar to the spectacular displays at night, but on the day side of earth and only visible to the naked eye during the long polar night. Now, scientists who want to learn more about effects of these particles are embarking. On a special initiative that is taking place from December twenty eighteen to January twenty twenty in a coordinated effort between multiple countries to understand the physics of the polar cusp, scientists from NASA and the US as wellness from Japan, Norway, Canada and Great Britain have launched the grand challenge initiative cusp a series of sounding rocket missions. That will provide the data needed to conduct nine unprecedent. Studies of near earth space at the polar regions this series will help scientists glean answers to a number of questions about the cusp. Why is our atmosphere leaking out into space from the cusp how and why do the turbulent hot patches of dense plasma that exist inside the Aurora region? Disrupt global communications, what's the stains, strong updrafts of atmosphere gas in this region that can cause enhanced drag on our satellites as. The orbit. Doug rolling space. Scientists that NASA Goddard Space Flight center explains. The cusp is a great natural laboratory to understand how earth's atmosphere responds to Direct Energy input from the solar wind. This kind of science can be done. Nowhere else on earth, twelve sounding rockets conducting the mind missions will launch from two sites in Norway and Ilya space center and small barred rocket range, in some cases, launches will be conducted at nearly the same time from India and fall barred providing simultaneous observations at different altitudes, and latitudes. Why use rockets instead of satellites or weather balloons, Doug rolling explains rockets are ideal for taking the measurements we need. These rockets will be packed with monitoring instruments to capture information as they move upward in an arc and on the way down to they can gather up to fifty. Eighteen consecutive minutes of direct measurements from a specific region of space, and you can launch them precisely you want your rockets to fly right through the auroras just as they're going off satellites cover a lot of area. But at high speeds, they don't spend as much time making observations of any one location balloons can't be launched high enough and their location can't be controlled as precisely as rockets the new data gleaned from the grand challenge initiative. Cusp will help scientists make better space weather forecasts and give us a better understanding of the particles responsible for one of the most breathtaking sights on our planet. Take the initiative to learn more by visiting science dot NASA dot gov.

Nasa Aurora Norway Goddard Space Flight Center Ilya Space Center Doug Rolling Great Britain United States Canada India Japan Eighty Two Eight Hundred Kilom
Global eyes on encryption laws

Correspondents Report

05:34 min | 2 years ago

Global eyes on encryption laws

"Encryption has become a hot topic in parliament this week with the federal government's new laws designed to catch criminals who secretly communicate with each other allies last minute deal secured the passage of the new laws, and it's a move that subtracting attention from internet policy. Experts abroad are spoke to one of them to gauge he's views. Daniel Watson is the director of the internet policy research initiative at the message, she sits institute of technology. I think it's right for governments to be tackling the issue of how to do effective investigations in the digital environment. No question that's important to all of us. I think what is risky is. When government puts the interest of investigators over the safety of everyone who uses the internet and mobile phones. So can you elaborate on that what sort of weaknesses ov- owner abilities could come with these? If the strategy in government gets access to encrypted communications the government will now have a thirty two. To require communications companies internet companies software companies to provide assistance to law enforcement in conducting surveillance. I think there's nothing wrong with providing assistance. What I think is concerning is when that assistance becomes a requirement actually redesign the services that everyone in the world uses and to actually diminish the security of the services that we all depend on. Specifically, we've heard from law enforcement that they have difficulty when they encounter in cryptic communications. That is when the communications are the data that we use is scrambled. So that no one, but the intended recipients can access it. This is done obviously to protect users from all kinds of of fraud and abuse from criminal activity. It's designed to make sure the terrorists can't take over systems that we all depend on if. The power that the Australian government is now getting is used to weaken the security of an infrastructure used by everyone. Then I fear. We really will have been a situation where we'll have a disproportionate response to what is a real problem that that the police have, but we don't want to enable police to solve one set of crimes and create the risk of much larger set of crimes in tax. So what could the ramifications be for US-based tech companies then because essentially this is about a government challenging day K selling points, and that's being able to communicate in a secure environment. One of the most important features that computer hardware, companies smartphone hardware companies internet service providers offer is the ability to communicate securely to keep our banking information secure to keep our health records, secure to keep our family information, secure to keep proprietary. Business information secure. And if company that does business globally is all of a sudden told by the Australian government, did it has to weaken at security in order to do business in Australia. Then it may think twice about whether it's really worth being in the Australian market at the price of weakening at security, or frankly, incurring major expenses just to satisfy the regulatory requirements of one country among many and even terms of actually enforcing this. Is it a situation where a perpetrator could simply circumvent these laws bind venting a new form of encrypted communication. So in other words, alternative platform to what sap that Kant be traced. Well, remember this law does not prevent any citizen of stralia or anyone else from using the strongest encryption possible. So the police may demand that apple or Android? Loyd a smartphone provider create back doors for law enforcement to do surveillance. But nothing in this law will stop any either criminal or just security conscious individual from adding applications and services that provide extra security. So we do have to wonder how effective these provisions really will be a determined criminal or a determined terrorist. You certainly going to be able to go out onto the internet today and get for free services that will lead the capabilities that this law is designed to help the police work around. It's really important. I think for countries that respect human rights such as a stray Ilya to think about the kind of example that is being set and the kind of standard that's being established particularly with respect to the behavior of countries like China or Russia or others than human rights violators. If democratic countries decide that it's except. Able to reduce the security provisions that are available to all users can be very hard for us to resist those same kinds of demands from China from Russia, and they're going to be used outside the context of the rule of law in much more aggressive ways, they will will violate individual human rights in a way that I think we'd really be concerned about so we have to think about the global standard that we're setting here as well. And whether we're living up to the the values that we have then you want the director of the internet policy research initiative and to MIT.

Australian Government Director Daniel Watson Russia China Fraud Apple Institute Of Technology Kant Australia Loyd Ilya MIT
White officer who shot neighbor inside his apartment indicted for murder

All Things Considered

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

White officer who shot neighbor inside his apartment indicted for murder

"Have shown up, but it probably wouldn't have been in a number. It's right now in this climate, Michelle Obama will also be speaking at the Barclay center in Brooklyn, tomorrow night, Saturday, and Manhattan and Brooklyn are both vying to light the world's largest minora in celebration of Hanukkah this year, the thirty two foot high four thousand pound gold colored minora is going outside of the plaza hotel in Manhattan today, and it will be lit on Sunday marking the first night of Hannukah across the river the river Brooklyn's largest minora roughly the same size will also have its first lighting of the season Sunday night at grant. Army plaza a concert kickoff for the festivities and Brooklyn organizers, we'll have music Lakas and the rest every night of Hannukah currently forty one degrees cloudy at five. Oh, six. Support for NPR comes from Baird for one hundred years. Baird has partnered with individuals businesses institutions and communities working together toward their financial goals. More information is available at Baird one hundred dot com. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And Mary Louise Kelley President Trump's sit down with Vladimir Putin looked set to go ahead on the sidelines of the g twenty summit this week. Then Trump threatened to call it off yesterday. He said it was probably on. And then from Air Force One on route to Argentina Trump tweeted. He was pulling out the bottom line is they may have an impromptu chat in Buenos Aires who knows there's nothing on the formal schedule. What we do know is that hanging over any meeting between the leaders of the United States and Russia is Robert Mueller, the special counsel who has been investigating ties between Russia and Trump and who this week showed his hand in a number of interesting ways, prompting journalist Garrett Graff to ask is Robert Muller's in game. Incite graph explores that question in wired magazine this week, and he joins me now hither Garrett by now as is prone to happen in two thousand eighteen there have been twists and turns even since you file. This story, and we're gonna get to some of those but to travel far far back in time all the way to Monday this week forgotten the dark ages. This was the day that Muller's team alleged that Paul Manafort, former Trump campaign chair had lied to the FBI. And you argue in your piece in wired that this day Monday may end up breaking among the most consequential days yet of the Muller probe. Why it's an incredibly hard, obviously to read the tea leaves of this investigation surprised us at every turn and often surprises us multiple times within a single day. But it seemed like Monday was the beginning of the end that the decision to declare Paul Manafort as non-cooperative and move forward with his sentencing appears to be perhaps a way that Muller is trying to move forward with publishing something that could. Look like the Muller report that he plans to file sometime presumably next week. A document outlining with the court all of Paul manafort's lies in crimes. So if that is one way that Mueller may be showing his hand or about to show his hand. Let me fast forward you now to yesterday, which is when longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen pleads guilty again this time of lying to congress about a proposed Trump Tower in Moscow. How does it that shift the picture? It's one of the most significant moves that we've seen so far from Muller because what it does is connects Donald Trump and the Trump organization directly to Russia in directly to Russian President Vladimir Putin during the course of the two thousand sixteen campaign and how so how are they now coming together? We'll what you have is Michael Cohen trying to contact in game the assistance of Ladimir Putin himself. To secure the funding and the approval for Trump Tower Moscow as late as the spring of two thousand sixteen well into the period where Donald Trump has secured the GOP nomination for president of the United States. One of the aspects of Muller strategy appears to have been he's kind of rating, whatever final report he's going to produce at the end of this as he goes, I mean, he's been producing these very detailed court filings. Exactly. And people seem to be waiting for there to be some hard back book that gets published at the end of this. That is labeled the Muller report like nine eleven commission style. Exactly. And I think most people are missing that. He is writing a lot of that report in public with every court filing where the details that he puts into these are far more than is strictly necessary for the criminal prosecution that he's attempting to pursue. So when you look at the. Totality of what? Bob Muller has published in these indictments in these plea agreements, there's a lot there. Well, it's about three hundred pages of what a Bob Muller report would look like at the end. So to your key question is Bob Muller's in game. And I think it is it's incredibly hard as I said to understand where this investigation is going day to day. But Bob Muller has to know that his investigation was under threat, potentially after the election, and after attorney general Jeff Sessions being fired. Absolutely. And that he I think appears to be ready for some rapid movement in the weeks ahead now that doesn't necessarily mean this is going to come to a quick conclusion. The prosecution's for Watergate stretched out over the course of almost a decade. But this is I think a case where George popadopoulos went to prison for his. Fourteen days sentence last Monday, another former trumpet, we should mention. Yes. And that I think by the time George popadopoulos comes out of prison. We're gonna know a lot more about this case, journalist and Muller biographer Garrett Graff Garrett. Thank you. My pleasure. So as we just heard one of the most significant developments in the Muller probe this week was President Trump's former lawyer and fix Michael Cohen pleading guilty to lying to congress about efforts to build a Trump Tower in Russia during the two thousand sixteen campaign and that effort came after decades of President Trump trying to build in Russia to be NYC's. Ilya marritz, co host the Trump Inc podcast. He joins me now to give us a more of the long view. Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. I should say Trump Inc. Right. I have to get to Trump Inc. So we know some about Michael Cohen's work during the presidential campaign. How does this week's news ads what we already knew about Trump's efforts to build in Russia? Well, we now know because Trump's former lawyer said it in court that Trump was actively pursuing a tower in Moscow while he was campaigning for the Republican nomination for president. This is something Donald Trump has long denied what history tells us is that Trump has long wanted to put his name on a building in Moscow. So in one thousand nine hundred seven he visits the US. Czar the Soviet Union, and he talks about how they need luxury hotels in Moscow and Leningrad. He makes another trip in one thousand nine hundred ninety s doesn't get anywhere. And then in the two thousand Trump's starts to lend his name to developers around the world. And there's a there deals around Russia. There's one in Azerbaijan there's one in the Republic of Georgia which Michael Cohen helps to arrange in twenty thirteen Trump's comes to Moscow again for the Miss Universe pageant. He owns the pageant, and he says again that he's in talks with developers. And then finally we see a renewed effort in two thousand fifteen and two thousand sixteen to build in Moscow.

Mary Louise Kelley President T Donald Trump Muller Trump Inc Trump Tower Trump Tower Moscow Michael Cohen Bob Muller Robert Muller Russia Vladimir Putin Moscow President Trump United States Paul Manafort Garrett Graff Garrett Baird Robert Mueller
"ilya" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"ilya" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

"They're going to help them squeak into the playoff picture from the Pacific this year. I would tend to agree with that. These are teams that are going completely different directions. Even though the Los Angeles Kings, even the summer doubled down on Wilson. We're still going for it. You know, we're going to bring in the mid thirties. Iliad Cova, Chuck, I know we're old but still doubling down on that after losing patchy grabbing Ilya Kovalchuk now that he's been there any other issues that is their main problem, but still that's the decision the LA kings made. And now this has been a complete change of direction for the Los Angeles Kings. I mean, we're approaching the twenty game Mark. So everybody knows what's under the hood. And I guess if you Rob Blake and many may say, hey, you might wanted to make this decision after he got smashed in the playoffs last year. And now waited an entire summer. But are you surprised that this wasn't done in the summer that you know, what we're gonna have a look at fifteen games. It's not there. Now, we're moving on. I don't think there's any way the kings believe their team would be like this nine chance and the way they're reacting now is proof of that. They never saw this coming. They thought it was going to be better than this. Now, I also believe this is part of the the whole change of scenery idea, which we don't change anymore. So we the sit down the other day with David Poile gonna air at some point. And we talked about how difficult much more difficult is now to make a trade the whole change of scenery trade the side from today is basically gone now. And I thought that if there was going to be a change of scenery trade last week. It was going to be between Pittsburgh and Anaheim because Jim Rutherford is been around for a while. And Bob Murray has been around for awhile and neither one of them like which way their teams were going, and they could both believe in that. And from what I understand the players that they were talking about weren't in this today at least from the penguins part. So I'm wondering if they're still potentially more there soon. I don't know. I don't know soon. I just I they were talking about has been speaking about his team. He wants to do stuff he wants to do stuff. And the thing we know. But your mother firs he doesn't wait wait till eleven. Our he gets his stuff done get in get with the program. Learn what we do here. We're not going to hear about trade deadline. We're gonna make our moves in advance agreed hangings will be done as a team. We wanted to worry about covering the Pittsburgh Penguins on trade deadline day. We'll know what the team is agreed for the most part. I agree with that. What I don't know is if he's done or there's still more to come. And I do think there was something going on between him and the ducks didn't involve necessarily haggling. So we'll see if it's a one move thing or they try and do something. Else and the kings. I don't think they're done either. The only question is how deep do they cut how close to the bone? Do they go? I think some of those guys that have been there for a while are probably looking at what happened today and saying it's not the only one on that will begin welcome to the podcast brought to you by the all new two thousand eighteen GMC Sierra the now..

Los Angeles Kings penguins Pittsburgh Penguins Bob Murray Pacific Rob Blake Ilya Kovalchuk David Poile GMC Sierra Iliad Cova Wilson Jim Rutherford Pittsburgh ducks Anaheim Chuck
"ilya" Discussed on We're No Doctors

We're No Doctors

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"ilya" Discussed on We're No Doctors

"Two starts on Halloween. Greg. Greg reviews candy. It's candy out at it. And how many of you done I've done eight of them already, and they're also on YouTube. Maybe wanna followings have you? Reviewed candy corn. No. I haven't review candy one. I haven't reviewed candy corn. Do you like it or do you don't like it? I don't know if I like it. I will eat them because it's sugar, and I'm kind of a dictated like popcorn. But I'm not like, I gotta you know, what I love bit Honey Obita, Honey. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. See that common. Here's an interesting about candy. Sometimes candy corn. Do I like it? And I have four what about when I have thirty four. I don't like what why are you eating thirty four. I don't know. Nobody said you had to eat the entire bag of something. Sometimes you eat something. Go one of these is good nine is a nightmare. Well, why did you go to the nightmare because I need to eat the whole bag. It doesn't say anywhere on the teed all of them. There's no instruction to eat or finish. It. You know, what I fucking love and had only have only recently tried but was well aware of them because of one a year comedy albums, Tim TAM's. It's technically it's not a candy. It's a cookie. But yeah. The biscuit, actually, but they Australia. Australia. Skip you whatever you wanna call. Yeah. They've got a there's a there's a ten there's something about them. They look they don't look winning. They look like something like, my my grandma has it looks like a ninety nine cent version of like a kit Kat one hundred percent, and it's like a fat. Yeah. It's like a cookie with chocolate on you're like how good can this bay? And then you have one and you go. Oh my God. And my craving. It has a. Yeah, they're unreal. I just finished working on a show all summer with an actress who was Austrailian and. What show it's called American Princess created by gingy Cohen and Jamie, Dan, bow and the lead actress is a stray Ilya her name is Georgia flood. Okay. And amazing. I think she's going to do a lot of great stuff. Australia Australia and just come over here. And they just kick ass. My first day working was it was just a scene with the two of us in. I didn't even know. She was Australian that's the thing we were on a break and it slipped. Her accident slipped on it was like holy shit. You're trillion I think he we just go. Then be cool. Right. Yes. Be cool. It just being everybody in. Yeah. 'cause you can do the accents right, but don't be compete. Dick. Don't put Russell Crowe. Right. Who actually has fucking from New Zealand. He's not oh is that true? Hey kiwi. So, but you know, go over there and be cool. And he didn't have anything you want. And that's they are they come over here. The Hemsworth Robbie all of them. They come over here. And there just I love them. But the last I think it was the last day of shooting. She brought Tim's hit. I was like gotta try it. Holy shit. I was like fucking scavenging. Yeah. Yeah. And you gotta get the one there's ones from here. But they're the ones from over there better. And and yeah, wow. Yeah. They're they're showroom. Got it was so good. They have one my whole thing was like they want that when that was cookies and cream already. Here's a cookie cookies cookie. And yet you, but they did and it tastes like there's a cookie inside of the cooking. It's a different cookie inside of a cookie. It's the same good. Yeah. Yeah. It's really good. That's really good. So that's lonely ghost stayed home. Candy review.

Australia Russell Crowe Ilya Greg Tim TAM YouTube Robbie Kat New Zealand Dick gingy Cohen Dan Jamie one hundred percent
"ilya" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"ilya" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"No i don't get how that happened i hang the ring to sensitive three ilya hm and when i saw the mom talk about it and mike of you de leon who i pictured like why could use the same earning lady it's the same lady i'm sure okay but maybe what about the principle do you think the principles silly what if they're being a using the principle that the woman was arguing even though she's annoying like do you think she has a point are you think movies are designed to be silly invention and also at movies are designed with cillian funny end like if you want to be outraged at that then helcom nobody's outraged at beauty and the beast the fact that they're beast is stealing her way from her father her up in a dungeon basically it's it's all a a domestic violence and nobody's outraged there's nobody like protesting at disneyland saying we should have beauty and the beast on any more because this glorifies domestic violence so are you telling me there are protests going on for angry groups of parents you have it there's rattling their angered groups of parents that things that maybe we should be angry about what if there was a character in a wheelchair nearly pusher down the steps would you think that was funny no civil where do you travel i depends will come movie we talk in just like theatre rabbit one of the people in in missouri gregory's i will inherit ask somebody in a wheelchair if they thought that was funny now i'm asking you because you're saying it's funny about the fn.

ilya hm disneyland cillian missouri
"ilya" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"ilya" Discussed on WLOB

"We're talking with ilya shapiro senior fellow in constitutional studies at the cato institute we're looking at the supreme court case digital realty trust versus summers it's about whistle blower protection and to a certain extent about the extent to which the law a should need to be interpreted as opposed to well at in other words in cases of ambiguity like this uh it does seem to be that the somewhere along the line uh that that perhaps a potential conflicts of should have been i should have been ironed out as we take a call here let me ask you a a yet is there any kind of of uh o ideally a computerized service when uh members of congress are writing legislation which appoints out this sort of thing on the from what's already in the statute other you're writing it an eight a bill uh about duck a widget regulation and and uh and a computer would say well in uh in 2013 they passed a law that does said soandso about widget regulation and it uh it would be contradictory with part of what's in your law is there any kind of of way that that members of congress in writing legislation can have instant access to what's already on the books so that may be misunderstandings can be avoided well it's it's not come automated computer but they have lots of uh very good lawyers uh that congress hires not just each member's reach committees but there's legislative counsel's office that's supposed to deal with uh with things like.

senior fellow cato institute congress legislative counsel ilya shapiro soandso