18 Episode results for "Ignace"

Meditation: The Sea of Awareness (2019-08-21)

Tara Brach

18:08 min | 1 year ago

Meditation: The Sea of Awareness (2019-08-21)

"The following meditation is led by tara brach to access more of meditations or join. My email list please visit tara brach dot com ooh <hes> <music> <music>. Perhaps one of the most direct portals to the awakened heart mind is is by waking up our awareness in the body do that with the gentleness it helps to have have the image and sense of smile you might visualize that spread through the whole sky the curve and receptivity of a smile spreading through a vast guy then let your mind merge with that vast sky sensing the smile filling your mind with that an openness receptivity. Perhaps you can soften your eyes and since the curve and image of a smile spreading through the is lifting the outer corners softening again the brow smooth you you can feel the receptivity in that whole region of the brow bringing a slight smile to the lips technology on calls this mile yoga because it helps connect us to a very natural sense of benevolence and ease. Maybe you can feel the inside of your mouth smiling line as you do. Let the tongue fill lower. Pallet can relax down to the root of the time. Can you imagine feel all the alive s through the mouth gums the t the time lips aliveness spreads through the face breath tangling in vibrating in the scowl and skull. You might might sense the throat filling the knack the aliveness sensation in the throat and allowing the shoulders to fall away from the neck fuelling inside the shoulder sensing that awareness can fill your shoulders deal the aliveness if there might be in the form of tingling are are vibrating or might be tension or tightness opened a what's there if there is tightness might let whatever's there float in awareness lau the hands to rest easy and effortless sway explore what happens when you soften the hands softening them and feeling from the inside out the aliveness softening softener again and again syncing syncing intimate presents inside the hands feeling tingling and pulsing alive again softening the is smiling and the is smile to lips allowing the curve and the image of a smile to spread through the heart area visualizing and experiencing the felt sense uh-huh this is not to paper over but really to make room for the life that's here their sense of space and alive the cast the upper back canning down to the mid section of the body see if you can let this next in graph be received a softening ballet this graph and now again and again continuing to let the body in the bill is soft him letting the breath be received deep in the torso course feeling from the inside out pillai ignace of sensation that fills you the awareness fill the mid back the lower back the tolls agreed relax the two aliveness where where your feet touch the floor pressure temperature where where you're sitting on your chair and you might imagine beneath few and bath dimension the her supporting and since the energy flowing up into animating this body has an expression of earth earth energy pouring through you perhaps right up to the basis filling the back. You're in the ballet and the body with aliveness. Perhaps you can imagine salivas extending outward from either side out beyond <hes> the furthest stars the space of alive maps props. You can imagine matten of live and space extending in front of you beyond the furthest and behind you outward outward beyond the furthest star above and below year extending instantly outward beyond the most distant distant star sensitive vast of space and aliveness ernest syncing the inner space aliveness as continuous continuous await space filled the light of awareness rusty in this openness and receptivity tiffany of awake space in the midst of it. The simple rise in falls. The bre <hes> <hes> happening on them. You might sense a possibility of resting completely -pletely fueling the movement of the inflow and the outflow of the brat like ways bassey of awareness relaxed and receptive you might notice that mine move and ways of the brad two ways of thought perhaps gets lost. When there's a noticing of that you can just not thinking thinking thought relaxed open again speed that c. awareness the different ways. Come and go sledding. The breath in the foreground and again has the way to come collect the attention moment to moment the pratt. If some other strong wave comes along strong emotion strong sensations perhaps pleasant tingling unpleasant kind of tightness let those waves coming fuelling saying yes took and also resting in the sea of awareness ernest. That's what happens attention and went on sounds appear if you can let them be waves coming and going this are winstone emotions fear sorrow r._o. Grief are more sound. What happens noticed the possibility of simply allowing the waves the continent momento rusty in this openness in wakefulness. You might ask yourself. It's possible to let go just a little bit more right now. Relax back to let life be just seduced. Soon breath by breath sensing in the foreground changing waves of sound cessation move promotion aw in the background this great alert siu awareness gives rise all the ways relaxing back that everything be just as it is.

tara brach pillai ignace pratt
Dispatch 2: Every Day is Ignaz Semmelweis Day

Radiolab

34:06 min | 11 months ago

Dispatch 2: Every Day is Ignaz Semmelweis Day

"You're listening to radio at WNYC okay. Hey I'm Jaboomer Rod. This is radio lab dispatch number two. This is a story that we're all living out twenty thirty fifty times a day in twenty second bursts store at anyone really know about but when this whole corona crisis was new just seems like it's been years but just two weeks ago when I first people I called was Murad Mr Zimmer. It's good to hear your voice. Who's Carl Zimmer? He's a science writer regular guests on the show. How are you doing everyone? Okay we sort of like you know fluctuate there. Yeah Call Them Up. I just wanted to a basic read on what science we should be paying attention to and covering so is asking him questions about vaccines and treatments. There were many parenting interruptions. I assume you wash your hands Roll Your eyes on your is what I'm talking about. Yeah there you go and you know we were talking about the science and in the flow of things he throws out this name. Ignace EMMA wife I found I found a profile ignites similize and I just sort of put it on a tweet and I said you know. Every day is ignored similize day. Like who's this ignace similize you know? Just how epic story? No what is this? What is this epic story? I mean and then he told me this crazy story for two thousand year old medical mystery that involves life and death and dogma disease and sacrifice and the price of knowledge and I was like Whoa. Whoa WHOA WHOA. Whoa get a USB. Mike I'M GONNA call you back. Okay just from start. Yes so so who it. Who is ignace? Some away so similar was born in eighteen. Eighteen to a family ran grocery stores in Budapest. Hungary he was the fifth of nine kids and he was. You know they. You hear these words described about him you know. Lighthearted guy popular jocular seemed like a very pleasant man at least at the beginning when you look at his station from the earliest photographs. We have he. He looks very into. This is Nancy. Thome historian medicine at Stony Brook University. Dark hair dark moustache he to my mind must have cut a fine figure. S doctor with that impressive face and those haunting is it is true as very smiley mouth in those early pictures but his eyes are like searchlights but in any case Similize it. I thought he'd become a lawyer but then he switched to medicine. He just had a really good medical class. I guess in that university and decided. That's what I WANNA do. And so he Then travelled to Vienna because he wanted to go to the best medical school he could And he started work there. Okay so Vienna Hospital. This is where the mystery unfolds. Can you set the tasty? I'm on an Oh that's beautiful. I'm in an interview right now. it's sorry as monotype. That's just parenting the pandemic okay. So Vienna Hospital said we should be picturing the Vienna General Hospital around eighteen. Forty six is a magnificent hospital. Vienna's is one of the intellectual centers of the world. This may be one of the greatest hospitals on earth. It's professors are revered as holding all the wisdom of of Medical Lore and by the way this is a moment when science itself lease we understand. It now was just getting going. Yes data empiricism statistics when the changes in the history of science coming about moving from the the old to the new was simply using your eyes and paying attention. So you had all these. Young doctors like similize. Come into this hospital with the idea that we're going to embrace this new era. The body contains all of these secrets and in order to learn those secrets. We've got a look inside. We've got to do dissections. See what it can teach us so that we can understand. How disease affects organs so that we can then learn how to treat them in living people. Okay so and so wise arrived in Vienna eighteen. Forty four you know. He's kicked around a bit at the medical school. Trying to figure out who what his specialty would be did. A lot of autopsies to learn about medicine and then he was assigned to obstetrics the delivering of babies and so it gives routine became that He in the morning he would dissect bodies as part of his training and then in the afternoon and evening he would deliver babies so he got to Got To become an expert on on childbirth. One thing to keep in mind at at this point women did not go to hospitals to give birth routinely in this time period. The women who went there was so poor that they needed the assistance. Nancy says if you were a woman during this time and you had any means at all gave birth at home and in fact many of the women giving birth in these maternity clinics not just in Vienna but in other big cities might be single women who have become pregnant they might be prostitutes and they would exchange that care during Labor for the right of the medical personnel to use them as teaching material so teaching hospital but not all of the hospital was for teaching their this becomes important later. There were to deliver awards. This hospital. One was run by female midwives. The other was run by male doctors so the division with the doctors the first division was you know the very high status one where they were advancing. The science combining what they were learning with autopsies with doing childbirth. This is where a guy ignace similize trained and imagine in those first few years he delivered thousands of babies and very early on. He was struck by a horrible fact. Many of the young women who gave birth in his delivery ward died right after they delivered a really haunted by all these women who were dying in front of him. I mean it really got to him. It hit him very hard and and it was just relentless just just a large number of these healthy young women would come to the hospital to give birth and then suddenly die In one of the most horrific ways you can imagine they'd give birth then develop a fever that would keep climbing until they were hallucinating. Convulsing filling with bile losing blood and then ultimately passing away. He writes about how much this haunted him. Because you know every time that there was another patient who was dying they would call the priest and every time a priest will come into the hospital bring about it had a strange effect upon my nerves. When I heard the bell hurried past my door Asai would escape my heart for the victim that once more was claimed by an unknown power. He has every time you heard that bell it just. It just made him shudder. Bell was a painful exhortation me to search with this unknown cause with all of my mind to the because he knew that they were losing another young woman that unknown power that was claiming all these lives was a disease with a strange name. Purple Fever per parole fever. It's not purple as in the color. It's Pearl fever which comes from the Latin emperor which means woman who gives birth. At that point it was sometimes called child bed fever. But it went back a long way. It had been described for thousands of years have hockey's actually describes it if however the predation of the appropriate does not take place even in the Fifth Century. Bc HIPPOCRATES Father Medicine described the fevers described the symptoms. He thought something had putrefied in the mother yes other physicians hold air inadvertently received into the uterus which closes the orifices of the vessel thought. Maybe it was the air in the delivery room India period. It is widely accepted that the quality of the air play a role in determining disease. This is Daniel Margot see historian of Science Cambridge University. Paypal argue that there is seasonal variation in a number of women being afflicted in other words. Maybe it was the weather. Some people argued. It was the moral standing of the women. Because if you are immoral a youth than to be the day if you are not both morally and physically than you'll live in squalid conditions all kinds of crazy theories. Some people even thought that The problem was that the milk that expectant mothers were producing to nurse. Their Children was somehow getting routed into their abdomen or their uterus. And in a weird way you can kind of see how they could think of something as crazy as that. And that's because when doctors would examine these dead mother's open up their abdomens. They saw this huge amount of Pale liquid. That look to them with a little like milk but it was bus. That is legitimately disgusting. But the point is this. Mystery had been plaguing doctors and scientists for thousands of years and it just so happened that when Ignatius similize was in delivery ward number one. It was a really big problem sometimes. Thirty percent of the of the women giving birth at the hospital in a month die of this fever. That is a huge number. I mean it would fluctuate in some months. It would be seven percent but still you know so everybody knew that this was a problem And so the question was what what's causing this. And how can we address it? I imagine that every time I heard that bell ignored him always thought. I've got to get to the bottom of this. And so in between his morning dissections and his afternoon delivery shifts he would visit the hospital archives. The Vienna General Hospital might not have understood what pro fever was. But they're really good at keeping records so he looked at their records and some things really popped out for him first of all. Despite a general impression to the contrary neither the incidents nor the mortality Purple Fever was related to whether there was no connection with weather. Cross that off the list. You know could rule things out. But here's the really big thing. He noticed observation number one. If you remember there were two different delivery awards the same number of deliveries took place in each of the hospitals to obstetrical divisions usually between three thousand and three thousand five hundred division number one. We're doctors number two were midwives in the first division an average of six hundred to eight hundred mothers died each year from Purple Fever in the second division the figure was usually about sixty deaths. Similize like runs the numbers and he's like my God like twenty percent of these women are dying where the doctors are in charge in about two percent time when the mid wiser and charge really. Yeah so the death rate is eighteen percent higher when the doctors are delivering babies. Ten Times higher think of it that way about ten times bigger wrestle dying when you know some of the best doctors in the world are delivering your baby. Naturally ignace was like. Why would that be? Why would it be so different? He was just looking and looking and looking like what could explain this. What could explain this shortly after he has this big? Aha moment and solves the two thousand year old mystery. That's after the break. Hi My name is Ray in and I'm calling from Cape Town Pennsylvania. Radio APP is supported in part by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation enhancing public understanding of science and technology in the modern world. More information about Sloan at www dot org jaboomer on this is radio lab so it is eight hundred. Forty-seven Iggy semi wise is flummoxed. He's noticed a very distressing pattern that You know there are two delivery wards in the Hospital Division One. You have the best in the brightest male doctors in the world delivering babies too. You have female midwives. He runs the numbers and finds that women giving birth in his delivery room division. One die at ten times higher the rate then division to he has no idea why this would be these are supposed to be the best doctors in the world but then he has a homo. What seems to really have made it. All Click in place was not The death of one of these patients but the death of one of his professors a man named Jacob Coletta. He had this mentor who had taught him about Medicine and how to do an autopsy how to do forensic pathology all that stuff and During one autopsy This professor was with a student. He and the student were bent over. A cadaver in the student was cutting open cadaver under his guidance. Making some incisions an accidentally nickname with the knife. Nick the professor yet. Apparently the students hand slipped or something and he caught his professor on the Finger. So the student Knicks the professor with the knife just a tiny little scrape and then suddenly within a few days his mentor. He died a terrible death but a terrible death. That seemed familiar. Totally shattered brooded over the case with intense emotion until suddenly a thought crossed my mind at once it became clear to me that child bid fever the fatal thickness of newborn and the disease of Professor. Collect one in the you realize. Oh my God. This disease is the same one. I've been seeing in the delivery room with the mothers. We didn't know why it was happening. But here we know the cause. It was the student students knife a knife that I had been in a dead body and then hit cut professors finger. The fact of the matter is that they're transmitting source of those could ever particles was to be found in the hands of the students and intending physicians. When professor died it all clicked into place. Because what do these doctors do? These doctors in the morning might have their hands deepen cadaver and then the afternoon it would walk over to a pregnant woman and start delivering a baby with the same hands. That's haunting so they're literally carrying death into the place where life begins. Yes they were they absolutely were and so I mean the way that similize described. Do Quizzes that When a doctor was finished with an autopsy he had cadaver particles on his hands. Oh to similize call these cadaver particles that gives me chills just thinking about that. He didn't call them. Bacteria viruses anything. He didn't know what those things were and when he put all this stuff together and came up with this idea of cadaver particles he thought. Oh my God because of my convictions I must confess that God only knows the number of patients who have gone to their graves prematurely by my fault I have been sending women to their graves. He immediately recognized brutal paradox of his situation. He'd been trying to do the right thing. Advanced the science save lives but it had done the opposite. In fact the doctor who worked at the delivery ward ripe for got there who is widely recognized as a lazy scientist didn't do dissections and as a consequence more women survived. Some always shows up starts doing dissections as he believed was his duty and the death spike. I remember this very much aware of that paradox. That it's with the rise of scientific medicine. That try fever is really coming into place. And he basically says that you know me being conscientious scientist is the reason by many mothers died before. I realized that I was the cause of their deceased. But in addition it is his scientific method in his scientific way of thinking that allows them to recognize that. So there's some it's very it's very I don't know it. Yeah it it it is interesting. I mean it's it's it's the whole nine centuries a little bit like try to you know with the rise of global circulations to spread off. You know steamships you get at the same time cholera so the spread of knowledge and the spread of diseases. Is You know they are often connected? Yeah okay so what happens next is it starts telling his colleagues we've been killing women and you know actually like a number of you know the younger set said you know. I think he's right and and it was. It was very hard for some of them and in fact You know there was. There was one doctor name Michaela's who he had delivered the baby of his own niece and she had developed propel fever and the realization that he was probably responsible for the death of his niece just became too much and he committed suicide. Wow that's for similize. Any he immediately said like okay. Well what could I knowing this? Is there something that I could do at the hospital to stop it? He actually started to do these experiments. He was very familiar with the smell of death. Obviously because he was working with cadavers all the time cutting them open and they didn't have particularly good ways of preserving them so it was a pretty nasty business and he was you know. His sense of smell is very tuned to the smell of a corpse so we figured well you know if if I can get these cadaver particles off my hands then maybe then I will be safe as a doctor to go delivered babies and so he tried things out. You tried out different ways of disinfecting his hands and he would just sort of basically smell his hands and then if the odor of death after an autopsy went away he'd be like okay. This this is good. He settled on basically bleach. You would take some bleach put in some water and create a solution. It wasn't a whole lot of bleach not enough to burn your skin but it was enough to burn off that stench and to take care of those cadaver particles and so similar wise was by now was in charge of a lot of the birth that were happening at Vienna General Hospital and he just said Okay neutral folks after you do your on autopsy and before you deliver a baby. I've got this bowl here. Wash your hands disinfect. Your hands and And what happened? He kept track and He basically like brought the death rate is pretty much zero. I mean he couldn't completely eliminate it but he got pretty close. There were some months. We're like no women died at all none and it is here that ignace similize reaches his disinfected hands into the president. Because all those PSA's hearing these days but washing your hands. They really begin in this moment with a Hungarian guy realizing that handwashing the simple act of rubbing your hands together with some soap or bleach would be the key to the two thousand euro mystery of Pearl Fever. If only could have lived to see Carl. Zimmer's tweet or see steph curry or Lebron. James urge their millions of followers to wash their hands but alas he could not he was stuck in his own time and beyond his own clinic. His idea didn't really catch on poor. Ignace CIMA Vice. What a sad story. There's a final tragic chapter to this tale and this one can be many different ways. Yep Very complicated and A lot of pretty intense controversy see Nancy says summarizes end is something historians still argue about sometimes quite fiercely and one version of events. Is that classic very familiar science? History story where you've got a guy who saw something at insight but then the dogma push back absolutely it's that Galileo narrative. Yes along those lines. We know that after his big breakthrough and he collected all kinds of data. He was very scientific in many respects. We know that ignites similize began to write letters to everyone in Europe. He says I figure this out. You need to institute a handwashing and you need to accept my theory. As I mentioned there were doctors to believed him doctors however they weren't running the hospitals. They weren't running the medical schools. And so you know. The the older generation pushback really hard push. How like? Don't tell me what to do. Young person kind of thing. Imagine imagine imagine that you are one of the most respected doctors in obstetrics in the world and you've delivered thousands and thousands of babies. You know what you're doing and then a twenty eight year old. Who has barely gotten started in? The field of medicine says you are responsible for the deaths of countless women because of these mysterious things called cadaver particles And then to imply that an educated upper class DNA physician could have been had so dirty that they were transmitting. This this terrible infection. I think that that is definitely an element at a at a more subterranean personal level. Don't tell me dirty Nancy. Thanks part of it was just that the older doctors were offended. Or you call me. Filthy and similize was you know was not very not terribly diplomatic He would reply to these doctors. No I'm not calling you filthy. I'm calling you. A murderer is being really blunt about it. He you know he he would write letters to doctors and say just say like you Sir. Been a partner. In a massacre his thoughts writing more and more Batali letters and things that everyone disagrees with him must be an evil person. You get the idea that this this may have turned him from that. You know jovial popular guy to kind of amount of maniac and this gets us to the second version of events that the reason big breakthrough didn't break through at least not in his lifetime is that it's as much his own fault as anyone else's sometimes historians tell his story as an example of what not to do in terms of communicating science. He railed against his colleagues. Call THEM NAMES REALLY. Not a great way to Win A lot of friends to say especially some of them. According to Daniel Margot see had legitimate scientific questions like okay. Let's wash hands fine but can you explain to us why washing hands works and why every so often it persephone berries they shoot that Certain mother still die. After as citizens of Hand Wash Inc not all cases of tied fever disappear as a result which physicians wanted to know. Could he explain that? Isn't it possible that there's more than one 'cause here? What are these cadaver particles? Has He ever seen them with a microscope? if they really are these contaminating agents shouldn't the babies get sick as much if not more than the mothers? And that's not happening. Do we know why semi wise just didn't have the patience to deal with these questions. And the problem was that In in the eighteen sixties he seems to go into a rapid decline. I mean you can see like pictures of him In this man is early forties and pictures just show. This man starts to look like he's in his sixties or seventies. He something terrible was happening and he his personality change all sorts of ways. I mean he was already could be a pretty irascible person but He just started acting very strangely and a meeting where he was supposed to give a report he would just start reading from a random piece of paper completely confused you know he was married and had a family but he started like living openly with a prostitute. Something had gone terribly wrong. And so eventually his his family decided they had to bring him to an an asylum in Vienna use. Forty-seven that's pretty startling mental crime because of that decline again is something historians debate. People have speculated on it There had been some theories that it was syphilis. Certainly syphilis just basically eventually turns your brain and much more recently. Someone thought it was Alzheimer's disease Very early onset. Good look very much like Alzheimer's case. He was institutionalized but he didn't last more than two weeks he died he died in that institution. Yeah so it seem. It seems that what happened was that you know he was getting uncontrollable and kind of violence. By the time he was institutionalized. And you know this was a pretty dark time for people with mental illness Says the guards of the asylum basically just beat him to death I mean they beat him badly and then he probably developed an infection in some of those wounds And that determine how it's kind of sad irony it is. It is ironic. Yeah that he probably died A of an infectious disease himself very rapid devastating infection. Let me tell you what I take away from the story. This is maybe a third way to see it that. Here's the moment where we were not. Just summarize all of us were trapped in a middle space kind of tragic gap. We learned a thing but it wasn't enough similize knew that something was making these women sick. He called that something. Cadaveric particles didn't use the word bacteria because he didn't know about bacteria and only a couple years later Louis. Pastor would come along and say bacteria. That's what those could ever particles really were and he would offer the world a comprehensive new idea called Germ Theory. That would change everything. Similize was unfortunately the moment right before that in many ways. We're in that moment to now. We know the enemy. We know what shape we can draw pictures of it. We can track mutation rate. But we can't tell you why it attacks some people so harshly and others barely. We certainly don't know how to cure it. We just don't know enough yet but we do know one thing. And it's the same thing that Agnes. Some always taught us back in eighteen forty seven. Your hands are limousines for pathogens. You deliver them to their next comb. The virus that causes cove nineteen this corona virus. It's got a a membrane around it. It's kind of oily and it breaks up in soap. So all you need to do is soap. Your hands for twenty seconds. Sing happy birthday twice soaps up so rinse it off. Well and dry it off. Well and you haven't just like rubbed off viruses have actually like Split Open Kerr viruses. They can't harm you. It can't harm anybody very satisfying the way you just described that washing hands then becomes a kind of an act of war. Yeah next time you wash your hands. Think about that did this. Mundane Act was fought for and died for that. There are hundreds of years of life and death in ignorance. Knowledge all right. They're co mingling with the soap and water has a special way of cutting into the oil. It breaks the oil up into tiny drops leather from its water to penetrate the skin board and walked away dirt and other Madij glavas. Pumice could come clean with one more. Did you ever think how much fun it is just to be alive when you feel healthy and well just wash the hands clean the first? Why wait a minute that worship times in my depends in this? Wash your hands. I heard it from my parents. Jimmy did you wash your hands all well. Someday you'll find out why people want with so big. Thanks to Carl Zimmer for spending so much time on the phone with me in the past few days and a hat tip to the late Sherman newland. Who wrote a biography of IGNACE similize scrape? Biography called a doctor's played a lot of the information. The Senate was taken from that book. This story was produced with Bethel hop day. And let if Nassir I am Jabba. Rod Thank you for Washington. This is learner. Toll Washing her hands and overland park. Kansas radio APP is created by Jad Able bratwurst Robert Krulwich and produced by Soren Wheeler Dylan Keith. Our director of sound design. Suzy Lechtenberg is our executive producer. Our staff includes Simon Adler Becca. Pressler Rachel Kucic David Gavel Buffalo had T- Tracy Hunt Mac healty any Mikaelin Latif Nassar. Sir Quarry are now on Wack Pat Walters and Molly Webster of help from Shima Oli a with Harry Fortuna Sarah Sandbox Melissa. Donald Tag Davis Andrew Wrestle. Our fact Checker is Michelle Harris.

fevers ignace similize Vienna General Hospital Murad Mr Zimmer professor Nancy Vienna ignace bell similize Vienna WNYC Ignace EMMA Vienna Hospital Daniel Margot Budapest Hungary Jaboomer Rod writer Hospital Division One
The Semmelweis Effect

Second Opinion

03:52 min | 2 years ago

The Semmelweis Effect

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion, a growing number of high quality medical research. Studies challenge the status quo by providing evidence that traditional things like surgery, just don't work. It turns out that much of what we offer patients has little benefit. But that's only half the story. The other half is that once these studies come out nothing seems to change we still do the same number of useless surgeries. In part. This is due to what is called the Semel Weiss effect. This is the tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it doesn't fit with what we think are what we've always believed Ignace similize was born two hundred years ago this month. He was an obstetrician like every other obstetrician at the time who lost a huge number of babies to infect. His disease. Now remember this was way before we knew about bacteria or other infectious agents. There was no germ theory of disease at the time. It was common for obstetricians to perform autopsies on all babies who died to try to understand the cause of death. But obsta Tristesse were in high demand, and they would go back and forth from what we call labor and delivery to the morgue. Well, similize observed that when doctors washed their hands with a chlorine solution between patients or between, the autopsy and the patient death rates fell not a little poten- fold at the time. This was a remarkable observation he urged his colleagues to engage in regular hand washing. Similize wise could not explain how hand washing prevented deaths, but he was convinced. It did his hand washing. Suggestions. Were resoundingly rejected by his colleagues. They thought this was the height of nonsense. How could a man's hands possibly transmit disease by something you couldn't even see similize continued his careful handwashing and had the lowest death rates by far in his hospital while he saved hundreds bias blindness and ego cost the lives of thousands. Maybe even tens of thousands because his colleagues failed to listen to similize or even evaluate his observation. It was worse than that. He just couldn't convince them the leaders of medicine grew irritated by his letters and his lectures, which accused the medical profession of being reckless even murderers when the establishment could no longer ignore him. They accused him of being psychologically crazy for considering disease caused by things that were unseen. They. You can find him to a psychiatric hospital where ironically he died of an infection years later bacteria or discovered and found to be the cause of what was in similize time. Call child bid fever doctors hands were the main source of spread but the Semel Weiss effect is very much alive. Today. It helps explain why humans doctors in particular reject new knowledge because it contradicts. What we've always believed. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Ignace similize Dr Michael Wilks Semel obsta Tristesse KCRW fever two hundred years
111: Bored

The Slowdown

04:59 min | 1 year ago

111: Bored

"I'm US poet laureate, Tracy case Smith, and this is the slowdown. I remember childhood as slow quiet and lit by an ever-present, California, son. I have multiple vivid memories of staring up at trees and staring past the trees at clouds of picking handfuls of grass and throwing them into the wind of watching ants and birds of watching cars glide past and waving at the people inside them. I thought my life was boring riddled with absence a never ending idle after noon, I dreamt of growing up and getting away from my parents house in our small town of going some place where things happened now. I look back at all of that daydreaming as a luxurious freedom the freedom to get to know the sound of my own thoughts. I suspect that all those after noons devoid of str-. Lecture devoid of any real purpose are probably responsible for my becoming a writer because I was so bored. And because boredom invites the mind to wander to wonder to be imprinted by all the little strange and wonderful pieces of the world. It happens upon. Is it just me or does the world feel different? Now, it seems like long days and interminable weeks have gone extinct my time. And I suspect yours too is suddenly spoken for even children have pleased to be appointments to keep shuttling mind from school to sports to music to swim class. I think wow, all it took was a generation or two for boredom that wonderful laboratory of the imagination to be almost completely eradicated. Today's poem is bored by Margaret, Atwood. And it makes me think foil for the days, I spent paying attention to all the many small nothing's that once made up my life board by Margaret, Atwood. All those times, I was bored out of my mind. And holding the log while he sought it holding the string while he measured boards distances between things or pounded stakes into the ground for rows and rows of lettuces and beats which I then board weeded or sat in the back of the car or sat still in boats sat sat while at the prow stern wheel. He drove steered paddled. It wasn't even boredom. It was looking looking hard and up close at the small details. Myopia the warn gun Wales. The intricate twelve the seat cover the acid crumbs of loan the granular pink rock, it's Ignace veins. The sea fans of dry moss, the blackish and then the graying bristles on the back of his neck sometime. Times. He would whistle. Sometimes I would the boring rhythm of doing things over and over carrying the wood drying, the dishes such minutia. It's what the animal spend most of their time at faring the sand grain by grain from their tunnels shuffling, the leaves in their Burrows he pointed such things out, and I would look at the horrible texture of his square finger earth under the nail. Why do I remember it as sunnier all the time, then although it more often rained and more birdsong? I could hardly wait to get the hell out of there to anywhere else. Perhaps though boredom is happier. It is for dogs or hogs now, I wouldn't be bored. Now, I would know too much now. Now, I would know. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation.

writer Margaret US Ignace veins California congress Tracy Burrows Smith
Listen First! DOG TALES, A Parcast Original Series!

Natural Disasters

14:04 min | 1 year ago

Listen First! DOG TALES, A Parcast Original Series!

"Their four legged full of love and more like family than their nickname suggests. Now they're the subject of the park cast original series dog tales every Monday here the true tales of heroic canines who have gone above and beyond and their best friend duties. Check out this exclusive clip from the first episode on Buddy the German shepherd. The world's first seeing I guide dog. And if you you want to listen to the full episode follow Dog Tales Free On spotify or wherever. You get your podcasts. It's been a long day trouble at work stuck in traffic family drama. You get home. Open your front door and see your dogs wagging tail they press against your legs feet tip tapping on the floor. Nope as you wrote there is your frustration melts. If you're most people you picturing a Labrador retriever. A fluffy loyal sometimes mischievous pup. WHO's always there to play? Fetch cuddle after a bad day. Most people don't think of a shepherd mix who saved fifty people a Newfoundland who helped create the map of America. Well the huskies his star in Cuba gooding junior junior classic snow dogs through Millennia. Dogs have evolved to be our best friends but some dogs go beyond the coals. Also sit rollover and stop chasing the Amazon delivery guy. This podcast is about those very good dogs. Welcome to dog tales accost original every week. We tell the stories of historic here ROIC canines. We'll profile dog sue. Save people from earthquakes went outer space and even spurred the invention of Velcro. If you're looking for fun stories and a warm heart you're barking up the right tree I knew host Alistair. You can find episodes of dog tales and all other parkas originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream docked tails for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type dog tales in the search bar at Parkas. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we doing doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at Parkas network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help is to to leave a five star review wherever you're listening today off focus is a German shepherd named buddy. Most of you are picturing a male l.. Dog Right now but actually buddy was a girl and her unusual name might be the least interesting part of her story. Born born on fortunate fields farm in month pelerins Switzerland Buddy was in one thousand nine hundred twenty s working dog. She was a German shepherd that was bred. Read to help soldiers win. Woes police officers track criminals and the Red Cross save lives but buddies destiny was lifesaving of a different sort. She became America's first seeing eye. Dog when Buddy I met Morris Frank she was not infused. The Americans smelled weird and he ran out of treats ferry quickly but he remained friendly but wary relying on her sense of smell ten thousand times better than a human's and her extremely strong strong hearing which could detect anything from an oncoming earthquake to Morris's heartbeat. They were both nervous as she sniffed him getting familiar then. He tried to put her leather harness on. But instead of the swift maneuver she was used to. He poked her in the eye. Why she and he jerked away more sensitive to sound than her masters? Maybe they did have something in common. Morris reached out again the strap caught on her muzzle. Had he even mets a dog before after a few more minutes of awkward. Maneuvering the harness was finally on Buddy Wag. Tetteh let him time for a walk. But Morris just sat there She nudged him. Let's go outside. He stayed in place on confident. Buddy sat patient and she didn't know it but she'd been picked for this role precisely because of patience and tolerance she also didn't. I know that this was the beginning of the biggest relationship of her life. That she bond with Morris away no other animal not even a a great ape. Could and buddy definitely didn't know that Morris Frank would one day say quote as surely as those Pioneers Leonese who discovered lands and ideas for the world buddy rediscovered the world for blind people. All she knew was that Morris. Frank needed her help and she was going to do her. Best to provide it born in Nineteen nineteen o eight Morris. Frank was just like his mother. Jessie sadly when Morris was three Jesse was thrown from a horse she already lost sight. I took one I years earlier during childbirth and after the second accident Jesse fully lost her vision in nineteen twenty four. Morris took a hit during a boxing match with a friend pain bus through his head and the world when dunk it never Grew light again. As we said Morris. Frank was just like his mother. Despite his blindness ignace Morris still attended vanderbilt working as a piano tuner an insurance salesman on the side he was determined to have the life he planned for himself blindness blindness just meant he required extra systens. So the Franks hiatt help for Morris. But this wasn't the easy fix. It sounded like Nick Morris described his helper as unsympathetic which is putting it nicely. The helper attended classes alongside Morris. When he remember said he went on insurance sales? Kohl's and talked over Morris. He kept Morris from tripping on the sidewalk if he was paying attention. Morris was from a wealthy family but clearly no amounts of money could keep him safe and he had very little expectation of a future wife life for children who could help him. Morris could only take a girl on a double date since he required a friend to guide him so Morris's already limited options with even more limited by Age Nineteen Morris. Frank was fed up one afternoon as his unreliable guide walked him home from the Insurance Office. Morris heard the yells of paper boy not an unusual sound on the streets of Nashville in nineteen twenty seven. Evan except the yells redress at him. Apparently the paper Boy Thought Morris would appreciate one of the articles in the Saturday Evening Post. According to Dixon hot wells book dogs against darkness. Morris didn't know if it was curiosity or self defense that drove him to buy the paper Papa for all he knew it was just a sales tactic either way more soon found himself sitting in his living room listening to his father. Read an article. It'll titled the seeing eye. The piece described a blind man. As Pathetic Sean. Pray and at the Mercy Z.. O. Of all he comes in contact to and that's only in the first two sentences while oil. This was a common sentiment at the time it couldn't have felt good. Luckily Martha's father kept reading getting to the much kind of heart of the story. The writer Dorothy Harrison eustis detailed program. The German government setup the program ped- World War One veterans blinded by mustard guests exposure with dogs trained to guide them to be. There is as his father finished. Reading Morris was flogged wheel spun in his head. Could he help bring this program to America. How did wanted opt one of these incredible dogs? Did it truly truly work as well. As the article claimed Morris wrote to the journalist Dorothy Harrison eustis immediately posting his letter on November Ninth Nineteen eighteen twenty seven. He had no idea he was about to change the American perception of blind people forever and he also had no idea that Dorothy Harrison eustis wasn't actually a journalist. She was an arrest by birth an expert by choice and a German Shepherd Breeder by passion. She lived on a Swiss state with her family. Her business partner at approximately a hundred German shepherds her life's mission was to breed and train. These dogs to be useful useful was one of Dorothy the favorite words. According to her biographer Miriam S Garelli previously useful. Had meant helping the Red Cross the local police ace and the Swiss and Italian armies. Dorothy dogs worked in search and rescue as International Messengers and as security guards to improve improve business. Dorothy and her husband. George traveled around Europe observing dogs and learning about various training methods on a trip to Germany. They visited visited Potsdam. Where Dorothy? I saw blind veterans partnered with Guy Dogs. She wrote the One quick. Glimpse of the crying need for guidance and companionship. In the lonely all in -veloping darkness stood out clearly before. My swimming is to think that one small more dog could stand for so much in the life of a human being. Not only in his usual rollers companion but as his eyes Sword Shield and buckler suddenly useful had a new meaning guiding the blind. Dorothy was obsessed so when the Saturday evening post approached her to write about her work at fortunate fields. She sent them something being a little different. Dorothy wrote about the useful incredible German dogs in the very article. That spurred the letter for Morris Frank. The seeing I Jersey was inundated with mail. Her article had done the nineteen twenty seven equivalent of going viral. But marist Chris Franks letter called her heart the hops. Because Morris didn't simply ask for a dog but asked how he could help. Dorothy wrote back filled with sympathy. She trained dogs sure but not dogs for the blind and 1927 wasn't wasn't great year for sending disabled Americans into Germany as the Nazis were slowly gaining power however dorothy did have several well all trained German shepherds and she couldn't stop herself from offering Morris a dog and she wrote. If Morris was willing to come to Switzerland her husband. George and colleague. Jack would try to train Morris to work with the dog. Jack's brother was blind so he was familiar with the help required. It would be a moonshot. A grand experiment. None of them had ever trained to guide Doug Partnership before. But they were willing to try so longest Morris was truly committed. Dorothy would be in the states for Christmas in a few weeks and would follow up with a phone call then about Oh two weeks later. Morris received a telegram. Dorothy would call that night. Bursting with anticipation Russian. Morris sat by the phone every jittery breath taking him closer to the dream of independence. She could barely keep still when the phone rang. He bounced out of his chair. Dorothy spoke softly. Mr Frank do you still want to come to Switzerland Insulin for your dog. It's a very long trip for a blind boy alone. Morris struggled to speak through his thick emotions finely. Only the words poured out loudly all at once to Switzerland to get a dog misses eustis to get my independence bank. Go to hell to find out what happens. Next listened to dog tales. Free on spotify. Or wherever. You get your podcasts.

ignace Morris Morris Frank Dorothy Dorothy Harrison eustis spotify Switzerland America Dorothy Harrison Newfoundland Chris Franks Germany Red Cross George Cuba gooding Amazon Alistair facebook Potsdam Tetteh
 Inside Napier: the former army barracks housing asylum seekers

Today in Focus

29:20 min | Last week

Inside Napier: the former army barracks housing asylum seekers

"Today why is the home office keeping asylum seekers in former barracks. I was staying at a hotel in london for three weeks and then one day in the morning after two weeks a bad reception called me and say pack your stop. You're going to be transferred. And i was really confused anxious because when you're in that position you're not you can't predict what's going to happen next. Swear you're gonna go. Maybe it's gonna be a dispersed accommodation. Or maybe it's going to be. A deport sensor cannot predict this man. We're calling my time has come to the uk from iran and is seeking asylum. When i packed my stuff went out. I asked texts driver where we are going to and he didn't respond because maybe i think they had the fear that if they informed people ignace cape so i just found out when i saw the folkston sign under wrote. When you are heading to napier barracks. Napier is a former army barracks in kent. But it hasn't been used to house the military for fifteen years now. The home office has re purposed it as a combination for up to four hundred vulnerable asylum. Seekers it's one of two sites they using the other is pinelli wiles. Minister say it's temporary accommodation because of the pressures of covid nineteen but men like matter who were not supposed to be detained. It feels like being sent to jail when i got. It's totally filled like prison. Defense the security guards all around you and you're really under control your movement hours or limited two times that day keeping you. Everyone is observing. You and i mean if you ask me personally. It was worse than prison when you're in prison. You know what you're being detained and you know how long you're going to be there. But these are not the chases neck napier barracks missile seeker from the guardian. I'm chris kristalina. Today in focus inside napier. The former army barracks used to house asylum seekers. I want to before we start that we mentioned self harm and suicide in this episode jamie grayson as fast correspondent for the guardian. Can you take us to the basics of this story. More on napier and pinelli. When did they start being used to house. People who are seeking asylum in september twenty twenty emerged that the home office had set up a deal with the ministry of defence to use to former military sites. One called napier barracks just outside of folkston. Kent and the other cooled pinelli barracks in pembrokeshire in south wales to temporarily house asylum seekers that was very little consultation. The news of the sites being used emerged through local authorities and local. mp's who objected from the outset. And that's how it was brought to attention of the public and the press for the majority of this episode. We're going to be focusing on napier barracks because what's been happening. There has been dramatic to say the least arrested been. Have you ever saw like new ice then inside taken to the streets surrounding the barracks in protest over grim conditions. They're living in october ours or are they protesting. Because i told me exercise you say tested. Tell us that. They're doing this because they want to offer value for money for the taxpayer because currently migrants are housed in hotels while they're signed. How did you first get alerted to it. I started getting calls from volunteers working charities in the local area to provide donations to the site and they were raising concerns about the conditions napier barracks and what they were telling me really did shock me take the overcrowding on the sites are fourteen blogs that has residents asylum-seekers bit can house twenty eight people each and the people who are inside our sharing two toilets and two showers in total. So even when it's not during the pandemic this place was not suitable and not hygienic. To keep four hundred people in one place for example. When i got there. I got capeeze. Scape base. Yeah in i two or three weeks. That i was stander. What escapees duty. How does it make you feel will. I had to scratch all my body parts of my body and it's became really read and rush. I clinton sleep at nights. Because i couldn't resist scratching. My buddy and two other of my friend in my block had the same problems so it was like when you put four hundred people from different backgrounds. Different cultures and hydrogen is really poor. The chance of getting any kind of disease is really high. Struck me that this was not at all covert secure or try print for the time but on top of this being flung into a military environment. Bob y around the perimeter the many described as looking and feeling like a prison was very alarming for a significant number of the man held inside all sorts of things had the people you stayed within napier experience before they got there will the majority of the silom seekers there are from syria iran iraq. I had one friend for example that when he was a child they used to stay in shelters at night because of the fear. They had the bomb being in shootings during iran. Iraq war on being in napier barracks reminded him the situation that he experienced at nights he was dealing with insomnia. He was taking pills. I mean i have so many stories about the i don't know where to they. All came across countries in europe. They experienced so many teams smugglers people who tried to steal their money or take advantage of them. There were people in the camps who are married and have children in their home. Countries and being in a situation comes through really worsened mental health. How are we spending you days in the first days. I was keeping my mind busy by learning french and reading books and helping people when they wanted interpreter or something to have problems because not all. The people don't speak english so i had to translate for them but after sometimes like after two or three month all of the people there can really hopeless and nuts k. To socialize with others. I've been inundated since september with messages from asylum seekers volunteers lawyers doctors raising different concerns about napier barracks and also palley barracks and this is range from allegations of home office cover-ups when volunteers were presented with nondisclosure agreements. Asking them not to talk to anyone including the press about what they had seen within the site lawyers getting in touch saying that they've been refused access to the site to speak to people. They are actually representing doctors. Raising concerns about the poor access to health care. These are all fundamental human rights with anyone ness onsite at napier to care for up to four hundred. Man is difficult to see how the men's human right to medical access could be fully matt. One medic has been raising concerns about the use of the barracks for months. Now is dr jill. O'leary she's the liege gp at the helen. Bamber foundation a charity working with refugees and asylum seekers and she's been trying to help men inside napier. I'm pinelli well. Many of the residents that we have assessed are displaying symptoms consistent with post traumatic stress disorder accessibility on depression. So specifically those symptoms would be flashbacks. Nightmares irritability anxiety. Poor sleep is quite high. Prevalence of those symptoms among the residents that we've assessed both of the sites have shooting ranges nearby and so it's not uncommon to hear 'em gunfire and and sort of heavy artillery from both of those sites where people are stay. You can understand. Just how triggering re traumatizing. Those noises might be to a large group of traumatize men who are all being housed in these storms. The first residents i ever assessed was a young man from the yemen who had made some negative comments about the yemeni government. He was subsequently imprisoned for ten to fourteen days. He was beaten starved tortured before he managed to escape he then immediately left yemen had a very very difficult journey largely on foot across europe to try and get to the uk once he arrived in the uk he was in initial accommodation in london and starting the silom application process when he was very suddenly moved to pinelli barracks being in this military site where there's high barbed wire and mash and dormitories in shared facilities. Put him right back to his time in prison in the end. He started getting intense flashbacks nightmares. He couldn't sleep. He was avoiding being around to the other residents wherever possible and for the first time in his life he started to have suicidal thoughts so it was a highly inappropriate environment for him to have been placed in and it clearly had very very detrimental effect on his mental health. What medical access of the men guessing. I think first of all. It's really important to say that both the nhs trusts that were expected to take clinical responsibility for these residents were given approximately two days notice before the residents were moved in so no health care pathways. Were put in place prior to moving residents into the barracks. That's a really important thing to bear in mind now boasts the cg's for napier. Finale have put in really really hard work in very very difficult circumstances trying to create health care pathways however access to healthcare remains really inadequate. And there's lots of barriers. Jill says that if the men want to go off site to see a doctor they have to ask permission from the staff at pinelli. That means they're forced to divulge their medical conditions which may be embarrassing or distressing to talk about how to staff who aren't themselves medically trained. It's then up to those members of staff to decide whether or not these people will be able to access medical help. An example of that would be one resident that we assess who had symptoms related to previous torture and that involved him having urinary incontinence he then had to speak to a cure springs manager. Explain about these symptoms of continents that were related to his previous trauma in order to request. Visit to see a gp. You wouldn't be surprised to know that. He found that completely humiliating an objectively his his mental health deteriorated significantly as a result. I mean what you're describing also sounds to me like it needs specialist. Help i imagine your average. Ep doesn't often come across people who have suffered such traumatic events and happy a in response to that. What are the kind of things that you need to watch out for with. Ptsd and how important is it. That these maingot specialist help people who have ptsd. They're likely to behave in ways. That can be destructive impulsive destructive to themselves into their environment they're much higher risk of mortality and morbidity. We need to be really conscious. A fast one i think radio obsessing feature of the barracks also is that. Both sides have become hotbeds for far-right activity. So there's lots of social media groups that are dedicated to monitoring the comings and goings of people from both sides that involves filming people against their will taking pictures of some harassing them. Asking them where they came from when they're leaving one resident that i spoke to who is experiencing quite severe symptoms of anxiety and depression. And i asked him if there was anything told in the barracks that gave him some pleasure some joy and he told me that she liked going for walks down to the beach. He'd sit by the sea and it would suit him but recently he hasn't been able to do that because every time he leaves the barracks he gets followed and harassed in sheriff's insulted and filmed by these far-right protesters. So the one thing that gave him. Some comfort is now been taken away from him. The other big concern for doctors like jail is about the risk of covid nineteen back in november. She and others right to the home office to voice their concern that there could be outbreaks at these sites but she says she never got a response when it came true. Madam was there at napier. I can remember that. The first days of january one block there were around five to six infected people in one block and they isolated the whole block for today's and after two days they open defenses and let infected wants once meeks with other people and when we asked why you did such as they say because the camp is representing a beach house and they are allowed to be free in their own helps. One be kester. One hundred and twenty positive cases were confirmed. I was really frustrated. Because it wasn't possible to practice social distancing it wasn't possible to keep yourself safe from this is after a positive. I had paint oliver. My buddy shivering. At night fever really fatigued. I was still staying in my own room. Which wasn't a room really was just. I'm with certain other people. We were actually four positive cases. Be ten negative cases to sleeping in same area and then things got worse at napier. In late january a fire broke out. Kent fire and rescue service said that they have been called to assist. Can police upbeat napier. In folkston eight fire engines have been sent to the scene. People living window fire happened when i came out of my block. I couldn't see to staff the people who are in charge security guards. The smoke was all over. The flames of the fire was really huge firefights Were trying hard to make everything called. But it was the same day that i felt. I'm really a bad situation really unsafe. And i've never experienced this. That was one of the worst memories. I've had in my life. What happened napier after the fire. How did life change. We had no electricity for today's. I know hot water heaters. I can remember that. I was sleeping in cold dark place for two nights. The fire was horrible for everybody involved. If you couple that with the fact that people are so frightened of contracting covert since. The outbreak has happened in napier. Lots of the dormitories. The residents are opting to sleep with the doors. Open to allow ventilation which i accounting notch on how cold that must be at the moment for them. When the fine crews went in they discovered us best daas. How worrying is that for people's help discovery of asbestosis just proves the point that these sites are not fit for purpose and not fit for anybody to be living in and so people need to be evacuated as soon as possible jamie descriptions we've heard of napier terrible. I'm struggling to understand why the government would hold people who are seeking asylum in those conditions. Have there been any inspections important point. You raise a no so father. Haven't been any inspections by any independent bodies. And i think that really sets these facilities apart from the established framework that we have to deal with either asylum seekers arriving in the uk or those the country wishes to the poor in the last few days we've had confirmation that the borders and immigration inspectorate along with the prisons inspectorate have been granted access to both napier barracks and pinelli camp. We understand that in the last few days since the spectrum was announced the officers significantly reduced the number of man being held at napier barracks to around fifty to one hundred just a few weeks ago. There were of course. Four hundred men at napier barracks i mean. Obviously you can't get in there to have a proper look at these sites. Look like one message that you get from ministers as well. These are good enough our soldiers. Why aren't they good enough for asylum. Seekers what is the response from charities and volunteers to that argument. Well first of all. They haven't housed military personnel for years. I've seen photos and videos of the the buildings inside the urinals often taped up backed up because they're out of water across the floor. The bathrooms the sleeping areas. Have no privacy to the point where the men have had a pin sheets up themselves to create. You know curtain to give themselves some sense of dignity if they want to undress. I would be surprised if they would allow military personnel to stay in them as they are now without some significant renovation. So they've now taken a significant number of people off the site that recognizing at least that it's been overcrowded. Why is the home office using napier and pinelli all the home office and the ministers a saying that at the time they started to use the barracks last september we were dealing with an influx of asylum-seekers seekers. Arriving over the channel you might recall the reporting at the time significant numbers of asylum seekers arriving at the channel in small boats and is correct that on individual days there were significant numbers record breaking numbers arriving on individual days and so the home office said they needed additional contingency accommodation to house this surge in arrivals it's also the case that because of the pandemic and its impact on migration flows that actually during that period the number of asylum applications in total in the uk at fallen because of obviously other routes into the country arriving in a lorry or even on a plane with severely limited so the number of asylum applications actually fell at the time you have to also said it in the context of a lot of rhetoric and messaging. That was coming from the him secretary. Pretty patrol and immigration minister. Chris fill about how to deal with asylum seekers in the country which is much harder than we've seen in recent years that would reports some of which revealed in the guardian about proposals to send asylum seekers to offshore facilities in the south atlantic. That were proposals to silom. Seekers on retired ferries oil rigs now. None of these things have actually happened but it certainly power the broadening rat trick that the home secretary and junior ministers have been using. They keep repeating that. They believed that the asylum system in the uk is broken. And i think that's one thing that they actually have some agreement with when it comes to the charities. Healthcare professionals is speeds. They think is contagious for different reasons. coming up matt and makes it outside. Napier will get the same chance london. Stock exchange group is here to be your essential global markets infrastructure data partner. Where open isn't just a platform but philosophy giving you the freedom to make your mark in the world open makes more possible. Last week he was taken out of napier. What finally happened. That meant you could leave. I was told in the morning like nine or ten. Am i seen by staff. That had to pack my stuff. And i couldn't believe. I mean when you are told debts. You're getting out of the prison. You are sitting so much. Surely it was the same feeling when there wasn't a car on my way to my knicks accommodation. I when i was seeing the buildings people cars and the normal life. It's really affected me. Because i totally forgot how the life is outside of the barracks jamie martin who we've been speaking to is out of napier now on the home office has given him a space in a hotel. Can you explain the legal process. That's enabled him to get out. A number of law firm specializing in human rights. Issues have taken on a number of asylum-seekers within napier as clients and lodging individual legal claims at the high court. They claim that the stay of siam in napier amounts to degrading or inhumane treatment and other claims have been based around ask three which is unfair imprisonment in the interim before the substantial hearings are held at the high called in the interim a couple of judges of already ordered the temporary removal of a number of men from the site based purely on britain. Submissions and the judges were convinced enough by those written submissions. That the men shouldn't remain on the site and ultimately that could be a substantial judicial review hearing which will look at the broader issues of the suitability and appropriateness of using these military sites to house asylum. Seekers we've heard from jail about what she's trying to do to improve the medical access the men in napier and pinelli can have and a lot of people medics lawyers volunteers and others are increasingly trying to highlight what is happening on these two sites in fact earlier this month joe gave evidence to a government select committee and has everybody jay that been tested older residents will the staff working there. Has everybody been tested. So access to testing has also been an intermittent and on some of the mp's. She spoke to seemed shocked by what she told them. Three people cont get canoga test results that still sharing accommodation in which they clearly is not social distancing and there are private cases on the signed treaty. Shocking it's just very troubling information that that will giving us. What is the likelihood. Do you think of the government shutting the size down. It was originally said it would be until the end of march however there have been reports from unnamed sources within the home office that they are considering a public consultation to extend its use beyond march however there are now a number of legal actions in process which could ultimately threaten the the ongoing use of napier and pinelli which is still open. In the meantime what will happen to martin and the people he stayed with all of these men have submitted claims for asylum in the u k now the average waiting times for an asylum claim to be processed goes beyond six months some asylum seekers i've spoken to in in the last years have waited years in the meantime. They're in napier barracks and they don't know when the answers coming. You know one thing. The government says and i've certainly heard this from previous governments certainly since twenty tad is that people have traveled through safe countries to get here and they should have claimed asylum in one of those countries instead of the uk. What do you make of that. The uk received around about forty five thousand applications for asylum in twenty nine thousand nine now. That was less than a third of the applications received by germany. It was about a third of the applications received by france and it was far fewer than the number of applications for asylum received by spain. I'm greece now. We all one of the countries in europe. Which has a high number of aside locations but we are by no means the country that receives the most and there are many who have argued that we should be doing a lot more to help refugees in this country. Who jamie thank you very much. Thank you my. Thanks to martin. Dr jill o'leary and jamie grayson. Who has written about this story. Do look up his brilliant reporting at the guardian dot com in connection with the fire at napier one man. Muhammad ali who is thirty one has appeared in court charged with affray common assault and criminal damage. All of which he denies thirteen other people were arrested and released on bail. We went to the home office for comment on this episode of the spokesperson told us that they did not recognize what they called inaccurate claims they said the government provides safe won't secure accommodation with three nutritious meals served a day all paid for by the taxpayer. These sites have previously accommodated army personnel. And it is wrong to say they are not adequate for asylum seekers. They said that the pandemic had the accommodation system under severe strain because of measures to control and manage the public health risk they added the government has been working tirelessly to secure extra accommodation to ease the pressure on the system and to me start straight obligations to support asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute. The ministry of defence gave us permission to use these temporary sites for twelve months and will be discontinued when we are able to do so. The government continues to work closely with accommodation providers charities local authorities police and other partners to ensure that the sites operate safely securely and in line with public health guidelines. That's it for today a big. Thanks for all your reviews and feedback on social media. Do keep them coming. This episode was produced by hanna. More sound design was by nicholas. Alexander the executive producers on jackson and phil may not. We'll be back tomorrow. London stock exchange group is here to be or essential global markets infrastructure and data part. Not when he's in just a platform but a philosophy giving you the freedom to make your mark in the world. Elsag open makes more possible.

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The 5 Ws of Marketing and Making Money

The Tai Lopez Show

46:27 min | 2 years ago

The 5 Ws of Marketing and Making Money

"If you had a site that looks like this, and you were trying to sell us speaker, something or whatever it is. You wanna sell? I would move the object to the side here. And I'd put a video right here. I'd have it from five twenty minutes, depending on the price, and you need people to understand what you are selling. People fly through a series of steps. Their first step is do we respect the authority of this person on a police officer pulls you over first thing, you do is look for a badge or look for a gun. You're not gonna if so a random person tries to pull your car over. You're not gonna stop. You're not going to change your behavior because someone is driving next to you and yelling out. No pullover, man. In fact, if they do that, you're probably gonna drive away faster. So you can't just have a website. You're not apple you're not Amazon. You don't have a forty. So you have to explain yourself. So the only way you'd be a Ignace. Now, the only way you'd be able to pull someone over is. If you said, hey, listen, you don't know me, my name's tie. But I notice you have a flat tire. Listen to me, you need to pull over this car or you might crash on an auto mechanic. And I notice your brake pads are noticed your wheels are. Out of alignment or something's about to go wrong in your car. So that's what a video does on your website. If you're trying to sell stuff if you're trying to sell books, if you're trying to sell clothing online and t-shirts if you're trying to sell knives or household items trying to sell pet products people have to know why you because if they don't know why you they're gonna pick someone they trust. And a lot of people are just going to go to Amazon and buy without you. Now teach a little trick and second you can actually sell on Amazon. So you get the authority and respect than Amazon has, but they actually are buying from you because many years ago Amazon started allowing other people to sell it's not just Amazon selling so number two. How did you make a good video? Let me show you some stuff one of the things here's what I do. And there's different opinions on how to do this. This is a video that I have on my blog here. Let me just pick a random YouTube one. If you watch how I do this video here behind me, you'll notice. It's very simple. There's nothing fancy there in this video. I'm not even looking into the camera. I'm talking to other people, and it's a six minute video. Okay. And this video does very well. Let me look I haven't looked on YouTube. You can watch it on YouTube. Thirty thousand views or something if you go here, we'll pick another one this is a slightly different type of video. If you go here, this is me, speaking into the camera selfie style. Though. This one's twenty two minutes, and this video actually did better than the other one this video. I haven't had this video up for long. But let me see. So this video are we doing to fail? Yeah. I've had it up. I don't know two thousand likes on it. I like this style I've had videos that get millions of us fifty million views and stuff like this. So my main thing, and I want to show you is when I say us video. Just do it. Like Nike says don't overthinking don't try to make video spend fifty thousand dollars on a camera, crew and complicated editing. You could see there. I do this world's simplest videos, and I've made tens of millions of dollars from that approach. So if you had a site that looked like this, and you were trying to sell a speaker, something or whatever it is. You wanna sell? I would just put a video I would move the object to the side here. And I'd put a video right here. I'd have it from five twenty minutes, depending on the price the more expensive the product or trying to sell the higher the price. Okay. And you need people to understand what you are saying. I mean, what you are selling so many people in this world just expect building a website, there's millions and billions of web pages. Now a web page alone. Doesn't stand out sell yourself. People by you, not everybody likes me. But a lot of people do and those people buy for me and the people who don't like me they go buy from someone else. Everybody likes somebody. There's not one even the grumpiest person you ever meet like somebody and gets along with somebody. This video is huge like in the next three years. Probably eighty to ninety percent of all use of the internet is going to be watching videos. It's already kind of that way with net flicks. And YouTube just think about your internet activity, even now people are used to watching videos, so like ten years ago, even to me this is outdated website because apple soon is going to have video on their homepage. Let's pick a product let's build a business. I'm going to build a business with you right now before I go off line from scratch show. You guys let's pick any product. What's something? I always recommend start with something around your house. What's something around your house, guys? What are you guys? Have tell me I'm going to read the comments here. Hover boards cowboy boots gloves. I like gloves. Let's do gloves depending on where you live in the world. It's always win or somewhere pretty much because or at least half the time because if you're south of the equator into winter the opposite time, so let's do gloves. So the first thing you want to do. So we're going to build a business from scratch. You guys can steal this idea. I'm gonna do it on the fly. I'm gonna show you how easy it is. To get started not to make a million bucks immediately. Although I've seen people in their first year do a million dollars in sales. No problem. Here's why like gloves somebody said that. So when it just pick gloves. Why gloves? I don't know. Why not people use them? I use them when it's cold. I like to sell stuff, I use all wear gloves all the time. But when it's cold out, I'll wear gloves. So first thing you gotta do you need a name. How do you pick a name? And then third thing you need to do some research, and these can be an any order, so well, let's do the research, and then we'll do the name. All right. So here's what I do. Go over to Amazon. It's the biggest research free re- research website in history put in word gloves. Now if you live somewhere where it's cold. That's great. And if not you can just sell the people who are the other part of the globe. Okay. So I like to go here. Do you? Go to gloves. You can search by relevance. What you want ideally to start with stuff that's under a hundred bucks. Okay. So we're looking for stuff that's under less than one hundred dollars to start selling why it's just easier to get inventory. It's less marketing costs upfront. It's an easier by next thing. We're looking for is I like to so you can go here to research. Also, I like to look at things like price hide alot like what's the most expensive gloves? I like to do a little research. Okay. Boxing gloves. I mean, sorry baseball mitt twenty two thousand dollars. What the hell this can't be? Right. Somebody's trying to not sell a glove. Okay. Don't start by selling twenty two thousand dollar baseball gloves. Baseball mitts here. You have more time gloves for thirteen grant. I don't know. What the hell is up? All right. Zack you need to get this glove. This is a glove chair. Please I want you to be an expert in selling these. There are six thousand dollars. And what's the best part? There's only two reviews, and they got a the har-. Okay. Guys. If you wanna know what not to do to make money start by selling couch glove that people don't like it's temporarily out of stock. Okay. So let's go to the first common sense thing here. That's not too expensive. It looks like they randomly have in here. Peter to Homa gloves. Okay. This looks like. So the high end here fourteen hundred dollars. It says best deal that's an Amazon best deal. Let's see if we want. We need some reviews to kind of get a feel for this. Yeah. There's no reviews. That's not a good sign. You don't wanna sell things that have no reviews guys. So let's switch what we're searching for. This is a kind of bizarre. Let's look average customer review. That's good. What's getting a lot of good reviews? What are these alien gloves? Man. Look at this. Hey, here you go. This is actually a good business idea. I can already tell even though it looks like alien gloves. So these are twelve dollar gloves. You can remember you don't have to manufacture the gloves yourself. You can buy the gloves wholesale and raise you could be a reseller. These are handgrips would. To the ice cream handgrips strengthener. So basically, it looks like you wear these gloves, but you go like this all day to try to get stronger hands. So here's what I like about that. It's a niche I like niche things not everybody wants strong hands. But like bodybuilders probably would or people who, you know. I don't know people in the massage industry people and construction maybe, and here's what I like about it, it it has a good amount of reviews, but not too many. It's got about two hundred customer reviews. David a five star assuming they're not fake reviews. That means that people are buying them. They're in stock. They're not too expensive. They're under one hundred bucks. Like, I said this is what else I like, I think I can do something better than them. Why? Oh, here we go. Here's I like to read the reviews to see if they're real. So this one by Lauren looks pretty real. I had surgery when I was twenty two that left my hands fairly numb. Oh, yeah. You could sell these physical therapist. Okay. I'm giving you guys literally a business like this can make one hundred thousand to a million bucks a year guarantee. You guarantee you look there's grip strengthener as you can have some upsells where you sell people other stuff. So I like to do my research already found out something I hadn't thought of which is you. You can sell these two freakin, you know, people who had surgery on their hand, physical therapist. You could sell this to hospitals, and it's not too expensive. If they're selling these for twelve bucks, plus seven dollars shipping, you can probably buy these wholesale for like three bucks or something which is cool, which means you if you're doing drop shipping, you won't have to come out of pocket, but even you could buy one hundred of these for three hundred bucks and get started on Mike million dollar business. Now, we did our research. I like this. I would try to go right after I would either contact this company or find a competitor to this company. Okay. We don't have time not going to do the full research right now name we need a name. So why don't now I was thinking more gloves. But now face them, my research, I might make a different website. So go, by the way, I'm giving you guys literally one of us going to take this idea that I give you if you're smart last time, I did this. I did a business. And so what was the last one? We did with Alex. What was that? Oh, you whereas here Mel was your forget what business, but oh no way was vegan snacks vegan snack mart. Somebody bought the domain. I gave them the idea. So here's how I like to pick a name. I don't know. You can be funny gloves of doom loves of death. That probably would not be good. Let's see that's available. It's a valuable nobody by that. You could have a little fun in life gloves of death dot org or I should buy the dot org. It's a charity. No. But how about this glove of steel that's a little less, dramatic gloves of death? Look, you can get gloves. I'm just giving you this. You could buy these for ten damn dollars. I shouldn't even be giving you guys as business, but I'm going to. So you got better go, by the way. I don't work for go daddy kung FU Gripper's police said. Grip. You could have a lot of funny names around grip? Zach do you want to improve your grip? Why do you want improve grip? He said he'll tell Zach say he'll tell us later what he wants to sound. Like, what was that? From is that from Princess bride? I'll tell you later. That's it when he does the clearly I cannot take the glasses in front of me. Hey, what does that tell you later? Okay. Rehab gloves. You could call it. Okay. Let's see if that's available rehab gloves. We got all the serious people that don't like my that's a veil of that you can buy it. It's in an auction. So minimum offer you could probably get that name for a thousand bucks. I I recommend you buy the dot com. Okay. So you pick one of these names. Now, the next thing you, do you can go to click funnels or you can go to shop a fi you go here to click funnels. I don't own this company. So I'm not promoting it not trying to make money off you I know the guy who's doing it. So you can literally start for free look at that fourteen dollars. And look what he has Russell Brunson. They have a video this is a website builder. Webs company. So you can go here sign. Takes less than sixty seconds, you go and you'll get access to as. There we go. We've got a video going right there. We turn it off. Let's see something. All right, so zero dollars or like one hundred bucks a month, if the trial you can try you can also go to this company right here. Shop affi-, they're huge company, and you can get started on how much shop affi- costs to start. I built my own website because this used to not what nineteen other they have a free trial right here to you, enter your Email address. And you get started not bad. You can see all the people with their websites. So now, we've got our website built. So let's draw this out here. Here's you today. Maybe you're like me, you started out broke. I had less than one hundred bucks my Bank account, and I figured out how to make you know, ten million bucks more or more a year. Just online a lot more than that. But I like to understate and stuff. So here's you today. You're worried about money. But you do a little research you buy a domain name you go to one shop a fire. Click funnels you build a website. You can do it. Literally today. You could be building it it used to take a six months to build a website. Now, it takes sixty minutes or less you go here. You can start out by drop shipping. That means you don't have to buy in the case of the gloves. You could just ship them from have them shipped directly from the factory either in China or in the US directly to people. So you don't have to keep you don't have to like buy a whole bunch of gloves up front and put them in your house. And then we do the marketing you got to build some marketing you can start with Facebook ads. They're very simple you can star for five dollars a day. And then you need to start testing. Because your first idea might not be that good. Maybe the glove idea doesn't work then as you test. You can also build out another second store on Amazon. So you can have your. Own website, but you can also sell on Amazon because some people like to buy Amazon that don't want to buy from website, they trust Amazon. They already have their card numbers saved there might as well sell fifty to one hundred million people or more who already have their credit card stored on Amazon, and then we'll talk about that's for more advanced stuff. I'm teaching you guys what I call levels zero. Then at the end of this. I'm gonna put a link if you wanna get in level one that level one is like more teaching we'll show you even more. There's multiple levels about three levels. You can go through. It's kinda like high school undergrad degree bachelor's master's PHD today. I'm doing the highschool version for those you going to get in the program, you can be someone who gets in the bachelor's degree. It's not actually a bachelor's degree. But it's an analogy. Okay. Gloves of strength. Somebody said love club strong, head glove, guerrilla gloves. Hey, that's a good name guerrilla gloves. I feel like dudes. I don't know if that will appeal to women as much do a lot of women want to have gorilla hands. We have a woman here. Khloe not to interrupt you texting or anything. Would you like to have gorilla hands is that a goal of yours? Okay. So if your target market is men gorilla hands would work, what would be an ideal glove. If you had hurt your hands, and you want to rehab your hands. What do you call them? You like closes the'll. All right. I'm telling you gloves steel is a damn good. Did anyone by it yet? Let's see last time. I shared this live somebody else bought it in like ten minutes. Somebody bought it. Khloe? You should have bought it faster. Don't play me. She's blaming me for those of you who miss out, by the way. I kid you not some people don't believe me because we live in a hyper cynical world. I can't tell you. How many people come up to me even this weekend this event I had in my house? People are like dude, I was broke now making those yesterday. I want is still on my step chat right now. Those two kids they were like tie one or two years ago. We started following you. What are they selling? Do you? Remember, I don't even remember now, and they're gonna make oh they started a marketing agency, and they do marketing, and they're making twenty five grand a month this month twenty five thousand dollars in most of its profit. Okay. That's a lot of money for people, especially for a beginner twenty five grand change your life. That's in one month. So how do they do it? They're not so cynical. They listen, and they just go out there and do stuff is that really what you were doing khloe trying to buy. Why didn't you let me buy it? Please tell me someone bought gloves of death because that's just a fun. Funny name it might get you in trouble with the police or something is getting accused of every strangulation murder. Somebody bought gloves of dead. Somebody. I gotta stop that. Somebody bought gloves of death and gloves as feel and somebody over here was trying to buy it. And she lost it. You snooze you lose. Now. The key thing is door. If gloves a death gloves a steal somebody bought to the key is demonstration marketing demonstration marketing. Remember this the problem school system? It just lectures, you you have to show people not lecture people tie. Why do you show Lamborghinis and Ferraris because I'm demonstrating why you wanna put in the work to learn and build businesses. So you get the reward. What do you think I should do? That's the way marketing should be think how much you would learn in school if they would have showed you the fruits of your labor first versus just saying memorize this and take a test. It's so stupid that I even have to talk about this. It's basic psychology when you are selling if you've got something like Amazon or apple here you want to demonstrate. Have a video demonstrating the product most people, don't listen, if you don't show them, the reward marble, fitness at absolutely hus- office that if anybody wants to buy gloves of steel, hey, he owns them. He's selling them. He's on YouTube. This one huddles hustler. Zac. Let's talk about your sleep. We were at a movie last night. And you were snoring was that movie. It was the laundering earth. Zach was fading in and out of consciousness, which made me wonder are you getting enough steep? There's a Harvard and John Hopkins steady chronic sleep deprivation has been shown to lead to depression, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease that would explain it. That was explained did that movie increase your odds of having depression, diabetes, obesity, the wandering earth wasn't so bad. It wasn't so good. Either of been wondering why been depressed and becoming obese? And you're not obese all those things you need because there's hours of sleep. You got two of them in the movie last. Did you go home and sleep six more? There's no how many I've been trying to do that Leonardo da Vinci thing where you sleep fifteen minutes every three hours. I saw ardor to Leonardo Di Caprio no Davinci. I saw Kramer talk about it on Seinfeld. Because Kramer, absolute expert. Do you listen to the Leonardo da Vinci? Podcast or he explains is exact ways. How would you know that about Leonardo, you know, but I will look into that listening. Thanksgiving be searching Leonardo davinci's actual podcast was told. He was way of his time. He did come up with the helicopter subway submarine. Okay. What is one of the biggest sleep problems? I will give you three guesses ready. Go. Night tremors. No. Wedding the bed leading the venue as an adult male. No, me chills making four friend. Okay. My friend told me. No. The actual answer is temperature. It's hard to get good sleep. If you're hot or cold. So let me tell you about something. It's called the pod by eight sleep the pod. Not to be confused with podcast. It is a high tech bed designed specifically to help you achieve optimal, sleep, fitness. So as developed by leading sleep researchers after track dean yet this forty three million hours of sleep. Now you as a Leo or approaching forty three million Zach as a Leo if you believe in astrology things Zach we went to the zoo yesterday with one hundred one hundred gram, and my grandma we get to the lions it's like the best part of the zoo. What are they doing that? The lions do not need the pod. I've never been so jealous of animals in my life as a Tanner air to insecurities. Sack. Always try every time we go to the zoo. He starts the twitch when I bring up. Let's not go there aid that anyway, so forty-three millionaires asleep. They tested, so they got a combines dynamic temperature regulations. Sleep track to enhance your restaurant covered. It learns your sleep habits and unjust in just the temperature automatically. I don't think it will help your bed wedding back. But besides that do you like cool or hot when you sleep cool? How cool like fons you'll cry like grou- Jane Burke wool was like liquid like Han solo Empire Strikes Back. Cool. Definitely. No, no. Actually, I think it depends on the time of year. If it's winter I like to put a hairdryer in the bed. Yeah. We actually story went in Vegas with Zach and keep listening very dissect story, we're trying to go gambles acts like I'll meet you there. I'm gonna go quick shower. So after an hour don't hear from our and a half. And I'm like, we should go up and does not and see what's up. We get up there. Nothing. He's not answering. We listen. We put our ear to the door. We hear a drug hairdryer billowing off just nonstop running. And I go, oh, my God Zack must've fallen taken a shower hit his head while he was blow drying his hair, and we gotta get in there. So we go down we get the we get the light emergency them to open up the door. We get ins access sleep on the bed with the hairdryer next to his head. I go Zach what are you doing? Where you do. Exactly what I was trying to have a cell constant sound going because white noise anywhere you almost set fire the Venetian hotel. Now, it wasn't close. Your. I haven't heard the blanket, we're the Maitland's white noise. Remember, I had my phone across the room to plug it into. I didn't have my phone charger. So I had to do a USB port and the only one was on the other side of the room. So turn it up louder. It was too distant as bogus though Suu sweets. You have two options you can get the PA by eight sleep or you can have a fire hazard and run a air dryer nonstop anyway. So it combines dynamic temperature regulation all this stuff learners to it means if you like the bed cool and your partner likes the bed warm now you can both have it at the same time. So Zack and know cuddling know cuddling because it's a very comfortable bed sleep longer and deeper. So you wake up refreshed and ready to take on the world's. So here's the deal draw for one hundred nights, not ninety nine. But not one hundred one you take this thing run on one day. It's over send the police, and if you don't love it. It will refund purchase and arrange range free pickup. So for a limited time get a hundred and fifty bucks off your purchase. When you go to eight sleep dot com slash tie. That's E. I G H T the word sleep. So not the number do by e t sleep dot com slash T A my name, eight sleep dot com slash tie. That will get one hundred fifty bucks off. I like the idea I do think like everybody house reading like Sigmund? Freud to one of these guys actually sitting them forty civilizations. Discontents talking about how humans like variation in their life saying how you stick your leg out. Like you. Don't want us to hot under the covers in leg out that your body Thermo regulating. So this eight sleep pod does that for you? And you get one hundred days that's a serious like window to work with see if you like something or not don't be buying it for one hundred days Senate back and then calling him a week later with the different all my name is. Zeke cookman I need one hundred day test. It's Zak with an h this time time, oh, my name is that's Copan. Yeah. So see you guys over there. Let me know how the bed works for you. We'll see help Zac grow hair back zak's. Primary main goal of any commercial. I ever do from podcast pod, sir. Should be permanently. Zags like, what does this do to my hair? He's been do. They have a special hair pod. Let temperatures helped me grow hair on the top of back as you're going to be like on the Jefferson. Remember, they used to go to the hairdresser. And put those big glass things over the edge that we saw it on them. Helmet infrared they'll grow needs. All right guys, see over on the website. So let's talk about something that is talked about once in a while and business but not enough. I was talking with Alex, my business partner about scaling this new business, we've launched and he of course, is always a little bit more. How do I put it gung ho than I am about scaling? And so he's like, let's go let's go. Let's go. Let's get the company of an animal. I quoted of something that I read I can't remember the exact words now, basically said you can only scale business as quickly as you can hire you can scale hiring. And there's a lot of truth that because I don't care what business you're in. The hardest part is not product development. It's not marketing marketing, a good product is easy. You know, if you can't market it. It's usually because your product is in good. Nobody wants it. You know, you can't sell underwater basket weaving to the world. No matter how good your marketing skills. Are if you pick something that people want like Uber. Pick something that people wanted it just sold because you know, Uber and lift people want to have to get a taxi and they went up on cards. So if product and marketing is not in the heart of business, especially when you want to scale, what is the hard part in my opinion. It is growing your employee base your assistance, your marketing team, you know, you're right hand, man or woman, you're COO getting good accounting. Bookkeepers like this is usually has twenty nineteen on being really good at hiring. And one of the reasons that I partnered, you know, all my show with ZipRecruiter is just because it's a powerful tool because they actually unlike most job sites ZipRecruiter finds qualified campaigns for you. And that's that's unfortunately, like Warren Buffett said when he graduated from Wharton he thought it was gonna be real. Hard to make a lot of money because there'd be so many talented people in the world. And then he said he went out in the real world. And it was like, wait. Is there wasn't that many good people? And for that reason if you can use technology like what ZipRecruiter has to narrow down the needle in the haystack in twenty nineteen that's gonna be when you look back on twenty nine thousand nine you'll be like the domino that you pushed that made all the other dominos fall in place was efficient hiring. So you can start off this year strong. It is go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash tie. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash TI tire. The right people. They have this powerful matching technology scouts scans thousands of resumes to identify people with the right skills education experience, and it actively invites them to apply to your job. So you get qualified candidates fast. And you know, that's why ZipRecruiter's rated number one by employers in the US and that rating come from hiring sites on trust pilot Chaz. I think over a thousand reviews, so so and oh, by the way, my listeners right now, you can try ZipRecruiter for free, but you got to go to this website URL, ZipRecruiter dot com slash my name tie, ZipRecruiter dot com slash ta. I if you love this show, so your show your support and support for Zip Recruiter, not really supporting ZipRecruiter supporting your own business by using ZipRecruiter by going to ZipRecruiter dot com slash t. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash TI. It's the smartest way to hire. Demonstration marketing you need to show people. Why the gloves are good? A and number two. Why they should trust you. Now. Why should they trust? You. So member people need a why? So this is basic marketing, but not so basic because people forget this why should people by so from you is the first thing so member this who what where when what wear when that's what you remember learning that in school the five or the four ws or whatever who what where when and why and they also said for what reason is another one. But that's kind of like why? So let's go through this. Make sure your video covers this who who are they buying from say a little bit about yourself you. I'm like, hey, it's titled buzz here. I was born in LA. I grow up a little bit of North Carolina. My dad, and my mom was a single mom. I live in a mobile home as a teenager. I moved back to California when I was in my twenties, and I built different businesses. And this is why you should buy from me. Here's my life. I show. Here's my friends. Here's my friends Zach. Here's my garage. Here's some books on reading. Here's where I live. Here's what I do. When I go out for fun. Here's my buddy, Rome. Like, here's me working. Now. That's like all about the who your video can have that about your gloves. Make it interesting. There's no reason most marketing and TV commercials are so stupid even the Super Bowl. I was watching some of them. I this is some Super Bowl commercials member. These are supposed to be the best commercials. Some of them were awesome. But some of them were so bad. It's like what the hell is wrong with you. They forgot the who, you know. Now what you need to explain what you're selling. So in this hypothetical business. You gotta explain yo I got some gloves. The average person who has has added an injury your hands. When weakened or just sitting at a job nine to five doing your, computer. You got hand problems. You need a strong grip in life. It's the basis they build your whole forearm. Strength. It allows you to be. I do Bach. I do jujitsu if you ever get in the street fight you want strong hands. If you are somebody actually strong hands and building muscle of protect you from carpal tunnel. A lot of people texting all day while people on a keyboard? So having strong hands. It's good in business you save somebody's hands. They respect. You got a freaking handshake. If you've got a little girlie little handshake, not I'm not talking about men or women. But if you got a week can't shake people are gonna perceive you as weak. So that's the what in the video then wear you say, look, you can buy them right here. I've got them here on my website, my shop afire click on a website, there's a button below or you can go over to Amazon if you already got your credit card there, and you can follow this link to buy them on Amazon when give people a reason to buy now say look your first time visitor my site. I'm running a special right now, you get two sets of gloves for one. If you ever watched TV infomercials, they always got like a win. They're trying to put a clock to it. Because people are procrastinator. As you need to give them a little nudge. And then why you need to say why they should buy from you because they might just say, well, I saw other people selling these JJ handgrips, you say, listen, the reason you want to buy from me is number one. I'm giving you two sets for the price of one number two. Here's my home phone number. Call me if you have a problem number three. Here's my wife and kids where a family business, you know, give people like a reason to like you. That's psychologists call this liking and disliking bias. It's a very powerful bias. And when you understand it, you make more money this simple thing. Nobody does go to almost any website. And people forget one of these things, you gotta just follow the basics, the fundamentals, you know, in boxing, you need to know how to do a Jap a right cross a left hook, maybe an uppercut, maybe a body blow. That's about it and maybe shot to the liver. You know, there's like six. Basic moves you need to know how to slip and just some basic stuff. So when it comes to business people make this thing, so hard, and I know why it's because the school system didn't teach us to this teaches this growing up. So we subconsciously go. Oh, they didn't teach it because it was so hard. It was too hard to teach when I was twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen so they save it to go to Harvard Business School at twenty five years old. Well, forget that that's a bunch of BS. It's a bunch of BS. You can learn this. I've got kids that are have there. They can't even sign for all the money. They're making their parents have to sign I've as young as there was a ten year old here with his dad who's making one hundred bucks a month with his app at ten years old. He's already made a couple of grand this year at ten just think of the law exponential. Don't you wish all of us had been taught how to make money online when we were ten years old better? Your financial situation will be well good news is what? Ever age. You are right now, you should start sell something think of it this way. Even if it doesn't work out and you don't make a ton of money. Who cares? This to do everything. I said today you could buy it on the name on go. Daddy for ten bucks. You can do a free trial on click phones or shop. So that's zero now Amazon marketing, I mean Facebook ads will show you can start for five bucks a day. Do you have five bucks sitting around you can build a Facebook campaign for five dollars? If you don't have five dollars, you can build a campaign around your personal Facebook, your personal YouTube, your personal Snapchat Instagram it costs nothing we live in the most spoil generation because everything's there right at your fingertips. But the one thing that's missing is the know how you gotta have the know-how in life. And that's what I'm trying to do right now. Because no one gave me this. Growing up. So you recommend selling specific items rather than having a range of items to start with yet. The yes, and here's why if you don't agree with my logic. I'll kinda back it up. Jeff bezos. Who's now the richest man in history in absolute dollars, not inflation adjusted, but he was up to one hundred twenty billion dollars. He started out. Amazon was just about books when it started see now. Amazon sells everything they call it. The everything store but back in nineteen Ninety-four Rome wasn't built in a day. He started out selling books, and then he expanded out some people are too, greedy. They want to do everything at once. They forget that Confucius said the man who chases two rabbits catches, none. You can't chase to rabbits guys star with one. If it doesn't work. Swap it out with another one. Sometimes it doesn't work. I've sold stuff that didn't work out doesn't just let it roll off your back move onto the next thing. Who cares? The main goal is to increase your income tie because this apply to the music industry is. Well, like with selling hip hop beats. Yeah. There's a website that I bought some beets. From to us. It's called Geagea. It's a good website. But man, you could they could improve their website. It's a good concept with a horrible website of this website. First of all you're going to enable adobe fly. It's like this website. No offense to these guys. Because I like what they're doing. And I'm not a hater. But if this is making the money, they make so much more money. First of all, there's no there's no video oops. I'd like to see a video that goes over the who what why where and where why should I buy from this? You know, like it's got this two hundred thousand likes that's kind of good. They have some social proof. They're they've got some pictures who they've worked with. I know I know some of these guys what the heck. They crazy bone AAC on. I'm gonna music AAC on us my house here for a music video that I'm actually in embarrassingly funny. But. What you know? Adrian just laughed at me and came. So there's an example. Where you can use it to build music for sure what are you drinking? It looks good dude this company I wish I could buy this is the best coconut water. Full disclosure. I don't own any of it. So this is unbiased whoever owns this. I want to buy this company is best coconut water. I've found you should resell. This you make a website called coconut coke here. I'm going to give you one last bonus. You make a damn website called coconut water reviews. Right reviews. I swear this isn't even better idea than the glove one. Look at that. It is all it's taken doesn't matter watch this. Let me take s off. Okay. Still taking coconut water ratings. You just go to the thesaurus come up with another one. Oh, look at that. Coconut water ratings close going to try to buy. I'm giving you guys another business idea coconut water ratings. You make a website, and you rate all the different coconut water. You use my formula that I have for videos. So that you explain, and then you put a link to an Amazon store that you own which has all the different coconut waters, and you rank them, and you have like video testimony was not some cheesy review site of telling you people they should've taught us in school. It's a wide open world, you can buy this stuff wholesale and resell it now some of them you need permission to do it. But if you start moving up stuff, they're going to give you permission give you permission someone's going to buy that, it's eleven dollar domain name. It's probably gone by the time you watch this. Yeah. There you go here. Let me see that. Here's your first review. This is such a good business. I just give these away. So all you people who are complaining on five charges money. Fuck you give all this shit away for free. What are you talking about dumb ass? Here you go right there. Here's you got to coconut waters, given million dollar business ideas away for those you say I'd charged for everything. Fuck you. I'm giving a best business your mom and dad, and your schoolteacher to never give you a business idea is good for free. What are you ever done for me? Mostly just follow me on social media and ship for me. So don't bitch. All you whiny bitches shut up the world got enough of that go out and make your own destiny. Make a website review, coconut waters and make money on all of them. Really stop whining at what point in the timeline of building business to you. Go to legalzoom to get your LLC. You know, what I saw legalzoom doing a thing like under one hundred bucks. I would start your LLC pretty early. Just take the name if you own whoever bought coconut water ratings dot com. You if you wanna turn it into a LLC or S Corp, which I recommend you do in the United States. Then you go to a company like legalzoom, they'll help you. I'm not a lawyer. So I can't tell you exactly how to do it. But that's what I do. I form LLC's pick a state like Delaware, Nevada. Those are two very well known ones. But there's other states. I've done them in Florida. I've done them in North Carolina. I got a California one I got him out of the US. But that's for later. Keep it simple stupid Goethe's company. There's a couple of companies legalzoom's one of them. So Ty feel like embarrassed to say I'm gonna negative situation. Feel like a failure told my kid I've had extremely negative thought about giving up an ending myself. I haven't expressed my self to anyone but your program really has my attention. I'm gonna horrible situation. So Jonathan, you know, look, man life tough. Some people say life is about suffering that adverage person all. Us will have one disaster every three months for the rest of our life. And that's just part of his game a life. I don't I didn't make the rules. So you kinda gotta play by them. And sometimes you people feel you know, if you're truly feeling suicidal. You gotta talk to some that's not my specialty. You should talk to somebody who specializes in that. If you're just feeling, you know, discouraged what I can tell you is part of the game to feel discouraged. If you feel it every minute of every day for a long time, you probably need a doctor if as a temporary thing sometimes you just got to plow through it, man. We all have been there. I don't want people to think that my life has always perfect. It's not I've made a lot of mistakes and business part of the reason I teach this stuff is so that other people don't have to make the same stupid mistakes that I've made. I've made things too complicated in life. I've looked back in time like a lot of life. It ain't that. It's like a lot of common sense. It's like, okay. Why do people get fat? It doesn't have to be on huge mystery. Like, if you eat more food than you, burn bor- energy in you, get fat what else happens when you're fat you lose energy. So you don't wanna work out. So you get fatter quicker than you look yourself in the mirror, and you get kind of like, oh, I don't like look so same with business and money. It's like, okay. You grow up in a school system. You do not taught about how to make money. So then we get thrown out into the modern world and people don't aren't good at making money. Well, that's kind of common sense. If you don't learn and have somebody teach you owe foreign language or someone teach you martial arts or someone teach you, you know, how to cook. Or how to fix a car you don't naturally? Learn this stuff. So if you're discouraged about your financial situation, a lot of it's common sense. So you just got to reverse the common sense. So if it's common sense. That you're not you don't know how to fix your car because no one ever showed you then you've got to find somebody who was show you how to fix a car. If you don't know how to make money you got to reverse it. Why do we not know how to make money because no one ever showed us? So you have to find somebody to show you. It's not that. Sometimes people argue with me on that point. I'm like what is wrong with you more? Like, no, you should just learn from your own experience. We'll do you just learn from your own experience out of fix a car. You just walk in a garage with a wrench and you just start ripping stuff apart. That'll take you thirty years to learn how to fix a car you've got a shadow somebody who's already knows how to fix the car. And then you can learn it in like, six months or three months or one year or whatever. But it's if you learn the slow way, that's when you get discouraged.

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Power Project EP. 184 - Frank Tufano

Mark Bell's Power Project

1:44:34 hr | 2 years ago

Power Project EP. 184 - Frank Tufano

"The. Whenever you already. I'm ready ready, Freddie. Let's do this ready with the spaghetti. What's happening? I gotta I gotta work out already in today. I saw that that you you popped in pretty early today came in here and a little bit of cardio session and hit up some dead lifts and some bantam rose and some late curls. Just moving around, you know, trying to good we're got again, I might I might work out again. Because like, you know, my workouts are a little shorter. So actually they're lot shorter. Like might only be like twenty thirty minutes long. So when they're shorter it's kinda easier just to get him in because you're not thinking about your workout being so hard. And I think that's a huge problem that a lot of people make when they're thinking about a diet thinking about exercise. They're thinking about man, this is going to be, you know, have to go Kito or have to do carnivore. I have to be gin or they think that they have to do something so crazy, and it's like, we'll were you starting. Let's let's figure that out. If you're starting from the couch, then a wa- simple walkout side would be fantastic progress and to do that for a few days in a row that would be a really excellent place to start doesn't always have to be so hard, right? Just change the simple things, I know a lot of people that when they first start lifting. They start like programs like two and a half workouts or two hour, long workout. So I'm just like, hey, no, you're not going to stick to that. They work at like six or seven days a week just start slow. Well, we know a lot of people to that that exercise frequently and that don't have nearly the body that they want or the strength that they want and these same people will, you know, on a Friday Saturday night, they might go and let loose and then they're like, oh that's it back on Monday. When Monday comes around cardio in the morning fasted. And then I'm gonna hit the gym at night. And it's like dude you really like you're setting up a really rough schedule for yourself. That's okay. That you enjoyed yourself. That's fine. Everyone should everyone's got the right to good for you. And just, you know, don't let just like Jay Cutler said don't be fancy consistent grad away to be consistent with it. If you if you're able to do fasting. That's great. If we're able to throw in some cardio that's cool able to mix some lifting some cardio fasting. That's great. But it doesn't have to start out that way you have to start out with a big bang right away. You can kind of chip away at things you can work your way into things. That's kinda why excited talk to today's guests because it's like how do you end up down this rabbit hole? Like this. You know, how do you? We got another carnivore guy on the podcast today. And not only carnivore, but he's like eating raw meat, right? He's a he's a deep savage. Yeah. He's eating raw meat raw liver you ever done that for. No. What about sushi sushi? Yeah. I guess it's that have carpaccio sliced beef just pretty much. I think the same things we're all a restaurant in Lisa's carpaccio. That was the first time I had that. But yo- like my household. We cook our army. We all cook are meat. So yeah, this is a Steph different culture shock, and the only thing I've ever had just polka. Yeah. But no now that I think about it is kinda odd that like, you know, I'm cool with eating like fish, right? Raw fish. But the idea of eating absolute raw meat like raw is kind of odd. Right. Yeah. Just kind of those two together. I'm like never thought of weird too. 'cause like Ross steak doesn't sound that bad, but raw ground beef sounds hor horrifying discussing or or raw chicken can even watch Neidl Keith wrought chicken. I think he does like straight raw red meat. I mean, can you just like, you know, grab a bird and try to just eat it or like those and go go by the cow. Substrate up eat frequent tat tackle him. True. Carnivore? Have you had like raw liver and stuff like that? Like two straight up. Have you done that? I don't think I have there's there's a video of him like he has large raw liver. Just to eats the whole thing. Just like. I would like to eat something's hard just to say that. I did. That'd be pretty savage. Yeah. That's like a Mike Tyson saying, I wanna eat his heart. I want to eat his children. Did eat somebody's ear. Well, yeah, it's a it's interesting. I guess we'll get to the bottom of it. We'll try to figure out why the hell this guy's doing. All this. Yeah. Looks like he's good to go. So you wanna hit them up? Yeah. Let's do that, you know. It'd be easier just to be born Nigerian. It would definitely true. And you just have perfect skin, your, handsome and tall and strong. All that stuff right laugh and everybody else. Hey there. He is. How's it going Frank? What's going on or you gentleman? This guy's got perfect teeth. Perfect skin is this from eating raw meat. What are we going on here? Little bit of a little bit of Columbia. I'll leave it at that. What's what's going on with this diet? It looks looks pretty crazy to see you eating raw liver and stuff. How did you? How did you even get into something like this? I imagine you weren't doing this. When you were five years old right now. It's it's it's actually a pretty interesting story. I used to be really big into bodybuilding, fitness that whole thing. And I did it from when I was about thirteen to maybe twenty. And at some point, I said this isn't for me. I never really wanted to take it to professional level. Never had a large bone structure. I was always like five eight like one hundred fifty one hundred sixty pounds. Even when I was muscular figured it. Just wasn't for me. And after taking a drug called Accutane, which I didn't actually know it the time that kind of ruined my digestive system. I was eating three four five pounds of sweet potatoes a day and had no energies. I was like, okay. This isn't working for me. How can I figure out what? I should be doing. I literally started googling what the healthiest is came across a few different YouTube channels and ended up discovering a book on indigenous civilizations, it was called nutrition and physical degeneration and this dentist went around early nineteen hundreds and he noticed one thing that was consistent across every single diet of these native people that was the presence of certain animal foods, and particularly particularly ones that were along the lines of organ meats, and even though we're talking about organ meats, and things that people don't deem as approachable other nutrients that are more approachable like some of these groups of people had shellfish crab molluscs, clams. They had dairy products. They had eggs. It's not just, you know, biting piece of raw liver out of alive animal, and I said, okay. This makes sense and upon further inspecting these animal products they had an inherent fats. I. Vitamin content, and I can get into the actual availability of that stuff in a bit. But the other thing I was thinking was okay, I don't have energy eating carbohydrates. And if animal foods are the most nutritious foods, according to what I've read here than wouldn't it make sense to eat animal fat as my source of energy and putting it together in my head made sense because okay, well, animal foods have the highest amount of nutrients in their most available forms and animal fat can be used as an energy source and Kito service. And then I read another book called primal body prime and at the time which was about over six years ago. Now, I kind of paralleled Kito diet with a paleo diet and said, okay, I'm gonna do paleo Kito. But that pretty much means that I'm only eating meat and fat. So my theory behind not including vegetables and fruits that the modern forms of the fruits and vegetables in a lot of cases, and especially at certain times of the year. Weren't necessarily as high in nutrition as they used to be and at the time, I didn't actually know about the carnivore diet, and there was actually a form zero car, but the time that's what the diet was referred to. And I came across it and upon reading what that dia was just muscle meat, and no real guidelines to nutrients, no real guidelines to macro nutrient ratios, I didn't really think much of it. So you know, three or four years go by and I decided to make a YouTube channel. Because one of my goals was to convey, the importance of these nutrients to other people and how good I felt an even though I took that drug Accutane twice. I mean ruined my liver ruined my body. I'm sure there are so many people familiar with the drug and how bad it is. Even though I took that drug twice it still didn't fix my acne. The only thing that actually ends up fixing. My acne was going on this diet and roofing lot of foods and increasing the nutrients, but there's a lot of the three. Main things I used to explain aspects of my diet are one logical standpoint to the anthropological evidence of our ancestors and three the scientific one of you actually, looking at the nutrient content of foods and the mechanisms in the body, and we can observe that through nutrient databases or even mechanistic studies your eating large amounts of potatoes back in the day sound like you said you're eating like three or four pounds of potatoes. Every single day nowadays new any carbohydrates. No. Back. So over my six and a half years now on this diet. The only time I ever consumed carbohydrates was back in less. You're April two thousand eighteen I started experimenting completely raw most of the time. I consume maybe sixty seventy percent of my food is cooked nocco. Sorry, sixty seventy percent raw. And then the rest is cooked. And when I mean cooked, even though I'm just cooking eggs blue rare a lot of the time. But that one time I did try carbohydrates was on the raw primal diet. I had a little bit of raw Honey, and I tried incorporating some dairy products again, and that I mean, I've always had a dairy allergy when I was younger so that didn't really work out. So well as much as milk products from a local farm, raw high-quality grass-fed. Although there's definitely some things you have to be aware of if doing that the difference between like those dairy products directly from the farm and the dairy products that you buy on the shelf in the supermarket. That's definitely a discuss. To be had. So my reasoning for incorporating anything into your diet is either nutrient density or energy and the role that carbohydrates grains, play in my mind is when we look at certain indigenous groups in the recent few thousand years when agriculture started, and we started producing readily available forms of carbohydrates, they replaced wild plant foods as an energy source and every single one of these carbohydrate sources can be addressed on an individual basis in regards to its composition is preparation methods. What the pros and cons are obviously something like modern wheat, which is made from hard red winter wheat, it has forty eight chromosomes. It's hybridize it's much more inflammatory than an heirloom variety of wheat like corn wheat has twelve chromosomes. It's something our ancestors would have consumed. So not only do you have to look at the base food. You have to look also at the preparation of it, are you naturally fermented that sour dough bread and breaking down the anti nutrient content, or are you just? Throwing that bread in the oven as is with a yeast starter overnight. And then there's a course a bunch of different grains, have different preparations from oats to rice bunch of grains of cross all indigenous groups, but one thing I did want to touch on as a final in. This regard is the sheer variety of foods. These people consumed and the variety of preparation is absolutely absurd. Imagine this you go fishing in a river. And there's ten different types of fish in that river, and for each of those ten different types of fish. There's ten different species. So you might have six seven different types of trout in one river. So just the amount of animal foods that our ancestors. Consumed was incredible hundreds to thousands, let alone wild plant foods imagine walking into essentially a jungle and seeing just the sheer variety of foods used to eat that being said there are indigenous. Is that only eight like some of them? Maybe they only had Swiss cheese. Red cells definitely something important to note. But what's even crazier is one indigenous group might have prepared one food in one way, and another group would do it in a different way and the amount of different ways. They would do it. You know, imagine, you could take a fish. You can eat it raw. You can call it smoke it. You can hot smoke. It. You can foil it like under a an oven. You could bake it in fire, you could roasted over an open fire. There's dozens of different food preparations that these people practice because it was their job. Their job was viral in nature and their job was to prepare food, and you can imagine if you have limited food access in your environment. You're probably going to start doing some interesting things to either change the composition or to preserve it. And each of these things serve different purposes. One of the few people I've ever heard talk about switching up the type of meat that eat was Charles policemen. I don't know if you're aware of his work. But he he mentioned that he thought it was. Portent that you you don't just always eat cow. Don't always eating elk you, switch things up a bunch. And do you think that's important to to have a wide variety? You're not just eating cow meat all the time. I think a good answer to that question is. Yes, there was a sheer variety of meats in in. The indigenous groups bought the one consistent thing was the quality. So when you have access to different sources of meat, it helps to variety them because tha very them as you don't necessarily know the quality of the animal unless you raise it yourself. So if you buy Grespin meat from one place and Gretchen meat from another place. I have pictures on my Instagram of this grasp at beef that it looks orange. But I'm sure you've never seen something like that in a supermarket. So the quality of the food definitely ties in here. And when you're only eating one type of meat from one source. That's where you start to question. Okay. Is this the highest quality source of meat on eating the only scenario where I would say, it's okay to eat one source of food is if you're literally seeing what that animals eating in its in its life, essentially, of course, there's a realism that we have to have that's practical to life that we can't always beating the highest quality foods at all peers of. Time, but that doesn't necessarily justify going to like a restaurant having wings and soybean oil every night when I'm when I'm hearing what you're saying about like food, you eat it seems that whenever you're looking at these meets and you're looking at your food as far as you Tilleke. Yeah. And you're looking like a big micronutrient standpoint. So what's going give me the move new nutrients and yet, so I'm curious because whenever I see people go from like, pure carnivore or pure vegan. Right. And they just cut out also informs of food and a lot of individuals that do carnivore a lot of people feel much better than when they were eating all these carbohydrates. But then I see a lot of vegans that claimed that they're feeling much better eating. No meat. How how would you like let's say bring somebody to the other side. Would you even think that they should if they're feeling much better doing something totally opposite to the carnivore deal? Okay. So the carnivore diet achieves one thing inherently that's the removal of inflammatory foods. Okay. The vegan diet can do the same thing. So the reason I market myself to the carnivore died is because my diet is technically a carnivore diet. But what my diet achieves is the micronutrient density, and before really going into a discussion of the vegan versus a carnivore diet and actually like analyzing, okay? Vitamin a in its plant and animal form of vitamin k two and its plant and animal form what we can look at is. What happens to vegans after they go to three or four five six months on vegan diet. So b twelve deficiency is obviously something that you can't ignore every vegan needs to supplement be twelve. And for me the lodge. Perspective behind twelve doesn't make sense because you're literally falling a diet that you cannot follow when they didn't have the supplements even forty fifty years ago. That's one logical thing wrong with it. And I haven't done an incredible amount of research on this yet. But I'm not sure if b twelve blood levels are indicative of tissue levels as definitely something out be concerned about what b twelve is definitely associated with neuro cognitive problems in the long run. And the second thing is the iron. I haven't seen any proof that vegans would not be anemic in the long run. It's not an issue in some people and a one thing that shows that before this was people have different genes that regulate how will they assimilate vitamins from plants. That's why some people last a very long time on a vegan diet and some people fall apart in two months one other vitamin that's not really spoken about is vitamin d three. And I think vitamin d three is the best argument against the vegan diet because the skin itself synthesizes cholesterol to absorb vitamin d three. So. So if you don't have extra cholesterol in your body, you literally can't achieve certain levels of vitamin d three. So I would make an argument that from an ideal health perspective, it's physically impossible to get your three levels to that amount on a vegan diet. So those are just problems with a vegan diet in general. I mean, the, but another thing to consider is standard American diet is so poor that when people refer to stand American dieters as meters the macro nutrient ratios in a standard, American diet are thirty percent, animal foods and seventy percent plant foods. So these meters are they really meters. And what's even more? Interesting is vegans always talk about Blue's zones. These owns where people have unusually high life expectancy, but guess what the macaroni ratio of blue zones. Are it is the exact same as standard American diets when we actually look at what these blue zone people eat, they might eat seventy percent of their calories from grains, and thirty percents more or less and thirty percent from animal foods, but the food. Quality is the difference. They're not eating McDonalds. Burger they're not eating McDonald's, burgers, and what was my favorite show when I was a kid was the cookie crisp like that type of stock. So they're not eating that type of stuff. These people are drinking sheep milk straight from the goat in their backyard. These people are eating the highest quality cheese, the highest quality, grains. They're preparing them in certain ways, and there's definite pitfalls in the context of a standard American diet that we have to kind of brush aside, the problem with the vegan diet is we're missing those main nutrients, but there isn't and I always tell people this, you know, what? Whether it's five ten twenty thirty issue. Now, these vitamins there's gonna be a big emphasis on them because they are really the most important things in Uman function. And I'm sure you guys have heard about the importance of item indeed three in the recent past and how doctors are even subscribing vitamin d three in larger amounts. And there was a study that I post on my Twitter like every week the vitamin d three RDA was based on. Typical fallacy the four hundred. I you RDA was actually supposed to be nine thousand. I you. So there's definitely something to be said about the importance of these vitamins going under the rug. But the reason I'm saying this is because I can't even convince carnivore dieters to eat these nutrient dense foods, how am I supposed to convince a vegan to do it. It's very very difficult to turn people off what I like to do is. I like to present information and let people make the decision for themselves. And the of course, there's a lot of things that go into that. An unusual man of things that go into that. But if someone really wants to make a turning point what I always tell people is if you do something, and it doesn't work. You you may you might wanna think about doing it in general. That's when I take vitamin d three when you go out in the sun to the beach, you feel euphoric, right? You feel amazing after going to the beach when I eat foods like liver and salmon Roe when I eat certain high-vitamin animal foods, I feel like running through some drywall go I can go I can go. I've I work is used to work as a bartender. I still do and some times I would go like two or three nights without sleeping, and then I have to go down to Manhattan work ten or twelve hour shift, and I'd still be running circles around everyone else. So there's definitely something to be said about optimizing your energy levels. And how you feel on your diet is a vegan diet better than standard American diet. I think so in the con-, but it depends on what you're eating. And it depends on how you are to be twelve deficiencies and deficiencies I think in the short run it's better than what most people are doing and in regards, actually, I mean, I don't really want to discuss how to supplement an ideal vegan diet because there are literally. Certain things you cannot get and that's that's a bit off topic. But it's definitely something. I can go into seems like everyone needs to have some sort of nutritional plan, you know. And it seems like the biggest factor in all this is, you know, avoiding junk food, which is all the same stuff. We hear all the time. So potentially if you're on a vegan diet, you may be voiding some junk food, but there's ways of doing a vegan diet where you're not avoiding junk food. There's also Kito Akito diet where you could potentially be avoiding junk junk food, but there's also you could be doing a Kito diet and having some kind of dirty Kito foods in their things that have sugar alcohols in them and whatnot. But whatever the case is whether you're doing carnivore vegan Kito paleo, it's probably still a better decision than a standard American diet. It's still probably we're still probably eliminating some excess junk maybe some excess sugar excess processed foods. And we're probably ultimately limiting some calories. Do you think calories factor into any this at all when you start to really look at the different the different diets and things like that. Interesting to one interesting thing to look at in the context of calories is how your body assimilates nutrition from plant food versus animal foods, what people notice when they go on a Kito died or carnivore diet versus Egan by the volume of food that you need to consume versus the amount of food. You expel is is drastically different. So the caloric intake when increasing your plan food consumption. It can definitely go down. And I mean, there are arguments going either way there are people that go on Kito, diet and gain weight. There are people that go on a carnivore died in gain weight. There are people that go on a vegan diet and gain weight. One thing to note on the vegan diet is the high anti nutrient content of these foods because of things like five Tate's, which inhibit mineral absorption oscillates also inhibit mineral absorption, things like electons can cause leaky gut. What this essentially does is causes your body. Not to absorb the nutrients in the food. Your body loses its ability to digest the food. So there is a concern about certain anti. It's in certain grains, and legumes specifically on a vegan diet. I mean, this can be alleviated to some degree by fermentation. Of course, it can be made easier by choosing foods with less anti nutrients. I mean, like carbohydrate sources like sweet potatoes and plantains and maybe for mental oatmeal would be better choices than kidney beans. That's an example of that. Caloric restriction ties into fasting as well. I I think the overall reason that people consume excess calories and don't lose weight is the lack of nutrients in their diet, and that's affecting their hunger signals, but restricting calories and is definitely a way to become healthier. Even if you're eating doesn't really matter. What you eat is definitely an improvement and one way to go about this is whenever you put something in your body. It's always a net loss doesn't matter. How healthy the food. Is it doesn't matter. How good the food is for you. You're always doing something negative to your body. Because either way you're putting stress on your digestive system. You're putting stress on yourself to eat something. So whether you put something in your body or not it just a matter of arguing how negative it is liver. The act of writing the act of eating itself causes inflammation, period. Yes. That's I mean, that's a very loose statement. And it's it's it's it can be using a negative connotation in weird way. Because. Actually, we need to eat food. But this is where we assess the inflammatory response to the food whether it's just based on its inherent profile of nutrients anti nutrients, whether you have an allergy to it as well as the caloric density of the food. That's you know, we look at the food is it going to give you issues was the nutrient density, two things really just inflammation nutrients so looking at a food like liver or salmon Roe if you try to eat fish eggs, you wouldn't get past a quarter pound of them. That's because of the nutrient density of the food, and that's a lower caloric restriction. So you. You know, you can make arguments that if people were eating a nutrient dense diet and had proper station in proper appetite that they wouldn't be over consuming calories, and they wouldn't be stressing their digestive system in an artificial amount. This also ties into lean body mass and bodybuilding because when you have a higher lean body mass, your body requires more nutritional more sustenance. So your body will crave protein macronutrients more than that or micronutrient. So when I used to lift weights or like, you guys even if you guys Villier micronutrient requirements, you guys are gonna want way more protein than the average person just from that your body. Your muscles are literally telling you I need protein. I want to eat protein. That's not the same case with most people, but fasting is a whole like that's a big topic in itself with the Towfighi and the main benefits of Towfighi is people claim that and it's not a claim. This is what it does your body, essentially recycles. It sells and heals itself in Towfighi. But my argument behind a nutrient dense diet is that. At the processes that regulate. How sales are made gene expression and cell differentiation are directly correlated to the cell health in your body. So vitamin a and vitamin d three in particular are the precursors, gene expression. Gene expression turns on and off certain genes. This literally tells your body what sells it needs to make whether it's a stem cell or red blood cell or white blood cell. I don't want to know. I'm not a biochemist physiologist, I don't wanna go into this too much, but one anecdote I like to make is when I had terrible terrible cystic acne take weeks acne to heal. And then when I had this terrible like nickel-sized blemish on my face that blemish would take. Three four five six months ago way. I did a video on my YouTube of I had a cyst it exploded. And I all this is a little girls. I'm sorry guys. So anyway, the point is I heal my skin and literally three days I went from a cyst on my face to pretty much clear skin. And the way I did. This was I fasted I consumed a large amount of retinal from liver, vitamin A. And then I went in the sun for five six hours a day. So what happened was the first day kinda got inflamed? And then it popped the second day started healing third day formed into a scab and the third day the second day turned into a scab. And then the third day. It was pretty much completely healed in the blemish was almost gone. So our body essentially is like a plant, and you know, when people are growing or growing, something they don't blame the plants genetics on it, not growing, they blame the soil. They blame the nutrient was given they say it didn't get enough water. We kind of need to look at the same thing for. Humans. Genetics are determined by environment over a period of years and years and years. That was a bit of a ramble from the question of, you know. Do calories matter. But I think I touched on it on a few different ways. I think a lot of people would be curious especially looking into you. Don't eat any vegetables or anything like that. Right. Okay. Yeah. Cool. A lot of people would wonder 'cause I I saw video where you you mentioned how fiber isn't necessarily that important. How how like how would you explain that to individuals in terms of do you get fiber from outside sources, or is is now into you all now so in in regards to fibers association with any sort of health benefits, such as reducing cholesterol was your social with reducing cholesterol, more consistent bowel movements, reducing rates abou- gander. That's not actually demonstrated in studies. But to me five or does play a role in the health of the gut microbiome and building a diverse microbiome. And that ties into you know, the thousands of and hundreds of wild plant foods that indigenous people used to consume. Yeah. So having a certain gut back to your gut bacteria is essentially specific to your while in in the case of let's say like a mother has a baby and starts nursing her child. The mother is eating certain foods in her diet that are in a way introduce. To the child through the breast milk the environment than when the child grows up the child would eat the foods that are in the mothers environment, and this is kind of what determines our microbiome? So the role that fiber plays in the microbiome inherently being in those foods that they needed to eat survive. I think survival is a big over arching thing here. A lot of the foods. We used to eat were really because we didn't want to die from from caloric standpoint. But fi- five or from a mechanistic standpoint in the body. The only thing that's hypothetically beneficial is feeding some sort of positive gut bacteria. Then in an actual cases where people have digestive issues, especially things like diverticulitis as well as IBS reducing fiber actually improves their health. What about performance we're talking about like lifting weights, or at let's what are some of your thoughts on utilizing a carnivore diet for these things and also make some sense for somebody to add in some carbohydrates at some point. Or do you think people don't really need them? So I've had con- conversation with an exercise physiologist about this. And he claimed that carbohydrates are not beneficial in any way, whatsoever that Amine. In fact, I it would be better. But I am not necessarily that is not my method of thinking my method of thinking is your body needs to produce enzymes to digest food. Whether it's Pep's in for protein lie pays for fat, the starch digesting enzyme does. Well at your body can only digest a certain amount of each macro nutrient Eddie point in time. And when you're a high performance athlete, and you're consuming an unnatural amount of food in regards to what maybe your body frame of your genetics allow you to do, you know, obviously, someone like Thor those strongman guys is what I think of when I think of this. I'm thinking, okay. These guys have very very highly body mass that require an incredibly unrealistic amount of food. Now, what answer what would answer your question is? Can we actually figure out whether the body can absorb only fat? And protein faster than it can absorb the combination of fat protein and carbohydrates. Is there a bottleneck on the peps in production? The body is there bottleneck on these pro- as spoke protein, adjusting enzymes, amylase, carbohydrate, digesting enzymes is the body bottleneck in producing these enzymes as well as insulin or can the body actually produced just as much of these enzymes as it needs in the context of animal foods based diet. I think this is gonna be Anik going to be anecdotal. If you're not a super, high performance athlete. I really don't think this will make a difference once you achieve a certain amount of activity in muscle mass. Then you might notice if you consume carbohydrates, and you're on a carnivore diet, and you notice a performance increase. I think you're at that threshold where your digestive enzymes cannot keep up with just the protein and fat diet. That. Yeah. That that actually makes a lot of sense. And I think you know, bodybuilding purposes, I think some people talk about like getting a pump. And a lot of bodybuilding coaches will say that's critical, you know, in in your training, and then from powerlifting perspective or strongman perspective. It's my belief that it's just important have body weight on you. So this may be against what most people are looking for most people are a lot of people are looking to get smaller or lose lose bodies. Yeah. Lose weight, but for a power lifter, or for strongman athlete or even some MA athletes. It might be important for them to stay in a particular weight class. So therefore, they might need some of the carbohydrates, and like you said, I think is pretty accurate account of what you said, basically, the carbohydrates could be a fast acting energy source could help them potentially recover from workout some people are doing to workouts day. So how you gonna get the fat and protein to really kind of like shuttle into your system. Maybe it does make sense to have. Some fruit or some coconut water or something in between workouts? Whatever whatever carbohydrate source you choose. We'll probably be appropriate enough to kind of replenish, some of those stores and get you into that next workout get you kind of repaired from the previous workout. There's so many factors here. Because when you think about what your body needs to recover and perform, you know, you don't only need protein to repair the muscle tissue. You don't only fat for energy. There's also nutrients there's the electrolytes there's a lot of factors that go into this. And as I've been on one hand, I really do want to know what would happen if someone like, you know, Brian Shaw or have to Bjornson when on like, a high neutral carnivore diet. I mean a hundred percent they're losing a lot of weight. The question is how much strenght would they lose? And what the adjustment period would be. Unfortunately, I don't think that's something that. Out think it'd be possible to do that in the context of these people because it would just be to jet detrimental to their essentially professional career. But I love to see some more research being done on this in the future because you know, the the metabolism of protein and fat in energy is definitely something. That's not understood by a lot of people. Yeah. We're seeing it more and more with kind of endurance athletes, people that run people that do rowing and things like that. And we're getting really good accounts of of what these people are doing and the response that they're having it seems like it's a good one. But yeah, we don't know what it looks like, you know, from an NBA basketball player NFL football player, or, you know, high level strongman athlete. Yeah. Yeah. I've been consulting with a collegiate basketball player, and what we do for him is we increase the nutrient density, but we still keep some carbohydrates in the diet. So we essentially have a very high nutrient carnivore dia, but then he has things like sweet potatoes. High quality, grains, maybe some more dairy products. Maybe Honey occasionally just things for the carbohydrate metabolism in the body. What are some of your thoughts on this insieme from having a bodybuilding background and being someone that does jitsu and you lift I mean, you have a pretty pretty busy schedule, you know, with the amount of physical activity that you have have you explored any this? Have you tried just to only eat the like almost Kito and and just only eat meat. Yeah. No, I have like for for the past two weeks, or so, you know, started messing with much much lower carbohydrates. I haven't cut my carbs out. But having probably a minimum of fifty or sixty day, which is much lower than I usually have in the past of my background each and intake, and unlike like, Frank like, I mainly paid attention to my macro nature and intakes make sure that I've been like I have intake for enough food to fuel my workouts because a lot of days, I'll come here. Then I'll go to jitsu afterwards. An oddly enough I found like having much lower carbohydrates but much higher fats didn't really affect my energy levels that much. I did feel a little bit affect in the gym. But at least in terms of my cardio on the mats. It didn't affect me that much. But what I what I really I'm curious about is something I never paid much attention to in the past has been my quality of meats of heard about you guys talk about this and lot grass-fed versus you know, grain fed meets I never made attention to that. And I'm just wondering how how important that is in terms of like potential performance or quality of meat because personally like again, I just make sure that I'm eating enough food. Right. Macaroni genetic. I do take a few supplements here and there to make sure I get my three and natural, bro. I gotta take no subs. But like like my d three it's cetera. But I haven't paid attention to like meeting. Sure. My meat is grass-fed. I know Frank that you you've talked a lot about like oh grain fed meets her not good at all. How does that tie in does that tie into performance or any of that? Yeah. I'm smiling year because this is like this topic in general is what my main focus is. So one thing to look at is if you look at those indigenous groups and what they ate and you analyze the foods by amount and the micronutrient amounts. We can assume that those amounts of foods that they're eating and those micronutrient amounts or what the recommended dietary allowances should actually be and things like, you know, the human body can produce one hundred thousand you of vitamin d three in the sun, the higher retinal content of these foods. So we can assume that humans have a higher nutrient requirement than what we've been told. Now when we actually analyze the nutrient content of the food. There's one thing that determines the neutering. Content of the food. Specifically what the animal was raised on. The example and cows is and cows have very in ruminant digestion is very interesting. You know, a human would actually have to have five gallons of fluid in their stomach fermenting to be the equivalent, but an ingress when a cow goes in the field. It has an incredible sense of smell, it might think clover tastes like ice cream. It might think we grasp is a burger and the cow will actually go in the field and choose the grasses, and the whatever that they like the most and this is because the nutrient content of those grasses varies and vitamin A is actually mislabeled on food in plant foods. It's beta carotene, they can label it as vitamin for some reason the carotenes in this grass convert in the cows body into retinal in its tissue. So cows eating the platform, vitamin A and converting into the animal form of vitamin A. Same with vitamin k there's vitamin k one in grass and the cow converts vitamin. K two in its body. And this is through fermentation, the gut bacteria eats, the grass for man's turns into nutrients in the body. So if the cows being fed a crude soy's feed of like corn, whatever guy cooked corn cooked soy things like that. It's not going to have micronutrients. And this is the problem. Also with a lot of vegetables in modern diets. Monash inc. Soil as in. There's micro new. Toil that aren't necessary for the growth of the plant or the animal, and there's macro nutri. There's macro nutrients in the soil that are not necessary for the growth of the plant or the animal, and then there's micro nutrients, so I'm sorry, I'm confusing. These completely. Unique macronutrients for energy. This is what you need to grow a plant micronutrients can be deficient in plants and animals, and they will still grow. So these micronutrients for soil are N P K. Let me just wants potassium nitrogen. And I was the other one it's just general fertilizer. So it's nitrogen phosphorus and potassium. So you need nitrogen phosphorus and potassium to grow a plant. So essentially, if you grow corn with nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus, and then you feed that corn to a cow. It's not getting those micro nutrients in it, the same thing can be said about humans in general and how we are raised on low micronutrient foods. So basically, how the food was raised determines the nutrient content. So if the cow wasn't eating grass and might not have a high nutrient content and in the context of granted versus grass-fed. Yeah. I mean on paper grass-fed is going to have vitamins that great at isn't going to have the fatty acid profile is going to be better. But you have to consider the muscle isn't really where the nutrients are stored the nutrients in the animal are stored in the fat. That's why they're called fat soluble vitamins, they're not called proteins vitamins the muscle tissue stores. Minerals and elements, and if there's fat intertwined between the muscle tissue. There is nutrients in those fat in that fat. But if you take a grain fed steak with a ton of fat on it, and a lean grass fed steak the nutrient contents going to be insignificant because there's no fat on grass-fed steak. This is where in you know, when you're eating muscle meat, primarily you're not really looking at a nutrient dense source compared to the fat. And when you look at what our ancestors ate RA by and ground beef didn't exist because animals don't actually store fat in those parts. That's because of how we've bred cattle other factors fat in the animal is stored on the belly on the brisket on the short rib around the kidneys, those fatty parts of the animal around the organ tissues. That's where we would have had to obtain fat and calories in nature. So the whole grain fed versus grass-fed debate. In the context of eating a steak isn't nearly as relevant as it is in the over. Diet and the primary fats, I will vitamins that were concerned about getting. It's not really I mean, you know, we have vitamin a in the form of retinol probably the most under appreciated vitamin the most important vitamin that's going to be discovered. I think really in regards to people understanding that you need to get in large amounts of vitamin d three. Of course, we don't have to touch on that anymore by K two as a big one of K two ties into vitamin d three in calcium metabolism saw in order to absorb calcium in your body. You need vitamin d three. But in order to move calcium around tissue, you need vitamin k two things called matrix glob protein, M GP moves it binds to calcium ions in the body and moves them around and vitamin k two. Vitamin k two is the secret of a lot of these indigenous groups and some animal foods because vitamin k two is only present in high quality animal foods, and what we mean what we mean by this is if an animal is not grass-fed or race properly, the vitamin k to content will be lower. But what's more important about gay to is its presence in fermented foods? So although foods like egg yolks and liver have some vitamin k two when you for Matt to food. It increases the vitamin k do content, and the one thing that I can't get passed in my mind is that there's a really good book the indigenous foods of the south Sudan, the fat of the land all of these indigenous people, whether it's the eskimos or the Africans. They purposely rotted their meat, and I mean, in modern society, we eat things like cheese and ham and yogurt. We eat a lot of rotten foods all the time. And we don't really think twice about it. But these people would literally take fish leave them out in the sun for seven days and. The need it. And you might say, okay. That's the anthropological evidence. What's the logical evidence? Okay. Maybe a hundred years ago. We wouldn't have had refrigeration was the scientific evidence. The protein breaks down it becomes more digestible. Well, there's there's three enzymes in meat fat. Hydrolysed enzymes, prolific enzymes and the Gleich lick enzymes the fat hydrolysed enzymes for meant the fat. The pro Olympic enzymes from the protein and the Gleich lick enzymes when the animal dies, the lactic acid the glucose in the meat turns into lactic acid. That's why sometimes people think liver has carbs in it, but that's not actually true because the Gleich lick enzyme breaks down the glucose in the liver into lactic acid when the animal ties, so these enzymes for meant meet in a way that's more favorable to the microbiome. So not only are you breaking down the protein. You're getting the fat, and you're turning certain nutrients into vitamin k to essentially, so. There's definitely a role in Ignace groups of these vitamins, and there's definitely an importance of these vitamins in overall health. But this is something that is, you know, we know as president in their diets, it makes sense on paper value perspective that you can't really obtain these vitamins in any way from plan foods, and anecdotally speaking, you know, when these foods and a lot of my clients when they eat these foods, they notice a difference when you sit down and you eat certain foods, you notice immediately. How you feel? So definitely I mean, you know, some people like saying, I speak out my ass on people like saying, but I try to give I try to give as much information as physically possible if I can explain it in any way whatsoever. I do it. And I'm also open minded to the contrary. But again, it's it's one of those topics where people if people haven't heard about it, and they come across all this information about it from someone, and this is not something that like, I read a book and. I started this is you know, when I'm on the street. This is literally what I'm thinking about you know, when I'm driving in my car somewhere. This is what I think about I have ideas and things I read on every single day. This is an accumulation of like seven six seven years of doing this. And that all that information is accumulated into essentially a five minute blurb on why vitamins are important. So that's why I like to say as I said earlier present the information let people do the research on their own. But there's definitely a lot. A lot of lot of if I could talk for two hours just on vitamin a you know, there's so much to touch on. It's just absolutely insane. When you are talking about these different for mental foods, how do you personally have permitted food? You mentioned that you have trouble with dairy. I think, you know, rented food, you know, one way to get it is through like, you know, yogurt or Keefer or, but what are some other options? People can look into. So obvious. I mean, if you guys have realized I'm crazy yet. I have they call it. It's called Hymie. And this is what the indigenous groups used to call because it makes you high when you eat it and me can actually be inadvertently rotten. So if you bought like, I e Corre or salmon Roe in a store, you know, if it was salt it unfermented, and ate it would give you that similar feeling obviously cheat. So the two easiest access foods for K to our egg yolks and cheese. Egg yolks have vitamin k two in the form of MK four. That's the form that's president animal foods when they're not permitted. And then it turns into 'em k seven when it's for mental MK seven k two is the fermented form. And there's evidence that you kind of need seven as well. So cheese has high amounts of MK seven cheese is really kind of the best source of food that most people have access to unless you wanna start eating duck. Sliver goose liver. And that's because migratory birds have a very interesting function their metabolism where they store fat in their liver for the winter. So in these ducks fatten up there, also storing vitamin k two in their liver. That's why EMU oil is a very popular supplement product. The oil is has a high K to content it has benefits to it. But cheeses interesting because I guess we could talk about quality of dairy here. So the difference between the dairy on the supermarket shelf and a raw dairy product is. First of all, there's no inherent nutrient content to the dairy product if the animal wasn't on pastor. So we can kind of cross a little off when the dairy homogenized. Much larger fat particle, then she milk goat milk. So when you strength down this protein particle, it can get through the gut lining and be more inflammatory to people that have cosmic allergies. And you're also pasteurizing the milk, although that can kill bacteria that the farmer might, you know, bacteria and milk and concerns about bacteria are generally from poor cross contamination practices like they didn't clean the milking machines things like that. So although pasteurization does that reduces the nutrient content, and when you pasteurize food you while you're cooking it and a raw food for Mets naturally, a cooked food oxidises and rots and forms harmful bacteria. So if you have a raw piece of meat on the counter for a couple of hours, that's fine. But if you cook that piece of meat, and you lay it out. That's how people get sick so cheese in specific aces. It's made with the rennet of the animal and baby. Calves have run it in their stomach that curdle the milk into cheese. Essentially, it's pretty interesting. I would mean not to be cruel. But if you cut open baby cow, there would essentially be cheese in their stomach and the way that she's made you take this ideally, raw high-quality grasp and milk product. You add the rennet to it it forms cheese. And then you age it and that aging process ED's K two, and if people want to get a good source of two in their local supermarket. There's usually plenty of raw imported cheeses. A parmigiano reggiano is a DO p its designation protection, which means they can only make the milk from certain cows and certain areas, and it has to be made a certain way, and that parmigiano reggiano DOP guarantees essentially that it is a raw cow's milk cheese that it is a very high quality source of nutrition. So that's a very easily accessible what generally any raw imported cheeses are what people should look for in the supermarket. But since I am allergic to cheese. What I do is. I I will take any really animal meat animal fat, and I'll put it in a jar. And I'll pretty much. Let it for Mets. And guys. I really I am not crazy. Like a lot of this came across in a weird way. So one time I bought some beef that from a farm, and it smelled like parmesan cheese. And I was like and then like, I I didn't eat it. I just left it there. And then I smelled like rotten a dead body in my kitchen, the they later, and I was like what is is that the fat? So I go open the fat out. And it's like a comedy, you know, it's cheeses funky. It's rotten. It really is. So I tasted this beef fat. And I swear to God, it was it tasted exactly like promise on obviously the texture was different. But I was like that's really interest you from if you ferment fat even from an animal any animal developed similar flavors of the cheese and a good example of this is people that dry age stake almost all stay dry Asia. But you go to a state. Yes, you have a dry age stake. It's essentially rotten piece of meat. I mean, obviously, the fermentation processes way different. But. But that's definitely an interesting element of my diet that I haven't really Inc for most of my carnivore dietary history, just the importance of it is something focusing on now, mainly because of the food access thing, you know, for me to have rotten jars of meat and do that is completely crazy compared to to go into a store and buy cheese. That's for sure and vitamin k can you mentioning basically how it can help? I guess metabolize calcium or hope kind of move along calcium, but it can be really beneficial to your heart is that right? Yeah. Very important in blood health. But when I saw so immigrants the actual metabolism vitamin k in blood health. I know it reduces blood clotting. That's for sure I think I'm gonna look up the metabolism of that real quick. But one thing I do like to touch on immigra- arts to blood health is specifically omega three fatty acids. So there's a really interesting book called eskimo diet, and the one analogy I like to start this conversation with is if you cut an eskimos arm. It would take them eight to nine minutes for their blood to clot an American would take three to four minutes. That's and you might think, oh, that's a bad thing. They're going to know that's a testament to how smooth their blood flows. So what omega three fatty acid consumption does to the blood is. It changes the structure of the blood cells and makes the more pliable they can squeeze through arteries, better blood cells are actually much larger than a lot of the tiny arteries, not arteries about the tiny veins and vessels. They go through and they need to squeeze in flexible omega three improves the flexibility of this, it reduces the five bridge in in your blood. Which is it makes your blood flow quicker and. It's really just an overall ability to bind to calcium the not omega three k two's ability is really that binding to calcium and taking out the blood is reducing a lot of inflammatory stress. I radically the video I did yesterday was on calcium and showing how calcium deposits in kidneys. And the heart are really result of not getting enough vitamin k two and one overarching thing that I say a lot is the calcium RDA and idea that calcium build strong bones is one of the biggest mistakes of our generation calcium RJ being high is actually a consequence of not getting enough of these vitamins and our diet. I have not consumed any calcium in six and a half years and my blood levels of calcium right dead in the middle. It's like nine point four on a scale of eight point two ten point six. It's so interesting when once you start to eliminate a lot of foods from your diet. It's really crazy how the work starts really kind of men together. And and almost like fix it self you don't really lift anymore nowadays, you basically just run right? And what's the kind of reason behind that? Like, you know, we we love lifting, and we we we also understand like, you know, the way that we like to lift we might be beating ourselves up a little bit. And maybe it's not gonna help us necessarily live to a hundred do it for long Jimmy purposes, or why did you kinda switch things up? Yeah. I mean, there's definitely a lot. I've been having this conversation myself with the past few days, actually, because you know, I have a I obviously marketing myself from a health nutrition perspective is also a fitness aspect. And if I don't work out, I don't lift weights. I'm kind of missing some sort of clientele away. So on one hand I wanted to lift weights again for that purpose on the other hand, you know, I mean, I work as a bartender. I do my YouTube channel I have another. The job that I work on the side. Getting I can get in the gym for an hour to a day. That's not too much of an issue, but the extra eating I'm gonna lose lose three four hours of sleep a day. That's my personal reason. I've always had really bad stretch marks on my arms. And I know that sounds silly. But that that's never gonna go away. So that's not actually a good reason. Because regardless of muscle. I always have the best stretch marks. I think what my small bone frame right now. I'm I'm like five nine hundred forty pounds for me. I have very small. I'm sure you guys familiar with the term small joints. I'm sure you could explain a better than other people. I have really small joint. So when I have sixteen seventeen in arms that's not like on on you guys. Like, you're probably like eighteen nineteen twenty twenty one inches. You guys are gigantic. If I when I have sixteen seventeen inch arms, I look really really big at least for my bone frame. And I actually did a physique competition back in two thousand five. Fifteen. I mean on my own I looked okay. But if you put me next those guys you'd be like, what does that guy doing on the state, so the bone frame, even if I did if I lifted weights, and I kept lifting weights my peak muscle tone for my frame is only going to be one hundred eighty one hundred ninety pounds max max, so with my small bone frame and how I looked like a like it's way too. Muscular part of that ties into. Fitting into my suits. That was honestly like a reason like I don't fit like I could retail all my sous. What then what if I don't wanna lift weights? Again, a lot of maintenance things regarding the actual physical reasons about why lifting weights might be detrimental. The only concern is to me you need to consume excess calories to put on muscle. And as we said earlier anything you eat is inherently inflammatory, that's one element to it. But there's so many benefits of lifting weights. It's hard to say that it's bad because when you go into Jim the people that are in shape or not on the treadmill. The people that are in shape or lifting the weights, and one fact that was really shocking to me. I I always knew muscle burned a lot of calories, but one pound of muscle burns fifty calories day. So if someone put. One or one and a half two year time span for natural. Was is going to increase a thousand fifteen hundred calories depending on the amount of muscle. They put on and that will literally help them lose all the way they need to lose. So there's another element to this is we are much less muscular, then a hundred gatherer, you know, these people would have been much more must go than we are now so getting into the gym and doing this weightlifting is a way to make up presenting Terry activity. If you stay, you know, if you're if I'm a bartender, and I'm moving around all day shaking up drinks doing this doing that. And I used to work as a personal trainer to. But the point is if you're active on your feet all day doing things building muscle inherently through endurance activity. You're going to have a decent lean body mass. What if you're sitting at a desk all day the only way for you to make up for that seven eight hour day of sedentary activity is for you to go in the gym and kill yourself for an hour. So I don't think there's any detriment to wait way training. Obviously if you're in the realm of you want to try to. Lift your house in like rip up some ply boards. That's a different conversation. Like I used to do that stuff. I mean, I I was never really that strong. I only maybe I benchpress like low three hundred and lifted like be in the low four hundreds after training for a couple of years. I was never in my brother's a bit more into the the powerlifting stuff himself. I think he Dallas in the five hundred. I don't know what his his numbers are part of your part of some triplets. Is that right? Oh, you know. This is this is so funny. I always forget to bring this up. But I being a triplet is a pretty unique thing. So we're all twenty-seven my brothers out. He he's an engineer works in aerospace. My sister, unfortunately is mentally disabled. So I do work with her and part of the reason that I do this whole nutrition thing is because I have a belief that, you know, nutritional deficiencies can cause things like that not to say that not to say that that was the reason my sister was I mean, the reason I mean that whole story about how my mother had kids, you know, they botched the C-section she ended up having to get like double kidney transplant that's a whole different story. So my sister isn't necessarily the reason, and my belief nutrient density is the reason but seeing modern medicine how we're living. Now how unhappy people are just even on the street. All of this stuff has been a driving factor in my message to just get people healthier in general. My thought is if someone's healthy if someone's energetic. That's part of the problem. You know, if we make sure everyone has a certain quality of life, you know, in regards to improving the world in itself. It's so much different. You know, I remember when I went one what did I do one day? I went into it just felt like everyone around me was on edge with size myself. Like, I went into a butcher shop. And I was like I'll just hold my house came in what's going on. Do you guys have? And he was like the guy was like freaking out, you know. And then I went then like, I'm driving my car, and these people act like lunatics, just the behavior that people per tray in general to me is so absolutely crazy. And I listen, I drive Manhattan. There's something wrong with say your New York. Yeah. No. There is something wrong with me. But there's like. A different level of anxiety. That people have that I haven't noticed in myself or healthy and reasonable people a good way to coined. This is a lot of people are emotionally driven. And that's part of the reason they also don't really care about their help too much. And if you can't if you can't fix yourself how you supposed to fix other things. I mean, of course, you know. I mean, they're nine was a nine percent of those people on this planet. Don't eat a healthy diet, and they're doing amazing things. But I just feel like out of context a lot of times when I when I go places and just seeing how how people act how unhealthy people are how unhappy people are. And that's hopefully, and I'm doing it. Well, so far improving people's lives in that regard. Have you ever seen Ghostbusters to? Listen, I I would I'm I haven't I've seen Ghostbusters when I haven't seen goes. So the second Ghostbusters takes place in New York City and underneath the city is all this pink slime, and as people are getting more on edge. And as people are getting more pissed off this pink slime is is rising up. And it's and it's mounting. And I think I think that the paying slime represents carbohydrate sugar and processed foods, and I really honestly feel that like this is bringing people to fucking boiling point. And I couldn't agree with you more on like the sanity of people like I walked through the airport, and I a lot of time just just in general this mile at people like every once in a while I have resting bitch face. But for the most part, I try to try to be I try to be pretty happy because I feel like if you if you smile, it kind of makes you feel happy on the inside and brings her brings your mood up and why not? Knowledge the person that's walking across from you. Or whatever what kinda give people a head nod or smile little bit people. Look at you like they just wanna punch right in the fuck and face. What's this guy's problem? Maybe needs get on the carnivore died. I don't know the I went to the UPS store earlier. And I saw this. I mean. Like this like maybe middle aged Asian lady walking out of the ups store. I walk into the ups store. I go out I go to the post office, and I see her the polls ovals like, oh, hey, what's going on? We both had the same idea. And she was like she was just she was looking at me with a death stare. And I was like, and then I went through. I was like, oh, no you would just ups. She was just a, hey, it wasn't even that just in a hazing future. She didn't even notice me. Right. I was there. And I noticed most people are in this Hayes of confusion, and is it the sugar carbohydrates the refined foods, of course. But I'd be curious to see if you increased if you if these people had a base amount of nutrients in their diet, that's probably part of it too. That's that's my main contribution. Before the show, we were actually talking about Romeo and eating raw meats, and you know, like, my family wouldn't f- with that like like straight up, you know, just like you cannot convince African family to eat like. But Andrew mentioned something funny that I never really thought about sushi, you know, and I. Yeah. You know, I eat raw fish. So what is this like adversity? It's like eating a raw a straight up Ross steak. Right. So yeah, this is a whole another big topic in itself, this is so for the indigenous example all indigenous groups eight cooked Ross, they ate all types of meat every indigenous group every single way raw, you know, every way logically speaking. On Anna scientific on a scientific basis. What happens when you cook meat is you're essentially you reduce the micronutrient content to some degree, the if you cook a steak well done which most people don't do. So the nutrient degradation isn't this aveer? If you cook a steak well done broil in the oven for an hour. You lose about fifty percent of the vitamins and twenty thirty percent of the other fats Ivo vitamins. Now, of course, if you cook a steak, rare that's not as big of an issue. But what you're doing by cooking the state because you're concentrating the calories. So you're sacrificing micronutrients, and you're increasing caloric density. This is very important for survival. Because. You know, when I tried the raw primal diet. I started craving meat. I started not meet I started craving cooked meat. I started craving salt. There's a caloric need and consuming only raw meat products. Like bottlenecks that caloric need in the diet. So when and if you're consuming, a carnivore diet, there's no indigenous group that was really they're very few that were completely carnivore. And even those that if an indigenous group had unlimited access to animal foods, they would still only eat eighty percent of their calories or so from animal food. So this means that okay? If you only need to eat, maybe thirty to forty percent of your calories from animal foods to get enough nutrition in the diet. It doesn't really matter. If you cook your meat and reduce the neutering, and by a certain amount because you're still getting the nutrients in, you know, does that make sense? So if you eat if you need to get a certain amount of nutrients and cooking, the food reduces the nutrients by half, why not just double the amount. That's what you can essentially do. So what you're doing is. You're getting more calories, but you're getting less micronutrients. I mean, there are some nutrients that you do like if you really cook a piece of meat long, vitamin c content loss and me does have vitamin c for anyone that doesn't know that. There's a couple of nutritional databases that do indicate that. And certain usually the water cycle vitamins are more prone to oxidation of vitamin d three is a bit more prone to oxidation heat as well. Now, the bacteria thing and the parasite thing is certainly certainly big one to talk about so salmonella and E coli salmonella occurs. Only in chicken, that's im- pretty important to note. Chickens, carry salmonella, I'm assuming it's because even though a lot of animals are kept in horrendous conditions, chickens or captain even worse conditions in E coli is present in. I mean, I'm sure more people get e-coli from Romain lettuce than they do from eating meat and there's a lot of recalls around, but this is all cross contamination. People don't realize that a lot of these very low paid workers literally have to use the bathroom in the fields. And sometimes that gets in people's vegetables. People don't realize what's going into you know, where the meat's go. What's going into that ground meat? I you know, I've never listened. I've been eating me. For six and a half seven years on this diet, and I've never been sick. Once from raw meat that being said, I've never eaten ground me from the supermarket raw. That is definitely a good way to get coli and another thing to touch on is the strains of these bacteria. So if aggressive animal has e-coli, the strain is different when you feed a cow grain you increase the acidity of their room in one of their stomachs. This makes the coli bacteria more resistant to acid normally e-coli that occurs aggress but animal is going to be killed in your digestive. Tract it won't be as harmful, but that acid resistant strain of e-coli that will wreak havoc on your digestive system. It's interesting how feeding these animals different foods affects their meat quality to since ruminants have different Justice system than chickens the omega three two mega six grain fed beef is far more favorable than the omega three to omega six in grand chicken. But things like chicken and pork are supposed to have essentially the same omega ratios as. Things like grass fed beef and wild caught fish. It's just to have those animals on that quality of passer is really cost prohibitive at this point. So the bacterial concerns have a lot to do with cross contamination and how we're raising our animals, you know, if you go out, and you hunted deer and you kill that deer. Granted it didn't have some sort of infection. All that meat is going to be free of any modern bacterial issues. So I if I need to touch more back to your I can, but the parasites or what scare people and on one of my raw meat eating days of video people are like, oh parasite has entered YouTube or something like they're making jokes that I'm going to get parasites, and as someone who's works in restaurants whose benefit Carter who's who's been cuts meat. I know what animals parasites in so parasites in ruminant animals. I mean has anyone if listen you guys listening right now, if you if you've seen a parasite interstate, please let me know because I've seen hundreds and hundreds and. Thousands of pounds of Eton. I have not I don't even wanna bring this up because it's not really a concern. But an animal can be infested with liver flukes, and these are I think it's like snails and marshlands carry these and then the couch the grass, and then they get liver flutes in their liver. But if a cow has liver flukes, it's not going to get past the butcher. They're gonna see the livers infected Lanham lls sick. It's not going to get the meat is not going to get past. I'm sure you could Google pigs have cancer, and you could see meet with cancer in it. And you could see stuff like that stuff. Does not get past the butcher, thankfully, the big concern. The only thing I have seen worms and parasites in is fish. And it's funny because people do eat sushi, but people will I'm sure I wonder how many people have oh, you're gonna get sick from eating raw steak, and then they go to have sushi the next day, and they don't realize that sushi is actually a lot easier to get sick from and. Yeah, I mean, if you freeze meet at a certain temperature, it will kill the parasite, but parasites in fish are very very normal especi-. In larger ocean fish, if I filleted openness, salmon, and I didn't find around warm in the belly or a nematode in the belly. I would be surprised the nematodes that occur the roundworms that occur. They're non segmented roundworms that occur in salmon aren't harmful to you means because they can't really borrow through the intestine they can cause stomach upset if they get through. But this is like if you get sold a piece of meat, and there's a worm in it, and it get it gets passed the butcher it gets passed your inspection. It's kind of your fault for not really looking at the meat carefully. Or and if you're not looking at me carefully and slicing it, then then you probably want to cook it a little bit to some degree, and the worms that are actually an issue. There are some segmented tapeworms, but those occur in freshwater fish. But salmon, do go upstream and rivers. So they can have tapeworms, but these tapeworms are much much much larger. So this ties into the Bush thing it's not going to get past the butcher, you know, when they cut open the salmon there's going to be so it's gonna. To be so infested that it's not the meat is not consumable. I mean, if you really want to get gross out anymore. You can watch parasite videos on YouTube, but a really good resource for this is the CDC center for disease control, you can type in any parasite any animal any disease, you're concerned about it will give you statistics on how frequently people get sick. It will give you the ticks on parasite occurrence on bacterial infection rates. What foods they come from? And you'll find that it's mostly plants. I didn't forget about trick noses as well as preowned diseases. So trick Enosis I think that's from feeding a lot of times from feeding animals garbage. But the main concern for trick noses is a wild game meat. So unless you're eating bear meat or wild boar meat. You shouldn't really worry about trick. Noses a pork used asterik Enosis because how how poorly we treat our animals. So if you're going to consume pork, unless you're raising the animal yourself, and you got animal tests for trick Enosis when you started it. I wouldn't start doing any report. But there are a lot of countries that. Consume raw pork and they raise animals specifically to consume raw. I mean same thing with chicken people eat, plenty of raw chicken about preowned diseases are really interesting because preowneds are mis folded proteins, and you can't kill these things you could he'd. You could throw. Substance in the environment. That does not go away. I mean, Joe Rogan had a podcast on this with an expert on diseases and chronic wasting disease endear, and these proteins essentially, these bronze folds tissue in your brain. And essentially makes holes in your brain now in the context of mad cow disease, and consuming it and having an issue. There has never been one case of mad cow disease in the United States all of the cases were from people who consume to meet in another country, and then they came over here. And we're diagnosed with the disease, I've heard many very shady stories about the origin of mad cow disease. What to my understanding they fed sheep that had scrappy, which is the form of mad cow and sheep, they fed sheet meal to cows. And then they developed the bovine form of it. I mean, you can also get a pre disease crucial the disease if you were like a brain surgeon. And then you look the scout. Apple. But when people think that they're going to get a pre entities from eating brain tissue, specifically of the animal. That's not true the preowneds occur in all the tissues of the animal, although they are more concentrated in the the brain and the spinal cord the preowneds or in the whole animal itself. So in regards to concerns about actually day-to-day physical concerns scrappy in. I think it's actually called scrapie. I'm an idiot today. It's called scrapie because what happens is the sheep starts scraping their bodies against the fence. So scrapie in sheep is non has not been shown to be transferable to Uman's bought as we said earlier with these sick animals, these things don't usually get past the butcher same. Then if I mean, if you cut open lamb skull, and there's holes in the lambs brain, it'd be don't eat it. Pork is actually immune to diseases. They have like a genetic immunity to priante interesting. I've I have not eaten I've eaten Cavs brain. What's also, interesting to note is mad cow disease cannot occur in an animal until it is pass three years of age because it developed over time in the animal. What other brains can you eat? I mean, obviously, you don't wanna go out and eat a deer that had chronic disease. You don't wanna eat their brain or something. I'm sure something might happen there. But the point is has hasn't actually been shown that you can even get pre-owned diseases from other animals outside of humans and cows. And the reason the calif- was transferable to Uman's is because it was a mutated form of BSE. And the reason you can get. I mean, you can get crucial the cubs from eating brain tissue. That has groups will the cops. And also, some people arm you to it in general. That's also you mentioned that you don't eat raw ground beef. So what's your favorite type of raw meat to eat? Yeah. I mean, I maybe I've actually gone to foods like twice in the past year end. Rog around me, that's on a rare occasion. That's the only time I've ever done. It. I go to Pennsylvania has some listen to Amos people. They're the shit, man. I sort of got these people raise the animals how they're supposed to be. I bought this ground veal the other day, and I this ground like what I was like Jesus Christ this veal. It was so amazing the fresh meat raised. How it's supposed to be. I just have local farmers. I ask them. Hey, what are the cheap off cuts? You guys have fatty stuff, and I just eat whatever. But you know, you might think a brisket or a short rib or something has to be cooked very long period of time to me. I could cook a brisk at media. I could cook a brisket medium rare slice it against the grain. I can still chew it. I mean, I might have to slice it a little smaller. And but. My favorite thing to eat from a taste perspective. The tastiest raw foods to me are obviously I mean, raw dairy is delicious raw cream raw raw milk, raw sheet milk, man. My one of my favorite most, delicious foods in the world. But Maguire foods, you can cut off of an animal. I really like the the bone marrow can be really tasty. But this ties back to indigenous people they literally had preferences for every part of the animal like they might have liked the lower leg bone marrow, raw the upper leg bone marrow. Cooked. They might have liked the the sheep had boiled and the caribou had roasted over fire, very specific food preferences. And when you start tasting these foods, and you notice what you like. Things taste different. You know, fat from one part of the animal taste different than other parts of the animal, but in regards to actual cuts of meat that most people are familiar with. Yeah. Of course, I love rebuy revise Alicia. If it's really fatty the fat on brisket has this very unique flavor to it the fat on the belly of the animal. Most people eat bacon has a very unique flavor to it. Every part of the animal has a flavor. I mean, that's the great thing about this diet when you eat you could taste if a steak is flank steak, if it's skirt steak if his New York strip filet Mignon, you can taste what part of the animal. The meat is from same thing with the fat same thing with the marrow. It's it's it's really interesting where should somebody start? You know, they'll say they're grossed out. They think you're disgusting. Eating raw stuff and eat raw brains and everything where should somebody start just to get some more nutrients in their diet period without having to beyond too crazy schedule. I wanted to be very clear that you don't have to eat raw food too. Healthy indigenous foods are sorry. Indigenous groups did eat both cooked raw fermented food. You can eat a completely cooked food diet. I mean, if you're looking every single thing too, well done the only thing I would be concerned about his maybe you want some vitamin C in your die from somewhere else. You don't have to eat raw products. If you're looking to source products. There's some excellent websites like eat wild dot com. Local harvest dot org where you can look into local farms and farmers markets and see what made you have accessible on a more on an easier, relatively speaking term. I literally can go to like all the supermarkets and local butchers in my area hall butchers will have lamb pretty much any part of I did a video where I tasted every single part of her all land that I slaughtered. There's meat that's easily accessible you just have to do a little bit of legwork. Okay. The the ShopRite have grass would by. Oh, ShopRite has whereby for nine dollars. A pound. It's pretty insane. Does hope I mean, whole foods is different sore. I can't afford to eat there myself. I'd probably probably go broke buying second foods, maybe you can do ground beef all foods, but you really have to look at it. We'll start from the easiest so explore your local options supermarkets, any any sort of wholesale store. Like, Costco, see what they have available for fish, local Asian markets are a godsend. These guys will have anything alive that you can imagine that you would eat. They have it there, and they will cut it for you. And I mean, even things these they have live kill Mark. It's like where I am in queens and Brooklyn of but the meat quality ties in here. Getting the hardest thing to do is to get a quality source of me, fresh and cheap. You could get frozen stuff. That's that makes it easier. And once you've export all those local options, then you can look into farmers markets and local farms, I literally call up forms, and I say, hey, how often do you abbatoir two abattoirs slaughterhouse? You could call these places up. They often do slaughter an animal. Can I buy X amount of meat per week? If you show people you're willing to spend money and develop these relationships than you can get these foods, obviously, no, I do consult a lot of people that don't want to do these things. So there is a way to do it. And like that I mentioned earlier raw grass-fed cheese. I mean, the problem with eggs is even if you're going to the supermarket and buying the best passionate omega, three eggs. They're still being fed predominantly grain feed, the grass and meat is not as fresh and good as it could be. So there is a slight sacrificing quality. If you do want easier access to food, but. I always liked to think there's to be something wrong with you to do what I do. No, I'm sorry. The resources for anyone that's interested. Eat wild dot com. Local harvest dot org. Real milk dot com is great for finding local milk sources. And then you can even just Google. I would just Google stuff in your area. Butcher abattoir farm. There's probably a ton of Facebook groups that I don't really mess with entry. You got any questions over there? She got buddy. No. Well, my question was exactly how do we get started? But the those the websites that you mentioned were great. So thank you for that one thing that I did want to ask. And we're talking about it earlier. You know, you mention indigenous people in our ancestors and whatnot, and I'm not trying to be combative or anything like that. But we were just to take like an AB comparison, and I'll just be super basic and simple with it. We are living longer now. So why is it referenced so much in something arguments? So I actually did a whole video on that the other day explaining that one thing off the bat. That's not actually that's not actually true statistic the lie the life expectancy now is not too far off of what we used to have the constituent here is the infant mortality rate. So there were groups of people who will literally have an infant or child mortality rate of fifteen twenty twenty five percent. But if you got past that young period of life, you would likely live to sixty five seventy seventy five, and if we look at life, I mean, we can look at blue zones in life expectancy by country and see what they can they consume general. But the main argument against that is the life expectancy the other thing I like to bring up. Okay. You could argue let's say these people did die at thirty five. Let's say some of them did because these people are surviving. How long do do we think any of us would last in the woods without modern rifles Ma? Equipment. The fact that these people were able to survive with a bow and arrow in the forest like like to me. That's the craziest thing general if these people can survive with a bow and arrow in the forest and procure calories in that way. It's completely amazing. And that ties back into if you go into a forest the only thing you'll be eating is animal foods because you didn't have your ancestors to tell you. This plant is good that plant is good. You know, what to eat? There's that element of these people were literally trying to survive they had very harsh lives, and even in these in these tribes where they were very skilled and adapted hunting, and they were able to your calories very easily. They went around killing each other. You know, if you Google Australian aborigines cannibals natives to Australia. There's some really really crazy stories that I could talk about on here about what these cannibals used to actually do and they had beliefs like eating the heart of your enemy would make you stronger eating their brain would make you smarter. And I mean, listen. The branches of an animal might have mega three fatty acids in it, but that doesn't necessarily mean you should go over your neighbor's house and have some twisted thoughts going on. But. To tie back to the their life expectancy, people don't realize in for mortality, people don't realize the elements of survival, and the I mean, the main thing is these there's no evidence of genital disease in these people. There's no evidence of diabetes as evidence of cancer. There's no evidence of chronic disease. And if you see what they looked like they're like per, they look like marble statues. They look like perfect physical specimens and a lot of these pictures. And and one interesting thing, I bring up is not to offend any people. Have you ever seen a picture of bald eskimo or a first national asking or a ball native American? These people didn't lose their hair either. That's one interesting thing. I'm yeah. It just it gets got me thinking, you know, looking pictures of native Americans looking picture of these indigenous people, you know, they all look the same in a way, they if you think of a species of people that are from a certain area, they kind of look a certain way, and whether or not they developed properly in that way is. Conducive to their environment that I answer that. Did you want me to touch on anything specifically on the life expectancy thing? No, that's that's just about it. And yeah, there's it's definitely it's kind of like the who's better Jordan LeBron. There's so many different variables there like it's it's impossible to AB comparison. But now, you I think you hit it right on the head, man. I think to like, you know, I think that were dying longer. What I said kind of before we got on the show like there's so many people are so sick, all it's it's upset and say all life expectancy is higher and people get excited about that stat. And it's like everybody's on like all these weird drugs. And I think I mean, I'm just I just go by what I see. I see a lot of people not feeling. Well, see a lot of people. Wheelchairs and just sickly and and just not doing well and having diabetes, and heart disease, and all these other things. So I think that the message is great, you know, if we can get people to be healthier. And I I like your message to because it's coming from a place of addition now. Yeah, it would be great to have everybody like wipe out processed foods from their diet. And it'd be awesome. If people could have the willpower that you have to ninety two carbohydrate for the last decade. But you know, we realized that that's not probably realistic. But can you start to get more meat in your diet? Can you start to explore? Maybe some of the things that you mentioned to get more nutrient dense foods of Ken people make some room for some dairy and more for mended foods. Yeah. Absolutely. Can absolutely. Can it's not hard to do anyone can kind of implement some of these things. And I think it's a great way to go about it is dish by subtraction. You keep adding convince people that they need to go on a walk or have some form of exercise convince people they need. To drink more water convince people that they need more sleep. They need to recover from their day, the need to recover from their workouts. And I think it's a good place to start. Definitely. And if if these types of foods are supported if people start and even the past years, you know, these big companies, whether it's McDonald's or processed food companies when they see people want healthy foods, they switch their marketing. They try to meet the demand. So if people want to be healthy and people want healthy foods, and they're complaining that oh it's too expensive to do. Well, that's that's a whole different story. Once we once we start becoming healthier start supporting these higher quality foods. That's when there becomes a drastic shift, and it becomes accepted as opposed to the opposite of the norm. Yeah. Should be seeing awesome. A fast food rotten meat places. The opening up around the country pretty quickly here. I think. It's funny that McDonald's cheeseburger. Although I McDonald's does sell essentially rotten milk on cheese. I mean, I think the actual cheese the cheese a McDonald's patties is actually completely fake. It's not legit. I think that's a funny thing. Like people say, you know, that you brought up the Ryan meet him Donald's. Well, technically speaking if that was if that was an aged burger and cheese. It's really my it's really about convention and perception to it's really interesting. Thank you so much for your time that repre- thank you so much. Where can people find you? Frank to final on YouTube. You guys can follow me on Twitter Instagram website. Frank dash afoul dot com as well. Appreciate it. Thanks again. Thank you guys. Okay. Take care. Very interesting eating all that raw raw food. Pretty cool. I think some things some things he said, I mean are are easy to adopt. I mean other than other than like diving in on some raw food. I mean, I think I mean, it's all stuff. We've we've talked about on this podcast before having some variety of meats. You know, we've talked before on the podcast about, you know, bone broth bone marrow liver. Our brain can eat some of those things can eat liver and heart and maybe not maybe maybe just don't dig it. Right. So don't make your life any harder than it really needs to be. But if you try something, and you like it, then maybe you found something that you can implement into your life. The biggest the biggest. Just getting over how unconventional it sounds. You're right. You know, like like we talked about fasting before like, you mentioned we thought it was the stupidest thing ever, we do it. Oh, it's pretty great. So just like again like just getting over L Rami that sounds bad like from as a kid. You just don't eat raw meat. Right. Right. So you just got to get over that. And maybe do some research. See what you can eat. Maybe give it a shots. You feel probably a lot of it's probably not that bad. Trying to think of like other than a restaurant where they've had some thinly cut beef. I don't think I've really tried a lot of like raw. Meet in that sense other than like, we said sushi. That's been about it. I haven't really at home. I haven't just randomly grabbed a piece I eat my food, pretty rare. But raw is a different ballgame is a little different. And what he said made some sense to like if you choose to cook, it, maybe you just need to little more of it in the same amount of nutrients because when you cook it, you're going to cook out some of the nutrients, so it's like, okay. That's I mean, a lot of what he said even though there was some things in there. That are crazy. And he least acknowledged that. Like most people aren't going to be able to follow and do exactly what he's doing. Yeah. I like what he said about, you know, eating basically twice as much because I know when I make a steak, rare it tastes so much better. But it kills my stomach again back to my ridiculous stomach. But when I cook it really, well, I it's easier to handle, but I'm also like damage kicked it a little bit too long. But then I don't wake up in the middle of the night with my stomach cramping the way, I did the other. Try to so bad. But what if you eat less of it, and it's cooked a little less. I could give that a go. Maybe try that. Yeah. I wonder if it's the fat content too. Because I know I got some some friends that I've put on diets before and like when I put him on a Kito Dodi their stomachs is they're dying. And I think it might have to do with just the maybe the overall amount. So maybe just try to eat try to eat like six ounces and just see what that does. Maybe I can't like keep up with the the demand of trying to break all that down in my stomach or so it'd be some people there's so many other things that factor into this. But some people's gallbladder doesn't like keep up with trying to digest that amount of fat. And so therefore, it could be, you know, making you sick or could be other influences. Well, but maybe just trying to eat a little bit less might my work. Yeah. My some good. But then I'm gonna wanna reach carbs. Yeah. I know carbs like other carbs, I know car. Beget carbs. Well, that's what I noticed when I've been fasting. I'm still doing it every day. It's still Levin it. But if I have something I don't know like I'll have potatoes or I'll have extra rice just because unlike tastes really good right now. The next day is really hard to get through that initial wave of hunger. So I I don't know if that's just me or if that's just the way it is. But it's been tough. I think I think a lot of problems get solved when you keep your stomach empty. I think that will continue to help you a lot. I think fasting can be can be great from that sense. And I think you know, what Frank was talking about with just eating less, and just, you know, the conventional American standard American diet versus some of the other types of diets people might go on the main factor, whether you're going vegan or carnivore which seem like total opposites maybe in both cases, you just are making healthier decisions. And maybe in both cases because you're on a quote, unquote, diet, your also choosing to eat less, and maybe the simple. The act of eating less can help make us healthier. And then also, you know, when we had marxists. And on the podcast. We've had other people on the podcast who talked about Kito genyk diets. And they talk about you know, your body's ability to switch over from being a sugar burning machine to a fat-burning machine. I think that some of these things are are misleading. And I think that in the absence of excess calories. I think the body works at self out and uses what's there as fuel? I think you're buys like pay. We got we got a little bit of sugar over here. And you're getting kind of tired, let's funnel that out to whoever needs it. And I think the body like, although it is it can be very confusing on how all all the stuff works. I think it's I think it's simply a lot of times just come down to you know, if you're if you're continually eating massive amounts of food. I think you're kinda Rican havoc on your system and causing a lot of problems. Yeah. And then my biggest concern, and you know, how we talked about it a couple of episodes ago about. Like fascinate doesn't make any sense to me. Like, I need to be eating way. More like this dumb, blah, blah. I haven't lost. Anyway at all. And I really only been eating one to two times a day and yesterday or Tuesday doing dead lifts trap bar dead lifts, but Markle's like let's go for a heavyset of six in to see what you can get like, you're probably still fill in strong from the meat and everything. So let's go go for it ended up pull in three hundred six times previous to that did three hundred once for a like all-time PR. So I don't know what that was all about. But it's I'm not losing strength. And I'm not losing weight, which was my biggest concern of all of this. So whatever the hell is happening. It seems to be working. I think fasting. Your body releases some hormone to help protect lean muscle. Mass body will lease them a hormones that will just help protect you in general. So I think it's you know, how long were you fasting that day fasting pretty long on that day. I don't know. Exactly. I just know. Also, I sure skip breakfast. And then I don't eat before one o'clock. So there's a good chance that was eighteen hours fast. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think that that's kind of falls in line with most of the research that shows that you aren't going to really lose muscle mass. Now, you know, could you could you optimize your diet better towards gaining more muscle mass and towards by eating more. Frequently sure I'm sure he can write. But you know, from what I've seen in seem as been doing this for a little bit longer as well. And I think a lot of people are reporting kind of similar facts with fasting. That's great thinking it just six. Trying out because like like I mentioned shortly. I was doing it wasn't Kito because I'll still eating carbs panels eating less than about seventy grams of carbs day and still doing the same activity just to see like in the back. I was like I'm gonna feel tired. I won't have much energy. I felt fine. But I didn't feel at any less energy at all actually felt maybe a little bit better. So it's kind of odd. Because like when you look at a lot of like, let's say high intensity athletes, maybe athletes that do basketball soccer jujitsu. I would've expected to feel like no energy on the mats. Because that's what I hear from a lot of people that, you know, cut cut out there, carbs or weightless carbs. But I didn't feel any of that. So I think there's probably a large mental aspect to it. They're like, oh, modding carbs feeling tired. I think that a lot of that might not actually be true just might be literally mental. And you're pretty smart with all this stuff too. Because you've been doing it for a long time. So I'm sure that maybe when you look at it. You're like I'm gonna cut back on some carbs. But we more fat. I'm going to have. Yeah. I'm gonna have more meat. I'm going to eat more fat, right? And. I think that was Frank's point was like a lot of times if you're gonna eat carbs a lot. Maybe you're not getting the nutrients that you need. Maybe you eat a couple of French fries, or maybe you eat which you'd get like a little bit of like vitamin C and a little bit of vitamin a, and maybe some potassium and some sodium from that. But you're not going to get a whole lot more than that. But if you just simply eight more meat, you would get more nutrients you'd probably get a good amount of calories because you'd get more fat and you'd get more protein. So when you start to kind of break it down that way, you know, something like rice just is almost just carbohydrates. It doesn't really have a whole lot else in it doesn't mean that you can't eat rice. And doesn't mean that you shouldn't every rice. It just means that, you know, maybe maybe what we're looking at most of the time is not always the right thing. You know, we're always looking at the macro, and maybe we should be looking at the macro and the micro and piecing those together because maybe when when piece those together, maybe we have something that would work. Efficiently and work faster for us. So anyway. Some good stuff. It was. Yeah. I like that. He wasn't. He did say some crazy things and he does some even crazier convention unconventional. I'm thinking, you're good. With with words. But he wasn't you know, he said that he doesn't totally right off vegetables. And you know, he wasn't. So like, it wasn't like a religious thing for him. He's just like this is what's working. And this is why it works. You know, he kinda had a little bit of facts back everything up. He wasn't full-bore. Everyone should be eating meat. And you can also just you can utilize this knowledge for whatever you need, you know. So like vegetable somebody might say vegetables or kinda worthless. And like he pointed out vegetables can sometimes have anti nutrients, and they certainly don't have a lot of calories. Right. But now, let's talk about, you know, you're doing bodybuilding show or you're doing a physique show. And he want to lose a bunch of. Or let's say you wanna lose a bunch of weight. And let's say let's say you weigh three hundred pounds. You wanna lose weight well shit a three hundred pound person has probably over long period of time. Consumed a lot of food a large volume of food. So now, let's say, okay. You know, I want you to with every meal, I want you to have, you know, two big servings of vegetables because he want that person to feel satiated and you want them to get used to their food and you want over a period of time for to bring down their caloric intake. And that's where you can utilize vegetables to your advantage. And Furthermore, if you just like them, just eat them, you know, you don't need to make life that hard. I mean, if something is is messing up your sleep. If something is messing up your stomach if you're not feeling right then. Yeah. You need to reevaluate that. But in general, if you feel pretty good, and you like the foods that are in your diet, you're pretty happy with the results you're getting and I don't think there's a lot of reasons to really overly worry about the fights not against vegetables. If it's not against for fight against trying to trying to pull the reins and a little bit on these processed foods because those things we're gonna tend to overeat and more than likely those are going to be the things that. Give us the body that we don't want three just taking a little bit from everything. And just keeping it simple. I don't eat a lot. Don't eat a lot of sugar or a crazy amount of it. If you want to have a little bit here, and there and a lot of processed packaged foods, I've been staying away from that for a long time. Now, I just feel overall better and just add in what feels good you don't have to totally cut out carbs. If you feel better with carbs, but don't eat like, eight hundred grams pay liquid carbs. It's it's it can be very simple, but you can make it difficult if she a lot of unnecessary when used to eat more carbs, and even when you design diets for people what happens when the carbohydrate intake is really high. I would imagine that the fat content has to come down. Right. The fact there's a guy right now. John John Schafer. I think you've seen it before is really white black guy on Instagram. Right. He's eating like maybe four hundred he's white and black. That's why. But he looks white, but he's half black. That's why really white black. Anyway is in. Bagram name. It is Instagram. All it is is John. I think right now is eating like ninety grams of ninety or maybe hundred grams of today, but he's eating like an nexus of a four hundred ninety five hundred cards. Yeah. He does jitsu. Also, he's done shows. He's he's jacked. And this is like the Lena sees ever been, but the most food is ever been eating, and that's even a pretty reasonable amount of fat. A lot of times you hear even some of these high level bodybuilders that are big that are, you know, this guy probably weighs what two hundred pounds to ten to actually probably to ten to twelve. And the funny thing is is like right now, he's doing jitsu lifting. But what we were getting ready for his body building show think like a year ago year and a half ago Hughes eating like maybe his carbs are at two hundred and his fats down elect fifty sixty to get that lead eastern a lot of loans to cardio now. Obviously, he's doing much more work and for to actually feel that we're just eat a lot of. Food, but he's almost he's close to being show. Right met him before Barbara Reagan you've met him. Yeah. So I mean, if you were to right now like he'd be there in in six weeks, but like he's eating an insane amount of food. So it really just depends on the person, and like how much activity they have to feel their workouts? That's what I'm like. It's also a good idea. It's a good idea to get yourself used to eating more food is a good idea to get yourself used to eating less food. Right. I mean, if you were going to go back to bodybuilding, you might wanna think about like, you know, for lack of a better term. You might wanna think I'm gonna race up my metabolism. And I'm going to start to eat more often more frequently, and maybe you're gonna start to do today workouts, where you got a little bit of cardio in their little bit of pump sessions going on here and there, right? And so you might just switch stuff up just to throw your body like just throw a monkey wrench into it. And kinda see you know, how how you react to it. But you know, a lot of people that are trying to adhere. To a diet. They just try to always eat less and always eat less and always eat lessen the new start maybe with something like fasting, and then they're trying to fast, more and more and more and more all the time. And it's like well now, you might get to a point where you're going to start to rebound back from it. So we need to you need to kind of like an exit strategy out of these things like what what are the next couple steps gonna look like and what I shared with a group that I've been helping earlier today. I said there's gonna you need to have time for everything understand that you know, there's going to be period of time or you eat less and you'll continue to weigh less. And it's gonna be a point where your weight's stops your hundred eighty five pounds, and you're stuck there. And you wanna be one hundred sixty five or whatever you're gonna be stuck. We stuck there for a little while. It's okay to be stuck. And when you're stuck that's a good good time not to give up. But it's a good time to switch gears. A good time to say, okay, I fasted I made some progress a loss fifteen pounds. That was great. And I you know got. Of carbohydrates. I'm gonna bring fruit back in. I'm gonna bring I'm gonna bring a cheat meal back in once a week. I'm gonna burn right? Like just because you're playing the long game. You know, you don't there's no reason for you to weigh one sixty five tomorrow. And even if you die even if we could figure that out you're going to rebound back hard, and you won't be in the shape that you wanna be in anyway. So because we know that we're playing a long game it might take a year to get there. But that's fine. The longer that takes us to get there at the longer you're going to be able to stay there and the easier going to be. Anyway, that's all the time. We got today. Strengthens never week this week this never strength. Catchy. Guys later.

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Mark Lippett CEO of XMOS on the Chips that Make Voice Assistants Work - Voicebot Podcast Ep 87

The Voicebot Podcast

53:17 min | 2 years ago

Mark Lippett CEO of XMOS on the Chips that Make Voice Assistants Work - Voicebot Podcast Ep 87

"Pizazz number eighty seven of the voice podcast, today's guest, Mark lapel CEO of Xmas. Welcome back for about nation. We have a great guest today. Marc Lopez is CEO of ex-boss they make the chips in bed. It software that enable voice interactions on a wide variety of devices ranging from smart speakers, too, smart, TV's and remote controls. We often focus in this show voices system and what they can do today. We learn about the enabling layer in the role that hardware plays. I think you're really going to like it before we get to Mark. I have a quick listener shout. Sean weathers from jargon left us a five star review on the Alexis. Skill store for our flash briefing called voiced by daily. So he says I quote, I listen to the voice by podcast. Religiously and love the insights, it brings from conversations with our friends in the voice community voiced by daily is a great supplement to that. It's an excellent way to quickly get the voice industry news. I need to know start my day. No other source provides this convenience in value to me, great job, and quote, there you have it. You Alexa, fans can add voice daily as a flash briefing and get a daily one. Minute summary of the top story of the day. You can also just say anytime Alexa, or hey, Google launch voice. Bot says you'll hear the same content, and you can hear it and sequence. So check both those out. But in particular, if you use flash briefings, you should set that up because it's really quick. And you get information that'll be useful to you. Thank you so much, Shawn. I appreciate your view in the comments. If you the listener today, leave us review and the Alexa skills store and the Google action directory or an apple podcasts you to make it a shout out on the voice podcast. Okay. It's time for our interview with Mark lapel of ex-boss, so Markle bet joined ex- moss in two thousand six is vice president of engineering was later promoted to COO and then CEO about three years ago before Xmas Mark was CTO co-founder of silicon IP and better software provider Ignace earlier in his career. He was a network systems engineer, Texas Instruments, Mark work, Mark earned an MBA from Henley management college in a master's engineering for electrical. And electric engineering at the university of Surrey, Mark lapel. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thanks very much for having me. Well, I'm gonna have you. We don't normally talk about hardware. We have a few times. But we tend to talk more about software, and, you know, the big voice systems, and then design and a lot of different things. So I was really intrigued when I saw some news coverage of Xmas around CS, and I thought, wow, it we're long overdue to have a good hardware and systems level discussion for voice by listeners. Okay. Well, glad to oblige her great. So I think good place to start is ex-boss Leno talk about what the company does. And how you came to work there. Sure. Well, so I I'm this is going away back as you say two thousand six I exited my company Ignace you mentioned in the intro there. I had a youthful summer off during which the then CEO of ex-boss goading contact with me. Looking for somebody to run the engineering team? The company was really small. I was employee number six I've known the CEO for many years. We could friends I was very happy to join. It was also no Pacino with David May who's one of the prominent compute, scientists avow era. So I was very very happy to very closely with him in the Elliot's too. So around two thousand six I guess Q three two thousand six I joined the company company funded series funded in two thousand seven as you mentioned where we're hardway company. Business model is to sell silicon chips and software and development of silicon chips is somewhat capital intensive and takes a little bit of time. We were out in the mall kits in round two thousand nine with how novel microcontroller I'll check and the problem that we were solving was that consumer electronics designers in particular, very constraints by the platforms that were available to them firstly, very cost constrained in general, as we will know the. To some extent those calls contrite constraints driven them into a welding, which like it really only by me too products. So they they've been forced into situation where they couldn't really differentiate end products. And so we had a solution novel microcontroller architecture that allow those kinds of engine is to continue developing sea-based solutions, but to create really really differentiated products right from the show, so they could actually Ryo and protocols in software and change the hog way of a heavier that designs while still say writes in control software and DSP to right. The the high level application so we about to market almost immediately involved in in the audio space. It was around the time that file was being dropped from books and the procedure. Rodeo business was was heavily dependent on MAC books. And and consequently on fire y an apple was suggesting that that community needed to use US VDI to that wasn't a available chipset for that. But we had this platform. Technology that's them suited to fos spin for a new kind of interface class. And and we have we were in the market in a number of months and the rest is really history. We've dominated that USB multi business pretty much ever since alongside that obviously built significant audio expertise during which time we we observed the emergence of voice around about two thousand and two thousand fourteen we started to see some about customers using the solution for rain microphones, so taking our software that that we'd written for platform, but modifying it to use to interface to numerous microphones. And it was almost I think two or three months later, the Amazon launch the echo, and we decided that decided that that point that the audio space that we'd been in just grown by factor of ten or hundred and really have been doubling down on voice voice ever since. So what percentage of your current businesses voice related? So it's about between ten and twenty percent about current business. But it's it's. Comfortably growing growth rate is very strong right now. So we've been we've had revenue in the voice space. So this is selling those chips, we voice voice specific foam where embedded within them. So we've been doing that since two thousand seventeen and we grew substantially in two thousand eighteen when we expect to grow substantially again. That's that call of business this year and beyond and what about audio general what percent of your businesses audio based? So it does vary. Little the audio business that we're in is is mentioned, it's the procedure space is quite quite a mature market. It's very demanding. And so we've we built a reputation for quality in the years that we've been playing in that space, which is paying dividends in the voice face. But it's eighty percent. I would say, okay. Yeah. So really significance. So between the two. That's most your business. Correct. Yeah. We have some. So the the platform that we developed back in the early years is almost entirely general purpose. It doesn't apply. From the sort of performance in the cost footprint. It's not specifically dedicated tools audio it can do many many other things. So we have a very active community of uses using the technology full also things from toys to to robots but as far as our own Goto market emphasis is concerned. It's really all about audio and increasingly about voice, right? So I think it's correct to say, you're a fabulous semiconductor company. That's right. And so explain to the voice by listeners. What does that mean? Well, that means is that some we don't own manufacturing capabilities. So I wear somewhat rice mile when I'm saying this. But if you're being successful as a fabulous semiconductor company, you really have a seal products. So we ask. A five a chip five to to manufacture wafers for us using our design. We also them to ship that those waivers to to act Jim company packages tests, south design chips, we then send those chips to logistics company, which is another third party. And then we instruct that logistics company to sell to send those chips to customers. So we we all right. The entire supply chain arms, and what that means for us is business is that primarily will business traits in intellectual property as primarily engineers the hospice business, right? So in this case, your customers actually do buy chips from you then. But you you don't manufacture them you send the design to somebody else and you coordinate that that product will be shipped to your customer. That's right. Yeah. So those chips get shit with ex-boss written on the on the lid, and right and the bed. It software that you supply is is your only software. The software that runs on the chip that. Shipped with the chip or do you have other embedded software that you sell is an add on. Typically, we can do either. So, but but the vast majority of the of the self way that we foams Paul about product is software that runs on the on the the x moss chips themselves. So we have in the past and licensed technology that might for example, run on the laptop. So, you know, USB multi channel host, for example. And but primarily out our IP our expertise is really about deeply Betty technologies in the in the end product. And so what are some examples of products that Xmas technology is in out in the market today? Okay. So while looking at the voice space in particular, the there's a fantastic Tiffany sound ball wherein. There is a free box delta, which you're if you've seen that that was released a few months ago, set a box a convergence product to set a home hub, a wireless speaker that's being marketed to the French market at the moment. Primarily without some allow they plans to expand just picking another category at random you may have seen the pillow health human wellness robot. That's being mocked by black and decker that has an X most voice solution in it. We have a TV accessory with sky with in China with the next most voice, so they Shen and numerous conferencing products from from Alexis elaborate s- and an EMMY China as well. So we have many actually many provex already in the field fine launch. They've mo-. They've quite recently been introduced over the loss of six to nine months. Okay. Yeah. And we have written about pillow health and black Deckers prio product, which is the exact same thing. Exactly. Which which flagging decker was upset that we wanted out that it was just basically a new label on the exact thing ridiculous. It's the same. Isn't it? It's fine perfectly fine strategy to do that because they're focused on other things than black and decker head sort of a mixed history in terms of acquisitions and building products that it was a good way for them to get into that market. But in any event, we digress. So just sort of at the high level, though, you know, we're talking about you getting into voice and some of these other applications devices, his it surprised you how popular smart speakers of them. Yes. It has. I think it's one of those things I think it's one of those technologies where you know, you whilst whilst the in the early days, at least, I'm really only open the door, a crack, you know, there was lots of potential for improvement in those those early products looking beyond that was was clear clearly a tremendous amount of potential. I think I think what's most being surprising is the rate of adoption not not the fact that the with selling millions of products that was always going to happen. But it's happened over a comparatively short space time. And he's really gross the public's mind chair. I used to back in the day back in two thousand fourteen you know, part of the pitch I would take around companies would be, you know, of you heard of this voice thing, it's pretty important. It's coming you need to be prepared for it. You know? That's that's part of my presentation. I absolutely don't need to to give any more. It's really more about where voices going to be found next. And is it just gonna be voices? It going to be voice plus contextual awareness, and so on and so forth. So you know, it's been a tremendous help to us really that the adoption has been as quick as it has. I still think that the the hype is bigger than the market right now. But I said anything that we're seeing we're seeing that turn around and what really starting to see the market start to arrive just done. The smart speaker side. Obviously, we see I've got some new data out or we'll have it out shortly this publishes. I will have it out that the adoption rate in the US is about a little over twenty six percent of US adults. So it's sixty six million is a size of that. And that does not include necessarily other. Devices setup boxes right bars things like that. Most people don't characterize smart speakers that verse odes, even so lightly broader than that. And and what I what I see there is that in the UK Germany little bit behind that couple. Other markets are actually going to jump ahead of the US this year, which I thought was interesting, but yet really really popular in the I think for someone like you say that you never questioned it. But when it happened you were surprised at the the pace of Dopp Shen. And I wonder if I wonder what? I wonder what your reaction would be. If I said that the rate of adoption of voice in general right now has been catalyzed more by the introduction of far field voice than it has in recent advances in SR the viewpoint is one that we show. I'm actually seeing some data behinds behind that one about customers has a number of products in the market. I would say they all but so maybe number in the market with. So it's across the range of costs points with pushed tool with NIA field microphones with field microphones, and their vacation has been that's off microphones is being used by mole individuals within a family context will say more frequently than than the push to token field variant. So I'm not annoying tiny surprised by that. I think in particular push to talk sort of misses the point. I mean, if you're looking at something like a small TV, for example, the he Timoti of Falfield voices that you don't need the remote control anymore than as a father of. Six children, you know, I can never find the remote controls, and that's one of my APs of ours. Fall voices concerned and having to find the remote control to push the button until into it doesn't really cut it for me. So I think versus pushed tool it's very clear that fields very important. Now having said that if the company's adulting voice interface, I think pushed to a sensible interim step because it's not just about the bit that we do. It's not just about the voice isolation. The contextual awareness. It's a tremendous amount of f on the user interface, which shouldn't be underestimated obviously, pushed it to gives you an opportunity to get that nailed before you at the at the fall field. So I can see why people do it taking that route. But really it's about fall field to to really deliver on the potential of the the small invoice interfaces that we work on and even the Amazon echo offers. Push talk is an alternative, which is useful particularly in testing environments. It actually makes me think of my my friend amid boozy runs a company in the states software development company called whittling go, and he wrote a book a couple years ago called don't make me tap. You know, this whole idea of field. You know, we think about it are definitely got a lot better in the NFL Hugh has gotten much much better. And that's those are critical. I think everyone recognizes that those were critical developments. But I think there's something else going on here in that the explosion in the use of voice, and sort of the next step level change after sort of people had gotten accustomed to series of sort of something in the background. They were using it. But they were only using it narrowly this idea that that smart speakers actually become training devices to reintroduce people voice did explain to them or introduced to them the broad set of use cases that they never they never even considered. Right. And so I look at like last year the in for a US listeners sort of the equivalent for Europe. If if you had a high end speaker product, low ends a little bit different. But if you had a high end speaker product, you're at IVA, and you didn't have voice there was really nothing to talk about. It's. It's essentially came from within two years from an interesting novelty to a must have feature any for anybody. In the audio space for this ambient auto audio type of solution show, the wig we characterize the emergence of voice in in three phases. I think the speak is definitely obviously the the entry product. And as you say, it's almost a must have is table stakes for many many, while speak accounts agrees, that voice voice interfaces, adding voice interfaces to existing categories is is really for me. At least the first phase of first phase of adoption. But I think that's whilst may not be proliferating yet in the market with with at least seeing things like yet. You know, TV's adopting voice interfaces seeing sound buzz voice interfaces and increasingly convergence products that some combination of TV sound bar and a set top box all including voice interfaces. So we're seeing that that in the sort of design. Funnel. If you like. And we'll see we'll say starting to see phase two which which I think he's characterized by somewhat more entrepreneurial ideas, where where you've got you know, what you power and potentially. You've got wifi adding outing voice interfaces to things like we have. We have a light switch designed, for example with the voice face. We have sun shade. Would you believe by Shane cross that has an moss? We we wrote about that. That was you. Yes. Yeah. Who knew you know, it's one of those things right? When you think about it? It's it's potentially, obviously entertainment, but also potentially if you think about the hospital industry, it's the way of wave ordering a drink. We don't want to get out from us online just wanted to get gin and tonic every every half an hour say whichever whatever it is. So some various different categories that starting to starting to introduce this kind of technology, and then phase three I think is what I would describe as Ambien voices everywhere. These ambient technology everywhere. This so much technology that the only way of dealing with it is by interacting using natural language interface. And at that point, I think the whole whole sort of consumer electronic space starts to ask the question that the currently the speaker people are asking, which is well, how could we exist without a voice interface. What else is there to sell out products that point United States any moment enormous market? So. Pretty exciting. Absolutely. So I would add into face to the way. I think about this too. I sort of go beyond Ambien. I think it's starting to be a catalyst for near field. Mike again, and in headphones your buds, hearing aids all getting voice assistance. And so it we talk about that proliferation. Are you seeing that as well for near field in the the in year over your devices? Yeah, let's no so much space at the moment, but Sunday in the next twelve to eighteen months will start to to look more closely at the the most of the wearable site it suddenly a market that we brush up against regularly. But the the space rain right now with mostly tethered products that we we hang on the end of the USB cable, or we have power of some other description, Allah flexibility gives a certain aspects certain capabilities in the small home small devices whether wearables devices have a slightly different set of requirements and primarily I'm talking here about delivering these kinds of processes. Thing loads very very low power. And at the moment, we don't have a platform for that. But by this time next year, we will got it yet, low power, low low processing overhead Sportin because of battery life. How do you see that playing out over time? I think there was a lot of discussion couple of years ago where largely by people who were skeptical about smart speakers ambient losing that you know, we're going to have the phone the watch that your buds. It's going to be voice is going to be a personal tool that people are going to us through their wearables and the devices that they have as opposed to in the places they have it. How do you see this playing out over time? What's going to be the general breakdown of usage in those different scenarios? So I think it's important to be able to walk between, for example, be your home in you'll call may continue to maintain a dialogue with with your voice assistant that would suggest something like an end budwood or a phone all some somewhere -able would be the the appropriate medium for that. But. I think there's a place for all of it to be to be to be honest. I think they'll be some use cases that will be appropriate for mobile phones, a car remember where I saw some statistics about how many people tend to to ditch them all phone as soon as they will consider home. They have some some psychological attachment between mobile phone work, and they distance themselves from it similarly, bedrooms bathrooms, and so on people don't tend to wearing electronics tend to be wearing wearables. So I think there's certain scenarios where for example, a static small home devices appropriate, and then this certain scenarios and things like where Ables and phones more appropriate. So I didn't really see the dominance of any one of those categories. I think they'll be insane really in the same way as their off today a mix of solutions, but important thing will be the continuity of the the user experience you can move between those spaces and those devices without encountering vastly different characteristics in the end the voice interface. Yeah, that's great. Okay. So let's let's transition a little bit. I wanna talk about some of the technical aspects. What you do because you have technical background. And I like to take it as you've that when that's an option, and I'm gonna read something from your website, which I don't normally do that often quoting marketing materials, but I thought this could help spur some discussion engineering that goes into making far field, voice recognition work. Here's what it said. So today, we detect voice commands accurately from across the room. Even busy environments when the person's speaking softly significant challenges in doing that. For example, the output of the device needs to adapt to the acoustic environment saw furnishings absorb noise, whereas hard surfaces reflect sound bouncing around the room. And of course, the user may be moving around the room while talking altering the quality of the voice feed added to it. There'll be a range of background noise, and the voice enabled device itself may already be playing music. So there's a lot in that statement. So that's why I thought. Could you break that down force a little bit? Just talk about the technology that goes into what Xmas does for these devices around voice. Yeah. She'll say the the null star is for a company like us to create a boom microphone experience. If you imagine you've got a room full of people and they're all wearing their own boom. Microphones a mic microphone directly under the nose. And all the other noise is is cancelled by virtue of the proximity of that microphone. So that's what we that's what we try to shoot for and conspires against us in many, many ways, and to some extent the consumer electronics devices themselves conspire against us. So the first thing is obviously in any environment is potentially noise, and I'm sat here in a meeting room with an conditioning unit above my head. So that's that's a fanny diffuse noise. But it's it's pretty noisy nonetheless. And that noise needs to be cancelled to give us that boom microphone experience. The second type of noise that we might experiences is a point. Annoy solution so distracted that we we will distract us something like, for example, if if I've got my Amazon echo and things got my echo unit. But but I'm actually listening to the TV in the kitchen. So so so the Amazon echo would need to deal with the fact that there is a persistent point noise souls, which it needs to eliminate in order to to to to hear that that voice without virtual boom microphone. So that say, that's point noise source. So we've got digger annoyed. I like, how do you? How do you limit it that is that really just frequency range? They're very sways of doing it one way is to actively direct to microphone. So we talk a lot about being foaming microphones and sound source separation being fully microphones bit like shining toll. She in the direction of sound that you want to listen to. So if you can imagine a sonic tool that the picked up noise from a particular clash light for my English list. Yeah. Flashlight so so that that can help obviously because he gives you a high gain comparatively high gain in the direction of the flashlight, so by definition, everything else's is attenuated. There's another which is another technique, which is always the inverse of that, which is an interference cancel where everything else every other direction gets a uniform gain except the direction of the interfering sound source which actually gets attenuated significantly. So that's like an inverse of that flashlight concert. Well, there's a third way which is sound so separation in my history, the beginning of these pace, I didn't mention that some between two thousand sixteen in two thousand eighteen we acquired a company Boston set technologies, and we acquired that company because they had a really really exciting sound so separation technology, which allows individuals essentially to be picked out in a room and listen to individually, so we could we could pick out. Three or four individuals in a noisy space and simply listened to their voices. As though they were wearing this microphone, and that uses a sound soil separation technology, which is a different technique, which basically breaks the soundscape down into individual pieces figures out, which pieces are related to one another and then puts them back together Cording to the source and eliminate sources that you don't want and amplifies those that you do so to human hearing. Right. I mean because humans can do this. Yeah. I mean, that's one of the challenges that she when you demoing this stuff we were mobile world congress last week in the NBA noise in in the room that we ran with seventy five. So it was a bit like custody having a truck next with its engine running. Right. But humans have really really good at this. You know, that's one of the one of the challenges of demoing this stuff is that, you know, you've got human beings in front of us saying, hey, you know, this stuff's not so hard. To do it from sort of signal processing techniques is a significant challenge. So that's one of the one of the sort of perceptions. That says sometimes we face is wrong. And I like to do this is called me that difficult. That's interesting. So what actually just sorta come back to your previous previous question about about source of noise? The one thing that we didn't touch on was was self noise was the fact that these units and five most of them make their own noise. Probably music in case of speaker. Of course, we have to eliminate that. And that school, but that's that allows people to everybody's familiar with ball in even if they don't know it by that name allows you to interrupt while speak is whilst they're playing music, and that's that's a significant challenge because you have to eliminate that music. And it's it's ridge inform. But also all of the reflections that hit all of the surfaces in the room, and that's cool an echo cancer. And that's where a lot of the horse power gets used up in these solutions. So bargin the biggest challenge I would say it's one of the biggest challenges, I think that bargin is. Is is technology that is proportional to the number of output channels? So if you've got a stereo image that you'll project into the room, you have to have echo consulates, each one of those those two channels, and obviously if you're talking about a surround sound system what you might have seven point one emitting into the room, then than in theory after co cancel this all of those channels to get a good user experience. So it becomes quite a significant problem as you scale the number of channels. Yes. Want to one of the key technologies, but it tights probably typically three four or five separate techniques to really really clean up an audio. An audio signal voice signal that's been recorded in a in a Reverbere noisy. Ring is high range, low range frequency more difficult. That's emotional. I'm qualified to answer that question. But typically low range frequency of isn't very directional. We tend to find that to some extent you can ignore the low range free. Quincy's and the will be tolerant to us doing that. So for example, being fully with struggle to eliminate low range noise because it would be it would appear to come from every direction. So you can use techniques that said that that eliminate those low frequencies before sending the voice to the speech recognition by kens. But says aside sliding be all night my expertise to come into much on that while despite your protest actions. You did answer the questions we'll take. All right. So let's talk about on device versus cloud, speech recognition. I don't know if you mentioned today, but I know you you've done work with VS, Alexa, voice service. It's clearly cloud-based maybe some others as well. You talk. I think on your website or some of your material talk about kid AI for local how do you think about those in terms of your system, and how you work with the s are a really good question. I think there's there's three Hase's to consider. We'll see those, you know, the cloud base case, which will very familiar with. There's a hybrid which has some Esau capability, local and some in the cloud, and they mail rate, the local capability male parade offline so when there's no cloud connection or male rate as a FOSS respond to well known queries, and it will defer to the cloud for things that that it can't address locally. And then this purely off-line, which has used cases some use cases based on Welt, depending on what set technology deploy. If you put some some sort of heavy iron processing. Flying than Oviously or addressing any privacy. Consents? You might have fast speech going into the cloud or you might use a somewhat less capable processing device, but just have a very small dictionary. That is perfectly reasonable for something like a light switch, for example. I think the problem because when you transition I think I've had a convincing case full equality user experience where you flip between low dictionary local implementation of estate, very rich natural user interface online. I think that managing the user experience through that transition is problematic. So I think that's one one limitation of this hybrid mixing of owning off-line right now. Most of the hybrid is being used for wake word right so awake. Where locally maybe you also verify it in the cloud, but think of wake word locally. And then all the other queries are cloud that seems to be a pretty good use case. I'm not familiar with anybody who's doing. Well, actually, I do know. Somebody's doing. I think I think it's fair to say that some of the work that Mercedes does in the car does do this type of negotiation between what types of queries. It's gonna handle locally versus which it's going to send off to the cloud and have something like how to so. Yeah, I think what's his is a great example of use case, which is quite safety conscious. So, you know, having a fully online experience. He's very limiting, and tens of what it can be useful in automated context do need some local processing capability, so he's a good use case the other one that I've heard Cullman league quoted as if you're if you will in the presence of a robot the domestic Roble or a service Roble in store, for example, and you shout stall, you don't want to go to the cloud to determine what you actually meant by that camman you wanted to actually to stop moving. So there are certain cases around security. I think where I think it makes sense to have a very school dictionary. But the transition between the flying on the online dictionary has to be carefully managed to thing. Yeah. Yeah. I do that. That's that would take a lot of attention. I could manage imagine over time. So what is your expectation going for in terms of cloud based versus offline and local do expect the vast majority of the solutions to really focus on this cloud base solution because of the robustness of it or do you see a future where we're gonna have so many of these devices with voice interaction, many of which you don't want to always have to have wifi connection or persistent or that maybe that's not necessary because narrow vocabulary is going to be more important where you thinking about this in terms of how it's gonna play out local versus cloud. So I think first of all I think they'll be some countries that will just have local dictionaries. But that kind of you know, they'll be limited in scope, they'll be they'll have a limited amounts of functionality on probably below end of the mall kit things, I'd like switches, and so on in terms of connected components. I think there's two architectures that the will prevail. One is. Weather's local intelligence. So there's some sort of a hub and amongst out customer base was seeing competition for ownership of that that entity. So that could potentially run I SA locally it could run a off-line ISR reasonably ritual. Flonase ARIN deferred to the cloud on certain occasions. I think that's valid architecture where you've got sort of Central Intelligence in the home, potentially in the car. And then this the case where you get what you devote to the cloud all the time. And that's really the model that we're in now. And I think that's okay. And it depends certain geographies feel better about that than others. I think in the west we tend to concern us a little bit more with security in our experience in China is less concerns. And consequently, the always connected WI fi abled everything is more of a tractable solution for them. But I think today's market is really all about everything connected to the cloud as say this in the customer base now designed funnel. We starting to see hybrid products. That are starting to try to dominate the small hob- space. But that's that's yet to shake out. I think that makes sense now I have had previous gas talk about China and India particular when you get outside the large cities where the the lower reliability of broadband connections has potential to undermine some of these in Home Solutions, and that's why they're focused more on LT EBay solutions, if they're going to do cloud and everything else might have more local processing because if the natural wifi. But if the internet connection is down than there. Centrally nonfunctional, and I even had a conversation with an Emma's on executive. It's ES in twenty eight teen said that they're looking at ways that they can make the echo functional even if internet goes out, so we'll see where that goes ahead. Another thing I noticed on your website. What looked exactly like Deutsche Telekom's, magenta, smart speaker? What did you do for them? So we collaborated with a I'm being slightly hesitant because this is in the public domain. We liberated with frown Hoffa only microphone design for that. Okay. Great. Hey, own just on the microphone design, you mention that when we talk about the beam forming linear verse circular, how do you have to handle those differently? It's really just a question of refining, the owner them, so the don't change dramatically. So obviously a lot of the mall case to microphone at the moments. So to Mike offensively is all you'll be leading role circular. But when we've spent most of all time is focusing on what we perceive to be more of a trend, which is towards Linnea microphones, the the thesis that was Linnea microphones fit well into flat services and most consumer electronics actually is flat against the wall. And we had a particular island smart TV's when we when we were thinking about this. So we weren't interested in the sort of coq candidates. That's being napping quite successful. Late in the small speaker space, but we were interested in other categories. And if you look at white Goodson TV's and sound balls and so on they typically flat surfaces. They haven't won eighty degree range of of interest. If you will and that set favors Alenia solution. So the algorithms broadly, speaking out rhythms of the same. They adopt differently. A secular microphone, obviously has a capability sweeping three hundred sixty degree range, typically Linnea microphone aliases front and back. So you'll have one hundred and eighty degrees. But you gotta tell whether it's in front or behind the array, but in the electric that we that we've fitted into that's not relevant because behind is wall. So it's it's generally better addressing as a say, no flat Pinal solutions, and we didn't have a secular. In fact, we talked about and they using secure, right? And obviously we have a product roadmap as well. But most of success is being because we made that selection to focus on Linea microphone analyze. Yeah. That makes glass I question. Okay. So for those of you listeners who really didn't want to talk about the technology. We're moving on to use cases. And one of the things Mark that you said an interview this year was getting rid of the remote control is among the strongest use cases for voice technology, and you just mentioned that ago. So let's talk about that. Like, why is in particular? It's it's it's more than just losing the micro misplacing, the remote, right? Yes. It is. I think just a moment ago when we touched on this one of the things that quite often if a customer is new to this kind of technology, and they know they want voice interface, but they don't they haven't pressed through from from front to back as it were the thing that often gets forgotten is the user experience needs needs quite a bit of attention and. For things like TV's, and and boxes, and so on this one thing to be able to capture the voice and to understand the words that were being spoken. But to actually reflect that meaningfully in the user interfaces is is quite a different problem. So we just have to make sure that those customers are aware that they need to consider that from the early days, and essentially typical customer engagement for us done. This a few times. Now is we tend to be involved with the the the design right from the conception will do evaluations and testing with customers, and then will pretty much hold a hand through the whole process. Generally, speaking introduce the back end, the SA provider at some point as well just to make sure that all of the interfaces required to work together to make an excellent voice interface in place says quite an involved process. Yeah. That makes sense to me. I wonder too like how is this different weather? It's pushed to talk which we talked about earlier or far field voice. I have both in my house because I exp-. A lot of things. My set-top box provided my cable provider has a push to talk option, which is great. If the remote is near you. And then I have a one of the fire TV cubes which is far field, which also has a remote with push push to talk. So you've got both options there. How do you think about those differently? Or are you only working in the far field with your customers? Yeah. We only work in the fall field. So we really actually when we counts customer this doing push tool. We generally feel pretty positive about that because the transition from pushed to a fall field voice interface is significantly easier. Because generally speaking that customer who's gone through the thought process of what does it mean to make voice interface, a really good experience of the customer, and then the step from from push the tool to field and significantly easier. One thing that we're all seeing which I think is kind of an interesting development is third step which is having a fall field. Remote control unit, which is sensually a another step towards a built-in fall field. But actually means that you can leave the remote control unit on the on the I'm gonna use another English. Click rotel mental peace only beneath the TV, and you can use a fall voice interface. You know, if you don't if you don't want to hold the thing in your hand. So I think there's a few purchase hit. But the ultimate destination is a is a fall voice interface. I think can push the tool tactical approach and to to segment the problem. But as the utility of fall field is demonstrably bathroom using a push to remote so controls televisions. A lot of sense that that's of interest to you. You're doing a lot of work in that space. What are some other use cases for ambient and far field voice that you think are going to really drive voice adoption going forward? Yeah. It's a good question. I think there's a there's a lot of examples some of them quite cookie. You know, we talked about shade Croft as a as an example of you know, I would say very full with thinking. Company in in. What would otherwise be a one might think? Low tech space thing they've so carefully about use case and very specific market in that case of hospitality market. I then you've go to think about this thing from room to room. So I would say the kitchen in the kitchen, we've Oviously small speakers. They've they've really carved out place in the kitchen, but we're now starting to see you may have seen the G voice enabled crooked hood that has an X most off field microphone in that was launched at CS this year. That's a good use cases. It's directly above the the cooking surfaces has the ability to shine a camera down onto the cooking surfaces all towards the user. And clearly you can you can deliver content to that. Use a Welsh there is and tans of busy, which you think is one of the key qualifiers to to to the the compelling. Very compelling use cases speakers and and cook a hoods in the kitchen. I think obviously there's within something like a pantry than. The price of lights, which is the most appropriate lamp shades. Would you believe unites Scott power, it has generally speaking good line of sight to the entire room? So that's not such a city idea either lamps in light shades. And then washing machines, if I'm carrying mouldering to the washing machine, I wanna say from the dole because once again, my hands of busy, those kinds of things that perhaps not the not the most obvious most charismatic, but they have they have genuine utility, and you can walk through the house and figure out case OMB in my boss from well. I kinda like being having a quick catch up on using my boss from so we can see now we're seeing smart mirrors in the bedroom that the the the the along clock and so on and so forth. So there's I think there's a number of use cases in the home, and then Oviously outside of the home in office environment things, I it conditioning units typically out of reach and people have playing with them. So voice interface won't conditioning unit is is a smart move. We talked to some companies about the broader category of human sensing in work. Spaces. So that we can control not just the conditioning, but also lighting and so on so. Different use cases in different parts of our lives to motive as well. So this thing lots and lots of use cases where there's obvious utility right up until the tipping point where if anything needs to be directed with. Then everybody expects to have a user voice interface often often liken it to. Touchscreen suppose came on the scene. My my children was three to five years old. And they said we'll catchable a ton of visions television sets in the store and put their grubby fingers on it and swipe, and it was it was a natural expectation that was the that was ubiquitous user interface. And I think the same thing will be true voice into you mentioned a number of use cases. They're all utilitarian, not really conversational, but voice command oriented. How do you see that developing in terms of conversational versus command? Oh, I think so I guess my underlying premises not going to need ten of these things in every room, but you are going to want to carry on a conversation with your eye with your voice assistant throughout your home. So I think whilst easy to argue that a light switch intrinsically doesn't need to have a natural language interface. If it's the only voice assistant point in a in a room. Then the argument is well in order to have a consistent conversation with a voice assistant throughout the home. Then yes, it does. Need a natural language into. Case, right. That makes. So let me ask you a question, then so this brings up this other point, and I don't know if you've worked with Sonos or not, but so famously said two years ago that they were going to put who will Sistan and Amazon Alexa in the same device. Also allow you to access Siri is that a good idea. I think yes. And no. So I think it's a good idea. Because. If you're thinking purely from the consumer's perspective the consumer wants to access those fraud. I said the great the companies that deliver great technology and great. Great use cases. But. I don't wanna have to access those through four different speakers on my kitchen kitchen table. So from a from a user experience I'd like to have one device, and I'd like to be able to speak to those things now one trend where observing in in the third party space. And when I say third party, I'm talking about the non Amazon's and the non giggles jammies. And so on but companies that were existing brands that retrofitting voice interfaces to the categories that they already selling those companies want to put their own voice assistant alongside one of the either Google Amazon all whichever which company they want to ally themselves to and so then then you end up with somewhat schizophrenic device which shown if you say Alexa than that. I was in response. If you say, whatever their own key. What is then their own Irish funds? And so you've got this this branding conflict and right from the get-go. And I think that's just you know, if you had more and more different is to that with different keywords steering. Capability studies just gonna get worse. And it's just gonna result in a police or experience. So I think some point in the future in the may be somewhat heretical. But at some point in the future, I think there's going to be an intermediary. Let's going to be a digital Butler if you will or a digital twins. We've sometimes cooled it that sits between you. And and you know, I was in Google and the thousands of other is going to be competing for your attention is essentially protecting your attention. Your attention span whilst giving you access to all of the benefits of these various different providers. So one voice assistant concept is interesting. So we talked about precedes earlier and the US actually does Xs got nuance and how to find the back end. Now, all the people who have that architecture. But it it reminds me of my interview with that chair last November Adams, the one of the co founders of Siri and co-founder vivid which was later quired by Samsung, and they were really adamant about this sort of one. Voice assistant concept, and that people need that that otherwise there's going to be too much. And is I think about the Facebook did this with Alexa, longside in largely because Facebook voice interface wasn't robust enough to meet basic consumer expectations. And so Alexa gets in the game. Jingo and France by orange who is the same thing. They they they spent two years and realized that they were just going to be too narrow Sumer expectations. So they put Alexa on there as well. The sort of say, well, at least it's Alexa device. So you know, when we think about this. Then you really believe that we're gonna lead towards this single voice assistant, which is going to be personal. And then that's going to negotiate all our interactions with other assistance. Yeah. I think that's a possible future. I struggled with the idea that the the existing players going to dominate this space on an individual level in into the into the distant future. Whether it's five years ten years fifteen years, but some I think this is going to be so important that it's. Not going to be something that people will see to a particular play unless they have a very special relationship, and that relationship might well be it might even be a business to consumer kind of subscription relationship. A bit light. We have with all mobile handsets where you know, there was a contract, and it's well-known by both sides. And it's well, it's well, trusted people understand what the business model is that comfortable with it. So I think that there is the potential maybe that's already play in in the in in other forms of communication that could take that role. Maybe it's one of the existing vendors that can that can dominate that space. But my suspicion is going to be another party that's going to sit between between the user and all of these competing is protecting the privacy and security and also making sure that any information that they get that use it gets his timely relevant and not not an interruption to their everyday lives to think it'll be one party that gets dominant national or. Global market share. That's sort of the personal assistant that people use to connect assistance, or do you think there's going to be a number of those? And they all have this ability to connect to a lot of back ends. I think I think you'll be a number of them. You know, I think one I guess a number of clauses of company, you might pick out that could potentially do this. And suddenly, you know, wouldn't completely eliminate the idea that it might be Google or or an Amazon or a one of the other existing businesses in this space tool, but you know, you can imagine the telcos doing it. You can imagine all the service providers doing it. Other companies with subscription relationships with consumers could step into that space and claim some sort of moral high ground, if you will that would enable them to to be the the protectors of consumer data and privacy, and so on and also their attention or maybe a new play I'm tempted to think about. L in in in the nineties was the window on the internet until companies like mosaic Netscape came along democratized access to the internet and created enormous off gene ities for through other companies to to to help people access the the enormity of information that was there. I think there's a tremendous amount of Pachuca see between the the current state of voice. And and where it could go as a as a fully democratized access to to the internet and all of the, you know, the intelligence that resides there. Well, there you haven't the future of oyster systens singly summed up by Mark lip that I appreciate you taking so much time today, the share your background tell the Xmas story to the voice by audience. How can our listeners? Learn more about the company follow up with you track on social media. What's the best way for them to stay engaged? Well, actual still comb is going to be the the access point that would lead to the others. I'm on linked to in of course. And more than happy to have people reach out to me owning and starting conversation. That'd be great from. Okay. That's great. You one more thing. I just wanted to. Thank you feel time as well. It was great comb sation enjoyed it. Well, I appreciate everyone spending time and sharing the thoughts with the audience. And then, you know, as I've told many people I learned something every week. It's one of my favorite things. I've done. Over eighty of these now, so that's eighty consecutive weeks of doing this. But boy, it's eliminating for me. So I definitely appreciate it. And for those of you wanna find these things, we'll do the show notes, we'll do some links for you an Xmas X M O S dot com. So just in case you're wondering how that translates into the URL world. So thank you very much Marcle pet for spending so much time today. I'm Brechin sell. You can find me on the Twitter at brick and sell checkout voice about that voice. About says on Alexa, and Google assistant to get a daily update. We also have a flash briefing. You guys know all of these things and checkout research, we got some new research out on smart speaker option in the US and Australia coming out soon. So you will see the most in depth analysis of of how people are using these. How many they have what they think about? Them and come back next week. We have another mazing guests lined up. Thanks a lot Margaret appreciate spend some time today. Thank you.

Alexa Amazon United States Google China CEO apple Mark lapel Sean weathers Mark Mike Marc Lopez Oviously Ignace
Mark Lippett CEO of XMOS on the Chips that Make Voice Assistants Work - Voicebot Podcast Ep 87

The Voicebot Podcast

53:17 min | 2 years ago

Mark Lippett CEO of XMOS on the Chips that Make Voice Assistants Work - Voicebot Podcast Ep 87

"Pizazz number eighty seven of the voice podcast, today's guest, Mark lapel CEO of Xmas. Welcome back for about nation. We have a great guest today. Marc Lopez is CEO of ex-boss they make the chips in bed. It software that enable voice interactions on a wide variety of devices ranging from smart speakers, too, smart, TV's and remote controls. We often focus in this show voices system and what they can do today. We learn about the enabling layer in the role that hardware plays. I think you're really going to like it before we get to Mark. I have a quick listener shout. Sean weathers from jargon left us a five star review on the Alexis. Skill store for our flash briefing called voiced by daily. So he says I quote, I listen to the voice by podcast. Religiously and love the insights, it brings from conversations with our friends in the voice community voiced by daily is a great supplement to that. It's an excellent way to quickly get the voice industry news. I need to know start my day. No other source provides this convenience in value to me, great job, and quote, there you have it. You Alexa, fans can add voice daily as a flash briefing and get a daily one. Minute summary of the top story of the day. You can also just say anytime Alexa, or hey, Google launch voice. Bot says you'll hear the same content, and you can hear it and sequence. So check both those out. But in particular, if you use flash briefings, you should set that up because it's really quick. And you get information that'll be useful to you. Thank you so much, Shawn. I appreciate your view in the comments. If you the listener today, leave us review and the Alexa skills store and the Google action directory or an apple podcasts you to make it a shout out on the voice podcast. Okay. It's time for our interview with Mark lapel of ex-boss, so Markle bet joined ex- moss in two thousand six is vice president of engineering was later promoted to COO and then CEO about three years ago before Xmas Mark was CTO co-founder of silicon IP and better software provider Ignace earlier in his career. He was a network systems engineer, Texas Instruments, Mark work, Mark earned an MBA from Henley management college in a master's engineering for electrical. And electric engineering at the university of Surrey, Mark lapel. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thanks very much for having me. Well, I'm gonna have you. We don't normally talk about hardware. We have a few times. But we tend to talk more about software, and, you know, the big voice systems, and then design and a lot of different things. So I was really intrigued when I saw some news coverage of Xmas around CS, and I thought, wow, it we're long overdue to have a good hardware and systems level discussion for voice by listeners. Okay. Well, glad to oblige her great. So I think good place to start is ex-boss Leno talk about what the company does. And how you came to work there. Sure. Well, so I I'm this is going away back as you say two thousand six I exited my company Ignace you mentioned in the intro there. I had a youthful summer off during which the then CEO of ex-boss goading contact with me. Looking for somebody to run the engineering team? The company was really small. I was employee number six I've known the CEO for many years. We could friends I was very happy to join. It was also no Pacino with David May who's one of the prominent compute, scientists avow era. So I was very very happy to very closely with him in the Elliot's too. So around two thousand six I guess Q three two thousand six I joined the company company funded series funded in two thousand seven as you mentioned where we're hardway company. Business model is to sell silicon chips and software and development of silicon chips is somewhat capital intensive and takes a little bit of time. We were out in the mall kits in round two thousand nine with how novel microcontroller I'll check and the problem that we were solving was that consumer electronics designers in particular, very constraints by the platforms that were available to them firstly, very cost constrained in general, as we will know the. To some extent those calls contrite constraints driven them into a welding, which like it really only by me too products. So they they've been forced into situation where they couldn't really differentiate end products. And so we had a solution novel microcontroller architecture that allow those kinds of engine is to continue developing sea-based solutions, but to create really really differentiated products right from the show, so they could actually Ryo and protocols in software and change the hog way of a heavier that designs while still say writes in control software and DSP to right. The the high level application so we about to market almost immediately involved in in the audio space. It was around the time that file was being dropped from books and the procedure. Rodeo business was was heavily dependent on MAC books. And and consequently on fire y an apple was suggesting that that community needed to use US VDI to that wasn't a available chipset for that. But we had this platform. Technology that's them suited to fos spin for a new kind of interface class. And and we have we were in the market in a number of months and the rest is really history. We've dominated that USB multi business pretty much ever since alongside that obviously built significant audio expertise during which time we we observed the emergence of voice around about two thousand and two thousand fourteen we started to see some about customers using the solution for rain microphones, so taking our software that that we'd written for platform, but modifying it to use to interface to numerous microphones. And it was almost I think two or three months later, the Amazon launch the echo, and we decided that decided that that point that the audio space that we'd been in just grown by factor of ten or hundred and really have been doubling down on voice voice ever since. So what percentage of your current businesses voice related? So it's about between ten and twenty percent about current business. But it's it's. Comfortably growing growth rate is very strong right now. So we've been we've had revenue in the voice space. So this is selling those chips, we voice voice specific foam where embedded within them. So we've been doing that since two thousand seventeen and we grew substantially in two thousand eighteen when we expect to grow substantially again. That's that call of business this year and beyond and what about audio general what percent of your businesses audio based? So it does vary. Little the audio business that we're in is is mentioned, it's the procedure space is quite quite a mature market. It's very demanding. And so we've we built a reputation for quality in the years that we've been playing in that space, which is paying dividends in the voice face. But it's eighty percent. I would say, okay. Yeah. So really significance. So between the two. That's most your business. Correct. Yeah. We have some. So the the platform that we developed back in the early years is almost entirely general purpose. It doesn't apply. From the sort of performance in the cost footprint. It's not specifically dedicated tools audio it can do many many other things. So we have a very active community of uses using the technology full also things from toys to to robots but as far as our own Goto market emphasis is concerned. It's really all about audio and increasingly about voice, right? So I think it's correct to say, you're a fabulous semiconductor company. That's right. And so explain to the voice by listeners. What does that mean? Well, that means is that some we don't own manufacturing capabilities. So I wear somewhat rice mile when I'm saying this. But if you're being successful as a fabulous semiconductor company, you really have a seal products. So we ask. A five a chip five to to manufacture wafers for us using our design. We also them to ship that those waivers to to act Jim company packages tests, south design chips, we then send those chips to logistics company, which is another third party. And then we instruct that logistics company to sell to send those chips to customers. So we we all right. The entire supply chain arms, and what that means for us is business is that primarily will business traits in intellectual property as primarily engineers the hospice business, right? So in this case, your customers actually do buy chips from you then. But you you don't manufacture them you send the design to somebody else and you coordinate that that product will be shipped to your customer. That's right. Yeah. So those chips get shit with ex-boss written on the on the lid, and right and the bed. It software that you supply is is your only software. The software that runs on the chip that. Shipped with the chip or do you have other embedded software that you sell is an add on. Typically, we can do either. So, but but the vast majority of the of the self way that we foams Paul about product is software that runs on the on the the x moss chips themselves. So we have in the past and licensed technology that might for example, run on the laptop. So, you know, USB multi channel host, for example. And but primarily out our IP our expertise is really about deeply Betty technologies in the in the end product. And so what are some examples of products that Xmas technology is in out in the market today? Okay. So while looking at the voice space in particular, the there's a fantastic Tiffany sound ball wherein. There is a free box delta, which you're if you've seen that that was released a few months ago, set a box a convergence product to set a home hub, a wireless speaker that's being marketed to the French market at the moment. Primarily without some allow they plans to expand just picking another category at random you may have seen the pillow health human wellness robot. That's being mocked by black and decker that has an X most voice solution in it. We have a TV accessory with sky with in China with the next most voice, so they Shen and numerous conferencing products from from Alexis elaborate s- and an EMMY China as well. So we have many actually many provex already in the field fine launch. They've mo-. They've quite recently been introduced over the loss of six to nine months. Okay. Yeah. And we have written about pillow health and black Deckers prio product, which is the exact same thing. Exactly. Which which flagging decker was upset that we wanted out that it was just basically a new label on the exact thing ridiculous. It's the same. Isn't it? It's fine perfectly fine strategy to do that because they're focused on other things than black and decker head sort of a mixed history in terms of acquisitions and building products that it was a good way for them to get into that market. But in any event, we digress. So just sort of at the high level, though, you know, we're talking about you getting into voice and some of these other applications devices, his it surprised you how popular smart speakers of them. Yes. It has. I think it's one of those things I think it's one of those technologies where you know, you whilst whilst the in the early days, at least, I'm really only open the door, a crack, you know, there was lots of potential for improvement in those those early products looking beyond that was was clear clearly a tremendous amount of potential. I think I think what's most being surprising is the rate of adoption not not the fact that the with selling millions of products that was always going to happen. But it's happened over a comparatively short space time. And he's really gross the public's mind chair. I used to back in the day back in two thousand fourteen you know, part of the pitch I would take around companies would be, you know, of you heard of this voice thing, it's pretty important. It's coming you need to be prepared for it. You know? That's that's part of my presentation. I absolutely don't need to to give any more. It's really more about where voices going to be found next. And is it just gonna be voices? It going to be voice plus contextual awareness, and so on and so forth. So you know, it's been a tremendous help to us really that the adoption has been as quick as it has. I still think that the the hype is bigger than the market right now. But I said anything that we're seeing we're seeing that turn around and what really starting to see the market start to arrive just done. The smart speaker side. Obviously, we see I've got some new data out or we'll have it out shortly this publishes. I will have it out that the adoption rate in the US is about a little over twenty six percent of US adults. So it's sixty six million is a size of that. And that does not include necessarily other. Devices setup boxes right bars things like that. Most people don't characterize smart speakers that verse odes, even so lightly broader than that. And and what I what I see there is that in the UK Germany little bit behind that couple. Other markets are actually going to jump ahead of the US this year, which I thought was interesting, but yet really really popular in the I think for someone like you say that you never questioned it. But when it happened you were surprised at the the pace of Dopp Shen. And I wonder if I wonder what? I wonder what your reaction would be. If I said that the rate of adoption of voice in general right now has been catalyzed more by the introduction of far field voice than it has in recent advances in SR the viewpoint is one that we show. I'm actually seeing some data behinds behind that one about customers has a number of products in the market. I would say they all but so maybe number in the market with. So it's across the range of costs points with pushed tool with NIA field microphones with field microphones, and their vacation has been that's off microphones is being used by mole individuals within a family context will say more frequently than than the push to token field variant. So I'm not annoying tiny surprised by that. I think in particular push to talk sort of misses the point. I mean, if you're looking at something like a small TV, for example, the he Timoti of Falfield voices that you don't need the remote control anymore than as a father of. Six children, you know, I can never find the remote controls, and that's one of my APs of ours. Fall voices concerned and having to find the remote control to push the button until into it doesn't really cut it for me. So I think versus pushed tool it's very clear that fields very important. Now having said that if the company's adulting voice interface, I think pushed to a sensible interim step because it's not just about the bit that we do. It's not just about the voice isolation. The contextual awareness. It's a tremendous amount of f on the user interface, which shouldn't be underestimated obviously, pushed it to gives you an opportunity to get that nailed before you at the at the fall field. So I can see why people do it taking that route. But really it's about fall field to to really deliver on the potential of the the small invoice interfaces that we work on and even the Amazon echo offers. Push talk is an alternative, which is useful particularly in testing environments. It actually makes me think of my my friend amid boozy runs a company in the states software development company called whittling go, and he wrote a book a couple years ago called don't make me tap. You know, this whole idea of field. You know, we think about it are definitely got a lot better in the NFL Hugh has gotten much much better. And that's those are critical. I think everyone recognizes that those were critical developments. But I think there's something else going on here in that the explosion in the use of voice, and sort of the next step level change after sort of people had gotten accustomed to series of sort of something in the background. They were using it. But they were only using it narrowly this idea that that smart speakers actually become training devices to reintroduce people voice did explain to them or introduced to them the broad set of use cases that they never they never even considered. Right. And so I look at like last year the in for a US listeners sort of the equivalent for Europe. If if you had a high end speaker product, low ends a little bit different. But if you had a high end speaker product, you're at IVA, and you didn't have voice there was really nothing to talk about. It's. It's essentially came from within two years from an interesting novelty to a must have feature any for anybody. In the audio space for this ambient auto audio type of solution show, the wig we characterize the emergence of voice in in three phases. I think the speak is definitely obviously the the entry product. And as you say, it's almost a must have is table stakes for many many, while speak accounts agrees, that voice voice interfaces, adding voice interfaces to existing categories is is really for me. At least the first phase of first phase of adoption. But I think that's whilst may not be proliferating yet in the market with with at least seeing things like yet. You know, TV's adopting voice interfaces seeing sound buzz voice interfaces and increasingly convergence products that some combination of TV sound bar and a set top box all including voice interfaces. So we're seeing that that in the sort of design. Funnel. If you like. And we'll see we'll say starting to see phase two which which I think he's characterized by somewhat more entrepreneurial ideas, where where you've got you know, what you power and potentially. You've got wifi adding outing voice interfaces to things like we have. We have a light switch designed, for example with the voice face. We have sun shade. Would you believe by Shane cross that has an moss? We we wrote about that. That was you. Yes. Yeah. Who knew you know, it's one of those things right? When you think about it? It's it's potentially, obviously entertainment, but also potentially if you think about the hospital industry, it's the way of wave ordering a drink. We don't want to get out from us online just wanted to get gin and tonic every every half an hour say whichever whatever it is. So some various different categories that starting to starting to introduce this kind of technology, and then phase three I think is what I would describe as Ambien voices everywhere. These ambient technology everywhere. This so much technology that the only way of dealing with it is by interacting using natural language interface. And at that point, I think the whole whole sort of consumer electronic space starts to ask the question that the currently the speaker people are asking, which is well, how could we exist without a voice interface. What else is there to sell out products that point United States any moment enormous market? So. Pretty exciting. Absolutely. So I would add into face to the way. I think about this too. I sort of go beyond Ambien. I think it's starting to be a catalyst for near field. Mike again, and in headphones your buds, hearing aids all getting voice assistance. And so it we talk about that proliferation. Are you seeing that as well for near field in the the in year over your devices? Yeah, let's no so much space at the moment, but Sunday in the next twelve to eighteen months will start to to look more closely at the the most of the wearable site it suddenly a market that we brush up against regularly. But the the space rain right now with mostly tethered products that we we hang on the end of the USB cable, or we have power of some other description, Allah flexibility gives a certain aspects certain capabilities in the small home small devices whether wearables devices have a slightly different set of requirements and primarily I'm talking here about delivering these kinds of processes. Thing loads very very low power. And at the moment, we don't have a platform for that. But by this time next year, we will got it yet, low power, low low processing overhead Sportin because of battery life. How do you see that playing out over time? I think there was a lot of discussion couple of years ago where largely by people who were skeptical about smart speakers ambient losing that you know, we're going to have the phone the watch that your buds. It's going to be voice is going to be a personal tool that people are going to us through their wearables and the devices that they have as opposed to in the places they have it. How do you see this playing out over time? What's going to be the general breakdown of usage in those different scenarios? So I think it's important to be able to walk between, for example, be your home in you'll call may continue to maintain a dialogue with with your voice assistant that would suggest something like an end budwood or a phone all some somewhere -able would be the the appropriate medium for that. But. I think there's a place for all of it to be to be to be honest. I think they'll be some use cases that will be appropriate for mobile phones, a car remember where I saw some statistics about how many people tend to to ditch them all phone as soon as they will consider home. They have some some psychological attachment between mobile phone work, and they distance themselves from it similarly, bedrooms bathrooms, and so on people don't tend to wearing electronics tend to be wearing wearables. So I think there's certain scenarios where for example, a static small home devices appropriate, and then this certain scenarios and things like where Ables and phones more appropriate. So I didn't really see the dominance of any one of those categories. I think they'll be insane really in the same way as their off today a mix of solutions, but important thing will be the continuity of the the user experience you can move between those spaces and those devices without encountering vastly different characteristics in the end the voice interface. Yeah, that's great. Okay. So let's let's transition a little bit. I wanna talk about some of the technical aspects. What you do because you have technical background. And I like to take it as you've that when that's an option, and I'm gonna read something from your website, which I don't normally do that often quoting marketing materials, but I thought this could help spur some discussion engineering that goes into making far field, voice recognition work. Here's what it said. So today, we detect voice commands accurately from across the room. Even busy environments when the person's speaking softly significant challenges in doing that. For example, the output of the device needs to adapt to the acoustic environment saw furnishings absorb noise, whereas hard surfaces reflect sound bouncing around the room. And of course, the user may be moving around the room while talking altering the quality of the voice feed added to it. There'll be a range of background noise, and the voice enabled device itself may already be playing music. So there's a lot in that statement. So that's why I thought. Could you break that down force a little bit? Just talk about the technology that goes into what Xmas does for these devices around voice. Yeah. She'll say the the null star is for a company like us to create a boom microphone experience. If you imagine you've got a room full of people and they're all wearing their own boom. Microphones a mic microphone directly under the nose. And all the other noise is is cancelled by virtue of the proximity of that microphone. So that's what we that's what we try to shoot for and conspires against us in many, many ways, and to some extent the consumer electronics devices themselves conspire against us. So the first thing is obviously in any environment is potentially noise, and I'm sat here in a meeting room with an conditioning unit above my head. So that's that's a fanny diffuse noise. But it's it's pretty noisy nonetheless. And that noise needs to be cancelled to give us that boom microphone experience. The second type of noise that we might experiences is a point. Annoy solution so distracted that we we will distract us something like, for example, if if I've got my Amazon echo and things got my echo unit. But but I'm actually listening to the TV in the kitchen. So so so the Amazon echo would need to deal with the fact that there is a persistent point noise souls, which it needs to eliminate in order to to to to hear that that voice without virtual boom microphone. So that say, that's point noise source. So we've got digger annoyed. I like, how do you? How do you limit it that is that really just frequency range? They're very sways of doing it one way is to actively direct to microphone. So we talk a lot about being foaming microphones and sound source separation being fully microphones bit like shining toll. She in the direction of sound that you want to listen to. So if you can imagine a sonic tool that the picked up noise from a particular clash light for my English list. Yeah. Flashlight so so that that can help obviously because he gives you a high gain comparatively high gain in the direction of the flashlight, so by definition, everything else's is attenuated. There's another which is another technique, which is always the inverse of that, which is an interference cancel where everything else every other direction gets a uniform gain except the direction of the interfering sound source which actually gets attenuated significantly. So that's like an inverse of that flashlight concert. Well, there's a third way which is sound so separation in my history, the beginning of these pace, I didn't mention that some between two thousand sixteen in two thousand eighteen we acquired a company Boston set technologies, and we acquired that company because they had a really really exciting sound so separation technology, which allows individuals essentially to be picked out in a room and listen to individually, so we could we could pick out. Three or four individuals in a noisy space and simply listened to their voices. As though they were wearing this microphone, and that uses a sound soil separation technology, which is a different technique, which basically breaks the soundscape down into individual pieces figures out, which pieces are related to one another and then puts them back together Cording to the source and eliminate sources that you don't want and amplifies those that you do so to human hearing. Right. I mean because humans can do this. Yeah. I mean, that's one of the challenges that she when you demoing this stuff we were mobile world congress last week in the NBA noise in in the room that we ran with seventy five. So it was a bit like custody having a truck next with its engine running. Right. But humans have really really good at this. You know, that's one of the one of the challenges of demoing this stuff is that, you know, you've got human beings in front of us saying, hey, you know, this stuff's not so hard. To do it from sort of signal processing techniques is a significant challenge. So that's one of the one of the sort of perceptions. That says sometimes we face is wrong. And I like to do this is called me that difficult. That's interesting. So what actually just sorta come back to your previous previous question about about source of noise? The one thing that we didn't touch on was was self noise was the fact that these units and five most of them make their own noise. Probably music in case of speaker. Of course, we have to eliminate that. And that school, but that's that allows people to everybody's familiar with ball in even if they don't know it by that name allows you to interrupt while speak is whilst they're playing music, and that's that's a significant challenge because you have to eliminate that music. And it's it's ridge inform. But also all of the reflections that hit all of the surfaces in the room, and that's cool an echo cancer. And that's where a lot of the horse power gets used up in these solutions. So bargin the biggest challenge I would say it's one of the biggest challenges, I think that bargin is. Is is technology that is proportional to the number of output channels? So if you've got a stereo image that you'll project into the room, you have to have echo consulates, each one of those those two channels, and obviously if you're talking about a surround sound system what you might have seven point one emitting into the room, then than in theory after co cancel this all of those channels to get a good user experience. So it becomes quite a significant problem as you scale the number of channels. Yes. Want to one of the key technologies, but it tights probably typically three four or five separate techniques to really really clean up an audio. An audio signal voice signal that's been recorded in a in a Reverbere noisy. Ring is high range, low range frequency more difficult. That's emotional. I'm qualified to answer that question. But typically low range frequency of isn't very directional. We tend to find that to some extent you can ignore the low range free. Quincy's and the will be tolerant to us doing that. So for example, being fully with struggle to eliminate low range noise because it would be it would appear to come from every direction. So you can use techniques that said that that eliminate those low frequencies before sending the voice to the speech recognition by kens. But says aside sliding be all night my expertise to come into much on that while despite your protest actions. You did answer the questions we'll take. All right. So let's talk about on device versus cloud, speech recognition. I don't know if you mentioned today, but I know you you've done work with VS, Alexa, voice service. It's clearly cloud-based maybe some others as well. You talk. I think on your website or some of your material talk about kid AI for local how do you think about those in terms of your system, and how you work with the s are a really good question. I think there's there's three Hase's to consider. We'll see those, you know, the cloud base case, which will very familiar with. There's a hybrid which has some Esau capability, local and some in the cloud, and they mail rate, the local capability male parade offline so when there's no cloud connection or male rate as a FOSS respond to well known queries, and it will defer to the cloud for things that that it can't address locally. And then this purely off-line, which has used cases some use cases based on Welt, depending on what set technology deploy. If you put some some sort of heavy iron processing. Flying than Oviously or addressing any privacy. Consents? You might have fast speech going into the cloud or you might use a somewhat less capable processing device, but just have a very small dictionary. That is perfectly reasonable for something like a light switch, for example. I think the problem because when you transition I think I've had a convincing case full equality user experience where you flip between low dictionary local implementation of estate, very rich natural user interface online. I think that managing the user experience through that transition is problematic. So I think that's one one limitation of this hybrid mixing of owning off-line right now. Most of the hybrid is being used for wake word right so awake. Where locally maybe you also verify it in the cloud, but think of wake word locally. And then all the other queries are cloud that seems to be a pretty good use case. I'm not familiar with anybody who's doing. Well, actually, I do know. Somebody's doing. I think I think it's fair to say that some of the work that Mercedes does in the car does do this type of negotiation between what types of queries. It's gonna handle locally versus which it's going to send off to the cloud and have something like how to so. Yeah, I think what's his is a great example of use case, which is quite safety conscious. So, you know, having a fully online experience. He's very limiting, and tens of what it can be useful in automated context do need some local processing capability, so he's a good use case the other one that I've heard Cullman league quoted as if you're if you will in the presence of a robot the domestic Roble or a service Roble in store, for example, and you shout stall, you don't want to go to the cloud to determine what you actually meant by that camman you wanted to actually to stop moving. So there are certain cases around security. I think where I think it makes sense to have a very school dictionary. But the transition between the flying on the online dictionary has to be carefully managed to thing. Yeah. Yeah. I do that. That's that would take a lot of attention. I could manage imagine over time. So what is your expectation going for in terms of cloud based versus offline and local do expect the vast majority of the solutions to really focus on this cloud base solution because of the robustness of it or do you see a future where we're gonna have so many of these devices with voice interaction, many of which you don't want to always have to have wifi connection or persistent or that maybe that's not necessary because narrow vocabulary is going to be more important where you thinking about this in terms of how it's gonna play out local versus cloud. So I think first of all I think they'll be some countries that will just have local dictionaries. But that kind of you know, they'll be limited in scope, they'll be they'll have a limited amounts of functionality on probably below end of the mall kit things, I'd like switches, and so on in terms of connected components. I think there's two architectures that the will prevail. One is. Weather's local intelligence. So there's some sort of a hub and amongst out customer base was seeing competition for ownership of that that entity. So that could potentially run I SA locally it could run a off-line ISR reasonably ritual. Flonase ARIN deferred to the cloud on certain occasions. I think that's valid architecture where you've got sort of Central Intelligence in the home, potentially in the car. And then this the case where you get what you devote to the cloud all the time. And that's really the model that we're in now. And I think that's okay. And it depends certain geographies feel better about that than others. I think in the west we tend to concern us a little bit more with security in our experience in China is less concerns. And consequently, the always connected WI fi abled everything is more of a tractable solution for them. But I think today's market is really all about everything connected to the cloud as say this in the customer base now designed funnel. We starting to see hybrid products. That are starting to try to dominate the small hob- space. But that's that's yet to shake out. I think that makes sense now I have had previous gas talk about China and India particular when you get outside the large cities where the the lower reliability of broadband connections has potential to undermine some of these in Home Solutions, and that's why they're focused more on LT EBay solutions, if they're going to do cloud and everything else might have more local processing because if the natural wifi. But if the internet connection is down than there. Centrally nonfunctional, and I even had a conversation with an Emma's on executive. It's ES in twenty eight teen said that they're looking at ways that they can make the echo functional even if internet goes out, so we'll see where that goes ahead. Another thing I noticed on your website. What looked exactly like Deutsche Telekom's, magenta, smart speaker? What did you do for them? So we collaborated with a I'm being slightly hesitant because this is in the public domain. We liberated with frown Hoffa only microphone design for that. Okay. Great. Hey, own just on the microphone design, you mention that when we talk about the beam forming linear verse circular, how do you have to handle those differently? It's really just a question of refining, the owner them, so the don't change dramatically. So obviously a lot of the mall case to microphone at the moments. So to Mike offensively is all you'll be leading role circular. But when we've spent most of all time is focusing on what we perceive to be more of a trend, which is towards Linnea microphones, the the thesis that was Linnea microphones fit well into flat services and most consumer electronics actually is flat against the wall. And we had a particular island smart TV's when we when we were thinking about this. So we weren't interested in the sort of coq candidates. That's being napping quite successful. Late in the small speaker space, but we were interested in other categories. And if you look at white Goodson TV's and sound balls and so on they typically flat surfaces. They haven't won eighty degree range of of interest. If you will and that set favors Alenia solution. So the algorithms broadly, speaking out rhythms of the same. They adopt differently. A secular microphone, obviously has a capability sweeping three hundred sixty degree range, typically Linnea microphone aliases front and back. So you'll have one hundred and eighty degrees. But you gotta tell whether it's in front or behind the array, but in the electric that we that we've fitted into that's not relevant because behind is wall. So it's it's generally better addressing as a say, no flat Pinal solutions, and we didn't have a secular. In fact, we talked about and they using secure, right? And obviously we have a product roadmap as well. But most of success is being because we made that selection to focus on Linea microphone analyze. Yeah. That makes glass I question. Okay. So for those of you listeners who really didn't want to talk about the technology. We're moving on to use cases. And one of the things Mark that you said an interview this year was getting rid of the remote control is among the strongest use cases for voice technology, and you just mentioned that ago. So let's talk about that. Like, why is in particular? It's it's it's more than just losing the micro misplacing, the remote, right? Yes. It is. I think just a moment ago when we touched on this one of the things that quite often if a customer is new to this kind of technology, and they know they want voice interface, but they don't they haven't pressed through from from front to back as it were the thing that often gets forgotten is the user experience needs needs quite a bit of attention and. For things like TV's, and and boxes, and so on this one thing to be able to capture the voice and to understand the words that were being spoken. But to actually reflect that meaningfully in the user interfaces is is quite a different problem. So we just have to make sure that those customers are aware that they need to consider that from the early days, and essentially typical customer engagement for us done. This a few times. Now is we tend to be involved with the the the design right from the conception will do evaluations and testing with customers, and then will pretty much hold a hand through the whole process. Generally, speaking introduce the back end, the SA provider at some point as well just to make sure that all of the interfaces required to work together to make an excellent voice interface in place says quite an involved process. Yeah. That makes sense to me. I wonder too like how is this different weather? It's pushed to talk which we talked about earlier or far field voice. I have both in my house because I exp-. A lot of things. My set-top box provided my cable provider has a push to talk option, which is great. If the remote is near you. And then I have a one of the fire TV cubes which is far field, which also has a remote with push push to talk. So you've got both options there. How do you think about those differently? Or are you only working in the far field with your customers? Yeah. We only work in the fall field. So we really actually when we counts customer this doing push tool. We generally feel pretty positive about that because the transition from pushed to a fall field voice interface is significantly easier. Because generally speaking that customer who's gone through the thought process of what does it mean to make voice interface, a really good experience of the customer, and then the step from from push the tool to field and significantly easier. One thing that we're all seeing which I think is kind of an interesting development is third step which is having a fall field. Remote control unit, which is sensually a another step towards a built-in fall field. But actually means that you can leave the remote control unit on the on the I'm gonna use another English. Click rotel mental peace only beneath the TV, and you can use a fall voice interface. You know, if you don't if you don't want to hold the thing in your hand. So I think there's a few purchase hit. But the ultimate destination is a is a fall voice interface. I think can push the tool tactical approach and to to segment the problem. But as the utility of fall field is demonstrably bathroom using a push to remote so controls televisions. A lot of sense that that's of interest to you. You're doing a lot of work in that space. What are some other use cases for ambient and far field voice that you think are going to really drive voice adoption going forward? Yeah. It's a good question. I think there's a there's a lot of examples some of them quite cookie. You know, we talked about shade Croft as a as an example of you know, I would say very full with thinking. Company in in. What would otherwise be a one might think? Low tech space thing they've so carefully about use case and very specific market in that case of hospitality market. I then you've go to think about this thing from room to room. So I would say the kitchen in the kitchen, we've Oviously small speakers. They've they've really carved out place in the kitchen, but we're now starting to see you may have seen the G voice enabled crooked hood that has an X most off field microphone in that was launched at CS this year. That's a good use cases. It's directly above the the cooking surfaces has the ability to shine a camera down onto the cooking surfaces all towards the user. And clearly you can you can deliver content to that. Use a Welsh there is and tans of busy, which you think is one of the key qualifiers to to to the the compelling. Very compelling use cases speakers and and cook a hoods in the kitchen. I think obviously there's within something like a pantry than. The price of lights, which is the most appropriate lamp shades. Would you believe unites Scott power, it has generally speaking good line of sight to the entire room? So that's not such a city idea either lamps in light shades. And then washing machines, if I'm carrying mouldering to the washing machine, I wanna say from the dole because once again, my hands of busy, those kinds of things that perhaps not the not the most obvious most charismatic, but they have they have genuine utility, and you can walk through the house and figure out case OMB in my boss from well. I kinda like being having a quick catch up on using my boss from so we can see now we're seeing smart mirrors in the bedroom that the the the the along clock and so on and so forth. So there's I think there's a number of use cases in the home, and then Oviously outside of the home in office environment things, I it conditioning units typically out of reach and people have playing with them. So voice interface won't conditioning unit is is a smart move. We talked to some companies about the broader category of human sensing in work. Spaces. So that we can control not just the conditioning, but also lighting and so on so. Different use cases in different parts of our lives to motive as well. So this thing lots and lots of use cases where there's obvious utility right up until the tipping point where if anything needs to be directed with. Then everybody expects to have a user voice interface often often liken it to. Touchscreen suppose came on the scene. My my children was three to five years old. And they said we'll catchable a ton of visions television sets in the store and put their grubby fingers on it and swipe, and it was it was a natural expectation that was the that was ubiquitous user interface. And I think the same thing will be true voice into you mentioned a number of use cases. They're all utilitarian, not really conversational, but voice command oriented. How do you see that developing in terms of conversational versus command? Oh, I think so I guess my underlying premises not going to need ten of these things in every room, but you are going to want to carry on a conversation with your eye with your voice assistant throughout your home. So I think whilst easy to argue that a light switch intrinsically doesn't need to have a natural language interface. If it's the only voice assistant point in a in a room. Then the argument is well in order to have a consistent conversation with a voice assistant throughout the home. Then yes, it does. Need a natural language into. Case, right. That makes. So let me ask you a question, then so this brings up this other point, and I don't know if you've worked with Sonos or not, but so famously said two years ago that they were going to put who will Sistan and Amazon Alexa in the same device. Also allow you to access Siri is that a good idea. I think yes. And no. So I think it's a good idea. Because. If you're thinking purely from the consumer's perspective the consumer wants to access those fraud. I said the great the companies that deliver great technology and great. Great use cases. But. I don't wanna have to access those through four different speakers on my kitchen kitchen table. So from a from a user experience I'd like to have one device, and I'd like to be able to speak to those things now one trend where observing in in the third party space. And when I say third party, I'm talking about the non Amazon's and the non giggles jammies. And so on but companies that were existing brands that retrofitting voice interfaces to the categories that they already selling those companies want to put their own voice assistant alongside one of the either Google Amazon all whichever which company they want to ally themselves to and so then then you end up with somewhat schizophrenic device which shown if you say Alexa than that. I was in response. If you say, whatever their own key. What is then their own Irish funds? And so you've got this this branding conflict and right from the get-go. And I think that's just you know, if you had more and more different is to that with different keywords steering. Capability studies just gonna get worse. And it's just gonna result in a police or experience. So I think some point in the future in the may be somewhat heretical. But at some point in the future, I think there's going to be an intermediary. Let's going to be a digital Butler if you will or a digital twins. We've sometimes cooled it that sits between you. And and you know, I was in Google and the thousands of other is going to be competing for your attention is essentially protecting your attention. Your attention span whilst giving you access to all of the benefits of these various different providers. So one voice assistant concept is interesting. So we talked about precedes earlier and the US actually does Xs got nuance and how to find the back end. Now, all the people who have that architecture. But it it reminds me of my interview with that chair last November Adams, the one of the co founders of Siri and co-founder vivid which was later quired by Samsung, and they were really adamant about this sort of one. Voice assistant concept, and that people need that that otherwise there's going to be too much. And is I think about the Facebook did this with Alexa, longside in largely because Facebook voice interface wasn't robust enough to meet basic consumer expectations. And so Alexa gets in the game. Jingo and France by orange who is the same thing. They they they spent two years and realized that they were just going to be too narrow Sumer expectations. So they put Alexa on there as well. The sort of say, well, at least it's Alexa device. So you know, when we think about this. Then you really believe that we're gonna lead towards this single voice assistant, which is going to be personal. And then that's going to negotiate all our interactions with other assistance. Yeah. I think that's a possible future. I struggled with the idea that the the existing players going to dominate this space on an individual level in into the into the distant future. Whether it's five years ten years fifteen years, but some I think this is going to be so important that it's. Not going to be something that people will see to a particular play unless they have a very special relationship, and that relationship might well be it might even be a business to consumer kind of subscription relationship. A bit light. We have with all mobile handsets where you know, there was a contract, and it's well-known by both sides. And it's well, it's well, trusted people understand what the business model is that comfortable with it. So I think that there is the potential maybe that's already play in in the in in other forms of communication that could take that role. Maybe it's one of the existing vendors that can that can dominate that space. But my suspicion is going to be another party that's going to sit between between the user and all of these competing is protecting the privacy and security and also making sure that any information that they get that use it gets his timely relevant and not not an interruption to their everyday lives to think it'll be one party that gets dominant national or. Global market share. That's sort of the personal assistant that people use to connect assistance, or do you think there's going to be a number of those? And they all have this ability to connect to a lot of back ends. I think I think you'll be a number of them. You know, I think one I guess a number of clauses of company, you might pick out that could potentially do this. And suddenly, you know, wouldn't completely eliminate the idea that it might be Google or or an Amazon or a one of the other existing businesses in this space tool, but you know, you can imagine the telcos doing it. You can imagine all the service providers doing it. Other companies with subscription relationships with consumers could step into that space and claim some sort of moral high ground, if you will that would enable them to to be the the protectors of consumer data and privacy, and so on and also their attention or maybe a new play I'm tempted to think about. L in in in the nineties was the window on the internet until companies like mosaic Netscape came along democratized access to the internet and created enormous off gene ities for through other companies to to to help people access the the enormity of information that was there. I think there's a tremendous amount of Pachuca see between the the current state of voice. And and where it could go as a as a fully democratized access to to the internet and all of the, you know, the intelligence that resides there. Well, there you haven't the future of oyster systens singly summed up by Mark lip that I appreciate you taking so much time today, the share your background tell the Xmas story to the voice by audience. How can our listeners? Learn more about the company follow up with you track on social media. What's the best way for them to stay engaged? Well, actual still comb is going to be the the access point that would lead to the others. I'm on linked to in of course. And more than happy to have people reach out to me owning and starting conversation. That'd be great from. Okay. That's great. You one more thing. I just wanted to. Thank you feel time as well. It was great comb sation enjoyed it. Well, I appreciate everyone spending time and sharing the thoughts with the audience. And then, you know, as I've told many people I learned something every week. It's one of my favorite things. I've done. Over eighty of these now, so that's eighty consecutive weeks of doing this. But boy, it's eliminating for me. So I definitely appreciate it. And for those of you wanna find these things, we'll do the show notes, we'll do some links for you an Xmas X M O S dot com. So just in case you're wondering how that translates into the URL world. So thank you very much Marcle pet for spending so much time today. I'm Brechin sell. You can find me on the Twitter at brick and sell checkout voice about that voice. About says on Alexa, and Google assistant to get a daily update. We also have a flash briefing. You guys know all of these things and checkout research, we got some new research out on smart speaker option in the US and Australia coming out soon. So you will see the most in depth analysis of of how people are using these. How many they have what they think about? Them and come back next week. We have another mazing guests lined up. Thanks a lot Margaret appreciate spend some time today. Thank you.

Alexa Amazon United States Google China CEO apple Mark lapel Sean weathers Mark Mike Marc Lopez Oviously Ignace
Science News Briefs from Around the World

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs from Around the World

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor, Steve Mirsky. And here's the short piece from the June two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits, and it's a rundown of some science and technology stories for round, the globe compiled by editorial contributor, Jim Daly from Canada. Archaeologists have now confirmed that Toronto service Rex skeleton found in the nineteen nineties at a fossil site in Saskatchewan is the biggest and heaviest on record at nearly forty two feet long almost twenty thousand pounds. Scotty as it's called surpassed the record set by the famous sued t Rex which was found in South Dakota in nineteen ninety from Argentina are gala GIS identified a site, where ancient humans killed and butchered giant ground sloths, mega theory, American. Madam in the pampas region in eastern Argentina, the find provides evidence that Uman's contributed to the sloths extinction from Kenya. A science teacher who won the two thousand nineteen global teacher prize announced he intends to donate, the one million dollar award to benefit society, Peter to Beechy a Franciscan friar mentors, a science club that came in, I in its category in the two thousand eighteen Kenya's science and engineering fair from the autonomous island of Anjouan in the union of the Cymru's, that's in the Indian Ocean between the east coast of Africa, and the northwest end of Madagascar geochemists at Columbia University, found a load of court site, a metamorphosed rock formed from sandstone on the island of Andrea on the island is volcanic, and had been thought to contain only Ignace rocks. And from North Korea physicists at Kimmel sung universe. City in Pyongyang have brokered a rare green to collaborate with Italy's international school for advanced studies in Trieste, the North Koreans will study, computational neuroscience with talion physicists that was quick hits by Jim Daly.

Jim Daly Argentina Kenya Steve Mirsky North Korea Pyongyang editor t Rex Toronto Trieste Uman Ignace rocks Kimmel Scotty South Dakota Canada Indian Ocean Saskatchewan Italy Columbia University
TMHS 348: Diversify Your Mental Inputs And Step Into Your Purpose

The Model Health Show

1:14:25 hr | 1 year ago

TMHS 348: Diversify Your Mental Inputs And Step Into Your Purpose

"You are now listening to the model show with Shawn. Stevenson for more. Visit the model had show dot com. Welcome to the motto show this finishing nutrition expert, Shawn Stevenson, and I'm so grateful be tuning in with me today, as you know, we talk about so many different dimensions of health and wellness. That are often look pass in our culture today. We know that nutrition matters, exercise matters, absolutely, sleep matters stress management in all relationships, of course, have a big impact on our health. But also, there's some really fascinating research now showing that having meaning and purpose in our lives is a huge contributor to our overall health and wellness and even our lifespan and funny enough today more than ever there's this deficiency. That's really happening, and it's a deficiency in a sense of purpose. And so today, a we really want to dive in and talk about deconstruct what this actually looks like what is purpose really mean to help you to really uncover. What that is for you. And. If you feel like you've already honed in on your purpose, how to fully in authentically step into it because you know, back in time there there was a time in history win your purpose really was just handed to you. You know, if your if your father was a blacksmith, you're a blacksmith if your dad was a king e prince, I if your family was in the farming business, that's just kind of what you rolled into times have evolved and people begin to decide on their purpose for themselves. And I think a great illustration of that is the movie sing have you seen sing is so good animated movie. But you know, these animated movies have so many dimensions. And character development is just it's not just for the kids. You know? But if you haven't seen seeing definitely check it out, but there's one character who is by is basically a singing competition. It's like American idol, but it's like cartoons and the and the actors that are playing these characters. Singers, just phenomenal one the characters is Grela because you know, it's a animated film. So it's like a animal community, and he's a gorilla in the family business is robbing banks is robbery. All right. He's a teenager. He's supposed to be learning to be the getaway driver for his his dad who's played by Ignace Elba. All right. And the the sun is played by this actor, and I hope I'm saying his name, right? But it's tearing Eggerton, and he's played in king's men, and he's playing Elton John coming up, and he just has a phenomenal voice. So he's playing this character. But he doesn't wanna be in the family business a crime. I wanna sing that I wanna sing. And so throughout history, we would just fall into it. The family business looks like, but then we start to have this society where we can begin to choose now today more than ever we live in a society where everything is really ripe for the taking most. Most of us get to choose what it is that we want to do we get to quote figure out what it is that we want to do and that can be some serious like mental punishment. You know, it's just like here you go figure it out figure out what you wanna do in this world. And today we have this phenomenon of something called the paradox of choice in this a wonderful book by Barry Schwartz. You could check out. But just speaks to the fact that humans we like to have choice we like to have the idea of freedom. But when we have too much choice. It can be debilitating for us in this can add to that kind of ingredients that's baking up this lack of purpose cake that a lot of us are making in. So today, I really want to dive in again deconstruct what it looks like to really uncover our purpose in step fully and completely into this. Because the reality is that some of us have this very romantic idea that. Our purpose will be presented to us in his magical moment something's going to happen. It's just like the clouds are going to part music's going to be playing in the background. And we're going to figure out boom. That's it. That's what I'm here to do. And I'm just here to tell you today. This it doesn't really work like that. But there are some incredible magical moments. And there are so many different things that are intertwined win. You experienced that deep seated feeling of stepping into your purpose. And we're going to go through that today. And I think at the end of this you are going to feel much more, connected and compelled and empowered in your life. And with that said again today, we're gonna talk about uncovering your purpose. And if you feel you've already honed in on what that is how to really fully and completely step into that. Now, some of us get up each day on our purpose, and we sip a little Cup of Joe we have a little Cup of that black bean juice or you can call it coffee. Think coffee is much more attractive name and for years. I didn't touch it. And I've said this before, but I had a really traumatic experience as a child a some grandma grandpa drinking coffee every day. And it just looked like they were having such a good time. Like, it's just what's going on here. So I decided I'm gonna take a sip grandma's coffee, took a sip. And I thought something was wrong with my grandparents I thought that they there was something off with their Madurai oblong. God, I didn't know what was going on. Why would they think this is okay to drink? It was nasty. All right folger's in your Cup, and I hadn't drink any since then until about two years ago when my wife kept raving about the forcing Matic coffee. You know, I was doing the elixirs and she just kept every day. She just was so pumped to have our coffee, and I'm gonna make a confession today that I haven't shared before. But she basically refers to me as a barista. All right. I gotta get in there and make that. Coffee every day for her. I heard little I call. I see I'm Garcia. Alright. So even when I present the coffee tour like I have my head down, and I give her a coffees morning. She looks forward to it. Now, I do too, and I really get it. Now, it's coffee isn't just coffee in the potential benefits there. It's an experience. It really is an experience and one of the reasons that a lot of us turned to coffee and check this out because I don't think a lot of us know, factually, y but there's some really cool data affirming some of these benefits. So let's talk about on the energy front, and he really getting out and getting after our purpose in living our lives in also having energy and even influencing our body composition through the use of high-quality sources of caffeine. Check this out. So this was a study that looked at the fascinating fact that caffeine can increase your metabolic rate by approximately three to upwards of eleven percent boost in your. Metabolic rate. How your body is burning calories? This study was published in the American journal of clinical nutrition and found that most of the increase that caffeine Spurs about with our metabolism is caused by an increase in the burning of fact, it's actually burning fat really really cool. Now, this is where we have to really have some judicious approach in using caffeine because they're good sources of caffeine. And then there's not so good sources that come along with a little or sometimes even a lot of negative side effects. So we want to go for high quality organic sources of coffee, specifically says we're talking about coffee because insecticides pesticides fungicides. Those are either neuro or estrogen IQ, so they're literally potentially having an influence on your nervous system, and even your indicates system and. It's just not cool. So obviously organic is important. But I'm here to also inform you that we don't wanna double triple quadruple down just knocking down coffee. We can utilize something has more of a synergistic blend to it because coffee does in fact, stimulates your nervous system. Which is okay. And also some stress hormones are related to that, namely adrenaline. But we also can fall into this place where we're just pushing that button down way too hard way too much in causing issues with everything ranging from our sleep to our energy levels and having that kind of correlated crash of energy that so many people see when they're out there guzzling conventional even sometimes high quality coffee, and so I love this blend because of this listen to this. There was a study that was published in medicine and science in sports and exercise, and it looked at thirty healthy test subjects for six weeks to record the effects of cortisol sets mushroom had on their performance. The group that adequate steps to their daily regimen had twice the oxygen intake of the control group who didn't get the court accepts oxygen is essential. Because this is delivering nutrients to your muscles, preventing fatigue, also, preventing the build up of lactic acid, helping you to go another feather are going either. Further. Also, the study revealed that the same group showed an overall nine percent increase in their aerobic activity from taking quarter saps. So why am I talking about quarter SEB's and coffee because those two things come together in forcing Matic medicinal mushroom blends there quarter sept- coffee is one of my favorite things in the world. And I rotate that with the lion's mane coffee, but it's just something I really look forward to and so many people have shared their stories with me that they really love the energy that they experience, but they they don't have that weird. Associated crashes like this consistent natural energy because his really is operating on your body's natural energy systems rather than to just hyper stimulating your system to keep going going going. So obviously, I'm a huge fan. A highly highly recommend you check out their quarter steps coffee and also their lines main coffee, if it's more like mental work that you're going to be doing and. Just their other formulas as well. If you're not a fan of coffee, they have mushroom hot cocoa mixes. They also have their general mixers which you can get quarter steps by itself or lines maim CHA and just pop over there. Check him out is forcing Matic dot com for slash model. And you get fifteen percent off everything fifteen percent off everything they carry this exclusive with the model house show. So go to f oh, you are S. I G M A T. I C dot com for slash model for fifteen percent off and get hooked up. All right. So on that note, let's jump into the apple podcasts review of the week. Another five star review by the trendy Voyager. Hi, Sean this review is long overdue. But I wanted to let you know that you changed my life. I'm the trendy Voyager on Instagram at these days ago. I had posted your podcast on my story to share your meaning show with others. A simple direct message for. Um you came at such a good time. You told me I hope you know, how amazing and powerful. You are. This message came such an important moment in my life. Having been recently laid off and looking for work. That was the message I needed to keep me going. Thank you for. All you do. Sean, your podcast is truly changed my life and has helped me get through the toughest days over the last few years. Awesome. I appreciate that so much. Thank you for leaving that review over on apple podcast, if you've yet to leave review please pop over to apple podcasts and leave a review for the show. Let everybody know what you think about the show. And I appreciate that. So so very much in on that note, let's get to our topic of the day today. We're talking about how to diversify your mental inputs and to step into your purpose. And this was really encouraged and inspired by my recent keynote that I did at the biohacking conference this year and in this keynote I. I shared the importance of diversifying our exercise, diversifying our approach to recovery. And also the essential need to diversify our thinking, and I think that it really struck a chord with a lot of people, and they were really inspired and compelled to make some big changes and shifts in their lives. And today, I'm going to share with you some of what I covered in that final section of that talk. Because diversifying our thinking is an absolute key to uncovering and walking in your purpose. So impasse episodes of the motto hell show, we've talked about research regarding mirror neurons and the synchronization of human brainwaves. So these are things that we talked about one of these episodes was an interview with Dr Daniel Goldman who wrote the book, emotional intelligence and also social intelligence, and he's probably the number one person who really impressed and put emotional intelligence. Into public lexicon and the same thing with mirror neurons, but the theory surrounding these mirror neurons that inhabit our bodies are they gather data from our environment. Right. So we have neurons we have cells in our bodies that model in simulate what's happening in our virement. So what we're exposed to these cells kind of simulate us being a part of it or doing it. And for example, if you are watching someone on television, there are cells that you have that are kind of simulating you being part of it or simulating you doing the thing that you're witnessing, and that's the best description that we have and there's still a lot more data to be done regarding these mirror neurons. But the bottom line is this is one of the major ways that we come to learn our culture and learn language and how to speak. We're not often just kind of encouraging kids talk. They're just picking it up from the environment. They're simulating the lip movements in the. And the sounds at their picking up by reading their environment. And they cells are simulating these programs all the time, which is super super powerful stuff. And this can really start to explain why we as humans inherently have so much empathy for other people, right? We see certain situations happen, and we really have this experience, very visceral experience of feeling remorse or sadness, or pain or joy. You know, you see one of those proposal videos on social media, and you just feel happiness and joy for that person. Or you see something sad story in with a tragedy taking place, and we viscerally feel it even though it wasn't us. We still feel it and this is inherent in our human connection, but empathy like so many other things can be trained out of us. But it's something that we naturally do. You know, just like anything it can be kind of trained out of us enforce out of us. But. We have a natural innate connection with other people and these mirror neurons are big part of this equation. And again, so much more is going to be coming forward about how this stuff works super fascinating stuff. And just again, keep in mind that what we witness and see with other people what they're experiencing we feel for them. And it's through these pathways of these mirror. Neurons is a big reason for that. So that's part one. Another part is research coming out of Princeton University that has affirmed that the human brain, actually, quote, syncs up with other people's brains when we're in conversation, if you're watching this on YouTube, you can see the image of the two brains that are literally matching each other and is starting to become like a coordinated dance. And this is just two people that the test subjects who don't know each other just creating some initial report, and you can see the brainwaves will literally start to sync up and match in quote mirror each other. Other. And so we do this automatically all the time. This is happening. We're sinking up brains with the people that were in conversation in connection with and if you're interested in personal growth and good mental health, the first reaction when hearing this information, which was my reaction is I need to be careful on talk into I need to stand guard to the door of my mind, you know, and not get too unconsciously or haphazardly get into conversations with people who are going to bring my brain some drama and simulate some drama programs. So this is something we might do and kind of latch onto that and become hyper guarded. But what I'm here to do today into share with you is that if we become too guarded that we can miss out on some of the most valuable growth of all in our lives. And it's not that you need to purposely, go out and get yourself in negative environments and surround yourself with negative people. But our tendency. The our natural tendency is to surround ourselves with like minded people. And this is wonderful because it helps to affirm things to keep us in a good space. But there's also there's another side to that story. And this is the fact that if we are only proactively putting ourselves in environments around like minded people, this can actually block our growth, and in some instances, this can even become dangerous because if we're around the same people having the same conversations, we can easily become stuck in a certain way of thinking if you if you really kinda just start to analyze stuff, let's take the nutrition domain, for example, let's use Kito specifically, and I'm a fan of Kito. It's something that I've employed for patients over the years that I've utilized in my own life. But it's just it's one tool that's in my superhero utility Bill in your superior utility belt innocent incredibly valuable framework and being part of a Kito community will further support your. Lifestyle and your goals. But if all you did was spend time talking to other Kito folks when discussing nutrition your conversations will become very linear you will develop tunnel vision. Right. And we'll start to miss things on the periphery that could be beneficial for us, and even just help with our understanding and versus fire communication, if you wanna be really great at communicating the benefits of Kito to a person, we might want to know about the benefits of the other proteins that they might be taking on, but we can miss that. If we're not practically getting ourselves in other conversations. So I hope that makes sense a good example and somebody who can be considered even like the poster child slash guys slash elderly fellow would be Mark Sisson which giving that label of elderly fellow. He's been here. Some decades believes in his sixties, but he's really changing the game in the paradigm on what that really looks like and his goal is a show. What's possible for people in their sixty seventies eighties? His. Physique and his functionality his mental capacities like that of somebody who who's decades younger little he's out there competing and in whipping we've been on twenty year olds regularly in performance and Easter such great example. But being that he somebody who's authored books on Kito and been been one of the biggest proponents, you might get in your feelings. If you're you seem at a restaurant, and he's like, putting some some olive oil on some bread, you might run over and dive and try to knock the bread as is going towards his mouth. And try and stop him. But he's going to be. Hey, relax. Kito is amazing. But he's experienced enough to know that we need to be open and listen and learning from other camps, and he's the I tell you that he's he's about flexible Kito right and being metabolic -ly adapted and metabolic Lee, flexible and utilizing some of the wonderful things that we have access to in our lives so STA versa. Fighing are diversifying our conversations because his super easy to dismiss someone. Anyone who doesn't believe what you believe are think about that for minute. It's super easy to dismiss someone who doesn't believe what you believe. But if it's getting results for them who are you to say that it's wrong. It's not our place. And so what we can really learn from is we can learn through people's winning. We can learn through what is working for people. And even if it's a different approach, we can still learn through that. But. But we can also learn through their mistakes. Right. And if we're not getting that diversity in conversation, we're gonna miss on winning in different forms and also mistakes in different forms because success leaves clues. I remember Jim Rohn saying that it changed my life. Success leaves clues buff fail. Your leaves clues as Well I- failure leaves clues as well. And when I think about failure failure leaving clues I think about this old ad with this cookie that was walking around. So it's like a it's animated cookie. It's walking around and it's leaving little chocolate chips behind it as it's walking as a trail of chocolate chips as the cookies walking. And if you look at the at your media like that's poop. This cook is leaving little clues. And droplets of poop who who did somebody get fired. Like, why would you think this is? Okay. But as chocolate chips, right? So it's kind of funny. But that's what I think about when I think about failure leaving clues is leaving little chocolate chips that look like PU so with that said in time this altogether in diversifying our thinking for definitely getting ourselves around like minded people, and really affirming and cultivating that positivity and support, but also not being afraid to engage in different environments in different conversations because this is step one identifying and walking in your purpose is fostering, ideas, ideas, ideas, truly are on the most powerful things in the universe and exposure to new ideas, this is key to really uncovering. What our purposes when we're kid. I we have so many magnificent ideas. Everything is possible. We can be anything we can do anything my son. Brayden recently I mean for he's he's going to be a ninja like. You can't go to lake a job search leg Knin hiring ninjas. Right. You're not gonna find this out there. But for him. This is a possibility, but the beautiful thing is this could manifest in different ways. He could end up being a ninja in a movie, he could be a martial arts instructor, you know, he could design costumes for, you know, have the the number one costume designed for ninja gear in the world, whatever it can take on different forms, but we can be the president of a company or we can be the president of a country like everything is possible, these ideas. And so something happens though, along the way society starts to kinda stamp on these ideas, and let us know in subtle and sometimes aggressive ways at these things are possible for us. And so today on encourage you to take your power back and to begin to let your ideas, really. Express themselves into thrive and to manifest themselves again. And I want you to start to become an idea machine and James alter who's been a guest on the show talks about becoming an idea machine. There's a strategy for that every day he wakes up, and he writes down ten ideas ten ideas any and every kind of random thing that he can think of is could be, you know, an idea for a new app it could be an idea for a new way to do a morning routine. It could be an idea for someone else that they can execute on in their business in the list goes on and on an idea for new pro a physical product. Maybe it's an idea for some kind of a double handled kettle bell or something like that or toilet seat warmer. You knows just different stuff, but just writing down ideas. And what he says a lot of ideas are just, you know, they're crazy they're nonsense. But they matter they're exercising. That idea muscle and some ideas in their gold that have. Made millions of dollars. I so really starting to grow and develop. Your idea muscle is part and parcel to uncovering your purpose. And so that's one side. Also, we need exposure. And this is really what I presented in that talk of the biohacking conference because we talk about diversification in our finances and money and investments, we talk about diversification. In our food in nutrients, we know the importance of that, but we also need diversification. In our thinking in our mental inputs because again, this will enable you to prevent stagnation in linear thinking and tunnel vision, and and helping you to avoid this easily trapped way of being and it will add unique dimensions to what you do that. No one else has when you were diversifying your mental inputs, even if you are a personal trainer, you will be so much. Different than any other person doing it. Because you have this really unique tapestry of mental inputs that are automatically expressed through you. And I like in how we really are to like rogue in X men. I don't know if you've ever checked out, the comics or the movie or the the cartoon, even but she absorbed people's powers, if she touched them, she absorbed their powers, and this is what we're always doing all the time by being around people. We are absorbing their their ideas were absorbing their energy, and is becoming a part of us when we hear somebody else's ideas coming in some of their statements, some of their language, we absorb it. But the cool thing is we don't when rogue does it. They like pass out. All right. We do that other people are still good. In fact, they're doing better because there's a statement that when you teach something you get to learn it twice. So when you have somebody teaching you something they're becoming better and more verse and understanding that. Themselves and you're able to absorb that power. I so now how do we do this because the model show we would like to bring some practicality to it and some action steps so how do we go about diversifying our mental inputs in our thinking? So here's my challenge for you right in this is going to help tremendously with becoming an idea machine. And fostering, the idea that will help to uncover your purpose, and or help you to firmly powerfully step into that purpose. And this is my challenge for you, at least once a month go and try something that you normally wouldn't do something that people know, you socially, would be surprised to know that you did. All right. Good example, recent phenomena life event in Jamaica. There was a day where we went on an excursion together. You know, the attendees and also the speakers, and we the excursion was. Climb a waterfall. But you can do that. I couldn't rationally see in my mind, like how is that even possible, and we get to the place and sure enough is like these different levels of rocks. And and and and this multi level waterfall that you can climb and my mother in law who is just migrated st- teacher in this space of like, you know, person development, and and even nutrition she really sparked the beginning of some huge insights and transformation for me. She was looking at the situation. Like, I didn't sign up for this. This is not who I am. And sure enough she standing around the guide is telling us. Okay. So we're going to do this. We're going to go up together. You know, make sure you step on these rocks and not those rocks because you could fall in Bush, right? And he immediately grabs her hand and says your leading us today and she shared that in her mind. She was like, no, I'm not you got the wrong person. I didn't come here for this. Right. But she did something that was out of her character. And she did it, right? She did something that people who know her would be surprised to hear that. She did. Right. Even though she is a leader in other dimensions her being a leader taken us up waterfall different story. Right. So put yourself in some unique situations like that for me. I went on a recent date with my wife, we went to the art museum here in Saint Louis. I don't know about art. I know about the human body. You know, I think that's art. And that's beauty and fascinating. I don't get it with abstract. He knows orange blots perp. I don't understand. All right. Some of course, like there's magnificent art pieces that are like these beautiful murals, and you know, paintings that looked like somebody took a picture, you know, there's really cool. But for me, I'm I'm blown away. I just saw an elephant. Hold a paintbrush with his trunk and paint an elephant. That is fascinating for me. All right seeing elephant paint elephant. It was like inception is incredible. But just going to the art museum. Now, my tip go thing. But I did it and people who know me, even if you know, you know, me you would think like I don't I won't be surprised like he's hanging out at art museum or something like that. But I did that. And I got that experience in those new inputs, and I was very inspired. And definitely want to go back and do that again. But I did something unexpected. And it was fun. We had a good time. Got connect with my wife. You know, and it was awesome. So encourage you to do that at least once a month going try something do something that you normally wouldn't do. All right. So that's number one number two way to diversify. Your thinking is to begin to diversify. Your media diversify the entertainment that you're taking in and this can be incredibly powerful. And so let's start with the the books and magazines that you're reading for many. Years when I got into this field, and I was just on fire. I want to read and learn about everything I could about nutrition about human health about psychology about everything that helps to create a truly sovereign healthy human being, and I started to really believe that reading fiction was just not productive. It's just not productive. Why would I do that? And the funny thing is that reading fiction is what got me so excited about reading books period. Because I went from college to leg, you gotta read which when you are forced to read is. It's generally not as fun, right? But after graduating on even my wife, she was like yet never gonna read again. And for us we picked up some we know the Davinci code started on the Davinci code. Wow. Such a great book had us, just enthralled. And we read it together as a couple, and she couldn't wait you not. Talk about it with me if I didn't get to the part yet. And so it was really really cool. And and by the way, just a little sidebar, the Davinci code, you know, a lot of people will say for so many different things, you know, you see the movie and there's a book, and they're like, oh, the book is so much better. Sometimes it's just that's just just like Len people know the true at the book. But sometimes it's true. And in the case of the Davinci code the movie was sm- smoke in like droplet of chocolate chip. All right. But the book was phenomenal. And that led me into interest and just reading other things, and I started to kind of dive in and read more nutrition books because I was like attending things like absorbing the information that way, I just became a really just ferocious reader, and but again fiction became unproductive in my mind. So I want to help to create an new place of thinking if this is something. That sounds familiar to you reading more fiction can actually increase your emotional intelligence. And there's a study in. This was conducted at your university and the university of Toronto and the lead researcher said quote individuals who often read fiction appear to be better able to understand other people empathize with them and view the world from their perspective in quote, and they also stated that this effect is probably because novels and short stories get inside the heads of multiple characters and helping to explain their motives and their objectives. And it's really liked being able to look at things from an omniscient viewpoint right from a meta perspective and seeing all of these different emotions and and driving forces in different characters. Reading fiction helps us to do that it translates to better relationships in our real lives, potentially. You know by taking advantage. Of this. And so this is just something that I've incorporated more often. I don't read a lot of fiction, but I've incorporated more often than I definitely see the translation in benefits for sure. And if you're somebody who already reads fiction, let's pivot, and maybe try some reading something that you normally wouldn't read like if you're totally into like, the the Davinci code and like, Dan Brown or Jack Reacher type of things. Maybe check out fifty shades of gray. Who knows just jump into something new and might be a bit much might be a bit much, but just diversified those mental inputs because they are going to add layers to your understanding and your character. All right. Also, different types of music. This is another way to diversify our media, and I truly do believe that music. And I know, you know, this is well like you hear certain songs, and literally just instantly brings you back to a certain time in your life music, really is a soundtrack of our lives, and I know, you know, songs from like thirty twenty ten years ago, you haven't even heard, and you still know those words even hurting years, and you know, the lyrics. Incredibly powerful input. And they get the something about the melody in the music that drives these things deeper into our psyche. And so being diverse in your musical choice really helps to create diversity in your thinking. You know, there's it's statement that it fire together wire together. And so having these experiences of different music's really helps our brain to make different connections and to connect in more, creative and interesting ways, even and so for me when somebody sees me, or they, you know, they hear me speak. They're probably like, you know, what that guy. He definitely listens. Probably like, some some smooth Rb, Sean is sensual a f he just is her you might think that but the reality is. Yes, I do enjoy a dabbled in that. And you know, hip hop. But also, I love country music. I was just my whole morning was this country music today. And people would be surprised to hear that you know, if shared it before. But I is a big part of my childhood who my grandmother and driving to the country, you know, the live there's a straight dirt road, and you know, fishing and hunting and all those things as a little kid in those long three and a half hour. Car ride is listening to Kenny Rogers and Randy Travis Dolly Parton, REBA mcentire fancy. Don't let me down I shot out to REBA mcentire. All right. And even today some of the music, but then you start to see today. So interesting that there's such a big crossover fact happening, you could see so many different aspects of hip hop in country music now and recently, there's a huge glob ration- took place with this new artists. And is I think his name is little gnaws X number one song old town road country vibe to it got Billy Ray Cyrus on the remake. Wchs. First of all have you ever heard of a remix of a country? So okay. This is huge. He got a legend on that track. You know, he's got he's got that hip. Hop vibe to it. And it's like this. But this is when I heard that song as like, that's m-. That's me. That's my life. I'm a blend of those things. Funny enough really took off in popularity. So it's having this really interesting opportunity to take in some different things. Don't be so pigeonholed in like what you think is like this the only type of music I like allow yourself to taste and touch different different things. Because also, so I listen to country music. I love certain classical music. I love. Soundtracks like the Lord of the rings soundtrack. I play that bad all the time. I I don't know why at the it's just it's just a vibe is just a vibe. So give yourself some different inputs through that medium as well. Also same thing in the shows movies. Those kind of things those inputs don't just be in that one lane that you tend to be in right diversify yourself watched some things in in incorporate some things that you normally wouldn't the other day on the flight, you know, they got like he's like creed to on there. So somebody see them he's going to watch creed to like scan in the movie options. I chose a star is born lady Gaga, Bradley Cooper. And first of all if you haven't seen it. I don't want to spoil it for you. But there's that framework of certain type of movies boy meets girl boy loses girl boy gets girl back. I didn't know what happened like that. I was all in my feelings like for two days after watching that movie. Oh my goodness. It's really really great movie. But I haven't really vibe with lady Gaga before. I remember when I heard about it. I had a client who, you know, this is when I was doing a lot of client work, and sometimes I have these VIP folks in, you know, they fly me out, and you know, like a immersion with them. And she said that I was the lady Gaga of health and wellness is like ten years ago. And I was like what in my mind. I'm like is that a cop? I guess the compliment. But this was like, no, no, you don't understand she she is this incredibly talented performer, but she's a classical trained inist as well. And she's become a world class songwriter and motive. Vader and community builder. And so like when she started telling me all those things I was like, wow. I am lady Gaga. No. I'm just kidding. I'm not lady Gaga. I still the connection the not so much. But I thought it was a great compliment once told me those other parts, but if you haven't seen the movie check it out, and again this the other day, I was wrapping up my my lunch, and I decided to watch Keanu Reeves talk about his motorcycles. I don't know. What thing about motorcycles, not a thing? And yet I watched it just like I'm going to let me partake in this sample of this little morsel of same thing. We do this with food like we try different cuisines, and I gave myself that mental input, and it was really inspiring. It was inspiring to see somebody who cared so much about what he's doing. You know, because he's become a part of a motorcycle company in the here's some of his story and the connection to the different motorcycle. And you know to think about he showed a concept vehicle to hear what the thinking about the future and all these things are relevant in our lives in different ways. All of those things I just talked about those different aspects are relevant. And so to see that in different fields is incredibly valuable. All right. So again, proactively taken in different media can help us to diversify our thinking, whether it is through the books, we read the music, we listened to the shows that we watch, you know, movies things like that. Proactively try some different stuff out. Right. Tastes them different things because you might find something that you really like. But most importantly, it really helps to diversify your language right in the mosaic of who you are as a human being. All right. So on top of then diversifying our thinking is also talk with different types of people. This is so important talk with people from different cultures. This is one of the greatest gifts that we have today that we heretofore did not have the opportunity to do this. Because we're so is elated in our tribes today, we have infinite connection, and it's really we tend to just jump in. Again, just jump into our little circles when we can have access and communicate and learn from people have so many different cultures. So many different driving forces in motives and experiences. And so we need to do this. Because today like seriously, we are a world family. We're not like this idea of isolation and separation and countries and borders, and all these things we just made this stuff up real talk. We just made up the line all those lines. You see separating states and cut we made them up. We're one race. We're one. Humanity here together, collectively and life is is is is working to express itself through all of us in this really powerful. When we start to retrain are thinking and becoming more connected. Of course, we can have patriotism, and and joy of where we come from. And you know, our cities and our teams and things like that. It it creates some great fun and competition, but to think that the other people in places don't have immense value and purpose themselves and desire and drive to be healthy and happy that separates us. So getting involved in talking with people from different cultures in learning. You know, what are their driving forces in their motivation? This is one of the great gifts that I've had access to by spending some years working at a university when I was a strength conditioning coach, and I got to meet people every day from different countries and many of them I worked with and you will hear the same things. He everybody wants to be. Happy. They won't have good relationships. They wanna be healthy and feel good. They wanna have fun. They wanna have meaningful purpose for work and to enjoy an express themselves into into have fun. I might have said fun twice because everybody wants to have the funds. All right. So, but we we don't know that if we ourselves is this them in us, and the reality is we're really all connected if we get into this. We start talking about like the string theory, you know, some other kind of weird stuff with quantum mechanics. We are connected and we've done so show sokoll talking a little bit about that with Mark Gober. So we'll put that in the show notes for you. If you really want to have your mind blown and how we are really connected, but proactively to diversify your thinking diversify who you are. Your lifeline your value proactively talked to and get connected and experience. Other people in other cultures are so you have to keep these fresh inputs coming in first perspectives. Not just more of the same. All right, diversify your thinking, and is going to help you to unlock your potential in to help you to fully step into your potential and your purpose in a way that no one can ever replicate. And is really just for me helps me to think about the diversity that I see in a certain brand that I absolutely love for many years. I've been just a huge fan of and it's due to the CEO the person who created the company in the first place and some of the things he was into was like ima- and nutrition in unconventional training tools. Like clubs steel clubs and steal. Macy's and frickin swords like all this stuff and also personal development and really working on becoming the best possible, human and leader. And friend that he can possibly be. And I'm talking about Aubrey Marcus who's been on the show, and he's just a really good friend of mine, and he's the CEO of on it. Oh in I t. This company is just literally exploded and has taken off to new dimensions. And you see so many different people out there. I mean, we're talking about millions of customers and people who are taking advantage of all their incredible resources. But also, you see this in these huge communities like mixed martial arts so much. So that not only are many of these top professional fighters apart of the on at team. But also they at the on it headquarters in Austin, they created in an m a training facility there. What that's a serious dedication to something that you love this is a nutrition Mike manufacturing place, and they readjusted in change their their facility to bring that part in and super inspire nece-. And they've got the cold crowd therapy there. They've got if you're an awesome pop on check him out go to on. It are the gym is just dope is just fine. All. Cool people. They're big shot to everybody down there. A primal soldier are Eric big shots of him. So many cool people, but bottom line is this came from the diversity inexperience of our remarks, and I highly encourage checkout on it. And I love their MCAT oil whenever I talk about my coffee, please. No, the MCAT oil is in it always like every time. I get. I'm upset as Drake song when I don't have my MCAT oil in I travel in happened. Forget it. It's only been like two times this happened. But I wanna make sure that I have my MCAT oil because of the Thermo genetic effects number one. This is all like, we've got clinical evidence for this also benefits for supporting your friendly, a gut flora and potentially getting rid of pathogenic bacteria and also the energy translation in your body because the MC tease, the medium chain triglycerides are in a form that can actually go directly through your cell wall to provide energy for the cell. All right. There's there's nothing else in conventional food that you can name that has at Saint capability. So I use the emulsified him see oil. Let me be clear, there's the, you know standard kind of clear MCC oil. That's cool. I love the most defied NC tool because it's like a coffee, Creamer that the texture the consistency. Super. Easy to blend mix together. And I love the on the milk lotto flavor. My wife loves the vanilla. I love the strawberry and some different stuff as well. Definitely check them out. It's on it dot com slash model. It's oh in in IT dot com for slash model. Ten percent off you get ten percent off everything their nutrition, supplements foods. Oh, man. Have you tried there fat butters yet? You gotta look at their fat butters. All right. Ooh. So good. And also their fitness equipment. So the rock, right. Dwayne the rock Johnson. He's using the on it kettlebells. Right. They are the primal bells. They've got marvel inspired battle ropes and kettlebells. Well, the ironman kettlebells just dope. All right. So many cool. Things steal Macy's and clubs. They are the company that put that stuff on the map. Check him out. Ten percent off everything that they carry are on dot com for slash model are so we covered. Number one on these. And it's really three steps to uncovering our purpose, and or fully stepping into our purpose authentically and powerfully number one was ideas, and the generation in diversity of ideas and exposure and being able and giving ourselves permission to express those ideas, that's number one. All right. So with ideas as great, but idea cannot manifest in purpose in and of itself. We also need the second component, which is passion. Now, first of all when we talk about living your purpose? The word passion in and of itself can be misconstrued. Right. A lot of us are thinking like I just need. I don't know what I'm passionate about. You know, you see somebody who's really, you know, in their purpose, and you see the passionately have and the work ethic and all the stuff they're doing but nine times out of ten. It's not like what you see especially out there on social media. You know, they're great individuals who are out there. Inspiring people like Gary v right? Gary vantage hook, you might see him on social media and see some of his talks, and you just see this incredible. He's as drip in passion is dripping off. Right. He's just very passionate bouncing around kind of character and approach to things, but the reality is this. Even if he wasn't doing this for Vader media in this entrepreneurship brand an investing and all the things that he's a big proponent of and giving content for helping entrepreneurs if it was put Gary v in selling John Deere tractors are selling cupcakes or selling clothes, sell, you know, selling the swag. He still probably going to have that same demeanor as somebody who is seemingly like bouncing around and and and excited about everything. Right. But that's just the person's character. You don't have to be overly excited about something to be passionate about it. So sometimes we see that we think I don't I don't have that. I don't feel like he does about that. We think we don't have passion, and it's a huge huge misconception and mistake to think that way because passion is not about being overly excited and having something like by new on the but to get you out of bed in the morning and throwing you in the shower. And just like pulling you to this vision. It's not like that. It's not like that ninety nine percent of the time passion, we tell you what it is passion is more like real love. Passion is more like real love not in love. Okay. Because there's a difference. There's a difference between being in love in real love are being in love with something is having that kind of, you know, constantly infatuated in wanting to be with this this something and work on it. But that initial phase fades away one hundred percent of the time at some point. So passion is really more like real love, which when you're in love, it feels like you're not in control, right? This love is just kind of captured. You really love is intentional. You choose it. I choose to do work in this relationship. I choose to be a part of this and to grow in this to develop this, even when things are not fun. Even with things are not this happy vibe or their struggle, or there's pain or there's confusion. I choose to be in this. I choose to work on this. And I choose to love you. It's not unconscious. It's not something. I'm not in control of I choose to love you. This is what passion really is. Because we're working in our purpose. Things are not always going to be rosy posy, sunshine. You know, everything is going to be going your way absolutely not and some of the greatest most successful most fulfilled. People will tell you that at many stories of trials and tribulations and things that they've gone through in working in their purpose. And so if we have a connection to something that we know that we would do no matter what even if there was not money attached to it, even if it was something that would require. A lot of our time and energy and focus. We'd still wanna do it. Then you kind of. Starting to to to hear the whispers of what that purpose and passion really looks like. And also, I think support is share this that the word passion itself is derived from Greek word meaning to suffer. All right. The word passion is derived from Greek word meaning to suffer. And it would automatically be kinda strange because it's just like I thought passionate was about something that was good and inspiring. But our passions can also take us through some really turbulent and in dark places sometimes in trying to figure out how to live with this passion, because it's generally pretty unique to us in some form or fashion. And how can I live this passion and keep this as a part of my life? They're suffering involved. You know, but I'm I'm a huge advocate of language right in so suffering for me is optional right? We don't have to necessarily tie passion to suffering, but just difficult times going through stuff needed to work on figuring stuff out and getting good at something. Right. Getting good at. Investing in something. Because for some some people they've been working at certain field in a passion just driving them through. And they put in these ten thousand hours in at world class of this thing, and they just enjoy what they're doing, you know, but it doesn't have to be this picture of what somebody else's passionate looks like. So you don't want to compare your story to somebody else's story when it comes to passion. I so I hope that makes sense. And this part was really brought to me today by my son. Brayden and he came over to me last night, actually, and he sat down next to me. And he asked me, hey, dad, when did you start speaking on stages, and I thought that was like really interesting that he asked me that. And he's been there. He's been in many of the events that I've spoken at over the years, even since he was a little baby. And sometimes I even involve him, you know, some of these events, and so is that he's been exposed to create this tapestry for him. This. A layer of of his thinking that this is something that you do in that is possible. And he asked me when did you start or how did you start? Speaking on stage is how did you start? How did you start which is a very powerful question? Because asking what are the steps that made that a thing for you? And I've literally spoken in front of thousands at different events. And it's been an incredible experience into something that I really enjoyed doing. Of course and make sure next time in a bit come in hang out with me. I we have the most amazing time. I definitely come to the next event. And I've got something really cool coming up here soon. Solid snow about that. So be ready. But the first time and I shared with him. I said, you know, what no one gives you permission to do the things that you wanna do in life. Nobody tapped me on my shoulder said, hey, you're going to speak. Hey, you're going to create a number one podcast, go do it. Nobody gave me permission to do any of this stuff. And that the same. Thing in our lives. Nobody's giving. You permission. You choose. And so I was inspired about things I was learning about nutrition. And so my first speaking event was in front of three people in my mother-in-law's kitchen, and I was super nervous actually. And I don't, you know, the nervous days nine, but for me at that time. I was like because I was I just wanted to be able to make sense right to help them to understand a what I was experiencing in. So I can help them to to up level their lives as well. And so I was very very invested in helping these people and it went from three people to five to ten to twenty two. My mother-in-law's kitchen was packed little people sitting on laps is too. Hot had multiple fans going AC. It got crazy. And then we were like, we should probably do this somewhere else. And it just kind of evolved from there, and then within the room people. They're telling other people about me, and what we were doing and then invited me to speak at their events. And you know, the kind of the rest is history. And so I shared that with him. But there was something even deeper than that. And this is what I would want to point your attention to. Sometimes in our lives, and we're talking about uncovering our purpose in your life. You can usually look back in fine tiny signs of what might be come. Right. We can find tiny signs of what might be to come. When I was just a kid. It was fourth grade while all before this. But fourth grade is the time is really kind of hit the the tipping point. And is when I was my my teacher was miss Norman so shot at the miss Norman, if you happen to be listening. Thank you. All right. But you know, I was getting good grades. I was doing what I need to do in class, but I was acting up a little bit. All right. I was acting up and my teacher made an agreement with me, and I don't remember how this came about. But she made an agreement with me that if I would stop acting up in class at the end of class. She would give me five ten minutes at the end of the week to stand up in front of the class and sing right to sing. Or? Or to you know, tell some jokes. The the stage was mine. And so I would bring my friend Andrea up there with me at the end of each week. And this was for several weeks this happen. And I was seeing I would entertain and I had forgotten about that. I forgot about it. Because that might not be encouraged, but I knew that I would be speaking in front of people. I knew that I would be behind the microphone and here. I am today. Speaking on these stages in front of thousands of people behind a microphone is just a different version of that. And something that really fills me up more than anything. I could have every magin. So look back on your childhood knows things that brought you joy and happiness, and these can be great guideposts to uncovering your passion and your purpose. But you might be like one of my passions. Was I love to cook. With my mom. I love to cook with my grandma, but I can't make a living through that. Yeah. You can right. Just the subject of food. We've had one of the Kevin curry put his episode in the show notes. He was here in the studio. He's crushing it. He didn't go to a school of whatever it become this what certified cordon blue, chef whatever he just started making food and sharing his food with people and sharing his story. And how he was making his recipes in his fitness journey and has become something has transformed his life in a bestselling book and all of this influence, and and livelihood, and he was able to like turn down a job at Google Google reached out to him is like not. I'm this is my this is my passion, and he's turned into a thriving business. So if you're interested in food, there is a way like if you're interested in like, I don't know sheera, right? She. Era from when I was a kid. There was he man than Shiro was like follow up. But you know, it's like the the female lead versus the the the male lead. And he man Shira. And usually I'm super I love sheera. It's my thing. I got she reteach shirts, you can create a website and sell sheera gear. Right. There's a new Shiro cartoon on Netflix. Like if that is your passion. There are ways for that to manifest because I'm pretty sure there are at least a couple of people who into sheera when they were kids that made that cartoon this new reboost possible. Right. So we have to start thinking differently about our our our experiences and things that we love to do. And even now is there something that is just calling to you in. You're super interested in that you want to get involved more with. But you talk yourself out of it. Because you have the story that you know, there's this for other people. This is something that I can't do. Maybe it's nutrition. Right. Maybe it's nutrition and health, and you just passionate about it. And you would love to be able to make. That your career in the thing that you get up and do each day is is teaching other people about health and nutrition and wellness in supporting your family through that means, and it is absolutely possible. But we tell ourselves stories that you know, I don't have this the experience. I don't have the connections. I don't have the resources. I don't have this. I don't have that. And we started talk ourselves out of something. That is literally just a decision aways is within reach it can be our lives, and we're gonna talk about that more in a minute. But there's so many different things that we can do in the health and wellness space. You might see that you know, this lane is totally taken. There are so many different lanes that you can choose so many different dimensions of it. And this is one of the things that we've been teaching in how to actually create a sustainable business in the health and wellness space because if we're going to help other people to really access their greatest version of themselves and to improve their livelihood. We have. To make sure we have our livelihood covered. So we're not like cutting corners and not spending time doing the thing that we're passionate about in the thing that we are here to do. Right because there are many people who are in the health and wellness space, maybe got a certification somewhere, and there, you know, health coach, but they're also working one or two other jobs just to make ends meet. And that's not how this is supposed to be folks are not getting the right education. Right. The nutrition stuff might be solid. But I think you should get the very best. And also the business side. I wasn't taught in college. How to be successful? There was no success one on one or one or two or two two. I would have taken them. Nobody's teaching you. How to actually be successful and to create a sustainable business, and it's not even that difficult. It just isn't. There are certain pieces of formula to it. The difficult part is getting yourself to the place where you say yes to it. And you take action and you fully enroll yourself in a bigger vision. And you are aware that. It's going to take that time and energy and effort, but you are going to create a life that you truly love and you're gonna make an impact on a lot of people's lives. So and as you know, I'm a partner and advisor for the institute of transformation with nutrition, and we are really leading the field in health coaching. But also in making sure that our students are making big big waves in this field. Right. We've got students who are making, you know, six and and seven figure incomes, but also some people that's not their goal is just having their bills covered and matching what their job is currently and having money to, you know, sustain their livelihood pay their bills and have a good life. But some people are like super killing it because we're giving them access to the very best teachers in the world in business and in nutrition. Right. And also the impact, you know, you've got some of the biggest influencers that are out there in the health and wellness space or students from our tin, and you get to learn from a lot of these folks as well. So if you're interested if this is speak. To your soul pop over. We've got a quiz see which would qualify for. And there's somewhere that you can fit trust and believe that but go to transformational nutrition dot com for slash model. Right transformational nutrition dot com for slash model while so put it for you in the show notes right now, we have our two thousand dollars scholarships still available. All right. We've replenish these funds, and we have two thousand dollars scholarships available and one of them is yours. All right. So pop over there. I process is taking the quiz and take it from there. But I just want to share that with you. If your passion is health and nutrition that you can absolutely make that the thing that you do in poor your passion into that. And make that your purpose are, so we've covered ideas, we've covered passion. Third component third and final component here with uncovering your purpose and truly walking fully incomplete. Early in your purpose in your power. The third component is decisions decisions. Really are when the most powerful forces in all of the universe. If you look back on your life in understand this piece that where you are today is a direct result of the decisions that you made in your life is directly every decision that you've made prior to this moment has brought you here to where you are today. If you really start to understand this you understand the power that decisions carry. All right. You were just one idea one decision away from transforming your entire life. It is that close is simply a decision away. Now. The catches decisions are super easy. But getting ourselves to the place that we make the decisions can be complicated. All right now, I've said this before but decisions are from the Latin day meaning from in kaija, which means to cut. So when you make a real decision about something, you're cutting way the possibility of anything else, but the thing. You decided on. So when some somebody truly decided to stop smoking. That's it. They're nonsmoker is no more discussion. They've decided it's done when somebody decides to start a business when somebody decides I'm going to spend the rest of my life with you. When you really decide these things it is done. Right. Come. What may this is what I've decided to do. Now that comes with a lot of weight. It comes with a lot of pressure because of all the other all the other. What about this? What about that decisions? Can be scary. That's why we don't easily make them are. It's not a small thing when you decide most people don't decide until things are so bad that they have to choose life has forced them to decide back against the wall there on the bottom floor right there. They're rock bottom in life. And they only way is up after decide to get up. That's what happened with me. My work is to make sure that you don't have to hit rock bottom. There's a net there. I I we're gonna hit the net. You won't get close. You hit. The net. You're gonna bounce up a bounce up. Trash Ps you grab the trapeze do some flips. Whatever you're going to be like, Robin. All right, Robin, Hugh, he came from the circus. I don't know. I've never mind. But this is the goal is to create a situation where we don't have to hit rock bottom. I because the reality is many of us don't get up many of us. Don't get up. You hear the stories of those that did? So you're just one decision away from creating that life that you were here for and that's the power of decisions. So with that said, how do we get ourselves to that place where we are making the decisions that we need to make first of all we gotta understand this point that the results in your life. Are only limited by expectations are everything in your life is built upon a framework mental framework of staying congruent with the person. You see yourself to be every decision that you make is based on who you. So who you see yourself to be there's certain things that you do because of your identity is certain things that you don't do because of your identity you have to work on shifting your identity. And how do you do that you shift your identity by getting exposure to the things we've talked about kitchens self around new ideas, get yourself around people who are thinking differently because you can get stuck in your own way of being your own way of thinking. So you need exposure that is the key. That's the tool as why these things are so important. That's why this is a formula. Get yourself around. And other people to help to shift that identity for you only. Then would you be able to make new decisions because so many times we think we're making a decision, but really just trying some stuff. I would really just wishing. Okay. We we think we're latte, and we're rubbing the lamp they, but the reality is you have not truly decided. Okay. It shot up to Aladdin, you know, re- reboot Will Smith out. Now, number one is realizing that that your limited only by your expectations your beliefs about who you are. And what you're capable of. And you will never you will never outgrow the beliefs that you carry about what you're capable of. That's it's the invisible box. So we put ourselves in. Okay. And so to get past that again, shifting the identity shifting exposure. Now also another thing with decisions. I want you to stop over thinking. Okay. Thinking is important. I want us to think, but sometimes we mull over and we over think, and we think ourselves right out of wonderful experiences and learning lessons, even if it doesn't go the way that we planted to we still are gaining experiencing getting ourselves closer to the person in the life that we went to live. So we need to stop over thinking everything in analyzing I talked about this on episode to kick off this year five things to quit doing this year in in twenty nineteen when this is played. So if you're listening to this, you know, next year years from now that show is still hyper relevant. All right. I talked about perfectionism that can be one of the things that stops us. I so overthinking, but for some people is not perfectionism is also just fear of like all the possibility of what negative can come. And we we again, we can think ourselves right out of taking action in in life that we want. All right. So that's the other part is. With zillions. A real decision comes along with action. There couple together you truly if there's not an action taken when you have decided you haven't really decided. All right. So take action when you decide that this is happening. I'm about to do this thing. I'm going in this direction taken action. That is informing your brain. You're serious and all of life. The entire universe is conspiring to assist you in going in that direction when you decide it has your entire life. When you decided to do something everything has fallen into place to create the life that you have today. Whether it's the life that you want it consciously or the life that you settled for those are the things that you decided upon. All right. It finally. Please understand you you're going to experiment. You're going to get out try and taste and touch experience different things. This is super important. We've talked about this throughout this show. But the reality is we need to surround ourselves with it with with new environments new people new inputs, and also, of course, the positive affirming environments and people who really helped to affirm who you are what you're about in what you're here for our. We all need that in this a superpower we can have access to today on than ever are. So I hope you've got a lot of value out of this. And I want you to go into your day right now with this quote from Napoleon hill who wrote the epic powerful manifesto thinking grow rich. He said, quote, you are the master of your destiny, you can influence, direct and control your environment. You can make your life. What you wanted to be our thank you so much for tuning into the show today. If you've got a lot of value out of this make sure to share it out with your friends and family on social. Media. And please tag me. I'm at Sean model on Instagram. Let me know what you thought about the show, and you can follow me tag me on Facebook as well that's at the model health show on Facebook. And I appreciate you so much for tuning in today. And I truly do believe that there is greatness in. You you have gifts talents capacities that have never existed before and human history and will never exist after you. You are important and your time is now. So let's step up and step into me. Take care have an amazing day. And for more after the show makes her to head over to the model health show dot com as we could find all of the show notes he could find transcriptions videos for each episode. And if you've got a comment, you can leave me a comment there as well. And please make sure to head over to itunes and leave us rating to let everybody know that the show is awesome. And I appreciate that so much and take care. I promise a key giving you more powerful empowering great content to help you transform your life. Thanks for tuning in.

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S13E30  Whistling indoors

Ubuntu Podcast

39:44 min | 4 months ago

S13E30 Whistling indoors

"Welcome season episode thirty of the book. I'm alan joining me this week. As martin. how you pray well yourself. Yeah you know. I'm sure we should make this video poker high one of one of those weeks and only choose day. Oh my gosh yeah martin. What you've been up to this week. Well i have Been upgrading my computer whole. Yeah it's been all over the incident now seeing photos of lots of expensive pieces of computer equipment Well yes they. All started with the very first expensive pair of computer equipment which is a new graphics card. So i saw that Nvidia released their new three thousand series cards so you got some bitcoin Had the day off work on release day and purchased an rtx. Thirty nine is the ones which fills up half of the case Yeah it's triple width card. And i have a large case and just has like full millimeters of clearance in the of the length of the case the volume. That's taking up the heat sink or the fan. Yeah i mean the economy the circuit board in the chip because this is the heat sink. In the fans i mean the circuit board is is a thin fairly thin. Pc pcb these channels where they tear it down. You think. Close all this fuss about this though thing. Yeah it's like a key low and a half of copper tubing and Fiend stacks what have you and then three Great big fans plant on top of that out and Can you play crisis Yes i can even play the remastered version which is just being released as well. I think To coincide with the launch of these These cards and have you actually used in anger or is it just been admiring and taking photos for instagram. I've been playing some games. Were the first thing. I did is Stretch out my lead as the number one performing computer gaming on lenox benchmark forums. So there's a standard standard bent coupla benchmarks to do that so immediately i ran up those and then over by system and trimmed down the operating system and just made the mougins bigger and bigger addssome funding. That played some games as well driving games. of course so You know all the usual one so you know f one twenty seventeen and grid autosport and the rally and then some of the all katie ones. That's pretty much all i play. I did actually play some something else. Career what it was now played an actual compute. Oh yeah it was it. So there's only one rtx game on lenox rtx being the ray tracing technologies. And that's quake too. I think is which was remastered with full light ray tracing so i've played expecting to date anyway as someone who is averse to first person shooters. I quite enjoyed that i. I was having fun playing that. So i think because of its vintage. It's a little simpler than some of today's first person shooters any. It was about my pace. So i enjoy playing excellent mark even up to anything. I been playing. Haiti's did i mention that you have you still been playing a lot. more hours. clocked up in. Hell have you year. I've no actually kept track of how many hours but he eats. Good still enjoying it. I'm not a lot further. Third bosses very tricky. I find okay. Awesome well before the hearing more about another time. Let's get on with the show. So i we want to seven chat about that. There is not thing that everyone keeps talking about and to be clear in the context of this conversation. We're going to be talking about iot devices in a domestic home setting we're not talking about industrial robots and iot in the enterprise and stuff that manages buildings and sits smart cities or any of that nonsense. We're just talking about the stuff that you as a human being might put in your dwelling to make your life better. So how are we qualifying devices. Mark do you have a definition in your head of one iota devices. Okay when i think of is device it is a device which you plug in in your home and it connects to the internet and does something performs some sort of utility in your home using the internet to enable that he said plug in and i have some that. Don't plug it so yeah. Let's be william vague. It's a thing in your house and he's probably got an ip address that so. I think there's some things that we can easily go to. There's the smart speakers. I'm not gonna say their names robust reasons and in recent years lighting stuff. But then i was wondering do like games. Consoles passes an internet of things device Because i have one that has some of the features of some of these other more traditional. You know i m not devices is not. Because he's a general purpose computer happens to be running the software which also runs one of these embedded devices. I think that's the difference. Is these things on general peps. Computers generally imbedded systems. I think we should discount general-purpose competing devices such that might live on your desk and have a keyboard and a screen right which it's not one of those and well also things are all in one screen which occupies most of the device. Snow one of those either so okay. So what you're saying is basically set top box of sorts. Yes right so. I don't know i guess they do. I guess they do count. Because it's a single purpose purpose device much like a smart speakers a single purpose device. Okay it's extendable extensible so we've kind of talked around a little bit. So what what i. O t devices. Do each of us have in our homes. Well i started with. I think well obviously set til books and you know. I've had those over the years i'm going to dismiss those. I didn't think they can't for my for my thoughts. So i'm going to dismiss those and say of the lady cylinders and i call them that simply because a lady's voice in its electrical The us to the amazon one. I used to play music and ask for weather and the kids. Use it to do the homework and stuff like that. Can i just make a point. Hey you're you're trying really hard not to say the at. It's called amazon echo for a reason right so that you don't have to say the when you when i often say the word inadvertently and there is one on my desk. It doesn't matter. Utsa his headphones on icee. Then it might react so yeah of course some of them. Five of those dotted around the house. Those are the first things go. Are they connected as a single coherent group is downstairs group and to them upstairs so no then all group together you can't you can't do stuff like play music on all of them and it will synchronize the music or of them or play podcast across all of them so as you walk from one room to another. It's quite like that. I quite like having the same audio me as i walk through the house. If i'm doing housework or something you know carrying close from one of the house to another. I don't lose the context of a conversation going on our podcast or something. I quite like that. And because i'm not wearing headphones i don't have the warriors wires batteries or one of my kids jumping out of somewhere and scaring me because i'm wearing headphones playing. Its engine. which does happen in this house. So yeah that was. The first thing is the amazon things. Yeah so i think as well in the traditional sense of iot devices that was the first iot device. We had in fact curiously the day i got it. Mark was at my house. Yes and it was the original echo of the tool amazon echo and My daughter who was identified like four or five at the time was absolutely fascinated by this thing that you could talk to and it would owns you. So that's where it started for us. We have three of those now on that all discreet. So one is. My daughter's one is my wife. Someone is lying on their in different rooms in the house yes mark. I don't think you have one of these. The no i mean the the closest thing that i have really is a couple years ago. I tried to make my doorbell using a ross reply and a fancy button that i bought off ada fruit but no. I don't have one of these amazon echos unfortunately fortunately so. I got to the point where you could go a notification to my favorite when someone press the doorbell but stopped working and then i basically i had a baby and i didn't have time to mess with doorbell so i went out and bought a wireless doorbell instead of trying to make one so the even my doorbell doesn't tell my phone when when someone's reading the door so speaking of doorbells i also have the ring branded doorbells which have cameras on them to them because my house is a weird shape into the doors face fords and some people come to wondering some people come to the other and he's quite nice that when someone's giving delivery and i'm upstairs they hit the button and all of the echoes in house bring and then say there's somebody at the front door of the somebody at the side door as tells me which door to goatee. Now i can hear joe saying i'm completely lazy and really. It should just be a doorbell. And you can buy doorbells traditional bells that have two different rings or two different doorbells. Oh yeah i mean we had before this. We had two different buttons one on each door but they haven't been ditches on the back and you could change the ring depending on which door button was pressed. You can't do this without small without ip addresses. But i think the thing that i like about. This is the accessibility. I didn't have that ring doorbell. And so that wasn't a feature that i cared about. And then when they came out. And i saw my neighbor had one and i thought actually. That's quite cool. I like the fact that the doorbell and in fact this morning i had a delivery from ikea at seven. Am and i was laying in bed and there's almost no chance anyone's going to rise me out my bed at seven in the morning because they hit the doorbell and the amazon thing is right. next to my head's by my bed it rang and said there's somebody at the front door and so luckily zombie. I was able to bed. Go to the door so you could argue that lazy. But i actually call them for good so the recently very recently in fact. I've got quite a lot of small bulbs smart lights and lamps and things so this will face. All of the lighting in this room is smart in air quotes. I can whisper her name and she will. Illuminate me in every color of the rainbow. And then for my livestreaming. I've got l. Ghardaia key lights. Now those icon speak to but i can push buttons on my phone and turn on and off and that's quite nice because i just now have one button. Which tends everything on and sets everything the right levels whereas before it was all manual to around and twiddle nope some buttons on six seven different things so i'm ready so setting out where they is something that saved me a bunch of time and something. I do quite regularly. I just push a button and magic happens. So what you using your iot devices for an ave a labor saver for you or are they just not value. I mean i could open the amazon app. And scroll through and tell you will the things i've ever said because it keeps track of all the things you say partly because there's a button next it where you can say where it says did did did i do the right thing. And can say yes or no to help train the algorithm or whatever they call it to make it better and so if i scrolled through i would probably find that another time. It's me having. I want to listen to the radio. And so i'll just say her name and then say play and then radio station. I want to listen to. And there's like half a dozen radio stations. That i listen to law and as i walked from one room to another. I'll tell one of them to shut up in the next room. I'll like play different radio stations. So a lot of it is just playing radio. And yeah that's convenience. I don't have any radios in this house anymore. It's all streaming radio and some radio stations. Just aren't i listen to on available on normal. Fm bands and if they're on the reception's terrible and cuts out whereas streaming of the incident. They so you know yeah okay. I could replace this. Internet enabled device with something else. But it wouldn't be as good right. I also use them to turn the lights on and off and self light outside and inside which come on at the twilight so the lights are on. If i'm coming home in his dog. I know the lights will be on which is more welcoming and i have all the lights in house. Go off at bedtime and stuff like that. So yeah it's it's automation. Some of it and some of it is just convenience lot of the time it's set in a timah in a three minutes. I'm cup he'll you know senator time if something in the oven and setting multiple times and having her beep at me for a convenience more than anything and while i could use a smartphone could use a notepad and a piece of paper when i'm making chicken wings picking up a pen and a piece of paper and the smother in like chicken juice all over them. Some of these cases are very similar. I actually looked and i could. I could say that. Broadly there are five things. Every smart speaker only needs to do five things that needs to be able to play music. Radio stations this is what we're we we do. I'm turn lights on and off Tell you the weather and Kitchen timers is the is the main one Because when i'm cooking. I don't have to stop push buttons. I just yell at the thing and tell it to set a timer for two minutes and it's done so as i saw alluded to when i said once i tried to do this thing and then i didn't anymore you kind of get the impression that i don't really have any of these things and for me. It's kind of a trade off. Because while i have you. I don't have an internet of things in my house. I wouldn't mind having an in front of things in my house if everything state within my network but what i'm not ready to kane on is all of this stuff is essentially bouncing stuff off someone else's servers and sending my data elsewhere and that data's being used for some purposes other than just providing me with these comedians and for me the things you've just described there's got to be a trade off so yeah i carry a small phone around which does a lot of the same things that gathers a lot of data and so on but for me a smartphone having smartphone in your pocket everywhere is it's a completely life-changing device whereas the ability to not put push the button on the front of my oven when i'm standing in front of my oven cooking something. It's not worth having something. That's always listening to what i'm saying. And what my family is saying in my house. All of the time in order to enable that the trade off isn't worth it for me. Well i think you'll minimizing. How time has work. Because it's not okay so there is one timer. There is on the front of your oven. Your oven has one time it does. My microwave has a second time. My smartphone has as many as i need in the almost never events that i need to time things differently like that. I just sat one timer and then i remember how long everything needs. It's yeah maybe you might not like cooking something complex and you want different things to finish at different times then maybe of different times or jansher. Okay yeah okay or do what. My mother in law does and she has a notepad and she writes down all the times and then takes them off as she puts things in the oven and stuff like that sure. There's analog versions of all of these these things could go and look out the window to see what the weather is like but he's quite nice to know when she says there is a an percent chance that it's going to rain in the next hour. He's quite nice to know as i'm walking out of the house. It's a convenience. The whole thing is it commits a trade off. You're right there is the possibility well there is the inevitability this data is being sent somewhere else and i know is being sent somewhere else. Certainly for the ring doorbells. Because i pay for service that the video for three days and so i know that the video is sat on a server somewhere the video of a dog walking boss my front door in the video of me leaving the house in the morning and me arriving at the house a few hours later all of that stuff is archived on a server somewhere and i think i've come to the realization that life is too short and i don't care i don't care that there is video somewhere of me in a public place driving onto my driveway. I don't there is no tangible harm. That can come from knowing. The i was driving onto my driveway at ten thousand nine this morning. Because anyone who's standing outside my house could see that anyway. Okay so another. Another thing that i think about is the fact that essentially your you all providing for free a load of data for someone else to exploiting for their business and not really compensating you for it. Which isn't something that. I'm particularly comfortable with just like i did when i contributed to the projects. Before i started working for canonical. There are some times in life. Where like i contributed album. Titles to the cd project back in the day but they're not see these. These are open projects which you can then benefit from not anymore isn't it was bought by a company and closed so no is complete. It's an example of that happening is happening. But i'm not. I'm not thanks good thing. I'm saying yeah. I'm old and i've got a long history of contributing to stuff over the years. Which is you've been browbeaten by the you just stopped. Caring partly is partly. i just think. I've got to the point. Where life is too short and i think like okay. Yes it is a minor worry that these things are listening all the time and listening for their wake word and maybe they hear something. I say that sounds a bit like their name. And from that point on words for a few seconds they record the next few words of my mouth that data then get shipped off to a server. The i don't have control over. That's a bit of a worry. But what are gonna do with that like this. Three seconds of me saying something after the word that sounds a bit like what her name is. Okay maybe maybe those words might be. And then i murdered. That's quite unlikely not i. Don't think the kind of person who has committed here heinous crime and then he admitted it after slightly saying the lady cylinders. Name such that it's recorded and stored on a disk somewhere in a data center. I don't know it seems like a contrived thing that actually isn't going to happen. I dunno so earlier. This year when i started During the small light thing. The first set of bulbs. I bolt all bluetooth only so the hugh phillips bulbs but they don't require a hub They have an app that you put on your phone. A different app to the one speaks to the hub and you set them up a manage them entirely for bluetooth right and i use that for day and thought this is good and then i stop some small plugs and then it was all a boever pfaff and i bought a home hub and go the out does have and did it all in one place in it's infinitely easier to create these multiple profiles and zones and all the rest of it rather than turning them on and off discretely via bluetooth. I mentioned i mentioned a few weeks ago. The fact i bought these tapa camera to monitor my daughter's nursery. Which i think you probably agree that i don't will narrowcasting over the internet. I don't think either of you would like video of your child on the internet without the with so the interesting thing about that is. I can use their up which manages all their devices body is. I'd internal app. It's not there might be something that the can connect to the internet. But the fact. I've filed the camera off from the internet doesn't impact anything at all about how it works. I mean days possibly the with something like that. The mining convenience that if you had that setup for another purpose you might be able to view it from outside the house but for me. That's not anywhere near the use case. Have for so. He's actually quite nice. That you sets up a direct wi wi fi connection to the camera to set up and then it connects from there to your wifi and then it keeps everything internal and yet that for me was a nicer a nice feature of it even though is it's actually using their dare official app it doesn't have to connect to the internet and bounce their server to do it. It's interesting how some companies are doing that. The nevada combs right way or safeway or failsafe safe. There was a apple keynote. Today and there was a whole section on Home lifestyle products bill around the apple smart speaker and at the end it was punctuated with someone very clearly saying what leaves your house and we'll does not leave your house and under these circumstances it won't and you can only do certain personal questions when your phone is nearby so implying that you are nearby so if you're in the house the kids count query your calendar and stuff like that. So it's it's it's it's i find it interesting that some companies are pushing the privacy englehard and pushing the data to yours and the data stays within your network and isn't going to be exfiltrated out to to all data center somewhere but does that bother you to mountain. I'm in a similar camp. You in the eye. I think about these things and i try to do the right thing. But then i like the convenience of some of these devices and software. So you know. Mark talked about fiber rolling his camera. All of my smart devices are on a separate valen. Which i do have network monitoring on and i do look at just to see what they're up to and that's just being a little little bit cautious i suppose and matt's kind of the extent of myself tinfoil hat ignace about these devices and i was just thinking you know would i get any mole and i think yes i would. I would certainly like to have more smart lamps and plugs and lights around the house that super convenient and a bit like you. I would probably go as far as you know. The doorbells video entry and smart entry devices is when in the future as funny. I i was thinking you know. None of these things are essential. They're not like bread and milk. I could do without all of these things. In fact like around the house and pull the batteries out of all the ring doorbells and i could just all of the amazon echos in the house and replace all of the light bulb with traditional led. Deal whatever light bulbs and i. It wouldn't be a catastrophe. Wouldn't be a disaster. I wouldn't have a massive problem with it. But i quite like being able to step into the kitchen and say thing radio full and on it comes immediately. After a brief advocate for bbc sounds ab- debut. Please still doing podcasts. I think then none of them massively change your life at all. They conveniences and it's nice. That when i drive up to the house the lights are already on and it's nicer eleven o'clock it could not just me to go to bed by turning the lights in the house of or fading them down or fading them up in the morning to wake me up. That kind of thing is that these are all nice things to have. These are all luxury. Trappings of first world but the essential and i could do without them by quite like them that i'm interested to know from listeners. What iot in that devices you have. We ran a quick straw poll for fun yesterday on our twitter account and the general consensus was on those things in my house But i'm interested to hear from people who do whether they're the kind of people like martin who watched the network or like mark firewall. Them off. completely. All i made care. Let us know. Send us an email show of anti podcast dot org. And now it's time for command line love and this one. I saw the internet's martin win. Press please outs in a very obvious. Humble brag about how many cpu has what's this then. Martin what's this all about. Well you may remember. We talked about bash top a little while ago and we send yan's and alm file wave youtube videos and blog posts and all the rest of it saying how this was an amazing system monitoring tool for your command line. Well bash talk is dead about well. It's been fine because they've been working on. Be pi top which is yes. They need to work on the name. I saw somebody coming on twitter. They should have cooled it by top pie bash topi are you just put wi on the end bash. Topi which would have been quite good anyway. It's a pipe an implementation of the same tool. It's be pie. top is available as a snap. It's also instill liberal via pip and you run be top and it does all the same things except and here is why i had that picture. I was running back top all my new supercomputer which i will talk about next week and brush crashed because it couldn't cope with all the 'cause i went to the website to file a bug or see if this was an issue and there was a big banner saying Be pi topaz. The success so i went to that page read. It did a snapping stole connected. Some interfaces i'm be. Pi top works absolutely fine so i didn't have to raise my bug on the dead bashed. I started using b-pi top instead. I could see all sixty four threads during nothing while doing something for a very short amount of time and then doing nothing right. Brilliant so be pie is the new bashful indeed. Thanks and now it's time for all of your wonderful feedback. Ratchet emailed us love. The show just wanted to let you know the time using a bantu to ten daily billed as my daily driver. The decision was taken after a few weeks of using tinted vm. And always blown away by the performance of it. I think two thousand eighteen is more stable than the lts twenty four hundred my system. I feel like my computer has been resurrected. This version of nolan super-slick. Many things have been to team in malton. And i'm sure this will be one of the best releases seen in a while. That's good to hear. It's always nice to get a reinforcement of the releases not yet upgraded. All of mine two thousand ten as well this machine. I'm recording on now and laptop behind me and to others there will twenty ten. It's working really well is very good yet. We had a twenty ten testing day at work today pretty successful. I'm really looking forward to this. Release super inform. email us. he says on the back of your victory with grievous guerrilla naming for the next to release mountain may i suggest who bristol hyena. Well his thing. I'm managed to catch the attention and air of mark shuttleworth to get that gravy guerrilla name and dies and going to happen again. So thank you twice. You definitely not twice in a row. Yeah exactly exactly so. Thank you for your suggestion. But this one is very squarely in Mr shuttleworth's cool. I think make left to comment on our youtube channel mugs. Soft edged stay in the windows world leafs mimics alone to its stable life. Anyone need educated boots up your windows. Ten vm and do it get your loads of virus. There enough is enough. Doubt commence from youtube do that. Nobody's forcing you to use it. He don't after install it you could just know. Install it it's fine. It's fine and mike del ripple emailed us. I am eagerly anticipating the release of microsoft's dad's brilliant. that was. This is why. I put the youtube coming in because i thought it was great that you know we have you know broad broad interesting analysis he goes on say. I switched to five fox from crime as my daily drive for about two years ago. Five fox contain developers. Tools are what drew with me with recent developments that missoula. I don't believe fire. Fox will be a viable develop a browser within a year or two. I'm not ready to go back to chrome. But i need to develop on a browser. The normals us unthought. What has me interested in. Mike soft-edge while i trust microsoft a lot more than once did i have heard grumblings about edge sending more telemetry data that i would necessarily want so. Here's the question. What tool would you recommend to analyse telemetry data coming out of the edge browser wants. It's released. I don't want sift through the traffic in my network. So i'm looking for a way to analyze the data coming out specific application. Why shock that was my first thought but then you would need to constrain that to just the traffic to from a particular apps. So i'm not sure how to do my head while you can do. In a vm. So you could have y. Shark running on the ip address. Of the vm. And have the browser in the em or you can have on another computer on your network if he wanted to vm. If you've got another laptop be could monitor all the traffic from that machine and if the only application running on that machine was edge then you just gonna get desktop traffic and whatever just doing. I mean his question. What would you recommend. I wouldn't not security professional. No name professional. Let someone else do it. And see what the internet comes up with because this is exactly the kind of thing that you know. Security professionals on the internet are going to be looking for. So i would go and hunt down articles about edge telemetry. And if you can't find one drop a hint to some security nerds somewhere. And if they'll do it for because they've probably got the tools in the nile today at dusty nisbet jones emailed us two questions because you each recommend focused on youtube channel or both that you really like all of your suggestions in the past have always been stellar. And so i'm sure listeners will enjoy your recommendations. Okay johnny go. I mark okay. This is this is going to be a bit niche burr. Give it a go. It's the critical role. Podcast so critical role is Basically some a team of friends playing dungeons and dragons and all voice actors professionally and. It's absolutely brilliant. Basically it's kind of like listening to an improvised ply the episodes along. But you can you know. Break them up. If you want a really good listen. That sounds awesome martin. What about you. So because dustin emailed us two questions breaking with the strict guidelines of this segment. I decided. I'm gonna answer this question with to youtube recommendations and no podcasts whatsoever. So i'm going to recommend a two youtube channels from australia. One could gase 'cause and another one could hardware on boxed and they're both sort of Pc hardware enthusiasts gase because has lennox angled some of that stuff so if you want to see the latest hardware and often with into running on it. that's great and nick is Very entertaining and hardware and boxes deep dive hardware information and there's none of the shouting That the american equivalent channels do And it's a little bit australian and bandari. And i like them a lot. Okay so i'll give you a youtube channel cooled lindy beige and this is a gentleman who is an acc eulogised by trade and a bit of an amateur historian seemed like a professional historians me but he just sets his camera and talk straight to the camera about mostly battle and war related things and he is such an enthralling person. You need to watch these videos. Crabbe or some other beverage and just pay close attention to what he's saying because he is so engaging. I even sit through all of his adverts and watch while he reads his adverts because they're just as entertaining as the video itself. And i have to pass on credit for passing that on to andy smith from bit folk because he recommended linney beige to me. And so i'm recommending it to review and a podcast. I would recommend the taskmaster podcast which is interesting. Because they haven't actually put out any episodes yet because the newspapers of thomas muster starts this week on channel four in the uk and One of the contestants on a previous episode is presenting cost. It's going to be released immediately after the tv episode as so. I'm looking forward to that. I haven't heard any episodes. Yeah other than the intro. It's going to be released so they get. There's not a question but we don't have time for that so moving onto the final piece of Email from gear apple store. I think a into marty. Twenty four one thousand. Lcs's i was prompted. To upgrade upgrade. Almost full is but i miss my gnome. Do what is the recommended. Way of getting similar functionality. On a bantu multi twenty four. I want something that makes it easy to start. Applications using the keyboard only something that learns which applications are used most frequently and gradually suggests these ulta. Just a key stroke. Okay so let's start. Game do is no longer available because it's not maintained anymore. And it was removed from the archives. I looked at all of the launcher things that i knew of and all of them have fallen into disrepair except for one so my recommendation to you is cup fifa which is in the archive apt stool cup. It's a spotlight style application and you hit control space to invoke it all there. You can remember that k. And it's got integrations full web browsers a music players and calendars and contacts. And just everything. So you can search files you can execute you know applications and you can also look information that's in your other applications as well and it's the only one that's still maintained There's a new version on their website if you want to grab that So there is cup for what up links in the show notes and. that's all for your feedback that we have time for this week. We have to have more time. All famous owed thirty. Thank you for listening Next time we'll be back with some news and community news and maybe some events who knows but it meantime if you want to keep up with us you'll find us on twitter at a to podcast and you can also find on telegram. You'll find this to polka dot org slash telecom. I'm finally thanks to jay during our show production. If you need ho cost production services you can contact him at joe risks dot com cenex time

amazon katie ones martin amazon Utsa youtube hugh phillips Nvidia boever pfaff Haiti alan Mark three minutes william two minutes apple Three seconds joe ignace Mr shuttleworth
50: Paying it Forward

Software People Stories

28:20 min | 1 year ago

50: Paying it Forward

"Velka M- to this episode of the Software People Stories. This is a very special episode for us and I hope you find it very special because this is the fifty I get that the other day meant you try and I were talking about the fiftieth episode. The team thought could be paying it forward because one of the reasons this started was also also debate forward and also to share that the software people. I'm not just geeks and nuts but also have softer sides to them and always keen on paying it forward. The open source movement in the software industry is a very great example of people creating without expecting any returns directly in this episode. We don't don't have one guest but seven seventy five. PM Poker Leagues to share their own abuse and experiences with being forward. And of course to try and I share our perspectives perspective. As well I hope you would also come forward and share your experiences and bad forward the community through this affair people stories. Listen good afternoon shift it has been. I'm feeding a little nostalgic today because we're very close to eating fiftieth episode. How do you feel about this milestone still mixed feelings I of course exempted person is a lot of people said that it is very difficult to sustain beyond this exhibition if you owed on seven so it was a little bit of a doubt initially but then head came game from different quarters including been used attendance at the new would also like to the dig the ignace code so the technical the media fifty first episode to injured Zito but definitely fifty episodes is not smaller than it's been almost a year that we've been I'm doing you know the point you said that helps came in from unexpected sources That was also something that I experienced medium strength and I said Okay and partners with you and let's see how far disclosed Honestly I had a lot of self doubt STU especially during the initial episodes when I found myself struggling with editing Stitching together posting the absolute and every little step seemed highly trivial yet so difficult to accomplish but at every step of the way. That's been help help from you help from other colleagues help from friends. I think over a period of time I sort of eased into it and now when I look back I feel the donny was well worth it. Because this is this is a medium that I've liked but more importantly I see that it's been able to attract so many people around. Yeah absolutely in fact. That is really nice. Bugged the hell coming in shipping of the challenges that you mentioned also colluded against getting down. Some of them had doubts about being on. What do I do have to say? It's Ah I think one of the reasons starting this gusts or Mayo but also is being brewing that everybody has something to shed and everybody has something to benefit from others so innovate with team of a being forward was born. Good starting this because I haven't experienced that myself. I remember the first memory to have receiving something without the wasn't expecting anything in there was a neighbor of mine when I was in schooling playful and then always interested in other the things that studies and didn't attend different activities and so on so she the thing not just telling me but also sitting with me replying to help me a bed for a failed because he moved on to the job so he would out of the lead. They used to say that. But I took it rather lightly and then I the exam then later on. When do I ac- I see A? He was very happy saying that. This is what we're doing and then he asked. Could you do this. And what candidate Jamir do or why not anything else. I've seen you think the view of again a little more if you take up a a ghost in that way to ensure this is going to help you know unexpected. I think in the gun. I'm extremely grateful at least giving the system. It is not just a monsignor who this they used to spend a lot of time teaching physics and vans. And how do you look at the problems. Now definitely that I did maximize on the guidance that he was lead to give me. So that is what I've been trying to Lou overtime shedding to me. The beaching is shedding your expedience. So that something that gives me a lot of satisfaction and invaders things that they do talk about it later becomes that also prompted me to think of studying this podcast where we can go beyond on the boundaries of Roy Platform to come in shed do also have the experiences of guests drumbeat industry to shed their own stories. Began drawing spacious draw. Some of these cannot be slotted. Does lecture it is not a document that you can create so these relations I've also heard from some of the listeners that have been insufficient for them thumbs of both knowing how somebody address some of the challenges as well as it is a very very heartwarming story. Shift in fact one thing that struck me when you were talking all all of us have this inherent nature to think beyond ourselves. It's just that perhaps few people realize that early on and actually do it like you said this gentleman gene was persistent. You know all of us have had such people in our lives. In fact I would say definitely right now but then you are one person from who I have sensed insistent and that's actually helped me do things and do them better so I have to say thank you to you for that but I also think that this this is something that is so pervasive around us. If I can go back in time and just look at my school days and in college days very a similar expedients and terms of teachers would not you or push you. I think there was the intent that they genuinely wanted to make a better human being out of you and yes I also have perhaps not having paid the kind of attention that would have helped me maybe a different career path or discover something thing else in life career basketball started. That way is when my coach actually spotted me when I was perhaps in class six or seven and all all he saw was this tall girl who lived right opposite and he just approached my parents and please send her to please. She has the height. And let's see what she can do. In of course with a lot of reluctance I went because it meant sticking to a routine it meant a lot of hard work Abbott. For my parents. It was a a big relief because it meant that the child was getting exercise and was out of the House for a couple of hours. But over the beat of the flame I began Santa Delays. That I was enjoying learning the game the exercises and most of all having so many teammates who later became very good friends to do it with all through this journey any of about ten plus years. The coach was someone who constantly pushed encouraged instill discipline confidence teamwork and so much more with a completely selfless approach and even in college. I was lucky to find a professor so who offered to tutor me along with other sports students in a a fairly complex subject of control theory simply because he wanted us to do well in both academics and sport and not give up on one or the other he suddenly went beyond his call of duty. And I'm so grateful for it. That is very interesting to have a particularly Like the example of teachers ultimate and dumping going forward they go beyond job not take it on the job but the empathy and the gap that they give and that resonates with what the Kelly had busy. Listen to his thoughts on paying it forward I find it idea of paying it. Forward very appealing mainly because of the potential for long term impact and the possibility of setting in motion. A chain of leads in the past couple of years and my father and I intend may needed living agendas iphone how hard it is to get one. Given that Teresa's are mostly in the unorganized sector. That's by that experience with a good number. Condensers was very good on it becoming middle-aged man without massively sources on education often leaving their families behind an idiot model but the decent people easily blending in a good sense of don'ts by living in someone else's household and most importantly demonstrated a level of compassion compassion for the patient that we actually did not expect. Many of them treated my father-in-law own father and went well beyond their call of duty in confronting him mentally tally as well as physically. I believe such acts of genuine kindness should be amazed more than just through immediate payments. It can take the form of a corpus tape Assistance to children medical insurance for them or pension scheme. And they themselves can no longer customize like my father-in-law and actors themselves who says on their children and they grow up can contribute to this corpus. This is just an initial idea. Lots to be thought through on his ability getting it started and sustaining living in this game. Thank you ship with many of us having eating patterns and we ourselves soon becoming an older population this selfless acts acts of Keiko's certainly outta call to all of us debate for but for them sometime topic of taking game. I think that's also very rigby of paying forward and in fact a UNIN talks about nick. Let's listen to him. I really like paying it forward as a concept because they didn't create you someone to do something kind without expecting anything in return. Hopefully we do not keep score and wait to benefit from act of kindness before we do our next one personally. The most significant act of kindness that I have received is emotional support from friends when they needed it. Most I would. I'd like to pay that forward someday. And and more so because it's not an easy thing for me to support someone emotionally difficult for me. Have a parenting forward. I can think of one example. Nothing major but something that gives me a great deal of heart dysfunction one of the projects that it was engaged in my mentor had the habit of for always appreciating what did no small or big. I wouldn't turn pass on my genuine appreciation to someone else the same day over time I started getting satisfaction by looking at the face of the person receiving those words of a position so what started as paying it forward has become a habit now I do not have received words of a precision before handing them out although I needed to mind mice with every now and then to carry on with act. Learning by observing. People around does do these acts of kindness or forward and seeing the effects of it. How simple it is to do? Thanks for sharing. I've been Guidry also has once going beyond thinking about hit by this that it is through mindfulness. The goods at the lips listened to her. My early memories of being it forward comes from my GRANDPA who used to be a Alesi Alesi agent that time he used to talk about you'll shameem hominum watered muses if everybody is fine in this world that's what helps back in Tamil Nadu because this was so they couldn't become it is Everybody looks at it. Looks at yourself as a family for for me. Personally I I always think of bringing family takes village. So I have a constantly being Some voluntary services or the other and that is maybe radio being it forward as as the net is so so veep date. So that's the belief I have and because of that I lamb part of multiple Wallace's earlier in my Society had been Insisted on being a part of the Green Waste Management. I have a thought number of people on Yoga and mindfulness and Now I'm part of Anita Dot Org to increase the money empowerment to continue. Can you do have Roman technologist in their career. So if I had my way I would definitely like to have more and mover Sushila Sheila enterprises that we great to have in the society but clearly are on the climate. Change and already irradiation. I used to be part. The United Nations Sustainability Twenty goals but of my previous company. Those are really thinks that I have been involved and I want to be continued to be world to pay it forward so that everything comes back. That's what the goal of secret also what we say it actually keeps coming back to us in some shape or form. Thank you for letting ninety meter dog and stuff look for the results and the next fifty. Thank you guy three. I was hoping someone would talk about being forward Karar Environment and leaving better future for our children. You just did shift our next speaker. Visual has quite a different take on the topic. Let's listen to it my abuse on paying it forward as a concert in my view. It's very much part of the purpose of life. This is from Rick later on purpose itself life it says atmono at took a diet. What it means is that purpose of life is short oneself realization and doing good forty-four table Saami Vivekananda adopted this estimator autumn mission? Denise back when I went through deep introspection and self inquiry what steeper push of life and the most worthwhile thing that I should be doing in my life I edited the same point since then. Whatever I'm doing in my life if that professionally at familiar social context or in personal life everything has dislodged percent meaning? It's really interesting my life in all this dimensions. If you give anything without any expectation of anything in return it comes back multiplied that Slav off abundance. I won't claim I am dead yet but I have experienced it. I would like to share a story in this. Context may be relevant. There was a savvy businessmen and one day he died just like anybody else then. God came and asked him relate to go to hell or heaven. Being Savvy businessman he said Let me evaluate Eh booth and then decide got said Okay and asked very want to go first. Businessman said let me see the healthiest so got to Kim to hell. He opened it puts. What's it was a beautiful palace? The enter the main hall looked like a large party was set up there not late music and dance a big dining hall with lots of Food Denisov people sitting on the dining cheese but we surprise they all look very hungry start emaciated and some sad faces some angry some frustrated depressed. He wondered why they're not eating food. Then he noticed that that hands for tight with long forks spoons. which could not reach their mouth? So they're sitting there. Helpless resigned then the businessman said okay. Let me see the heaven so got to Kim to heaven. Opened the doors. Very very similar ballet's very similar all very similar party dining extra businessmen ask. God why have you brought me to the same place again. By then. He noticed people people sitting on the dining says that handset also tied with long folks and spoons but David all very healthy will add very happy. The difference from Hell was that that David fighting each other probably this being fodder or feeding forwarding navy if everybody understands realizes and leaves by the real purpose of Flav as mentioned in the Greater dysplasia Solidere Heaven might being forward is connected with this larger ultimate purpose of life. This is what motivates me and tasers centralized. I'm in modern a few initiatives which helped me being over. One of them is mindfulness by integrating with leadership development and adults not permission. Mindfulness is helping in bringing awareness in many people and triggering them to exploit this dimension. This is not only in corporate but also in schools and communities equitize about three thousand people to this in the last couple of years and other days I'm part of something called sensual community Stanford old routes ups and new shoots exploring ancient wisdom and bringing them to Martin Martin Management and leadership ethics. And other insurance I am associated with some education in Bengal which is doing a great job of bringing more emotional intelligence organization and managing inside for managing outside aspects in education through influencing the national education policy of India and implementing them in hundreds of schools and decide insignificant drops in the large torsion. But this mall being forwards are significant in my spiritual growth and overall other dimensions of group. Thanks she went Chitra for asking these as questions and providing me an opportunity to share some of these thoughts. Thank you for taking my less to get him back. And I think I can relate to the law bundles that is experienced. Ben Spread match writer. I think we had probably accelerating the thing the whole environmental ecosystem to be easier to in fact the data's being one of my teams are being forward in the sense off looking good communities different communities within the business community in our neighborhood new moving here that had a few houses and nothing. The things needed attention and we said let's be also it's not doing something slowly. April started rallying around able to get a lot of things now including erecting. Someone congratulated illegally getting into communities rather than business friends. We have some projects or being a buddy assist. You mentioned nudging I think is also a good way of paying it forward dynamically you helping people realize their dreams in pushing shing themselves to what they thought limitation than beyond those limitations. So those kind of things that definitely again do and even simple acts subversiveness. Like what has to say I think paying it forward is a wonderful book too happy living. I believe I've benefited from Benita. The Max of greatness help from unknown versus all through my life. I also noticed that when I tried to kill others even when they do not solicit help I feel very happy chatting any of those be knowledge. Physics Link Three head let me feed I believe it is the greatest form of Jedi for example one morning ying early morning walk and ended struggling to push his car on a slope just joining had made my day being needy students with their fees and and books is very importing. Nubia forward you'll actually sharing what you know is dispensable resource. And you're putting it to good use. I think I think the great value for any society. That was very touching. I will walk. That road with you is is so powerful very very inspiring. I want to share that. I often court children to play any sport to encourage physical exercise which is important in this overtly digital age and do it by playing with them teaching simple techniques of exercise running squatting shots and playing with them as a team it's sorta wanting to see them off off enjoy themselves and hopefully live better lives. Let's now listen to another colleague. Paramore doc about his unique perspective and expedience this concept of Bay forward I think is an old concept The ancient Greeks breakfasted. I think even India. I think many people mattress practice. Did they give arms to people in exchange for somebody is helping them. So I think it's concept and I agree with that concert one thing I I find. Is that if you look at things that you all be that through kinds of owing oneness gratitude the others indebtedness service Something which for which you really cannot pay back usually forward independent. This is something that you have have to be back. For example. Somebody gives you a loan of a lack of obese. You cannot expect bay somebody thousand And hope that this guy. It'd be happy that is if he does something good for you. If you look for the others I'm sure the Buzzer this good for you will be happy so that these two kinds of Owing and I think gratitude can easily be satisfied by bang. Folic if you ask me got I do the bay. Our I suffered many NGOs and I think you all gratitude. Everybody even beeper letting you live. It's a great way thing and I like the story of the crane and the and the and the Fox does not biting off your Uh Bill thanks so many people serve the great gratitude right. So you have to pay for our those in Muskie's gratitude at indebtedness. That's something to think about thanks. PERMA actually is not the team. Just for this podcast. PM Baylor also so bill with the concept of paying it forward with out expedience can be useful one of the CO founders of has distant my view on paying it forward. It's it's a wonderful concept of believe the world is a reasonable place to live in only because of the number of people who actually practice it don't even necessarily relating what could would they do. This you feel good when he practices in the process. Contribute inspiring those around you into your own Neighbors burs family and children to do the same thing. I would like to pay for many things many things. My father provided me a great education. We're going through significant financial status and unfortunately was not alive. When I graduated? This is perhaps to for many people I guess and any obviously paid forward through your own children and perhaps helping goes around you who are in need of education nowadays and I would like to say one or two monitor that I work with WHO provided a solid foundation to me in my professional career on innovative in paying it forward to the PM part platform idea ideas it will inspire others. I guess you lead by example that bills for you in the environment you live in and people subconsciously change when the absorb what you do have seen that in in my one neighborhood with my own family and neighbours my warn children they never. I think I'm contributing to building a good place to live. So I think the team Luke paying it forward is something that is actually natural dose many dams meek conditioner sales and slopping ourselves either not reaching out extending that helping hand or being helpful. Sometimes you're just being a passive listener that also hibs so having having the embassy for around us so the prime motivation for imbalanced. PSE being that office had out on get addictive east. We've been there done things. We still want to be useful to the community. What does it that we? He can share promote expedients. Out Dead with Nana just three. What matters is the experience to en- delays that you're on the plate so that is guiding theme and as you heard of us have our own passions own priorities were paid for it? Suddenly Shiv in fact The embargo has given several of us. That platform I can. Surely we say that the platform that power has provided me is one of the feeling of you are on your own implying that you were trusted to give your best yet not alone where you can seek support and help whenever needed to enable you to give your best to me as an example of paying it forward each day that I work here number be make this even better. How can we make better of it? Certainly love it. If listeners can come forward and share some of their stories is one thing that I have for inking if I could share some background stories off offer or behind the scene stories of some of the podcast recordings A lot of guests were novus. The one thing that people have shared is is a lot of people have said that they have on our cost that they have never shared with. Anybody are having shed anywhere else. It's in their lives before that was a that was a deep Aha moment for me. I said if we have been able to uncover that and it's something that other people listeners have resonated with business of this podcast be interested in sharing their stories. I'm tape listener. Please share your stories. You never know what you will ignite in terms of an idea in those of passion in somebody going to hear you on your experiences out. Valuable interest you. Please help US enraged community. Do Shed Yawn. Expedia insist on these look forward to having you write to us. Remember our email address is podcasts asked at B. M. Hyphen Consulting dot com. Everyone the next episode on Lisbon back to our format of having a guest. Look I guess you own heavy delays if you find it useful if you want something to be done differently in any case do.

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Last Monday of June Show Intro

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

06:17 min | 8 months ago

Last Monday of June Show Intro

"Hi Guys Katie lowes actress, mom and host of the parenting podcast. Katie's crib. A show that helps women navigate the colossal changes that come with motherhood. You'll hear from resilient Mama's knowledgeable experts and me asking a whole lot of questions, it's real talk that offers real perspective on what it's really like to be a parent. New episodes published every other Thursday. Listen to Katie's on iheartradio APP or on Apple podcasts wherever you get your podcasts. Ladies and gentlemen MMA have your attention, please. It's Monday morning. It's beginning of new week, but it's the same damn thing opinion. Turn up his. Create this ignace be bothered body. Dog Gonnit, Shirley, stroke we. Choose. More. Weight. Layer That was fun. Young people listening to this show. We live. In saying that no moat. They say they'll say I still. I'm scared to use modern day. Slang I'm still going I'm still doing you know what's happening. I don't play. That way I know. I know how to style and all my talk is. Ferrall. What have we bought? That life was going out. You Got One I. Just don't save money on. Paying? Tommy. You Got One lit light. I'm living my bath life. Yeah do steel work, turn up. What it is. What. Was Good. Fun, coup. Slapping. Day. You May as well go right on St. Say Right. Steal, say Amen when I talked to my older brother. Is like talking to Marvin Gaye. Curtis to? Give me some of that skiing. skiing. There's five on the black hands. So. Going on, you play. You still doing it, ain't you? Ain't easy somebody. Might. Be Me. One of my little girl, but Housing. I Don't I, don't I don't smoke weed? Out My. Either way I wouldn't. What lit bit. Especially in front of your key. WHAT'S GOTTA? Stay fresh in hip. Tommy. We got younger kids. Hey a limited what idea? One day in Atlanta I came off my shirt open, and my key Israel's was in the how you say. Day shared his open I said I live here. Too Long flat stomach from around looking. But it's so funny. Steve you're right because we're at an age now where everything we do embarrasses our kids. There's nothing that we can do to. Our kids think we're cool nothing. I live in coming up in thirty two. After the hour. We'll have more of the Steve Harvey. Morning Show right after this. We. Turn Up. You're listening to. Morning Show. Are All successful people full of crap. I'm Genre I'm an entrepreneur went from being broke at Twenty eight to a millionaire twenty nine to having a mental breakdown at thirty, and then writing a book about the whole experience, my mission is to talk about the grey areas of success like burn out mental health and all the crazy stuff that happens behind the scenes that no one gets the see. Here on my new podcast, the John Rowe is show. I'm going to explore the roller coaster of life in conversations with the most successful people in the world like creative leaders, celebrities, entrepreneurs and artists. You'll hear raw hyper. Honest conversations that are guaranteed to inspire entertain educate. Listen to the John Rowe, a show starting July sixth on the iheartradio. APP Apple PODCASTS, or wherever you get your podcast for more info, go to row DOT COM. That's R. A. DOT COM. The only way is through a new podcast in partnership with iheartradio and under armor. Join us as we hear from the world's greatest athletes, coaches and trainers, as they discuss how the last training competition and recovery to improve their performance and push through. Star defensive and chase young has been wreaking havoc on the college level for the last three seasons, but now as chase gets ready for spouting the REDSKINS. Elevate his game to the professional level his chase. It makes me feel good man. You know inspiring young kid coming up, and that's one of the biggest things that I wanted to do are playing this game because obviously I was the kid one day. The feels great in there. Something that I'm definitely going to try to keep on doing. and. I feel like has being my best. That would definitely help me make an impact on the field, and hopefully my impact can inspire people to work. Listen to the only way is through. Available now on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you get your podcast.

Katie lowes Steve Harvey John Rowe Tommy Mama Apple Curtis Marvin Gaye chase REDSKINS ignace Dog Gonnit Atlanta Israel Shirley One day one day
3: The Market Of Self Expression

Clarissa K Explains It All

44:06 min | 10 months ago

3: The Market Of Self Expression

"Hello Wealth! Clarissa Kaye. Where we used. T to share some time with each other and talk about the could fix around in our. Country! Hello and welcome to another episode of Year H. Thank you so much for joining Ni. Is, this is attending visit that. Happy. Thank you so much I really appreciate it and if this is your first visit. Call some treats the. It connects with and if you like, please support the channel. And please share. Thank you so much. So, we're still going for the tour season. This week is going to get quite interesting things in discuss all going to be more the long-term aspects, so it's just not for a season is for a period of time. And some of them we've still got another. Six years? And this energy, some of them started from. Los. Decade and their continued the and these things are just introduced to shake up is to. Just restructure and revise. Create new pathways. Thinking you know. Ultimately. As. I know that I thought the was not us. But it is. Is You know what constitutes as edition development of human being. DEVELOPMENT OF A. Development of systems. Development over knowledge, so we can be better. Full. And Teacher generations so that is. I think. Let's begin. So a gun for appeared the land. That is both law for few years. I is really a continuation. Is Good about this. Aspect is the IT's looking at. Out, point-of-view! Is Looking at the way, the hey, and is also looking at how we'll viewed. So. What's really good about it is that we have entered into a grounded mindsets. So that's good. And not just grounded mindset what is attached to the ground? IGNACE is. Essential feature thinking huge ideas. And when you mix those things together I'll decrease innovation. So this is really good. It's not just us. Waving a has in the everything. Oh, look this idea. is about. Bringing the idea into. A practicality so. We'll able to have ideas. Implement them. See and see where they are. And you know there's no. D. Dalian with the ideas. So really really good. so yes, it is about innovation. And also, the grounded NECE has arrived. because. We now have to address. The notion of security. And Tequila. Financial, SECURITY That's how it's going to be represented to lost. That's how it was gonNA flip to us. We'll financial security and stability. This have. Thought it really from the Viking for lost. Two thousand eight days. OFF OF I on that show crisis that we had the world trade. And we saw some. Breakdowns and Institute in. household names. Anything to do with structure, really. Anything to do with a sense of security. Had an effect. Was Financial. Well may financial. Of Things, also relationships would have longstanding partnerships. Would no longer be effective. so. What now is is still this period. A. While ago, but it still paired because. Someone to solution that will create it to resolve a at the time. May Not. Be, so. He is now. And so the thing that were implemented. time. They on now, being tested to say whether they can whether they will truly. Be going to the next stage. Of Progression. And so. Those institutions mainly. On now you know that all scuttling to. To move into this new way of doing things which is. Online. So This is where you know now. Other type of businesses. All gaining momentum because the needs of of us have changed. And so they able to. See those things. And it's almost like. A sensible change people come, and now it's hit and had the idea for a while, and it's almost like. Time catch up with them. You know. Let the mindset catch talk with. Them and so I mean this is. This is like holes. This is like. We just grocers union being the same things happen off the wall. which is the same aspect? That would be now the having to introduce. New Ship. Systems New, implementation but to get there. We all mice need to pull back. In like the the Russian, Control the villages to do things the patients. And then once way. you know showing that we can be all we. We are in that period with almost given. They'll pretend to to to run up the day. So This is the time. To. One the patient. And To think about innovation. what would it mean? think about ideas that we can introduce. On been structured about. so it is really good. Period is compared it's about the well identity. We are showing who we all. And and we want to be one of. The full the full frontal. We want to. Introduce I did that. we'll be effective all around. You know not create for the business. Because you know where you know one of the ones leading the the market of self expression. New Experiences. These things All just development and it shows discipline shows approach to life. It's going to be things in involved in technology science definitely. obviously the the. Our freedoms and rights is people are gonNA or site going into politics. Because this time has made us aware of certain things that things we'd like and the like. And you know there's there's not just one nine with people. Send them one sided the the. There's most live and. All those fourth need to be taken into consideration. know what we need to teach to is just remain. Wait for the tests. and. Look further ahead than right now. Because it's harder to do because we live in right now, so all the emotion and the buttons, and and the think that westbound can. Affect us right now, but the mind wants us to use those energies. And use them as drive to be creative to be innovative to have ideas to think the feature what is is have now, and what would they look like? In five years time ten time all? What do I want ten years time, look like and reverse engineering. To now to have faith in that is needed to push us for and get there. I know it feels like the mind. What is having a rough time? But I just think that the infant feeling I think underneath. We are really looking forward to. An freedom. because. It's nothing like feeling held and secure to make Chris Shape your freedom. So when we owe cannot goal. Off the, we supposed to care that we can tho those. We? I am telling you we're going to be running whether they feeling so good evening. How is that will grow snuck like? Oh my gosh, I made you know are going to be in touch with ourselves. was revealed the restrictions of gone and. It would just feel so much more precious. We're going to be This will this will I into. Wanted to call health. Look at. Anything connected to just having a policy of way of life, because we now values also on violent our relationship so much more. And so. This is this is why I can? I can keep my divine. Join this paired as well. And also. To the future because. Wait a kind way Wanna see what new things are going to be a while I did on guys debate. pull out there and you know leading off into the next step. Because I, see it already. and. It looks great to the point where I'm going to need to get any fine. Of these APPs I'm telling you these APPS. Are taking. Over And my doesn't have enough men me, so is to be. I'm going to have to Khalid. From ooh, APPs old APPs vicious than meeting all this not as Active as the one that are coming up now. A paving the way. I look at some apps much. Home and We're kind of mine create. This is amazing. And, so These things I like because. It's not just about the. Technology what is granted that is? On need to connect. and a filter. For, the parents were going for filters through everything who a health pro- relationships from a relationship with money relationship with the future. So and it's not just whimsical ideas realistic ideas. All already. that. They just need is the opportunity environment to blossom, and that is now so a lot of thing that What would be considered? A previous mindsets. You know those things are going to need severe adjustment. And just like anything. Just like those ideas that were was already, but need the environment the new environment to to common live. It's the same with. The progression of Mindset Is the same with the progressional force? We all know sometimes willing to. move into a new mindset all. Blend into what could be sometimes the risks that. wool. That has. Distinct icon. Continue to go on. And and introduce that new mindset. And this is where I get got. We got gaps in in people's minds to different ages and different different way of life. I really want to say that. I will just be always open to. New Things. But it's not always easy. It's not easy I just look at the I love technology. But I also love. wellbeing nature spirituality. you know I? Do believe in. The you know Defy Chemistry and physics. As well as Technology think they're both of benefit. To Us! but it can be. They have to think about the direction. The expectations of the future. So His a time where we just you know we'll we privatizing. expectations how expectations and really are trying to. Align with what is required from the future as what has balancing ways needed for now to help us get food time. So again, Alot Diligence Gordon ideas and this is were being given. The most often given. The gift of time to able to. Go through these ideas and look at all the structures around US relationships relationship with finance and money What life. Income Children family. Personal Health Pesto. Cat customer value. All is saying. A communist play. On the collective level they work. Together. Because well, will individuals. the way we moved to them. Is Paul the case? Of moving forward would. And and how we, how we show ourselves to the rest of the world's and how they view us. So. I like it whereas goal orientated. Plan orientated. Revenue. Some people do any supplies why? Nature Uh June is time and leaving. There's some maybe even prices cells now and call it in portion posted an boundaries again. Is another. Another time taken from. Nick and our security. And where some of all security reflects onto the structures around us. and the things that keep. A, stable. In the material sense. In our own sense of In a nest. Waking Up, listen that make us feel emotionally secure. IS COMING TO IS COMING TO A. View. That is more on. I mean this is a lot of the time we could have been can win this view all of view of US think of us. In a even even in smallest sense. From family expectations. Guidelines that have set for us. The unconscious by life I've been step specifically. You know from family from generations. even I'm sex was expected. So think some people are GonNa be surprised funny this glory need just be. Identify themselves in the way that they want to. And and Because of that? Connection to new emotional cessations Dan Creek that own security in the move. We delve into those things. The mall were feel like. we can gain our own initial security from. Ourselves and not necessarily from. The things that all around those the. The conditioning! is around us. So. You. Would you start to see this? Discuss this reform at this craft Hale in general. On a maybe. We seen for myself I've seen in. The Rizal uncondition be. Now. is still relatively seat as unconventional. But. Really it's just us. Is just. Here Sharon ourselves, shareholders quirks that things that we have. been insecure about but using them as you know the lighting. This is. This is me, you know. Like freckles. Own, having two different color eyes. OR HAVE BEEN IN A. You know. What else could be just? And anything, even if it's just lots of areas, Lots Pearson Tattoos on the face, the neck and all these things that would have been. No No, no, no, no, no, no, I'm! Not Going to work, that doesn't look. Nice. Is Now being seen? As beautiful. How we choose to identify themselves. a scene differently. Seen. With an L., sexuality and bt. And I do think this is such a thing. We've been the The parents kind of introduced this so. This is just going to grow our. Saddam lying. It will be thinks that tried to clash respect. Point of view because again the think, but we just don't know how look. It may look clean dishes to how you. The bt presented previously and now Sunday's Ut's becoming more diverse. We may in future future. A complete reversal of the beauty, but in a completely different way than when it was just. But I like this payment that would. Think. is just. I'll emotion site things we feel emission connected to, and we're bringing it out. became. you know insecurity that was hidden. And then it was so sick is security. On the table once it was addressed. It was okay. Let's let's try that then. Once. It. was tried tested. which was so Opened the doors. Anything. So. That's just that's just what we had to go through mobile editor and we'll continue in. That? And you know it's still stalled with. physicality, but it will move. Into Mall happy things. Things to do. Things to do river preferences things to do with what we attract to because I open dosa one thing. And when you open the door. And you need A. Runs in. A one out. Everything runs out. There's natural to him, so we're going to be seen. Law So things that could. I think it's good i. think he's good. One. I like to cannot whole pitch on. Thing though. Things are always you know I to in a here, but I do also want to just into the realistic side of things. It's funny that this Paul is realistic other things, but it's to do with. Our mental stability so. where a may stability can be looking at things unrealistic point if So. This environment that we're going, her has definitely helped me to find. Blessed in solitude, someone was a really love. The idea of. Being in a very contained on one violent. And and Definitely just feel though is airs helping. This. but also been in such a contained environment can also. have a real effect profound effect on the mind. And Jonas time we can definitely. Dell south into lot unwind. and. June time. ESPECIALLY WITH Some of the contrast in now, happen at the time at this time. They can be you know any introduction to. kind of to. and. Once. You kind of grew up that road. And Leisure. He can take further in the in the in. And so Be An when happen at some reason people know. They all in I'm said I guess. I believe. It's fine. and. Help them. Say New. Narrative of what world of Netflix E. And, those things are only really seen as controversy when crews of office. US when people see the different point. Whether they work and whether they don't work over there, too. then. Or not enough. To there. So, I'm not flying. We'll definitely needs to be having conversations which ago. Team of his point of view is is when it becomes lifestyle. What it tastes on a lot of his own, that's when it can be an issue. when it filters into of areas of life. That then become less positive. Less positive for those around them when he can be an issue. An. Account Crate a distraction. In relationships in tossed. In normal, say more. So. Is, it's a time we need to just talk. With. You know some elements of size penalize all. Of Us. because it may not necessarily be a thing. Where is just? East just come about that may have been. On the line issue so ready. This has been a catalyst. Another counselor, this is now where all the you can go. Because! This this. Energy. And environment that going for. Can really validate certain. Will truly it can really make things so profound for some. And that. Is it black and white them. And Because of that can create issues. So Bad needs to be you know. needs to be people around those have. Things going on like that. It's not just. people can't them thinking okay? That's you know that's that's what they're going to go for for this this narrative at the moment. And you know be overseen. This is this is a continuation. This is not a smooth haired continuation. This is a generational thing so. Then needs to be. An Awareness Basing as well and and again maybe things Li. Maybe she will be introduced. That womb. You know help. Where Sutton. mental challenges in when I say challenges. That's a mental illness and is just because I. really don't like easing the what mental illness. That because. The INS and outs of it very apple. As kind of A kind of label so And different degrees off. Delving into mind. And discover the mind. Processes are. Good, and some will create A. Conducive to? The life that we now. But. It just may because sometimes. It's just a conversation. But again like everything. Structures are changing reforming. So maybe that is going to be a need for some changes within that area struck tree. And maybe there's going to be an expansion all And mental health. Diagnosis, maybe this guy be new Um We'll call them. Clinton remember. Yeah just need like. Say. Yeah and it might be new solutions to these things as well. They may be new into tation all suspicious that all based on being active. Lava Dan medical and. Pharmaceutical there may be. More active treatments. That you helped with With mindset like the. Del Deep. Think is good anything that helps us to. congress. As a whole is going to be, it's going to be a good thing. mental challenges as They are not just. Not just. People, they can affect every single one of us because we're mind. I mean woken Demi. Junk Pencil Four. And and you know it shouldn't be something that wheel freight talk about. The the. Especially when it comes to the labelling of. Different mental challenges. And so yeah. It has this time will open up. Oh you all. The mental challenges that people have on how this time environment that was going for can really highlight an expound some of those issues because when A. Manifest into the physical things a can be a problem ball those around them. And the and themselves so. We may see new places the rise instead of things. And setting challenges. So. Yes. Yes We've known. For some! Day all becoming more spiritual. And? I feel like spirituality is one of those words that. Is just. So. Those slower in what is trying to represent because. We all individuals so. Even if we had the same beliefs, we don't have the same beliefs. So. His Co... For All of that into one was I. don't know. Because I this time. There is a law of self examination. And there is And especially coal those. get into an older age. And, maturity that has. been a about. A rule sensitivity. To Fan Vitamin to the needs of those that they love in life. Even a new sense of loyalty. They really are more compassionate to. What they hold important. In life and this trickles into everything even personal day say level and also. Collectively as world will. Look at our relationship that we have with. Those in all, the areas may see. where? Where the same but. There's a great. You know there's a really great and then. And so way. This hold onto those. just relationships. Because they reflect. On it miss. The towel in. being connected and what it means to be connected to that, Paul. Your relationship, life and offer officer thing and they offer a reflection on. What we want and again we over fictional. Material. And I'm Bishen. Out Hostile Environment, L. Spiritual, development. And Is really good time. It is a really good time in connecting. With others is on a very deep level. It's not just. In Ohio with friends is a really deep of. We are here together in yes. And what we believe. and. It's really about belief. We want to be surrounded by those with similar beliefs. Similar aspirated. and. Similar home. In Life. And you know it it really. MAKES US look at this superficial. Think No. Don't want them. So. Is Really Nice I could just bail. How Nice is just? Is just like I know in. All that that passes by my side. You know we can. talk about anything we can. We can. Discuss and formulate all our kids without judgment. Without Concerns, all. Others! Mean you. We can handle this. That's what it feels like. As Way Nice. I WANNA relationship. Yeah we can, just we can be. And is there is. There is the tangible the the day to day walk, but there is that spiritual as well we. Can? I like the. We have no in that. We are connected sir. I'll be good to me I knew. And likewise it'll be good view themselves. They want to be the best version they can be so they can heighten every experience. That's what it is. It's about on national development. And how we how we? how feel? How we feel. It then. By brace and translate into how walk how we speak how we communicate with us. How we embrace new ideas. How we! Let Go `this. It Oh really spots refill. If we wake up angry morning what day we can have. Is Not GonNa be chilled. IF WE WAKE UP A. Peaceful. Lead so. Is Not to say. That there's GonNa be peaceful. It's just we will react different in each situation. 'cause love is what it is. Melting. As we blend. Every month or every point is the every belief. You and emerging. If everything back, so we are going to ultimately. Interact with. Everything. Possible. But the one thing we are truly connected to. Ourselves? Sir. How we all every situation? Will be reflective on how feel we see this now. Shooters in society. We see his angry. Nine who you know who who angry and his. Recovery comes out. Is Sane, and and we do on a we don't any reduce basis, and then we do on the military bases collectively so. Is What it is. This is a very good time. To. Have a look at. where it starts, will really going into the Ethan source of where does this fun? Trying to hold a realistic of year, not flow into. Illusions about things Li and the sound like. This is what I'm saying. This is how office. and. Thinking that, we can change things overnight. Is Not not going to be realistic. Knowing that we can work on. just day to day. Having News all having you pointed to you Phil. Do things that help even even just diet. Even the Diet a true believer will. Have a direct relationship with our mission. And that sounds absolutely ludicrous. But I truly believe. Is Thoughts from our stomach go? You know whatever we eat. It then. Has a relationship with. A body. and. However appointee feels. Relates to. How we do things. We've got As. An example. If we have a pain shoulder. Weeks on end irritating not how much pain me for take. It's just a constant pain. Is. GonNa Affect Tom. Motion is GonNa fix. Conversation is always going to be on. MIND IS GONNA affect every single thing we do. when we you know one way. pull up. With sex DOT MIL. We respond differently to. If we were really hungry, so even just dat an empty stomach. Is. A new I should've used thanks hope. Real good example of how everything that's going on. Affects us so what we've been put into. Body is also likewise going home. Saying Yeah males troubles, but it's all connected. Well. Thank you so much for listening one of a week and will hippie connects with the ignite p share, or so I'll be so great for you. Support the channel you can subscribe. The is. Can contact me as well. Even visit my website. Only! The details script shunned. From you again this.

Paul US Clarissa Kaye IGNACE D. Dalian Los New Ship apple Khalid Wan Li Dan Creek Nick Rizal us. Hale Phil Saddam Sharon
Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness- Podcast Episode 004: Alicia Anabel Santos- La Santera (part 1)

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

44:18 min | 1 year ago

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness- Podcast Episode 004: Alicia Anabel Santos- La Santera (part 1)

"From the journeys of belonging to blackness digital it'll media project. I'm India Lorrie Wilmot and you're listening to the podcast talking journeys out belonging to blackness. IGNACE joining us today is at least Annabel. Santos also known as last I sent theta. alesia is an Upper Latina author playwright writing coach a fellow podcasters teaching artists and activists as well as a film director actor and producer. She is the founder of the New York City. Latino Writers Group and the National Book Award Faculty member for over a decade alesia has created and nurtured safe spaces spaces for emerging and established writers to nurture their creativity whether she's a frequent guest speaker and workshop facilitator for universities and nonprofits across the US or a guest on shows like NPR's tell me more at least us work focuses on topics that intersect identity religion sexuality quality feminism and Social Justice where people of Color and particularly women of Color in addition to her two thousand eleven memoir finding your force a journey to love and her play production production and one woman show entitled. I was born at least us. Work has been published in magazines such as Latina magazine Glamour Domino and BusinessWeek and most notably her essay two cultures marching to one drum appeared in urban Latino magazine in addition. At least you're Rowen produced the documentary entitled Afro Latinos An untucked history with the Renzo debut. which is a film that intense to build awareness and help give voice to large community of African descendants in the Caribbean being in Latin America who've been silenced and historically marginalized more recently alesia has launched a new business venture that allows for to blend her spiritual practice this with her writing and community empowerment work called last synthetic spiritual consulting and? I can't wait to learn more about that but right now. Let's welcome lasted. I sent that I got so much for inviting me on your show. I'm so humbled to be here. I'm so proud of the work that you're doing and elevating and celebrating our voices and our testimony and so yes. I'm thrilled to be here. Thank you thank you for taking the time out of your extremely extremely busy schedule to share a bit about your work with our listeners. You know what's so funny is that I'm always always intrigued by our guest who are also engaged in projects designed to educate in lift African descended communities. And so you seem to do it all so I appreciate your Kudos does to me too but chow. I think you're probably one of the longest Intros I've given to date. Like what is she. Not doing leaping pink. I guess but I in honesty your energy. That's infused throughout the work. Whether it's through Penn or you know really keyboard but at at this point but depend on the screen in your performance are is quite powerful and you cannot very well with people. And I'm I know I'm not I don I say this but your messages resonate deeply and I think it's because you are an effective storyteller and the care you take in the time you make when helping others feel empowered or to tell their stories. I mean it makes sense that you are considered by many in the community a writing midwife. I just think about the moment that I realized that I was the writer. Like all of this when we come when it comes to like how. How do I come to ask Dominican as an Africa Tina to the fullness of myself as the black woman how did I get there? Where did it come from the journey? It's been a journey of identity Self discovery and self awareness. And and so I'm a person who grew up in Brooklyn and seventies right and so there was no Latino like I start off with that like when you come in. Come up in a space. Well you're not even sure where you fit. You will either black or you're white. There was no Latino we were not even the census at that point and so so I wasn't light enough to be white and I wasn't dark enough to be black so I immediately come up in elementary school. Not Having a home not having a place place but I knew I was more black than white. I've always known that whatever that word minority meant then I was a part of that group I was a it was definitely definitely not in the Ingraham. I was always in this like space of lent me here because this is where I feel most safe emo scene and then you go through your you know your high school years and I went to predominantly whites and I grew up in a home where you're taught you marry white because it marrying white is right. And it's about a glut on the LAROSA. You're being told you being taught in programming happening conditioned to believe that okay. You don't want to identify as black because Y is where it's at and here's where you will excel and succeed and and and not be. Invisible is rain so you immediately. I immediately have this conflict. This inner conflict of will the WHO am I will do. I belong whereas my I place there was a long time from when I was even Latina when I was in even wanting to speak Spanish. You know and it's like I feel like I've had decades of transformation Shen and it wouldn't be until I came out as a writer in two thousand one right so after September eleventh that I begin to delve deeply into what my my identities are. What are the things that I'm connecting to? What are the things that make me me? What do I get to claim? And when I came out as a writer and I knew the first magazine I wanted to write for publishing was essence. I knew that that was the place for my voice. Because it's where I felt I. Most related wasn't even Latina magazine and there was an African Americans who said to me. How dare you WANNA write for SS magazine? You Ain't black. Latino is not your place and the words it's not notch replace or the things that were ringing in my head like Shit. It's top my. It's not my place than what is my place on. What does that even mean that I begin to look at but wait my mother's lactating? Mothers Caribbean I am black. And not only at so not only am I Latina I'm black and at my place but it's my responsibility to really look at what that means and why it is having this these conflicts so that story that you The tidal two cultures. There's March march into one drum was originally titled Real. Will the real black girl please stand up to essence. It's an essence. Rejected it. They they weren't with it. I'm sitting like the title and what I was trying to do his bridge. This black brown divide so that we really have a conversation Asian about race at but but mostly what we had in common as black people so when it got published. It really wasn't affirming because it allowed me to really continue to do this work. Because from that article is where I landed at Filipinos the story as their head writer and producer her and I'm interviewing lack Latinos all over Latin America rate countries. Later and this question about. Why aren't we talking about being being black? Why are we identifying as being black and what is what does this look like and not in America which is a completely different experience to the United States and are are African American history here because the racial project looks very different in the Caribbean and across Latin America in just articulation of racial ratio projects? And when I think about you and and when I'm talking to folks like yourself who who are really very unapologetically black because I met I I met you know I've known you for a while but I'm known you as this person who's like I'm I'm black and that this weird juxtaposition that you felt yourself sort of traversing in earlier on in life. There's a lot more clarity when I meet you in the present and so for me. It's just like I then wonder all right well. How do did a person like at least you get here right? And what was her journey like. Because as you were saying this is a process that moment when you are like embracing your identity as a writer but then and embracing your soul. As after Latin necks as a black person. As an African descendants there are so many people out in podcast land listening in who who are creative like yourself and who are who want to be able to tell their story in their journey that might be similar to yours and I'm like you know what this woman is powerful awful and so here's a platform to share a story so no when I think about the question what brought me here to my blackness to owning my blackness Nepal legit Jin unapologetically. The first thing that came to my mind like lips was religion. Sponge well God. So when you're on this journey and you're having these nervous breakdowns and life is just fucked up and you realize that you know you don't fit in this world you're not white you don't fit in this world people people don't see us back because you're too late. You got to begin to take your identity omit but also prove it in some ways. People WanNa see that I own my privilege also a black. They WANNA see that. I recognize that I've had some access to things that I might not have gotten if I was three shades darker Parker Or if my hair texture was a little bit different and I do remember early on before I wore my hair national natural curly when I was distributing it out weekly that people ooh respect me more when I walked into spaces so when you say `I stand my blackness unapologetically it has. It took a long time because I had to br dismantle a lot of misconceptions about process and my journey in particular I come to my blackness through religion and and spirituality and my connection to my ancestors and my roots and really honoring and recognizing where I come from that's where that's where my blackness act. Mrs warned the roots of me the history. You know when I think about my mother's father my mother's mother my mother's siblings and this line nine this lineage of African descendants that I come from how do I pay homage. How do I connect to them? So this is where the journey begins against for me truly to understand own it is I am I am entitled. I am entitled to this To this religious practice that is Sunday Dante via that is the that is Voodoo right. Because I'm Dominican. I share an island with Haiti. And so it makes sense. At all. Of these things coursing coursing through my body. I just wasn't taught how to access it right and so with age I I become someone who questions more and I investigate more and I love and it's funny when I went to visit my mother this summer and we were preparing all of my first last data spiritual bats. The first batch had her hands in her touch over it and I'm doing Tarot card readings and gun Ceuta's the entire month on there with her like she's a Mike Mom. I'll be right back. I have three readings tobacco. I'll be right back. And she looked at me at one point and said I cannot believe that you do these things because my grandmother used to do go on Sutras Consulting and readings things for folks who would come in the neighborhood in Dr. which for me was this is? This is my roots. This is of course I am who I am because of this this and then I look at where I am today. I'm an e Locher or more goon and or Ya and that in itself has been. We could talk about at that hour. Listen what you said. It's just a nice way for us to transition into our first segment Act One call to adventure. I think about your memoir finding your force and the ways you talked about your journey towards self love inhaling and and I think too about the work you do today. That's all about using your force in the ways drawn on your Inner Strang on how you use your voice and that must have a great influence in the work that you do today so please tell our listeners. How did you become interested in doing the work you do today? Then what motivated you or inspired you to become this writing midwife. See these are some oprah questions. I took from Oprah Big Oprah questions right. Now listen when you when you grow up as As far as I'm baby of color right you're you're young and you're in the fourth grade and nine years old and you have of this white teacher your first experience with With knowing that you're different and and knowing that you don't belong in your teacher is the one who makes fun of you and and I grew up in the seventy so I remember that I was wearing in the fourth grade. bell-bottoms I right and a lot of times. I was wearing clothes that were hand me downs from people from other folks. They weren't even like things that my parents could afford to buy because they had just come to the country in nineteen sixty eight and nineteen sixty nine so this teacher laughs at me in front of the class. Everyone's laughing at me. That's all I remember. Numbers everyone pointing and laughing at the clothes I was wearing because I was poor and I stood at the door of the room. And I'm like you think that's funny. You think that's funny business funny and I gave her and the entire class in the middle finger. You flipped them the birds since I ran to the bathroom and I was crying in hysterics and I knew I was going to get hit. I knew I was going to get beat when I got home for the at that incident. CENDANT but I didn't care because what I knew was that I had things to be ashamed of and you carry that into your adulthood and you're working for white bosses and you're working in corporate America because I've had incredible positions. I've worked with some of the top magazine publishing I've worked for some of the top Liquor companies in the country and the world like IPAD. I've worked corporations like big names. And so when you work for these places and they're beating you down these people beating you down. You understand that it's because you're black and they believe they can get to a place where you decide am. Am I this desperate to stay because I have to feed my daughter her as a single mom at the time or do I leave. Do I love myself enough to say F. IT I'm done with this. I'm done with being treated did badly. By these people who do not value me who do not see me who do not respect me and a lot of that was born when I came out as a writer in two thousand one so here I am and I'm just coming to WHO I am. I'm coming into myself. I'm coming into my power undecided. I'm going to. I'm going to take care of me. I work for my last corporation. I work for my last editor. It's two thousand five live. I left Florida in two thousand after two thousand one after September eleven. That's when I knew I was a writer I worked in publishing and then fast forward. I'm working for this editor in chief. Two thousand four have a nervous breakdown. I can't I can't take it anymore. I CAN'T I. Can't it beat up anymore and this is not why came to New York to New York to pursue writing and so the moment that I took. I'm not to that identity. I'm a writer I I was standing in the fullest with myself as a black woman. I said you know what I'm going to work for myself for the rest of my life I never going to allow myself to be in another position like that and the rest is history a truly because two thousand five. I left that job and I wasn't working for a little while and then two thousand six. I write the article two thousand eight. I begin the journey for Afro Latinos. I'm gone I'm traveling. All of Latin America fifteen countries. That's where I'm really delving into the religion where learning where I'm studying and all that time making a decision about whether or not I'm going to become initiated or part hartness religious practice because there was a lot of fear there was a lot of m I worthy of this It was a lot of having to build myself backup gop in this journey and it makes sense when I think about being a black woman and I think about our history the American also all right. We'll see very often but I was born here. There were things that I had to just deconstruct to build myself back up and so during the film. Yeah I me- women from all Latin America. Who in the fire first? Five minutes of meeting me WanNa tell me their life story or something about the exchange and makes them feel safe so like even scholars historians sociologists professors. Like I would sit with them and they wanted to tell. Tell me the testimony about their abuse while they're sexual whether was physical whether it's you know power struggles at work whether it's being invisible is like it was from one like Peru y Guba Dr when the Rico Argentina. You name the country as I'm traveling the world and it's a lot of the same thing and people at telecommute they're bringing it all to me to hold and help them Give voice to so you ask you like how my podcast right so I come back with all of that on my shoulders All of these women were with me how to why honor black woman after Latinos the untold story. Making sure that I'm doing justice. This two hundred and fifty million people of African descent and Latin America. How do I tell their story? How do I tell their story? How do I honor that truth? Even on that living there experience I write a one woman show fi right the documentary. I read a woman show. I was born where it's camano logs of seven different women that I met in their experiences and it was part of the the one festival right. Yes one festival in New York which is was an amazing experience in and it was performed. The one woman show is performed by on seven nights seven different women who had memorized the entire descript. Because I wanted it to be different voices. Different women different experiences telling these stories and was amazing all while facing eviction all while facing not working because remember I quit my job to say I'm working for myself and so a lot of the owning who I am has been. It has been hot. Do this on my terms. How do I do this on my terms in hold onto some software respects when people want to continue to be things Adamy I write finding your force two thousand and eleven. I wrote my memoir in a month at taking a month off from connecting to anyone anything to write this like my partner just suddenly says she says it's a thousand page Memoir Mike. No it's not. It's close devoted in Amman. That's it's amazing. It was crazy that this rate I should have you as my ghost rider. Because I'm like Yo I've tried to produce something that's like two hundred pages and it's taking like seven I that was on beasts mode but also me needing to purge all of this out so I write the memoir I I read it in a month. I publish it that same year at some point so that like I finished it I wrote it in. May I published in August of that. I self published my mouth and so after you write something that Major that's your entire life story. Your journey coming out as a lesbian in your failed marriage. You're being a single parent all the ways you damage her. You're being raped and violated. You like your whole journey of your whole journey of of life like this twenty year span. This memoir spent twenty years of my life. What's next Pizarro was asked me you still have you found force a Mike? I'm always finding it in different ways. It's never ending you. Never completely flying ended I recorded finding your force s an audio book. It's available for free on my soundcloud and from there. I decided that I needed needed to record these podcasts. These video blogs of just things that like with different topics and things that I be that that'd be going through and experiencing as a writer as a woman of color as a black woman as lesbian as a mom. Whatever came up that day that was the theme of the day and I suggests freestyle I would just free style and just go and until I really got? Got My niche right. 'cause I was then talking about the craft of writing and I was doing meditations and then I've come to a completely different place as has a healer as a fan they'd I as Yorkshire and I'm doing under the less data umbrella less unfit search for consulting on providing daily card readings. Amusing my social media to connect to people mostly are people right women of color black women and men who are really trying to connect spiritually and connect to the God. That lives in ma'am. So that's that's the truth of like where my work has taken me as I have I. I know that I went through all of this. And my journey to this place. Why get to share how I got there and what I know now so I'm appeal at a bit for audience because I think it's important? Go to really look to that pivotal moment where it's just like. I'm going to really embrace. Take on this identity of being a writer because because I think in many ways the choice that humane after September eleventh to say you know what I need a shift in my life and it's more than just oh I'm GonNa take writing and this is a hobby because I think for creatives. It doesn't necessarily matter so much the platform per se. But it's there's something that's in there being but what you did requires a set of courageous steps to take right to actually make a a professional shift from. I'm getting money. I'm doing well in this corporate environment and into pivoted something that honestly to be creative there is financial instability in that and often times. I'm sure there may be some of us Some of our listeners out there listening in and thinking like I want to be a writer. And they're kind of pussyfooting around it because this is like to make that leap. What you did is huge and so take take us back like what was some of the contextual things that was happening that was like you know what I need? I need to change and this is what I'm going to do and I'm going to do this full time. And this is definitely a part of my journey that I'm GonNa put forth because that's very intentional on your part and I'm sure it's more than just being an African the sending in these workspaces because a lot of us work with you know those others and we feel marginalized but we are still beholden to that Environment Armand but then still try to find creative patches elsewhere but you are just like screw it on love this something speaking to you right now in over two point Oh that is probably may have set it quickly in the interest of time but truly one of the hardest decisions I've ever had to snake right and so I like to tell stories and use dates so September eleventh two thousand one that Tuesday. We know that the towers come down when the towers come down. I'm living a Miami and a working for a major arm company Major Company and so I'm driving to the office that day and among the phone with my sister Josie and she's she does her good morning running America thing she's telling me she's catch me up on the news. She's washing the news in real time. I'm driving through Miami. And she's like Oh shit. A tower describe is crash. A plane just crashed into the tower and I was like what and I'm driving driving driving driving and I'm still driving to work to Miami. And she tells a second Plane Lands in Tower in the Twin Towers and shit were under attack. That's when I felt instinctively I was like Oh we attack. I get to the office office and I remember saying to my boss. Have One more thing happens amount. I WANNA go pick up. My daughter will be with my family after September eleven and all of the days that follow we. They are watching September eleventh on replay. All of us around the world just an on a loop ramp towers the people jumping out of windows all about that horrific moment right and I'm thinking damn what if I had died and one of those towers. What if I had died? What what? How will my daughter remember me? What significant contributions have I made in life what I believe her with? How will unhealthy remember me? And I decided that I was gonNA write her memoir. I did not know how to write a memoir. I didn't know how to begin to even tell a story at that point. I had had no inkling internally that I was a writer like I didn't know it and you wake up to it yet but I knew it was going to remember because I said if anyone's going to tell my daughter my my dirt about my life is going to be me and so I began to look around my book. Shell and I had all of these books on writing how to write how how to publish how to get a big editor so I have been collecting these books. Do you remember those little papers that you would buy a book for a penny. Yeah absolutely so I had all had been picking all these titles. It was preparing me but I had no idea till I said I should write her book. And then once you I mean I love that biological who quote from the alchemists when you want something badly enough the universe conspires in helping you achieve it. That's right it was the natch. There was the Miami Book Fair was happening and it was that following month in on Mike and it was like you know if submit thirty pages and you get to sit sit with a with an international editor and agent and I was like great thirty pay like it came out of nowhere I was GonNa took three days off of work mark. I was just like I'm going to tell my story and I was then I was writing a book called the coming me and I always say Michelle Obama stole my title title. I had that title many many many okay. My skin and I was reading about my parents love affair and I was was reading. The book called writing from personal experience And as I'm reading it the lines that were really everyone has a story at its fell. Everyone's experience France matters. And in that moment I looked at my daughter who was little at the time she was like nine and I was like. I'm I'm a writer and she's like I know mommy you're gonNA write me a book I said No. You don't understand I'm a writer she's like. I know you're going to buy a house house with a McDonald's in it and McDonald's are belly she was sitting get it but in that moment it was revealed to me that I am a writer and once I had that revelation I began to make moves to manifest that and I knew that I wanted to leave Florida and come back to to New York City because I felt like New York is where I needed to be to hone my skills to really master my craft and I want. I just knew that New York was where I needed to do that. And so I began to save money and I saved four thousand dollars. I had had a job lined up I. I had a school picked out for my daughter. She's going to be going to a private school. Everything was aligning perfectly until I made a huge. I mistake at my job. I was accused of embezzlement huge mistake that I had made so at the time I was an executive assistant to a marketing manager for this major on company and I was in charge of doing of of organizing. Is this huge sales meeting. People internationally coming in so old districts hotel food entertainment All the workshops everything and my boss to me but I want you to have fun. It was at the four seasons. I want you to have fun. Have Fun have fun. And I'm like absolutely. I had private yoga. I got a manicure. PEDICURE got a long story short two weeks before you're leaving because I had given my notice I was moving to New York. Everyone knew I was pursuing writing. I'm called in and they were like. Do you realize you spent four thousand dollars at the four seasons and I was like no they made me pay it back in twenty four hours. I was escorted it to my car. I was humiliated. I went home and I cried Davis. I was devastated. I was so ashamed. I had disappointing wanting my boss. I couldn't believe I had done that. I've always been an excellent employee right because we're trained that way too great excellent and I'm in the bathroom towels in my mouth crying. No one knew my parents had to know I had moved in with them to save money rate and the saving of the four worth thousands and went right back to them in so the universe is funny right the I will always remember this woman. The vice president in human resources at this farm company called me a few days after the incident and she wanted to check in and she wants to know how I was. This is a woman who had taken me to see. Wayne Dyer Fire. Plays like these are people who like really loved me and she was like okay. Tommy what's going going on with New York. What are you what are you doing and I wipe might wiped my tears? came out of my hysteria took a deep breath. And I said I'm still going. I'm still going I'm going to New York. I'm still going and she was like that's what I that's what I like to here. I said always be a woman. This is another woman of color. She's always be a woman of your commitment. A woman of your word and I've carried that all my life so I appreciate you knowing that sort it was important to share because it hasn't been easy to choose writing it has not comedians. Come a great costs in his. Come a great humiliation and devastation but it has been the very thing to help ground me and choose me because at any moment i Tony Talents that you know what writing isn't for me. I'm not GonNa do this but I have an. I still am choosing writing. I still am choosing me. I love of your story and even just as whole segment because it's that's the call to adventure right. And so when I when I was thinking about I'm just even as a sidebar thinking about how to organize this podcast. It's like any time we're embarking upon a particular journey. You can have a multitude of different journeys Ernie's journey for me in this context the journey of life but we have many journeys in trips along the way Kind of goads or triggers us to go on a particular pat. And I think it's so powerful in meaningful in the sense of just slight. They're all these things that are happening in your environment. Arment around buying books having these conversations but it's so interesting that there's certain clues around them a manifestation of Jim that you're you're having that sometimes you're not even cognitive that you're like Oh so to your point where you look up and you're like wow I have all these books that are about these things your your mind and with subconsciously doing something because it was trying to express a passion or a of yours and you don't even realize it until you just look everyone was like. Oh Oh and I think your story about. Just the MISSTEP in the corporate environment to where there are trappings. That are like that that we as people of Color. I've I've heard stories like that. Before before where you're thinking that you have a particular relationship with your manager or someone who is you know a little bit and has a little bit more influence in the organization. And you're thinking oh I have some latitude and then it comes to bite you in the behind in a harsh way. But I think it's just really a testament to our experiences experiences in which you are able to be resilient you know when I started the New York State Electricity Group in two thousand six came out of this Need to have space to tell us stories unapologetically without having to translate or explain ourselves or you know whitewash or whatever to make people feel comfortable it was we can come as we are with our stories And we could be amongst women that get it Like we get it and so from that from creating space right there. I started in two thousand six with six women meeting in my apartment Harlem to growing in one month thirty people from in six months one hundred people and now thirteen years later. The New York selecting rise group has over eight hundred members. Go from there. I began to create. You know for the past seven years now. The right it's writing from the womb workshops where I meet with writers. It's either a nine one session where we're writing for nine months and I'm helping them to give birth to a story from Mike inception to finish finish line. I'm helping them to dream it. I'm helping them to see the the story that they might be missing like asking them the right questions in the most loving nurturing supportive space because they're not getting that in other spaces so for me I love. I love that when I write it as the one who called called me the regio. The you're the writing midwife because she's like you know you you know with writing prompts and activities and just this space that that I've created. I'm really proud crowd of because I've seen so many writers complete things and gone to publish things. And they're actors and filmmakers and they're just taking their in writing to the next level which is really really don't And I even think what you start to talk about with your work in terms of being a writer and a producer for Afro Latinos the documentary. That's important in terms of you even coming into your fullness around embracing racing this you know yourself identity as a black person you know more than just saying on of African descent because I think a lot of folks within the lat next community do recognize like okay. It's slave Africans came to this region along with the indigenous people that were already there and and with the white colonizers so yeah of course. That's why we look this way or our hair. Has this particular curl pattern in my booty. Looks like this in my music music and my food. But that's about it right. That's very different to say. Oh yeah there's some African descended people somewhere in my lineage. That's different from saying no. I am an African descended person. Whether you are starting that as being afro hyphenated whatever like Afro Ecuadorian or for Afro Colombian versus like on black which in and of itself means different things in different contexts. Right that's a very clear identities that I've always always found interesting being you know with family. That's of the Caribbean and although we may all speak different languages across the region it's just like like you know there's this real tension around color ism there's a real tension around embracing that and that's deep for you to even come into your own with data and then to be on the other side of the Lens Hearing People's stories so you have your own story but then you're hearing other people tell their story to you. It's crazy to me. How Oh my journey of self discovery and identity in this you know coming into myself brought me to Africa Pinos okay? I intentionally wrote a story that was about bridging. The Black Brown divide so that I'm thinking black girls and brown girls. We realized that we all black. And we all come from this place and it was about this like this school of thought that the first woman came from Africa. Like all of this ece like this is all of the things that I was embracing studying learning and taking on as truth because we could know that Mongo is an African word and and our booties are African fine but there is something very distinct about saying. I'm a black woman within Dominican in culture. Many black women aren't identify plaque. And so I think it is interesting because they haven't arrived to a place of of being proud of that blackness that's heartbreaking right so like when I think about where we where we are as people here in the US and and where there are a lot of African Americans who feel like. Oh now you WANNA be black rain you WANNA be apart. Oh now because it's a trend. You identify where. I'm talking about Apple Latino for letting nothing that now you now. You WanNa be black because it's cool the truth of the matter is we've always been black. We just have never loved. It loved being black back because we were told not to. We were told to hate the skin that we were born in much. Like Everton Americans yesterday who have come come to not all African Americans but there we've had that struggle with an African American. See The community we would that is to WanNA light in your skin and cleanse. That's not just happening here in the US. It's happening all over anywhere anywhere where there are black folks. There's as someone who is suffering and identity crisis an uncertain about whether or not they should love the skin that they're in great. Ain't that the truth because wherever we are in the world I mean there is some sort of colonial and post colonial history. That's there I mean even on the continent you you know. Slavery look very different on this side of the world is the western hemisphere but still even the Cologne post colonial practice in how this discoveries were divided the way they were divided who came in colonize them plays a role in the ways in which that to me. You're like wow like it's big business in places like Nigeria and Ghana and along the western coast of the continent around Lightening of skin. It's it's it's devastating. You know what I what I do. Love is that there are more and more and more people who are standing in their blackness. All over La. In America there are a lot of movements. There are a lot of laws being passed. Finally you know To protect people against racism and discrimination. I mean it it still common practice in in Latin America to you. have in your your newspapers that they're looking for someone with went up at a sense. Yeah good presence and that reba reading between the lines that means that they really want someone who is light. WHO's White White Latino with straight hair light eyes? You know for this job and definitely. Don't be a black person. A black woman coming in here with kids they definitely are asking you the most inappropriate questions on an interview and so I feel like where I am. I love that you're asking about the film. It has been interesting to be across from the people. The p the Africa Filipinos after Colombian Dominican asking them about the experiences With identity and those who are like not having it right because there are people who are still like. I'm not black right dark arcus midnight lay. Okay then I black. They're brown damn well lateral and so. I know that my work here is to show people this where we come from. This is our history. This is the truth and I believe that I think that people need to have agency Over their identity. So I'm not here to like start this like Afro Latino Movement like you're either embracing your blackness or you're not if you're I'm not I'm sad for you you because you'll never be like a full. You're never going to be a whole person because there's a part of me that you're denying ashamed of because you haven't been taught the truth of of who you are where you come from and so we'll do. Our civil rights movement in our Black Power Movement and black is beautiful movement. Like you see it. You see it more. And more like there's a woman her she owns missy sauce. Our Honeymoon Caroline Cabrera's but she she has this movement where she started a salon and a school. So you know black girls and Dr could begin to embrace their hair and know how to take care of the hair and and so. It's really empowering that I've learned about myself and Incredible work that I'm I'm seeing happening there. You have it folks. This concludes park one of our conversation with with Annabel samples Lassen Thera stay tuned for the next episode. Part too as she talks about the road and where we land piece.

writer New York City Latin America United States Mike Mom Caribbean Africa America Latina magazine producer Annabel Miami National Book Award Lorrie Wilmot editor Florida Penn Ingraham IGNACE
Comparing Our Spiritual Gifts

Daily Grace

50:30 min | 1 year ago

Comparing Our Spiritual Gifts

"Welcome to daily grace. We believe that the Bible is true trustworthy and timeless and we want to help women and like you know and Love God's word the Bible shows who God is and who he is changes. Everything my name is Joanna. I'm Stephanie. Come join us as we chat about the truth of God's word in our everyday lives breath spiritual gifts are given to us by God for the good of the body of Christ but our tendency is often the fall into unhealthy unhealthy comparison when it comes to our individual gifts. Maybe we find ourselves and being someone else's gifting or even taking pride in our home mm-hmm in today's conversation. You're going to take a look at that harmful tendency in our own hearts and see how God's design radically changes the way that we view and use our gifts. Hey guys welcome back to another episode. Would've daily grace. This is Stephanie. And I'm here as always with my co-host Joanna. Hey Hey hey so today we are going to be talking about spiritual Gifts with the specific focus on how we can find ourselves wrestling with the tendency to compare our gifts to a someone else's gifts. I know that there have been times in my life when I thought man. I wish I could have that gift. And do what she she does. I mean let's be real. There have been times when I thought. Wow I wish I could speak as eloquently as Joanna and you. This issue of comparison doesn't just concern secular. Things I guess is what I'm getting at so we're going to talk all all about that. But First Joanna Sheriff favorite thing of yours from this week. Wow my favorite. Thank for this week is a seasonal seasonal version of Hershey's kiss. It's always food related. I know I know So are so I love Hershey's Hershey's kisses and I don't know if you know this about me. There's something about a milk chocolate Hershey's kiss and people make fun of me for that are like youths. Boring it's gross. It's not classic. Yeah classic but there is a seasonal flavor for Christmas. I don't know if it's still out or not but I still have some leftover and it is the Cherry cordial cream Hershey's kisses And they are so good. I've not tried that one so I grew up. AM eating like the actual like Cherry cordial chocolate. Yeah around Christmas every year and I always loved them and then I tried these Hershey's kisses and I thought he's so good and then I ate one of the actual cherry cordial's and it was not as good as their. She's guesses they are better. So if they're still available go who out to target and buy some before they're gone. I thought you were going to say the peppermint ones which I really love. There's the peppermint Hershey kisses but you know what this is a great example of Howard just so different but I thought that were different. And we're going to talk about that what about you. What's the favorite thing of yours? Oh man so. We had talked about this off the air yesterday and juggled my mind that I wanted to share it on on the air and is the song Jesus strong in unkind by city. And Yeah it's such a sweet song to sing with your kids to sing over yourself and kids and I Sing it every morning together. Now just because I want it ingrained in their brains and my Brain and heart so that is my favorite thing. Everyone has to look it up. Jesus as a strong in kind by city alight. Yes it is so good and the reason Stephanie. And I were talking about this off air yesterday is because I was in the playroom with my two and a half year old daughter and out of nowhere. She starts singing the words we can always run to Jesus and I- sweet despite lost it right right there in our playrooms. Yeah man so good so back to our topic for the day. We are talking like Stephanie. Said about spiritual Gifts but specifically the tendency that we have to compare ourselves to other people in regards to our spiritual gifts and you know. I think it's easy for for ask to look around other believers whether it's in our local church or maybe somewhere in the world of social media and see people who are gifted in many different ways and then look at ourselves and compare and say why can't I have that gifting or even kind of more judge mentally say how they they really aren't gifted in that area. I am might not say that out loud but we think it and you know we won't talk about this idea of of spiritual gifts are tendency to compare them and why it's actually a really good thing than they are different that we don't all have the same gifting acting. Yeah I'm so before we jump in there. We need to kind of ask ourselves while what are spiritual gifts. What are we talking about when talk about spiritual gifts? Well I think. One of the great passages to look at is in First Corinthians chapter twelve and verse seven says to each is given given the manifestation of the spirit for the common good so as we look at spiritual gifts what we're talking about is a manifestation Shen of the Holy Spirit this is the Holy Spirit working in US and through us and it is for the good of the body of Christ so that we can fulfill the mission that God has called us to in his kingdom to advance his kingdom and proclaim the Gospel And so that's going to look different For different people that spirit is going to work through US differently manifest itself off differently and so a couple of disclaimers before we get to far into this conversation. The first one is. There's a lot of debate about whether or not some of the spiritual chill gifts and specifically want to have to do with the revelation like prophecy or speaking in tongues. There's a lot of debate about whether or not those kinds of of gifts are still active. Today we're not going to go into that debate There are lots of passages that you can look at. There are lots lots of articles you can read lots of different arguments for both sides. And we do WANNA point you to kind of the four major passages on spiritual gifts fs in the New Testament. And that's First Corinthians Chapter Twelve Romans Chapter twelve a Fijian's chapter four and first Peter Chapter Four. And so if you want to do some more research on that end of the spectrum start with those passages and then go do some reading. You'll find tons out there tons you can look at so. That's the first claimer second. DISCLAIMER is. There's also a debate on. How many spiritual gifts are listed in the New Testament? Some people say there are to some people say they are somewhere in the twenties and most people agree that the less than the new testament aren't exhaustive. So with that being sad we might talk about some things that are not specifically listed as spiritual gifts in the New Testament and so some of them might not fall into that category of spiritual gifting but they might be more just strengths talents abilities. Things like that so we are not necessarily saying that every single type of strength that we're talking about is a technical spiritual gift right. We are definitely taking a broad approach to the topic of gifts here and I will say though that because the debate around spiritual gifts isn't a first first order issue it shouldn't be the cause of division within the body of Christ and we want to fight against division and fight for unity and that's also why we're talking about what we're talking about today on the topic of comparison because it's important Comparison more often than not. There are some exceptions but it was often than not comparison is unhealthy and doesn't lead to greater unity and when we look at scripture concerning gifts we we see that the different gifts given to God's people are given for the purpose of the common. Good Joanna you adverse seven but I'm going to go back to First Corinthians twelve and and read verses four through seven yeah says this now. There are varieties of gifts but the same spirit and their varieties of service but the same Lord and there are varieties of activities but it is the same God who empowers them all and everyone to each given the manifestation of the spirit for the common. I'm in good. So spiritual gifts are gifts of Greece given to us by the spirit and they're given to us for the edification of the Church Church and the spread of the Gospel for the glory of God They're given for the common good. That's the key phrase here right and the diversity of our gifts should lead not to division by actually lead us to greater unity within the body of Christ. Yeah and I think so important to start like you did Stephanie. With the purpose of spiritual gifts. Yeah right like you said. I Corinthians twelve seven says to each is given the manifestation. They should have the spirit for the common good. And this is what it's for. It's for the good of the body of Christ. You know we see that idea reiterated in First First Peter Four ten that says as each has received a gift use it to serve one another as good stewards of God's varied grace and so we tend to think that these gifts are for us Or that maybe they somehow define our value are worth or we can even treat spiritual gifts like personality identifiers right like we might take a personality test. Oh well here's my spiritual gift. That is part of my personal identity. Yeah that can lead to some really unhealthy comparison between one another so for example. Maybe we see someone who is able to beautifully and inciteful teach the word of God to a group of people and we are envious of them wishing that we could do it and end up feeling like they're better than us and we just aren't good enough because we not have that gifting or maybe on the flip side you are especially empathetic to the struggles of others and you take pride in that and then look down on others aren't so quick to jump in and help And so if we're comparing ourselves in a way that results in envy or results in pride we're clearly missing the point here right. God works these things in us for the good of one another and instead of viewing them as four or one another. We're looking at others as competition We're looking at others as something to measure our own worth and value instead of looking to how we can use what God has worked in us for the good of one another and so it should causes causes to be unified and build each other up but unfortunately it can often cause division when we focused on comparison. Yeah I think you're absolutely right. That comparison often happens. Because that's how we assess assign value to ourselves and to others and like you said that's spike comparison often leads to competition. You know we want to increase our own sense of value and we feel like the way to do that to be better than someone else. Yeah but we have to remember that spiritual gifts assign value to a person feel like we need to say that like over and over again like spiritual gifts are sovereignly given by God. They are gifts and got doesn't have favorites right when we are united to Christ we have the righteousness of Christ and that's true for anyone. That's United's decreased. Yeah and that's so true that we just have to get past this idea that our spiritual gifts somehow determine how awesome we are awesome. We Are you know that same passage from I Corinthians chapter four and emphasizes there are a variety of guest but the same spirit says there are a variety of guests but the same spirit and their varieties of service but the same Lord Lord and their varieties of activities but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone and so it says focus on there is one spirit so in a broad sense all believers actually have the same gift and that is the gift of the spirit we have the in dwelling Holy Spirit. Beer it within us. But the spirit chooses to manifest himself in us in different ways And and you know we see that again. In First Corinthians twelve eleven all these are empowered by one and the same spirit who apportions to each one individually as he wills else and so. Yeah God is the one who gives them. We don't earn these gifts And so we can't take any kind of pride in them right after Paul talks about spiritual gifts he goes on to talk about the people of God as a body He does this also when he talks about spiritual gifts in Romans Chapter Twelve and inefficient chapter four. And so what we see. Is that this idea of the body of Christ in the spiritual gifts working together for the body is so important so i. I do WanNa read. A few verses begins begins in chapter. Twelve First Corinthians verse twelve for just as the body is one and has many members and all the members of the body though many are one one body so it is with Christ for in one spirit. We were all baptized into one body. Jews or Greek slaves are free and all were made to drink of one spirit for the body does not consist of one member but of many. If the foot should say because I am not a hand I do not belong to the body that would not make it any less part of the body and if the ear should say because I am not an I I do not belong to the body that would not make it any less a part of the body if the whole body were an I wear would be the sense of hearing if the whole body were an ear where would be the sense of smell but as it is God arranged the members in the body each one of them as he chose if all were a single member. Where would the body be as it is? There are many parts yet at one body and I love this passage because it just shows us that it is such a good thing that we have different gifts. Yeah you know. If everybody had the same gifts we could not function properly. We wouldn't be the body. I'm just like a body won't properly function without. Its different parts have different purposes. Says you know you might think that your purposes more important or less important but each part has been arranged in a way that it's indispensable for for the body to function properly. Yeah so think about it this way. I thought of this analogy. Let's say that you are planning this huge huge wedding. It's GonNa be this elaborate elegant super fancy wedding right. You're going to need lots of different people involved. You're going to need a minister minister. Someone who is a good decorator pastry chef to make the cake a chef for the food autography musicians a seamstress. That's right on and on and on so. Let's say that you focus your attention on finding the best pastry chefs in the country because that needs to be good. I says we're going to be a legendary cake. So you find all of these incredible pastry chefs and you hire them to run. The wedding and the cake is magnificent. But here's the problem now. You have pastry chefs trying to take wedding portraits. Trying to sing your first damn. Let's the office is going to be a mess. We're going to get some interesting stuff coming out of that wedding because what you need is the diversity of abilities abilities or gifting to come together to make this beautiful wedding. Yeah and when it comes to the body of Christ. We don't decide that we're going to pursue this gifting reading or that or go to school for it but God is the one who gifts us and he has perfectly ordered it so that we can all work together to function properly A. and grow up into Christ so we see that it's really so important and vital and by design that our gifts are different but even still in the early search this tendency for unhealthy comparison existed or outs. Paul wouldn't spend so much time talking about it. Yeah I think that's so interesting what I loved your analogy That helps us. Visualize it really well But I think it's interesting that this issue of comparing spiritual virtual guesses not new like you said it was in the early church and so let's talk about what fuels comparison. You know. There are many things in our sinful nature that can fuel comparison and threaten the unity within the body. Right off the Bat I think of like insecurity and envy. Can you know if we are misplacing. Our identities then we're always going to be insecure to some degree and we're also always going to compare ourselves to others to some degree and if that's the case we'll always Russell with envy right. If we're insecure. We begin comparing pairing. We're GONNA always wrestle with envy. 'cause it's this vicious cycle that just feeds off of each other. You're you're insecure U. N. B. Other. Compare yourself up to other people and then that just makes you more insecure And here's the truth though like there is always going to be someone no one else. That's doing something better than you. There's a who is going to be someone else. Embodying a particular quality or virtue more more than us you know no matter how much we strive for perfection like no one is perfect apart from Christ. So that's what I'm getting at. No one is perfect right. Romans three ten when none is righteous. No not one so then. We need to be careful about where we're placing our identities and we're going to get more into that in a minute. It's so true. Envy insecurity can really fuel that comparison and on the flip side. A lot of our comparison can come out of and result in pride. You know we might see our gifting as better We think that we've earned it or produced it in ourselves. When in fact dodd gave them out based on his own will? It was his decision. And it's not because of anything that we've done and so. I think that we can kind of fall on both ends of the spectrum. Yeah there is this kind of despairing insecurity and envy or it's this kind of judgmental judge mental pride. Yeah absolutely so how do we combat all of those things insecurity envy and pride and how do we combat comparison of spiritual gifts and we kind of always say this. But it's because it's true. We need to remember the Gospel Because the Gospel leaves no room for simple comparison because the gospel honestly puts us in our place. You know the only comparison Jason that really matters is between senators and a holy God you know. We are sinners and we fall short of the glory of God. There are no exceptions to that but the Gospel of Jesus Christ is good news so instead of being insecure the Gospel tells us we can securely rest in Christ and. Here's something else. The Gospel does it gives us great. Hope it takes her eyes off of ourselves and puts it on Christ who is the main in character of the story of redemption. So it's just reordering things to how it should be to God's design and what we need to do is we need to continue you to live every day with that truth before us. We need to take our focus off of ourselves to behold God and by His grace man we need to put off the old man and live in the new identity in Christ that is given to us and to know that our value and are worth is not contingent on anything or anyone else apart from our God who is unchanging and so when we and live with their identities firmly rooted and Jesus and keep the Gospel ever before us we won't struggle within security and will find that we will will be able to better understand like really understand that anything good is given from above. Yeah but so good. I think you're so right when we can take our eyes off of ourselves and stop navel-gazing where I look to Christ who is our identity man all that insecurity there's just no room for it and it just it can't survive in that kind of environment And you know as in thinking about how do we combat these other issues of envy and pride I was thinking I think actually combat them both in the same way because I think that there are two sides of the same coin. Yeah right so I thought of three kind of major things that we need to be seeking after in order to combat combat envy and pride that comes in to play with this comparison of gifting and one of them is humility so first of all we need to recognize is an acknowledged the truth that it's God who gives these gifts and that he has our best interest in mind in sovereignly averagely administrating these gifts to us. So that means we don't have to be envious of what he has given to others because we know Oh that he does what is best. Yeah and we have no place to be prideful because we know that we didn't do anything to earn it. It's all his work. Irk sure so that just comes back to knowing and reminding ourselves what God's word tells us about this issue of spiritual gifts and the second thing in in addition to humility is gratitude which I think flows out of humility and so we have to remember that God does not give us gifts because we need them but God gives us gifts because somebody else does right. Our gifts are given to us for the good of the body of Christ. Yeah and so. We can combat envy by expressing gratitude to God forgiving others the gifts that we need to benefit from right if if we realize Oh God has gifted the body of Christ in order to help me. Some he's given someone else a gift that I need to to benefit from man we can praise him for that and instead of being envious that we don't have it. Just thank the Lord that someone else has that to offer for us On the flip side we can combat pride by expressing gratitude to God for mercifully working in us in the midst of our own weakness right when we turn to him in gratitude. We are acknowledging that this isn't of us that it's all of Heaven uh-huh and there's no place for pride there so humility gratitude and then third we need to serve. You know ask yourself how can can you use your gifts for the good of others. And the way that this combat's envy is that we begin to see the fruit of how God has gifted us as we serve out of our gift ings and we can rejoice in that we can see the good that he intended for what he has worked. Worked in US and it also combat's pride because as we're serving we're shifting our focus from how we can puff ourselves up and better ourselves and serve our own best interest were shifting to ask how we can encourage and build up others And so I think that really envy. VM pride they go hand in hand and the way that we combat them is really the same. You know as I'm hearing you talk them like beyond such amazing and grace that God designed it that way to help us. Not Be so self reliant but we can't do it all on her own. That's grace once. I started viewing spiritual ritual gifts as gifts like you said given to me to gift to others. Like things really shifted and I think as we begin to really let that sink in that our gifts are sovereignly. Given by God to us for the common good will move from Comparing our spiritual gifts to actually celebrating our gifts and others guests like we will collectively celebrate them. And I think it's proper I think that's right. We should cherish them because they are gifts ordained by God for his people to the praise of his glory And they're given given to us to strengthen us not for our own self promotion but to the service and good of others and there's this beautiful all truth fat because these gifts are for the common good for the good of the body like we've been saying and like you said we benefit from other people's gifts and that such profound truth that we can easily lose sight of but it's so rich and it's so good yeah and I have seen that play out out time and time again in the context of my own local church. You know we have people in our local church who are gifted in teaching and can draw us all to God's word so that we can know him more fully. Yeah and we have people who are gifted in administration and they plan our events aunts and they make our budget and they really help the church to function in a way that we can steward what God has given to. I want you know we have people who are especially gifted in welcoming uppers who show up early to make coffee and in greet people and make them feel welcome and I can tell you personally that I have been so encouraged and so add a fide fide by those people who remember what kind of tea I like to bring and make sure that it stocked with the Coffee Bar and it's just you know all these different different people come together We also have people who have experienced and abilities that might not be considered spiritual gifts per se but they I use them for the benefit of the body. Anyway right so whether it be technical skills to run audio and lights on Sunday morning or it's people who have skills in web design who have made our website beautiful and accessible or people with handy skills who paint the walls and have helped to build furniture that we need for the new building that we just purchased right so we have all of these people using their own talents abilities and their spiritual gifts for the good of the body of Christ. And you know you might look at someone who leads worship through music or teaching or whatever and say. Hi Wish I could do that. But the truth is we're not gonNA function properly as a body. If everybody is gifted in that way right it might be like have some really pretty music. But the church isn't going to be functioning the way it's most too And so we are better together not in spite of our differences but because of them. Yeah man as you were talking. I also thought the people who serve in like children's ministries. Yeah so grateful for them Bam we really do need each other. That was God's good designed nine for his people. Yeah I really do. Think the metaphor of the body depicts the depth of that truth so well I think it's so interesting that it was the natural progression of all of Paul's writings on this She said it was in every major passage. Because yeah if someone within the body is not exercising the gifts Scott has given them the effects are actually systemic. It says if the eyes were not functioning you know that lack of site would uniquely affect the entire body and so we need each other walking and step with the spirit and utilizing the guests that he has given us and we need each other for so so many reasons and much work through those real quick here first off we need each other for our mutual Sancta vacation and we talked about this more more at length and episode twenty nine studying scripture together. So if you haven't listened to that I encourage you to go back. But we're just sanctified as a body and we develop unity the unity as a party when we study got together and we go in depth in that episode but we talked a little bit about how we can help each other see our blind spots and we can share insight and understanding and I thought of proverbs. Twenty seven seventeen right iron sharpens iron. One man sharpens another and Joanna. You did a great job of showing us. How different gifts within your local church contributes to the vitality of the whole church? And so you know just thinking about that. It's not just the people with the gift of teaching that edify the body though they do in a special way by faithfully teaching the word and helping people rightly handle the word of God. But I'm just saying that. Our churches need those with the gift of administration to help the body function in an orderly manner rating and then they reflect our God of our order. So we get to see God's nature and a fuller way and we need those with the gift of service you know. They do a lot behind the scenes but we need them to help ministries emissions worship service just happen and so there are just so many different ways we can help each other grow in Christ likeness ignace and as we enjoy the fruit of sanctification and our own Reis are going to be multiplied when our brothers and sisters are also so growing and Christ likeness because we share this ultimate aim to glorify God and so when this happens we are going to collectively of Lee rejoice. Yeah I love that in that building up of the body that sanctification that we experienced together and you know I also think that we we need each other in the body not only for the good of the body but also for the good of those who are watching You know one of the amazing things about how God has designed the body of Christ is that it's so different from much of the way that the world actually works. You know if we look around the world differences differences tend to be a reason for division instead of a reason for unity. You know we talk a lot in our world in our culture about the need to come together to show kindness to each other despite our differences but the truth of the matter is that's not the reality. That's not what really happens most of the time time but if the body of Christ functioned the way that God intended it to function imagine the witness that that would be into a divisive watching world. Imagine if we actually did celebrate our differences and actually rejoiced in them and saw after them because as we know that we need each other. You know we're not always very good at this. You know the body of Christ. We are a body of sinners being sanctified by God's saving grace but this is what we are called to. This is what we are called to grow up into. And what an amazing witness for the world around us to see the body of Christ. The people of God are united and stronger. Yeah because of their differences. Yeah you're so right like true. Unity amongst diversity not because of shared interests or an passions but because of the Gospel like fat fat is truly beautiful yeah absolutely and unite the thera lot of practical implications of this of the fact that we have this unity and diversity and one of those is that we need to get involved in a local church show as we look at the fact that God has gifted us individually as members of one body. I think that there are a lot of practical implications for us as believers and you know. I think that what we need to see is that we need to get involved in the body of of Christ and specifically I would encourage getting involved in a local church and there are several reasons for this one. Is that you. We need the body of Christ in that. First Corinthians twelve passage where. It's talking about the body of Christ verse. Twenty one says the I cannot. I'd say to the hand I have no need of you nor again the head to the feet I have no need of you and so what we see is that we cannot say. I don't need the body of Christ Christ. We have to realize that watching sermons. Online isn't enough for our growth and functioning in the body of Christ. I mean going to church coach on Sunday mornings honestly isn't enough. We need each other and that means that we need community. We need to be intentional about getting involved fault. Maybe that's joining a community group at your church or meeting up with someone in your local church on a regular basis because we know that that those other people have something that we need for our spiritual growth and that we as a body need in order to fulfill what Christ has called us to do. Yeah so you you need the body but also the body needs you. Yeah here's the thing you have gifting that God has given you for a purpose and that purpose this is to serve other members of the body and so if we're not using our gifts for the good of our fellow believers honestly we're walking in disobedience. To put it bluntly we are sinning and I know that feels weird to say. 'cause it's a lot easier to recognize sin for something that we are doing than something something that we're not doing. Yeah but if we are not using our gifts for the good of the body than we need to repent and I think we can ask ourselves some questions questions in order to get involved. And that's how has God gifted me. What role has he placed me in? What resources has he provided? Me With and how can these things be used for the building up of the body and you know when this happens when we see the body of Christ working together as God intended us to a beautiful thing happens and we see it. And I Corinthians twelve twenty four through twenty six says that God has so composed the body giving greater honor to the part that lacked it that there may be no division in the body that the members have the same same care for one another if one member suffers all suffered together if one member is honored all rejoice together and isn't not just something that we all want that we all long for is to walk together not suffer alone and to have someone to actually share our choice. Well you know I think a lot of try to find this and things like a romantic relationship and you know God absolutely has gifted. Did those of us who are married with this opportunity to have someone to walk alongside us and share our burdens but we also need to know that we can have have that kind of family loving unity whether we're married or single because we are united to the rest of the body and when we suffer we all suffer together and if we are honored we all rejoiced together. We are called to be in this together. Yeah off that's also good and think that's great encouragement to not just attend a local church but really be involved in the local church to actually be the church we want to encourage ourselves and all all of you that are listening to us the gifts that are entrusted to you to edify the church and you do have have a gift right. We've Read First Corinthians twelve like so many times but look at bursts seven to each is given the manifestation of the spirit for the common good. So that saying if you are united to Christ if you're a member of the body of Christ you have a role to play in fulfilling the calling God has given to the body because you were given the manifestation of the spirit so you have a gift yeah and you might be listening thinking cool. I have no yeah no idea what that is not know what may sphere gifts are. How do I find out great question? Yeah so You you know there are these things called spiritual gifts tests out there and you know. I want to kind of caution you so that these can be helpful to give you kind of an overall idea But we have to know that these are not the end all be all right eight right. Yeah a test that you take online isn't going to tell you the spiritual gifting that the whole year has given given you with absolute certainty. Yeah right that's just not the way that it's going to work so just like any kind of personality test. These things can be helpful but we don't need to let them be the end. All be all ran us right. I would say a better way to find out. Start serving you know if you I don't know your gifting don't worry so much about figuring out what is my gift but instead ask the question. Where is their need that I can help fell? Yeah you know Paul is talking in this. First Corinthians twelve passage about how we don't all have the same gifts how they're going to be different and then he says this I will show you a still more excellent way and so there's something that he's GonNa tell us that's more important. And then what are specific gifting is and he tells us what that is. The beginning of First Corinthians chapter thirteen. Here's what he says. If I speak in the tongues of men and of Angels Angels but have not love I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal and if I have prophetic powers and understand all mysteries and all knowledge allege and if I have all faith so as to remove mountains but have not love I am nothing if I give away all I have and if I deliver up my body to be burned but have not love I gain nothing and so above all the specifics of the different spiritual gifts is love. Yeah this is what the purpose of these things are. This is what is going to be enduring. Passed all of them and so look for ways days that you can love others even if you don't know what your specific spiritual gift is. You're going to be exercising in some way if you are faithfully faithfully seeking to serve and love others and you know we can't let this uncertainty be an excuse to not love others right. All these other gifts are going to pass away but love never fails surprise. That's that's the context of that love passage learners patient. Love is kind you know. Oh all of that. It's in the context of these gifts. And that is the purpose of them and so we can start. They are even if we don't know how the rest is going to work out. And that's how we find doubt we find out by serving and I would also say become involved in a community like we've talked about already and ask those people who know you. Well you know say to them. Where do you think would be a place that I could serve based on what you have learned about me? What kind of gifting do you see evidenced in my life? Sometimes we need the insight of another believer who has walked with us. Yeah to help us see those things you know when we enter into community community and to real community with others they can call out gifting they see in us so much of the involvement that I have in my local local church right now is because somebody who knew me said. Hey I really think that you would be a good fit for this. Would you be willing to serve here. Yeah and you know even thinking back before my local church the whole reason that I ever considered becoming a teacher. which is what I did? Right out of college is because my high school schoolteacher said Hey. I think that this is something that you need to pursue when it comes to not only our talents and our abilities but even our spiritual L. Gifting 's those in the body of Christ who have walked with us can be an incredible resource and helping us to identify and Stewart those gifts fs and our lives. Yeah I totally agree. That's kind of my story as well It wasn't a spiritual gifts test or anything although I have taken them but what was more enlightening and helpful Lasting for me was just having someone within the body of Christ like encouraged me in that way and identify it and so since since then I mean I try to be very intentional and calling out gifting that I see in those around me I think it's so much easier to identify gifts and other people people then in our cells and I also think it's just encouraging and loving too and we need to help each other persevere in the fight fight of faith so there are many reasons just kind of Have Your eyes open to other people's gifts because like we said we need each other We benefit from each other's gifting things so I think you said a really good point that this can only happen like this figuring out spiritual gifts calling it out in each other if we're doing more than just showing up right even if you don't know your gifting I think you're so right. We need to say this again. Like serve in some way. Even if that means like you're just lingering during around at first like just remember that there is always room Yeah who serve and ticket plugged in and I think more often than not the the problem is is that we don't give the time and space That's needed to kind of figure things out and so just an encouragement to just extend extend grace and put yourself out. There may not happen the first Sunday or the second Sunday but discontinue showing up continue. I'm really doing what you can hand to plug into your community. Yeah and you know in light of that. I think it's important to Kinda give this word of caution that be careful that you aren't confusing to serve in certain ways because that's not my gifting shrew You know I was looking through these different spiritual gifts passages. There are a lot of spiritual gifts listed in the New Testament that we are actually all called to exercise in some degree even if it's not our particular spiritual gifting so for example spiritual gifts included are giving showing mercy service right. We're all called to do these thing. Yeah but for some they are given this manifestation of the spirit in a particular way in those areas. And so don't use service isn't my gifting as an excuse to kind of sit idly by in your church and do nothing. Hey don't don't use. I'm not gifted generosity or giving as a reason to have a tight grip on our own material possessions and You know I do want to say I think is important for us to be mindful of where we might have weaknesses and consider that right so if we're not gifted in teaching. We probably shouldn't volunteer here to speak at our churches women's retreat right. That's not where we are going to be. Best able to use our time and it's important for us to be good stewards stewards of what we have to offer. And it's not going to benefit the rest of the body but on the flip side. Let's say that God has done something. Something incredible in your life and your women's ministry leader has asked you to take a few minutes to share about that and at your women's Bible Study Right Eight. That might be a time when you say okay. I'm not gifted in teaching. But maybe God is asking me to serve out of my weakness and share share. What he has done proclaim his good works like scripture calls us to even though? This isn't my particular gifting right. So yes as we need to be mindful of our spiritual gifting. Yes we need to focus our time in the places that we are gifted because God has gifted us there for a reason but and we also have to realize cleaning bathrooms or taking out the trash at church is not a spiritual gift and somebody's gotTa do it right. We all can step in and serve you. Even if that's not our gifted right I I also find it interesting when Paul talks about how we do not all have the same gifts. He calls us to desire some of the gifts that we do not have avenue earnestly now out of envy but out of a desire to serve others and so this makes me think that maybe our gifts aren't a one and done in kind of thing that may be. God gives them to us at different times for different occasions. You know. I don't have a place where scripture directly says that scripture. It doesn't say you'll be given different guests different times but in this is kind of me taking this context of this passage. If we're called to desire those gifts chiefs maybe they're not always going to be static and so. I think that we need to be open to what God might be calling us to do. And where we might be. We needed to fill some need in the local body of Christ. Yeah I always say if God has called you to it he's going to equip you through it so or or to do it well and so yeah. I love that you know. We are all called to spread the good news. Even if we don't we have the gift of Angelism we are still call to walk by the spirit and grow in Christ likeness and love our neighbors and make disciples which actually are all aspects of evangelism. So I think the best sway to go about all of this is just to keep God's global mission as your life mission keep it in mind and be apart like really a part of a local church and be under the care of your pastor and strive to live according to the word of God with a heart sat on obeying his lead. And we can't go wrong doing those things. Yes absolutely absolutely. I love that. Well praise God that he has made us different. I hope thet we can walk away from this conversation with hopefully a fresh perspective afresh humility and gratitude and just excitement for what God is doing through us and through the rest of the body for the good of his kingdom and his name. Well we want to thank you all for joining us once again. Hey we quoted lots of scripture And so you can find all of those references including those kind of four four key passages in our show notes and you can always find our show notes at daily grace. PODCAST DOT COM. We'll always have all the episodes up there for you to listen to as well thank you so much for joining us and we'll talk to you next day

Paul Joanna Sheriff Stephanie Hershey US Peter Four Howard dwelling Holy Spirit Hershey Christ likeness ignace Church Church Greece Shen Romans Chapter Twelve Russell dodd Jason