15 Burst results for "Ignace Similize"

"ignace similize" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:18 min | 11 months ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Ideas

"Through painstaking observation and statistical analysis. A young doctor ignites similize made a pivotal discovery. Handwashing saves lives. He couldn't show the precise mechanism that would have to wait for the germ theory to be proven less than two decades later. His data and real life results were compelling yet. They failed to win over skeptical colleagues who clung tightly to outdated theories and practices of the past. So what is it that can make us blind to progress even in the face of demonstrable facts? That's what we try to answer in the second half of this documentary the dirt on hand washing the legacy of Dr Vice. It's very to tell you about ignace similize Marion scientist from Mines McLaughlin Glen. I'm from Nottingham. Trent University in England and a microbiologist by training and research but also the Learning and teaching manager for the school the Science and Technology. It may not sound like rocket science. Now the idea that your hands deepen and cadaver to deliver a baby. Possibly some sort of hand wipe will something might be appropriate. But at the time huge that I found Michael's video on Youtube. It's called ignite some vice my favorite scientist. You can find it on our website. Cbc DOT CA slash ideas. I asked him why of vice show at the start of semester. We look briefly at the history of microbiology which to be fair is largely talking about dead white bid Europeans so at the end of it always put up a slide being a little bit more diverse. About where SCI. He's now we go through it pretty much sort of from maybe the sixteen hundreds on woods just picking on human stories. I'm one of the most human stories that we have is similize because unlike many of the others he didn't win he didn't get to claim people didn't necessarily believe him. Michael loves showing the meticulous data and some of the sixty four tables some of vice produced to students. Those are on our website to best dater ever absolutely gorgeous. Data Looks Great. You argue with it. It's a graph way you have the mortality rate so if you're magic standard graph you got parkway maybe two thirds of the way up. You've got gotta line going by month and then once you get to the point which handwashing was brought down. He plummets a show that students as you know. You can't interpret the state or any other way if this is the only variable we talk about the other things. I tried if the only thing that's been done this then this has to be the thing making the effect. So why didn't other doctors believe him? There's a number of possible explanations beginning with dental vices reluctance to do the hard work to communicate his results. I think it highlights students as you can have the best data in the world but you need to convince the people to use it and if you count dude that's just as valuable as skill especially in this day and age to be able to explain what it means persuasively if you want that to be an outcome at the end of it is is is going to save lives. That he's going to change the world in a in a positive way. Some of ice had an aversion to writing so while he was repeatedly urged to publish his findings it was his associates and supporters. Who publicize them eat was a decade? Before he wrote his book the Ideology Concept and Prophylaxis of child bed fever at painfully detailed and sometimes angry five hundred and forty three pages.

Michael Dr Vice scientist similize ignace similize Marion Trent University Nottingham Youtube Mines McLaughlin Glen Science and Technology England
"ignace similize" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

12:33 min | 1 year ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"To all this good stuff all right get love him very much and now before we jump into our incredible show topic of the day. Let's jump into the apple podcasts. For the week another five Star Review Pedal dedicated by here it and Valentin. I have to thank you for your honesty. Humility and unwavering commitment to helping others. It is so evident that you're dedicated. Not only to the physical health appear listeners but also to the growth of their minds and the way in which they serve their community. I don't think there's anyone quite like you in the industry and I'm so honored to learn from you. Keep up the good fight while thank you so much for leaving that review over on apple podcast that means so much. Thank you for recognising. Me and Just thank you for making me a part of your life and I'm just very committed to continuing this conversation and to serve and everybody listen if you've yet to do so please pop over to apple podcasts. And leave a review for the show. It means so much and on that note. Let's get to our topic of the day today. Want to share some of the fascinating data. That's come forth as a result of this social and economic shutdown now first of all when the most striking things that I've noticed living in. La Now is notorious for traffic and for air pollution and over the past couple of months. I've been doing a physical therapy session several times a week. And so when the quarantine kicked in traffic was absolutely amazingly gone like there was so few cars out on the roads compared to what it was and also does being more relaxed because it not as much like traffic pressure you start to just really. Kinda see your arm and a little bit more and so prior to the quarantine. I could see a slight little daintily view of a mountain off in the distance on my drive home when the quarantine kicked in within a week maybe two weeks. I could see that mountain as clear as day. It was beautiful now just this week a couple of days ago coming back from my session. I could see mountains behind that mountain. In fact I could see mountains behind that mountain behind that mountain. I is crazy. The amount that that the air quality has improved and that the skies have cleared up as a result of the corn team now. The Corona virus said downs have had an unintended benefit of drastically improving our air quality pollution monitoring satellites operated by NASA and the European Space Agency have observed drastic decreases in air pollution in countries. All over the world while the quarantine has been in effect the satellites measured concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. Which has released by cars? Power plants and industrial facilities and the difference is on mistake. We now have one to one proof that the more humans are out and about being all sophisticated the more that we are damaging the environment around us all right and it is what it is to our environment as humans. We function much like a virus. Does we insert ourselves into the environment? We take control of the environment replicate and we also bring harm to the planetary organism that we all actually live in win things. Get Out of control and in some ways. Humans are actually more virus than viruses are. And if you think about it actually makes complete sense because humans are more virus than viruses are. And we've talked about this on a pass episode really diving in and talking about the science behind viruses. Because that's what we really need to be at in the conversation about what's going on. We need to look at the basics and the first kind of hallmark thing for us to realize that we have over three hundred trillion viruses in an on our bodies right. Now you and me both. And this is just the normal state of things you'd have over three hundred trillion viruses in you right now so some of these viruses are infecting your quote human cells and some of these are even infecting your bacteria cells in your because viruses are immensely small smaller than bacteria and you can have hundreds even thousands of virus particles inside of a bacteria and so these are called bacteria phases the type of viruses that infect your bacteria but in addition to this and this human viral so we know about the microbiome has been a lot of talk about that but it largely focuses on the bacteria cascade but we are largely made up of viruses to the degree that viruses actually take things to an entirely different level because as they Extracted things in looked at the entire human genome as we talked about it was discovered that humans are in fact over eight percent virus. The human genome. The thing that makes us human is eight percent and Dodge retroviruses that make us up that make us human. If it wasn't for viruses we would not be who we are today and I'm talking like high levels of statement because I just read a recent study that affirmed that it was a symbiotic relationship with viruses that enabled us to actually evolve a placenta over many generations so without viruses we laying eggs. We'd be laying eggs if it wasn't for viruses in order for us to allow a fetus to mature inside of the mother's uterus. An animal needed a way to provide oxygen nutrients while removing ways and keeping both blood supplies. Separate right in. This was thanks to the help of symbiotic villages that we volve with now again. This goes back a long time. We're talking millions of years of evolution. But what about viruses? How do we know how long they can live? And what's so fascinating? The oldest virus discovered was about thirty thousand years old and this was discovered in Siberia. Whenever I think of Siberia I think about the movie. Spies like US Chevy Chase. You know the big coast. I don't know if they were in Siberia but that's just kind of I think about but it was discovered in Siberia and was trapped in the permafrost. I so frozen. Virus discovered thirty thousand years old. Here's the crazy part. When they brought it back to the lab. This virus was still infecting cells. It was still able to infect cells this virus basic like Captain America. All right get stuck in the ice and when it's thought out is still doing his thing. The resilience is remarkable in. It actually adds onto the human resilience because we evolve viruses and that symbiotic at tation over time is what has made us who we are so pretty fascinating stuff and this is just a small slice of it because there are also other viruses that actually help deter us from a ball of cells into a fetus into a eventually of believe formed infant and these viruses have actually evolved to help this process of reputation so reputation and also to protect us from pathogens in the process as we talked about on a pass episode our immune system is based off of the functions of viruses that we have within our bodies adapting against other viruses in creating this incredibly intelligent immune system that we have so we evolved in large part. Thanks viruses so my question for you is. Why has a narrative been shifted so heavily to protecting ourselves from viruses? There's obviously a lot of information that's being tossed around right now. Due to our current situation but a huge portion of that information and the information that seems to make the most headlines is information based on assumptions and not on actual facts and even things that are deemed to be true at the time can evolve and change so why then when new facts brought forward that contradict or disprove the things that we previously believed. Why is it so difficult for us to accept that the original some are no longer true and this is something that has haunted humanity for a very long time and this reminds me of a wonderful story about Stein while he was teaching at Princeton University teaching physics US teaching a class of second term physics students so he taught them for their first term? And now they're in class with him for their second term and he passed out an exam and the teacher's assistant was shocked to see that this was the same exam that he had given them last year and he came up to nine. Stein after the exam was over and he asked like you do realize that you gave them the same exam that you gave them last year. Don't you and he said yes. The exam was the same and teaching. Assistant was still perplexed. Just like why. Why would you give them the same tests that you'd given them last year in Albert Einstein replied because he answers changed the answers changed? Science changed even that small amount of time. Things can change dramatically. The facts that we now believe the assumptions that we hold can change and evolve and we have to be willing to imbibe into here and to imbue these new facts these new pieces of data into our psyche. But it's very very difficult to do. So and this is thanks in large part to what I refer to as a mind. Virus a human mind virus and it's the fact that we have a tendency to replicate the same thoughts over and over and over again once we are infected with an idea and this is just kind of how we're hard wired and he today with access to the Internet and with every piece of scientific data right at our fingertips. We still have highly trained absolutely brilliant people. Brilliant physicians who still believe that nutrition and sleep and exercise aren't very effective at treating and preventing chronic diseases even with all the data that shows that it is in fact true now. Let's be clear. It is a growing minority. But it's still true not to mention ten or twenty years ago. When much of the date on nutrition was still available? Already of health practitioners were not given viable training on nutrition. It's just not something that was seen in universities and as a result many folks believe that nutritional science was not very credible for example when I was working at my university as a personal trainer. I'm talking eighteen years ago. I was sitting with my clients. My new clients and I had this cereal bar package that I kept with me. He was actually. There was a cereal bar still in it and I did this for a couple years. Cereal bar was probably still good because it was made of. You know stuff that never dies Kind of like a virus. But I was showed in the back of this cereal bar and show them the high fructose Corn Syrup in partially hydrogenated oils. And I'll talk about the data. That was right there so clear that nobody seemed to know about in how this can damage their health. And now today a lot of the data is still present from back. Then there's even more data to affirm for example research published in the journal Pharmacology Biochemistry and behavior found that high. Fructose Corn Syrup is a major causative agent in visceral fat accumulation. Fat around the belly and Leptin resistance so if we're talking about helping folks to lose body fat to lose weight yet. They're eating these low calorie cereal bars and things of that. Nature were often setting people up for failure because they have ingredients like that but again this has been common knowledge for a long time. But if you're not willing to look at the data and to accept that is true. It's very difficult to take data and then to help people with it even the handwashing that everybody's become so adamant about today. Clean Hands was widely ridiculed and rejected by the medical establishment. Not that long ago. Physician ignace similize with his against their name in and of itself.

Siberia apple Valentin Stein Pharmacology Biochemistry NASA Albert Einstein ignace similize Princeton University Captain America European Space Agency
"ignace similize" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

The Past and the Curious

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

"Five dollars off any scripture others. Copy Heine Volvo. Hello again everybody. It's mixed eleven and this is the past and the curious as I promised I wrote and produced another show within a week's time I will probably never be able to do that again but you know the time was right. I guess And I felt this was an important show to share at this time A lot of fun doing it too. I was lucky. Went out of the blue. My friend bridget. Ceylan happened to ask if she could read a story. Sometime soon. It's like yeah. I'm finishing up an episode right now. Have I got a story for you? So it all fell into place very quickly by the way brigid is a really really great musician and songwriter and all around entertainer known her for a really long time. So Thanks to bridget for being a part of this episode. I also want to thank and dedicate this episode to anyone and everyone working in healthcare right. Now it's April twenty twenty and there is a lot of hard work being done. You people are amazing. Oh you an awful lot so if you are a healthcare worker thank you if you are not bet you know one so be sure to tell them. Thanks for all of their hard work. Okay this is going to be a fun show. Let's get going ignace. Similize was a showman but when he truly believes something he fought through the feelings that might have otherwise nope back his voice one of the few things that he was outspoken and confrontational about was the simple act of handwashing. He was certain it was necessary but only after much observation getting other people to believe him was a different story born in Hungary in the city known as Buddha which would one day join its neighboring city across the river to become Budapest. Similize started law school but he wound up becoming a doctor in the end in Eighteen. Forty seven just three years after earning his medical license. The methodical and intelligent fellow was given a notable position at a maternity ward in Vienna Austria. His job was basically as the chief resident which gave him a lot of responsibility and power over the staff at his hospital. There were actually two maternity wards which is where women go to give birth. The first word was staffed by doctors called obstetricians the other word was staffed by midwives trained health professionals whose main concern as caring for women during before and after the Labor of childbirth more on the difference later when some of I started he noticed two things one. All the women admitted for delivery wanted to go to the ward staffed by midwives and to ten percent of the women who went to his word the obstetrician. Stafford died while they were there. Well no wonder everyone wanted to go to the other word right. The unfortunate women died from thing called child bed fever which we now know to be caused by an infection. Women wanted to go with the midwives because well they weren't done living yet and fair enough but ignace wanted to know why there was a difference in the fate of the patients in the two wards and more importantly how to solve it so he made some methodical observations. I he noted women gave birth in two different positions in the two different words so he had the doctors deliver babies the same way as the Midwest. No difference same fevers same tragic results then he noticed that when someone died a priest walk through the halls ringing a bell in solemn honor of the women who passed he thought maybe this played psychological tricks on the women in the word. Perhaps they realized that someone had died in that they very well could be next. The suggestion alone might make someone gets sick. Meanwhile of course no one died in the other word hence Nobel ringing so do you get as line of thinking. Well he told the priest ago ring his bell somewhere else still no difference with his methodical mind. He tried everything he could think of. No luck of any especially for the poor patients on the ward then. One of the doctors got sick with symptoms similar to the women and before long. He too died at this time. Medical doctors not only took care of living patients but they spent time on cadavers. Or dead bodies. It's kind of gross. When you think about it and it would certainly give me the willies. But what better way is there to learn about the human body than with a real not live human body? It ain't pleasant but it's the truth and we've learned a lot as society in this way anyway. It turns out that this now dead doctor had practised finger while working with a dead body now we know he got an infection and he died eighteen fifties Austria like pretty much everywhere else in the world didn't understand germs or bacteria or viruses or infections yet. There were still plenty of people who most diseases were brought on by miasma which is bad air in shortly idea was that you might smell something really bad and then get sick. It sounds crazy now but you should understand that. Most diseases made a body smell bad You're around some smelly sick person. You might get sick too. We know it's germs now but all they had to go on was that sticky stinky surrounding. The city Sim obese new. They're just had to be a connection between the dead bodies and the sickness. Unlike the midwives who simply dealt with the pregnant women many of the doctor spent time dissecting analyzing and learning from the cadavers which obviously meant touching them then they just hopped on over to the maternity ward when there was a baby to deliver and they did not wash their hands or their tools. Crazy right by today's standards. Yes but two hundred years ago. This was business as usual. The connection had not been made by science. The evidence was pretty clear to some of ice so he made a new rule. Doctors must wash their hands in chlorine and their tools. And guess what happened. The number of deaths fell dramatically. In fact in the obstetricians ward the survival rate was basically the same as the midwives ward so he went around telling everybody about it. Wash your hands. You're bringing gross stuff to a healthy body with your unclean tools and you're unclean fingers and instead of being excited and saying thank you. The doctors were like you're telling me I making my patient sick. Who Do you think you are? I am a good doctor and you know nothing similize before long. He was ridiculed out of existence. It's too bad. They didn't listen to him. Lives could have been saved with some simple handwashing just a few years later. There was a British nurse working in a war zone during the Crimean War who helped revolutionize medical cleanliness Florence Nightingale paid attention to international science. She took her job seriously and was responsible for the lives of thousands of recuperating British soldiers. There's a chance she heard about vices. Observations there's also a good chance that she just figured it out on her own because when she implemented rules about washing hands and tools the same thing started to happen she saved lives but still there were plenty of detractors. The anti hand washers. The dirty hinders the filthy fingered. You know nothing nightingale. They cried but you see these two did know what they were talking about. They might not have understood it on a microscopic level but they could clearly see a relationship between dirty handed doctors and sick or dying patients. The world was changing in the mid eighteen. Hundreds and doctors were doubling as scientists often to determine what was causing serious illnesses. While the two were dealing with people in hospitals there were others working to solve illnesses and public places like big cities at the same time. Florence was saving lives on the war. Front another British doctor was trying to save lives in London. There was a cholera outbreak and a man named John. Snow was going to solve it. You know nothing Jon snow. They told him dauntless he was determined to help cholera as we now know is a bacterial infection which hangs out in your stomach and causes. Lots of problems mostly related to diarrhea. Diarrhea is no fun but cholera. Diarrhea is really bad. People were dying again. One prevailing theory was the miasma theory. Bad smells equal bad sickness but Jon snow was not convinced he believed that contaminated. Water was a factor and transmitting diseases and in eighteen fifties London. No one had running water in their homes. No Faucet and no toilet. If water was shared there was a good chance that the disease could get in there. Go listen episode thirty-seven Sewer Water and Water for more on that much like semis. He made an observation and tried to find relationships. The outbreak he was concerned with was centered. In the Soho neighborhood and most of the cases were close to broad street. A restaurant nearby had several customers get sick. Some families who live nearby got sick to oddly. Some kids who lived in another neighborhood also got sick lots and lots and lots of people got sick with cholera which was often fatal at a nearby jail however the prisoners did not get sick. There was a lot to consider but he discovered a connection. The restaurant used water from the public pump on broad street. The families who were sick also drew their water from the same pump. But what about those kids from another neighborhood? Well it turns out that they stopped at this pump for a drink on their way to school. And what about the jail? No one was sick there well. They had their own well which was a clean water supply. Jon Snow soon discovered that most who lived in the area and who were not sick. Got Water from another source. He approached the authorities of town and convinced them to remove the pump handle on broadstreet they did and slowly without a way to contract the disease which was obviously related to the water. The sickness began to disappear from the community. Still there were detractors. You know nothing Jon snow and they set about to prove him wrong. One Naysayer interviewed local residents an actually wound up proving John. Correct as it so happened. The mother of a child who is sick from the disease had been washing out the dirty diapers Anna Cesspool and the cesspool was mere feet away from the well on the broad street pump and some of that poop owned up in the drinking water. No wonder everyone was sick. Gone where the cries of you know nothing. Jon Snow with a quiet brooding confidence. He probably whispered something like the wealthiest dark and full of diapers. Then if he had any dramatic sense he would have put on a Cape and muttered. And now my watch has entered it..

Jon snow cholera bridget Diarrhea Volvo John Similize Ceylan brigid Midwest Florence Nightingale Vienna Austria Hungary ignace Florence Budapest London Stafford Nobel
Hands!

The Past and the Curious

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Hands!

"Ignace. Similize was a showman but when he truly believes something he fought through the feelings that might have otherwise nope back his voice one of the few things that he was outspoken and confrontational about was the simple act of handwashing. He was certain it was necessary but only after much observation getting other people to believe him was a different story born in Hungary in the city known as Buddha which would one day join its neighboring city across the river to become Budapest. Similize started law school but he wound up becoming a doctor in the end in Eighteen. Forty seven just three years after earning his medical license. The methodical and intelligent fellow was given a notable position at a maternity ward in Vienna Austria. His job was basically as the chief resident which gave him a lot of responsibility and power over the staff at his hospital. There were actually two maternity wards which is where women go to give birth. The first word was staffed by doctors called obstetricians the other word was staffed by midwives trained health professionals whose main concern as caring for women during before and after the Labor of childbirth more on the difference later when some of I started he noticed two things one. All the women admitted for delivery wanted to go to the ward staffed by midwives and to ten percent of the women who went to his word the obstetrician. Stafford died while they were there. Well no wonder everyone wanted to go to the other word right. The unfortunate women died from thing called child bed fever which we now know to be caused by an infection. Women wanted to go with the midwives because well they weren't done living yet and fair enough but ignace wanted to know why there was a difference in the fate of the patients in the two wards and more importantly how to solve it so he made some methodical observations. I he noted women gave birth in two different positions in the two different words so he had the doctors deliver babies the same way as the Midwest. No difference same fevers same tragic results then he noticed that when someone died a priest walk through the halls ringing a bell in solemn honor of the women who passed he thought maybe this played psychological tricks on the women in the word. Perhaps they realized that someone had died in that they very well could be next. The suggestion alone might make someone gets sick. Meanwhile of course no one died in the other word hence Nobel ringing so do you get as line of thinking. Well he told the priest ago ring his bell somewhere else still no difference with his methodical mind. He tried everything he could think of. No luck of any especially for the poor patients on the ward then. One of the doctors got sick with symptoms similar to the women and before long. He too died at this time. Medical doctors not only took care of living patients but they spent time on cadavers. Or dead bodies. It's kind of gross. When you think about it and it would certainly give me the willies. But what better way is there to learn about the human body than with a real not live human body? It ain't pleasant but it's the truth and we've learned a lot as society in this way anyway. It turns out that this now dead doctor had practised finger while working with a dead body now we know he got an infection and he died eighteen fifties Austria like pretty much everywhere else in the world didn't understand germs or bacteria or viruses or infections yet. There were still plenty of people who most diseases were brought on by miasma which is bad air in shortly idea was that you might smell something really bad and then get sick. It sounds crazy now but you should understand that. Most diseases made a body smell bad You're around some smelly sick person. You might get sick too. We know it's germs now but all they had to go on was that sticky stinky surrounding. The city Sim obese new. They're just had to be a connection between the dead bodies and the sickness. Unlike the midwives who simply dealt with the pregnant women many of the doctor spent time dissecting analyzing and learning from the cadavers which obviously meant touching them then they just hopped on over to the maternity ward when there was a baby to deliver and they did not wash their hands or their tools. Crazy right by today's standards. Yes but two hundred years ago. This was business as usual. The connection had not been made by science. The evidence was pretty clear to some of ice so he made a new rule. Doctors must wash their hands in chlorine and their tools. And guess what happened. The number of deaths fell dramatically. In fact in the obstetricians ward the survival rate was basically the same as the midwives ward so he went around telling everybody about it. Wash your hands. You're bringing gross stuff to a healthy body with your unclean tools and you're unclean fingers and instead of being excited and saying thank you. The doctors were like you're telling me I making my patient sick. Who Do you think you are? I am a good doctor and you know nothing similize before long. He was ridiculed out of existence. It's too bad. They didn't listen to him. Lives could have been saved with some simple handwashing just a few years later. There was a British nurse working in a war zone during the Crimean War who helped revolutionize medical cleanliness Florence Nightingale paid attention to international science. She took her job seriously and was responsible for the lives of thousands of recuperating British soldiers. There's a chance she heard about vices. Observations there's also a good chance that she just figured it out on her own because when she implemented rules about washing hands and tools the same thing started to happen she saved lives but still there were plenty of detractors. The anti hand washers. The dirty hinders the filthy fingered. You know nothing nightingale. They cried but you see these two did know what they were talking about. They might not have understood it on a microscopic level but they could clearly see a relationship between dirty handed doctors and sick or dying patients. The world was changing in the mid eighteen. Hundreds and doctors were doubling as scientists often to determine what was causing serious illnesses.

Ignace. Similize Vienna Austria Budapest Hungary Midwest Ignace Florence Nightingale Buddha Stafford Austria Nobel
"ignace similize" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Medical community was very much the same and we'll talk about it after a sponsor break. You've heard me talk about Norton. Three sixty with lifelock a cyber safety solution that helps protect your devices. Identity and online privacy and while cybersecurity is still important right now. I want to tell you something. Really special that Norton lifelock is doing with kids going online more for schoolwork and entertainment right. Now it's important to help keep them safe when they're connected and as a company that's dedicated your Cyber Safety Norton. Lifelock wants to do their part to help. That's why they're giving away six months of Norton family for Free. It helps you monitor your kids online activities blocks on suitable sites while your kids are surfing the Internet. Lets you see what website search terms videos and ANDROID APPS? They're downloading helps your kids. Avoid accidents giving out sensitive personal information like your phone number and address and More Norton. Lifelock IS COMMITTED TO HELPING. Keep your family safer online. Get Norton family for six months free. No payment information is required. Sign up today at Norton Dot com slash family. That's Norton Dot com slash family for six months free. Here's the thing saving money with. Geico is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes. And who completely hack you? And then put his hands up and say no foul no foul with gyco. It's easy to switch and save on car insurance. No need to fake. An ANKLE SPRAIN. Because you're absolutely exhausted. So switch and save with GYCO. It's almost better than sports. Semel vice was born on July first. Eighteen eighteen and the Toubon area of Buddha Hungary Buda would combine with pest in eighteen. Seventy three so. It was a little bit later to become Budapest at the time. Hungary was part of the Austrian Empire and he was the fifth of ten children. Born to Grocer Yosef semo vice and Teresa Mueller. There's a bit of disagreement about the family's heritage. Some accounts claim that they were Jewish and that anti-semitism was a factor in parts of similar vices story but Sherwin be newland author of the doctor's plague germs child bed fever and the strange story of ignace similize rates that parish registers document. The SEMEL vice family was Roman Catholic. Going back to the sixteen seventies the counter argument is that similize. His ancestors may have been baptized for the sake of assimilation while the family was still culturally. Jewish but this is largely conjecture and it seems mostly just to be based on their surname and eighteen. Thirty seven at the age of nineteen semo vice went to the University of Vienna to study law a year later he changed his course of study to medicine and he graduated with his MD in eighteen. Forty four. He looked for a physician practicing internal medicine but he couldn't find one so he changed his focus once again and looked for a position in obstetrics on July First. Eighteen forty six. He was granted a two year appointment as an assistant to Professor Johann Klein. Who was the director of the Vienna? Minute Konkan House or the General Hospital. Vienna General Hospital was a teaching hospital so in this role. Semo vice was both a doctor and a teacher. He supervised an educated medical students and he assisted with difficult deliveries. He was also the clerk of records which put him in a good position to spot patterns among the patients and their outcomes. The maternity clinic at the Vienna General Hospital was one of the ones that had been established to provide free medical care to impoverished patients. So patients essentially got free care in exchange for helping with the medical students educations originally. The hospital had one maternity clinic which was staffed by midwives doctors and their students and after a while that one clinic became so overcrowded that the hospital opened the second one which was still staffed by a mix of doctors midwives and their students but around eighteen forty the two clinics were separated into the first and second clinic. The first clinic was staffed by doctors and medical students and the second clinic was staffed by midwives and midwifery students. The two clinics alternated admission days so if the first clinic accepted patients on Monday the second clinic would accept patients on Tuesday and so on when the maternity clinic first opened in seventeen eighty four. The hospital director Lucas bore had not included post-mortem work as part of the obstetric students course of study because he thought it carried a risk of contagion but in eighteen. Twenty three you'll hunt. Klein took over as director and started using autopsies as a teaching tool for the obstetrics students by the time. Semel vice joined the hospital staff. The rates of child bed fever at Vienna General Hospital vary dramatically between the two clinics at the midwives clinic between one and two percent of patients died of child bed fever and at the doctor's clinic the rate varied from five to thirty percent with an average of about ten percent. This difference between the two clinics was so huge and so well known that laboring patients who were told that they were being admitted to the doctor's clinic would beg to be sent to the midwives clinic instead. Some even gave birth in the street outside the clinic after hearing that it was the doctors day for admission and then they would say they had been on the way to the hospital and the baby just came before they could get their that way they would still have access to the free care at the clinic but without the risk of death that was associated with it. That's gotTa be terrifying choice when you're like no. I'm I'm just GonNa do this in the street and then I'll let them take care after that well and I imagine a thing I didn't find I didn't find sources that said this but considering that my own Mother did this when I was born. I imagine the people that I'm Labor but I'm not far into labor and it's the doctor stay. I'm going to wait a few hours so I can go the midwives clinic. I imagine that was the thing. So you my. My parents did that because if they waited till after midnight they wouldn't be billed for the extra day. I had a ton of money. Similar vice noticed that even these bursts out in the street were safer than giving birth in the doctor's clinic at the hospital he wrote quote to me. It appeared logical that patients who experienced street. Births would become ill at least as frequently as those who delivered in the clinic. What protected those who delivered outside the clinic from these destructive unknown endemic influences? He became completely fixated on this question. It was appalling and deeply offensive to him that there was such a huge difference between the doctors and the midwives clinics so we started trying to figure out what was different between the two clinics and then making adjustments to what the doctors were doing.

Vienna General Hospital Semel lifelock director Professor Johann Klein Norton Norton Dot University of Vienna Grocer Yosef semo Hungary Vienna Geico Budapest basketball General Hospital fever ignace similize
"ignace similize" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

10:23 min | 1 year ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Radiolab

"That's for similize. Any he immediately said like okay. Well what could I knowing this? Is there something that I could do at the hospital to stop it? He actually started to do these experiments. He was very familiar with the smell of death. Obviously because he was working with cadavers all the time cutting them open and they didn't have particularly good ways of preserving them so it was a pretty nasty business and he was you know. His sense of smell is very tuned to the smell of a corpse so we figured well you know if if I can get these cadaver particles off my hands then maybe then I will be safe as a doctor to go delivered babies and so he tried things out. You tried out different ways of disinfecting his hands and he would just sort of basically smell his hands and then if the odor of death after an autopsy went away he'd be like okay. This this is good. He settled on basically bleach. You would take some bleach put in some water and create a solution. It wasn't a whole lot of bleach not enough to burn your skin but it was enough to burn off that stench and to take care of those cadaver particles and so similar wise was by now was in charge of a lot of the birth that were happening at Vienna General Hospital and he just said Okay neutral folks after you do your on autopsy and before you deliver a baby. I've got this bowl here. Wash your hands disinfect. Your hands and And what happened? He kept track and He basically like brought the death rate is pretty much zero. I mean he couldn't completely eliminate it but he got pretty close. There were some months. We're like no women died at all none and it is here that ignace similize reaches his disinfected hands into the president. Because all those PSA's hearing these days but washing your hands. They really begin in this moment with a Hungarian guy realizing that handwashing the simple act of rubbing your hands together with some soap or bleach would be the key to the two thousand euro mystery of Pearl Fever. If only could have lived to see Carl. Zimmer's tweet or see steph curry or Lebron. James urge their millions of followers to wash their hands but alas he could not he was stuck in his own time and beyond his own clinic. His idea didn't really catch on poor. Ignace CIMA Vice. What a sad story. There's a final tragic chapter to this tale and this one can be many different ways. Yep Very complicated and A lot of pretty intense controversy see Nancy says summarizes end is something historians still argue about sometimes quite fiercely and one version of events. Is that classic very familiar science? History story where you've got a guy who saw something at insight but then the dogma push back absolutely it's that Galileo narrative. Yes along those lines. We know that after his big breakthrough and he collected all kinds of data. He was very scientific in many respects. We know that ignites similize began to write letters to everyone in Europe. He says I figure this out. You need to institute a handwashing and you need to accept my theory. As I mentioned there were doctors to believed him doctors however they weren't running the hospitals. They weren't running the medical schools. And so you know. The the older generation pushback really hard push. How like? Don't tell me what to do. Young person kind of thing. Imagine imagine imagine that you are one of the most respected doctors in obstetrics in the world and you've delivered thousands and thousands of babies. You know what you're doing and then a twenty eight year old. Who has barely gotten started in? The field of medicine says you are responsible for the deaths of countless women because of these mysterious things called cadaver particles And then to imply that an educated upper class DNA physician could have been had so dirty that they were transmitting. This this terrible infection. I think that that is definitely an element at a at a more subterranean personal level. Don't tell me dirty Nancy. Thanks part of it was just that the older doctors were offended. Or you call me. Filthy and similize was you know was not very not terribly diplomatic He would reply to these doctors. No I'm not calling you filthy. I'm calling you. A murderer is being really blunt about it. He you know he he would write letters to doctors and say just say like you Sir. Been a partner. In a massacre his thoughts writing more and more Batali letters and things that everyone disagrees with him must be an evil person. You get the idea that this this may have turned him from that. You know jovial popular guy to kind of amount of maniac and this gets us to the second version of events that the reason big breakthrough didn't break through at least not in his lifetime is that it's as much his own fault as anyone else's sometimes historians tell his story as an example of what not to do in terms of communicating science. He railed against his colleagues. Call THEM NAMES REALLY. Not a great way to Win A lot of friends to say especially some of them. According to Daniel Margot see had legitimate scientific questions like okay. Let's wash hands fine but can you explain to us why washing hands works and why every so often it persephone berries they shoot that Certain mother still die. After as citizens of Hand Wash Inc not all cases of tied fever disappear as a result which physicians wanted to know. Could he explain that? Isn't it possible that there's more than one 'cause here? What are these cadaver particles? Has He ever seen them with a microscope? if they really are these contaminating agents shouldn't the babies get sick as much if not more than the mothers? And that's not happening. Do we know why semi wise just didn't have the patience to deal with these questions. And the problem was that In in the eighteen sixties he seems to go into a rapid decline. I mean you can see like pictures of him In this man is early forties and pictures just show. This man starts to look like he's in his sixties or seventies. He something terrible was happening and he his personality change all sorts of ways. I mean he was already could be a pretty irascible person but He just started acting very strangely and a meeting where he was supposed to give a report he would just start reading from a random piece of paper completely confused you know he was married and had a family but he started like living openly with a prostitute. Something had gone terribly wrong. And so eventually his his family decided they had to bring him to an an asylum in Vienna use. Forty-seven that's pretty startling mental crime because of that decline again is something historians debate. People have speculated on it There had been some theories that it was syphilis. Certainly syphilis just basically eventually turns your brain and much more recently. Someone thought it was Alzheimer's disease Very early onset. Good look very much like Alzheimer's case. He was institutionalized but he didn't last more than two weeks he died he died in that institution. Yeah so it seem. It seems that what happened was that you know he was getting uncontrollable and kind of violence. By the time he was institutionalized. And you know this was a pretty dark time for people with mental illness Says the guards of the asylum basically just beat him to death I mean they beat him badly and then he probably developed an infection in some of those wounds And that determine how it's kind of sad irony it is. It is ironic. Yeah that he probably died A of an infectious disease himself very rapid devastating infection. Let me tell you what I take away from the story. This is maybe a third way to see it that. Here's the moment where we were not. Just summarize all of us were trapped in a middle space kind of tragic gap. We learned a thing but it wasn't enough similize knew that something was making these women sick. He called that something. Cadaveric particles didn't use the word bacteria because he didn't know about bacteria and only a couple years later Louis. Pastor would come along and say bacteria. That's what those could ever particles really were and he would offer the world a comprehensive new idea called Germ Theory. That would change everything. Similize was unfortunately the moment right before that in many ways. We're in that moment to now. We know the enemy. We know what shape we can draw pictures.

ignace similize Vienna General Hospital Ignace CIMA similize Hand Wash Inc Europe Alzheimer Nancy Carl James Zimmer Daniel Margot syphilis Alzheimer's disease Louis partner personality change president Vienna steph curry
"ignace similize" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Radiolab

"Two. This is a story that we're all living out twenty thirty fifty times a day in twenty second bursts store at anyone really know about but when this whole corona crisis was new just seems like it's been years but just two weeks ago when I first people I called was Murad Mr Zimmer. It's good to hear your voice. Who's Carl Zimmer? He's a science writer regular guests on the show. How are you doing everyone? Okay we sort of like you know fluctuate there. Yeah Call Them Up. I just wanted to a basic read on what science we should be paying attention to and covering so is asking him questions about vaccines and treatments. There were many parenting interruptions. I assume you wash your hands Roll Your eyes on your is what I'm talking about. Yeah there you go and you know we were talking about the science and in the flow of things he throws out this name. Ignace EMMA wife I found I found a profile ignites similize and I just sort of put it on a tweet and I said you know. Every day is ignored similize day. Like who's this ignace similize you know? Just how epic story? No what is this? What is this epic story? I mean and then he told me this crazy story for two thousand year old medical mystery that involves life and death and dogma disease and sacrifice and the price of knowledge and I was like Whoa. Whoa WHOA WHOA. Whoa get a USB. Mike I'M GONNA call you back. Okay just from start. Yes so so who it. Who is ignace? Some away so similar was born in eighteen. Eighteen to a family ran grocery stores in Budapest. Hungary he was the fifth of nine kids and he was. You know they. You hear these words described about him you know. Lighthearted guy popular jocular seemed like a very pleasant man at least at the beginning when you look at his station from the earliest photographs. We have he. He looks very into. This is Nancy. Thome historian medicine at Stony Brook University. Dark hair dark moustache he to my mind must have cut a fine figure. S doctor with that impressive face and those haunting is it is true as very smiley mouth in those early pictures but his eyes are like searchlights but in any case Similize it. I thought he'd become a lawyer but then he switched to medicine. He just had a really good medical class. I guess in that university and decided. That's what I WANNA do. And so he Then travelled to Vienna because he wanted to go to the best medical school he could And he started work there. Okay so Vienna Hospital. This is where the mystery unfolds. Can you set the tasty? I'm on an Oh that's beautiful. I'm in an interview right now. it's sorry as monotype. That's just parenting the pandemic okay. So Vienna Hospital said we should be picturing the Vienna General Hospital around eighteen. Forty six is a magnificent hospital. Vienna's is one of the intellectual centers of the world. This may be one of the greatest hospitals on earth. It's professors are revered as holding all the wisdom of of Medical Lore and by the way this is a moment when science itself lease we understand. It now was just getting going. Yes data empiricism statistics when the changes in the history of science coming about moving from the the old to the new was simply using your eyes and paying attention. So you had all these. Young doctors like similize. Come into this hospital with the idea that we're going to embrace this new era. The body contains all of these secrets and in order to learn those secrets. We've got a look inside. We've got to do dissections. See what it can teach us so that we can understand. How disease affects organs so that we can then learn how to treat them in living people. Okay so and so wise arrived in Vienna eighteen. Forty four you know. He's kicked around a bit at the medical school. Trying to figure out who what his specialty would be did. A lot of autopsies to learn about medicine and then he was assigned to obstetrics the delivering of babies and so it gives routine became that He in the morning he would dissect bodies as part of his training and then in the afternoon and evening he would deliver babies so he got to Got To become an expert on on childbirth. One thing to keep in mind at at this point women did not go to hospitals to give birth routinely in this time period. The women who went there was so poor that they needed the assistance. Nancy says if you were a woman during this time and you had any means at all gave birth at home and in fact many of the women giving birth in these maternity clinics not just in Vienna but in other big cities might be single women who have become pregnant they might be prostitutes and they would exchange that care during Labor for the right of the medical personnel to use them as teaching material so teaching hospital but not all of the hospital was for teaching their this becomes important later. There were to deliver awards. This hospital. One was run by female midwives. The other was run by male doctors so the division with the doctors the first division was you know the very high status one where they were advancing. The science combining what they were learning with autopsies with doing childbirth. This is where a guy ignace similize trained and imagine in those first few years he delivered thousands of babies and very early on. He was struck by a horrible fact. Many of the young women who gave birth in his delivery ward died right after they delivered a really haunted by all these women who were dying in front of him. I mean it really got to him. It hit him very hard and and it was just relentless just just a large number of these healthy young women would come to the hospital to give birth and then suddenly die In one of the most horrific ways you can imagine they'd give birth then develop a fever that would keep climbing until they were hallucinating. Convulsing filling with bile losing blood and then ultimately passing away. He writes about how much this haunted him. Because you know every time that there was another patient who was dying they would call the priest and every time a priest will come into the hospital bring about it had a strange effect upon my nerves. When I heard the bell hurried past my door Asai would escape my heart for the victim that once more was claimed by an unknown power. He has every time you heard that bell it just. It just made him shudder. Bell was a painful exhortation me to search with this unknown cause with all of my mind to the because he knew that they were losing another young woman that unknown power that was claiming all these lives was a disease with a strange name. Purple Fever per parole fever. It's not purple as in the color. It's Pearl fever which comes from the Latin emperor which means woman who gives birth. At that point it was sometimes called child bed fever. But it went back a long way. It had been described for thousands of years have hockey's actually describes it if however the predation of the appropriate does not take place even in the Fifth Century. Bc HIPPOCRATES Father Medicine described the fevers described the symptoms. He thought something had putrefied in the mother yes other physicians hold air inadvertently received into the uterus which closes the orifices of the vessel thought. Maybe it was the air in the delivery room India period. It is widely accepted that the quality of the air play a role in determining disease. This is Daniel Margot see historian of Science Cambridge University. Paypal argue that there is seasonal variation in a number of women being afflicted in other words. Maybe it was the weather. Some people argued. It was the moral standing of the women. Because if you are immoral a youth than to be the day if you are not both morally and physically than you'll live in squalid conditions all kinds of crazy theories. Some people even thought that The problem was that the milk that expectant mothers were producing to nurse. Their Children was somehow getting routed into their abdomen or their uterus. And in a weird way you can kind of see how they could think of something as crazy as that. And that's because when doctors would examine these dead mother's open up their abdomens. They saw this huge amount of Pale liquid. That look to them with a little like milk but it was bus. That is legitimately disgusting. But the point is this. Mystery had been plaguing doctors and scientists for thousands of years and it just so happened that when Ignatius similize was in delivery ward number one. It was a really big problem sometimes. Thirty percent of the of the women giving birth at the hospital in a month die of this fever. That is a huge number. I mean it would fluctuate in some months. It would be seven percent but still you know so everybody knew that this was a problem And so the question was what what's causing this. And how can we address it? I imagine that every time I heard that bell ignored him always thought. I've got to get to the bottom of this. And so in between his morning dissections and his afternoon delivery shifts he would visit the hospital archives. The Vienna General Hospital might not have understood what pro fever was. But they're really good at keeping records so he looked at their records and some things really popped out for him first of all. Despite a general impression to the contrary neither the incidents nor the mortality Purple Fever was related to whether there was no connection with weather. Cross that off the list. You know could rule things out. But here's the really big thing. He noticed observation number one. If you remember there were two different delivery awards.

fevers Vienna General Hospital Vienna bell ignace similize Vienna Hospital Murad Mr Zimmer Ignace EMMA Nancy ignace writer Budapest Hungary Stony Brook University Paypal HIPPOCRATES Father Medicine Ignatius similize Thome
"ignace similize" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That the physicians who rejected Mary Montagu ideas were not behaving like real scientists. They weren't being dispassionate. They weren't being objective. They were bringing psychological bias into the picture sexism xenophobia tribalism in the real world misinformation spreads because of some combination of network effects, and psychological and cognitive biases. You see the same thing in the case of the Hungarian physician Ignace similize, he was an insider, a man and a doctor he even had the assistance of scientific evidence to support his claims, but it turned out even these were not enough to overcome the barriers that confront the truth. Ignace some allies was a physician living in Vienna. He was put in charge of this clinic. The first obstetrical clinic in Vienna. Next door was the second obstetrical clinic Avena he was in charge of training, new doctors and obstetrics. And at the second clinic, they were training midwives and shortly after he took over he realized that something really terrible was going on. Because in his clinic. Ten percent of the women were dying mostly of child bed fever while the midwives next door who presumably they would have thought they were less expertise only three to four percent of their patients dying. So someone was obviously really worried about this. He had patients who would be begging on their knees to be transferred to the other clinic. He had this kind of breakthrough moment when a colleague of his was conducting an autopsy and accidentally cut himself. And then shortly thereafter, he died of something that looked a lot like child bed fever, some allies realized while I've got all these physicians who are conducting autopsies on cadavers and then immediately going and delivering babies and he thought well, maybe there's something transferred on their hands. And you call this cadaverous particles. Of course, now, we know that that is bacteria, but they didn't have a theory of bacteria the time. So he started requiring the physicians to wash their hands in chlorinated solution. And the death rate in his clinic dropped way down. But of course, the the way we think about science we say, all right? We've someone's discover something wonderful, everyone must have instantly adopted this brilliant new idea, you would think right. And he has this wonderful evidence. Right. It was ten percent. He introduced the. Practice goes down to three percent. But that's not what happened. So he published his ideas and the other gentlemen physicians did not take them up. In fact, they found them kind of -fensive they thought this is. He's writing that. We have dirty hands. We have unclean hands. But in fact, were gentlemen, they also thought it was just really far out of the range of theories that could possibly be true. So they didn't believe him despite the really good evidence and the deep importance. People's lives were really at stake. And it took decades for his hand washing practice to actually spread. In fact, I understand that Semo vice himself eventually suffered a nervous breakdown how how did his.

Ignace similize Vienna Avena Mary Montagu Semo three percent four percent Ten percent ten percent
"ignace similize" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Physicians who rejected Mary Montagues ideas when not behaving like real scientists. They weren't being dispassionate. They won't be objective. They will bringing psychological biases into the picture sexism xenophobia tribalism in the real world misinformation spreads because of some combination of network effects, and psychological and cognitive biases. You see the same thing in the case of the Hungarian physician Ignace similize, he was an insider, a man and a doctor he even had the assistance of scientific evidence to support his claims, but it turned out even these were not enough to overcome the barriers that confront the truth. Ignace some allies was a physician living in Vienna. He was put in charge of this clinic. The first obstetrical clinic in Vienna. Next door was the second obstetrical clinic Avena he was in charge of training, new doctors and obstetrics. And at the second clinic, they were training midwives and shortly after he took over he realized that something really terrible was going on. Because in his clinic. Ten percent of the women were dying mostly of child bed fever while the midwives next door who presumably they would have thought they were less expertise only three to four percent of their patients dying. So some always was obviously really worried about this. He had patients who would be begging on their knees to be transferred. The other clinic. He had this kind of breakthrough moment when a colleague of his was conducting an autopsy accidentally cut himself. And then shortly thereafter, he died of something that looked a lot like child bed fever, some allies realized while I've got all these physicians who are conducting autopsies on cadavers and then immediately going and delivering babies and he thought well, maybe there's something transferred on their hands. And you call this cadaverous particles. Of course, now, we know that that is bacteria, but they didn't have theory of bacteria the time. So he started requiring the physicians to wash their hands in chlorinated solution. And the death rate in his clinic dropped way down. But of course, the way we think about science we say, all right? We've someone's discovered something wonderful, everyone must have instantly adopted this brilliant new idea, you would think right. And he has this wonderful evidence. Right. It was ten percent introduced the. Practice goes down to three percent. But that's not what happened. So he published his ideas and the other gentlemen physicians did not take them up. In fact, they found them kind of -fensive they thought this. He's writing that. We have dirty hands. We have unclean hands. But in fact, were gentlemen, they also thought it was just really far out of the range of theories that could possibly be true. So they didn't believe him despite the really good evidence and the deep importance people's lives were really at stake. And it took decades for his hand washing practice to actually spread. In fact, I understand that Semo vice himself eventually suffered a nervous breakdown how how did his own story..

Ignace similize Vienna Avena Mary Montagues Semo three percent four percent Ten percent ten percent
"ignace similize" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Well. Jerry Lewis is dead sitting Nancy dead Kirk Cobain. Also, Courtney love insane Johnny cash. Dick, did I turn abusive XXX ten Tassie own Amy wine house completely off the rails? Disgrace land is a rock and roll true crime podcast about musicians getting away with murder behaving very badly. This hosted by me Jake Brennan, I grew up in round rock and roll. In the one thing, I know to be absolutely true. Is that real Rockstars parties? Sane more like feral narcissistic animals than functioning members of society in this is precisely what makes them so damn entertaining to big Marvin Gaye James Brown. John Lennon GD Alan stones and the Hells Angels running security and a dead kid on the dance floor these stories and more are all waiting for you in disgrace. Listen disgrace and on the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your. God casts. I don't wanna let this go the importance of people washing their hands just in general. There was a guy the Hungarian doctor named Ignace similize. And he was the person who could have saved so many lives, especially during childbirth. And so on by the simple technique of washing one's hands. Leave he introduced that in eighteen forty seven at the amount of minds Konkan house in fair Deutschland, but doctors were upset and they didn't listen to they said this similize guys making us look bad because he's implying that we're giving these women and children fevers. He also wasn't very tactful. He was kind of a a Larry David or Bernie Sanders figure you know, what I mean bit of corruption anyway Semo vice eventually ends up in a mental health facility in an aside. Silom to wash your hands. The inclusion of this, and hey, sometimes speed is everything. Yeah. Come on. Guys, slowdown smell the roses figured it was vague summations. I can make going real fortune cookie caption here something interesting will happen this week. Oh, oh, okay. That one was made live and interesting. Great. It's gentlemen. Judge. Strickland AK Christer. This may speak come as a surprise people. But you're you're back again. You're back your old rule shenanigans tricks. I just can't keep me out you keep changing the locks key breaking in. Well, as we know that missed you guys. Oh, hey, how's vacation buddy is really good? Thank you for asking. Mrs knows fantastic highly recommend London Paris. It was wonderful. That's right, man. You went to the UK was there is I was there during some interesting protests would leave it there. But now, I wanna know is about Brexit about let me tell you something if you want to take the chunnel from London to Paris, don't do it. When dude as climbed up on top of the train station 'cause you ain't going nowhere awhile. Were you the dude? No, no. I was in line very long line to get on the train that was almost certainly not going to leave. Well, thank you for narrowly escaping disaster or the channel to come with his employees one of our most divisive games. Yes. The the most cringe or these segment and all the pod casting is which was which was again, if we have to straighten out the stork record here, which was your idea. Yes. It was. I one day. We suggested that I present you with different scenarios and you have to determine whether or not the scenario. I'm presenting to you is in fact, a real one or if I made it up cease, and so the way this works is I will present the scenario. And then the the the two gentlemen would have three minutes to deliberate on whether or not I'm telling the truth, or I'm lying, and they may ask questions of me, if they follow an arbitrary rule of choosing which I realize I did not think of before I came in here. So in honor of the topic for you to build us a question, you must preface it with the phrase, doctor, doctor, give me the news. I got a bad case of cutting. You just just the first purchase Nokia just to commit the followed by your question. And now I will read up a scenario when I am done. We will start the timer. So get the big grandfather clock ready. I'm limbering up. Dr hasty Lanyon was a bit of an eccentric surgeon. He was nearly equal parts performer and doctor and had a flair for the macabre. He had studied though, probably never directly the work of Luigi Galvani for whom the galvanic response is named Lanyon took to extremes and in northern England in the early eighteen hundreds demonstrated some rather ghoulish applications of the technology upon cadavers that I am sure were totally acquired legally while there were no truly reliable reports from those demonstrations some reporters of questionable honesty road of corpses. Pointing grimacing twitching and in one case even sitting up and gasping in response to the electrical impulses. Dr Lanyon applied modern historians. Doctors doubt the veracity of those claims, but it seems that Hastie Lanyon was at least well known for some pretty primitive corpse. Puppetry start the timer. Doctor doctor give me the news is Mr. Bill, and so this the sky hasty, this guy hasty was primarily known for this or it was how he became famous. Otherwise, he was a doctor studied at the university of Edinburgh school of medicine, but apart from these are really the only records of the doesn't have like a long storied career that exists in any record. But there are records of these supposed demonstrations hasty sounds made up to me sounds like hasty like he was little too hasty perhaps. Yeah. Honest with you. I don't know why I feel optimistic about this. But I'm going with true. Wait what? Yeah. Oh, that's not what I was getting at all.

Dr hasty Lanyon Marvin Gaye James Brown Jake Brennan murder Ignace similize iheartradio Dick Tassie Apple Johnny cash Hells Angels Courtney Jerry Lewis university of Edinburgh school UK AK Christer John Lennon Luigi Galvani Larry David Nokia
"ignace similize" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

09:59 min | 2 years ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Alzheimer's? When Australian physician Barry Marshall came along few decades later to challenge this theory. He was met with Tony face transicents. He couldn't get his articles published scientists night at him behind his back, even though as turned out his data was far better than eighty Palmer stomach studies. Coming up what Barry Marshall to fight misinformation. And what we can learn from his story about how to spread the truth. This message comes from NPR sponsor smart water. Whether you're starting your own company starting your commute or simply taking a sip of H, two smart water believes, there's a smart way to do it like vapor distilling water for purity. And adding electrolytes for taste smart water. That's pretty smart support for this podcast comes from the William T grant foundation at W T. Grant foundation dot org. Australian physician bounty Marshall tried and failed for years to convince doctors that's Tomek ulcers will caused by bacteria like Ignace similize. He found that MIR evidence was no match for conventional wisdom, people would blading in mar practice and dying from else's in hospital. I could see it the only person in the world at that time who could make an informed consent about the risk of drinking helicobacter was me. So I had to be in my own experiment. So we cultured a patient with guests rightous I to a by Sloan indus- copy, drank bacteria, tend to non ninth colony forming units. Then I had this vomiting illness. No acid prison in vomit and win vomited early in the mornings, still half asleep. But it was just like water coming up one on earth. Was he doing keta? So he decided that his. His idea that in fact, Alzheimer's are caused by bacteria wasn't spreading fast enough for his taste in the scientific community. And so he did this demonstration he gave himself H pylori gave himself stomach ulcers. And then he later cured them with antibiotics in this publicity stunt almost to convince people that in fact olders were caused by bacteria. Eventually, Barry Marshall and Robin. Warren went on to win the Nobel prize in medicine for that discoveries. Mary Montague the woman who face resistance in bringing vary elation to England never won a prestigious prize. But she also found a way to spread the truth. Nag Barry Marshall, she founded had more to do with her sales pitch then with the evidence. So in the end, she did something really smart, which took advantage of the ways that we use our social connections to ground our beliefs and our trust. So she ended up convincing Princess Caroline of on's. Bach to vary late her own two small daughters to do it in this kind of public way. So she got one of the most influential people in the entire country to engage in this practice. So that did two things. So number one it made clear because she didn't this kind of public way and her daughters were fine. It gave people evidence that this is in fact safe practice, and it's a good idea. But it also made clear to people that if they want to conform to the norm if they wanna share a practice with his really influential person than they should do the same thing. And after Princess Caroline, did this very relations spread much more quickly, especially among people who had a personal connection to either Mary Montagu or to the Princess. What's fascinating here is that this wasn't. And some is a a rational way to solve the problem. It wasn't saying look there's really convincing evidence. Here. You're almost using a technique. That's pretty close to propaganda. It is propaganda technique ob- -solutely. So propagandist tend to be very savvy about the ways that people use their social connections to ground, trust and knowledge and choose their beliefs. And they take advantage of those in this case it was using the social trust for good. But in many cases, people use it for bad. And if. You look at the history of industrial propaganda in the US. Or if you look at the way Russia conducted propaganda before the last election people have taken advantage of these kinds of social ties and beliefs to try to convince us of whatever it is. They're selling. One must idea and how you counter bad information some of ice as we saw did not succeed in push waiting other doctors during his lifetimes to wash their hands thoroughly as before they were treating patients, but of course, now that idea is widely adopted what what does that tell us Kaylynn about how signs in some ways might be south correcting, it might not be self correcting at the pace that we want. But over time, it appears that good ideas do beat out the bad ones. Yeah. So we have thousands and thousands of examples in science have exactly that happening of good ideas. Beating out the bad ones. Of course. Now, we can look back and say, oh good idea. One. How not good idea when out we can't actually look at right now. And know, which of the ideas, we believe now are correct ones or good ones. So there are actually philosophers of science like Larry Loudon. And Kyle Stanford who argue for something called them, the pessimistic meta induction, which is something like this. Because scientific theories in the past have always eventually been overturned. We ought to think that our theories now will probably be overturned as well. But there there's actually an optimistic side to this which is that if you look at many theories in the past ones that were overturned often the reason people believe them is that even if they were wrong they were good guide to action. So Newtonian physics got us to the moon. It's not right. But it was really successful even the theory of stomach acid causing ulcers. Well, if you treat stomach acid, it actually does help with Alzheimer's, you know, it wasn't a completely unsuccessful theory. It's just that. It wasn't totally right. And it wasn't as successful as the bacteria theory of ulcers because antibody Stu better. Of course, when it comes to something like hand, washing e you know, you can say that over the last one hundred fifty years or people have adopted that idea, but but it didn't actually mean that the people in Semel vices time change their minds. It really was that those people essentially left the stage and new people came along. There's an old joke in in in science, which says science progresses funeral by few. And in some ways, that's what you're talking about here. Yes. So that can be set theory change can happen. Because ideas, that are good ideas spread throughout a community. And then more people start to test them. And then they communicate them to more people and eventually reach a consensus. One thing that the philosopher Thomas Kuhn, really argued is that when you're having these kind of big paradigm shifts in science often, it's young people coming up with new paradigm and then switching to it. Because they don't have any skin in the game in the old one. You know, they haven't spent their life defending this older theory. And then, you know, maybe eventually the people who are defending nettled or theory, retire or die. And then you have theory change. One of the interesting implications about all of this is how we should think about the truth. And in some ways, I think the picture that I'm getting from. You is a picture that says the truth is not a binary question. It's not, you know, is it true is at fault. I mean, some questions, of course, perhaps can be reduced to is it true. Is it falls? But really scientists in the business of producing probability estimates for various claims. And I think what you're saying. Is that for us to actually be on the right side of the misinformation information divide, it's helpful for us to think in probabilistic terms rather than in binary terms. Yeah. That's absolutely, right. So we do think it's really important to think about belief in terms of degrees and evidence and believing something strongly enough and part of the reason is that there has been the strategy where people who are trying to subvert our beliefs. We'll say, but we're not sure about. Something they'll say evolutions just theory or there's some doubt about global warming. But ultimately, not being sure about something is not what matters were never really a hundred percent. Sure about anything if you think about it think about any belief. You could have you know, that the sun will come up tomorrow. Well, it always has in the past. But that doesn't mean that one hundred percent sure it will tomorrow. There's a really good chance that will tomorrow. We shouldn't be looking for certainty. Instead, we need to be saying to ourselves. When do we have enough evidence to make good decisions?

Nag Barry Marshall Alzheimer Princess Caroline Palmer Tony NPR vomiting Nobel prize Ignace similize William T Kaylynn Sloan indus Kyle Stanford US Mary Montague Thomas Kuhn W T. Grant foundation Bach Warren
"ignace similize" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Them. Now, you could argue that the physicians who rejected Mary Montagues ideas when not behaving like real scientists. They weren't being dispassionate. They weren't being objective. They will bringing psychological biases into the picture sexism xenophobia tribalism in the real world misinformation spreads because of some combination of network effects, and psychological and cognitive biases. You see the same thing in the case of the Hungarian physician Ignace similize, he was an insider, a man and a doctor he even had the assistance of scientific evidence to support his claims, but it turned out even these were not enough to overcome the barriers that confront the truth. Ignace some allies was physician living in Vienna. He was in charge of this clinic the first obstetrical clinic in Vienna. Next door. Was the second obstetrical clinic of Vienna. He was in charge of training, new doctors and obstetrics. And at the second clinic, they were training midwives and shortly after he took over he realized that something really terrible was going on. Because in his clinic. Ten percent of the women were dying mostly of child bed fever while the midwives next door who presumably they would have thought they were less expertise only three to four percent of their patients were dying. So some allies was obviously really worried about this. He had patients who would be begging on their knees to be transferred to the other clinic. He had this kind of breakthrough moment when a colleague of his was conducting an autopsy and accidentally cut himself. And then shortly thereafter, he died of something that looked a lot like child bed fever, some allies realized while I've got all these physicians who are. Conducting autopsies on cadavers and then immediately going and delivering babies and he thought well, maybe there's something transferred on their hands. And you call this cadaverous particles. Of course, now, we know that that is bacteria, but they didn't have theory of bacteria that time. So he started requiring the physicians to wash their hands in chlorinated solution. And the death rate in his clinic dropped way down. And of course, the the way we think about science we say, all right? We've someone's discovered something wonderful, everyone must have instantly adopted this brilliant new idea, you would think right. And he has this wonderful evidence. Right. It was ten percent. He introduced the practice goes down to three percent. But that's not what happened. So he published his ideas and the other gentlemen physicians did not take them up. In fact, they found them kind of -fensive they thought this is, you know. He's writing that. We have dirty hands. We have unclean hands. But in fact, we're gentlemen, they also thought it was just really far out of the range of theories that could possibly be true. So they didn't believe him despite the really good evidence and the deep importance, you know, people's lives were really at stake. And it took decades for his hand washing practice to actually spread. In fact, I understand that similize himself eventually suffered a nervous breakdown how how did his own story. And so the way the story goes, though, this is a little hard to verify is that he was so frustrated that people weren't adopting his hand washing practice that he had a nervous breakdown as a result. He was put into Vienna's mental hospital where he was beaten by guards and died of blood poisoning a few weeks later. We've seen how being an outsider. Breaking tradition can be barriers to the spread of good scientific information. But you could argue that these examples from a long gone era of gentlemen, physicians and amateur scientists, but even in the modern day of science, researchers demand heart evidence to be convinced. It turns out that false. Inaccurate. And incomplete information can still take hold in nineteen fifty four AD. Palmer published a paper that changed how doctors thought about stomach ulcers. So what he did was looked at a lot of stomachs. I believe somewhere in the range of a thousand and he found that there were no bacteria whatsoever in the stomachs that he investigated a lot of people at that time had been arguing over whether stomach ulcers were caused by stomach acid or some kind of bacteria. This was taken as really decisive evidence showing that. Okay. Well, it can't be 'Bacterial. Because everyone thought Palmer study showed there are no bacteria in stomachs. So it absolutely must be stomach acid. And of course, this case Palmer was not trying to fabricate his data or make up. Did. He was sincerely arriving at what he thought was a very good conclusion. That's right. And it seems that it just was a problem with his methodology. Of course, there are 'Bacterial in our stomachs. He just didn't see them because of the way he was doing his particular experiment. This was not a fabrication at all one of the things. That's interesting about the this episode involving Palmer. And the stomach ulcers is that as individuals essentially came over to believe what Palmer was telling them. There was a consensus that started to grow. And as each new person added to the consensus, it became a little bit stronger, which made it even harder to challenge. Yes. So although they had been arguing for decades about whether all sorts were caused by acid, or by bacteria at this point, people started to share Palmos results pretty much everybody saw them and this. Consensus was arrived at okay, it's acid, and everyone who had been studying the possibility that bacteria caused ulcers stopped studying not and many people turn to looking at. Okay. How can we treat stomach acid in order to treat Alzheimer's?

Palmer Vienna Ignace similize Mary Montagues Alzheimer three percent four percent Ten percent ten percent
"ignace similize" Discussed on Second Opinion

Second Opinion

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Second Opinion

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion, a growing number of high quality medical research. Studies challenge the status quo by providing evidence that traditional things like surgery, just don't work. It turns out that much of what we offer patients has little benefit. But that's only half the story. The other half is that once these studies come out nothing seems to change we still do the same number of useless surgeries. In part. This is due to what is called the Semel Weiss effect. This is the tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it doesn't fit with what we think are what we've always believed Ignace similize was born two hundred years ago this month. He was an obstetrician like every other obstetrician at the time who lost a huge number of babies to infect. His disease. Now remember this was way before we knew about bacteria or other infectious agents. There was no germ theory of disease at the time. It was common for obstetricians to perform autopsies on all babies who died to try to understand the cause of death. But obsta Tristesse were in high demand, and they would go back and forth from what we call labor and delivery to the morgue. Well, similize observed that when doctors washed their hands with a chlorine solution between patients or between, the autopsy and the patient death rates fell not a little poten- fold at the time. This was a remarkable observation he urged his colleagues to engage in regular hand washing. Similize wise could not explain how hand washing prevented deaths, but he was convinced. It did his hand washing. Suggestions. Were resoundingly rejected by his colleagues. They thought this was the height of nonsense. How could a man's hands possibly transmit disease by something you couldn't even see similize continued his careful handwashing and had the lowest death rates by far in his hospital while he saved hundreds bias blindness and ego cost the lives of thousands. Maybe even tens of thousands because his colleagues failed to listen to similize or even evaluate his observation. It was worse than that. He just couldn't convince them the leaders of medicine grew irritated by his letters and his lectures, which accused the medical profession of being reckless even murderers when the establishment could no longer ignore him. They accused him of being psychologically crazy for considering disease caused by things that were unseen. They. You can find him to a psychiatric hospital where ironically he died of an infection years later bacteria or discovered and found to be the cause of what was in similize time. Call child bid fever doctors hands were the main source of spread but the Semel Weiss effect is very much alive. Today. It helps explain why humans doctors in particular reject new knowledge because it contradicts. What we've always believed. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Ignace similize Dr Michael Wilks Semel obsta Tristesse KCRW fever two hundred years
The Semmelweis Effect

Second Opinion

03:52 min | 2 years ago

The Semmelweis Effect

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion, a growing number of high quality medical research. Studies challenge the status quo by providing evidence that traditional things like surgery, just don't work. It turns out that much of what we offer patients has little benefit. But that's only half the story. The other half is that once these studies come out nothing seems to change we still do the same number of useless surgeries. In part. This is due to what is called the Semel Weiss effect. This is the tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it doesn't fit with what we think are what we've always believed Ignace similize was born two hundred years ago this month. He was an obstetrician like every other obstetrician at the time who lost a huge number of babies to infect. His disease. Now remember this was way before we knew about bacteria or other infectious agents. There was no germ theory of disease at the time. It was common for obstetricians to perform autopsies on all babies who died to try to understand the cause of death. But obsta Tristesse were in high demand, and they would go back and forth from what we call labor and delivery to the morgue. Well, similize observed that when doctors washed their hands with a chlorine solution between patients or between, the autopsy and the patient death rates fell not a little poten- fold at the time. This was a remarkable observation he urged his colleagues to engage in regular hand washing. Similize wise could not explain how hand washing prevented deaths, but he was convinced. It did his hand washing. Suggestions. Were resoundingly rejected by his colleagues. They thought this was the height of nonsense. How could a man's hands possibly transmit disease by something you couldn't even see similize continued his careful handwashing and had the lowest death rates by far in his hospital while he saved hundreds bias blindness and ego cost the lives of thousands. Maybe even tens of thousands because his colleagues failed to listen to similize or even evaluate his observation. It was worse than that. He just couldn't convince them the leaders of medicine grew irritated by his letters and his lectures, which accused the medical profession of being reckless even murderers when the establishment could no longer ignore him. They accused him of being psychologically crazy for considering disease caused by things that were unseen. They. You can find him to a psychiatric hospital where ironically he died of an infection years later bacteria or discovered and found to be the cause of what was in similize time. Call child bid fever doctors hands were the main source of spread but the Semel Weiss effect is very much alive. Today. It helps explain why humans doctors in particular reject new knowledge because it contradicts. What we've always believed. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Ignace Similize Dr Michael Wilks Semel Obsta Tristesse Kcrw Fever Two Hundred Years
"ignace similize" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"ignace similize" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Rambling repetitive almost nonsensical ignace similize said been described as abrasive dog matic and even rude for most of his career but by the time this book came out he was also starting to behave irrationally this got worse in the early eighteen sixties and on july thirteenth eighteen sixty five he returned home from a family outing and was behaving so bizarrely that his wife became convinced that something was seriously wrong with him and on july twenty first he went to a meeting at his job where among other things he was supposed to talk about candidates for a vacant lecturer's post and according to his former assistant instead he read a piece of paper containing the midwives of practice clearly unaware that he was doing anything amiss similize planned to go to a spa and take water treatments there and he departed with his wife and some attendants on july twenty ninth but the next day for reasons that aren't entirely clear he was instead committed to a public institution where he died on august thirteenth eighteen sixty five at the age of forty seven he was buried in vienna two days later there are some conflicting reports about what happened at the institution in some accounts he became so violent that he had to be restrained and during that encounter he was injured but in others he was severely beaten by guards and then left without any kind of medical treatment regardless of exactly what happened injury to his finger that he had and he got to the hospital or sustained in the incident became infected an autopsy that was performed at vienna alchemy kraken house diagnosed quote paralysis of the brain as his cause of death today it seems likely to have been septicemia but the autopsy also revealed that he had severe injuries do suggest that he had been beaten it's also not clear what caused.

lecturer vienna ignace similize two days