21 Burst results for "Ignace"

"ignace" Discussed on Flash Fantasy: Rift Walkers

Flash Fantasy: Rift Walkers

03:56 min | 9 months ago

"ignace" Discussed on Flash Fantasy: Rift Walkers

"Bone crunch as the warden's mos- cartilage and bone shoots into its brain and the warden falls over dead his next. I believe it's either maker. Nick is gonna go then. And mick is going to make drinks. And then he casts modify memory on sir ignoramus while he's friendly dog abandoned because of that. I think it just doesn't get advantage. It just doesn't take advantage so egg melissa will rolla wisdom saving throw sixteen. You're dc's probably seventeen. Yeah so cool so then. Ignorance is incapacitated and unaware of his surroundings though. He can still hear all so you can affect the targets memory of an event that it experienced within the last twenty four hours and that lasted no more than ten minutes. Go this has been fast. And so does he hear a voice in his head or something like that or can i make it. That way does awesome okay so ignorance. Here's in his head. You never found these escaped rift. Wardens reese ra- india. Whoever you think that you're supposed to find they've escaped and they went. South is. Is that all of this modified memory then mick or will you do anything else. Well it has to be within the last twenty four hours. So i can't really do those. You know deep memories for childhood young So i'm trying to think of what he would have besides our interaction mart. Maryam i may oh and also no no. Yeah he just we just got away and we went south because we're going north right. We're going obsolete word over nocco and south. I just forget where everything is. Y'all is i. Chris has a bad memory. so yes. that's all right then. do you break the spell. Yes does implanted in mind and yet and he still friendly what you should. You should have also thrown in their own. By the way you discovered you have a foot fetish. That's that's not changing belief. Is that the end mixed turn. Pretty much columbia's action that if another warden enters the tavern or if ignace turns hostile she will make an attack last player les rods little. It's is also going to ready and action. He's going to ready and action. He's got that. Honk and big ready. Well he's probably going for more of a stabby stabbed than a big swing here and they're relatively confined areas. Got that hawking. Leave folks right towards ignace neck and he's ready to give it a quick ignorance. I couldn't remember his name. Ignatius rock is an ignorance neck because ignatius to. He's got a poke already towards the neck right. Hit carry out a couple of tax. This magic who do does it work. I back to the top. Then as ignace blinks awake his vision blurry his mind unfocused. He stumbles toward the taverns door. Not glancing around. That's any of you. Who were other arranged behind. And around him but not directly in front of him and he steps outside the rift wardens couple dozen or so that are waiting in the yard have started to attract attention from the nearby ken and as they retreat inside their riffs. Ignoramus looks back at reindeer. And though still hazy. You here in your mind. Relentea well-made ken lieutenant and then the rift closes upon him..

mick melissa Nick Maryam ignace neck Ignatius rock ignace india ignace blinks Chris columbia ignatius ken lieutenant
"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

"And just want to acknowledge Marion in the family for her sacrificing and sharing because basically they're sharing you with all of The swept mc nation and all the people across canada. And so what a strong partnership that you have and you're both Written books together. You both work with elders. Together and I i know you might be the commissioner ron ignatz but you're definitely backed up in salt very solidly by a strong woman to be with you by your side. So that's a strong statement going forward so commissioner on what gives you hope in spite of all the things we've endured in canada. What provides you hope what gives you hope. Well if i may Go back to a statement that i made in our auguration for those of us who are survivors of the oppression of our languages as part of the cultural in physical genocide church and state that ran residential schools and other institutional ways in which are languages were stigmatized oppressed the day. That bill c ninety one in digits languages act received royal assent was a memorable occasion down long overdue. It's a rare piece of legislation as co developed by indigenous peoples and the canadian government and many of us are seeing it as a way forward as we seek reconciliation and i may add restitution and move towards a just future. Well commissioner on ignatius congratulations to gain job for all of us in canada. Well i congratulate you for all the good work that you've done and for the inspiration that you have to me. Yeah i raised my hands up to you in our tradition thanksgiving folks jam. Thank you so much. For coming on our podcast. Thank you and. I want to thank all the people from this thing. The odd cast. If you enjoyed it please subscribe so you don't miss future episodes. Give us a rating and tell your friends about social media and as always want to give a big shout out to the red dog singers at the treaty territory in southern saskatchewan for providing our theme music until next time i'm perry belgarde national chief of the assembly of first nations..

ron ignatz canada bill c canadian government Marion ignatius perry belgarde saskatchewan assembly of first nations
"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

"As i'm driving long when i see a stop sign a dozen. I don't read it in my mind does. This is the words in english stop. It comes in my language as taher. The order the command to stop this is a word for the stop and the on the end is to command that you must stop okay. But i'd be our languages are are really important. And if i may expand further on that for example in gene when i i have difficulty speaking about myself when i talked to others because in in western society you got to talk how great. What great things you've done. How what you've bacon. Good things you have accomplished but in so weapon gene. Because we're a collective society. When i speak to you in my language i have to end. It's a it's a fundamental law. There's no way around it over. Under any which way i have to use a diminutive diminish my importance while raising you up in esteem but there's a law of reciprocal relationship when the table is churned. Then you as a so quantum with dan do likewise and hold me up in esteem and that is because we're a collective society that is how we do not challenge each other's. I guess if you want in english eagle and that's the way we maintain peace in the valley honor and respect of each other. That's respectful way. That's a powerful teaching respect and humility and balance. Now my next question. I wanna talk about commission. You have a very strong partner. Your wife marian. She's an award winning linguist and to have written books together as a couple. You have a strong partnership Tell us about the role that your partnerships played getting to where you're at today as You know i wouldn't have been able to i am. I wouldn't be demand that i am today of. It wasn't for her. You know we met way back in the ninety s a fighting the double tracking into the thompson river. Which would have harmed the fisheries in the thompson river into we needed to naga for to record our cultural heritage on the river and she came in and One of the things that we're looking at his shoes looking at our family tree through our family tree looking at how we conducted ourselves on the water and i was really impressed by that. And we've worked together on recording our elders. But if i may point out too personal note. I never told this publicly in nineteen ninety eight my son. Gabriel that wall. Eric who i was training i took the mountains on his vision quest seeking his spirit powers.

taher thompson river dan marian Gabriel Eric
"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

"What are some of the biggest challenges. Have your new job well right now. It's actually the the big job we don't while we've been announced. As a commission. Commissioners and directors we yet to have our secretary established that is going to be big job finding an appropriate ceo and a staffing into budgeting designing the budgeting and laying out. The work plan tasks that we have to carry out So you've got to do the whole operationalizing of a whole new institution department if you will from the ceo to the go to the budget and ops plan and so that really becomes your first focus of work definitely definitely there is historic development and the first of its kind and we don't. We don't have a template to build off of an utilize sore building from ground zero. That's both challenging but it's also exciting. You're starting with a blank page. So that's what's exciting. You can create something out of a blank page. You can draw portrait. Yes yes most definitely and we hope to be able to draw beautiful pictures on it okay. Well commission mitterrand revitalizing in teach. This language has been your passion for a very very long time. You know you've been at this. Were twenty years like where does that passion come from. Where did that spark in you. Come from where did that drive. Determination that fire come from regarding language. Revitalization it goes back to my childhood I was adopted by my great grandmother. Cillian in yes. Who is a medicine woman who is following in the footsteps of her mother who was also a medicine woman. An indian doctor and civilians husband was migrate ground. Grandfather was the chief of our community and they raised me. She took me in as a child and she began. Doctrine me up took me into the sweat house and gave me my medicinal powers and with us. It's only once in your lifetime..

Cillian
"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

"I would like to recognize all indigenous peoples in their homelands to speak to you from my home and so robin cooler into open territory to embark on our work while. Thank you so much as well. Commissioner on ignatius. I want again congratulate you on your appointment Teller listeners. About you new position. What will be involved with becoming the first ever commissioner on digits language revitalization the implementation bill c. Ninety one. Tell us about that. Tell us what your new position. I'm honored and i have to say that. I'm grateful and thankful to be chosen along with my directors to formulate this commission. The calls for the the commission goes back a long ways in the two thousand three. Two thousand five taskforce on indigenous languages cultures there in the commissioner the task force chaired. We did come up with a twenty five fundamental recommendations of of which was called for establishment of legislation the commission but ultimately i have to be thankful for. Trc calls to action which lead fourteen and fifteen called for the establishment of a commission and And the language legislation that has led to the formulation and the work that we have to do as we know. There are seventy different languages across the country. Much of them are in danger and some critically endangered the and even such as the hurt huron language which is a sleeping language so it's important and apparent of that. We honor those those people in those languages that are in those situations and work with them to support indigenous peoples in their efforts to reclaim revitalize and maintain and strengthen just languages to support research and innovation and promote indigenous languages across the country and As well as the work of the task forces to to facilitate in Resolutions disputes that may arise whatever that might be but You know they we. As a commission have to be mindful of this. Those indigenous nations that are lead. Were there to champion and provide support and to be the watchdog on the legislation that the government of holds the promise of the legislation in terms of providing sufficient resources and sustainable resources as i watched prior to all of this our elders having to work out of closets having to work with pennies fundraise trickling. But now if this legislation they can now have the resources and not expand their time and energy a to properly work to pass on have the intergenerational transmission of are not of our languages within so you mentioned there's three directors could you give their names geena liberty director. Robert watt is the director and joan. Gray is is a first nations director. Okay and joan gray is is a member of the muskogee lake cremation with entreaty six territory. Scotch ruin gina liberty as may not her passion of educating others about the history of the not people and robert has been involved in promoting and protecting and preserving enough to cope. And i believe he's from northern quebec. Okay so you've got a good team. You're the commissioner you got three directors and you mentioned. You're there to champion. It provides support to first nations. You mentioned that. We have over seventy indigenous languages first nations languages across canada and a watchdog over government to ensure the sufficient. Sustainable resources are there to implement bill. C ninety one the language that's key..

ignatius Trc geena liberty Robert watt joan gray muskogee lake gina liberty joan Gray quebec robert canada
"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde

"For those of us who are survivors of the oppression of our languages as part of the cultural and physical genocide rod on us by the church and state that ran residential schools and other institutional ways in which are languages were stigmatized The day that bill. C ninety one digits languages act received. Royal assent was a memorable occasion. That was long overdue. That's commissioner ron. Ignatz he's just been appointed to lead the new federal office of the commissioner of indigenous languages. He's our guest on the podcast. Don sit to while and welcome to the podcast. I'm your host. Perry bell guard national chief of the nba. First nations alchemy. Mc is a cree word for you. All persevere are in other words let's keep going and don't give up on this podcast. We discussed the leading issues facing first nations peoples with top experts with elders and community leaders. And today we are pleased to welcome the first ever federal commissioner of indigenous languages. Ron ignatius is a member of the swept look nation in british columbia and a fluent speaker of schwope maxine. He was elected. Chief escaped us in indian band for more than thirty years. He has a phd anthropology from simon fraser university with a dissertation on swept oral history from twenty sixteen to twenty twenty one. He co chaired the assembly first. Nations chiefs comedian languages where he played an instrumental role in the development and passage a bill. C ninety one the indigenous languages act. Commissioner on agnes a very big. Welcome to our podcast. The way is in doubt. Elia eskan wellness as i can. Duck swayed Open as anna walked Lil elks clem stem. Ten muse. had two hours the full of year is i would like to. I say that. I'm honored and yet humbled to be sitting in front of the national chief who i've held in highest demon high regard for all the good work that you've done and it was an honor to sit with you as a co chair on the national chiefs committee on languages but as i said in my language In so hutton. gene..

Ignatz Perry bell Ron ignatius schwope maxine ron nba Don simon fraser university Elia eskan british columbia Lil elks clem agnes assembly anna national chiefs committee hutton
"ignace" Discussed on The Current

The Current

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on The Current

"You said when you were named into this post that these are your words are languages will no longer stand in the shadow of other languages here in our land. There are two official languages in canada. How how in the last couple of minutes that we have. How would you like to see that. Change what what should the nation due to recognize the languages that you have been speaking about. Well i mean let's As i stated that day that bill ninety one indians leg which received broiler said was a memorable. It's a rare piece of legislation that was co developed by indigenous peoples and the canadian government and many of us seeing it as a way for as we seek reconciliation restitution and move towards a just future. It recognizing our languages and shooting its rightful place. As the founding languages alongside other languages across country will help make canada whole are you. are you optimistic. That will happen that the that idea of making canada whole is really powerful. Well you know our chips in nineteen ten stated to the wilford. Laurie that our fight is not with the ordinary of our fight is not with ordinary. Citizenry of this country are fight with the government and we have been fighting with the government of canada and they but they went on to say that it is the duty and responsibility of those ordinary citizens who came here in good faith took up land in good faith. They have a duty and responsibility to see that their government does the right thing so that we can build a great and good and just country so today where we are going to call upon the canadian citizens to do that. And i'm deeply moved by the two hundred and fifty truckers. That had a Care about to the residential school hockey and crying and showing their love and support for justice. Let we are calling for the sixty bikers. I thank the the the rising up of canadians across this country showing their support for the loss of those two hundred fifty children and others. It is day working with us. That will surely help us. Attain.

Laurie today canada two hundred fifty children sixty bikers nineteen ten two hundred and fifty truckers two official languages broiler canadians canadian ninety one wilford indians
"ignace" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on The Current

"Of legislation to recognize our indigenous languages in law as well as the calling for the establishment of the commission. And that is what a has helped. But what invigorated us into the hard work of our political organization such as the seventy first nations it. J. and the federal government Adopted at the united nations un drip which then further motivated us to push for the the recognition of our languages in law. Thou what's the impetus along with all the social and political movements said. We've been engaged in across the country. Nothing has been given to us. We had to fight every inch of the way to get to where we are today and For those of us who are survivors of the oppression of our languages Part of the cultural and physical genocide that has been wrought on us by the state supported by the churches at residential schools. Another national another institutional ways in which are languages were stigmatized than the press. The day that belsey ninety one indigenous languages act received royal June twenty first. Two thousand nine hundred was a memorable moment for us because quinn stephen harper. Shout the task force report. I have to back up and say that when we finish the report we called it. We had a ceremony to honor. The work of the task force prayed for being brought to life. However when it was shelled. I could truly here. A from the the the hearts of our elders hitting the ground the country in that dearly. That that that invigorated me to stand up and fight harder in sulphur. Less we were. We were in in the woods for thirteen years. Fighting in the background. Fighting for our language is fighting for the recognition of her languages. It stood the hard work in the sacrifice of many of elders news and leaders. Many who have we lost. Who lost in the way on the struggle to get your and i would hope and wish up. Objective is to honor those people's memory bull as well as those survivors from the residential school to ensure that we do not experience what we experienced the residential school ever again in this country. I told the court that i'm wrong. Friend another.

thirteen years stephen harper ninety one indigenous language today June twenty first Two thousand nine hundred seventy first nations quinn united J.
"ignace" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on The Current

"Calling for declaration of a state of emergency for indigenous languages across canada unfortunately things that called that cry of a state of emergency for indigenous language across this country fell on deaf theorists. Do believe now is different. Oh that's different because you own. It's different now because there is a much has happened. Much has gone under the bridge. For example in i worked a established. i was called by national team failed in nashville chief at the time to come to auto established national committee languages after the Began discussions with the federal government to for the federal government to the establish a strategy to help maintain and strengthen our languages across country and fortunately And in the process i realized in discussions with the government at that time that is important that if we need to have a united front a to accomplish our hopes and dreams for our lang were just so i reached out to the inuvik and maty leaders and we join forces and were able to successfully negotiated an agreement with the federal government. Minister seila cups at the time and established a task force and we came up with the report that we was included. Twenty five recommendations of which one was called for a national legislation as well as a establishment of a commission to be the watchdog on the legislation ensuring that the federal government would uphold the promise of legislation Unfortunately when stephen harper got elected In the fall of two thousand five he shelved the task force report at pullback. The hundred and seventy million dollars. That was on the table that we negotiate with the federal government to begin launching the strategy to revitalize maintain and strengthen indigenous languages across the country. And in the meantime many issues such as the end the truth and reconciliation commission was established in sankt murray sinclair and his drc recommendation. Ninety four recommendations calling one of which was a fourteen fifty calling for the.

canada stephen harper Twenty five recommendations Ninety four recommendations fourteen fifty hundred and seventy million do one seila cups Minister sankt murray sinclair two thousand five truth and reconciliation commi nashville
"ignace" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on The Current

"He's an adjunct professor at simon fraser university and joins me now rana league. Good morning. good morning. What does it mean for you to hear. But what does it mean for you to hear that language knowing that so few people still speak it and there are brothers and there are communities. That are working so hard to try and keep that language alive. Well let me tell you you. What the state of our languages are in. I used to wonder if when i was young. A young man and sticking with our elders listening to listening to to say that. I'm feeling lonesome because there's fewer and fewer people that i can speak to our language. It's a heartwarming to hear definitely. How precarious are those languages. This is this has been your life's work in many ways. How precarious our our indigenous languages across this country will there are approximately Seventy seventy languages across canada and it is majority of them are are endangered or critically endangered. And some of them have no more speakers left in their community Fluid speakers left in their communities which is a travesty in my mind. It's a loss of a great heritage and It ought not occurred. That ought not to be the situation. We know that in the years since the truth and reconciliation commission Came out there. Were calls on the canadian government to create this position. What's your understanding as to why this position has been created now seven years on but before i go any farther i would like to say something. Yeah and I'd like to say and speak to the people across the speak to my digits people across the country by saying electric light elliot's Election this alex. This in dan New new cornelia Commitment luminous as i said my language i would like to recognize and honor all indigenous peoples in canada in their as i speak to you from my home and swept and territory as we embark on the work to stand up our languages together and again your question was which is why why. Now that's happening. I mean it's really important to hear the language and in in for so many people. It's a lifeline. And a lifeline. That has been taken away. Why do you think there's renewed urgency to to preserve those languages and why you are in this position now. Well the renewed urgency as you say it is has been For us always urgent for us to maintain and sustain and revitalize our languages for example in nineteen ninety eight There was a resolution passed at assembly of first nations.

canada simon fraser university seven years approximately Seventy seventy first nations nineteen ninety eight cornelia rana league so many people people canadian
"ignace" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"ignace" Discussed on WJR 760

"Travel Michigan. I'm Dave Lauren's from Shore Michigan. We are exploring the state of Michigan and I tell you, you're gonna have a relatively new way to explore the state of Michigan. I had just kind of learned about this recently. I heard a little bit about helicopter tours in Michigan. But not really a lot up until just a couple of weeks ago, I happened to see a sign that said, my flight aviation Dot com and that's the website for my flight. Aviation, eh? My flight aviation. They offer helicopter helicopter tours around the state to tell us more. Let's bring in Cassandra McAllister. She's from my flight. Aviation. Cassandra. It's great to have you on the program. Yes, thank you for having me now. You were telling me before We went on the air that you actually offer tours in several places around the state. So I'm looking forward to hearing about that. But let's start out in the Mackinaw area where I first learned about this. You're offering these helicopter tours. Let's let's learn about what type of tours and how people can take advantage of this. Yes. So mechanize, actually our newest location. We started up there this summer. We've been in operation since 2016. But our latest venture is going up to Mackinaw and we have had so much fun exploring the state of the city of Mackinaw. Um, the tourists come out of ST Ignace, so it's out of Mackinac County Airport, So it's actually really cool People drive across the bridge. To come onto the flight, and then they get to fly over the bridge. So we always joke that they get to do the best of both worlds. They get in and drive over the bridge, and then they fly over its. They see it from both perspectives. It's true, so you actually take off from the little ST Ignace Airport. Correct And it's right on the water, which is incredible. So the second you're off the air. You have full view of the water. It's uninterrupted views from the helicopter. You can see Mackinaw right across and then you fly right over the bridge and come back to the airport. It's to location. Nice. I've actually flown fixed wing from ST Agnes to the island is like a carnival ride with thehe winds from the straight straight to Mackinaw. But it's ah lot of fun. And something tells me doing this helicopter ride would be a blast. A cz. Well, how long are the kind of the basic tours and.

Mackinaw Shore Michigan Cassandra McAllister little ST Ignace Airport ST Ignace Dave Lauren Mackinac County Airport ST Agnes
"ignace" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"ignace" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Well, these underserved community and my pumping up their self, a famous faras daily affirmations and just things of everything building that would have the domino effect on them and their families that that I have to say, I'm most proud to be, you know, working with them to have a hand in that As well as just race related religion relation because of everything going on in prior to everything that's going on. This is been going on. Not just with the George Four thing has been going on for a while, So we've been actually working towards this forever. So now now that we're seeing more People in different nationalities getting involved. It gives you a sense of hope. That maybe things will one day change, you know, And so, yeah, We're just pushing the message pushing, you know, raising funds trying our best to raise funds to implement all these programs to help the community and help Everyone. You know what's interesting. You mentioned self esteem before and I feel like it is so needed like mentors and things like that to let people know that social media is not riel, and I'm sure growing up when you grew up. When I grew up, it was much easier than what kids have to deal with. Right now. With everything online. You know what I'm saying? It makes perfect sense. It's like you're chasing an invisible image. You're chasing an invisible self of yourself. That It is not realistic. It's smoking Mayor is it's not really what it is. It's like everybody is chasing this image of OK if I would just order this TR if I just do this and I'll be perfect, and then they invent something else. And they're promoting something else on social media, and it's like, Oh, well, that's out of bounds do this, and it's like if we if we help our youth at the core at the foundation of who they are. Then that will always stick with him. No matter what you go through in life, you always be grounded. You know, You always have that sense of your roots and who you are at the core, so that way when things come about, it won't affect you as harsh as if you if no one's pumping that into you and then you know in the community. There's no beautiful images, murals or anything of that nature, like they're not exposed to things that other people are exposed. So it's like That that has a whole another effect as well. So that's another thing we implement in the in the foundation. We try to get them out of their surrounding areas like some of these kids live, what? 10 15 minutes from the beach, and they've never even been to the beach. Wow. And this like a basic scene. You know, it's like really sad when you think about it, So we really try to promote that. That's why we're really pushing for the Program so that we can have these kids introduce something different and see an outside world of what they're used to, because there's no fun being pumped into the community that are pumped and elsewhere, and if there is they're not seeing them. They're not reaping the benefits, and it's like it's kids shouldn't have to suffer for other people's greed, Ignace as far as where the funds should go, so Yeah, we have Well you're doing. You're doing great work. How long have you guys had the foundation? I've actually had it. I want to say this is probably like solidly like the last two years, But I started it when my father passed on DH. I don't know if you're aware, but my father actually passed today. It was on Father's Day in 2012 June 17th but they you know Father's days on Sunday, but the actual day he passed was on Father's Day, but I started it. Maybe two months after he passed, And then once I started going through the process and of actual grieving I had to stop everything because it was very overwhelming for me, and I just couldn't take it mentally, So I just back I just backed out of everything. And then the last two years up solidly, like coming back, like, okay. You know, I have to use that pain to push, you know, for my passion, or else I'm gonna be paralyzed in my in my sadness will be paralyzed in my emotional statements like that's not helping anyone So solidly the last two years I've been like You know, full forcing it. How you made, you know something so tragic into you know something good that you're doing for the community. You know what I mean? Yeah, and I actually started it I would do serving, you know. The community before my fat father passed, I would go to skid row every month twice a month. The last Sunday's of the month and I just feed them. Whatever my budget was, I would make it like sandwiches, chips, So, ah, Jews, some healthy, some not so healthy, You know, just a basic paper bag lunch. Sometimes I will put shirts and socks just whatever was in my budget, and my dad would get so upset at me because I was spending my own money doing it. And he's like this is not a good idea. Like I know you mean well. But it was also depression because I never had enough. It would be most of the time I would do follow Lee 101 102 100 bags and they will be gone in less than 15 minutes literally left 50 minutes. So it was a little depressing for me because I've never had enough. It was like And then after he died, you know, I just stopped everything..

Ignace
Hands!

The Past and the Curious

06:42 min | 2 years ago

Hands!

"Ignace. Similize was a showman but when he truly believes something he fought through the feelings that might have otherwise nope back his voice one of the few things that he was outspoken and confrontational about was the simple act of handwashing. He was certain it was necessary but only after much observation getting other people to believe him was a different story born in Hungary in the city known as Buddha which would one day join its neighboring city across the river to become Budapest. Similize started law school but he wound up becoming a doctor in the end in Eighteen. Forty seven just three years after earning his medical license. The methodical and intelligent fellow was given a notable position at a maternity ward in Vienna Austria. His job was basically as the chief resident which gave him a lot of responsibility and power over the staff at his hospital. There were actually two maternity wards which is where women go to give birth. The first word was staffed by doctors called obstetricians the other word was staffed by midwives trained health professionals whose main concern as caring for women during before and after the Labor of childbirth more on the difference later when some of I started he noticed two things one. All the women admitted for delivery wanted to go to the ward staffed by midwives and to ten percent of the women who went to his word the obstetrician. Stafford died while they were there. Well no wonder everyone wanted to go to the other word right. The unfortunate women died from thing called child bed fever which we now know to be caused by an infection. Women wanted to go with the midwives because well they weren't done living yet and fair enough but ignace wanted to know why there was a difference in the fate of the patients in the two wards and more importantly how to solve it so he made some methodical observations. I he noted women gave birth in two different positions in the two different words so he had the doctors deliver babies the same way as the Midwest. No difference same fevers same tragic results then he noticed that when someone died a priest walk through the halls ringing a bell in solemn honor of the women who passed he thought maybe this played psychological tricks on the women in the word. Perhaps they realized that someone had died in that they very well could be next. The suggestion alone might make someone gets sick. Meanwhile of course no one died in the other word hence Nobel ringing so do you get as line of thinking. Well he told the priest ago ring his bell somewhere else still no difference with his methodical mind. He tried everything he could think of. No luck of any especially for the poor patients on the ward then. One of the doctors got sick with symptoms similar to the women and before long. He too died at this time. Medical doctors not only took care of living patients but they spent time on cadavers. Or dead bodies. It's kind of gross. When you think about it and it would certainly give me the willies. But what better way is there to learn about the human body than with a real not live human body? It ain't pleasant but it's the truth and we've learned a lot as society in this way anyway. It turns out that this now dead doctor had practised finger while working with a dead body now we know he got an infection and he died eighteen fifties Austria like pretty much everywhere else in the world didn't understand germs or bacteria or viruses or infections yet. There were still plenty of people who most diseases were brought on by miasma which is bad air in shortly idea was that you might smell something really bad and then get sick. It sounds crazy now but you should understand that. Most diseases made a body smell bad You're around some smelly sick person. You might get sick too. We know it's germs now but all they had to go on was that sticky stinky surrounding. The city Sim obese new. They're just had to be a connection between the dead bodies and the sickness. Unlike the midwives who simply dealt with the pregnant women many of the doctor spent time dissecting analyzing and learning from the cadavers which obviously meant touching them then they just hopped on over to the maternity ward when there was a baby to deliver and they did not wash their hands or their tools. Crazy right by today's standards. Yes but two hundred years ago. This was business as usual. The connection had not been made by science. The evidence was pretty clear to some of ice so he made a new rule. Doctors must wash their hands in chlorine and their tools. And guess what happened. The number of deaths fell dramatically. In fact in the obstetricians ward the survival rate was basically the same as the midwives ward so he went around telling everybody about it. Wash your hands. You're bringing gross stuff to a healthy body with your unclean tools and you're unclean fingers and instead of being excited and saying thank you. The doctors were like you're telling me I making my patient sick. Who Do you think you are? I am a good doctor and you know nothing similize before long. He was ridiculed out of existence. It's too bad. They didn't listen to him. Lives could have been saved with some simple handwashing just a few years later. There was a British nurse working in a war zone during the Crimean War who helped revolutionize medical cleanliness Florence Nightingale paid attention to international science. She took her job seriously and was responsible for the lives of thousands of recuperating British soldiers. There's a chance she heard about vices. Observations there's also a good chance that she just figured it out on her own because when she implemented rules about washing hands and tools the same thing started to happen she saved lives but still there were plenty of detractors. The anti hand washers. The dirty hinders the filthy fingered. You know nothing nightingale. They cried but you see these two did know what they were talking about. They might not have understood it on a microscopic level but they could clearly see a relationship between dirty handed doctors and sick or dying patients. The world was changing in the mid eighteen. Hundreds and doctors were doubling as scientists often to determine what was causing serious illnesses.

Ignace. Similize Vienna Austria Budapest Hungary Midwest Ignace Florence Nightingale Buddha Stafford Austria Nobel
Travel to Northern Pakistan

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:08 min | 2 years ago

Travel to Northern Pakistan

"Like to welcome to the show. David Harden from travel worn SATCHEL DOT com. Who's come to talk to us about northern Pakistan? David welcome to the show. Thank you Chris. Thank you at least to be. Your accent is clearly not one from northern Pakistan. We're talking T- well you're in the UK. Near Windsor what led you to Pakistan give you the shortened version. But when I was eighteen. I decided to travel overland from the UK to Australia. And I could as far as Afghanistan before you realized you'd run out of land. It was not in the Russians. Got In the way so yes. Well the happens doesn't it tells away two years and decided that still WanNa girl on the Silk Roads still interested Islamic culture and art and architecture and filling in the gaps. Ever since. I've sort of done Australia and Southeast Asia and all of Europe and a few of the songs but Pakistan is always there the one that I needed to to tick off really well in you chose northern Pakistan on this particular trip which as we were talking before hand you said is quite different from southern Pakistan and that would be a whole different trip. North and south is very different. I mean the north. It's cooled in those areas and they three huge mountain ranges. So you have the to the West. You have the Hindu Kush in the sense of you have the character forms and then surrounded on the north and east by the Himalayas. And they're absolutely wonderful mountain ranges but as you get further south. Islamabad where I flew into the great trunk. Road becomes planes. Sunset becomes desert would way down to Karachi New Arabian Sea. So yeah very two distinct areas. Shall we start them in? Islamabad actually just flew into Islamabad as bad as modern city. One of the interesting says the city right next to it as well. Andy which is the ancient city but Islamabad is the modern city Pakistan pill. Much longer grid lines are easy to navigate. I would say that actually just before I started this trip on originally planned to buy a motorbike in Islamabad an travel up through the Karakoram highway and then head off into various places. I'd read about in various books to say that I spoke to that is a big Pakistan community here in the UK. And I have up the friends one. Who's a Kashmiri? And he said well to be honest. I know you're motorcyclist but the roads are something else and I would recommend a jeep at least so you'd better listen to this sort of thing. They listen to him and I got myself a cheap and a guide to me actually at Islamabad airport. I spoke at the moment number weeks number of months. Really sending out my tinman. He can find out about what I want to and that was great and so I had this a jeep drive and I have to say it was probably the best decision. I made an enormously. I would travel alone and make my way round but I think this would have been a journey too far. How did you find a jeep and a driver a Kashmiri gentlemen here in the UK who promotes northern Pakistan but wonderful gentleman and he put me in touch with Earth's people over the and I came up with one Sean who you turn out to be absolutely brilliant and good thing was that. He's his the Chinnery but often is not. We will turn off the rodent gun sale. This liquid interesting here. I suggest we don't do this. And I think the question slips or went what about safety because one sure yeah this image of cool so Pakistan and especially the northern areas and you know I I thought of the trip I plan was to go up towards promised so and Eko took care of it. Sometimes Chris when you meet someone. They have absolute confidence. That you've made a really good decision. They already felt towards the back end of the trip. We ended up in a shallow. He said near the Afghanistan border he said had I gone two weeks earlier suggested shallow harassed security reasons and it's nice having someone who has local intelligence so to speak and he was always on his phone is always checking where we were not set up. There wasn't one time the only time was rather Longley wanting planted in someone's house and it was an old soldier. I didn't notice but his granddaughter sent his granddaughter all and having a cup of tea with him dump. She walked in with this shotgun undecided K. And he said I started brandishing. The shotgun around me and I was okay Maybe I made a mistake too much of a price to pay for a cup of tea but it turned out that he wanted to show me the gun which was made in combat nineteen sixty in Birmingham the UK because as from the UK and then he was crowded this so I mean that's the momentarily. I felt unsafe that that was it. That was the extent to how I felt and say in Pakistan excellent now you said as I said Islamabad. You said that's a modern city. It sounded like in your tone I was hearing so I didn't spend a lot of time Islam Abbad. I was more interested in the mountain. I sort of pasta very quickly. In fact which we left about an hour nine did we did come back so actually to see Faisal mosque. Okay which is a really beautiful most very modern initiative about nine thousand nine hundred and again a very very beautiful most news in the foothills of the Himalayas. It's great visit down as the last place of his. But I'll tell you about that. I if I may so folks in about nine thousand nine hundred. Eighty eight defies most because in Faisal of Saudi Arabia. Stunt up the hundred and twenty million dollars. Us to build it as one does the money partly he fis but what is interesting is he. Made a competition to will be architects. Come up with the design. Took you shocked. The name one is an Basti. The whole architecture on a Bedouin. Tent shot was pretty interesting in the appealed to King Faisal and he's a magnificent structure because it's like an eight sided tend to really doesn't like a tent and so big on this enormous white marble and gray marble and you just see it for miles driving towards thinking okay. Looks Okay and something. You just don't know the ten minutes down the road you think. I'm sure I should have been by now this grid system of Islam about so you go up. It's the end of the road unless they just ended up votes off the Bat. So twenty minutes you eventually get close to it and then you start to really appreciate the enormity of small the structure and get three hundred thousand people praying ally inside. I think it's ten thousand but with the porticos and the data coca grounds. You've got three hundred thousand people. Pray there and it was real highlight. Visit every interested in style of architecture. But one thing is that if people do visit to you have to take your shoes and men and this white marble and greyish sort of marble and it wasn't a particularly sunny hot day but every time I stepped off the white mob wants the gray marble. My feet wants to get an angle for a pit shuttle. Take a shortcut to the record. My feet was scolded eventually got in as well but that just finished prayer and like go up to the main entrance to get inside to have a look at this incredible space inside and they said No. I'm sorry you can't come in and I said well look. I sort of come with away from London. See this is. This is typical of buckets. Johnny people that they will try and be as helpful as possible really nice and he said okay look you should really go with this young man and he spoke to the man order when we rolled around the back this young man to be around the back and there was a back door and he took my camera with me. He said look no pitches inside and just tap a low. I thought this really really nice touch and again to tread on the carpet I saw rob and really nice and re serene place children. Having lessons and really great atmosphere. I came back and said I gave him my camera and come back and I was sort of going to complaints because everyone in that had come phones. So fees and pitches thinking well. I was lucky enough to be let in so I wasn't going to push that but really worth of visit. This is a lot of history to this place. That modern architecture ignace absolutely stunning in the surroundings of the hills with the backdrop of the foothills of the Himalayas. It's a

Pakistan Islamabad UK Himalayas Islamabad Airport Afghanistan Chris David Harden Faisal Mosque Australia Windsor King Faisal Silk Roads Southeast Asia Karachi New Arabian Sea Europe Birmingham Saudi Arabia Johnny Longley
"ignace" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

08:58 min | 2 years ago

"ignace" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"Straight harder especially regime said we'll go up with that because I saw seven hundred seventy eighty seven people to To make it becomes it does become the most challenging bit. But I think it's some. It's a huge privilege to be in a position where you can have a positive impact on people's lawns. Although you probably see all the things that you you don't do and should do better. There's a lot of people in there who love that culture and love nature. I'm always amazed by some of the guys who who work behind the bar. And how much they they still feel that. We'll pride and excitement looking after the customer by shared concern all working too hard enough cash. It's important The talk for each other regularly skating by his own boys' Tire Liam on the use of ignace. Missing should be. It's a really important thing we've gotten past names company to besetting the right title of the How we live all I think is incredibly important over the people that wet for us now and I have stories of companies in manages to in the morning of fucking bollock them and show them? And it's like it's like we live in a in a in a the.

ignace
Science News Briefs from Around the World

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Science News Briefs from Around the World

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor, Steve Mirsky. And here's the short piece from the June two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits, and it's a rundown of some science and technology stories for round, the globe compiled by editorial contributor, Jim Daly from Canada. Archaeologists have now confirmed that Toronto service Rex skeleton found in the nineteen nineties at a fossil site in Saskatchewan is the biggest and heaviest on record at nearly forty two feet long almost twenty thousand pounds. Scotty as it's called surpassed the record set by the famous sued t Rex which was found in South Dakota in nineteen ninety from Argentina are gala GIS identified a site, where ancient humans killed and butchered giant ground sloths, mega theory, American. Madam in the pampas region in eastern Argentina, the find provides evidence that Uman's contributed to the sloths extinction from Kenya. A science teacher who won the two thousand nineteen global teacher prize announced he intends to donate, the one million dollar award to benefit society, Peter to Beechy a Franciscan friar mentors, a science club that came in, I in its category in the two thousand eighteen Kenya's science and engineering fair from the autonomous island of Anjouan in the union of the Cymru's, that's in the Indian Ocean between the east coast of Africa, and the northwest end of Madagascar geochemists at Columbia University, found a load of court site, a metamorphosed rock formed from sandstone on the island of Andrea on the island is volcanic, and had been thought to contain only Ignace rocks. And from North Korea physicists at Kimmel sung universe. City in Pyongyang have brokered a rare green to collaborate with Italy's international school for advanced studies in Trieste, the North Koreans will study, computational neuroscience with talion physicists that was quick hits by Jim Daly.

Jim Daly Argentina Kenya Steve Mirsky North Korea Pyongyang Editor T Rex Toronto Trieste Uman Ignace Rocks Kimmel Scotty South Dakota Canada Indian Ocean Saskatchewan Italy Columbia University
"ignace" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ignace" Discussed on The Big 98

"Now text the nationwide keyword truck to two hundred two hundred confirmation text in info standard data investigates apply in this nation. Greg. Pile of stories, Bobby like in school like high school in particular, we like we learned useless, things like after school, we got out boom, you never use it again. I felt like most of the stuff I learned in high school. I never used again, especially math. Yes, I feel like a lot of that's on here. So Americans were surveyed with, you know, the top things that after graduation. They never use and yeah. Like pies on here. Periodic table the. Pythagorean theorem. Even that is pathetic, pathetic. What is that? I clearly school. High school. How many other math things are on there? I Don some science, stuff like protons, neutrons electrons, osmosis. Photosynthesis, I think that's valuable to learn if your path is that direction? They made me learn a lot of stuff that I do. I'd never use. I resented having to spend time to we don't teach things, though, that we should like how to budget if we do it's like two weeks of an entire class, a lot of stuff that we don't teach what else is on that list it keep going naming the president's in order. Not at mind that so much the types of different rocks that there are sedimentary Ignace metamorphosis, and I mean, I don't mind that stuff show off. Trivia. Well, I guess they're it helps you it helps us like when we played that, you know, I enjoy learning. It just they made me take a lot of stuff. I didn't wanna take. And I knew I would never use again. I like the way my high school they sorta handled they knew I wasn't that into chemistry me, and some other kids..

High school Don Ignace metamorphosis Bobby Greg president two weeks
"ignace" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

09:12 min | 3 years ago

"ignace" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"And chores are all taking the fun out of life for most adults. In fact, sixty percent believe their life is just too grown up as ridiculous to find ways to have more fun every day seriously, cloudy with afternoon showers. Highs around seventy six right now clouds and sixty five thirty three too short for boring. Thanks for waking up with us here. Ninety seven point one wash FM Hollywood showbiz buzz minutes away. What you got coming up the baby Sussex has a new name or a name, I should say and a TV personality making a comeback to television after losing his job. Call it a comeback in here for years. Thanks for letting us be a part of your day. Go back with this nineteen ninety nine Natalie Imbruglia torn ninety seven point one FM. Two. She was warm. He came. He was doing this. Ignace? Show. You couldn't be that man. Don't seem to know to care. Him anymore? That. The terrorist. Veins. Okay. Nothing where he used to. Inspiration. Eighty two years another favorite on ninety seven point one wash. Well. Let them. Problem. Wow. Let. The new. Until you the morning. Welcome to Thursday ninety seven point one Washington is on and it's time to go to Hollywood for your show, biz buzz. Here's what you need to know baby Sussex has a name Meghan Markle. And prince Harry's new baby named Archie Harrison Mountbatten Windsor at the mouthful but adorable Billy Bush coming back to TV this fall. He last worked for NBC on the today show, but he was fired in October of two thousand sixteen after the emergence of that tape where the then not yet. President Trump had spoken about grabbing things. So Billy has now tapped to host FOX's.

Billy Bush Natalie Imbruglia Hollywood Archie Harrison Mountbatten Wi Meghan Markle Sussex prince Harry President Trump Ignace NBC FOX Washington Eighty two years sixty percent
"ignace" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"ignace" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Experience of now you're in the presence of some kind of emergency. But how long do you want to suffer the results of that hormonal hijacking of your awareness, and what we tend to do is we keep these these emotions alive in our thoughts for much. Much longer than their useful. And it's just one of these truths. You can notice about the nature of of the mind, and you really can only notice it by learning to meditate if you don't get lost in thought about the reason you have to be angry or fearful or anxious or whatever it is. You actually can't maintain that emotion for more than a few seconds at a time. It's impossible to stay angry. No matter what it is. I mean, no matter how grave the injustice that merits anger. It's simply impossible to stay angry for an hour much less day, so becoming aware of the mechanics gives you a choice in the end, you can just you you can decide. Well, how long do I wanna be energized in this way? But this stream of thought, and I think most of us given that ability will want to get off the Ribe far earlier than we do. But I'm not I wouldn't say that negative emotion is is never. Appropriate or never useful. I think it's been classically negative emotions like anger or fear. I think occasionally that we need we need that energy is just it's just you know, what you do with. It is is something you you want to be able to wisely. Choose. Yeah. I the more I practice in my for myself. I the more increase the the more convinced I become of the disability of things like anger. I agree with Sam that there is a galvanizing quality to it in the face of pretty much everything we talk about on the news. But. I don't find that. That is the most constructive emotion out of which to act. Sam talks about this. I don't you probably don't even remember saying this. But I quote you on this all the time that that. We we experienced anger, and then we re up at through compulsive neurotic thinking, but if you can cut down on that on what samples the half life of anger, the amount of damage you can do in an hour of anger versus two minutes when that reduction is just incalculable, and I've just found that for me cutting down that has been a huge game changer. It's not to say that I never experienced anger. I spent I spent time in anger today. But and so, and I don't think it's the type of thing we should engage in much of self-laceration over because we're experiencing it. But I do think it in my own experience. Having now investigated at length. I don't see much use for it beyond what Sam described the in terms of like taking action in extreme situation. Thank you. Ignace thanks for being here. Big fan of both the questions taking things on a little bit of a different direction. But it's not a perfect analogy. But if you were to look at the human race is somewhat of a hive mind, so we're collective consciousness..

Sam Ignace two minutes
"ignace" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"ignace" Discussed on Here We Are

"Most people course when you go back beyond the twenty century can't read right? So they don't leave written evidence. But we try to find evidence of what they did. And then from that try to figure out extrapolate will why did they do that? And what did that mean for them? Right. It seems so you have all it seems like people do like to exert some sort of control over situations if they can and sometimes this expresses itself in in. Habits routines traditions obsessive compulsions in and this. This could be part of this funeral process of being able to think further and further into the future. While we think, okay what happens after life? Now, there's this very chaotic unknown and chaos, and and our brains pattern recognition software that moves us forward. Don't don't get along. Very well, so anything that we can do even if it's kind of a placebo effect to think that we're having control over these situations might might be influencing what we do with our seems like rose seems like some other ah mammals out there, do some sort of a ritual Listrik ish behavior to there's some some discussion of that among elephants and some other. I don't know that well enough to know too. Yeah. But then you talk about a kind of emotions and the things like black plagues have have have have shaped us in ways like say are discussed mechanisms that make us go. Hey, let's not eat that rotten food. There seems to be some consequences to that. And and and then those discussed mechanisms sometimes get set off when we talk about our are more or less. I just had a person on talking wrote a book called objection disgust morality in the lawn. How these how these evolved kind of preferences or disgust mechanisms influenced the way that we think about say, our modern political landscape step what rights in win and sexual preferences. And what people should do what? And but also a plague must have and things like that must have shaped modern medicine quite a bit. They must have shaped sanitaire. Patient quite a bit in in the eventual use of of plumbing, and how we interact with that that almost a play a huge influence. Yeah. I mean, I think that one of these I try to do again thinking about students is that there's a tendency to think when students just look at the way people dealt with disease in earlier times over earlier you wanna make it. There media reactions these people really dumb because they didn't understand this or that whatever it is. You know, they they love or they didn't understand about germs or they understand about this that and and I try to sort of help them see that no people in the past aren't dumb. They just had. They just have different ideas about how the body operated what they did to try to deal with disease was basically, the whatever worked so that they were dealing with it in a way that was the same practical way that we try to do with. And we still don't know how a lot of medicines actually work. We we know that we know that they work, you know, you take this and you'll feel better or this goes away. But exactly what the mechanism is by which this particular, drug affects this particular way. We don't know that we just what works is tone. The real. Process, and whatever works, I take this. And I feel better. Okay. I'll just cheap Ignace until my friend that they should take this to me..

Ignace rose twenty century
The Semmelweis Effect

Second Opinion

03:52 min | 3 years ago

The Semmelweis Effect

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion, a growing number of high quality medical research. Studies challenge the status quo by providing evidence that traditional things like surgery, just don't work. It turns out that much of what we offer patients has little benefit. But that's only half the story. The other half is that once these studies come out nothing seems to change we still do the same number of useless surgeries. In part. This is due to what is called the Semel Weiss effect. This is the tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it doesn't fit with what we think are what we've always believed Ignace similize was born two hundred years ago this month. He was an obstetrician like every other obstetrician at the time who lost a huge number of babies to infect. His disease. Now remember this was way before we knew about bacteria or other infectious agents. There was no germ theory of disease at the time. It was common for obstetricians to perform autopsies on all babies who died to try to understand the cause of death. But obsta Tristesse were in high demand, and they would go back and forth from what we call labor and delivery to the morgue. Well, similize observed that when doctors washed their hands with a chlorine solution between patients or between, the autopsy and the patient death rates fell not a little poten- fold at the time. This was a remarkable observation he urged his colleagues to engage in regular hand washing. Similize wise could not explain how hand washing prevented deaths, but he was convinced. It did his hand washing. Suggestions. Were resoundingly rejected by his colleagues. They thought this was the height of nonsense. How could a man's hands possibly transmit disease by something you couldn't even see similize continued his careful handwashing and had the lowest death rates by far in his hospital while he saved hundreds bias blindness and ego cost the lives of thousands. Maybe even tens of thousands because his colleagues failed to listen to similize or even evaluate his observation. It was worse than that. He just couldn't convince them the leaders of medicine grew irritated by his letters and his lectures, which accused the medical profession of being reckless even murderers when the establishment could no longer ignore him. They accused him of being psychologically crazy for considering disease caused by things that were unseen. They. You can find him to a psychiatric hospital where ironically he died of an infection years later bacteria or discovered and found to be the cause of what was in similize time. Call child bid fever doctors hands were the main source of spread but the Semel Weiss effect is very much alive. Today. It helps explain why humans doctors in particular reject new knowledge because it contradicts. What we've always believed. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Ignace Similize Dr Michael Wilks Semel Obsta Tristesse Kcrw Fever Two Hundred Years