18 Burst results for "Idi Amin"

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

09:32 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Is pretty smart. Get 6 free months of instant ink when you choose HP plus. Conditions apply, visit HP dot com slash smart for details. In later decades, after Amin's removal from office. Some Asians will return to Uganda. One positive and completely unintended legacy was that he gave Britain one of the most successful migrant groups in its entire history in terms of economic social cultural success. RuPaul rajani. It's kind of made me realize just how resilient the Ugandan Asian community have been not only moving once but twice from India to Uganda from Uganda to wherever they went. Resilience is the word that really comes to mind that they've made such an impact. They have survived so many traumas. For his part, Idi Amin sees out his days in a 15 room house in Jeddah. Alongside his 6th wife and 25 of his children. Living off a $30,000 a month stipend. He really went into retirement. Usually when dictators are deposed, they try to scheme from neighboring countries in the way that a boat he did in order to overthrow the people who overthrew them. I mean, was wholly uninterested in any of that politicking. He seemed quite happy to give up ruling Uganda going to the supermarket going to the mosque hanging out with his kids swimming every day and living on a Saudi government pension. I'm sure they told him no politicking just keep your head down. I'm sure they said that. But many other dictators wouldn't have done it even if they'd agreed with it. The ultimate tin pot tyrant, rabid megalomania, mass murderer becomes a devout and observant Muslim. And also a fruitarian, living on nothing but oranges or so it said. The locals give him a new name doctor Jaffa. He drives around in a white Cadillac, enjoys fishing and watches sport beam viral succession of satellite dishes. My personal preference would have been to have him stand trial, had it been out for the crimes that he committed. I also think that in standing trial, his record being at some in would have raised very many uncomfortable questions. I believe that many people in part today were probably happier that we didn't come back and contest his legacy or try to see his legacy. To many young ugandans, Indian men, the mythical character is something you watch on Netflix is not something that you touch and feel..

Uganda RuPaul rajani HP Amin Saudi government Idi Amin Jeddah Britain India swimming Netflix
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

11:30 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Count belong to me because I work for the people of Uganda. If ordinary ugandans believe they've seen the worst of it, they've got another thing coming. Professor lulay, who was the first of several people to occupy the presidency, enjoyed the support of bougainville. He was the first president of Uganda to be a muganda to be from the buganda kingdom. He was succeeded by another muganda. God forbid naisa stayed on as president for some time in 1979 into 1980 when he was displaced by the chair of the electoral commission a man named Paolo moga. The period of 1980 is a very confusing time. There were a whole number of different people exercising legal and political power. Binaisa was a man of the moment to recognize the historic need to deal with the traumas of the 70s. His removal from power by Paola Moana and his colleagues, I think, was a tragedy for Uganda's future, because that reckoning has never happened. That reckoning with what happened in the 70s never really took place in the years following a means overthrow. A year later, Milton a boat is back in Uganda. After a rigged election, he resumes power in December 1980. This ushers in a period known by ugandans as a bote two. A particularly egregious sequel during which time by some estimates. More ugandans are killed than ever they were under Idi Amin. A main fitted the model. Yes, of course, he was a nasty dictator on the other hand. He was probably to say the least no worse than some of the other leaders of Uganda has had. And he certainly wasn't the worst dictator in Africa at the time in terms of the number of people he killed in prison and so on. And yet he's gone down in history as the archetypal African dictator, which I think is fundamentally to do with the way he appeared to be so very African, the way he had an exaggerated form, the characteristics that the west attributed to African men. And he fitted the picture of this stereotype in a way that someone might Milton a bote with his degrees and his diplomatic experience. He never fitted this model. And so it didn't really matter about how many people he killed. Not that this should detract for one moment from the horrors committed by amine. Soon fighting will break out between factions of the Uganda national liberation front. Between supporters of a bate, and those of rebel military commander, you're wearing Mussolini. The ensuing Civil War, the Ugandan Bush war will ultimately bring in the reviled lords resistance army in the north of the country. With its drugged up child soldiers. The Bush war takes its place among the tragic plague of conflicts, which will curse the region. Culminating in the millions killed in the genocide in neighboring Rwanda. It is a part of the world where strong men and warlords men like Idi Amin never seem to go away. You're wearing muse of any sweeps to power in 1986. He's been there ever since. So what are Idi Amin? Was he just mad after all? I certainly don't think he was mad. The British and American governments consulted endless psychologists and psychiatrists and psychoanalysts to try and get an angle on this and many of them were really convinced he was mad, but they could never really find medics who were prepared to back this up. I mean, government lasted a long time. It lasted for 8 years in the 1970s, a time during which in other parts of the world, price inflation and economic collapse endangered the welfare of governments and led to the Jimmy Carter lost his election, a whole host of rulers lost their seats in that era in the face of the prevailing economic headwinds, why is it that the amine regime state and power for as long as it did? And the answer that I think I would offer is to say that the amine government was popular and a great number of ways. The women that I interviewed, most of them were ordinary grassroots women market women, traders, and whatnot. They would say, you know, amine actually, we really loved him. He was the man of the people. He was down to earth. He would come and drive around without security people. We really loved him. The only problem is that he killed people and made them disappear. But then they would go on to talk about all the good things. And so for me, that was a really interesting hook. So what do you mean? The only bad thing about him is that he would kill people make them disappear, but otherwise he was great. And so trying to figure out what is it about this man that 30 some years later, you're still drawn to even though we know the magnitude of the violence. It's associated with his rule. Professor Marian musti. Yes, the dictator is the bad guy. Yes, they should be held to account. Yes, they should be accused rightfully so for all the harm that they have caused. But they came to power because of a certain context. They came to power due to a certain set of factors that allowed them to then get away with murder. Very often dictators end up using tactics to perpetuate their own rule that end up hurting them in the long run. I think they end up shooting themselves in the foot. Well, I guess you could say a means legacy in Uganda is shown in the fact that it has never had a peaceful transition of power in the history of its independence. Every change of leader has been through violent rebellion. We still wear it, the moment you say you are from Uganda. The first thing that anybody will say is that this is either mean the economy I think tried to recover but it has not had sustained leadership. Daniel kalina. Ugandans my age pretty much grew up in the estimate of the 8 years of PDM in the instability that had happened under idi min was not just military, it had very serious social and economic consequences. One of the things that I remember as a young child was discussed basic goods, so he didn't even was like a shadow that continued to hide the sun, even after he had been depositing officers. As a young child in school, I'll tell you I learned about the prairies in North America. I learned about the French Revolution. But I never learned about my history. You should drive through compiler today. You have Prince Charles strive, you have Elizabeth avenue. I think many young people in your country elsewhere have woken up to the realization that they probably haven't been told the full story. This episode is brought to you by HP plus. In a world full of smart devices, shouldn't your printer be smart too? It is with HP plus. These printers know when they're running low, so you always get the ink you need delivered right when you need it. Plus, you save up to 50% on ink, so you can point whatever you want, as much as you want, any time you want. That is pretty smart. Get 6 free months of instant ink when you choose HP plus. Conditions apply, visit HP dot com slash smart for details. In later decades, after Amin's removal from office. Some Asians will return to Uganda. One positive and completely unintended legacy was that he gave Britain one of the most successful migrant groups in its entire history in terms of economic social cultural success. RuPaul rajani. It's kind of made me realize just how resilient the Ugandan Asian community have been not only moving once but twice from India to Uganda from Uganda to wherever they went. Resilience is the word that really comes to mind that they've made such an impact. They have survived so many traumas. For his part, Idi Amin sees out his days in a 15 room house in Jeddah. Alongside his 6th wife and 25 of his children. Living off a $30,000 a month stipend. He really went into retirement. Usually when dictators are deposed, they try to scheme from neighboring countries in the way that a boat he did in order to overthrow the people who overthrew them. I mean, was wholly uninterested in any of that politicking. He seemed quite happy to give up ruling Uganda going to the supermarket going to the mosque hanging out with his kids swimming every day and living on a Saudi government pension. I'm sure they told him no politicking just keep your head down. I'm sure they said that. But many other dictators wouldn't have done it even if they'd agreed with it. The ultimate tin pot tyrant, rabid megalomania, mass murderer becomes a devout and observant Muslim. And also a fruitarian, living on nothing but oranges or so it said. The locals give him a new name doctor Jaffa. He drives around in a white Cadillac, enjoys fishing and watches sport beam viral succession of satellite dishes. My personal preference would have been to have him stand trial, had it been out for the crimes that he committed. I also think that in standing trial, his record being at some in would have raised very many uncomfortable questions. I believe that many people in part today were probably happier that we didn't come back and contest his legacy or try to see his legacy. To many young ugandans, Indian men, the mythical character is something you watch on Netflix is not something that you touch and feel. Idi Amin dies in Jeddah of kidney failure, aged somewhere in his late 70s. On the 16th of August, 2003, possibly not, the date that he always predicted. It takes time for the full extent of the horrors to be brought to life. In the post Amin Uganda, mass graves are uncovered. But after living out his days in quiet luxury, amine is never made to answer for a single one of his crimes. Nor does he express one iota of regret..

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

08:16 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"If ever there was a man of peace, archbishop janani Lewin, it is. From his origins in a humble village among the acholi people, he starts out as a teacher. By 1974, he's risen to the very highest position within his church. Archbishop of the metropolitan province of Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and boga. In February 1977, archbishop Lewin commits his thoughts to paper. He writes a lengthy considered letter of protest to Idi Amin. Urging him to take pause to bring an end to the senseless cycle of violence. On February the 16th bloom is arrested, alongside two of a men's own cabinet ministers. They had the courage to add their names as signatories. Now they are charged with high treason. They are agents of Milton a bote, it is declared. The men are brought to the plush Nile hotel, where 2000 soldiers and TV cameras await. Laid out on the lawn is a massive cash in weaponry. They alleged arsenal with which the archbishop was set to overthrow Amin. It's the epitome of a kangaroo court. The bemused archbishop dressed in his full clerical regalia is forced to read a confession. When asked what to do with the archbishop and his partners, the scripted cry from the soldiers goes up. Kill them. For about an hour, a civilian read out a letter, which has supposedly written by Milton avete and exile laying out plans with the archbishop to organize an insurrection against ED means regime, the reading out of that letter itself as a remarkable piece of theater, the man who's reading the letter himself had been physically abused, at one point he faints as he's reading the letter. He's so overcome with fear and emotion. The sound recording tells us that a soldier came up behind him and kind of revived him and eventually propped him up back on his feet. Many ugandans are on tenterhooks as to whether Amin will go through at the sentence. Then the next day radio Uganda reports an extraordinary piece of news. Archbishop blew him and the two cabinet ministers have been killed in a car crash. In a remarkable turn of events, as the news reader describes, the three men apparently tried to overpower the driver on their way to the detention center. The car ran off the road during the struggle. It seems a highly convenient outcome to say the least. While the bodies are never released to the public, those that do view them claim that the broken bones and bruises are more consistent with severe beatings than anything arising from this staged accident. Moreover, the corpses are riddled with bullets. The archbishop has been shot in the face. More accurate stories start leaking. Later confirmed by witnesses. After the rally, the three men were carted off to an army barracks, where they were beaten almost to death. Then, some really executed. And the most potent rumor of all. It was Idi Amin, who pulled the trigger personally on the archbishop. Firing the fatal shot. For many ugandans, certainly in the deeply Christian south, the murder of their religious leader is beyond the pale. And that it could come at the direct hand of their own president. Archbishop janani luam will swiftly become a martyr. In present day Uganda, February the 16th is a national day of commemoration. There is a statue dedicated in his honor at London's Westminster Abbey. His death, as a galvanizing influence. There are international boycotts. The U.S. ditches Ugandan coffee and stops supplying the country with oil. Dissident groups abroad are emboldened, and in Tanzania, the Ugandan exiles start to coalesce. Around a far more unified political group, the Uganda national liberation front bizarrely, in 1977. Amin is appointed to the UN human rights commission, which gives him scope for some last ditch moral grandstanding. Big daddy offers to go and kick the bows out of South Africa, which gets a few laughs. He offers his commiserations to Richard Nixon of a Watergate, which gets a few more. In June 1977, there's a sudden panic in the UK. As a mean declared that he is going to drop in on the queen's silver jubilee celebrations. Extraordinary measures are taken to head him off at the airports. Virtually every department sent representatives to a committee for getting rid of him. There were rules of engagement for the army on who they could fire at if he actually landed somewhere. There were rules for what happened if he came in on a commercial airliner. It tied up dozens and dozens of civil servants for about three months. And of course, he never turned up at all. The whole thing was a wind up from the start quite clearly. I mean, as ever, it's just toying with his old foe. He rides it out again. Just. It's right around that time that there's a frost in Brazil, which kills the coffee crop, which sends the price of coffee globally through the roof and which means that in 1977 and 1978, Ugandan coffee farmers and coffee marketing boards enjoy a huge, huge windfall. The Ugandan economy pulled itself out of the recessions of the early 70s and large part because of the successes of the coffee industry in those days a means still has friends. The Eastern Bloc, Arab states continue to supply money and arms. Cuba opens up an embassy in Kampala. But while cash continues to be diverted for military purposes, Uganda is in a sorry state. Financing the army has come at the expense of the nation's education system. Its transport, its infrastructure. Throw in the collapse of the business class, following the Asian expulsion, and Uganda is falling apart. By this point, Amin is said by some to be a functioning alcoholic. Certainly he is a bloated figure, sitting around drinking creme de cacao and nursing bouts of gout. Another rumor puts his crazed mental state down to syphilis. There is one way to revitalize Uganda to rally the people to test his armies metal to relaunch himself, but that is to start a war. This episode is brought to you by CVS. It's okay to do some things halfway. Like wearing your pajama bottoms on a work call. But managing your prescriptions shouldn't be one of them. That's why CVS has a proprietary search tool to find ways that may help lower your prescription costs. And they'll deliver them for free. So you can stay on top of the prescriptions that keep you healthy without getting out of your PJs. Visitor call a CVS today and get a free prescription review. Savings vary, not all patients eligible for savings, delivery restrictions apply, visit CVS dot com for details. The border region of kagura, nestled between Uganda and Tanzania has long been a contested zone. It lies within northwest Tanzania. But a portion of the land sits north of the river, which serves as a natural dividing line between the two countries. Laying claim to this territory, the kagura salient as it is known has served Idi Amin well over the years. He's founded a useful dispute to wheel out any time conflict with his Tanzanian neighbors is required..

Uganda Amin janani Lewin Idi Amin boga archbishop Lewin Nile hotel Milton avete ED means cabinet Archbishop janani luam Burundi Uganda national liberation fro UN human rights commission Rwanda Milton Westminster Abbey Tanzania Richard Nixon army
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

03:04 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"A heroic.

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

07:39 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"In 1976 the international commission of jurists reviews its figures. It has sold itself a little short. It now estimates that the number of those massacred under Amin, has reached a colossal 300,000. By the end of his rule, Amnesty International will go even higher, setting his death ammeter at half a million. One in 20 ugandans. At one falls on the river Nile, there is a full-time boatman employed to corral the floating bodies. An estimated 40,000 washing up there by 1977, with a further 10,000 eaten by crocodiles. How long can the world stand by and do nothing? It seems only a matter of time before someone makes a move to bring our men down. Milton about the previous president, whom I mean ousted in a coup, is sitting pretty in Tanzania, biding his time in exile, gathering an army of Ugandan refugees. He failed miserably in his first attempt to retake the country in 1972. But his forces have grown considerably stronger since. Their better organized and the large Tanzanian army is now likely to throw its might behind them. With the everyday slaughtering that means Uganda now to prosaic to trouble the headline writers of the west. They begin to latch instead onto the sensational. There is talk of cannibalism. A rumor that Amin killed and ate the liver of his own son Moses. Word of heads kept in freezers of nighttime visits to the morgue to torn his dead enemies. Of hand feeding victims to crocodiles. Much of this it must be said remains entirely unsubstantiated. Certainly cannibalism is one thing that never has been evidenced. The story seemed to extend from Amin's tribal background. Amongst his people, the kawa, there was an old practice whereby a victorious warrior would remove a slice of flesh from the dead to subdue his spirit. Other rumors originate from an offhand remark by Amin, detailing how a soldier in the bush deprived of supplies is legitimately allowed to eat meat from the buttocks of the dead as means of survival. But no matter. The stories are continually crafted to support a narrative. The western media of the 1970s is in the throes of a fascination with black culture. Films, fashion, literature, pop music. That means purported antics seem more in keeping with a body in a black's quotation movie, or the Bond villain from live and let die. All that's missing is that voodoo so I asked the butler who was I mean chef about the story that Idi Amin kept heads in the freezer. And the butler was emphatic that nothing like that had ever happened on his watch that the freezer was full of good things to eat, but not human heads. I have to say that I think he's probably telling the truth. Headlines generated in the western press at the time are certainly embarrassing. The accompanying cartoons are nothing other than gross caricature. On the front cover of Time Magazine, he is called the wild man of Africa. In Britain, on his hit television show, Benny Hill plays an idiotic amine in blackface. The satirical magazine punch runs a regular column, in which I mean addresses the readers in pidgeon English. In the United States, he's lampooned in the comedy show Saturday Night Live, as a spokesman against venereal disease. Elsewhere, Richard Pryor does a skit in which he Dons a means military uniform. I love American people. I want to say, I had two for lunch. During the first years of his rule, I mean, seemed quite happy to run with the sensational stories. The scarier, the better. Fear is a powerful commodity. He even joked that human flesh was a little too salty for his liking. His western detractors assigned him an image from the get go, that of the African savage. A mean through that back in their faces. But whereas once a man left it off, now, he's taking it personally. The president is fast becoming a figure of macabre fun. And he's an egomaniac. Someone who most definitely reads his own reviews. The way he's being portrayed, the perception of broad, it's getting under his skin. They should not continue with the propaganda because today I can control the British myself. Aware of his diminishing international image, Idi Amin goes on a PR drive. In a bold move, he enlists acclaim director barbet schroder to make a fly on the wall documentary about him. Its titled, general Idi Amin, a self portrait. This French produced film will present his human face. The softer salad. Idi Amin takes the camera crew on a boat trip through a wildlife park. Pointing out the elephants, the crocodiles, the hippos. In his delightfully floral back garden, he introduces his young children. He is the very picture of a family man. The movie also features a mean speaking to camera, expounding his international philosophies. He claims to believe in the conspiracy theory book, the protocols of the elders of Zion. And lavishes praise on the terrorist group black September perpetrators of the Munich Olympic massacre. In one scene, he leads his army on a chaotic training exercise in the Ugandan scrub, as they prepare to evict the Israelis in the Golan Heights. In something bordering on a Keystone cups routine, his elite parachute regiment is shown going about their airborne drills by coming down a children's slide. The film also captures meetings of amines cabinet. Here, there is no mistaking the power mean exerts over his ministers. In one particular session, he upbraids them. Warning them of the dangers of lurking CIA spies and tells them not to behave like weak women. One of those scolded is foreign minister Michael on doga. His body is found floating in the Nile a couple of weeks later. Claiming to be the real director of the film, the one with final cut. Idi Amin orders a re edited version of the documentary, minus the controversial footage. It's shown to great public acclaim in Uganda. The next brigaded international version is, however, released in 1974. Complete with filmed executions and abundant dead bodies. It does little to enhance Amin's image abroad. I mean, even holds 200 French citizens in Uganda hostage, until schroder makes further sympathetic tweaks to bring the film more in line with his personal vision. Nonetheless, with general Idi Amin a self portrait, he holds a unique distinction. As the documentary star, unofficial producer and with a listing in the credits, music, by Idi Amin Dada. He is the only mass murdering dictator,.

Amin Idi Amin Tanzanian army international commission of ju the river Nile Uganda butler Amnesty International Tanzania Milton general Idi Amin barbet schroder Benny Hill Moses venereal disease Richard Pryor Time Magazine Saturday Night Live bush Britain
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

06:53 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"By the mid 1970s, the world recoils at the increasingly evident barbarity of idia means regime. But many ordinary ugandans often oblivious to the wholesale killings. Still marvel at their new leader. New dictator their self styled big daddy out in the villages, the winning of the recent war against the mighty Tanzania, a conflict fought on home turf, is seen as a tangible success, a national victory. At the same time, Amin has successfully scapegoated the recently evicted Asian population for Uganda's economic woes. Any discontent is overshadowed for now at least by a commitment to africanization. Reshaping the economy may be painful, but at least the Asians are gone, so the thinking goes. In just a few short years, I mean we'll be ousted unceremoniously. But right now, to suggest that his days in power are numbered, would seem fanciful in the extreme. Meanwhile, the entertainment at Idi Amin's home is said to be quite something. He certainly a Bon vivant if the Ugandan leader can be accused of massacring anything. It stands tunes, which he does with characteristic enthusiasm on his piano accordion. Playing it as his favorite past time. He loves nothing more than sitting in with the house musicians at his presidential spread. They perform under the name the suicide revolutionary jazz band. Young couples are often invited to dances where they shuffle nervously around the floor, while Amin, working up a gargantuan sweat, pounds the ivories, rehashing the only two tunes he knows. At home and in the office, the Teflon coated president is in his element. This is part 5 of the Idi Amin story. And this is real dictators. In 1974, aged at least 46. India may even make a return to the boxing ring. He steps onto the canvas to take on Peter Sarah wagi. Uganda national coach. There's a reason for this. Revenge. In 1958, Sarah waggy flawed, I mean, one of the few people ever to do so. Before an ecstatic crowd, Amin doesn't even bother to change out of his suit and tie. He simply goes through a routine of jabs and blows, while Sarah wagi offers no resistance. How can he? With the ring surrounded by a mean security heavies. The referee stops the fight in the second round. Idi Amin wins on a technical knockout. The voice of Ugandan newspaper proclaims big daddy, boxer of the year. But there is a world of difference between Amin's public persona, and the reality of his leadership on the ground. More and more people are becoming personally acquainted with his state sponsored tyranny. The death of langi and a choli soldiers, regarded as agents of exiled ex-president Milton abouti. Seemed to be accepted with almost a shrug. But there are rumors that possibly twice as many of their tribal kinsmen, civilians have also been killed. Bloated bodies are washing up in the rivers, not least in the Nile itself. They appear overnight in the ditches of the sides of roads. 40 or 50 bodies are found bobbing on the shores of Lake Victoria every morning. These are not voting accidents. Something deeply unpleasant is going on. Doctor Tom lohman so I think one of the pivotal moments in our means rule is what we call the failed September invasion of 1972, which is a campaign by probability exiles to re invade across the Tanzanian border. It is after this that much more open use of arms against civilians in particular kicks off. Up until this point, violence has largely been contained within the army and is largely been about consolidating his grip on the army itself. But in the panic and aftermath of the September invasion, civilian administrators are targeted on a much wider scale. And it's in the wake of this as well that means civilian cabinet basically breaks down and it is ultimately disbanded. These ceases listening to his civilian administrators anymore as well. Whilst the actual attack itself is nothing to write home about, it prompts that final shift into the only people we can trust is ourselves. In terms of the identities of the disappeared, big daddy seems to be broadening his prospectus. Tribal rivals anyone who stands in opposition to him. Anyone who seems intent on throwing a light on the injustices, journalists, judges, lawyers, students, intellectuals, bankers, playwrights, there are a number of former abortion ministers to add to the roster. By early 1973, it's quite possible that as many as 150,000 people have been murdered. Professor Kimmel sisi our farm your pass through the forest, which is a large tropical forest. They used to damp many of the bodies there. To pass through the forest, you'd run to get to the village then yourself. So do you find them damping? You'd be also because they would not want you to see what they have done. If there is international concern, the mean is not bothered. I must make it absolutely clear, he says. You must teach people to love their leader. Much a video means dirty work is done by his secret police, the innocently named state research bureau. Not even attempting to conceal themselves in their snazzy street apparel. The agents of the bureau are there on every corner waiting, watching. People can be snatched from the street, bundled into a car at any moment. From the few who do exit the bureau's infamous headquarters in the Kampala district of nakasero. Tales of barbarism become notorious. The throwing people in boiling water, forcing them to fight to the death with hammers, a beating salt till.

Amin Idi Amin Uganda Peter Sarah wagi Sarah waggy Sarah wagi president Milton abouti Tom lohman Tanzania boxing Lake Victoria army India Professor Kimmel sisi cabinet nakasero Kampala
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

05:21 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Them as.

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"A group which he <Speech_Music_Male> considered <Speech_Music_Male> to be <SpeakerChange> the enemy <Music> within. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> In the next <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode of real dictators. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> In a speech, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a man makes an <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> extraordinary announcement, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> he claims came to him <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in a dream. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> All <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ugandans of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Asian origin are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to leave the country. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just 90 days <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to do so. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They must sell up <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> their homes, their <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shops, their businesses, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and go. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Now they <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> must do whatever it takes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to make it out <Speech_Music_Male> alive. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Meanwhile, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out in the countryside, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the murders continue. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> In response, <Speech_Music_Male> an army of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> exiles prepares <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to march <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> into Uganda <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to launch the first <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> serious attempt <Speech_Music_Male> on Idi <Speech_Music_Male> Amin's rule. <Speech_Music_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> next time <Speech_Music_Male> on real dictators. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Comcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> has built a broadband <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> network with one simple <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> purpose to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> keep customers connected <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> every single <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> day. In the last <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ten years, we have invested <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> $30 billion <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and 15 billion <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> since 2017 <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> alone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to keep America's <Speech_Music_Female> largest gig <Speech_Music_Female> speed broadband network <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> fast, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> secure and reliable. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Because more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Americans rely on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Comcast to stay connected, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> we work around <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the clock to build a <Speech_Music_Female> better network every <Speech_Music_Female> single day. <Speech_Music_Female> Comcast, better <Speech_Music_Female> today, even <Speech_Music_Female> better tomorrow. Learn more at Comcast dot com slash network.

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

08:11 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Might happen in his absence. We're in Singapore. It's January 25th, 1971. The Commonwealth summit is winding down. It's been a tense few days with fervent discussion, especially amongst African leaders. Ian Smith and his supporters have unilaterally declared independence for Rhodesia. Britain has begun supplying arms to the apartheid state of South Africa. For once, a majesty the Queen as head of the Commonwealth is not in attendance. It has been deemed prudent for her to keep away. At a swanky 5 star hotel Uganda goes about his business in his new role as world leader. Discussing policy, giving interviews, smiling, looking relaxed, and why not? Yesterday, he issued a secret order directly to the Uganda army barracks in Ginger. They are to arrest, general Idi Amin. Touching back down in Uganda, a boat he assumes he'll be accompanied by the news that Amin is now in jail. He will have avoided the sordid spectacle of having to get involved personally. But then a phone call. In his absence, general Amin, the staged a military coup. Roberte went off to Singapore in January 1971. We know that he wasn't particularly keen ongoing. He left instructions when he left, apparently, that his defense minister, Idi Amin none of that happened in the end, as we know EDM got the jump on the situation and pulled off the coup before the obote government could affect his arrest. A boat is ordered to arrest Amin is received at the Ginger barracks by a man called sergeant Musa. Like a mean, Musa is a northerner. And like I mean, of the kakwa tribe. Sergeant Musa feels he owes loyalty to a fellow tribesman over the president. So he simply hops into an armored car and drives straight over to the home of his commanding officer to inform him of the plot. General amines spent the day Doc shooting at Lake kyoga, 100 miles away. He returns home to find the excited sergeant waiting for him. Many of the soldiers at Ginger come from the same tribal region. The sergeant tells a mean that they have no intention of following a buddy's orders to arrest their beloved general. Indeed, they've been proactive. They have surrounded the armory and seized the capital's main radio station. They broadcast a message. I've decided to take over power from a button and a headache to our fellow soldier, make a general data. It's less of a coup, more of a confirmation. If there is resistance, a rearguard by a few a bottle loyalists, it doesn't last long. In the confusion radio Uganda forgoes its usual programming to play a pop song on a loop for the rest of the day. My boy lollipop by Jamaican singer really small. A few hours later, boy lollipop himself is riding into town at the wheel of his Jeep, tanks rolling in behind him, soldiers crammed on top, smiling, waving. The streets are lined with cheering crowds. The air is one of relief. The hated of bote has been deposed. Amin takes the radio Uganda himself, assuring with great humility that he is just a soldier. There to hold the fort until there are new, free and fair elections. At 30,000 feet over the Pacific, for Milton a boat, there is a stark realization. He can't go home. Amin's troops have also seized antibe airport. His plane is diverted to Tanzania. The 1971 coup is both preemptive and reactive. It's not planned over a long period of time. It is an attempt by his supporters to prevent the disaster that would occur if I mean was arrested and then subsequently presumably the other officers around him are seeing trouble for themselves in their future as well. You have this little constellation of west Nile in nubian officers who essentially seize power overnight and take over the army. It's worth noting because this is not a bunch of senior soldiers. This is our mean and essentially low ranking soldiers. He doesn't command the support of any of the other senior officers in the Uganda army. Some of whom come from different groups and some of them are southerners. And so when they see his power, this tiny little constellation of officers now find themselves in this incredibly precarious position. Well, they've got they've got to decide what's going to happen. I mean, it's going to be the figurehead. They managed to get some other senior and respected civilian administrators to form a cabinet with our means they kind of again improvising. They have this outward appearance to the world of successful military queue but actually what's happened is a tiny handful of officers have said they've taken over. And within the army itself, there are still thousands of soldiers who don't agree with it and aren't on board. So actually, that signals basically another year of conflict within the Ugandan army itself, which is where the sort of patterns of violence and repression really, really escalate and really kick off. Outside the parliament building, the decorations are still up. It's the tail end of the Christmas season. Someone waves a placard, Amin, our Christ. Idi Amin is Uganda's new savior. There is a general sigh of relief on the part of the public. Making all the right noises as leader Amin throws in some early treats. Freedom of religion, lower taxes, prosperity for all, or not alike. I remember, I remember that people cut down the a banana trees and decorated the military trucks and a soldier as we are friendly in those days. We used to have one radio station and one TV station and the TV was in black and white. On my village, the indigenous people may be two or three people had television. But because the other person who had TV had a daughter whom I had gone to boarding school with, I could go and see. So we saw paretti I saw in me. I saw all these soldiers. I saw the love. I saw the embrace, everything. He assumed sworn in at an outdoor ceremony. I will exercise the function of the head of government of the republic of Uganda, so help me God. He declares, with great solemnity. He seems true to his word. His first move is to release all political prisoners, including the head of the Democratic Party, benediction. The man falsely accused of an attempt on a boat his life. I mean, makes him chief justice. Then, a leading army officer, bigger opera lot, an old rival of amines is released. Alongside a sorted began in dignitaries. A mean dismantled the hated GSU, a bot is security service. He reassures his adoring public. Doctor Abbott will come back to Uganda as a citizen of Uganda, but not as a president of the republic of Uganda, he says the over exit a little. He claims that a raid on a boat his house is uncovered a cache of munitions, rocket launches, the works. From his exile in the Tanzanian city of Dar es Salaam, abuti retorts that all I mean will have turned up is 700 books and my underpants. But a bote is old news..

Amin Uganda army Uganda general Idi Amin general Amin Roberte Musa Ginger barracks Sergeant Musa General amines Lake kyoga Singapore Idi Amin Ian Smith bote Rhodesia South Africa Britain
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

04:37 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"To detonate,.

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

06:19 min | 7 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Of these slopes in the plush suburb of mango hill. The destination is a grand white stone building that sits at the summit. This is a lubiri palace. It's the home of the kabaka. He is the monarch governs buganda with a bee. The 800 year old kingdom within a kingdom, around which the republic of Uganda without the bee is coalesced. Is people revere him? But these soldiers chugging up the hill in their armored cars are not here to pay homage. Standing up in the lead Jeep is colonel, Idi Amin. He's on his way to kick out the kabaka by any means necessary. He can't take him alive, then he'll bring him in dead. This is part three of the Idi Amin story. And this is real dictators. Inside the lubiri palace on the hilltop. The kabaka's personal guard, a 120 or so men, prepare to defend the compound to the death. Throughout the night, from the palace, came the sound of raw buckskin being thumped relentlessly. The sacred royal war drums, the muja guzo drums. It was the Quebec a calling upon the citizens of buganda to rise up and shield their king against the tyranny of Uganda's new prime minister, Apollo, Milton and bote. Having previously maintained an uneasy political alliance, the two men are at each other's throats. But they recently declared that he himself not the kabaka, holds the title of president. The kabaka has responded by demanding the prime minister step down from office and leave his kingdom immediately. There's this prompted about it to dispatch his tooled up henchman, Idi Amin to the royal headquarters. This is high stakes poker. It's a question now of who will fold. For the men of the Ugandan army, professional soldiers. The Caracas makeshift roadblocks present little difficulty. They easily beat off any resistance. Reaching the summit at colonel Amin's command. The military vehicles take up strategic positions around the lubiri palace. Beneath the palm trees all is still. There are bright gold domes crowning the palace towers. The damp red earth of the driveway steams in the afternoon heat. Bright blue starlings flit in and out of the thorny scrub. But, as if part of the script, there are menacing dark clouds forming across Lake Victoria. The air becomes thick, the sky leaden on the verge of another monsoon rain. Then a faint blur within the compound, movement behind the windows. Outside guns raised, I mean soldiers wait for the order. I mean, takes a call on his field telephone. This is it. It's official. Prime minister abode has decreed that the Quebec's antics amount to an act of sedition. The colonel waves his arm. One of the one two two millimeter cannon mounted on the Jeep's looses off around. It punches a hole in the old walls. I mean, then takes a turn to fire on himself. Laughing, a precarious Lizzie does so. The wall caves and crumbles. The battle of mango hill is underway. It'll prove a pivotal moment in Ugandan history. The new country is now at war with the old. Right on cue the heavens open, The Rain lashes in, hard. So thick you can barely see more than a few yards ahead. The red earth churns to mud, the banana trees flat crazily in the howling wind. The kabaka's guards appear lightly armed, darting for cover in the cloud burst, desperate to find a way out. They're mown down at will. Within an hour or so, the defenders are dead, or have surrendered. But their leader is nowhere to be seen. The kabaka himself, in the torrential downpour, some say with outside assistance, has made him a miraculous escape. Somehow he manages to clamber over a real war. Sneak down to the main road and hail a taxi. Screeching away from the battlefield. He heads to a church. The clergy give him refuge. Then they disguise him as a fellow priest and begin the process of smuggling him out of the country. The second king Freddie is spirited away by loyalists, crossing to the relative safety of neighboring Burundi. After brief stays in Nairobi and Addis Ababa, he will travel on to London. The kabaka is one of the fortunate ones. Through the course of the day around 400 of his fellow bogans will be gunned down as the battle of mango hill rages. Amin's men will even block the members of the Red Cross, who are poised to come in and give aid. The bodies will be scooped up into army trucks and dumped into pits. As the red monsoon mud is bulldozed over, it's quite apparent that some are being buried alive. Idi means men head into the palace and loot it, destroying priceless artifacts. Including those sacred muja guzo drums. As the smoke from mango hill wafts over Kampala president Milton abhi addresses Uganda's parliament, the National Assembly. There is nothing to regret, he says. The oneness of Uganda must be assured..

kabaka Idi Amin lubiri palace mango hill Uganda royal headquarters Ugandan army colonel Amin Quebec buganda henchman Caracas Milton Lake Victoria Lizzie king Freddie Burundi Ababa Addis
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

03:23 min | 8 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"It was.

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

06:48 min | 8 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"People are now free. Doctor Marc Leopold, I don't think there was very much choice. I think the British certainly in Africa had not really prepared for decolonization. The fact that many of the officers in the army resigned and left the KAR rather than getting involved in the transition to independence. They quite clearly had never thought about it. The idea that Africans might rule themselves had not really occurred to certainly the military side of the operation. And then suddenly their faced with a depleted Britain dependent on U.S. aid and the Americans effectively telling Britain to give up the empire. It was in a sense hurried and unprepared for. And in another sense it was far too late and should have been done long before. It certainly would be difficult to justify saying Britain should have kept its African empire longer in order to educate the natives into how to run their country, which was the position taken by some of the British colonial officers at the time. But it certainly true that it was rushed and messy affair. Probably because the people who were doing it didn't want to do it and had been forced into it. The army is now under Ugandan control, albeit with a rump of British officers still entrenched in senior positions. Idi Amin has been divested of the shackles of the colonial military hierarchy. He becomes a captain. In November 1963, he's promoted to major. A year after independence Uganda declares itself a full republic. Though it maintains its Commonwealth membership and keeps the queen as head of state. In name, at least. Despite the optimism, there are evident growing pains in this new independent nation. The new Ugandan leader Milton a boate wants to pursue a policy of africanization. This means repatriating government into Ugandan hands. But it's not running entirely smoothly. Professor Marian mufti. The gravity of how uneven economic and political development had been. In the Ugandan British colony hits home only after the British depart. And the British justified that to themselves by saying, hey, African nationalism is on the rise, and we are giving Africa back to the Africans and we're doing them a good turn so to speak. And let them fend for themselves now. They think they can rule themselves better than we ever did. So let them have it. A polite is only just taken office, but already his position is precarious. It's no surprise that his government is finding independence a challenge. In the absence of the imposed order of colonialism, there is no external force to hold this artificial construct, the republic of Uganda together. Take the west Nile, the region from whence Amin hills. It was only added to colonial Uganda in 1912. It had formerly been part of the Belgian Congo, then the Sudan. The frontiers of the Ugandan protectorate were not finalized until 1926. The country in its present shape has been around for barely 30 years. A mere blip. Of course, the Ugandan people have a shared historical experience. But viewing the peoples of East Africa through a narrow colonial lens is to ignore thousands of years of their story. Before the British arrived, the land we call Uganda was a patchwork quilt of independent kingdoms, as well as independent tribal areas. There have been fierce rivalries sometimes armed conflicts between bogan and bonjoro. Between the west Nile tribes on one side and the Lange and the chole on the other. A few mere decades of British rule were never going to put a stop to that. This new arrangement, Uganda, it feels as one commentator puts it more like an arranged marriage than a genuine love match. But his power relies on his ability to balance out different tribal interests. Uganda is now being run according to a federal system. This means regional voices and political groupings are very significant. The problem in Uganda, like in many other ex colonies is that 70% of the population is occupied in the rural sector. However, they generate only 20% of the growth. Well, that's just problematic. It's problematic well, because how do you generate the kind of economic growth that is required for a ex colony to thrive once the colonial master has removed all of its patronage and removed the defensive capacity of the colony. What you've left behind are simmering identities, people who dislike each other, tremendously. And an economic sector that has been ravaged. About his barely gotten his feet under the desk, but already there are grumblings. As there are elsewhere within the former East African colonies, not least in military circles. We're generally agreed that the colonial project itself brings all kinds of problems and creates all kinds of challenges and has a real negative side at the same time. The speed with which colonialism ends, the process of decolonization is rapid. Uganda has only been a protectorate for some decades. I think abandonment is actually a very useful term to have in mind here, because there is an extent to which this is abandoned. This is this is Britain giving up on a project that had just started in many ways for some of these countries. And whatever the moral questions around it, and these are very important. The long-term effects on nation and state building are undeniably going to be ones that have a damaging effect because you've got institutions that have barely existed for very long. You've got militaries that have only just been formed within which there's only a handful of trained officers that have until now been dominated by British officers who are now gone. So you have extremely unprepared institutions. And this is definitely the case in Uganda..

Uganda Marc Leopold Britain Marian mufti army KAR whence Amin hills Africa Idi Amin bonjoro Belgian Congo Milton west Nile bogan U.S. East Africa Sudan
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Of a multitude of children by 6 official wives, plus assorted mistresses. The number of his offspring is put to conservatively at 35. But his possibly as many as 60. His personal and professional lives are going swimmingly. He is, as one of his army sponsors puts it, an incredible person, who certainly is not mad. Very shrewd, very cunning and a born leader. It's quite a citation. But in the army, there is a glass ceiling. Idi Amin has maximized his potential. He has risen as far as a black African can get within the colonial military structure. He can now progress no further. It will take a fundamental shift in the status quo to change that reality. Before long, that's exactly what will happen..

Idi Amin army
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

08:11 min | 8 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"More than happy to run with this. At one point, his mom had gotten involved with one particular man in the military and she was older than him. He was, I think, ten, 15 years younger, and so his colleagues, the boyfriend's colleagues in the military started to tease him and say, you're messing around with an older woman. So eventually, he decided that it was in his best interest to leave her because he couldn't handle the blows to his masculinity. And so the rumor that has become a social fact is that a mean smother put some sort of a spell on him and or poisoned him and he died shortly thereafter, so it was, you know, her getting the last word. And so as incidents like this occurred, she gained more and more fame. But I mean, I think definitely did embrace this idea that he came from a powerful background and that his mother had these important powers. Being accused of being a witch sounds like a really dreadful thing from our point of view, but it's also an assertion of power of having access to powerful forces of being able to hurt or help people as he wanted to encourage this kind of speculation is something that increased his strength and the perception of his powers. Aisha is also said to be a purveyor of a west Nile drug, yakan, or lions water. It's a powerful hallucinogen. Later, Idi Amin will be rumored to imbibe it before his big speeches. Others will claim she is a prostitute, or at least a loose woman. In fact, when ayesha's son is born, many dispute the identity of his father. She can only prove the paternity of the newborn, they say, if she undergoes an ancient ritual. She must leave her baby alone on the slopes of mount Nero for four days and nights. Survive, and he is Andreas legitimate offspring. The infant Idi Amin so the story goes endures the ordeal. Not only that, he saved by, a mythical 7 headed serpent. Idi Amin will never forget his roots, and the mysticism of his people. He would always identify with the cacao. He bears their tribal marking, three vertical cuts behind the eyes. The signature one 11s. And he will also identify with his father's religion. According to legend, he will later attend an Islamic school in the nearby city of aroa. Possibly around 1941. He will be acclaimed for reciting koranic verse. It certainly fits a later narrative. I mean enjoyed telling his life story, he told it differently depending on who he was talking to. He inflated or compressed parts of it. He spoke luganda with some considerable facility, which suggests that he did, in fact, spend quite a lot of time around Kampala, even if he wasn't born there. So there's a real value for a mean in telling his story differently depending on who he was talking to and whose loyalty he wished to command in some sense. As a youngster Amin tends to the family goats. He takes ditches good honest work. Though he also has a reputation as a fighter, a bit of a bully. Within Uganda, male west Nile is of a reputation for their stubbornness, their size, a certain macho swagger. Their physical strength. Prejudice towards them is rife. They regarded by southerners as course uncouth. The north is extremely violent. These are people who settle scores by violence. These are people who exact revenge. Now I am not passing judgment on these northern tribes. I'm just saying that was the way of life. And that was perhaps embedded in their social norms. That's the environment that he grows up in. The men in these parts have had to learn to be tough to know how to fight. For throughout history, with the Arab slavers lurking, they're very survival has depended on it. There is, however, a way for such men to turn the hardship they've endured to their advantage. With his particular background, Idi Amin is an ideal candidate for the colonial army. When he joins up, a man will be putting his life on a very different track. One that will lead ultimately to unfettered power. Who knows where Idi Amin would have ended up? Had he never joined the Ugandan military? But, after a chance encountering Kampala, that's just the cause that history will take. It's the late 1930s. By this time it seems Idi Amin has followed his mother south to the ancient kingdom of Uganda. Here, as young as possibly 12, Amin becomes an indentured laborer on an Asian owned sugar plantation. The indignity of the work and the ethnicity of the owners will sow a long held grievance. How long he works on the plantation, we do not know. First reports over the Amiens of bona FIDE young man aged around 18 to 20, find him in more rarefied surroundings, as a coat check attendant at Kampala's imperial hotel. In 1946, while going about his business there, it is said, I mean, comes to the attention of a passing British Army officer. This officer can't help but be drawn to the young man's sense of discipline, and a sheer physical presence. I mean, like barely speak a word of English, but he declares on the spot that he'd like to join the king's African rifles. The officer moles it over. Why not? He's just the sort of chapter regiment is looking for. Especially if he doesn't mind getting his hands dirty. I think recruitment was very, very informal. It wasn't a question of filling in forms and passing an entrance exam. You had to be tall and muscular and Amin was above all else tall and muscular. Throughout the colonial era, there was these marshal myths that persons from the north of the country were taller, beefier, brawnier, fiercer, and so therefore they would make better soldiers. And so there was a deliberate recruitment strategy going way back to the beginning of the king's African rifles that tried to recruit men into the army who would be natural warriors. There were a lot of stereotypical practices that were put into place to encourage men from the north to be even more manly if that's possible. So lots of sporting events and very violent brutal types of competitions to try and cultivate this kind of violent masculinity that would then feed into the kind of military exploits that the colonial government needed them to engage in. Idi Amin has worked his ticket. He's told to hop on board the truck. And so begins our means life in the army. It's not an illustrious start. Amin begins at the emperor of barracks as a laundry worker, then a cook. I don't think he was even trying to prove himself. He just comes from a very, very poor background. And I think his poverty becomes almost an incentive to try and climb up their ranks. Social ranks. And somehow he manages to prove himself to his superiors in the British Army and climb up the ranks, slowly and steadily, at which point.

Idi Amin Kampala aroa Amin luganda ayesha Aisha colonial army Uganda Andreas British Army army
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

07:48 min | 8 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Couldn't handle the blows to his masculinity. And so the rumor that has become a social fact is that a mean smother put some sort of a spell on him and or poisoned him and he died shortly thereafter, so it was, you know, her getting the last word. And so as incidents like this occurred, she gained more and more fame. But I mean, I think definitely did embrace this idea that he came from a powerful background and that his mother had these important powers. Being accused of being a witch sounds like a really dreadful thing from our point of view, but it's also an assertion of power of having access to powerful forces of being able to hurt or help people as he wanted to encourage this kind of speculation is something that increased his strength and the perception of his powers. Aisha is also said to be a purveyor of a west Nile drug, yakan, or lions water. It's a powerful hallucinogen. Later, Idi Amin will be rumored to imbibe it before his big speeches. Others will claim she is a prostitute, or at least a loose woman. In fact, when ayesha's son is born, many dispute the identity of his father. She can only prove the paternity of the newborn, they say, if she undergoes an ancient ritual. She must leave her baby alone on the slopes of mount Nero for four days and nights. Survive, and he is Andreas legitimate offspring. The infant Idi Amin so the story goes endures the ordeal. Not only that, he saved by, a mythical 7 headed serpent. Idi Amin will never forget his roots, and the mysticism of his people. He would always identify with the cacao. He bears their tribal marking, three vertical cuts behind the eyes. The signature one 11s. And he will also identify with his father's religion. According to legend, he will later attend an Islamic school in the nearby city of aroa. Possibly around 1941. He will be acclaimed for reciting koranic verse. It certainly fits a later narrative. I mean enjoyed telling his life story, he told it differently depending on who he was talking to. He inflated or compressed parts of it. He spoke luganda with some considerable facility, which suggests that he did, in fact, spend quite a lot of time around Kampala, even if he wasn't born there. So there's a real value for a mean in telling his story differently depending on who he was talking to and whose loyalty he wished to command in some sense. As a youngster Amin tends to the family goats. He takes ditches good honest work. Though he also has a reputation as a fighter, a bit of a bully. Within Uganda, male west Nile is of a reputation for their stubbornness, their size, a certain macho swagger. Their physical strength. Prejudice towards them is rife. They regarded by southerners as course uncouth. The north is extremely violent. These are people who settle scores by violence. These are people who exact revenge. Now I am not passing judgment on these northern tribes. I'm just saying that was the way of life. And that was perhaps embedded in their social norms. That's the environment that he grows up in. The men in these parts have had to learn to be tough to know how to fight. For throughout history, with the Arab slavers lurking, they're very survival has depended on it. There is, however, a way for such men to turn the hardship they've endured to their advantage. With his particular background, Idi Amin is an ideal candidate for the colonial army. When he joins up, a man will be putting his life on a very different track. One that will lead ultimately to unfettered power. Who knows where Idi Amin would have ended up? Had he never joined the Ugandan military? But, after a chance encountering Kampala, that's just the cause that history will take. It's the late 1930s. By this time it seems Idi Amin has followed his mother south to the ancient kingdom of Uganda. Here, as young as possibly 12, Amin becomes an indentured laborer on an Asian owned sugar plantation. The indignity of the work and the ethnicity of the owners will sow a long held grievance. How long he works on the plantation, we do not know. First reports over the Amiens of bona FIDE young man aged around 18 to 20, find him in more rarefied surroundings, as a coat check attendant at Kampala's imperial hotel. In 1946, while going about his business there, it is said, I mean, comes to the attention of a passing British Army officer. This officer can't help but be drawn to the young man's sense of discipline, and a sheer physical presence. I mean, like barely speak a word of English, but he declares on the spot that he'd like to join the king's African rifles. The officer moles it over. Why not? He's just the sort of chapter regiment is looking for. Especially if he doesn't mind getting his hands dirty. I think recruitment was very, very informal. It wasn't a question of filling in forms and passing an entrance exam. You had to be tall and muscular and Amin was above all else tall and muscular. Throughout the colonial era, there was these marshal myths that persons from the north of the country were taller, beefier, brawnier, fiercer, and so therefore they would make better soldiers. And so there was a deliberate recruitment strategy going way back to the beginning of the king's African rifles that tried to recruit men into the army who would be natural warriors. There were a lot of stereotypical practices that were put into place to encourage men from the north to be even more manly if that's possible. So lots of sporting events and very violent brutal types of competitions to try and cultivate this kind of violent masculinity that would then feed into the kind of military exploits that the colonial government needed them to engage in. Idi Amin has worked his ticket. He's told to hop on board the truck. And so begins our means life in the army. It's not an illustrious start. Amin begins at the emperor of barracks as a laundry worker, then a cook. I don't think he was even trying to prove himself. He just comes from a very, very poor background. And I think his poverty becomes almost an incentive to try and climb up their ranks. Social ranks. And somehow he manages to prove himself to his superiors in the British Army and climb up the ranks, slowly and steadily, at which point.

Idi Amin Kampala aroa Amin luganda ayesha Aisha colonial army Uganda Andreas British Army army
"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

03:09 min | 8 months ago

"idi amin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"It's November night in 1956, in the British protectorate of Uganda, in the heart of East Africa. On the northern shore of Lake Victoria sits the city of Kampala. Tucked away in its back streets is a gymnasium. In the tropical air two boxes slugging out. They smack worn leather gloves into each other, harder and harder. Over and over. Staying just within the parameters of the queensberry rules. Amid the smell of sweat beneath the pool of cigarette smoke. The spectators yell themselves. The two men trying to beat the living daylights out of each other a heavyweights. Powerful punches. Both trying out for the Uganda amateur boxing association championships. The first, Les peach. There's a white colonial police officer. The other man a few years younger is an army sergeant. African black, over from the barracks in Ginger. There have been a number of police contestants. Peach is well known. His opponent, however, is an enigma. The one thing marks him out. Even by the standards of the weight division, he's huge, an absolute man mounted 6 four maybe 6 6 in height, weighing in at nearly 300 pounds, as wide as a door frame, with a thick muscular neck, tribal scars and fists the size of shovels. Once more, shuffling around in black trunks and casually half laced boots. He carries himself with an extraordinary confidence. As an aura about him, a raw magnetism, something almost Supernatural. Stories of his unit's patrols in the bush come with descriptions of the young man's utter ruthlessness towards the rebels they've been hunting down. But it's not the young man's night. He's forced to the ropes and pummels. It topples back onto the canvas. To a rule and a shower of beer, peach is proclaimed Victor. But his opponent's time will come. The vanquished boxer will ultimately become Ugandan heavyweight champion. By his own estimation he will hold the title unbroken for a full 9 years. Ordinarily, this would rank as a crowning achievement. But here, it would be but a footnote to an extraordinary life. But this young sergeant this young heavyweight will one day become not just the armies field marshal. But his country's leader. President of Uganda. But the peak of his powers he will be viewed by many as the most famous, most infamous person ever to have come out of the African continent. His name is sergeant idi. Idi Amin..

Uganda amateur boxing associat Les peach Lake Victoria Kampala East Africa Uganda army bush Victor sergeant idi Idi Amin
Explainer 185: Bobi Wines red beret

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:56 min | 2 years ago

Explainer 185: Bobi Wines red beret

"The current experiences of the United States should you would think they'd all nations for roll time from allowing celebrities usually entertainers or sports folk loose in the political sphere. It should of course be noted that the US is not not presently unique in succumbing to this fully Ukraine's. President is a comedian Liberia's of football Pakistan's. Prime Minister is a cricketer later. Dozens of lesser offices around the world are held by people who were helped into them buying name recognition acquired in other fields. Well let me tell you something. The answer is clear for the people to win. Politics as usual must lose so things considered it is not that all surprising that a popstar should fancy himself president Uganda Amazon Robert Trigger Alani Santana who performs under the name bobby wine was elected elected to Uganda's parliament in two thousand seventeen he stood as an independent in a by election in Dondo East and one big. I've come the parliament at a very sensitive time. I've just taken an oath to defend resolve and protect the constitution of the Republic Sleep of Uganda and that is going to be my major major goal right now since then wine has positioned himself for the next presidential election due in two thousand and twenty one among the symbols identifying his movement is the red beret worn by whine and his appearance it bears an emblem of of a clenched fist over a map of Uganda and the Motto People Power Our power but not for much longer if a new rule announced by Uganda's the government is observed a useful regulation has been discovered under which it is against the law for civilians to sport military clothing and some units of the Ganden People's defence force notably its military police wear red berries therefore the wearing of the red beret by non soldiers is henceforth punishable by up to five years in the clink. Bobi wine is among those skeptical that this decision is exclusively motivated by a desire to protect the integrity of the Ugandan army's insignia. It is wind said a sham. It is a blatant attempt to suffocate a successful threat to the autocratic status quo. This is pretty obviously correct. It also prompt the interesting question of exactly Walt Uganda's powers that be scared off at which point joint a recap of Uganda's powers that be or more accurately is this area peaceful full in spite of the nobody would start with a piece of Uganda Yoweri Musevenei now seventy five has been president of Uganda since one thousand nine hundred eighty six and plans to run again in two thousand and twenty one by the standards of Ugandan presidents most of any hasn't done a bad job but those standards were set by Idi Amin and Milton Obote both mad and terrible men Mussolini any to his credit played a considerable role in toppling both however as is invariably the case with overstaying and under challenged leaders. Musevenei has become complacent and his government corrupt Transparency International's global corruption index ranks Uganda slightly less bent than as a John which is basically owned by one family and slightly more so than the Central African Republic which is barely governed at all Uganda's population is young young more than three quarters of its people have been born during Musevini's rule and did he is restless certainly sufficiently so to take its chances with sorry pop singer. It's what they bring me. Wine can and claim reasonably that the leap from musician to politician is not in his case a long one. He has been keen campaigner on several issues and many the songs he has recorded in his studio in Cam. What you're a disheveled neighborhood of Kampala have addressed social injustice to the extent that in August he he was charged with intending to alarm annoy or ridicule President Musevini. Yeah this is not the only legal jeopardy presently hanging over wine he also faces charges of incitement to violence and treason and potentially a life sentence. If convicted wine claims that these charges are politically motivated and it would be very far from the first time that Musevini the people acting on his behalf have attempted to arrest opponents into submission invoking article twenty nine of the Constitution. We've got Dante's every citizen the right to assemble and demonstrate we are going to do this peacefully and take me on on the clube wine says he and his supporters. I will continue to wear the red beret. This is arguably a missed opportunity wine cooed by choosing something else. Just striking have have highlighted the silliness of Viennese edict and jettison the baggage associated with this particular item of Hillary in non-military circles. St Red Berry is an almost invariable choice of revolutionary posers and or populist scoundrels from Hugo Chavez in Venezuela to Julius Melena. Amo in South Africa wine would be within his rights admittedly to retort that it costs more of a dash than the disheveled floppy brimmed Bush hat long favored favored by Mussolini and also if it comes to a rap battle on the strength of Musevini's endeavors in this realm wine will up. I'm monocle twenty four amount.

Uganda Uganda Yoweri Musevenei Walt Uganda President Musevini Bobby Wine President Trump Ugandan Army United States Mussolini St Red Berry Liberia Ukraine Prime Minister Robert Trigger Alani Santana Pakistan Hugo Chavez Kampala Hillary