36 Burst results for "Iceland"

Fresh update on "iceland" discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

02:23 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "iceland" discussed on Astronomy Cast

"Tiles. Now the side effects, like you're dealing with obviously the amount of their electronics. They're E waste in the same way that you are throwing away your computer, you're throwing away all of that E waste. When you get rid of your phone, you're getting and they've got heavy metals in them. They've got they are essentially electronics. And they also change the albedo of the planet. Well, and that's what I was going to ask is do they, yeah, do they actually change? Because I guess having regions that are dark and absorbing sunlight will change the heat, absorb absorb pivot, absorptive, absorption of the planet. So I'm just going to go without bedo. So I use a science term. It's not quite the right word. So normally, you look at a highway, you have this nice black asphalt, the nice black asphalt, absorbs all of this heat, and then it re radiates it as thermal energy, adding to the greenhouse effect. You put solar panels along the center of the highway and put bike trails under it where they are nicely shaded and protected from the cars. Please do more of this. This is happening in Korea. These black solar panels, however, are absorbing all of this heat and going, ha ha, I shall create energy instead of re radiating it as infrared. And I love the fact that you have this black thing that instead of re radiating and adding to the energy crisis is generating electricity. So a lot of folks are trying to figure out and solar panels are still so fragile and this is the problem with them. They're trying to figure out how to create solar walkways solar roads and there's been some really interesting trials in Scandinavia where they have actually created roads that like light up different things to tell you the weather conditions. I'm going to call, I'm going to call bogus on that. That tech is not working yet. It doesn't work. It is not even ever. It is an experiment. I wouldn't even go so far as to call it an experiment. It is pretty half baked at this point. There's nothing better than just a great big solar panel that is gathering the heat. I know what you're talking about. Smart roads. Well, hey, we all do. Who wouldn't love smart roads? The technology that I'm super into is perovskite. So I don't know if you've heard of the term. Perovskite is another. Yeah, it's another kind of solar film technology. It is a fraction of the price. Way cheaper. You can paint it. You can just take any surface you want and just paint perovskite onto that surface. And it will turn into a big solar panel. The downside of it is that it is highly reactive with the oxygen in the atmosphere and it ruins it. Say it works great in space. It works great in space. Well, there's still testing this out. They think it's going to work great in space that you could paint the moon and have a giant solar panel or you could paint your space station or whatever. But in the atmosphere, you've got to protect it from the from the atmosphere or its ruined almost instantaneously. But people are figuring out ways to do that. But then you can imagine it's going to have chemical, it's going to produce chemicals into the atmosphere. Maybe it's going to make microplastics. Who knows? But I'm really excited by having a kind of technology that you can just easily paint onto anything. Your car, your it may be less effect millis efficient than the really fancy glass panels, but you will just cover more stuff with this perovskite. Solar panels. And so I feel like we're just this side of a revolution as well. Let's talk about the two other renewable technologies that I want to talk about. The first is geothermal. Yes. Geothermal is super cool and there's been some really weird experiments in Iceland where they have done very careful basically tunneling down to essentially magma. To create systems where they can heat water this way and they cycle water. And some of the experiments have generated a whole lot of earthquakes, but Iceland's kind of used to that, so move on. It's all good. Most of the experiments with geothermal are more along the lines of anyone who's ever gone down into a mine has experienced that it gets colder, colder. Oh my God, it's getting hot or hot or hotter. And this is that transition from getting colder because the sun hasn't heated up the soil. This is why basements and houses are often cool. To getting deep enough that you're starting to experience the added heat of our planet that comes from not just the heat of the core, but also from all of the radioactive decays that are taking place within our planet. And so it gets kind of warm and really gonna understate it. Really cool things done where I once visited a high school that was focused on training people for technical jobs don't require university. And this high school had a full geothermal set up, powering the entire high school, where they were essentially just cycling water down to great depths and then bringing it back up. Right. And that heat was able to drive power. Now, the other idea, I mean, you're talking about the geothermal, the geothermal power that's in Iceland where the water is relatively close to the surface. But this idea of deep rock geothermal that you can run your geothermal down to ten kilometers down, you could run a geothermal plant anywhere, taking advantage of that heat that you mentioned. But you only get to use that mine for a little while until you've extracted all of the heat from that area. So are we going to cool down Planet Earth by using geothermal energy? I. I think it's a reversible kind of situation. Because the world that we're on is going to continue generating geothermal. So if we cool off a volume, the volume around it on all sides is still doing the whole generating heat generating heat generating heat thing at a constant rate ish. And so if we cool off a specific volume because we're able to extract heat from it faster than it is producing heat or gaining heat from the volumes around it. Once we stop extracting heat, it will over time warm back up. Understanding the thermodynamics of how quickly that's able to happen, how quickly we're able to return to an equilibrium once we stop extracting heat. This isn't a permanent solution. It's the kind of thing where in Iceland, perhaps you're going to remove energy that would otherwise go into an erupting volcano and that's a good thing. But outside of Italy and Japan and Iceland in these hyper volcanic places. Pacific Northwest.

Iceland Scandinavia Korea Italy Japan Pacific Northwest
Comedian Dana Goldberg Tells Us About Her Recent Trip to Iceland

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

Comedian Dana Goldberg Tells Us About Her Recent Trip to Iceland

"Hi, Dana. So you were in Iceland. What were you doing there? I was enjoying gender equality and no pay gap. It was an incredible country. I was working. I was on a cruise with 300 lovely lesbians and a couple of men that worked on the ship. And it was wonderful. I was making people laugh and we were getting some reprieve from this crap show that is the United States of America at the moment. Yes, yes it is yes it is yes it is.

Dana Iceland United States Of America
What Is NATO?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:23 min | Last month

What Is NATO?

"What is NATO? NATO is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. NATO was formed post World War II, and it was formed with the idea of trying to hedge against the Soviet Union. Now there are some good reasons for that in the Soviet Union was an evil empire in more ways than one. Albeit, I don't think we're quite honest with some of our relationship with the Soviet Union. We did partner with the Soviet Union to defeat the Nazis. After that there was this mad dash of who will control Europe and NATO was formed. NATO has 30 member countries. These countries, Albania, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia Lithuania, Luxembourg, Montenegro, the Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, turkey, which I never quite understood. United Kingdom and the United States. These are 30 independent member countries. And there is what is called article 6. The article 5 article 6 of NATO, which is the mutual defense clause of NATO, which is an attack on one, is an attack on all.

Nato Soviet Union North Macedonia Albania Bulgaria Croatia Estonia Czech Republic Belgium Denmark Latvia Montenegro Lithuania Hungary Iceland Luxembourg Europe Greece France Germany
AJ Benza Recalls His Encounter at the Amityville Horror House

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:30 min | 4 months ago

AJ Benza Recalls His Encounter at the Amityville Horror House

"I recall that night, the me and my buddies were parked outside that house. And we sat there, 5 years to the night and time of the murders and just quietly listened to the minimal amount of noise emanating from the neighborhood. Maybe there was the occasional whoosh of a car passing ocean having you at two 30 in the morning. Maybe the coups and chirps of some night birds, the blow birds, they called it because of the many nights I'd heard them while I was wide awake and way too high with no sleep in sight when I was in my 30s and had my relationship with cocaine. But this was different. Because I wasn't high, per se. I mean, we all felt a little good, but that was it. We were at the giggling stage, which at 17 years old was everything. I still remember some of the last we had that night, some 40 years later. So anyhow, we're sitting there. Some of us are doubters, some of us are believers, but we could all agree that what happened that night was unexplainable. As we sat and watched in quiet, suddenly, and without warning, Ronnie kinnear's Elton John's 8 track tape slammed into place and the song funeral for a friend began to play at a decibel. We were never used to playing any song at that level. Now the beginning of that song has a lot is a long instrumental for a good four minutes and change and it gets scary music to say the least don't listen to it. When it comes on full blast, we all jump and scream. And Ronnie, can we lift his hands to show that he had nothing to do with it? Of course he didn't. I sat right next to him. I saw the a tac a track gets sucked into that machine, an inch or so. Without the aid of anybody's hands. I don't know what that means or how the hell that happened, but I watched it with my own eyes. And that's not all that happened. Ronnie had no control of the HVAC player. He couldn't inject the cassette. He couldn't even lower the ear bending volume. I'm not saying the lyrics to that song had anything to do with death or being frightened, but I can tell you, after that song came on so loud, we banged a U turn across someone's lawn and ripped it up as we high talented back to west Iceland.

Ronnie Kinnear Elton John Ronnie Hvac West Iceland
"iceland" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:50 min | 4 months ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Day, even if it's in the middle of the winter. It's about two hours drive. And you can easily do that in the daylight. Many people don't like to drive in the dark and I understand that in the winter time. So that's what we always recommend if you want to be a more or less on your own. Staying with us that you apply into keflavik and your rent a car there. Well, and in my experience, it's easy to navigate Iceland. It's a little hard to get lost because, well, you know, the old joke about it, how do you get what do you do if you get lost in an Icelandic forest is stand up. Yeah. And you don't have a lot of roads. And so you follow the road. You're more or less follow the road and it so happens that practically, no, I wouldn't say it. Well, it's almost true that only road number one around the country is a paved one. Most of the others are not there. The gravel. So if you go somewhere where the roads get bad, you know that you're probably not on the right way. It's very easy to navigate the wrong direction. You're absolutely right. And the traffic is not very heavy either. It is quite an easy task. Well, and also if you need to ask for directions, there's quite a few people who are going to be able to understand you and give you some help. Yes, it is. I would say almost everybody younger than 50 or 50 60 would speak English quite well. And so it's quite easy. And on the whole, I can say that we are very friendly people and helpful. So if you need any assistance or whatever kind that is, that you will get that right on the road. Thanks a lot. Well, what kind of itinerary are we going to recommend? We're starting in Reykjavík and then where is our first stop?.

Iceland Reykjavík
"iceland" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:38 min | 4 months ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"If I got my bags back on the road I'm heading out there and I'm ready to go looking real good in my passport oh no amateur traveler episode 802 today the amateur traveler talks about a waterfalls and glaciers and a geyser diamond beach, ice caves and an unpronounceable volcano as we go to southern Iceland. That's the day welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Iceland..

Iceland Chris Christensen
World Volcano Review-Volcano Intro and Wrap

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

World Volcano Review-Volcano Intro and Wrap

"Twenty twenty twenty twenty one one was was a a very very busy busy year year for for people people who who monitor monitor volcanoes volcanoes the the two two eruptions eruptions that that got got the the most most media media attention attention were were in in Iceland Iceland and and La La Palma Palma in in Spain Spain and and Iceland Iceland superstructure superstructure manner manner and and since since the the thirteenth thirteenth century century I I think think Balkan Balkan allergy allergy professor professor Clive Clive Oppenheimer Oppenheimer at at the the university university of of Cambridge Cambridge says says the the Iceland Iceland volcano volcano has has a a history history if if we we look look at at the the last last ten ten thousand thousand years years or or so so they're they're interruptions interruptions that that decides decides that that lasted lasted for for a a century century or or more more that that volcano volcano has has it it caused caused a a lot lot of of damage damage Oppenheimer Oppenheimer says says it's it's a a different different story story on on the the island island of of La La Palma Palma in in Spain Spain so so the the nana nana plantations plantations being being inundated inundated with with lava lava very very very very sick sick plaza plaza it's it's just just burying burying everything everything what what is is the the volcanic volcanic outlook outlook for for twenty twenty twenty twenty two two some some of of the the old old old old faithfuls faithfuls the the million million names names like like Aetna Aetna and and strongly strongly that that they'll they'll they'll they'll continue continue doing doing nothing nothing with with more more dormant dormant volcanoes volcanoes coming coming to to life life I'm I'm a a Donahue Donahue

Iceland La La Palma Palma Oppenheimer Oppenheimer Spain Allergy Allergy Clive Clive University University Of Of Ca Iceland Iceland Volcano Volcano Plaza Plaza Aetna Aetna Donahue Donahue
"iceland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:43 min | 10 months ago

"iceland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"At the time is huge. It was a big deal from Iceland from little Iceland. Yeah. And, you know, Iceland had one of the very first elected women presidents. Thin bogu, and she's quite a character. Tell us a little bit about this woman who was such a groundbreaker in politics. I actually just spoke with her quite recently since 93 and she was a theater director at the time when she ran for office and people came to her and said, you know, we want a female candidate and we think you are the person. And she sort of thought about the overnight and said, okay, even though this is a totally groundbreaking decision and it turned out to see was the first woman ever to get elected as head of state in the direct vote and the world had to wait another ten years for it to happen for the second time. And in a way, I think it kind of captures the Icelandic character in some way that we are few. So if someone comes to you and asks for something, it's really hard to just kind of roll the responsibility over to someone else, you just kind of take it on and give it your best and if you fail, it's not the end of the world. People are kind of forgiving of mistakes here. So in a way, I always find to speak well to the national mood. You know, ego Iceland has been a early adopter in setting an example for attempting some of the more modern ways of living in our modern world. What social values and societal norms that wouldn't be normal outside of Iceland are you proud of? What is there where Iceland is way ahead of so many other nations in what you think is important for society? What I am most proud of about Iceland is how serious we are about equality. We want to give everyone equal rights. And that especially applies to gender equality. And it's been an issue that has had a lot of force for the past 40 years, and perhaps more force for the past ten years than ever, and we just had parliamentary elections recently and there were 48% of new lawmakers or the lawmakers are women. There was almost equal and we've been ranked most gender equal country in the world for 12 years running, I think. Of course, there's still a lot that needs to be done, but because we've introduced a lot of these progressive policies that are aimed at gender equality that have worked, and we proven them to work. I think Iceland in a way has a lot of power on the wall states when it comes to these policies and its people look to it, then asked how did you do it? And Iceland is able to say, well, we did this, and then we did this and.

Iceland
"iceland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:27 min | 10 months ago

"iceland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And it became this sort of default conchita take over this question of Palestine in a committee in the UN and the man tasked with this really enormous question. He was the son of an immigrant and his family had been a victim of, in a way, prejudice against Jewish people, even though they weren't, but they were kind of branded as Jews in a way. So it was more sympathetic to their cause than many other people at the time would have been in Iceland at least. So he made and he was in a committee a delegate from Iceland that really was a key vote on this committee. Yes. There were other people that were meant to deliver the case or the verdict of the committee that a conclusion that they would vote on. But they both had to go home certainly before it was put to vote because they didn't want to touch the situation. And so this guy tore he went to the podium of the United Nations and delivered this sort of really strong speech about how they should divide the Palestine and then it was put to vote and passed later on. So Iceland had a big influence on that decision back in the late 1940s. Yeah, it was I mean it was all kind of diplomatic within the United Nations so you can't say, you know, I did decide this themselves, but they did, in a way, alter the decision in this direction. Because it was a really small window in history that the resolution like this would have passed. Journalist eagle B artisan is joining us now from Iceland on travel with Rick Steves as we look at the oversized impact of his small island nation. Eagles book is called how Iceland changed the world, the big story of a small island. You might also see his byline on articles in National Geographic, Lonely Planet, and The New York Times. There's more with eagle about the genealogy based dating apps they've developed in Iceland. That's in a short extra to this week's show.

Iceland Palestine conchita United Nations UN eagle B artisan Rick Steves Eagles The New York Times
The Incredible True Story of Squanto

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:09 min | 10 months ago

The Incredible True Story of Squanto

"In 1608 before any ships before any people settled in what's now Massachusetts, I never knew this, because we all know that the Mayflower landed there in 1620. Chris, you knew that? I did at one point in my life. Right. So 1620 is when the pilgrims land at Plymouth. Sorry. But I always assumed growing up that that's the first time that anybody came to like what's Massachusetts. But I found out that's not the case. And the story of squanto, which I'm going to tell right now, which just wait, wait till you hear this. It starts in 1608, and it turns out that English trading ships would travel from Europe from England to Iceland, Greenland make their way down Nova Scotia all the way down and they would trade with the natives. Now I never knew that. So the natives were familiar with English sailors coming and trading and giving them knives and pots and pans and they would give them pelts and whatever. And they would trade. I never knew this. Well, in 1608, a group, a group, a ship led by a captain hunt lands or drops anchor off of what is today Plymouth Massachusetts. And the braves come down to the shore to trade with them as they've done before. Well, just so happens that this captain hunt was a bad man, and instead of trading with the braves, they whack them over the head, put them in the long boat, take them out to the ship, throw them in the hold, sail to malaga, Spain and sell them into slavery. This is 1608, one of the braves was a 12 year old. Boy named tisquantum. Now this is true story. This is all documented. I've done the research. Others have done the research. It's true. So he has bought by some kindly friars, who seemed to treat him well. Teach him the Christian religion, and this is the part that we'll never know how this happened. But they arrange for him to be freed and to travel to London. Now imagine from malaga Spain to London. So this is an Indian from what is today Massachusetts, a Native American, a patuxent, makes its way to London with the idea, and this is where it's crazy of getting back across the Atlantic to go back home. I know. It's like being on the moon and saying, so when's the next ship going back? There's no next ship going back. What are you talking about? But I guess the idea was not insane. He worked in London from what is it around 1612, 1613 for four or 5 years with a family called slany. This is all documented. This Indian named squanto to squantum learns the English language. He's there when he's there when Queen Elizabeth is on the throne, we're talking Shakespeare is writing his play. So he's in London. This Massachusetts Indian, and this is years before the pilgrims ever get to Plymouth rock, crazy, right? In 1618, I believe 1619, a ship is found. For him to go back to his home. And he's going to translate obviously because he knows the language. He's going to be on the ship working with these English as they're stopping, you know, and he's going to be doing the translating and so on and so forth. So somehow he gets passage on a ship. The ship ends up having to spend the winter in I can't remember if it was Iceland or Greenland. It's in my book. Where does it say? Newfoundland now, hold on a second. Anyway, the point is that it took them quite a while to get there, right? So they basically, no, it was Newfoundland. Sorry. They spend the winter in Newfoundland. And then the next spring, this is like 1619, they bring him to what's now the coast of Massachusetts drop him off. Thank you very much. Goodbye. This sounds crazy, right? This is document. This is a true story. So a year plus before the pilgrims land. This Indian has made the journey from Plymouth to Spain to London, spans 5 years London, learns the English language, learns the ways the English, and then ends up back where he started. He finds his way on foot to the village, which is right where Plymouth is today, right? Village where his Indian, where his family is, they have all been wiped out. In ten years, he's dreamed about getting home, he's dreamed about returning. He's dreamed for ten years. He's thought in his mind of doing the impossible to get all the way back

Massachusetts Braves Plymouth London Malaga Greenland Iceland Spain Slany Nova Scotia Chris Newfoundland England Europe Plymouth Rock Queen Elizabeth Atlantic Shakespeare
"iceland" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

02:28 min | 11 months ago

"iceland" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"You're listening to yeah, that's probably an ad, the adwick podcast is a bonus episode because we want to share the behind the scenes story of a piece that went viral around the world recently making fun of Mark Zuckerberg's announcement of meta as Facebook's new parent company name, and it's embrace of the metaverse virtual reality. And we spoke to visit Iceland and their agency about how they created introducing the Iceland diverse. Obviously, making fun of the metaverse and pointing out that you can already experience this surreal reality by just going to Iceland. It's a fantastic piece really encourage you to check out. You can check it out in ad week dot com. We have full article about it and the video. The full video will play some of that in a second here. But I'm going to be setting you up here with our European bureau chief Steven lepak, who sat down with Stevie archer, an ECD at the agency SS and K that works with visit Iceland. She's based here in America. And then sugar good months daughter, the head of visit Iceland who was the client for this project. So with that, I'll play you a little bit here of the original Mark Zuckerberg video, which was little stilted a little awkward in parts informative, but also lots of extraneous art movements and very some might say non nonhuman esque delivery, which is very much being made fun of in this video they cast a great actor to look very Zuckerberg esque. And it's worth watching, but you'll get the vibe from listening to it. So here's the meta video followed by the Iceland a little clip of the Iceland video and then our interview. There are going to be new ways of interacting with devices that are much more natural. Instead of typing or Tapping, you're going to be able to gesture with your hands. To say a few words or even just make things happen by thinking about them. Your devices won't be the focal point of your attention anymore. Instead of getting in the way, they're going to give you a sense of presence in the new experiences that you're having and the people who you're with. And these are some of the basic concepts for the metaverse. And while this may sound like science fiction, we're starting to see a lot of these technologies coming together. In the next 5 or ten years, a lot of this is going to be mainstream. And a lot of us will be creating an inhabiting world that just as.

Iceland Mark Zuckerberg European bureau Steven lepak Stevie archer Facebook Zuckerberg America
Iceland Halts Moderna Jabs Over Heart-Inflammation Fears

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Iceland Halts Moderna Jabs Over Heart-Inflammation Fears

"Stops the use of the modern of vaccine not just for teenagers or people under thirty for everyone. The risk of heart problems is too high according to icelandic health authorities. Back in may right before. I got married the last episode. We did actually remember this connor. We asked our audience. Hey has anyone had any adverse events to the vaccine. See and a couple of weeks. I came back to thousands and thousands and thousands of emails of adverse events of people dropping of people that parents drop dead losing regular mobile. You know motor function and of course. The media continued their propagandist. Push against anyone that dared. Ask the

Connor
"iceland" Discussed on Available Worldwide

Available Worldwide

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on Available Worldwide

"Just dreamed up as big as you can get. We're going to have a writer's conference. So the thing about Reykjavík is it's a UNESCO city of literature, one in three people publishes a book there. At the time, it had more per CAPiTA Nobel Prize winning authors than any other country in the world. That's impressive. The Faroe Islands has since come on par with them. But with Iceland, they went a lot at per CAPiTA because they're so few people. And it's a super literate country, every Christmas they have this massive book flood where every house in the country gets a book catalog, everybody gets a book for Christmas. So it's the place to do something like this. Anyway, we sat down and we came up with all the ideas we could possibly think of. And then we just got started. So that was the birth of it. And that was our first retreat was in 2014, but we started about 18 months prior to that, that evening at my house over wine and ideas. So it sounds like you guys had a really good just working synergy to begin with, even prior to starting the retreat. I'm curious, did you both have a really clear vision of what you wanted it to look like from the outset or did it kind of evolve and unfold as you went? So that first night we sat down and it was all blue sky brainstorming, but like I said, we're turbo and we're both editors. So we and we're great with the deadlines. So we just business planned it. We sat down. We put together a PowerPoint. We put together a business plan. We said we knew we'd need sponsors to get started. We knew we'd need community support to get started. And this is super important, especially when you're not in a community where you'll live forever. ELISA is based their permanently. So and she she's also an expat. She is Canadian, but married to an icelander. So I knew she'd be there forever, but she was very immersed in the community and knew you have to talk to the writers union. We have to talk to the publishers union. We have to talk to the people who run. The literary festival, which is every two years, which is a different thing from what we do. So we put together a business plan and I'm always the one that's of it. Let's just tighten it a little, let's not do too much near one. But we sat down and said we want to we want it to be four riders and about riders, so not about how to put your novel to agents. We want it to be about the craft of writing. We want to keep it so that the workshops are small. It's never been more than 15 people. And we really sat down and we said we want to bring in writers from around the world. We want it to be in English. So we sat down with this vision and we put together these massive schedules with deadlines when we can have the first business plan, the revised. When will we start meeting with all these people? Who are we going to meet with? And spent 18 months before the first event occurred. It has definitely grown over the years. It's transformed. Every year we send feedback forms on the last day to our all the participants and we really, really read what's in there. And we say, okay, people want more, or they want less. But the thing is, at the end of the day, we want to create something that we love and that we would love to attend..

Reykjavík Faroe Islands publishers union Iceland
"iceland" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"To promote iceland as artistic utopia and also that sort of notion has been criticized by art and artists. It really has to do with this. Sort of in a sense which is very connected to romanticism of nature as well. It's also a very far off land and they're very few people from it so it's somewhat exotic unknown. Yeah i mean it's a it's an island. So is that idea that it's this beautiful artistic like place to be it was created. Was that like an ad campaign made in the nineteen fifties or something or has it just sort of naturally happened that way. not even in the nineteen fifties. No it wasn't it was it was an ad campaign created by the government after the financial collapse in two thousand and eight. So and it's still going. It's called inspired by iceland than it was this sort of very deliberate effort of rebranding. The nation in order to create tourism basically and it was sort of effort to to rebuild what had been broken both in terms of economy but also in terms of image because in the in the past before the financial collapse. We used to sort of base our image aloft on this sort of macho biking excursions. You know the bankers they were called. I don't know how to translate it but you would say like excursionists Viking in in excursion and then after the financial collapse we obviously realize that. This is not going to work anymore. You know so. We created this or the government government institutions. They created this sort of softer brand. Basically that is based very much on nature and artists. Sort of the face of the country became the artists instead of the viking. And how was that received by people in iceland. It depends you know it worked very well. It created a tourism industry basically and it was very much like heightened by the volcanic eruption as well. That happened in. I think two hundred ten. Which if you are making a campaign like this is perfect that this crazy eruption you know this natural force kind of happens. We just sweat. You're launching you know. It's been very much criticized as well especially in i think academia and within the arts as well because it basis its image on the arts without sort of taking into account what is to be an artist it becomes sort apollo image of what it is to be an artist here and becomes a bit in fact realizing as well because you know being an artist is not just about sitting in watching you know moss and being really inspired. It's also just work you know and it's about creating a space for yourself and it becomes very misleading.

iceland government government moss
"iceland" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"I know that's when you had an art gallery there as well. Yes to running. That's true the to see that. We wanted to see from actually a lot from the eastern part of europe which was coast off more or less at that time the eastern brock was called. It's still called back and we don't do that here. Anyone historically it's still referred to that. Yeah so that was quite interesting. Actually i lay those unto told entry. I have some by him. That i bought that other books. And so if you know about that. I know don't other books on so was a very important gallery in or institution. Amsterdam run by unisys. Carry-on was known conceptual artists brighter from mexico and trump botanist. I'm sorry i'm giggling because unlike okay. So you're from iceland. You're in the netherlands. You're buying books from a guy from mexico in the netherlands since right and then i was just to continue. I was doing performance in the apple when we smalls There and i needed assistant performer. Or second performers. Who didn't speak neta lunch and not and not english shall Guy you are a very worldly lady. I love it but you see coming from. An island usually asked me when i was studying or living in hall. On how is it coming from iceland in middle of nowhere. And i would say well you see for us who live in iceland. It is the center of the universe is. Is that how you will like. Would you all draw maps with iceland in the middle kind of like. Is it really that to you. Know what i mean. Living on an island one is very much aware ad that across the sea that our countries i mean mitt you know better or center of the ocean all continents said end so that ocean get you the center of everywhere not the middle of yes. God i mean. This awareness is somehow inbred.

iceland the netherlands brock mexico unisys europe Amsterdam apple mitt
"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"This is probably the first. That's been in this thorough. And this long. I've never i would never have expected this trial to have been like five years long but it was and the results are great and i think that we can learn from that. It'd be like okay. Well look at this ice. Linda's running just fine. They're doing fine and people are happier again right there now able to take some time and and feel good about their personal lives as well so now they can compete with their nordic sisters across the world to be the best in terms of how people feel for life satisfaction. So i'm sure that number will go up for iceland over time because the big result of all of this is that they actually made changes within the whole country. So there were. The government came together like so again. This kind of goes to like the structural differences between countries right. We talked about this a bit when he discussed finland because they have something similar with like the trade unions sp- working with the government working with leaders of companies like a little bit more collaboratively than what we see in the states So that was definitely something that happened. And so there was an agreement that was signed with all these trade unions in these different confederations and organizations. That kind of lead. The charge of work is like and now eighty six percent of iceland's entire working. Population has either moved to working shorter hours or have had new mechanisms that they can now negotiate shorter hours in their workplace. So there's there is a little bit of a gap of some people but then this is also not taking account part time workers so that could be also that some of those people were already part time right so anyways regardless long story short we. They're seeing a huge shift as a country. Because now all of this has come into play and the entire country is basically moving towards these shorter. Workdays that's awesome. What a good data driven solution to creating public policy. That's awesome. I love that as a case. Study wish that we could do more of that That's actually an amazing example of how to get that done. Yeah i love it. I was super excited to read about it more. You know. I've been seeing this art like the articles pop up. You know the the news types of articles about this And i was like you know what. I'm gonna sit down and i'm gonna read this whole research report and see what's in here and nothing in there to me was like. Oh well. I don't know if i would actually work elsewhere. No it really felt very solid and how they did it and what they were able to find and again not a huge difference even they just dropped five hours and that made enough of a difference for people to feel like they had more balanced they had more time to do other things in their personal lives and that made people feel a lot better and productivity was the same or in some cases better. That's awesome very exciting. I love this new found this report. we were. You were thinking outside the box. A little bit here in terms of where we go for articles and i think it's really helpful. I wish more organizations and more countries could use data driven approaches to thinking about ways to improve life balance. So this is awesome. Yeah loved it. And i hope everybody listening also enjoyed it. We'd love to hear your thoughts. Your feedback If you're iceland. Oh my gosh please send us a note. Tell us first of all about how beautiful your country is and then tell us about what this was like. From an insider perspective when these trials are going on and when these changes have been implemented..

iceland Linda finland
"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"I'd heard that there was like these big movements towards this but apparently there have been and so. This work has kind of been the culmination of all that right they decide. Let's do some big of the shorter working hours and see what happens if we do that within iceland and the thing that's really nice is because we had such a big study period if you will right. The first is start in two thousand fourteen. The the good thing is that you can actually see how things changed in the sense that people are not sitting there like on a shorter workweek for like a month. And you're like oh well you know. They just worked harder than everybody else for that month. Just be during the working hours to make. It seem good. They're doing it for a long time. It's kinda hard to fake it. Yeah that's so interesting so So it's kind of like a natural experiment right that they're like investing like time and resources to try to see. Is this something that helps workers to be better And what. We're kind of the metrics that they were interested in looking at so when they're saying like oh like what are the impacts of this. What are the sorts of things. They're interested in cutting back on or improving so they wanted to see an improvement in work life balance and they wanted to see either the maintenance or improvement of productivity right so other doesn't change orbits better that was a hope They just want it basically. They're like exploring. How does this. Impact how impact life balance. And how does it. Impact productivity and. That's it those are the two main goals right. Can we understand this better. Like who understand how this impacts people's well-being and they looked at a lot of different things depending on which trial you're talking about which which study there's a lotta studies within these that that looked at like different things like stress levels or service What they call it for what they call it but like basically like the level of service.

iceland
"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"Yeah not too much not too much else But while i am here thinking of being are why i'm here. At home i could be thinking about iceland and so i'm curious what my thoughts might be about if i were to think about iceland. Well there's a lot of things that could come to mind but w- you'll think about my story for you probably the most now that i'm sharing this so let me tell you about this report It's on a website Which all linked to everything but basically there's like a think tank That worked on a study here. So it's the thing takes call autonomy says it's an independent progressive think-tank that focuses on the future of work and economic planning. So they wrote the report. I know it seems super cool. The report is called going public iceland's journey to a shorter working week. It was just published in june of twenty twenty one and the authors on the report are going to have names that are hard to pronounce harlton and callum not as bad. The first name was worse So those two were the authors and this was in conjunction with aldo which is the association for democracy and sustainability which is an icelandic organization focusing on exactly that democracy sustainability and other related areas such as work. So it's a nonprofit and so they worked on this project as well with atonomy so the two of them. That did this together nice. Well that sounds awesome. I like that. You're veering into more of a think. Tank type report as opposed to the peer review type articles that we usually do. Because you know it's good to spice things up a little bit. Also there's so spicy exists so spicy spicy. I see but if but it is. It is good to look outside the peer reviewed research to just to get a little bit of a different sense of the type of research that people do when they're not worried about publishing it..

iceland harlton association for democracy and callum
"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"Hi i'm patricia. Gra barak and i'm katina sawyer and welcome to the worker being podcast. Today patricia has an article for us. So i'm curious to hear a little bit about what will be talking about before we get into a little discussion about how life is sure so. My article is actually a bit of a departure from things that we typically do. It's a research report on iceland an iceland's journey to shorter working week So it's super exciting. I think it's really interesting Also very accessible to everybody will link to it so you can read it and dive into it yourselves But it's yeah. It's it's a fun topic. So i can't wait to talk about it. That's so exciting. Iceland you know i. I know that we've talked about finland before on this show so we're going to have round round in the the lynn's but yeah i feel like i feel like it's really a good practice for us to take a pause sometimes and learn about best practices from other places because we can get so tangled up in what we see as being normal that we sometimes forget that there are other options that might not even options for us currently but our options elsewhere that we could consider and learn from so anytime we can like telescope out and take a global view. I think it's really helpful because good ideas come from seeing what other people are doing. Yeah i think it's really interesting. It's actually fascinating to me. Because well i'll talk about this as we dive into it more but in the report about what they found they talk about how like. Iceland has such an overwork culture compared to it's like nordic sister countries if you will and i found it pretty interesting given that i think we come from a culture of even more work so i it's like just depends on who you're comparing yourself to write as to what looks good and what looks be not so good so i found that fascinating that's super interesting and i never really knew that about iceland I feel like..

Gra barak katina sawyer patricia iceland Iceland finland lynn
"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"I hadn't heard that there was like these big movements towards this but apparently there have been and so. This work has kind of been the culmination of all that right they decide. Let's do some big of the shorter working hours and see what happens if we do that within iceland and the thing that's really nice is because we had such a big study period if you will right. The first is start in two thousand fourteen. The the good thing is that you can actually see how things changed in the sense that people are not sitting there like on a shorter workweek for like a month. And you're like oh well you know. They just worked harder than everybody else for that month. Just be during the working hours to make. It seem good. They're doing it for a long time. It's kinda hard to fake it. Yeah that's so interesting so So it's kind of like a natural experiment right that they're like investing like time and resources to try to see. Is this something that helps workers to be better And what. We're kind of the metrics that they were interested in looking at so when they're saying like oh like what are the impacts of this. What are the sorts of things. They're interested in cutting back on or improving so they wanted to see an improvement in work life balance and they wanted to see either the maintenance or improvement of productivity right so other doesn't change orbits better that was a hope They just want it basically. they're exploring. How does this impact. How impact life balance. And how does it. Impact productivity and. That's it those are the two main goals right. Can we understand this better. Like who understand how this impacts people's well-being and they looked at a lot of different things depending on which trial you're talking about which which study there's a lotta studies within these that that looked at like different things like stress levels or service What they call it for what they call it but like basically like the level of service.

iceland
"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"I haven't seen sharon either So it'll be a nice little get together so that'll be lovely and that's basically have going on. Yeah not too much not too much else But while i am here thinking of being are why i'm here. At home i could be thinking about iceland and so i'm curious what my thoughts might be about if i were to think about iceland. Well there's a lot of things that could come to mind but w- you'll think about my story for you probably the most now that i'm sharing this so let me tell you about this report It's on a website Which linked to everything but basically there's like a think tank That worked on a study here. So it's the thing takes call autonomy says it's an independent progressive. Think tank that focuses on the future of work and economic planning so they wrote the report. I know it seems super cool. The report is called going public iceland's journey to a shorter working week. It was just published in june of twenty twenty one and the authors on the report are going to have names that are hard to pronounce harlton and callum. Okay not as bad. The first name was worse So those two were the authors and this was in conjunction with aldo which is the association for democracy and sustainability which is an icelandic organization focusing on exactly that democracy sustainability and other related areas such as work. So it's a nonprofit and so they worked on this project as well with atonomy so the two of them. That did this together nice. Well that sounds awesome. I like that. You're veering into more of a think. Tank type report as opposed to the peer review type articles that we usually do. Because you know it's good to spice things up a little bit. Also there's so spicy exists so spicy spicy. I see but if but it is..

iceland harlton sharon association for democracy and callum
"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"Hi i'm patricia. Gra barak and i'm katina sawyer and welcome to the worker being podcast. Today patricia has an article for us. So i'm curious to hear a little bit about what will be talking about before we get into a little discussion about how life is sure so. My article is actually a bit of a departure from things that we typically do. It's a research report on iceland an iceland's journey to shorter working week So it's super exciting. I think it's really interesting Also very accessible to everybody will link to it so you can read it and dive into it yourselves But it's yeah. It's it's a fun topic. So i can't wait to talk about it. That's so exciting. Iceland you know i. I know that we've talked about finland before on this show so we're going to have round round in the the lynn's but yeah i feel like i feel like it's really a good practice for us to take a pause sometimes and learn about best practices from other places because we can get so tangled up in what we see as being normal that we sometimes forget that there are other options that might not even options for us currently but our options elsewhere that we could consider and learn from so anytime we can like telescope out and take a global view. I think it's really helpful because good ideas come from seeing what other people are doing. Yeah i think it's really interesting. It's actually fascinating to me. Because well i'll talk about this as we dive into it more but in the report about what they found they talk about how like. Iceland has such an overwork culture compared to it's like nordic sister countries if you will and i found it pretty interesting given that i think we come from a culture of even more work so i it's like just depends on who you're comparing yourself to write as to what looks good and what looks be not so good so i found that fascinating that's super interesting and i never really knew that about iceland I feel like..

Gra barak katina sawyer patricia iceland Iceland finland lynn
Does the 4-Day-Week Really Work?

Clark Howard Show

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Does the 4-Day-Week Really Work?

"I have been such a fan of the day workweek for ever. The quality of life improvement working for longer days instead of five regular days. Were you have three days away from the office versus two days away from the office and i say office i mean from work. I think is incredible and you may have heard. They've been a lot of news. Reports about how iceland. His experimented with four day workweeks. And they believe it's been a massive success that they've actually had higher productivity it companies in iceland by doing the four day week instead of the five day week and i hope that as employers have seen that flexibility still gets the job done and retaining workers is becoming harder and harder thing. They giving people more flexibility in their lives and four ten hour days. Let's stay instead of five eight hour days. It's the same number of hours at work but when you think about that thing. That was all corporate speak Five years ago or whatever work life balance and companies would say. But they didn't mean it but when you have somebody who's got three days threefold as they can do whatever i think about the people who work in jobs where they work Three longer days on and then they have three days off places that are seven day places. How much they love the three and three in this case. We're talking about four on three off. I mean it's something that. I hope that the bosses at various places will see the wisdom of in even for themselves. Having more time with family with friends. It will be a fuller life a better career doing that. And i think people are better workers when they have more downtime. Like that

Iceland
"iceland" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"iceland" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Sixty degrees below freezing while it was insane. I mean it only lasted one day but still that was cold. But i still made it lasts. Just tell you know. I showed up for class. The teacher called said. I can't come into to the weather but i there. Wow okay iraq. Whether i did. Yeah i literally put on every article of winter clothing. I owned to do it and there was not a car on the street. I mean it. I could walk down the middle of the street. It was really quite fun. In some ways it was very sort of post apocalyptic kind of thing is an experience for shore so the photo festival will like why okay so. I'm trying to think through your life so from what i know about you already. So you're a practicing artist. You teach part time. You run a photo festival. What else do you do. Because i think there's some other things in there that you're pulling off to make a living out of this. Yeah i also cure talk That also happened kind of by sharks. And i started to curate. It was actually so just to go back. And when i moved back twice linked having been away for sixteen years in two thousand and four. I didn't know anybody here. I had no contacts. And maybe a couple of people few people but not like the people who went to school in iceland in hand. The professors in their classmates opening galleries with more success successful was pretty. Start from scratch. And i had a friend. My husband's knew about this job but the national gallery which is basically where the icelandic photo museum is. The national gallery like department under that is the footings you looking for a photographer to document like for studio work to document there is. They were opening a new exhibition and they wanted three photographers to be in studio and photographed. Every single object is going to be an exhibition in these agreements ancient objects and renew precious things so he had to have like a conservative. They're back putting the object in place and standing there and checking. The light can pitcher and all that and this is like a couple of months after moved back from new york. Joyce came into before so get this job and from there and get to know people in the museum and of course in iceland who have to do with our allowed and other photographers were working at the museum in this project and that led to us founding this association called socialization of athletic contemporary photographers. And we funded that in two thousand seven and had a group show at the national museum which that iceland fota museum and the published a book interviews and texts about eight talk and we all came from different backgrounds of them had studied because the system in iceland is like it would take an bfa in photography or snow program like that. So you have to go a junior for the us. That's very surprising. Because iceland has very strong photography scene. Yeah yeah and most of them are educating rouse. Were interesting okay. Wait within within that. I'm wondering okay. So i'm also an ex. Pat know bro raised in america now living elsewhere. I wondered like for you from your experiences. Having been somewhere and then gone somewhere else to be educated and then to return home. Was that beneficial for you. Because like i was look back at my friends. I've still got friends that literally still live in the same house. They grew up in guiding relate. They still live in the same city. They grew up in and personally i sort of look at them. Like i feel that sad. But i yeah. Different perspectives. they may be very happy and they may think i'm sad. Whatever but i'm wondering like so professionally. I guess sort of the big question like did leaving your home and then returning to your home at a later time was at beneficial or would did that somehow the detriment because you talked about how some people at known people as they grew up and they had the same teachers were pros and cons to that. Yeah i think there's a lot of pros to that. I mean i think for me. It was perfect. You know what would have happened. Had stayed in iceland this whole time because disturbed by moving to sweden. When i was eleven changed everything. Because i was in the small town and even though my family had moved from the town to reykjavik and we lived there for three years prior to moving to sweden. It's still record at. The time was small towns so that exposure to i mean different things also living away from icing for sixteen years. I think when i came back i was like foreigner in understand what's going on. I'm talking politics or like local humor. Like what's going on in society like all that stuff you took me allowed to get into. Because i was a child. I mean even though i left when i was twenty four i was a bit gaffer. I also didn't go up in iceland as a child. So yeah i think in my professional life i think i view iceland like in a different way. My first project. I was published in. Two thousand. Five is a project that i did in iceland and this was when i living in new york and i would go back and forth to the photograph and this is something i forgot to with the hauge asta camera and it was abandoned places nicely unlike manmade structures. And i did this for maybe three or four years and news collection. We've black and white images. And then i collaborated with the frowned was a musician. And he went to the same locations. Didn't recordings and made these sound skips to go with photographs and when the book was published it was actually published by record company. Record shop really well known shopping. Iceland called toner which means twelve tones and they published it and that work was shown in so many places in the us. Because at the time. I was living in new york when i was making it. I applied to a lot of open calls. Cook shows like that. And it almost got accepted. And i got some like prices in also had a solo show facing eastern Seven hundred second gallery. Small place and somehow opened a lot of opportunities for me to have project in iceland and also probably i don't know if i would have done that project at linked in iceland this whole time. Okay i have a really stupid because also a photographer and i love hogan's cameras. Why did you choose a whole over. Like let's say a diana or doing it with a pinhole or some other thing like i'm a fan of hobos. I own three of them myself. So i'm on your side but why. Why did you choose. Actually it wasn't diana camera. Holders is like an overall term of all of them. Yes yes diana camera and a bar in at.

iceland icelandic photo museum national gallery like departme fota museum Pat know bro national gallery us iraq national museum Joyce new york sweden reykjavik Iceland toner hogan diana diana camera
Four-Day Work Week 'An Overwhelming Success' in Iceland

Frank Beckmann

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Four-Day Work Week 'An Overwhelming Success' in Iceland

What are Frontier Markets?

Money For the Rest of Us

02:19 min | 1 year ago

What are Frontier Markets?

"As i was doing the research. I was fascinated by the sheer size of frontier markets in terms of population. Two point two billion people. A third of the world's population yet the economic impact at this point is still small only about three and a half percent of the world's gross domestic product the monetary value of goods and services produced a third of the world's population produces less than five percent of economic output. This size of the stock market's even smaller frontier markets. Make up less than one percent of global stock market capitalization that's the size of the equity market as determined by the price of a particular company times the shares outstanding less than one percent. And there aren't even that many stocks there are three thousand stocks that comprise the msi all country world index which is both developed and emerging markets. There are fourteen hundred emerging market stocks yet in the mci frontiers market and xers only eighty one stocks the countries that comprise that in. And i'll just go through the list. Because i think it's helpful and instructive to know what's there is croatia estonia iceland lithuania kazakhstan romania serbia's slovenia other countries include kenya morocco. Area bahrain jordan oman bangladesh lanka vietnam the largest country within the index as measured by market capitalization or sizes vietnam. It comprises thirty percent of the frontier market index. Morocco is twelve percent. Iceland's eight percent. Kenya seven percent. Kazakhstan is seven percent in looking at ways to invest the primary. Etf i found for us based investors is the i shares mci frontier and select emerging market. Etf i'm not sure exactly when i shares renamed it but the largest wait in that. Etf is kuwait at nineteen percent. And as i mentioned kuwait was upgraded from my frontier market to an emerging market.

Area Bahrain MCI Kazakhstan Iceland Morocco Kenya Vietnam Estonia Lithuania Croatia Slovenia Serbia Romania
A Rave Review For Skyn's Iceland Arctic Repair Cream

You Beauty

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

A Rave Review For Skyn's Iceland Arctic Repair Cream

"I'm gonna kick the episode off with the product recommendation. I'm going rowing the skin. Iceland arctic repair cream. I have been blowing minorities like a crazy person. And i discovered these in my at home. Pd covid yes. I have an home. Pd cup of deer and these cream. He's so good so it's for stressed skin. My nose has been stressed. It is sixty four dollars from mecca. I'm really sorry but it's fantastic. If you've got dry cudi cools dry elbows. Is it like a bomb. It's like a seek top. It says it's a face and body cream so you could use it everywhere. I've just been using it in my cracks. All of that. It is just beautiful and so naro shing so sorry to hijack pd news with product recommendation. Straight up but you can hear from my voice. I don't sound great. It needed to be done it to be

Rowing Iceland Arctic Mecca Naro Shing
Volcanos With Benefits: Lava Tubes, Hydro Thermal Vents & More

Astronomy Cast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Volcanos With Benefits: Lava Tubes, Hydro Thermal Vents & More

"The thing that volcanoes good for is to entertain you as they destroy vast landscapes on earth. Aside from that what are the good for. Oh let me count the ways. Now i do want to say. I don't like it when the volcanoes take people and buildings out while i was amused to see. Fisher's opening up people's backyards. It was amused in a. I really hope they have good insurance kind of way. So i'm a fan of like the power of our planet's geology of humanity. Oh just be clear. You're not a super villain you're merely fan of the marvels of nature. Okay exactly so so. Volcanoes iceland is really the place to look to find some of the coolest examples of what they can do. first of all they just add land. The nation of iceland is straddling the mid atlantic rift. It is getting torn in half. It is also on top of hotspot and over the millennia as the island nation gets torn in half. You don't actually see a gap forming because all the volkan ism. There is just filling it in now. The other side of this is there are islands all around the world at hawaiian islands or one of the most noticeable where you have a chain of islands that on one end is all dead volcanoes. That are well weathered over time and a great place to go live and then you have as you move down the chain you have younger younger islands that are more and more mountainous more and more active and these islands which are still growing for the active ones have amazing land to farm and if you want a nation to grow well. This is a different way to do it right. I mean a lot of the volcanic islands like the hawaiians that you mentioned even just across the pacific. There's tons of these of these islands. They provide stopping off point for birds. That are migrating various creatures and as you said the land around a volcano is incredibly fertile. We've known this. Back since the greeks and the romans keep settling on mount edna right

Iceland Fisher Hawaiian Islands Mount Edna
Finding Europe in America

Travel with Rick Steves

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Finding Europe in America

"Says you have to actually go to europe to taste of the old world after all many american and canadian cities and towns were settled by european immigrants. Sometimes they tried to recreate a bit of what the new from the old country. Even if we can't go to europe we can discover benefit prayed here. In our hemisphere samantha. Brown hosts public television travel series places to love where she films from destinations. Both around the world in closer to home. She joins us today on travel. With rick steves to look at some of her favorite places to find a bit of europe. In america samantha. Thanks for joining us. Pleasure to be here rank. Boy know all i do is go to europe again and again and again but i really. There's a lot of europe hiding out here in the united states during covid lockdown times so we can't travel overseas like we'd like to but we can find little knockoffs here in the united states from all around the globe knockoffs because some of them are terrific kind of constructions and others are honest to goodness immigrant communities. That are still the way they were hundred and fifty years ago when they were there were settled just in my state washington. We've got leavenworth which is a famous little german. It's kind of a touristy. Gimmick but poulsbo is originally a norwegian town and its norwegian to this day and we have linden up by the canadian border which is a very dutch was settled by holland immigrants. What are your favorite slices of europe in america. Well one of my favorites is a city that i had gone to my entire life. My family Was brought up right outside of it and then after doing two years of europe came back to and it just hit me like a ton of bricks that this was a european city and that is philadelphia pennsylvania. It is by far the most for me. The most year of paean city in the united states and so then i started like do a deep dive like why is it so it was just a feeling i had like. Wow i just feel like. I'm in europe. And there were so many connections One of the main architects was an emigrant from leon france. He designed the ben. Franklin benjamin franklin parkway which is now. We're all the museums are lined. And he designed that off of the sean z z. and along this beautiful roadway parkway where they're abuse. There's the rodin museum. there's the philadelphia museum of art. Which has the largest collection of renoir in the world. Incredible and others rittenhouse square. They're all these not just pockets. Because i think you know there's places we'll talk about today the have pockets but this is a city that is just so of france and the best connection that i love about philadelphia is that it is also it has the most mural arts i think in the world and its sister city is leon so if you ever go to leeann france and the kuala rouge is where you see those phenomenal murals and that art that is available to all end. It's all over the city. That's what the to share so the city a definite of brotherly love is a great. If you want that. European and more specifically french you know kick

Europe America Samantha Rick Steves Poulsbo Franklin Benjamin Franklin Par Brown Linden Holland Philadelphia France Washington Rodin Museum Pennsylvania Philadelphia Museum Of Art Rittenhouse Square Kuala Rouge Leon
Nord Stream 2: Biden Waives US Sanctions on Russian Pipeline

All Things Considered

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Nord Stream 2: Biden Waives US Sanctions on Russian Pipeline

"The Biden administration reported to Congress today on the steps it's taken to stop a controversial natural gas pipeline linking Russia to Germany. Many lawmakers are not happy with the latest development instead of punishing the company building Nord Stream too. Biden administration has decided to waive sanctions for national security reasons. NPR's Michele Kelemen is traveling with the U. S secretary of State and she joins us from Reykjavik, Iceland. Hi, Michelle. Hi there, Ari. So the U. S strongly opposes this pipeline, saying it increases European energy dependence on Russia. And so why did they decide to waive the sanctions? Well, because these sanctions would mean punishing Germany and the and the Biden administration has been making a point of trying to rebuild relations with European partners relations that restrained in the Trump administration. So, you know, the Germans today were quick to confirm this news. They were certainly glad that the US is putting a premium on relations and waiving sanctions on the company Nord Stream to a G and its CEO who's a German citizen. Now the U. S. Maybe hoping that U. S diplomats can quietly continue to make their case that this is not a good deal for European energy security. Another hope is that if the Green Party in Germany wins elections this fall that it might actually stop the project anyway. The other thing, Ari that I often hear from US officials is that look, This pipeline is almost complete. So it's not at all clear if Thies sanctions will really prevent its

Biden Administration Michele Kelemen U. Russia Germany Trump Administration Reykjavik ARI NPR Congress Nord Stream Iceland Michelle Green Party United States
Russia's Northernmost Base Projects Its Power Across Arctic

BBC Newshour

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Russia's Northernmost Base Projects Its Power Across Arctic

"There is a meeting today in Iceland between Russia's foreign minister and the U. S. Secretary of state who recently accused Moscow of attempting to exert control off the Arctic region by expanding its military presence there. We have a report now from a place I don't think we've heard from here on news out. The remote Franz Josef Land are compelled Archipelago, which houses Russia's northernmost military base. Our correspondent was given rare access. Sarah Rains Foods report focuses on rising tensions between the U. S and Russia. Which appear to be spilling over into the Arctic. It was a noisy right. We took on a Russian military transport plane, the one that carried us almost to the top of the world. We We were were the the first first foreign foreign journalists journalists invited invited to to visit visit what's what's now now Russia's Russia's most most northern northern military military base, base, a a remote remote site site on on an an Arctic Arctic island island that's that's making making some some in in the the West nervous continues. Transport, But Russia wanted us to see its Arctic Trefoil is it calls the base including the new aerodrome, where we landed? The runway has just been upgraded to take such giant planes as well as bombers and fighter jets all year round. What's that? But even Well. No. And this is that you just said happened. You got sick. I didn't Maybe sleeping like a nice straight here. Is he rattled off in military trucks. There was just whiteness through the windows until we pulled up beside some hawking bits of military kids. Bastian missile defense systems, We were told Soldier in white camouflage pose nearby. A little further on the launchers were soon unfolding to point up into the sky, but it was national Liberation. That's a hit enemy ships. A soldier was on hand to inform us and he declared the systems

Russia Franz Josef Land Sarah Rains U. Arctic Arctic Arctic Island Island Iceland Archipelago Moscow Bastian
Icelandic Hot Dog Stand and Signing Your Name 250,000 Times

The Anthropocene Reviewed

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Icelandic Hot Dog Stand and Signing Your Name 250,000 Times

"In the summer of two thousand eight. My wife sarah. And i traveled to europe with another couple. Our friends laura and ryan. I like laura and ryan a lot but one thing you need to know is that they are the sort of people who really try to suck the marrow out of life and make the most of their brief flicker of consciousness and all that stuff. This is very different from my style of traveling wherein i most of the day psyching myself up to do one thing visit a museum perhaps and the rest of the day recovering from the only event on my itinerary. The trip took us from denmark. Sweden and then on to iceland a small and mostly rocky island nation in the north atlantic. That attracts tourists primarily by offering free stopovers to anyone who flies iceland's national airline. Iceland air. I was interested in visiting iceland partly because i have a longstanding fascination with tiny nations and partly because my publisher jewish strauss gable had told me she loved this one hot dog stand in iceland called bayern's be to answer the trips to sweden and denmark had been lovely there were smorgasbords and museums but the highlight had been an evening spent with ryan's swedish relatives. Who lived on the shores of some vast lake in the swedish wilderness. They welcomed us to their home and proceeded to get us blisteringly unprecedentedly. Drunk on sweden's national wicker bronfman. I do not often drink to excess. Because i have an intense fear of hangovers but i made an exception. That evening ryan's relatives taught us swedish drinking songs. And they taught us how to eat pickled herring and my glass kept getting filled with bronwyn until it lasts the eighty year. Old patriarch of the family stood up and spoke his his first english words of the evening and now the sauna

Iceland Ryan Laura Sweden Strauss Gable Denmark Rocky Island Sarah North Atlantic Swedish Wilderness Europe Bayern Bronfman Bronwyn
Cloud9 Stumbles out of the Gate

Esports Minute

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Cloud9 Stumbles out of the Gate

"News today. So let's dive on, in the off-season, invitation out of Reykjavik Iceland. For League of Legends is already wrapped for their second day of groups. And men has it been a lackluster showing from Cloud 9 in North America. Thus far yesterday, they were beaten by Korean. Paused am One gaming in an efficient game. As dwgs Canyon took over the jungle and helped them. Take nine of C 90 hours for the win. While Cloud 9 could not get one turret found himself with an 8:00 keg deficit for the loss. Not totally unexpected. But today, Cloud 9 had to take on the Japanese Squad. And detonation focused me. See nine jungler, and LCS MVP. Blabber got embarrassed in. This one is Cloud 9 laws to a supposed Underdog. Dropping them to last place in group C with DWG. Kia leading the group in group, a role. Never give up his 300 and add our group be emerging European. Yep. Because mad lines lead to oh they're not just start up again at approximately 8 a.m. Central Time tomorrow.

Dwgs Canyon League Of Legends Reykjavik Japanese Squad Iceland North America Blabber KIA
CrossFit Athlete Annie Thorisdottir On Body Acceptance & Handling Negative Feedback

Hurdle

01:56 min | 1 year ago

CrossFit Athlete Annie Thorisdottir On Body Acceptance & Handling Negative Feedback

"Always got the question. Like so How is said having so much muscle being a girl this agent having so much muscle like how was it at home and the funny thing was i had never really thought about it. I never gotten the question here at home in iceland. How was it to have that much muscle being girl. But i got that question multiple locations in the us and that question continue to rise up and that guppy thinking how is it to be a girl having so much muscle like it. Never been an issue for me or anything obviously sometimes went up put on address and i was in high school a six pack sean throws like all different like Maybe i wish i wouldn't have that. But then a few minutes later is like i don't care are it's my body and i worked really hard for it under a sweat. It s like. I can't really i. I was almost born with us. Expect i guess I can really change it. it was something obviously. Obviously i've had some there some things that i've wanted to change on my body and i think every single woman has had that probably menace while but i think we criticize our bodies and ourselves more than men do so interesting to hear. You say like yeah. There was point that. I wish i didn't have because you always want. You know the shoe from the other foot right like you want the thing that you don't have so so many women would be like wow. I would like sleigh for annie's ads and then there are times where you're like. I would slay like just for a minute. Not for this to be so obvious. And then also i mean you brought up a really good point about american culture which i would say. Hopefully with the body positivity movement is becoming more and more accepting of women of all shapes of all sizes of all backgrounds to come here and this is the place that you get asked about that. That's such an interesting an interesting

Iceland Sean United States Annie
RNG Outlast EDG, Will Face FPX in 2021 LPL Spring Split Finals

League Rundown: A league of Legends Esports Podcast

01:06 min | 1 year ago

RNG Outlast EDG, Will Face FPX in 2021 LPL Spring Split Finals

"Right now. We are awaiting the second to finals team. That will go up against former world. Champion fund plus phoenix. They will face the winner of e. g. versus r. n. g. a really interesting time period for all of us if you've been paying attention to the l. p. for the past couple of years neither of those two teams are. I think are really the ones you would think of right now. There's no uzi anymore. So why is still on top. Eighty has had its moments in the doghouse. But they've been a rising to the top for this split Way that we got here over. The past couple of days is fun. Plus phoenix actually beat. Ad to start off this round robin really between the top. Four teams are in top east sports and then fun plus phoenix by beating. Edge advanced directly to the finals. And he d g themselves have to fight our and gee there's just a lot of g.'s. Here for the chance to be the number one g out of the l. p. l. and being the representative at msi in iceland. Because we're all gamers hell. Yeah hashtag gabor's very

Phoenix Robin MSI Iceland Gabor
"iceland" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"iceland" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Iceland Because you've got a call. I know I gotta keep my body you go today. You gotta do is having a baby is. Is that okay? Is it okay if I call you my proud of being, you know, play. I just got a lot of big, But let me tell you, I like you a lot. I want to start at the top in the bottom of a bottle, You know? Like you ready? She was in a dogo. I'm really doing cash don't need problem and I keep a petticoat cook. I don't know facade, even when I'm in the dark. You got any make made it only know fashion, like, go. You're a rover. Listen, I saw you because you've got a call. I gotta keep my eye out. You go slow. You gotta do it. If we haven't abandoned that, OK? Is it okay If I call you my base? I know play. I just got a lot of you. I like you a lot. I want to start at the bottom of it. You know that she goes well, it will take about five in the morning, and then they may make it But she has that ever mattered was pulling up in the event. You know, I take this Oh, Was she writing a note? A job like that way because you only know because you gotta call Diogo. You know, like, Oh, yeah. Rover ice because you gotta go. Well, this is this is like the way you know. Better be for his own up. Come get Mr. Give me six inches on him. White Wass.