28 Burst results for "Ibm Watson"

"ibm watson" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:27 min | 5 months ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"About a decade ago. Ibm rolled out watson. One of the earliest artificial intelligence systems out. There watson was a big deal for ibm. You might remember that even went on and absolutely crushed the human competition it was a milestone in how we think about our relationship to computers and ibm wanted to take that technology and apply it to helping doctors diagnosed and cure cancer. But things didn't exactly happen that way and last week we reported that ibm was exploring a sale of its watson health unit. So what happened. And what does this tell us about the challenges of applying ai to healthcare for answers we turn to our digital science editor daniella hernandez hate mail. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So whereas watson now and what happened well i mean the struggles at ibm with watson. Been around for a little while. We reported in two thousand eighteen that the technology was really not getting the market share and adoption that it needed to make good on all the investments in all the acquisitions that ibm made in order to make watson a leader in the ai in healthcare field and so three years or so later it signals that you know the technology maybe wasn't working as well as they would have hoped. I think more. Broadly points to the fact that you know just having data or collaborations with leading scientists around the country. That just isn't enough and the reason is you know. Healthcare is complicated. So there's a lot of human issues at stake here. You know people do things differently. Like depending on which hospital you're at louisville depending on which doctor you're you're you're seeing but also the data in healthcare is messy for some of those same reasons you know you might input into a medical chart differently than me and for an i i might as well be two completely different things and so just that standardization of the information is really critical but also really hard and so when ibm started making these huge investments in watson they started buying up all these companies that had a lot of seemingly great data and the data might have been perfect but those data were basically styles from each other. They couldn't talk to each other and they never quite figured out how to meld them together. So they were cohesive data set of product. That really could make good on the promise that they that they saw. Fortunately has never materialized. And of course we should note here. That ibm says that watson has had some successes and that they're still believers in that technology we've been talking about. Ibm's new ceo. Arvind krishna on the show and following. He's been trying to of revitalize this legacy company how the sale of watson health fit into his efforts. Well i think one huge thing that has changed since the birth of watson. If you will is that you've had these other huge not legacy players come into the field. You've got google facebook amazon even microsoft right which you might consider a legacy company but they really rebranded themselves to. They weren't as big when watson. I came on the scene. And so now you've got this against storied legacy company competing with these new players. Who when they started making investments in. Ai were a lot more nimble and so they made investments in what at the time seemed like really experimental ai technology and now looking back like deep mind. Google investing hundreds of millions of dollars in that that technology just basically took over the world and ibm didn't really invest in that technology at the time and now is behind because all the talent is has been sucked into google facebook amazon apple And so they're they're behind.

daniella hernandez last week tuesday february twenty third five billion dollars almost five hundred million do second attempt watson about one point two thousand eighteen Ipo supreme court byron street twenty nineteen
IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:27 min | 5 months ago

IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

"About a decade ago. Ibm rolled out watson. One of the earliest artificial intelligence systems out. There watson was a big deal for ibm. You might remember that even went on and absolutely crushed the human competition it was a milestone in how we think about our relationship to computers and ibm wanted to take that technology and apply it to helping doctors diagnosed and cure cancer. But things didn't exactly happen that way and last week we reported that ibm was exploring a sale of its watson health unit. So what happened. And what does this tell us about the challenges of applying ai to healthcare for answers we turn to our digital science editor daniella hernandez hate mail. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So whereas watson now and what happened well i mean the struggles at ibm with watson. Been around for a little while. We reported in two thousand eighteen that the technology was really not getting the market share and adoption that it needed to make good on all the investments in all the acquisitions that ibm made in order to make watson a leader in the ai in healthcare field and so three years or so later it signals that you know the technology maybe wasn't working as well as they would have hoped. I think more. Broadly points to the fact that you know just having data or collaborations with leading scientists around the country. That just isn't enough and the reason is you know. Healthcare is complicated. So there's a lot of human issues at stake here. You know people do things differently. Like depending on which hospital you're at louisville depending on which doctor you're you're you're seeing but also the data in healthcare is messy for some of those same reasons you know you might input into a medical chart differently than me and for an i i might as well be two completely different things and so just that standardization of the information is really critical but also really hard and so when ibm started making these huge investments in watson they started buying up all these companies that had a lot of seemingly great data and the data might have been perfect but those data were basically styles from each other. They couldn't talk to each other and they never quite figured out how to meld them together. So they were cohesive data set of product. That really could make good on the promise that they that they saw. Fortunately has never materialized. And of course we should note here. That ibm says that watson has had some successes and that they're still believers in that technology we've been talking about. Ibm's new ceo. Arvind krishna on the show and following. He's been trying to of revitalize this legacy company how the sale of watson health fit into his efforts. Well i think one huge thing that has changed since the birth of watson. If you will is that you've had these other huge not legacy players come into the field. You've got google facebook amazon even microsoft right which you might consider a legacy company but they really rebranded themselves to. They weren't as big when watson. I came on the scene. And so now you've got this against storied legacy company competing with these new players. Who when they started making investments in. Ai were a lot more nimble and so they made investments in what at the time seemed like really experimental ai technology and now looking back like deep mind. Google investing hundreds of millions of dollars in that that technology just basically took over the world and ibm didn't really invest in that technology at the time and now is behind because all the talent is has been sucked into google facebook amazon apple And so they're they're behind.

IBM Watson Cure Cancer Daniella Hernandez Arvind Krishna Louisville Google Amazon Facebook Microsoft Apple
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 10 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
IBM Signs a Deal with OWL

The Esports Minute

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

IBM Signs a Deal with OWL

"Had bill Lavar, Berry IBM's eastwards zero on the East sports our podcast last winter on it he talked about how they're hoping use IBM's Watson to help ease Ford Show casters and eastwards industry late last Night Sports Business Journal's Adam. Stern reported that IBM signed its first eastward steal. It begins with the currently happening Odobi well, grand finals and will extend through the two thousand, twenty, one and twenty, twenty, two seasons IBM will become the. Official eight Olympics cloud ai of the Oh wwl IBM Watson will be used to process match data, create better stats for shout casters and improve predictive analytics.

IBM Ibm Watson Berry Ibm Bill Lavar Night Sports Business Journal Watson Ford Show Stern Official
"ibm watson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on KOMO

"G. forecast using IBM Watson it draws insights from local weather data predicting allergy risk up to fifteen days out now you can stay informed and enjoy a nice days from what they are get allergy insights with Watson on the weather channel and weather dot com summer means cool drinks from your fridge beach towels from your dryer and ice cream sandwiches in the freezer the home depot can help you make those memories with special buys on the latest appliances get an LG French door refrigerator for just nineteen hundred ninety eight Bucks plus up to an additional six hundred dollars in instant savings and you can get your new appliances deliver free to start summer dealers get more done free delivery on purchases of three ninety six dollars more here in the northwest world asking the same question when will it end which we need to know to stay safe at komo news were built for this TV radio komo news dot com and the komo news app all working together for you this is komo news M. O. C. R. O. K. O. N. O. F. M. the northwest only twenty four hour news station hello forward news eleven straight ahead mostly clear overnight lows in the mid fifties tomorrow mostly sunny highs mid eighties Wednesday mostly cloudy chance of rain back again with highs in the mid seventies right now it's Seattle it's sixty four degrees it's time for people to go home the days may be numbered for the tri city leaders say it's time for police to return to the east precinct after two shootings this is about life what the next steps for the neighborhood are still uncertain with no date for the protest to end a little hesitant because I don't know how soon it's going to happen developing tonight Seattle's mayor says the takeover by protesters on Capitol Hill has to end and it starts in this week in stages city leaders say officers will also return to the border to a police precinct following a weekend of deadly violence.

Watson komo news Seattle M. O. C. R. O. K. O. N. O. F.
Robert Smith, Vista Equity Partners; PPP & Minority-Owned Businesses

Squawk Pod

04:29 min | 1 year ago

Robert Smith, Vista Equity Partners; PPP & Minority-Owned Businesses

"For businesses around the world today isn't a restart it's a rethink that's why they're partnering with. Ibm retailers are keeping their systems up as millions of orders move online. Paul centers are using IBM Watson to manage an influx of customer questions with a I and solutions built on the IBM cloud are helping doctors care for patients remotely today. We're rethinking how business moves forward. Let's put smart work visit. Ibm DOT com slash thing to learn more this squad pod? I'm CNBC producer. Katie Kramer Today on our podcast private equity giant and richest African American billionaire Robert Smith on getting loans to entrepreneurs or capital is be driven. Frankly into this small businesses hands in probably give them a little more flexibility in terms of hobbies and and how to leverage technology for digital future. But I think we should think about what are the most effective ways for us to educate our population to drive forward into you know into the teacher of opportunity plus when reopening is on the Menu Cameron Mitchell restaurants founder and CEO laid off thousands of workers. Now he's opening doors again. I think we're going to survive but it's GonNa be a while before we get the hospital. It's Monday may twenty Fifth Happy Memorial Day squad. Pat Begins Right now Robert. F Smith is the founder Chairman and CEO of Vista Equity which has fifty seven billion dollars in investment capital. Vista is the fifth largest enterprise software company in the world as well and overseas more than sixty portfolio companies that employ more than seventy thousand people around the world. Smith is also the first African American to sign the giving pledge and he was recently awarded the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy. He's on many lists as the wealthiest black American and lately. He's been working directly with the White House on the roll out of the paycheck protection program and how to get the loans in the hands of the most in need especially minority owned business. Pp was designed to rescue mainstream. According to the small business administration more than four million loans have been approved so far totaling more than five hundred billion dollars. Here's Andrew Ross Sorkin with billionaire businessman and Philanthropist Robert F Smith. You had worked with the White House on this program and so I just ask you to start by giving it a grade. Do you believe the money's getting where it needs to go. You know be first Tron of the P P P I think was challenge to get to the the small businesses small medium businesses a second charter for being a lot more effective But one of the things we discovered. Angela's US not discussed is that there is a frankly banking desert's in a lot of the communities about seventy percent of the African American community. Actually don't have a branch bank and so we've been working with a they treasury you know senator Sector MNUCHIN and Senator Schumer in Pelosi Dachsie work on building capacity and what I saw the capillary banking systems which are the community development financial institutions and a minority depository institutions building out the Pasadena to get these dollars into the hands of these small businesses which are essential to our communities so what are those capillary banks. Look like who you to right. If you are a small business owner this morning listening to you this morning. Where did you go go? Go to get that money then. So there's a bad a little over a thousand of these days. Cdfi's and the India is and these banks typically are in the communities there mainly in what we call targeted communities Unfortunately a lot of the larger banks don't bank those organizations those businesses any longer and is about ninety four percent or so of the African American businesses are so proprietorships and don't have banking relationships. And so what we've been doing is is enabling. Technically enabling got some wonderful teams have been ebeling these businesses they interface with the transit system at the and you can go to number places. There's national bankers dot org goes National Action Network. We've been worked black churches. Our Fair share A number of organizations that we've been working with to enable these banks to be able to processed loans and we just probably about ninety billion dollars or so left in the second of AP and I think it's essential if these small urban businesses African American Latin next businesses get Get their share This stimulus capitals of really frankly Repair some of the economic damage that this covert virus

Robert F Smith IBM Founder Chairman And Ceo Of Vi White House Ibm Watson Cameron Mitchell Restaurants Andrew Ross Sorkin Founder And Ceo United States African American Community Paul Katie Kramer National Action Network Cnbc Business Owner Cdfi Pasadena
Where do we go from here? My thoughts on the Future of Automation.

Automated

07:07 min | 1 year ago

Where do we go from here? My thoughts on the Future of Automation.

"What I've attempted to do over the last twenty. Four episodes is to showcase some of the main technologies that are being implemented that can automate either parts of or the entire job which a human worker can do across many different industries and sectors. So I hope to have given you the impression that automation isn't really confined to a specific part of our society but is really wide ranging. I also hope that some of the ideas presented that are connected to this mega trend of automation such as reskilling centers. Bullshit jobs universal basic income. And of course the two possible futures of creative destruction and technological unemployment have at least raise some further interest or at the very least some other questions for you so I also presented that neither future is a determined outcome individual decisions and social forces kind of course guide us towards one or the other but the current path does appear to me to be more in line with human workers being displaced by the technologies that have outlined so far granted. This isn't going to happen tomorrow Even in light of the increased amount of automation being implemented during this corona virus crisis. I don't think a significant chunk of the population across the world will be made redundant even over the next two to three years but ultimately I do think this is the pathway or on even as we will of course continue to see instances of creative destruction and worker augmentation through the new technologies. That are coming out. I do of course see the merit in the argument. That new forms of work are being continuously invented but with the adoption of advanced automated technologies to do more and more of our physical labor. And of course is starting to compete with our cognitive labor. I personally really don't see this specific future continuing forever granted. This opinion is only a snapshot of today. I am of course more than willing to change my point of view depending on the evidence as time goes on so furthermore this doesn't mean that. I hope for this outcome to happen. I am very aware of the tremendous negative economic as well as psychological impact. This will have on millions of people across the especially if it were to occur rapidly and without the proper planning and policies in place but this is also part of the reason for the existence of this podcast. Right to grow the conversation around this important topic in order to help plan for such an eventuality. I think that with the current global pandemic and of course the current repercussions. We can all see the problems that come about when nations governments and people have not properly planned for certain possible futures. But with this said I'm happy to see that more. Attention has been given to this topic over the last few years so through social media different news headlines even the increasing number of books and resources on the subject as of course all the discussions that we all continue to have there seems to be a growing sense of awareness. That automation is a very real and significant trend. That deserves our attention especially in the years to come but personally I find. The underlying impacts of automation are perhaps even more interesting than the technologies themselves so although the constant creation of new jobs with the constant changing nature of work is valuable to understand. I think that job automation has a more profound outcome. So jobs are one of the most fundamental pillars of our modern civilization and they are the way in which most human survive today so by exchanging our time for income we feed and house our families have access to transportation healthcare etc and we even spend roughly about a third of our adult lives in our jobs and many people even attribute their purpose or self worth to their job so we also use the overall increase or decrease of jobs to partly measure the entire health of a nation or even of an era so thus if jobs will be destroyed at a rate faster than they are created. This would mean a large scale. Socio economic impact would follow which can evidently be seen today with the global lockdowns destroy millions of businesses and jobs practically overnight but with high levels of job automation. This would be brought one step. Further so one of the fundamental narratives that civilization has really been following. Generations would essentially dissolve and a new narrative would need to be formed namely the disassociation from our means of survival being based on exchanging time for income. But what happens to our longstanding social structures were social value is tightly linked to the occupation. You have so. Doctors are usually seen as having more social value than say cashiers. But what happens when IBM's Watson or some other AI algorithm becomes able to diagnose the patients illness more accurately faster and more people across the entire world not to mention the paycheck. That's tied to that profession so I think the really interesting thing to consider With an automated future is the need to redesign social structures so even the implementation of a universal basic income scheme doesn't really solve this issue so if an ex doctor and an X. cashier Both receive a living wage. This doesn't automatically mean that. Social hierarchies value systems and even individual perceptions of worth naturally follow. I'm not proposing solutions here but merely raising the question as I think This is one that is really worth thinking about so the other perhaps more obvious concern that has raised with job. Automation is the displacement of workers who are simultaneously the consumers of the products and services that jobs provide so essentially unemployed workers are now unable to contribute to the needed cyclical consumption that powers the economy since they have lost their purchasing power as consumers So universal basic income schemes have typically been put forth as a form of stopgap measure when this economic issue is brought up. And we can certainly see this today in the emergency financial packages Governments across the world are putting in place in response to the economic fallout of the lockdowns imposed by the krona virus. Even though I completely see the value and of course the future need of a scheme I personally don't really see it as a perfect solution if it supports and enables the continuation of our current global economic system which is of course unfortunately based on environmentally unsustainable practices. However there might be hope that with this current corona virus crisis and in the future automation crisis. Which has the potential to be much larger. There might be some shift or transformation in the way in which are fundamental system actually works so whether actually implemented Uba schemes will act as a full solution to this problem. However we will have to

IBM Watson
Science News Briefs From Around the World

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs From Around the World

"Hi I'm scientific American. Podcast editor Steve. Mirsky and here's a short piece from the February. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine and the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article was titled Quick Hits. And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by Assistant News editor. Sarah Lou Frazier from the US off. The California coast scientist measured a blue whales heart rate for the first time using a device attached to the animal skin by Suction Cup the heart likely weighing hundreds of pounds beats from the thirty seven down to two times per minute varying dramatically between diving feeding and surfacing from Peru researchers analyzing satellite. An imaging data have found one hundred. Forty three new Nazca lines. These are largely line drawings of humans animals and symbols etched into the Peruvian Landscape Millennia. Ago The drawings including humanoid figures sixteen feet across spotted by. Ibm's Watson AI system from Brazil despite the long dry spells in Brazil's Catchinga region. Scientists found the tree hyman a Conga era drizzles copious nectar from flowers to attract pollinating. Bats full-sized tree can release two hundred forty gallons of the stuff with thirty eight distinct sent compounds over a single dry season from Norway. Archaeologists ground piecing radar found a Viking era ship surrounded by a filled ditch lurking below the soil of a western Norway farm. The ship was once within a burial mound from Jordan. Researchers uncovered a two horned figure in early Islamic ruins that may be the earliest ever found the roughly thirteen hundred year old object matches a rook found in Iranian chess. Set from about four hundred years later and from Ethiopia microbes thrive in many of earth's harshest environments but researchers found no life at all in briny scorching civic pools near Ethiopia's Dalla volcano knowing the boundaries for life's adaptations helps to narrow the search for earth like life on other planets. That was quick hits by Sarah Lou

Sarah Lou Frazier Editor Ethiopia Norway Sarah Lou Twenty Twenty Brazil Mirsky Dalla Volcano Steve Assistant News California United States Peru IBM Scientist Catchinga
Bitcoin College Radio - Mo Sadoghi

Bitcoin Radio

08:06 min | 1 year ago

Bitcoin College Radio - Mo Sadoghi

"What's up my man. Welcome to the show dude. Hello hello everyone. Hi Ashley. High Joe's wonderful to be here absolutely for everybody who I obviously just gave them a very brief introduction moe you're an assistant professor at UC Davis. Right yes I'm faculty at UC Davis and Iran Expo Lab and absolutely and as I was saying introduction. You may got a chance to hear that It's you know we're in a place where blockchain the this technology is becoming a useful. It's becoming it's not just a speculative ICO craziness of two thousand seventeen like there's really important incredible people working with the technology governments. You know there's different agencies and and people that have been doing things outside of the blockchain space whether in tech or not including this and you know you're a perfect example that being on faculty at UC Davis and putting yourself position to to take on this role as a Ambassador for the CRYPTO space in the blockchain space. You know it's it's probably got a lot of pressure on you. Well when you look at research you don't ever take on Sort of a mature technology always gonNA take that. There's a lot of associated and started several years ago The picture was not as credible as you kind of express than it is today. So it's definitely a excitement of taking that risk and have been happy to be part of that at UC Davis absolutely. So let's first start off with this before we get into your background Let's talk about what exactly is the resilient DB DOT com website? What's it doing what we're what are we looking at here so I could? Maybe perhaps before that I could give you a little bit introduction of Harvey or is it sort of Jordan that brought us into resilient and resilient dot com. Is that for the last ten years or so I've been looking into transactions space and transaction all know what it is the you'll make a credit card transaction. You go to Walmart you go to Amazon. You buy something everything that we do realize around the concept of transaction and transaction. It's reminder of go back in the days a simple contract so when people want to engage in into any form of transaction they're really writing contract and transaction in computer science is the digital form of The old age a concept of the contract. So we've been looking at paradigm shift in the last decade is that how do we look at the changes in hardware? That changes in the application needs in order to improve The the efficiency of transaction processing. And what are the new application that could result from this in Dover and but in the last few years there has been the move and the push of this idea of the cryptocurrency. What if you look at digital market that is surrounded around this crypto and also the way we are going to look at the blockchain is no longer as we're going to put our trust into a single entity like like a single bank but we want to be able to at a level of a society? We want to be able to have what I consider those ideal of cornerstone of our societies. Democrat is Asian and decentralisation so now how do the form does digital contract in very democratic and decentralized way so that's exciting problems that we started looking at it also kind of looking at it as a secure transaction as a kind of a transaction that brings accountability trust and integrity without the need of relying on essential entity so that has been what initiated or research and as part of that we have In Expo Lab my research team at UC Davis behaved launched our fabric or blocking fabric. Which is a global scale Resilient blockchain fabric and called resilient. So that's that's where we are right now. Yeah by the way I really love the name too. I think it's really relevant and You know it stands out especially in the space so as as this process is kind of taking taking place How have the students really transformed this idea? Like as you as you noted and of course I don't Wanna get ahead of ourselves because it's actually one of the questions I have down the road but when he didn't know noted that process. You're right like you guys didn't happen yesterday. This has been going on. What you guys have been building's been going on for some time like what has that that that student. How was that student transform? What are you looking at these days when it when it comes to the people who are getting involved in this kind of show a lot of a funny story about the name has since as you mentioned it so we have every entering a new space and technology is there's going to be resistance and especially the risk of the technology is the more resistant you get? I had a pleasure working about ten or so graduate and undergraduate student along this journey and the one thing that we have Encounter over and over again the rejection of our papers the rejection of our ideas and so the resilient. Abo was kind of is that our team has become so resilient in building this blockchain fabric and. That's what actually the name of is that not only did. The fabric has become resilient but also the team has become precise in sort of pushing through this Yeah pushing pushing through from every aspect and we'd be successful at many fronts and we're still pushing and others. So that's that's how the name came came about and and you see that transformation into students is because it's part of it is even have to educate research committee. Not Everybody is aware of what the blockchain is. It's it's not a traditional topic so the student needs to educate himself. They need to educate the community and While this education sort of rippled down to other part of the university is that this is writing for example Move Spell. Come into the picture. In sort of empowering that the grass root is not just in computer science but sort of campus wide in order to get to that education of the auction as well too for sure. And I'm a firm believer like in and I'll say in this goes with mouse brought to you know when you find personalized story in a kind of Esprit de Corps to an extent of why you exist in your name you know I mean mouse ball stories a little bit different dalen Patrick and Gaylon walking with an actual mouse belt cord around his waist belt You know I it stands by the same thing I love watching people pour their heart and soul in these to these entities these these projects to these ideas and when they when their own. It seems like they're always far more successful as the best way to put it all right. So let's go. Let's go into a little bit about you. Who are you what did you do? How'd you get into this so I graduate? I did my phd at the University of Toronto. I graduate in two thousand thirteen and the focus of my research back then was I have sort of stream of data coming in and how to use modern harbor to do the analysis for efficiency and then from there I went to. Ibm Research and I was a IBM Watson in Westchester groups on Heights. That's sort of the headquarters of research and there are more and more came into the problem of transaction and Sudan in particular I looked at the problem of. How do I unify At an analysis the analytics with the transaction in a very general than unified way so and so that has continued at IBM. So I was there for about four years. Then I was faculty at Purdue University and that's where we really got into the space of large-scale disabled transaction and by the time I had a rich. Uc Davis you've already sort of planting seed of Looking at secure transaction or the blockchain and the moment sort of join a UC Davis that has been the The main

Uc Davis IBM Ashley Sudan JOE Iran Expo Lab Davis Purdue University Assistant Professor University Of Toronto Jordan Dover Research Committee Ibm Watson Walmart Westchester
This autonomous ship aims to steer itself across the Atlantic Ocean

Kim Komando

01:06 min | 1 year ago

This autonomous ship aims to steer itself across the Atlantic Ocean

"In next year will mark four hundred years he was a four hundred years since the Mayflower arrived in the New World were L. grams would set up the Plymouth colony and future tech is marking the anniversary the Mayflower is once again traveling from the U. K. to the U. S. now this ship won't have anyone on board just artificial intelligence powered by IBM's Watson you have to see the Mayflower autonomous ship A. K. A. M. I. S. which you can have your commander community member it looks more like a plane spaceship hybrid that sales about the warder the ship was built by pro Mar it's a nonprofit marine research organizations power mainly by wind and solar energy while the onboard tech work to avoid any house hazards that pop up during this twelve the journey across the Atlantic the tech also larger marine life and conducts sea level mapping during the trip and this will become one of the first full size autonomous ships to cross the ocean actually gonna sets sail September twenty twenty so welcome to the New World and when it does arrive you can save heard about that a year ago in the gimp commando

IBM Watson A. K. A. M. Commander
How AI is Changing The Content Generation Process

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:11 min | 2 years ago

How AI is Changing The Content Generation Process

"Always say that. Yes, tech is going to remove to the job roles, but he's also creating new roles digital age, it's probably creating more than it's actually removing and yes, there is no such thing as a job for life anymore. But we must all adapt to the continuously of over digital landscape and reinvent ourselves now in a former life. Of course, I was an IT manager. But now I create written an audio content a future-proof myself, ROY. Not really, because I can't rating how offficial intelligence is changing the content generation process, and even writing its own content. So I wanted to find out more not just in name of self preservation. But how helpful it can be to everyone listening? Now I loved today's conversation. I suspect your going to so book up and hold on tight. So I can be meal is auto. I descend from Cisco where they're having an even craziest spell of whether the wheel here in the UK so we can speak with Nihar some CEO of content stack, and she's going to tell us all about how automatically intelligence is changing the content generation process. So massive. All welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners who you are? And what you do, sir. Hi, everybody. My name is named Hassan Pat, I'm the founder and CEO of content stack stack is a company that's changing how organizations delivered digital content to their audiences. We have in modern content management system. We consider it now the world of content experiences. So we like to think of it as a content experience platform, not Shimon that produces content for a living. Well, the Shyam nervously optimistic about the. How do you think is changing the whole content generation process, so Khun crate completely original stories at the moment, but could that change? Well, interestingly enough, we're already seeing examples where a is powering content processing analysis. It's becoming a really crucial part of the content generation process as well. So to answer your question. Yes, it's already changing fed. I condemn. I didn't give you a few examples of, of how as being used in the content world today. One of the ones that I actually think a super interesting is text intelligence and analysis. So if you think about AI being able to actually analyze the tone, or the sentiment of content when it's being written, and maybe suggesting if it's suitable for an intended audience, their services out there that will do that language, detection, keyword, extraction profanity detection, and an essentially tell you hate that sentence that you wrote displays anger or displays love, and it helps you decide how you want. Continue to write an ocean. How are you? Seeing natural language processing, natural language generation accelerating that process of content generation is anything you can share around those fields at the moment sharing. Yes. So, like we talked about a is not necessarily generating full stories quite yet. Although it's kind of headed in that direction, and natural language processing natural, language detection, which is sometimes called NLP natural language processing natural language, generation and LG. These are things that can help accelerate the process of content generation some of these areas, where is already helping is, is actually doing content translations taking content one language translating it to another language or maybe to a Cal or to generation, and potentially providing transcription of video and audio and turning that into content that can actually be legible, usable adding tone or a sentiment too, that tagging or creating automatic meta data in content. Which is often used for websites and mobile applications and things like that. And you if you're familiar with tools like grammar, early doing grammar checks, potentially saying, hey, you might want to say the sentence differently protecting your content making sure that there's trademark protection. You know, checking against things that are out there on the internet, or things that are out in the world that have already copyrighted a lot of that is happening, and it's helping people to actually generate content work quickly. And with some automating, she I'm still into see more and more transcription services as well. So something like this conversation that we're having today, we have a twenty minute conversation. Trump's grow up full thousand words it could be repurposes different forms of content that really seems to be gathering pace, too. Doesn't it? Absolutely. Yes, in that's actually pretty interesting because if you think about writing it used to be you'd gravity typewriter need, sit behind it, and you try to write something. And now if you have a conversation like this, or if you're even a writer who sometimes says better having a conversation talking through something you can record yourself and that might create something that can turn into a blog post, you just have to go in and make a few tweaks, and then there's actually tools that will layer on top of that, and help you make those tweaks in an AI generated fashion. So the question of Goto ask, what of content stock for into all this, and how is it using to help its customers create those two experiences that we're talking about. Yes. So from our perspective, the world of content management systems of tomorrow, should be a already. They have to have something built in that will essentially, let a I be part of, of the way that Content's being generated on delivered a has to be easily integrated and you should be able to use all the best in best degreed services that are out there to do that. You don't you shouldn't have to be able to just work with only one content management system provider or one company. So we think of everything as Derry open and flexible and so- content sex, the first modern CMs, or the modern content management system that embeds AI into its user experience, and we've integrated with tools and systems like IBM's Watson Salesforce, Einstein on a company called monkey one to give contents debt customers the ability to easily leverage a to create highly personalized content digital experiences that go beyond standard demographics in traditional audience. Segmentation. Really while you're using content stack, you can integrate with all these tools that you like to use and use those to help you make your content smarter better sentiment easier, degenerate faster and integrated with everything that you care about from an analytic standpoint as optimization. Greece side and all that good stuff. You she'll pretty hogh-profile twilla though as well. Which is Miami Heat Maria. And Martha Stewart tonight, just a few. But do you have any use cases? It will help anyone listening anywhere in the world visualize. How you'll creating those a digital experiences but also how valuable they are to businesses to share? Yeah. Actually, one of my favorite ones, and this is something that most people can relate to especially those that are sports fans is the Miami Heat, actually, in the Miami Heat is one of the most beloved teams in the National Basketball Association, the NBA here in the US, and it's one of those experiences where people think about them as modern and. David one tons of awards for their digital mobile app and that digital mobile app is actually powered by content stack. So if you think about what that app is, it's a fan experience app that allows fans to engage both during a game. And also while they're at home continuing to be fans. But what's really exciting is when they're if you're actually going to the arena to attend one of the games, you can use the app to do everything for navigating to the arena parking at the arena, ticketless entry into the arena way. Finding to your seat in seat ordering all of the things that you want to do to interact with players in social media, and other fans that might be at the arena, that's all powered through content stack through integrations and within that saying, digital experienced Dan app. And what's exciting about that, from the Miami Heat's perspective, is that they're able to maximize engagement with the fan? They know what fans like which beverages or what kind of merchandise they bought and which. Games. They like to go to and they can push custom offers accordingly making that experience super personalized delight for delightful for the fans. But then what ends up happening is they get a really incredible return on investment, or what they like to consider a return on experience for their, their use of that mobile

Miami Founder And Ceo Cisco Khun Hassan Pat Shimon Martha Stewart UK National Basketball Associatio Derry CEO Donald Trump Nihar Writer
"ibm watson" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"I love this example, in particular in Weiser next generation of consumers because they had be on social media, filming themselves burning Nike apparel, and on the also in social they had an entirely new demographic activated. So we linked to a couple of boards within our report little meta here, but what we found out from others analysis that the people who are burning the shoes were essentially a slightly older demographic and than the people who are now their new customers where a slightly younger demographic. And arguably the younger demographic is much harder to win over in much harder shoe market too. Because of this reason of the emotion economy in having purpose. So what they did was absolutely brilliant. They ended up ultimately generating forty three million dollars. Revenue from essentially a single tweet from Colin Kaepernick and in doing so they've also future-proof their marketing for the next let's say decades because they're having teenagers were now bought it in who are only gaining purchase power as they get older and only gaining, but it's no disposable income as older as well fascinating. So that's trend number nine. And it's it's been great going through all of these trends together. What are your takeaways from the report? What do you think this all means? Yeah. There are so many takeaways, but if I really wanna boil it down, I think that marketers need to get smarter in that means a lot of things such as they need to get smarter about how internal processes are organized, such as are we actually agile organization. Do we have the right kinds of staff leg director of marketing. And we have the right kind of skill sets that might build up to what we consider. Protector and then on the other side about being smart. It's when we go to market are. We actually listening to the needs of our consumers in how does that match up with the ways that we can be authentic ourselves. So fi suggest think about those two things I think you can tie together all nine trans even things like margin. Attic set requires us to reassess our internal processes ends of tools and systems want us. So any final advice for marketers here in twenty nineteen or beyond. Just stay on top of things be excited about these trends, it's very easy to be pessimistic about things like GDP are. But it's our jobs as marketers to operate in this wild wild west. And if you're going to survive than you need to be enthusiastic and find the silver lining ear, which I think should be easy. And absolutely exists were just argh down by so much negativity that surrounds us about changes. So if it's things like become. Marceca in gaining skill sets. You have that's hard, but you should be excited. And that's why we get in the marketing we want to be constantly challenged. We want to know that the way that we use data four hyper civilization needs to be different in twenty nineteen. So let's get together. Tackle it. Make both marketing in the world of butter place, and changes fun. Right. That's why you're in the business. If everything was going to be done the same. What's the point exactly turbulent? But fun. That is. Yeah. One in the same. I kind of like being on an airplane when there's turbulence it's free kind of fun ride. So this is why I do this career. Exactly a man, you know, what I love metaphors. I'm glad we're doing this. Because like now we were literally shaking things up if it started as well. Jonathan. Thank you so much for joining me for this. Great discussion. Really appreciate it. And I'm sure you know, my listeners got a lot out of it. And I'm sure we'll get a lot of reaction to it for having. Thanks to Jonathan for being here. Next time. It's episode fifty if you can believe that and it'll be a special episode as we have my chat with Beth Monahan of ink house about fear and the future of PR stay with us. This episode of confessions of a marketer was written produced and edited by yours. Truly key Jordan of A-Class productions wrote the theme music. Confessions of market is a trademark of read Edwards global Inc. And this episode is copyright twenty nineteen. I'm Mark read Edwards CNN time.

Jonathan Nike Colin Kaepernick director of marketing Beth Monahan Edwards global Inc CNN Mark forty three million dollars
"ibm watson" Discussed on Hotboxin' with Mike Tyson

Hotboxin' with Mike Tyson

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Hotboxin' with Mike Tyson

"Right now, all your mic. I can tell you're saying, but right now all EA's passes. They only do things that they're told to do what if you? Uh-huh. Hey, I'm Mike Tyson and where at hot boxing today and Evan has a really important kit today. Neil tons about. This discovery of Fisher turn that you tell it pretty old. It's been around for eight years. We heard about. Well, it's been probably around for a few decades. But yeah, they've been working on since the nineteen fifties. It's just that. Technology's finally got to give it a people something non on are trying to free people up to do more important work, right? What the doctor doesn't have to treat. The common cold could focus on working on a cure for cancer. All right interesting. What do you think of what the Evan? I'm very skeptical of AI, man. But I understand it. You know, I understand will actually don't understand it. So how did you get here? Why why are we talking to you today? Totally by accident of it. Of course, are you from where I'm originally from New York. Yeah. Did you get involved in? I was working IBM in the magic insulting arm and developed a set of patents and talking about could machines learn because you certain things and there was a research project on called Watson that could you build a machine that could play jeopardy, right? So could understand what people are trying to say, an interact and active. It's human it's human. And as a result of some of the things that I've done I got involved very early into the project, and you know, we had the jeopardy challenge these things, and I was one of the people who was advocating to build what we call a Watson ecosystem where let's let anybody use technology them bring their expertise and solve problems..

Evan Mike Tyson Watson IBM boxing Fisher Neil New York eight years
"ibm watson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It's not so much focused specifically on standing language. It's really, you know, inspired by brain. It's his building neural networks to do all kinds of things and the assumption is that understanding. Of language, you know, as as he progresses using largely using Debry reinforcement learning that that will emerge. Right. So he's not specifically focused so much on on on the language stuff on the other hand one person. I talked to that. I thought was really fascinating was David Ferruccio. Who is who is the IBM Watson teen leader. Right. He's the guy that created IBM Watson, which of course, was very focused on understanding natural language. I mean that was the whole point of winning jeopardy. Right. That was the key capability. So he's got a new startup called elemental, cognition, which I think is funded in part by Bridgewater. Huge hedge fund, and he's really focused on on taking the work that he did Watson and taking that to the next level and building generally intelligence system using an understanding of language and doing as you say having this ability to to understand abstract concepts. And and he's very very ambitious. And an aggressive in his predictions. He he says specifically in the interview that he doesn't think that a I is this long term thing that that that's fifty or more years in the future. He thinks that we actually have the tools we need to build much more generally intelligent systems. Now, that's what to work on. I think that's quite exciting. And Ray kurzweil also at Google. That's another fascinating interviews, also very focused on language. He's using he he had written a book previously how to create a mind and his work is based on you know, his ideas from that. And and I Jeff hawking offer wrote a book before that called on intelligence that I think was in some ways an inspiration for what Ray Ray wrote, but raise working on incorporating hierarchical models with with deep learning and and using that to to solve the natural language problem as well. So the number of people taking these different approaches, and it's really fascinating to read. You know, these interviews and and and. When what they're doing? So I think it's very exciting. What I find interesting about kurzweil is I remember a couple several years ago when he was recruited to Google, and and just like kind of learning about who he was and seeing some of his talks and reading some of his books, and you get the idea that he's kind of this prophet. And he's got these philosophical ideas about AI, but you know, any and has built he has built companies in the past. So clearly he's got a an ability to build applications out of these things. But you kind of wondered like what does this guy actually doing about artificial intelligence? And then this auto complete feature comes out with you know, were Google auto complete your emails for you give the suggested responses, and you're like, this is this is an incredible breakthrough in Email technology of very very useful application, and I believe that his team was responsible for it..

IBM Watson Ray kurzweil Ray Ray Google IBM David Ferruccio Jeff hawking
"ibm watson" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"On IBM Watson really being watching is that fail voice model. For specific need, which means that. We can we're still we're already union the motto. So that it works better for kids yourself ours. For example, boaty understand stowaway as well as story before we bought as well as robot, and that's something that we can control because use watts and we've been continue to do that. Because warm kids are speaking, Cody, which means that we can use more and more those train. In terms of mispronunciations calendar stand with his asking. So we can wash options for those questions and outside of that though, we have plans for law more. Mantra plungers that additional new uses nonfiction content, for example, for social emotional lessons. We really want to be something that grows into child. There's something that and use over and over again, very long time. So we have a lot of hands on one exciting thing is that, you know, we're we're ran you something that maybe on the weekly even daily basis where you turn forty on. And maybe shares factor with the child for that day or might be seasonally focused. Maybe daily news, for example. So there's so much we can do with it. Then I feel like I'm advertising. IBM IBM cloud hasn't really great for allowing to all this really really great stuff sticky for sharing your story, Cody with us and Gracie. Yes. All right. Thank you so much. So I'm here today with Moen and Michael Paloma, and we're talking about how they integrated Alexa, more deeply than they did from CS twenty eighteen as well. As added Google assistant, Michael thanks for joining me today. Thank you for having me for sure. Okay. So what is the big announcement walk us through it? So we've got a couple of big announcements last year. Alexa, capability with the mown shower later eighteen we actually had expanded that with a smartphone skill where you can.

Alexa Cody IBM Watson Michael Paloma IBM Google Moen Gracie
Robbie Anderson Robbie, Keenan Allen And Packers discussed on Fantasy Focus Football

Fantasy Focus Football

03:31 min | 2 years ago

Robbie Anderson Robbie, Keenan Allen And Packers discussed on Fantasy Focus Football

"All right time now for one of our favorite segments of the week. It's wide receiver cornerback matchups with my clay. But before we get into the wide receiver cornerback matchup. We're going to solicit information from our good friend. Kyle soppe on the IBM insight of the week, featuring Robbie Anderson Robbie. Anderson. Romance by Packers this week. He's gone over fifteen point six points in consecutive games. And IBM Watson gives them a twenty two point seven percent chance to do it again this weekend. But he also carries a twelve point five percent bus chance, which would mean four or fewer points. You don't like that idea? Can it be a wide receiver three or a flex play for you this weekend? Mike the Packers don't have a lot defensively, but they do have to rookie Cornerbacks. That are impressive most specifically gyro exander. No question. He has been impressive. They also have Josh Jackson in there. They can good too. Yeah. He has been he's been up and down for sure, but shot and is a guy. Yeah. No question. He's an umbrella. He played outside. So he's been in the slot as of late. So they've some talent there for sure but they're still give up a ton of fantasy production. It's kind of like you think about Pittsburgh, right? Might kill them is really good song corner. But they get destroyed by slot receivers every every single week based on matchups against linebackers and safeties things along those lines unless the Packers have been destroyed by receivers all season long third-most. Fantasy points allowed to the permettre over the past two months. Six most over the past month, you'll get Robbie interested primarily perimeter receiver. Seventy six percent of the time. He's on the outside. He'll see the rookies Alexander and Jackson throughout this game. In his Kyle just pointed to he's getting volume as of late seven plus targets during five of his past teams seventy five and a touchdown during each of his past two games. So he is bounce back after that slow start, which is good. He's I think he's a very talented player. Sam darnold found a way to get him the football. And I think he is a wide receiver three or flexes weak little risky. But again, how many times we're going to say this throughout the show if you like that thirty to fifty range of receiver. It's a lot of a lot of guys with high ceilings and low floors. Yeah. No, no doubt about that. Especially in week sixteen when the stakes are so high, right? And the reality is a lot of people playing in the championship may not be making decisions about players that are kind of flimsy in terms of outlook. Right. Like, you have studs at you're going with. But there have been plenty of injuries. There have been you know, you may feel less confident because it quarterback doesn't. Play and as a pertains to a wide receiver. There are reasons to be a bit concerned be looking for reinforcements. Maybe no del. Maybe. No, no, Josh Gordon on Sunday. We'll see about Julio Jones, for example, players like that who could be out or limited. We'll see Keenan Allen, by the way, and what start with some news here before we get into the match up. He has with the ravens on Saturday night. But to find you it sounds like things are trending in the right direction here for Keenan Allen, right? And our Adam Schefter reporting today that Keenan Allen is expected to play you know, as I had mentioned earlier in the week. This is really a pain and functionality issue with a hip pointer, not a serious structural issue. But really how well could he function as the week progressed in his house like he's turned a corner, and they're feeling very optimistic about his ability to go I still maintain that the one thing you're concerned about is. If you look back at the video of when it got hurt he goes up in the air. He lands, you know, really hard directly on that. Right. Hip. It wouldn't take as much to flare it up and cause them to have to come out. But kim. Keenan Allen is one tough guy. And so I don't expect to see it. You know, I think to me is like the risk of stepping on the football field and having that injury last week. You just take that with a grain of salt and know that that's a possibility..

Robbie Anderson Robbie Keenan Allen Packers Kyle Soppe Josh Jackson Ravens Adam Schefter Sam Darnold Football IBM Ibm Watson Julio Jones Pittsburgh Josh Gordon Mike KIM Kyle Alexander Seventy Six Percent Seven Percent
"ibm watson" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

"Security feature or features designed to prevent hackers from accessing them. It does not define what those features should be. Some people are upset about this, but I actually think it's probably a good thing to keep this vague because technology in Christian technology changes so quickly, it does mandate that connected devices come with unique passwords that users can change. So I would. Love for them to say that you know you force users to change, but that didn't happen. I think they are forced to require before Cesar to change. If it doesn't come with a unique password, I think it's an either or. Okay. So some critics have talked about village being too vague, which I've just praised but they're like at, it's not useful. And they also basically like saying, hey, instead of forcing people to add security features, why don't you remove insecure features? I wish that they spent more time defining what those insecure features actually are. I mean, if I'm in one community, it is insecure feature to connect your device to the internet. Typically, I think of good practices are I security or to make sure every devices over there dateable and again, force users to change their passwords. Unique keys actually are really relevant and I'd like to weigh in corruption. That's a good thing that gets a little far deep, but you know, hey, okay. So that is the new law. The. Is this only works for people selling devices in California, but as California goes, so do many other places since it is the most populous state in the US south will say, Kevin has got IBM Watson, are you gonna add IBM Watson to your smart home? I think I might. We're not sure yet would is going to bring to the table, but I think I might IBM has actually put out a blog post that explains how to add IBM Watson services to home assistant, which I knew as a platform. Some of our folks use home assistant is open source in. It's something you kinda have to put on your own device like a raspberry pi. Instead of buying a smart hub, home assistant becomes the hub. So it's more for the DIY folks in the folks who like to program. But I think it's gonna be interesting to try. And I think I'm going to do this because I wanna see again what Watson brings. The idea here is platform agnostic. It works with all different devices in your house, and it will provide a unified interface. And then my guess is based on what I m saying. It will. Help you end developers make or compose analytics, visualization dashboards in new apps? I'm thinking, will it bring some kind of machine learning? We'll Watson actually start bringing more smarts to the smart home as a result of this. So that's the hope, but I will have to try it and see for folks have home assistant. It doesn't look too difficult to integrate. You might need a little bit of python programming skills, but I think that's something everybody should have anyway, I'll get off my soapbox and yeah, it's pretty much right out there in a get hub so you can go to the repository in ad. Got it. And so are you looking for like visualizations of.

IBM Watson IBM California Cesar US Kevin
"ibm watson" Discussed on IOT Podcast

IOT Podcast

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on IOT Podcast

"Security feature or features designed to prevent hackers from accessing them. It does not define what those features should be. Some people are upset about this, but I actually think it's probably a good thing to keep this vague because technology in Christian technology changes so quickly, it does mandate that connected devices come with unique passwords that users can change. So I would. Love for them to say that you know you force users to change, but that didn't happen. I think they are forced to require before Cesar to change. If it doesn't come with a unique password, I think it's an either or. Okay. So some critics have talked about village being too vague, which I've just praised but they're like at, it's not useful. And they also basically like saying, hey, instead of forcing people to add security features, why don't you remove insecure features? I wish that they spent more time defining what those insecure features actually are. I mean, if I'm in one community, it is insecure feature to connect your device to the internet. Typically, I think of good practices are I security or to make sure every devices over there dateable and again, force users to change their passwords. Unique keys actually are really relevant and I'd like to weigh in corruption. That's a good thing that gets a little far deep, but you know, hey, okay. So that is the new law. The. Is this only works for people selling devices in California, but as California goes, so do many other places since it is the most populous state in the US south will say, Kevin has got IBM Watson, are you gonna add IBM Watson to your smart home? I think I might. We're not sure yet would is going to bring to the table, but I think I might IBM has actually put out a blog post that explains how to add IBM Watson services to home assistant, which I knew as a platform. Some of our folks use home assistant is open source in. It's something you kinda have to put on your own device like a raspberry pi. Instead of buying a smart hub, home assistant becomes the hub. So it's more for the DIY folks in the folks who like to program. But I think it's gonna be interesting to try. And I think I'm going to do this because I wanna see again what Watson brings. The idea here is platform agnostic. It works with all different devices in your house, and it will provide a unified interface. And then my guess is based on what I m saying. It will. Help you end developers make or compose analytics, visualization dashboards in new apps? I'm thinking, will it bring some kind of machine learning? We'll Watson actually start bringing more smarts to the smart home as a result of this. So that's the hope, but I will have to try it and see for folks have home assistant. It doesn't look too difficult to integrate. You might need a little bit of python programming skills, but I think that's something everybody should have anyway, I'll get off my soapbox and yeah, it's pretty much right out there in a get hub so you can go to the repository in ad. Got it. And so are you looking for like visualizations of.

IBM Watson IBM California Cesar US Kevin
"ibm watson" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"This is the one that everybody thinks of as the giant risk and it's a big risk, but it's in addition to all these other things that we're talking about. So all the different things that could go wrong, start stacking up and we spend a lot of time and effort trying to figure. Out, okay. How do we prioritize these things? How do we figure out what's what? What are the stuff that we really need to deal with and how do we design systems? So they are intuitive. So they helped the crew with more autonomy. So they actually meant the crew. We're not looking to replace the crew with an IBM Watson or some artificial intelligence share. I think a lot of times people think that, well, we could put Watson on this spacecraft and it might be able to replace the doctor. We don't see that being something realistic anytime in the near future humans are too good humor to good, and and part of the purpose of human spaceflight is for us to explore and to and to utilize those skills that humans have. We've already sent robots all over the space all over the solar system. This is the next wave. This is what happens when we try to go there and try to figure out how we do things and how we function and how we respond to this environment. That's always the feedback I get, because I, that's a question that I love asking. All my guess really is is why do humans have to. Explore and it's, it's that. I mean, you just can't replace the perspective that you get from sending someone to another planet or destination or out in the universe than something. I think it's actually more fundamental than that. Really. I don't know that it's that you can't replace it because you can't right now. Maybe something in the future you could, but it's really the, you wouldn't want to. It's a prior assumption, right? We're going there to learn not only about these places but also about ourselves about our place in the universe about how we responded change and we're learning these things on the space station right now when you talk about the things that happened in astronauts brains and there is and how they're learning to accommodate two long duration. Spaceflight what we're really talking about is learning about us in a different environment and what happens, how do we do it this, this group of astronauts that exists in this closed container, we've selected them to be really healthy people, right? Yeah. So if I'm thinking about clinical research and medicine, and I want to ask a question about, you know what happens if I have this one insult on a healthy person, right? These guys are a control group for an experiment that we as a species are doing, trying to understand how we learn about ourselves. When we talk about loss of bone, loss of muscle, these are analogues for other diseases than things that can help us in..

IBM Watson
"ibm watson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Is ready to serve in next up is in he chose general manager of ibm watson's customer experience and she's going to talk about what's on the horizon for ibm watson so fascinating we just keynote we just got through the press conference talking all about the impact of artificial intelligence that can we have not have conversation without talking to watch absolutely i will tell everyone though you know one of the best things about watson is it's about specializing in every industry role and so the opportunity for everyone to kind of reinvent what they're doing with watson is exciting yeah that's kind of what i meant the press conference i actually was a customer at the ibm launch but the whole jeopardy ken jennings and watson beating ten in saying that he's looking forward to his machine over words so but it's great to see that the news not to be overlords but in ways of helping out society absolutely so augmentation the human capabilities so when i think about that i kind of categorizing mid two things one is recommendations around next best action automating that in your workflows like retrieving content it automatically tagging images but you know the average enterprise doesn't have millions of images of the same thing for training so one of the things we're thinking about is how do you really enable training on smaller and smaller sets of data with high degree of precision so that every industry can take advantage of this no i see that and i think that's where that's we're calling like democratizing technology down to not the large enterprise yeah we want to make sure that every business has the potential to be a future disruptor and that it's not all concentrated amongst the platform players that have coalesced allot data because unfortunately that's not necessarily a diner fuels the broader ecosystem of innovation so what are some of the things that you learned from this conference a few things one is when i think about the mindset through an entrepreneur you have the ability to almost start from fresh and so one of the first things i conversations i had with an entrepreneur was she had come up and ask me oh where can i get started with watson i'm a small company i'm not a large enterprise so i don't know that i can do this large customized project and we said you know this is great timing we've actually naval watson for developers which really is part of bigger ecosystem for large enterprises as well as heavily tech folks we actually started some smaller business applications that you can consume as a startup or small medium business on things like automatic tagging of content that you're going to use in your promotional campaigns or it may be new capabilities like pricing and promotion algorithm center automated for you so you don't have to dynamically think about that for you but there's a lot of different little set of micro services and applications that we've thought through enables small businesses you know we're out of time for short segment but i'd love to have you back on the show i.

general manager ibm watson
"ibm watson" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Here is all to the good or is it undermining people's abilities in any respect for the most part it's good in because most people who are working in medicine know how to navigate technology and find valid articles or useful pieces of information but the problem is you know we would have to go to the library and figure out what to search and maybe if we had a computer we can put in some search terms but the what people have lost is the thinking ability to figure out how to find what they're looking for how to sort of investigated as opposed to just pushing a few buttons on your smartphone with a key word and you'll dig around and the the information will sort of come to you so it's a little bit of a sponge effect as opposed to a shark where you're actually going to look for the information and figure out how to find the information because you have a smartphone or tablet that you're walking around with it takes out a little bit of the the effort to get the information action but you can get it very quickly is at making any inroads into your experiences a doctor i thought that ibm watson has a medical product where it's not just a matter of a human brain searching database but it's significantly facilitated by some form of narrow a is that showing up yet or not not quite yet in the mainstream i mean certainly we talk about in heard about it you know i think we're more still at the level of robotics which is a little bit of it's not really a ai but it's a little bit of artificial function you know we we don't we don't touch the patient anymore a lot of the time when we're doing surgery a robot who's doing the surgery and we're sitting across the room so you know i think they're certainly some i guess the a part is definitely part of medicine but the i not not quite yet in the mainstream so what percentage of your surgeries are done with.

ibm watson
Cincinnati awarded MLS expansion team for 2019 season

02:20 min | 3 years ago

Cincinnati awarded MLS expansion team for 2019 season

"The air with a six sixty eight era manager jim riggleman he faces an adjustment is going to be quite a transition for him because he's never done that and you know getting loose and quicker and ready to go into the game it's going to be quite an adjustment but right now the starting just isn't working that's not to say he won't be back in their starting some time in the in the future could be the near future but right now we're going to put him in the bullpen reds top prospects second baseman nick stenzel return to the triple a louisville bats lineup last night going over four sends l has been out since may third with a recurrence of vertigo frontier league baseball tonight florence freedom open up a series with a double header at evansville high school baseball kentucky regional finals cov cath over saint henri twelve nothing campbell county defeats george rogers clark sixty to montgomery county shutout browser to nil it was highlands over beechwood eleven to one ohio state baseball turning action in the state semi finals tomorrow it is madeira facing canfield on friday mason goes up against anthony wayne kentucky softball regional semifinals and girls action yesterday collins over walton verona seven one oldham county veto and county tend to one highlands blank saint henri thirteen nothing riled defeated notre dame nine to two ohio girls softball state semifinals tomorrow as lakota west against perry's berg ohio lacrosse state semifinals and boys action last night saint francis to sales got by mary mon fifteen to thirteen and girls action marymount beat saint francis to sales in overtime fifteen to fourteen tonight sycamore meets upper arlington and saint ex battles worthington kilborn major league soccer is adding cincinnati in its latest round of expansion sc cincinnati will join the mls next season play at nipper stadium until their new stadium has done in twenty twenty one owner carl lindner the third major league soccer thank you thank you thank you our community and our family couldn't be more excited i'm thrilled except the special scarf and especially for what it means to our city cincinnati we did it nhl game two of the stanley cup finals tonight vegas will host washington golden knights lead at their one game to none bill denison newsradio seven hundred wwl w sports mercy health is once again selected by ibm watson health is one.

Ibm Watson Health Bill Denison NHL Oldham County Collins Montgomery County George Rogers Saint Henri Kentucky Evansville High School L Louisville Nick Stenzel Jim Riggleman Washington Golden Knights Carl Lindner Nipper Stadium Cincinnati
"ibm watson" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"Integrating ibm watson development their ai development into as part of their of iowa's on machine learning system so that if you developed a model using i b that uses ibm watson there's a very very easy way or easy ish way to to convert that models a little work with iowa so that you can have that business business ethic that business app working very very well on on an ipad as well so it's very very good to see that not only are they finding it'd be it would have been nice if they simply twenty minutes during a keynote talk about education it's even better that they're saying no we're actually holding an event in chicago at a school and we're making the entire theme of the presentation that's the sort of stuff you like to see you like to see the fair that that's that's that's helps to convince you that they are still very very excited and interested in education as opposed to simply not willing to give up that part of the market yet what will we see hardware rene what do you think yeah the rumor is that we'll see a new version of the low cost ipad last year was a bit of an ipad air one point five it was it we didn't have the laminated scream that it had some of the other features that the ipad air to did and rumor that we'll get updated and maybe the price will get pushed down a little bit further but it's still a total cost of ownership acquaintan for apple for example when you get the chromebook you get the screen you get the keyboard with the ipad they have discounted keyboards they do in partnership with logitech but that's still as to the total price of the ipad and if you had an apple pencil to it it asks to the total price of the ipad and then if you want to do things with hdmi or vga to buy dongo's not as a little price of donald's at scale is still still expensive so it just the price starts creeping up and then there's a couple other issues to like apple google's id management isn't perfect for example if you get a school i d with google then you leave that school you lose that idea and a lot of people have lost accounts that.

iowa chicago apple logitech dongo donald google ibm twenty minutes
"ibm watson" Discussed on Pocket Now Weekly

Pocket Now Weekly

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Pocket Now Weekly

"Symbols gotten yeah good times so we do have a couple of other comments here's the conundrum yet vick who's wanting an acts on eight i am definitely on board is class on nine why just any follow up to the acts on as a proper straightforward flagship especially if especially if they can keep up with some of that audio on seven point one pretty epic g minus four from five hundred from jim brimble using the peon weekly hashtag i've been thinking for the last ten minutes why doesn't apple just by qualcomm in then you went and said it that would be whole areas i had one other comment here that i wanted to get to get to come on you can do it back there was i mean it was i was going back oh it was a we got this really great little conversation going on twitter just about ibm watson and how ibm kinda fell apart in that regard unfortunately it's a couple of people moving back and forth so i can't read all of those tweets but i you know i think it's just more evidence that the space hasn't been decided yet on how you interact with a smart assistant digital machine learning a whatever you wanna call it but we watch companies build up a whole bunch of mind share in that arena and then never seem to capitalize on it i look at microsoft with hollow lens i look at ibm with watson some really highconcept stuff and then when consumers finally get their hands on stuff they're using competing products which are probably not as good but you know no one's actually making stuff for those consumers so it's just a shame that they tend to fall apart just as they get to the finish line so.

jim brimble qualcomm twitter microsoft ibm vick apple ten minutes
"ibm watson" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Accelerate!

"So what's answer now if i knew that i would have already launched a a consulting company tell you exactly what to do to rebuild your cells and iron fiber i you know we're gonna have to find some other way either to develop cells reps ort or train cells are ups ondo's interpersonal skills that we learn that we learned that phase might be intercompany selling it might be actually literally just thinking about this now what somebody should build is a prospect bought where you can because there's all these like watson and stuff has wanted thrives on it yeah i be in watson has all these has these personality characteristics that you can bake into the the communist the cognitive algorithm right you should be able to feed the cycle graphic data from your target buyer persona into an ibm watson or something like that and then they should use natural language processing for me to try selling to it in practice that way yes somebody listening should go on set startup and i'll be your customer why that's i hadn't thought about though i think that's a that's a really interesting point us savvy do removes or the entry level stage of sales careers out of people people get into it anna i worry about a for all of them i worry about a for our our tech support folks to write like we generate customercare people customer yeah customercare customer success folks we generate a ton of really stupid inbound questions right customers are like where's this button annulling the bodies in front of you or at least the answers in the documentation right where watson kin or whatever the cognitive algorithm is can just look at your tech documentation and develop the answer and that's where our junior customer success folks generally start their career and then they move up in in the software world at least a either go onto the product team or they go onto the consulting and the heavy meaty customer success team were customers are asking questions that are in the documentation i'll and i think about that for them to lay not not that we're doing this anytime soon but if if companies start replacing the entry level of customer success folks which.

watson ibm natural language
"ibm watson" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"I think it's a combination of whatever market research but also just people not thinking i mean i visited ibm watson in in austin and there is a room that you can go into and you can talk to watson and he has this deep blooming male voice and you can ask questions and at the time i went there there was a second in the room that turned on the lights and the visitors and that one had a female voice and i pointed that out and it seemed like they hadn't really considered that so it's it's a mixture of people thinking oh this is going to sell better and people just not thinking at all because the teams that are buildings technology are predominantly young white and male and they have these blind spots where they don't even consider what bias he's they might perpetuate through the design of these systems so which brings us to the question of the such robots i acutest what you make of this and there are really complicated arguments on both sides of this of this question shoop we used machines is as know sexual companions should we use them in ways that could potentially satisfy the needs of of groups of people who in some ways we are troubled by yes so you know referring to pedophilia specifically this is a very difficult area because we we know almost nothing about pedophilia generally and we have absolutely no idea what the effects of technologies like this could be if they provide kind of an immersive sexual experience i mean it could be that this is a very useful outlet to use assertive unikely yes it basically that that ends up preventing real child abuse and on the other hand it could be that this is something that normalizes in and perpetuate certain behaviors and we literally have no idea what direction this goes in and i think this is a question that were going to be facing pretty soon i mean like you said their companies that make the doll's there's legal cases already about this and there's a lot of.

ibm watson austin
"ibm watson" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Fromapmi'mbenjohnson and this is marketplacetechazure often listed as the color of this guy is also the name for part of microsoft's business that it wants to grow big time yup from talking about the cloud there had been rumors of thousands of layoffs at microsoft as it continues to reorganize its sales people towards selling cloud computing products think storing things in using lots of software for your business all online some more of that we organization could come this week whatever happens microsoft even as a big player has big player competition here to talk about all of this is robenderle principal analyst at enderlegrouprob thanks for talking with us thanks to me is this just the other shoe dropping in the kind of long reorganisation of microsoft as a company welli think as we look at the tech industry you by and large and every tech company every one of them is almost constantly reorganizing now largely because the market is changing so very rapidly and so the idea here is that microsoft is trying to build its cloud computing business which they call as your service that's designed to handle other businesses software in crunch data and do storage and things that microsoft with mandela made that pivot to the cloud that's kind of the current big thing out there is moved as much as you cannot premise and someplace else or someone else can secure and protect and done and give you a better price what does that tell us about the company at large and where it's had it.

microsoft analyst mandela cloud computing principal enderlegrouprob tech company
"ibm watson" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

APM: Marketplace Tech

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"ibm watson" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

"From apm i'm ben johnson and this is marketplace tech azure often listed as the color of the sky is also the name for part of microsoft's business that it wants to grow big time yup from talking about the cloud there had been rumors of thousands of layoffs at microsoft as it continues to reorganize its sales people towards selling cloud computing products think storing things in using lots of software for your business all online some more of that we organization could come this week whatever happens microsoft even as a big player has big player competition here to talk about all of this is rob enderle principal analyst at enderle group rob thanks for talking with us thank having me is this just the other shoe dropping in the kind of long reorganisation of microsoft as a company well i think as we look at the tech industry by and large and every tech company every one of them is almost constantly reorganizing now largely because the market is changing so very rapidly and so the idea here is that microsoft is trying to build its cloud computing business which they call as your service that's designed to handle other businesses software in crunch data and do storage and things like that microsoft with no della made that have it to the cloud that kind of the current big thing out there is moved as much as you cannot premise and someplace else were someone else can secure and protect and done and give you a better price what does that tell us about the company at large and where it's had it.

ben johnson microsoft analyst cloud computing rob enderle principal enderle group tech company