37 Burst results for "Ibm"

Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on Free Talk Live

Free Talk Live

00:40 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on Free Talk Live

"We're going to go in and remove your 67 Corvette. My bed. It's just a gall bladder. You don't have a black paying you cash so you might have to sell that sweet little muscle machine just to cover your rent. More funny juice, But my papa gave me that. What do you wishing head after Locke? I love doing that health can change. But the life he loved doesn't have to keep your lifestyle healthy with black. It can detect the threat using AI and respond 60 times faster. It lets you know where your data lives down to the very server. It keeps your insights from prying eyes. So they're used by no one else But you it is the cloud. The IBM cloud Cloud that's designed for your data. Ai Ready? Secure to the core. The IBM cloud is cloud for business yours. When you work for yourself Taxes get complicated. Take out the guest work with QuickBooks self employed and stay in the float. E. It.

60 Times Quickbooks Locke Cloud Cloud 67 Corvette IBM Cloud
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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 2 d ago

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"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on  Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

00:35 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

"So let's just say that you've had the rock band from hill coming throwing the tv's at the window. Whatever you watching too much tv because you are backed up airbnb. Have a million dollar host guarantee and what that means is that if you can take fars if he can put a climbing and proof that the guests have caused damage so you need fired is you need sometimes of a police report. Sometimes you might need to get taishin from contractor to say what it will cost to repent the wall to replace a television. But if you can get all that that pipework together and submit if the guests does not pay for the damages airbnb will pay for the damages. And i have always had. Mike claims approved. There is some techniques to to get it done. But i promise you covid sire so i guess that's probably my five Five at a hotel would wanna get on. But i would absolutely encourage you to do so because you just you just might find it. It's a pretty cool experience. Yeah i guests that we had stayed from the airbnb platform itself One were shocked. We were hotel because we were condominium hotels so we are all swedes A mini apartment basically And they would stay and they walk the line like are we at the right place. Like yes you urethra the right place but they. They're pretty easy going 'cause they're already expecting like a house where they have to do everything themselves. So the perks of the hotel amenities such as like maybe complimentary breakfast or a pool or the pulled that they knew but like housekeeping service. That's all stuff that they're they weren't expecting so now at all so they're pretty chilled laid back like i ever had them once like at the front desk be bugging and complaining are doing pretty well sufficient gas which i really like and Of course. I said the reviewing platform really helps i think both parties on booking expedient. You don't have that option as a hotelier so we had a lot more issues with guests from ot as other than airbnb rather than airbnb self. So i think you make your budget really good points. I'm just thinking to we'll know on probably gonna take us in a bit of a different direction. He but i had a business. Those a business model. That i came up with and i dabbled with a little bit but anybody who wants to make some money. Get your pin piper at now. Because i'm going to give you is this idea and it is about creating a booking agent business and what this is. There's a lot of hotels and motels and smaller accommodation providers. Who are the on. Not on airbnb. Now these are people that possibly because they'd channel manager the the pay missile. The channel manager is just not it doesn't connect to ban bay and there's plenty of is out. They so traditional hotel channel manages to start. Why you listening. Mr listener his listening in right now if you were to go and talk to them to the little inundation the word all the van pock all the ave pack or whatever it might be go rhino feel services to lis- accommodations on a bambi. You've become the middleman you actually do. All the listing. But what you do is you created in the time. So you create a listing under the Let's say the hilton hotel. Let's guy for this muck around. Let's go to the big guys right so we got to the hilton hotel chain. We say we're going to list you. We're going to create a profile in be under the hilton hotel. I'm gonna create using our referral link for mine. Abm cancel. I get a kickback from ibm base. That's number one. We're going to make some money that But number two is..

Mike Five Hilton Hotel Both Parties ONE Million Dollar Airbnb Number Two IBM Swedes
IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:27 min | 3 d ago

IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

"About a decade ago. Ibm rolled out watson. One of the earliest artificial intelligence systems out. There watson was a big deal for ibm. You might remember that even went on and absolutely crushed the human competition it was a milestone in how we think about our relationship to computers and ibm wanted to take that technology and apply it to helping doctors diagnosed and cure cancer. But things didn't exactly happen that way and last week we reported that ibm was exploring a sale of its watson health unit. So what happened. And what does this tell us about the challenges of applying ai to healthcare for answers we turn to our digital science editor daniella hernandez hate mail. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So whereas watson now and what happened well i mean the struggles at ibm with watson. Been around for a little while. We reported in two thousand eighteen that the technology was really not getting the market share and adoption that it needed to make good on all the investments in all the acquisitions that ibm made in order to make watson a leader in the ai in healthcare field and so three years or so later it signals that you know the technology maybe wasn't working as well as they would have hoped. I think more. Broadly points to the fact that you know just having data or collaborations with leading scientists around the country. That just isn't enough and the reason is you know. Healthcare is complicated. So there's a lot of human issues at stake here. You know people do things differently. Like depending on which hospital you're at louisville depending on which doctor you're you're you're seeing but also the data in healthcare is messy for some of those same reasons you know you might input into a medical chart differently than me and for an i i might as well be two completely different things and so just that standardization of the information is really critical but also really hard and so when ibm started making these huge investments in watson they started buying up all these companies that had a lot of seemingly great data and the data might have been perfect but those data were basically styles from each other. They couldn't talk to each other and they never quite figured out how to meld them together. So they were cohesive data set of product. That really could make good on the promise that they that they saw. Fortunately has never materialized. And of course we should note here. That ibm says that watson has had some successes and that they're still believers in that technology we've been talking about. Ibm's new ceo. Arvind krishna on the show and following. He's been trying to of revitalize this legacy company how the sale of watson health fit into his efforts. Well i think one huge thing that has changed since the birth of watson. If you will is that you've had these other huge not legacy players come into the field. You've got google facebook amazon even microsoft right which you might consider a legacy company but they really rebranded themselves to. They weren't as big when watson. I came on the scene. And so now you've got this against storied legacy company competing with these new players. Who when they started making investments in. Ai were a lot more nimble and so they made investments in what at the time seemed like really experimental ai technology and now looking back like deep mind. Google investing hundreds of millions of dollars in that that technology just basically took over the world and ibm didn't really invest in that technology at the time and now is behind because all the talent is has been sucked into google facebook amazon apple And so they're they're behind.

IBM Watson Cure Cancer Daniella Hernandez Arvind Krishna Louisville Google Amazon Facebook Microsoft Apple
Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

03:36 min | 5 d ago

Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

"I want to come back to this idea social audio analytics and maybe the social audio management system this is going to be near and dear to the heart to a lot of the people who listen to this podcast because their space is accustomed to taking raw audio content transforming taxed analyzing it Actually putting it against other services and potentially returning information. So i wanted to explore that with you. A little bit we. We haven't seen that publicly yet and any of these social audio spaces you expect. People are actually doing it today. How do you think that that's going to play out. Do you expect this to be predominantly the platforms are going to try to control it and use this as a feature and trying to block other people or do you think it's mostly going to be third parties coming in and somehow getting the feed whether through direct. Api or from a rogue angle and then being able to provide that data to people who are interested in it. Yes so. I think there's maybe four constituent groups to think about here. Let's try to break this down. And i don't have all the answers here. I'm speculating so there are the platforms themselves twitter spaces and clubhouse and facebook. I think they are so twitter. Spaces already has real time voice to text translation into english which is on the lower third for some speakers. It's a three second delay about ninety percent accuracy. Ucla right yes okay. The second group would be the Government agencies and spies They're probably already doing it. But we'll never know. Group will be the traditional social media Analytics companies like salesforce and adobe salesforce acquired radian six In two thousand eleven ten years ago For three hundred million and their job was to grab all of the text based social media content. That was being produced at a rapid pace and make insights out of it and sell to brands for seven. Figure deals annually on what is being set in their market and give them analysis on share voice sentiment byproduct by region by country by network by individual by they produce. I was involved heavily with that industry now. The fourth group the fourth group i think is the one that will deploy so i. I don't think salesforce. And adobe wanna risk breaking the terms of service against twitter and risk that access that they already have in their. Api I don't think they wanna be scraping that content and also risk privacy concerns especially when a democratic administration is very concerned about privacy when it comes to social media as well as on the right hand side of the government as well they're even more concerned about suppression of so i don't think those big giant tech companies Adobe salesforce and oracle to do an ibm want to do that. So i think it's gonna be the fourth category which will be roguish punkish startups that are going to rip the content off with botts at a recording. The information then conduct voice to text analysis. And then do the other things that i already mentioned with sentiment in mining and influence analysis network. So i think it's going to be done under the covers of darkness fair enough and do you believe that the botts will be listed as users and basically some sort of fake user or are they going to be attached to a real users use. The system could be both. I mean there are. People are reporting data out of social audio by using. You know i rig systems and connecting to their ipod to other systems as well and just you know exporting that data. That's already happening.

Salesforce Twitter Adobe Radian Ucla Facebook Government Botts Oracle IBM
Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:10 min | 5 d ago

Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

"Luisa the welcome to come see us fan Saddest On people well-meant went guantanamo's kenneth lisa. What's your heritage come from who kansas louisa. Well kidneys louisa is trying to figure it out. But i i tell you what i am and what i've been doing what doing so i am not enough from venezuela in i grew up in venezuelan with my grandparents with i adore magnum weather. I grew up in small town in venezuela though what the super super state and they have the opportunity to come to the united states. And then some i came here to study. I went to the university to four business when i came here. Didn't know how to speak english at all in a hear about that. You didn't either an idea exactly what you may show one of your blood. 'cause i wanted to learn so bad so i wanted to surround myself with people that only speak english because i wanted to ask so. It wasn't very hard challenged. Because when i went to college didn't know how to speak english at all i so i knew in. Ibm it goes. I guess he'll was in noise Yes so but i didn't give up. I finished my education which was So so so happy and telling you a little bit about me from venezuela combing In had done so many other. Great things that you're going to be asking reward about it but you want me to answer the specific questions seven steps news. Okay good question. i can't him. I got married my first mary. I and my sick of marriage. Now when i met my hus- every though so i will have because my husband used to work for the american embassy in meeting in my country when i was ecstatic in one of the university concert that that was administered. Minnesota was beautiful lone That you here panda venezuela unfortunately very very sad contouring. Now people that really hungry that is not venezuela i grow up the minnesota eyebrow was a beautiful country has beautiful memories of my country. Anees very sad to see the country. The people desperate this matter saying is not the same by that is not when you are hungry on the is doing nothing for you. You know people lose the dignity people whose fact people lose who they are is like you said different things is that the footing is likely john gordon. My concert right now on his breaks my heart by amid my husband there in move here in continue with my education so that was the freeze tonight. Came him so you met him there and then he was like it's time to move back home anthems banana. Who does yes. We got married in my country and then via allows magnon. No noise is so funny but cook when the when i met my husband ex husband you know. He wasn't typical american told Blue is very hansel. I guess he has the most beautiful blue eyes is like. I was saying lowest. Lou is by didn't know how to speak spanish in. I didn't know how to speak english so when we met. He says ola senior double nita us like okay. So we went out a few timelines for launch. He used to pick me out for launch in. We launched and we'll look each other and we couldn't speak with assist mile. It was so cute in. We need that like a couple. Moore's acrimony guests at the ultra takeover. Nicotiana kimmy get it. I see it knows or he does he hope one day i said to hindu nowak. Don't call me don't call me anymore. I need to speak to you. I need to talk to you. Glad continual and so he was very sad in three months. He called me back. He was speaking spanish separately. Sap cohe layer is finding by himself. She in the newspaper bowl. So classes i Three mosey call me and louisa. Komo is task unit seat on more. Saudi yo who is there who is this. So yeah and how our love story star mary. Yeah

Venezuela Kenneth Lisa Luisa Louisa Guantanamo Kansas American Embassy IBM John Gordon United States Minnesota Nicotiana Kimmy OLA LOU Nowak Moore SAP Komo Saudi
Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

Short Wave

09:33 min | Last week

Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

"All right emily kwong so. We're talking about this announcement from a string of tech companies that they are going gonna put limits on their facial recognition technology especially when it comes to law enforcement amazon microsoft and ibm yes on june eighth. Ibm said it would discontinue general purpose facial recognition or analysis software altogether. Get out of the business completely and it made an impression after. Ibm's big letter. Amazon announced a one year moratorium on sales of they're very popular software recognition spelled with a k. To law enforcement to give congress time to implement appropriate rules so a one year ban. Yes microsoft took it a step further saying it wouldn't sell products to law enforcement at all until a federal law is in place. Here's microsoft president. Brad smith speaking to the washington post we need to use this moment to pursue a strong national law to govern facial recognition that is grounded in the protection of human rights and for matali in conde who has been pushing for regulation changes in tech for years. This was a big deal when these words were coming out of silicon valley. She felt all of the feelings. My initial was thank god. Thank god i was. I was happy. I was pleased. I was optimistic. I was short of breath. I was exhausted. Tally is the ceo of ai. For the people a fellow at both harvard and stanford universities for her. These announcements shifted the conversation. But that's about it. So i'm pleased. It's got us incredibly far but we're by no means the woods not out of the woods because for all of the advancement and facial recognition systems. Still get it wrong. They'll incorrectly match folks what's called a false positive or fail to associate the same person to two different images of false negative. Yeah and what's vaccine. Is these errors are happening. More often. when the machines are analyzing dark-skinned faces and that can disproportionally affect already marginalized communities prone to unconscious bias at the hands of law enforcement leading to false accusations arrests and much worse so until there's action on this metallic said words just aren't enough gotcha. So let's unpack this a little bit. Let's talk about how biased gets into facial recognition systems in the first place. I'd love that okay. So it starts right with how the systems learn to do their jobs. A process known as machine learning so to make facial recognition systems engineers feed algorithms large amounts of what's called training data in this case. That would be pictures of human faces. Yes the way machines learn is that they repeat task again and again and again and again and again developing a statistical model for what a face is supposed to look like so if you wanted to teach the algorithm to recognize a man you'd put in like millions of pictures of men you got it. The machine will then measure the distance between the eyes on each picture the circumference of the nose for example the ear to measurement and over time the machine starts to be able to predict whether the next image it seeing is quote a man which sounds okay right here comes the but but the machine is only a smart as its training data so remember joy ghulam weenie who i mentioned at the top of the episode. Yeah the the mit yes. So she and her colleague timid gabe developed a way to skin color in these training sets and the two they looked at were overwhelmingly composed of lighter skinned subjects. Seventy nine percent for ibi dash a and eighty six percent. For etienne's these are two common data sets that were largely as joy. Put it pale and male. So basically the training data used to create these algorithms is not diverse. And that's how that bias gets in The diversity of human beings is not always being represented in these training sets and so faces outside the systems norm. sometimes don't get recognized. Here's matala explaining what the research meant to her. That goes back to this other issue of not just hiring but a bigger issue of those no one in the team to say that you haven't put all the faces you haven't put all the digital images of all human beings could look like in the way that they sharpen society in order to recognize these faces. And it's so. After realizing how unbalanced these training sets were joy intimidate decided to create their own with equality in race and gender to get a general idea of how facial ai systems performed with a more diverse population so basically they fed it more diverse pictures to to look at. Yeah it was kind of interesting. They used images from the top ten national parliaments in the world with women in power specific yes specifically picking african and european nations and they tested this new data against three different commercially available systems for classifying gender one made by ibm the second microsoft and the third by face plus plus an running these tests joint him knit found clear discrepancies gender and racial lines with darker skinned faces getting mis classified the most. Here's mut-ali again. So one of the things that joy blue armies amazing work looks. That is the coloration between short hair and gender so many many many black women with afros where mislabeled as men mis gendered because the system had trained itself to recognize short hair as a male trait and this research project mattie produced a massive ripple effect further studies legislation in december the national institute of standards and technology or nist published a big paper of its own testing one hundred eighty nine facial recognition algorithms from around the world and they found biases to looking at one global data set some algorithms in their study produced one hundred times more false positives with african and asian faces compared to eastern european ones and when tested using another data set of mug shots from the us. The highest false positives were found among american indians with higher rates in african american and asian populations again depending on the algorithm. Wow yeah that is not what you want from your data. And i'm guessing white. Men benefited from the highest accuracy rates. Yes they did now. The knicks study did conclude that the most accurate algorithms demonstrated far less demographic bias but for multi. This evidence of bias raises a bigger question about the ethics of relying on. Ai systems to classify and police at all the problem with ai. Systems machine learning is that they're really really really good at standard routine tasks and the issue with humans is that we are not standard. We're not routine. Were actually massively messy right. We're not the same but when a police officer searches face in the system. They're not making arrests based on just spat match alone are they. Oh absolutely not. Yeah it's a tool for identifying potential suspects but if you think about how there's already implicit bias in policing critics. A facial recognition are basically saying. It doesn't make sense to embrace technologies riddled with bias to right if all this research has shown. These tools are capable of misidentifying black people. We cannot use biometric tools that discriminate against a group of people who are ready discriminated against within the criminal justice system but policing most specifically mattie. When i first spoke to mut-ali in march she was open to moratoriums on facial. Recognition like amazon is doing buying time for these systems to improve regulations to be put in place but the protests have her views. Because why why am i being moderate with completely reimagined how we interact with technology so now she wants to see facial recognition banned from law enforcement use which some cities in the us have done. Moutallos has tried to push for legislation to outlaw discrimination in technology before but it seems like now people are paying attention and have a language for talking about structural racism that they just didn't have before whether why america listened to me or not. I was gonna continue with this work. I believe that technology should be an empowering force for all people and that's my work but now having old and new ala not just allies but co-conspirators bright. I'm so happy. Because i didn't think would happen in my lifetime and it's an it's

IBM Microsoft Emily Kwong Matali Amazon Ghulam Weenie Brad Smith Matala The Washington Post Stanford National Institute Of Standard Harvard Etienne Congress Gabe Mattie ALI Knicks
Challenges and opportunities of blockchain in the insurance industry

Insureblocks

05:08 min | Last week

Challenges and opportunities of blockchain in the insurance industry

"For this podcast. We will be discussing challenges of blockchain in the insurance industry with special insights from ibm. And i'm very pleased to have mark mclauglin. Ibm's head of insurance strategy solution sales and partnerships worldwide mark. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself sure thanks lead and thanks for having me on as you said our head of strategy for the insurance vertical for ibm a teams pulled together. Ibm's hardware software services cloud and our business partners to deploy value for the insurance industry. I've been doing that myself For twenty twenty five years now. The first solution i built for the industry was artificial intelligence back in their early nineties for a large insurer here in the us and that solution is still running today which Either tells you something about our industry or something about my coding one or the other. so let's go was your coating absolutely exceptional. Not sure that's really really. No thank you for that introduction so as you know and hearing two blocks and we always ask. Our guest is first question which is what is blockchain. And how does it work the way i. Obviously i think most of your listeners. Are well aware that there is a difference between the blockchain enabled currencies like bitcoin and ripple and the actual blockchain functionality itself. The way i think of it is. It's a shared ledger. The trusted leisure. It's an ability for multiple entities. Who don't necessarily have a one hundred percent trusted relationship. They are business entities with different interests. Different goals but you can establish a common ground wear a set of documents they said of processes a set of data is maintained by a group across a business network and that is maintained in a way that is immutable Where everybody can see the changes that are going on and everybody has a record of what's going on you know whether it be you know data around contract or execution of a business process and being able to do that in a way that is trusted by all participants That can bake in features like smart contracts to help you automate some of those processes right. There's a lot of different things you can do. With the blockchain right currencies one of them but running a lot of shared business processes and other one of them and. i suspect. We'll be talking about that today right now. Thank you thank you for that. So as you are aware we've had a number of your colleagues on the inch. Blocks podcast from bos- expert within the blockchain in the insurance space. Now i'm curious to know from your personal standpoint. how would you characterize. The insurance industry's embrace of blockchain technology. Well i think high interest right. Insurers for a number of reasons are feeling the heat on innovation. Right whether you look at the you know. The forty six percent kager on tech investment. The last three years or the entry of of large-scale players like like paying on like amazon into more kind of online distributed type insurance ventures. Right whether you look at insurance being baked into other industries right when you go by airlines at the united states your offer travel insurance now as part of that process right. It's it's very different than the kiosks in the airport of old right. I think the industry knows that they have to figure out ways to connect to broader ecosystems. Knows they have to innovate and blockchain's one way to do that. There's there's definitely some great opportunities there's definitely some pitfalls but ensures you know high level of interest having a little trouble getting started in some cases and i think we'll dig into that as we go. Yeah exactly because you know we know we started our podcast mainly focus on the insurance industry in two thousand eighteen inch thousand nineteen. We spread out to cover other industries. Which is very fascinating to see the challenges and opportunities each industry have with regards to adopting mom blockchain but this is sticking for insurance for now. You know as you mentioned you had twenty to twenty five years experience in building solutions and partnerships ensures. Would you say that insurers are more or less open to embracing blockchain comparison to other previous or existing modern technologies such as cloud in ai to name a few. As you mentioned. You know you did this project in quite some time ago. How does blockchain compared to these kinds of technology. I think blockchain has great potential and as technology. I think insurers are are more than willing to embrace it. I think the challenges are the business model. Right i can take a And it and it's very easy to visualize. Hey here's here's a case. Where i could see how i might help me process a claim better. You know underwrite risk better advise in indentured. Better now actually getting it to do that is a little bit more challenging but visualize it. it's eas- right blockchain. It's a little tougher for the challenge. Isn't the tech. I think it's the use case behind the technology

IBM Mark Mclauglin Blockchain United States Amazon
Interview With Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

Technically 200

04:48 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

"This is the first of a series of technically two hundred talks or roundtable conversations. Where it's not just a one on one. But one onto plus. And i am very excited about this one because we have miss jessica odor yemi once again from ibm technical product manager. And we've got Ms katy call technical program manager at facebook. Such a pleasure to have you both here to night so i just wanna start with one question for each of you in. Why don't we start with katie. Katie what's your first memory of being excited about tech my first memory of being excited about tack. It has to be. I think in my freshman year computer science course. It's like an introduction a computer science. I just remember. I had started at princeton as a chemical engineer and i was just like i was in my first chemistry class. I was like this is like watching paint dry like this is not like the chemistry. I know from high school and i was just really excited about this idea. Setting chemical engineering. But when i took my first computer science course everyone had worn me before the course that was going to be so challenging difficult and i just remember just like enjoying every assignment and every assignment just felt like it felt like a puzzle. Felt fun and i. I felt like i was spinning. Just an inordinate amount of time. Just focus on by computer science work over my chemistry homework and i hadn't even got into sort of like the chemical engineering courses yet and i was like this'll make sense. Why by studying. Something that i am like. Great like begrudgingly. Getting through versus has studying something that i love so i just remember just being super excited about the next assignment and computer science like always wanted the next one wanted to do like the extra credit. I love that and jess unless you that same question. Yeah so let's see. I got into the tech industry per se a little bit later in life. But i remember the first time i was excited about anything. Simulated was an elementary school. When i found out I don't know if you've ever heard of them ike rube goldberg projects Like i don't know if you've ever seen a movie pee wee's big adventure. But at the very beginning he has all these contractions that connect to each other to do different things. But i kind of find out found out an elementary school. There was. We were introduced to the the concept of a rube goldberg project. In thought it was so cool. So i did something similar for science fair project and i thought it was the coolest thing ever As far as you know the tech industry goes. I think that happened much later in life for me. So that probably didn't happen for me until i was working and i think we've chatted about this a little bit before but i was working in the oil industry and it just occurred to me that i was out on the rate drilling wells and that was great but there was this whole other world behind what we were doing. You know software insistence. That was kinda powering. Everything that we were doing out in the field. So i think that's when i first got into Tech per se jessica. I did the rube. Goldberg is file. When i was younger. i've loved it. I went to the. I went to the national competitions. Like and since. I'm so close to purdue growing up so i would go to indiana. Just go see what the students The cooking up so had logged. Rube goldberg did that. When i was like what is the most extravagant way to crack in a like the prices so so member game mouse trap. I love that like that.

Jessica Odor Yemi Ms Katy IBM Katie Princeton Rube Goldberg Facebook Jess Goldberg Jessica Indiana
Modern Oracles and Astrology

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Modern Oracles and Astrology

"Welcome to kids myths and mystery signer host. Kit chrome with this podcast. I begin a month long examination of modern oracle's and their methods of divination last friday. I mentioned how not all forms of designation demand a psychic or even a sensitive one. Such form of discrimination astrology as common popular astrology is today is complex but as mentioned does not rely on the reader having psychic abilities instead relies heavily on planets and stars. Initially you might scoff at the idea of pulling any kind of prophecy from the heavenly bodies. But let's take a look at the history of astrology. Mayan astrology is a variation of mesoamerican astrology. One of the most forward thinking kinds of astrology of times. Mayan calendar's comprised of twenty day signs and thirteen galactic numbers. Making two hundred sixty day. Calendar year the mayan study of the moon planets milky way son was some of the most accurate pre telescope astronomy in the world. Mayan astrology goes back to around the fifth century bc. Then we have england stonehenge. Gerald hawkins work on stonehenge was first published in nature magazine in nineteen sixty three following analysis. He had carried out using a harvard. Smithsonian ibm computer. Hawkins found. Not one or two alignments but dozens. He had studied one hundred. Sixty five significant features at the monument and use the computer to check every alignment between them against every rising and setting point for the sun moon planets and bright stars the position say would have been in in fifteen hundred bc so has astrology around for a while no doubt but let's go back to present to find out how astrology works. Here's a simple answer. Astrology works on many levels at the simplest level. It is not unlike a complex clock the uses the motions of the planets in a similar way to the movement to the hands on the face of a clock. Now let's dig a little deeper. Astrology is the belief that the alignment of stars and planets affects every individual mu personality and environment depending on when he or she was born. Astrologers print horoscopes and newspapers that are personalized by birthday. These horoscopes make predictions in people's personal. Lives describe their personalities and give them advice. All according to the position of astronomical bodies a survey conducted by the national science foundation found that forty one percent of respondents to their poll. Believe that astrology is very scientific. This begs the question astronomical bodies affect our lives. Solar flares cost electro magnetic disturbances on earth. That can disrupt satellites and even caused blackouts. The position of the moon costs us ocean tides. If you're a fisherman that position of the moon can have a significant effect on your livelihood. The solar wind causes beautiful aurora and sunlight itself is the main source of energy for our planet. Still the question. How is strategy as a tool of divination astrology uses a set of rules about the relative positions and movements of heavenly bodies to generate predictions and explanations for events on earth and human personality traits. Some used astrology to generate very specific expectations. It could be verified against outcomes. What does science have to say about astrology. Simply that it's not scientific yet. Hundreds of thousands of people have been influenced by designation nation provided by astrologers millions across america. No there astra logical sign and read their horoscope in the newspaper. Daily get this j pierpoint morgan. One of the world's greatest fight answers was suspicious of accepting planetary advice but ended up applying astrology to all of his personal affairs. John adams famous second president of the united states refused to sign the declaration of independence until the exact moment planetary indications were most auspicious. And this will really get ya jay. Jacob stout jeff pierpoint morgan and seymour cromwell comprised a bracket of three successive presidents of the new york stock exchange who utilized astronaut. Advice implanted their operations. They scoffed at this. However upon the arrival of the wall street crash these men had been warned by their astrologers and thus averted disaster disci- support astrology is a form of give nation. No has astrology affected millions of individuals over the centuries the answer is a resounding yes

Gerald Hawkins Oracle Hawkins Harvard IBM England National Science Foundation Pierpoint Morgan Astra Jacob Stout Jeff Pierpoint Mor United States Seymour Cromwell John Adams JAY New York
Automatic Summarization

Data Skeptic

05:53 min | Last month

Automatic Summarization

"My name is martin luther before and i'm a vc student at the university from saddam. Main research is focused on natural language processing and information retrieval. And i'm especially interested in how we can learn from humans and human cognition to improve our ai models before that. I did my master's degree in artificial intelligence at my bachelor's degree in mystic so liked to take the knowledge i also have from the back roads and the light microbes research everything. I've done related to natural language processing carries with it a sort of computer science bias towards it. I don't have your background in linguistics. What advantages does that give you in your approaches to natural language processing. It's quite interesting. We've seen the developments. From the early days. I would say wehrley Quite prominence when we wanted to model language greedy looks into specific linguistic structures. And at least things then we went into an era. Our people throw that away basically no linguistics of war Data only we only want to learn patterns from data and always see a bit of shift back again so people try to incorporate knowledge from linguistics into models with the idea that they come maybe learn everything from data per se or if we have named with knowledge that might gives an advantage if we decide like these are models that could work well for this task for example is a pretty exciting thing to see that we go back in the knowledge of marie slogan definitely there have been a couple of people who have taken a pretty provocative ver- extreme point of view on this and is ibm. Has this famous quote. Yes i believe Frederick djelic said every time i fire a linguist the performance of the speech recognizer goes up so i imagine that was a deliberately provocative statement to make in your experience. How have these communities actually overlapped in the community or p. community specifically we want to model language and that's basically what you also want to do linguistics. You want to model language and you want to understand language. You may not want to light produce than which so much linguists rather observe whereas from nlp perspective you might as well to produce but also understand that right. So i think as linguist. You have certain intuitions about language with everyone might have. That seem very obvious to you as linguists that other people might not find so obvious such as negation can be a hard province so for me seems very obvious because this is a trend See gwyn stakes but like from computer science perspective. Never thought about this. You might wonder like why does my mom before well these types of includes or questions or whatever you might not realize that it was about negation or something. That is yet wasn't really that long ago when people still seriously considered that we could solve negation with just a couple of handcrafted rules Exactly like there's more to that right. I think in order to understand what would work well or licensing doesn't work well yet. List acknowledged really comes in handy. Will your paper the caught. My attention is titled what makes a good summary reconsidering the focus of automatic. Summer ization now automatic. Summer is kind of interesting that by hearing it. Even if you've never heard of this fuel before. You kind of intuitively know what it's all about yet. There's still some open questions practically speaking you know. What does it mean to do some reservation. Could you perhaps give us a survey or overview of the various techniques is a great question. Maybe not so clear which is one of the reasons why we started to write this paper. But that said i can give an overview first of what is often perceived as the way to do it in the community. so i'm talking about texts. Summarize -ation right because Of video summer ization for example with for decoration. You often do. thank you. Take any input documents. Texts article for example news article or a bunch of news articles media articles. And you want to kind of get the gist out of this input and right leg few sentence summary about it. That is the majority of work that is done now. How is this done with anything. We've seen a little progress. They're so it started off with a unsupervised Graph based model such as text. Frank relax wrangler. Basically people make a graph of the input documents and then kind of see. What are the most important sentences Extract those now with the rise of neuro models. We see that there is much To sequence approaches. That people used first night with our anez. We see transformers. And bird and bird dyke auto spoken up in a community. And then you also asked about the evaluation. So how often do it is served few forms of evaluation so you have flake the firm and often people use a roche with basically check for lexical. So have your label. Summary like the one you know. It should be any kind of check out. Many words are in common with summary. I produced there. How many acronyms to make it more precise and then there's also some new metrics such as like bird scores in one that doesn't measure lexical similarity with router semantics clarity right because in this lexical similarity approach. If you have a word is kind of the same word as in the summary. That was the label. But it's not the same word out and you don't want that so you run our to measure semantic similarity so that's another type of scoring functions people use and then another way is with human evaluation though you would ask. People questions like which of these summaries is more fluent or which one more informative or which one has the best coverage these questions

University From Saddam Marie Slogan Frederick Djelic Martin Luther Gwyn IBM Frank
Abbianca Makoni, independent producer, on documenting UK women gangs

Journalism.co.uk podcast

07:11 min | Last month

Abbianca Makoni, independent producer, on documenting UK women gangs

"You've got the documentary gun. Goals coming out on the first of february corrects. Why don't you stop by just telling us a little bit more about that documentary. And as of what's to come there so this solution-focused documentary samson i essentially spark to those on the front line of this issue so from the grocery charities. Those who training police teaches on also the victim survivors as well. Who go to them are now trying to give back to youth and trying to draw. Young girls On boys out of crime and criminal activity so it just looking at okay. This is the issue this is about is but what is being done and what can be done essentially on dogs we hit Solutions and ideas means by about how we can do. Better essentially lows of questions come to mind of course but it's a constant an easy time to explore this with with what's happening in the world. How did how did covert kind of affect the documentary coming together. It definitely did affect it. Of course with the restrictions are times where we Some point will. I can be able to go and film this We have to via zoom. How we're gonna get you to be able to do the interview by. Luckily we actually started filming a documentary at the start of last year so we started around february and then some of the film was around march so other covid with here in the uk. It wasn't as bad as as it is now and the restrictions one as well as i guess so over the fact that you're a multimedia journalists with the evening standard. The documentary has nothing to do with the evening standard. You chosen to independently while working with sampson followed zone of course as executive producer and editor. Why did you choose to pursue this story in such small numbers. I've always loved broadcast. I guess telling stories visually and particularly on this issue in this area. This is something i. i'm very passionate about reports. Crime in knife crime in the post. But i guess i really wanted to work with someone who i was very familiar with. I've known some simple years now. And i know that this is something he also wanted to explore and again a subject matter a. He's the media with as well. Gt know where he grew up in how he grew up. And i think that's how they came to light before you know what we are too young creatives who have a passion for this issue on something that you know although affects everyone it also affects our community will. Let's do it. let's get up. Let's see what we can do together and bring the topic back into the limelight. Could you have explored this with the evening standard. Like with your day job if you wanted to. I definitely think so. I mean the evening star. They have an amazing video team. That i'm sure would have been able to do an amazing job With this project. But i think again with everything happening nineteen and then with politics brexit the us. They just so much attention going in different areas. Where i think. That's another thing. Which i guess i thought about and i thought you know what the news extremely busy right now. I'll with so many different things. This is something that i can. I guess also do on my own. I think i've mentioned. I am a self usa so with some of the videos i did self she on my own which meant that. It did allow me to do not depend on too many people so that the project could actually happen and we didn't have the delays columbine easy doing this in what must be limited spare time you you mentioned. Start to get the star of last year. Journalists are obviously well known for boehner. The candle at both ends taught me about is a honestly. I was always tired. Because of course idea what i was using my weekends saw straight off to my shift then like sailed all night. It's absolutely crazy but again when you are passionate about something when attacking very sensitive sore you're gonna give it your all and i think janice ala's walled anyway so staying up too late. It wasn't anything new to me. But again because i knew that a lot of these victims of i was saying like look. You know we've been trying to get this more in alignment they so many things you want to talk about the also about how cova has exacerbated a few of the issue so the fact that you're doing this really grateful and just hearing those things as well it does make you wanna keep pushing And using your free time to ensure that the project does get done so but it was definitely odd. It was a Walking basically seven days a week basically. But yeah i can see your passion warrants this story so close to home. While few years. I did leave the frightened to knife crime and i guess you know the issue of knife crime itself. It's something that is definitely a meeting the a whole just london but i think some people until it gets close to home. That's when you really realize how bad it is. I guess Lost my friends. I thought he just meant wearing a few young people in getting involved. more youth committees workshops. Basically trying to help Those that might be out of education all at high risk of gang life. And i guess when your communicates me about some of these children. You're hearing that going through in your hearing what they see on a day to day basis and it is one young man who was fifteen at the time who told me that he seen people get stopped in the face. And you're thinking so young and you've just experienced the west thing. So i think that is what has i guess. Giving me this passion and this is to ensure that we all highlighting some of the issues around crime as a whole and how. It's affecting young people in particular more condolences. Ibm i'm sorry to hear about fine. Listen this is a topic clearly. With a lot of sensitivities and considerations going in in a broader sense we've seen this trend of journalists going independent albeit on their own publications. And that's not specifically what you're doing here. But when i've spoken to them they've said that you know i wouldn't want to do something to in depth investigative because i don't have the the gut check that comes with perhaps a full editorial tame. Did you think about that going in that having such small numbers when you are going to be exploring something so sensitive and and ethically challenging of course i think a lot of my friends at his friends are very supportive throughout this whole I guess process while i was continuously checking in on them. And if i ever had any question it was like okay. You know what. I'm doing this documentary and know how to go about this and how to go about that and i think With some of the country the documentary. I'd watch them previously anyway. Whether it was like a youth event so there was a lot of trust that had been built. Because again added john honest. I try to be well connected with a guest different communities us that when you saw stopped topics they know they can trust you if they ever have a question or a query. They're very quick to tell you. Well how are you going to do this in high do that. Don't shy away from also challenging you and ask you how you're going to go outside and

Samson Janice Ala Sampson Boehner Cova United States UK London IBM John
Global stocks sink after China coronavirus resurgence

News, Traffic and Weather

00:31 sec | Last month

Global stocks sink after China coronavirus resurgence

"Stocks slipped as a worldwide rally takes a pause. The Dow fell 179 points. The S and P 500 gave up 12 points, but the NASDAQ closed up 12 points. Losses started early in Asia than carried westward on worries about resurgent coronavirus cases in China and weak economic data from Europe. Here in the U. S disappointed earnings reports from IBM and some other companies put investors in the mood to sell. IBM dropped 10.5% for one of the market sharpest losses. Big Blue's revenue has been mostly shrinking for years.

Big Blue Asia U. China Europe
Stocks drift to mixed close

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:33 sec | Last month

Stocks drift to mixed close

"Narrowly mixed today, the S and P 500 edged up one point and the NASDAQ composite Rose 73 both indexes again, notching fresh closing highs. But the Dow industrials slipped 12 points. After the closing bell. IBM reported mixed fourth quarter results. The tech giant's per share earnings of $2.7 topped expectations, but revenue of $20.37 billion was weaker than expected revenue that IBM is cloud and cognitive software segment fell 5% from a year earlier in after hours trading. IBM shares are down more than 6%. That's your money. Now we

IBM
VIPER Rover Gets Powerful New Headlights

Innovation Now

01:01 min | Last month

VIPER Rover Gets Powerful New Headlights

"The extreme light and dark found on the moon makes contours in the landscape invisible. In the darkness viper drivers will rely on a system of mounted lights and cameras to help them steer clear of boulders craters and other obstacles that might be hiding in the shadows instead of the single. Led's found on mars rovers. Vipers lights will be a raise of. Led's that provide the same flexibility. As your car's ibm or parking lights one pair of arrays will be mounted on the rover's mast to cast a narrow long distance. Beam around the base of the rover as many as six lights will illuminate a broad area less intensely teams at nasa's ames research center are not only looking for the best prototype but how best to position the lights. The powdery dust on the moon reflects light. Which could blind vipers cameras so researchers are always looking for ways to limit back gallery

Ames Research Center IBM Nasa
Netflix surpasses 200M subscribers as quarantines continue

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:18 sec | Last month

Netflix surpasses 200M subscribers as quarantines continue

"Netflix. Kick off the tech. Earning season yesterday reporting that at a record thirty seven million subscribers in twenty twenty and that it had topped two hundred million total subscribers for the first time the milestone with powered of course by consumers demand for at home entertainment options. During the pandemic we'll get reports from intel. Ibm and others in the coming weeks.

Netflix Intel IBM
Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

Good Life Project

05:56 min | Last month

Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

"We have this conversation. I'm hanging out in boulder colorado. You are in vancouver and You grew up in british columbia. It sounds like in a small town. Did which is known it. Tell me if. I have this right as the second largest stampede. In canada behind calgary is that right. We're gonna go that right. Yes yes. I've lived my entire life telling people that factoid and for non canadian listeners. The stampede is certainly it biggest rodeo on the planet candidate you've I grew up by Surrounded by cowboys and gold. Rush prospectors bright williams. Like the. it's the town. It's pretty small town though isn't it yet. Is sub between fifteen and twenty five thousand depending on over the course of years. So it's it's pretty small it's largely in the interior of b. c. so it's a lot of mountains nearby and a lot of outdoors and that sort of thing. The caribous right. That's right. yeah it's in the cariboo. Yeah so were you. Were you ever participant in the rhodesia side of things. Actually my father was the the head of the rodeo. When year. But i was really small. I was never a participant. We had sort of friends that had ranches in for a while. We had cattle and horses forces scared me in the sense that they they had their own minds. I wasn't entirely sure when i was on a dirt bike. I knew how to control that but horses had to actually be a lot smarter than i was to know how to get on with horses so my sister wrote a lot got. That's kind of really interesting foreshadowing in a weird way though right because you sort of like as a as a kid you see these animals and realize that they have their own mind than their own will. And you're not entirely sure how it works. How to relate to them or had a surly interact way where you develop a mutual understanding and then you look pretty far far forward actually like a couple of years down. The road and your life has been devoted to similar process but with human beings absolutely. Yeah it's it's really interesting too because you see come full circle and not for me personally. But now acquaint therapy you have these people that are really being able to understand. The phenomenon of the brain is the brain is the brain right. So it's it's fascinating to see it across not just humans but across all animals. Yeah a much. A curious is so you do all this work on Measuring what happens in the brain and detecting what happens in the brain then translating that. Because i i've also seen sort of this really fascinating emergence of therapy and known people who both Lead therapy and have been through it. You have been inclined slash patients and shared how they feel like a horse's or these deeply wise animals who are fiercely intuitive and consents. Everything about you so that there there is this sort of connection really unusual connection that tends to happen with human beings as a neuroscientist. Does that land trudy. Yes it does. It's actually where. I'm i'm right now. I'm really interested in tobacco up a bit when ibm i built watson and challenged Jeopardy champions i got called in the neuroscientist to compete Sort of debate with computer scientists about the brain and a and all that stuff. And i got fixated on this interesting thing. I stumbled across my research where somebody proposed that there could be more functional connections in the human brain than there were atoms in the observable universe and over the years. I've really found that interesting. Because i've i've tried to work the numbers and that sort of thing and what i realized it. You know if you reduce that down to a simple circuit of neurons it is possible that that circuit can have more connections than it actually has atoms that compose it and when i really realized it was kind of cool is when if you think we'll wait a minute that's the neurons are not just within our own. Skulls are neurons. Interact with each other all the time right so minor runs right now. Are changing your functional connections in yours are changing mind so so i thought wow. Isn't that cool. Because that's like a really heavy kinda insight into ways. We could tap brain potential brain power to do good things in life. And so yeah. I'm always thinking about those things. Yeah and it's and it's really interesting to right because the fundamental assumption there. Is that the things that go on in our brain can in a very real way affect what's happening in the brain of being whether human or animal in proximity to us in some way shape or form. Yeah yeah we just had one of our Cyber narrow factoid and one of the facts that was really interesting as when musicians are playing music their brainwaves synchronized and doing all these things now. I don't personally do it but through in the field. There's all these meta scanning where they can show the neuro relationship between mom and baby and different people far away as just fascinating. Yeah that's amazing because then if you can show that the brainwave sink. Then if that sentence than has almost like this trickle down effect on the physiology and the rest of the nervous system then maybe that also part of the basis for people who were new you have these phenomenon where it seems like physiological cycles. start to sink Yeah yeah. And i think it's interesting because the more that we become mindful of that the more we can actually use it for positive impacts right and i think in the world today you can maybe start to ask the question if some of that is there and has just out of control and so how could we actually harness that. I think that's just such interesting ways to think about how you know we never really think about our brains right. It's just what moves our body and our personality and all that but if you could actually think about it in different ways i've i've always loved creativity in that. Yeah

Bright Williams Cariboo Rhodesia Boulder British Columbia Cowboys Calgary Vancouver Colorado Canada Trudy Watson IBM
Addressing the Digital Gap During the Pandemic

CompTIA Sharkbytes

06:47 min | Last month

Addressing the Digital Gap During the Pandemic

"Either this is alan shark and welcome to another episode of shark bites. This is the first episode in the year. Twenty twenty one so hopefully you had a happy new year and looking forward to a much better year than perhaps we had last year. As you know the podcast delves into europe. Cio's and other tech leaders throughout local government to some extent state government and today. We are very fortunate. Have john walton. John is a chief information officer of the county of san mateo california. I've known him for over a decade and he is getting all these awards and whatnot and it seemed like this is an appropriate time to really have a chat into sheer the discussion with you. John brings over twenty five years of experience in the fields of information. Technology has a diverse background in both public and private sectors sending innovative technology standards providing visionary leadership for numerous organizations each receive tons of awards and most recently state tech recognized him as one of the thirty people to watch in the year. Twenty twenty twenty-eight came out towards the year so hopefully it'll make the list again in twenty twenty one but he sent a lot of things that hopefully we'll get into that for example. I believe he'd been on school board. You have been a race car driver so you have a lot of interest so john. Welcome thank you on. It's great to be here. I really enjoy having the opportunity to talk with you. Ve enjoyed our friendship and partnership over the years and really excited for twenty twenty one. Yeah it's got to be better than last year. Such such an anomaly. Such a different year. It can only get better so john. I always ask when we begin these discussions. I always believe that. Very few of us wake up in high school or even college and say when i grow up and when i go into the adult workforce i want to be a chief information officer so i'm always curious to know. How did you get to where you are. You've had a really great career and is far from over so if you would you've had an interesting journey so let's spend a couple of minutes talking about. How did you get to the county san mateo allen. Yeah that's That's a great question and probably the most complex question. You're going to ask me today. So i will. I will try to keep it to a couple of minutes. It was a long winding road to end up. Were ended up i. I grew up in. A family of there was a military family. My dad was missile defense and so we moved a lot as you can imagine and my dad used to like to say we lived in places where people didn't care where he blew things up so those rather rural and isolated and i wasn't into computers at all matter of fact i'm of an age where computers were still a relatively new thing so my exposure to computers were really through. My dad was a bit of what we call order now. Every time they would demo out a test site he He felt terrible about all the expensive computer equipment that was getting thrown away. Pdp lebanon's and things like that so he would haul them home in his pickup truck. And i grew up with garage. Full of old mainframe computers wang's ibm's and so those were my toys. My friends growing up but to be honest they didn't really interest me I really love nature and so When i teach classes at san francisco state and things like that mba students. I always tell them to become a cio. The first thing you do is you go to humboldt state university and get a degree in natural resource science. because that's where every good cio starts with a degree in natural resources. And and that's really how i got started i. I really wanted to be a researcher. A scientist i wanted to study nature and the environment and at that time The college was implementing backs computer systems. That was a new thing and it turned out that i wasn't really great at school. I i guess you would probably call it. Add now. but i don't do well sitting in classes listening but turns out a really good at setting up. Faxes for all the computer. Labs all the professors would give me extra credit to make up for my poor test scores by going in and configuring all the computers in the labs and so that would really help. My career started i. I did get a bachelor's degree in science. I enjoyed that but immediately after college. I started setting up. Computer systems. for counties and cities and private industry and it just went from there and in those days. It was really what you did. You just sort of went from project to project and it was word of mouth and if you knew anything about computers that kind of puts you a leg up on the competition so while up here i am now i must cio the great county here in california You know appreciative of all the recognition. Our county gets think it's really a reflection to the hard work. The staff here does and the leadership of the county the supervisors in the city manager. I think i am probably the best easiest. Cio job in california. They they make things very easy for me. I met one of your deputies at a recent meeting in there. You do have a very talented staff so tell us. I did read somewhere about this racing car thing so tell me a little bit about that. Well yes so. That's like. I said the the technology thing wasn't really a passion of mind when i was young and my dad is a hobby was an amateur stockcar razor so i grew up around tracks and engineers. It turns out you know. He was an engineer. Engineers love to build things and so he looked to build cars and fix cars so i grew up working on cars and building cars and race cars and have always been around those. And so that's always been my hobby. As a matter of fact the mechanic paid my way through college. Because i had an aptitude for that. And it's really just built from there. I think from my childhood you know as a as an executive technology really. I spend most of my time. Unfortunately you know in meetings in office buildings working on spreadsheets. Power plants you know. It's not as glamorous as probably some people think it is to be a cio for me at least and kind of tactile this rule I built my own race cars. I tune them my drive them on the track. It's really release for me. And all the things i do probably things. It helps me too many of us in this world. Nowadays we all try to multitask too much when meetings and checking email and texting. And i will say if you ever need to focus. There's nothing like being racetrack. One hundred thirty miles an hour going into a turn to cause you to focus and not worry about. Who's texting you calling you on the phone. So i still love it. I've sold most of my cars now. I have to left. And i still do it when i have the time. But it's it's less and less these days. Covert has kept us very busy. And i have two young sons that i try to spend as much time with is like can so until they get interested in racing than i probably won't spend as much time at the track is i have in the past

Alan Shark San Mateo Allen John Walton John CIO San Mateo California Humboldt State University Europe Wang Lebanon MBA IBM San Francisco
Gary Cohn joins IBM as vice chairman

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

00:18 sec | Last month

Gary Cohn joins IBM as vice chairman

"Gary cohn president trump's first director of the national economic council announced today he is joining. Ibm as vice-chairman cola. The white house after the trump tax cuts fashion might remember that has since been critical of the president. I do have one question though. What is the vice chairman of ibm. Actually do

Gary Cohn National Economic Council Donald Trump Cola IBM White House
"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"That our tail today is brought to a close. There are many approaches to creating a personal computer off and like a lot of Longshot goals. They were many attempts going on in total isolation. IBM would eventually crack the code with the PC but it wasn't a bolt from the blue devel. And Company had been working towards the personal computer for the better part of a decade and then they only struck a big when they were able to give up all control. The PC was a very unhappy I am computer. It used third-party hardware and it shipped with a whole slate of third-party software, but that was just the Terminus of work that had been brewing since the early 1970s wage. If we actually want to look towards IBM's first personal computer, then we shouldn't be talking about the 5150. We should be looking at scam the 5100 the data master and all the trials and factors that led to the PC we know today and while that story makes things more complicated. I think it's a better one. IBM didn't get their act together all at once instead. They slowly learned they slowly adapted and they were slowly able to let go of a little bit of control if it wasn't for this long evolutionary. We wouldn't have the same computers we have today off. And was over this long Evolution, but Friday was scammed would turn into everyone's PC. Thanks for listening to admin of computing. I'll be back in two weeks time with another piece of the story of the computer. And hey, if you like the show, there are now a few ways you can support it. If you know anyone else who likes Computer History, then why not share the show with them. You can also rate and review on Apple podcasts. And if you want to be a Super Fan, you can now support the show through admin of computing merch or signing up as a patron on patreon agents get access to early episodes olds for the direction of the show and bonus content. You can find links to everything on my website at the end of computing, if you have any comments or suggestions for future episode and then go ahead and shoot me a tweet. I'm at Advent of, on Twitter and as always have a great rest of your day..

IBM Twitter Apple
In House vs. Consultancy

The Design Intent

05:19 min | 8 months ago

In House vs. Consultancy

"Well all right alex. Hey great talking to you again really appreciate your time. we're back for some more design intent. Myself tony orlando. Daniel phipps aaron hernandez and of course the creator founder. Alex you'll have to pronounce your last name for us. Alex this niece okay. Well let's go. The ad is okay so similar site so happy to talk to you guys Maybe we can you introduce yourself of where you guys worked So the the reason why we gather today is because. I won't do this interview because i often have. This kris jenner of You should be working in their constituency our in house because Differences that can happen at the end of doing years of working. In hostile working inconsistency you will have a very different skaters. So that's why. I think it's it's good to have both side here on in this interview. we antonio who Will introducing serve but is basically designed neither at delta and we have a daniel simpson everyone who are like with fund design. Now at so we really to weld one with the in house we've constituency so that's Good interview to learn on the. What are the pros and cons of each side. Yeah i think that's good. That's a good topic. I know i have people asking me that all the time. I'll let you go first daniel since you're okay you've kind of been around in both worlds. Sure i have the i. I don't know fifteen years of my career. Kinda bounced back and forth a little So right now. I'm with access design actually started the company in two thousand and five so i guess Two thousand and twenty. That would be fifteen years prior to that. I worked for a couple of different Companies delving one of them. I worked for ibm and then another one and in between there i worked at a short stint at it consulting company up in the chicago area as well so for the first part of my career bounced back and forth a little bit and then i kinda finally may finally made the decision of okay thank the consulting thing is is a good place for me to rest for a while and so. That's what i've been doing since. Two thousand and five fifteen years running running your own small business correct consulting for various companies all over the country to some more for international companies as well So yeah and for the record. I've actually hired dan quite a bit to do work for me. Working adele so I'll i'll give a quick introduction of myself. I'll give a bit of a history later. I'll let aaron kinda talk about his his role. But i'm antonio designed enter for latitude no dell and i've been with dell thirteen years now but i've been in the industry for quite a long time erin so my name is aaron and i work here with daniel. I had access. I've been here for a little bit over two years two and a half years and a half years and this is all the experience or real real world. experience have had And i know it's a. It's a huge question whenever you're graduating or you're about to graduate or you're in school it's like what wh- what what she do. She go the consultant route or the more corporate route so i hope People get to learn how many years of experience you have in the field. Two and a half advocate. So that's that's you can give us the formula have i did. I have twenty years of experience. In most of it is inconsistency so we we have like like a goo- good of people different spectrum invasions on the same on this. I if one thing i would say that anybody getting out and design new in the design world or even established the design where i think the most single most important thing he can do is make sure that the the mentor that you work for or with is the right mentor for you. I i think that's you know my career was was the last with with really fantastic. Mentors when i would start at. Ibm right out of graduate school. And if it wasn't for those guys in al i'll name them John swansea was probably the first designer that i worked for for a long time who retired from ibm lenovo a few years ago. He worked there for over twenty five years. I

Daniel Phipps Daniel Simpson Alex Tony Orlando Aaron Hernandez Kris Jenner Antonio Aaron Kinda Daniel Dell IBM Adele Chicago DAN Erin Aaron John Swansea Lenovo
"ibm" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:52 min | 10 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Welcome to blow your mind production of iheartradio. Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert. Lamp and I'm Joe McCormick. We've got something a little bit different for you today. Today's episode is going to be part of an ongoing series called smart talks, which were producing in partnership with IBM so in each episode of smart talks here on the stuff to blow your mind feed Robert, nigh are gonNA sit down for virtual chats with people using technologies developed by IBM to deal with the unique challenges. The world is facing today. In this episode we'll be focusing on how consumers, retailers and supply chains adapt in the midst of a pandemic, and for this subject we're going to be in. In conversation with Luton Yossi the IBM Global Managing Director for Consumer, industries and Carl Holler who is a partner at the consumer center of Competency at IBM. If you'd like to hear more episodes of smart talks, the tech stuff podcast is already released the first four episodes of the series in its feed a you can find them on the iheartradio, APP or wherever you get your podcast, just look up tech stuff and click on the episodes labeled smart talks and stay tuned for upcoming smart talks episodes here on stuff to blow your mind, which will be published in our feet in the coming weeks, and now.

IBM IBM Global Managing Director f Robert Joe McCormick Carl Holler center of Competency partner
"ibm" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"ibm" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Work with a I've been trained by experts in twenty different the IBM the cloud it's free talk live the new year's eve edition we're here live you can take control of the airwaves you can bring up anything that you want ends want to remind you that fork fest twenty twenty the fourth fork fast is going to be happening in the summer time it'll be actually about the second week in the summer starting June twenty ninth until July fifth that means it will include independence day for the very first time ever because in twenty twenty four fest will follow the porcupine freedom festival previously it had come before the porcupine freedom vessel which is it's gonna be a good change I think in a lot of ways one it's going to be a little later in this it's gonna be actually in the summer instead of the last week of spring I can be your marketing is gonna include fourth for the fourth actually you should lashing should rename it to just for this year rename it forth fest you got to go I got I got I have good work animals and I got animals to feed yeah yeah yeah yeah you can hire people to do annal feedings hype you know what a like middle men hello is it been since you've been up there Conan hello two thousand I'll note for five years okay really for five years about I guess not I but I've never been the forecast I've only been right porcupine freedom fest I don't understand why people like you and bother having kids is not what they're for their for work in the well his moved out yes I know I'm you bring back in temporary state season you're speaking about Bernie she's in Verne Val of Vermont she doing lots I don't know all I know is that we don't talk as much days and I think it has to do with politics no work fast dot party if you wanna get together with people that actually share a lot of your beliefs not all of them you never know who you're gonna meet their libertarians Valadares anarchists they're gonna hang out from June twenty ninth till July fifth at Rogers campground it's in the beautiful White Mountains of New Hampshire maybe just wanna chill out relax campus mother freedom lovers or maybe you want to create a thing for those people to do because fork fest is decentralized there's no organizer so Johnson you're talking about marketing I mean yeah I market for fast but it's not on behalf of anybody right not for anybody that there are other people that market for trust as well right I think Chris Wade our Friday night host is actually promoting for fast on a Lennix meant website or the Lennix meant website yeah so I need a great I hope we get more crypto people to shop it was really like almost like a crypto camping festival this year because all of the vendors were taking crypto currency which is awesome you could eat all day long so I'm sure if Chris gets his way they'll be a large free and open source software contingent wonderful they could have like speeches or hackathon or something like that you can put whatever you want together merge with what's that the the I don't even know where you're gonna Jack Jack should Max thing alt exponents expo the lord thanks bro and have some sort of thank you and I'm gonna happen or they could do it separately you never know right like people can do whatever kind of merging or creating of they things they want to it's up to you the experience that you have there there's no organizer's there's no tickets the only thing you got to do is just book a campsite at Rogers are gonna for close to a party that is an unofficial website at the link you to chat room and forum in such a let's go back to Serie she's on the line with us here in California sure your government school teacher out in California and cut and you to ask the question right before we went to break the the the big what we hear what we pleads here quite often is that teachers do not make enough in this country and I am just curious and I know you've got some years under your belt so you probably make a lot more than the guys just entering into the position but what what is your opinion on the how teachers are paid I think overall it's not too bad any aspect I mean you still spend money on your classroom because you don't get and a lot of money you know you get so much you only get a little bit of money for your classroom but you end up spending a lot of your money but I don't I'm not you bad I mean my husband makes an income to so you're not uncomfortable after however many decades of teaching you feel like you're all right and you also get some benefits in there as well that I imagine aren't too bad yeah I mean I don't think I make that by the late now when I worked for the private school that was really difficult because then you're not making anything I mean you're making anywhere from forty thousand at the most and actually that high so usually it's around the twenty and right now I'm making in the seventies and I'm not gonna get any higher in the park openness my master but yeah yeah I mean that seems like a little bit like a decent you're you're not in San Francisco right no okay and it's not bad I mean it most seven thousand dollars of the national that's almost rich territory people out I've gotten to where he can out now you do spend you know more than you don't work twelve hours I mean you spend you know you work you get work and then you work when you get home yeah but what about ten o'clock at night sometimes but one day I and just working the one day is off I think one day off a week what do you do from July to September July two so I start planning for the next year I take pride but a month completely off why don't do any school stuff what did you do take a lot of I know some schools as well prep courses for teachers for the upcoming year during the summer morning yeah you have classes that you'll go to you might take classes little short ones you know on the line you might find something new to try out with the new with that young net new year they spend a lot a lot I think that's what people don't realize is that you spend so so much time sure I was a thanks for calling in joining us here tonight definitely appreciate hearing from you and thanks for sharing your experience she sounds like somebody who you know got into it for the right reasons she did say when asked you know what she would like to see changed as having more choice more educational choice from the teacher's perspective a she did indicate that she was given some choice meaning that she had to teach to certain standards that are you know cram down from on high but ultimately that she could sort of support supplement that I guess with some and has taught in private schools yeah but probably decided not to continue that route because they make so much less the money's better also money isn't the bunnies better when they the government the facility so which is which it you know like like I said this which is probably why that charter school what we talked about earlier failed because it could not compete with the too big to fail education system and while it might be a salary of seventy thousand dollars if you're taking a month off it's more like seventy six thousand that's a lot of by the way I'm sorry because very that's a lot of their money for for what a teacher has to do I'm I know that you're providing a good service but that's my it's a paid vacation for a month and you said your husband back into so I mean that's a land line yeah and that's not including the Bennies right so seventy thousand plus the bachelor's degree I should going to teach you go for that but that kind of money I mean like why not I should be doing something better than you know go go you know you're you has two other battles right you know teaching English in some other country let's get one these companies they have benefits they have packages no need to Greece for that I heard they're just looking vehicle could see so much a lot of the ones I've looked at or the good ones required agrees start starting a bachelor's in up in in yeah you can drag and I'll be I mean the best of all time types teachers because I have a degree in art so you know I could go teach art at the school there you go make that money will never get rid of me they Love Me the toll free number is nice you know the liberal backpage should a fifty five four fifty free we're going to talk about to the shooting we need to because I have a sneaking suspicion that a little a large segment of our population probably hasn't heard about this okay because it doesn't fit the agenda the gun grabbing take the guns away from the desk jockeys from the button pushes because we don't want them with the ability to defend themselves if they don't like how we're doing things because that's what it's all about it's not about hunting it's not about you know what's you know the second man is not in not even about defending yourself from burglars because when the when the framers were coming up with this idea and the guys before them as well I don't think any of them they could ever conceive a time when no one would not have guns it course you're gonna use are going to go hunting that's not what it's that's not what it's about it's about when the first amendment fails and you can no longer get the yahoos that are taking charge of your life to listen and reason the second amendment is there to protect and to take it back so in this case IT help when attending Christmann was drafted you know you private civilians had must get some cannons and you know the government had muskets and cannon was coming up here a fifty five traders we've all bought books we've all surgeon that we're all looking for that magic formula well.

IBM
"ibm" Discussed on Z104

Z104

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"ibm" Discussed on Z104

"Yeah thank you do IBM second that'll see you you'll be surprised that happens it sounds nothing new so is on thank god you can they without even question you can I was training over the.

IBM
"ibm" Discussed on FT News

FT News

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on FT News

"Technology and services, and I b m success many decades has been to stay relevant that companies look to it as a cool supply and that went through the mainframe air, and then later into modern technologies now the risk IBM is that it's becoming less relevant that people aren't looking to IBM's technology anymore because the cloud has come a long, cloud computing, and we will know that Amazon web services, Google, Microsoft. These are the companies that are running the big new cloud platforms that are starting to soak up more and more. Of the world's IT an IBM is kind of running behind in this game. And so although there have still a very big and important supplier of technology to companies owned data centers. They're not really anywhere in the cloud yet. And so what they really need to do is make themselves more relevant and adding this open source of this complex subject. But essentially that betters the they can reengineer quite a lot of those products and services, and the all of their customers will suddenly CIT IBM is more core to our budgets than we thought. And this is actually therefore gonna lift them into the next generation of computing. There's a really big bet it's really important, then right? And Jimmy has been talking a lot about what she calls the hybrid cloud. Can you tell me a little bit about what the hybrid cloud is? Well, there's a lot of jargon in IT. We all know that. But essentially the way to think about it is that what I am isn't did very well and has now been fully by some of these other internet companies is. Is it said to a lot of big corporate uses of IT. Look, you didn't have to build more data centers and put more technology in your data centers. Just give us your computing world. Let's move around them in IT too centers because we're Amazon we go these massive intimate data centers we can use. And they've just taken all that work laid off companies relieved them of it and just charge them and service fee. That's cool. The public cloud for some reason because it's not public data doesn't go out to the public. But anyway, anyways called the public cloud. Now IBM is betting that for most companies. They've got a massive sunk cost in their existing infrastructure. I'm for decades, they're going to carry on using their own data centers, even if they put some of their work in this public cloud. IBM's bet is look we can engineer it. So that some of you will computing happens in the public cloud. Some of it happens in your data center. This is a hybrid cloud. And the if we have the technology that help these two things glued together. Better that move your what leads? Computing toss efficiently between the two this is a much better world you to be in then just trying to handle Amazon web services, which is something alien and out there and takes a lot of integration. But we can do it for you. Right. And is that where red hat comes in in helping the transition for companies between their own private servers and the public cloud. Well, it is. But it's this is not a slam dunk pry B M, these two companies do not fit together. Answer the cloud question. Say IBM itself has been playing defensively for the last few years trying to protect its business in data centers. And obviously that ground is eroding. So is falling behind is revenues have been falling for years red hat, basically, a lot of his business is putting Lennox Lennox rating system this open source operating system, which is used by clouds and in data centers. But that business isn't the future. The future is all the other technologies that said on top of that that help. People manage what leads and so this is much new business for red hat. They haven't been doing that much of it for very long. But what they are trying to do is find ways to make it easier to shift those work leads from a corporate data center into the cloud back again and create this common framework that spans both the technology analyst..

IBM Amazon CIT IBM Lennox Lennox Google Jimmy Microsoft analyst engineer
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ibm did not own the operating system it meant that ibm had managed to create its own competitors in the marketplace this was great for the end consumer if you were someone who is shopping around for a computer it was great because there were a lot of different opportunities out there that had a really affordable machines that could run similar programs to ibm's but it was not so great for them if they had maintained ownership of the operating system it would have been an entirely different story ibm what did not just set the tone they would be the dominant factor in personal computers because they'd be the only game in town that could actually use that operating system someone else would have had to have come up with a different operating system that was at least as good if not superior to ms dos in order to have made that a more competitive space but ibm didn't have that microsoft had it and of course for microsoft it made way more sense to license out ms dos to any company that was capable of running it because that you just make money from multiple customers so microsoft was making out like a bandit compared to ibm ibm would end up staying in the pc market for several years but their choices meant that it was tough to create products that had good profit margins and good enough sales to justify that that industry and in two thousand five ibm ultimately decided that it had had enough and it sold off its pc businesses to lenovo for a cool one point seven five billion dollars and at that point ibm said i'm out but the architecture they had created the ms dos and then later on windows operating system platforms had defined what pc's were and to this day most computers you find out there follow that modular architecture that ibm set up where you can make.

Ibm microsoft lenovo seven five billion dollars
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Doing scientific research or engineering so it was not something that you were going to play games on it just didn't follow the mainframe terminal form factor that you had seen in previous computers from ibm so this was a very specific use computer the idea being scientists in the field or mathematicians who need to have a computer that they could potentially bring to another location and not just have in a big research laboratory ibm would refine their design into updates there was the ibm fifty one ten and the ibm fifty one twenty these were general office computers so no longer scientific research machines but office machines they were marketed as being the machines the company would invest in an order to do stuff like accounting or data management or word processing ibm announced the fifty one ten in nineteen seventy eight and it could support more peripherals than the fifty one hundred could the one that came out before it including per full called the ibm fifty one fourteen which was an external dual eight inch floppy drive so floppy disk drive that could take eight inch floppy disks you might not remember that there were such things they weren't really used in personal computers they were used in these business machines and by the time the personal computer floppy disks came around they were more frequently the five and a quarter size and then later on three and a half inch size the entry level fifty one ten which supported the basic programming language only and had sixteen kilobytes of ram would cost eight thousand four hundred seventy five dollars but if you wanted a top of the line sixty four kilobytes machine capable of running both basic and the ap l programming language that would set you back fifteen thousand seven hundred twenty five dollars the computer had an all in one form factor the keyboard and display were all part of the case the.

ibm eight inch fifteen thousand seven hundred eight thousand four hundred se sixty four kilobytes sixteen kilobytes
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ah forward facing side to them where they would have contact with customers but ibm didn't their customers were other companies ibm grew larger and more powerful and became a leading name and business machines and it all started with mechanical devices but eventually transition to electron eq and then microchip technologies in the nineteen forties ibm would partner with harvard university to build the company's first computer although most people refer to it as harvard's first computer known as the mark one or the automated sequence controlled calculator this was an enormous electro mechanical computer so in other words it had electric parts electric parts rather and the chemical parts and it played a very important role with several war related calculations in the nineteen forties including some designed by john von neumann as part of the manhattan project that's the project that developed the atomic bomb it had seven hundred sixty five thousand components and more than one hundred miles of wire and cable so obviously this was not a home computer although i guess if you were desperate you could maybe cut a hole in it and make it a home but still not quite the same thing as what we mean when we say home computer in nineteen fifty two thomas j watson junior would become the president of ibm and thus began the golden age of the company the engineers ibm did groundbreaking work including creating the first commercial hard disk drive by the nineteen sixties ibm was a leader in producing massive computers for businesses to help them manage their data and at this point no one would dream of owning their own home computer even after the invention of the transistor these machines were still pretty darn massive and they would take up an entire room of your house in the early nineteen seventies as the first computer hobbyists were experimenting with building their own basic computing machines.

harvard university john von neumann president ibm partner manhattan
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yeah i just would like to add a different perspective about ibm it's a large company and whereas maybe divisions where this is occurring but i can tell you from my experience i am sixty one i'm currently at ibm i'm on a product that the announced end of life so the product is going away they told people that you have two years to find something else at idea now i did not start the process of trying to find something else they came to me with the new product and said would you like to be on this new product and i'm getting training on this new product the mid just about everybody that was on the product that's into life that has gone over to this new product the all over the age of fifty so whereas what they're saying may be true i don't think you can say it is idea i think you have to say it is divisions within ibm bob i really appreciate you putting that perspective on the table ariana a speak to that issue i mean is this something that you guys have found is across ibm or is bob right as this sort of division by division issue perhaps and well first of all bob i'm happy to hear that that is your experience you'll if you look at the peace you will notice that we tried to be very exhaustively chirp peter is over there laughing exhaustively careful with the way that we phrased to this because of course it is impossible for us to make any kind of end of day sweeping final statement about what is or isn't happening.

bob peter ibm two years
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Movement toward unionizing at ibm and all of these people in these places where they were getting angry about changes at their employer would come together and try to compare notes to figure out what was happening to see if there was some kind of larger plan or strategy or unfair targeting of certain kinds of workers and up until two thousand fourteen ibm was providing the kind of information required by law that you just mentioned the which is a list of ages and positions within the company so before two thousand fourteen in those communities they had that information and could make decisions about things like pension plans where if they made a change to they made a change the way that retirement benefits had worked is this something that we as workers should push back on if there are huge group of employees being laid off at the same time would there be reason for us to come together and file some kind of class action lawsuit after two twenty fourteen when they stopped handing out those lists people at ibm got angry and a couple of years later they came to us and they said we used to have this information we could make decisions now we can't really interesting peter gaza wanna come back to you there were other sort of systematic approaches that you guys describe in your piece for weeding out older employees i'd like to talk with both of you about a couple of these ideas here's one of the ideas encouraging employees targeted for layoffs to apply for other ibm positions while quietly advising managers not to hire them.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hi i'm mindy thomas and together we bring you well in the world npr's podcast for family every week we explore wild a new scientific discovery also write a bird we also write a bird find wow in the world on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts this is on point i'm anthony brooks were discussing alleged age discrimination at tech giant ibm you can join the conversation techies ageism a particular problem in your profession did anyone think forty would be considered an older worker speaking with peter goslin and arianna tobin reporters at propublica who along with mother jones looked into age discrimination at ibm and arianna before the break you're talking about one of your findings and that is that when ibm lays someone off they deny workers information about others who were laid off and that's information that according to the law if i have that correct i learned from your piece they have to provide so first what's the purpose of that law and second why would ibm want to withhold that information so part of the story about ibm as you have already discussed is that they have this huge an engaged workforce so at one point that i b m invalid probably more than four hundred thousand people mostly within the us and that's the size of a huge substantial city link that's really a huge mass of people and the people who worked at this company care quite a bit about what happens to them they care about what happens to the company so when i started they hadn't had a layoff until the nineteen ninety s when layoffs started to become part of their business model when they started to become part of the an option for workers who had joined this company people would talk about it they would join together on facebook groups they would join together on email list serves they talk i know that we mentioned that there is no ibm union will right around two thousand the there actually was a pretty substantial.

mindy thomas npr anthony brooks peter goslin jones ibm us apple arianna tobin facebook
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yes and no i mean obviously i had been around a long enough since things started to change but for for decades if not generations the culture was well here's a quote that i lifted from someone else in the discussions on facebook the more loyalty pride and dedication and ibm employee has the greater the sense of betrayal and deceit at the inevitable layoff and that is that's i'm that's it in a nutshell we were the generation that had still been around when ibm had their three basic beliefs respect for the individual outstanding customer service and trust in personal responsibility in all relationships and the first and last ones especially i mean that was how you conducted yourself at ibm that is why for decades there was never eve even a whisper of a union at ibm is because it was it was a family of employees but it was more than that we knew that we could trust our employer and to make that culture shift is very very difficult even though we knew it was coming laurel am i want to ask you this and i want to preface what i what i ask you by saying i'm i'm very sorry that you were essentially forced to retire because i can hear from your story that this was a huge disappointment to you but i want to ask you this you know in a fast moving konami employers are certainly going to be tempted to replace older workers for younger ones with for for a lot of reasons.

facebook ibm konami
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"As opposed to perhaps years or decades or centuries depending upon the complexity of the computational problem now again that's only for a specific set of computational problems for that set quantum computers will be amazing but if you wanted to play a game on a quantum computer it wouldn't necessarily run any better in fact it would probably run worse than on the classical computer because you have to have enough cubits to at least equal what the classical computer could do cubits also are very tricky keeping bits and superposition keeping anything in a quantum state is tricky because the slightest thing can cause to deco here too for the whole system sort of fall apart and then just become a classical computer and since most quantum computers have a relatively small number of cubits they end up becoming very dumb computers if you were to disturb your typical quantum computer and reverted to classical computer satis owed probably be less powerful than your average smartwatch but there's going to be a lot of discussion here at ibm think about quantum computing and how it will start to become a practical thing and not just something that's been worked on in laboratories and research facilities there are a lot of interesting speakers here as well obviously ibm has a lot of their experts here on things like cognitive machine learning artificial intelligence virtual reality augmented reality that both of those subjects are also represented here at the conference they're going to be doing breakout sessions all week long and i hope to talk to some of them this week but they're also representatives from other companies that are taking on sessions folks from like american airlines or invidia or even companies like ticketmaster there's also some.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"And there's also quantum computing that's another discussion that's going on here at ibm think there's talk about quantum computing emerging from labs and going into practical use quantum computers are interesting things they make use of cubits cubits are quantum bits a bit obviously for those who've been listening you know all about this bits are the basic units of information they can either be a zero or a one and that is you can think of as a no or a yes or an off an an on and using bits and chaining bits together you can represent all sorts of different types of information ultimately computers are processing information and bits a cubit a quantum bit can be in superposition which means it can inhabit all possible states which means it can be both a zero and a one and everything ten weekly in between simultaneously now that does not necessarily mean anything for every single type of application but for certain types of computational work that would make it much easier to process information rapidly specifically and he's anything that was using parallel processing cubits would be pretty good for that not all computational problems would benefit from quantum computing but the ones that would the processing would take a fraction of the amount of time i mean a fraction of a fraction of the amount of time that classical computer would take one of the big things that that cubans could do is make decryption really easy which is kind of terrifying because encryption is how we keep a lot of data safe basically the way your your your base level encryption works.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Those images perhaps on your smartphone but they also exist on other computers that's cloud storage and it's very useful if you want to be able to store more stuff that what your device can hold that's fantastic it's great to be able to turn to that but it's also somewhat limited because i mean someone else has your your your file your work your images and that means that if they change their policies you may no longer have access to it or you may not have full control over you may have surrendered control over the things that you generated to the entity that is now storing it you might be compromising your own privacy is a tricky situation it's it's got a lot of factors to it and it's a big big deal here at ibm think recently there was a big news story and i'm going to do a full episode about this later but there was a big news story about a company called cambridge analytica which used an enormous amount of data that it mind from primarily facebook in order to influence elections to get information about voters of potential voters and to help push them in a specific direction when it came to elections it is an enormous story and at developing scandal really and because of that story i feel like that's going to end up generating some questions here at the conference as well not just about about the viability of cloud services and data mining but the ethics of it what is ethical what is not and how should we codify that how should we define those ethics and how how do we hold ourselves accountable to ethical standards to make sure that the technologies that we have at our disposal are used in a responsible manner because some would argue that so far that has not happened that we have had multiple instances of violations of privacy security another example of of that sort of thing is all the different data breaches we have seen over the years where companies have not done a good job at protecting customer data and since that data is very much important to us as individuals this is a big concern in fact that's another area at ibm think it's all about data security how do we keep that day.

ibm cambridge analytica facebook
"ibm" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"Tens of thousands of decisions like that being made a every day across the different policies in the company like ibm as the chief teed off certain ibm you were central to your efforts as a company to chun yourself into a kind of enterprise i would love to hear some lessons that you learned along the way and get some insights into the advice that you have free executives who are about to embark on this journey themselves yes soul and right now i mean what i would submit to you is that organizations are working that through wikileak rewrote the leading edge of all this all in little very good position at ibm because in a sense data is the prerequisite to being able to use the are systems if you don't have good data you know you're you're going to be still pretty much subject to the garbage in garbage out phenomenon yeah i systems can be formed quite easily by feeding them all wrong types of data and so they reach the wrong decisions and so the data is kind of the prerequisite you you you have to get the data out of state of readiness so that these ai systems and consumers so i was that's why said i was fortunate in the sense that i could be in in some sense the very first cog in the wheel so then i could i could provide the leadership to move will move things forward a won't be done though beyond that is we have published a blueprint to prise blueprint so how do you make and enterprise like ibm cognitive one of the main considerations to being able to do that and we laid all that out in this new print and then our clients who worked in you know very uh very closely monitoring our own progress because we're producing these showcases that they can but replicate they've they've asked us to go further on say well okay what are some of the foundation.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"In a one of the challenges of being a cop provider as you have to do everything while the buses moving a while everything is up without disruption and so as we would bring in something significant like hebron at ease yeah will do that side by side for a period of time as we transition over to some new architecture that we're going to run you mentioned the adoption of sre style and operations talk about the operations model of the ibm cloud like what's the division of labour look like are these 'sorry people sitting in the data center itself or are they a veto teams that are remote from the data center gaga's talk about just the operations framework in the management structure sure so generally speaking you know that the way we describe it as you build a you rise meaning you know he think about o'clock platform i got him caught his comprise of a collection services of each of the services is owned by a team in that team moans the life cycle of that service and the end inning they build it and they run it they operated and so are s are ease are generally speaking aligned with each of the services and they said conceptually with the service not in the data center but in the development team you know s r e is a model where you're applying software engineering practices and principles to the domain of operations and so watch agree those sa reserve aligned with the development organisations and and sit in this part of those teams and their job is to romance service and to design it further elibility an to continuously improve how we deploy and operate an update on recover that service through automation you know in through software technology you we of course have some centralized you know functionality around socket knock and you know central hurting and other things to help can of wire the cloud together but on the whole we kind of running each service has its own and an life cycle and that's really powerful and it's actually a model.

data center gaga development team ibm