10 Burst results for "Ian Kinsley"

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:45 min | Last month

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And the rangers, buddy bell, top of the list, followed by Rafael palmero and Ian kinsler, who just returned as a front office person, Jim sunburg would be after them. Toronto, leader is Dave Steve, the great Dave Steve. Perhaps a Hall of Fame snub also a number retirement snub. Followed by Jose Bautista, Carlos Delgado, Tony Fernández, Jesse barfield, Jimmy key, Lloyd Mosby, and finally, the nationals slash expos. Steve Rogers at the top. Another unsung pitcher Max Scherzer right after that and then Vlad Guerrero and Tim walk Anthony Rendon Javier Vasquez. So I'll put this all online for anyone who wants to peruse it. This is a fun resource because if you Google this, you can find the best players whose numbers are not retired, but it's often just kind of based on feel, and this is a nice little objective way to judge it, although again, like what you mean to that fan base in that city, that's something that we can't quite quantify here, but it has a big impact. All right, we will end with the past blast. This is episode 1966. And the past bus comes from 1966 and from David Lewis, who is an architectural historian and baseball researcher based in Boston. Now I will give you a quick follow-up. First of all, the 1963 pass blast from David if you recall was about MLB sponsoring and amateur league for the first time because the miners had been reduced and so they were looking to have another pipeline and so they sponsored the central Illinois collegiate league. And I wondered, I wonder how many players from the central Illinois collegiate league in 1963 eventually became big leaguers because there were quotes in the article that David highlighted there there was one scout, the most optimistic scout said he doesn't believe more than ten players in that league have major league potential. Another major league scout said there's no more than there are fingers on one hand if that many. So between 5 to ten, I guess we could say was the estimate there. And as it turned out, we were hipped to a page here that actually tracks this. This was an email from listener Michael, thank you who sent us to prospect league dot com slash MLB alumni. This was formerly the central Illinois collegiate league and tracks all of the players who played there and were for future big leaguers, and there were 8 in that inaccuracies. And who went on to be big leaguers, the best of them by war, at least, would be Doug raider, who was an ASTRO for years. And they pretty solid player a 5 time gold Glover, although the modern metrics don't match the reputation there. So there was some talent in that league. So four 1966, David writes, Oakland, gambles on coliseum. Isn't that always the case? On September 18th, 1966, the NFL's Oakland Raiders played the Kansas City Chiefs in a game that officially opened the newly constructed Oakland Alameda county coliseum. While Oakland was excited to have a new stadium in which to host the Raiders, the city knew as San Francisco examiner sportswriter art Rosenbaum pointed out that a stadium can not be profitable on 7 or 8 games a year. The key to profitability, Rosenbaum suggested was bringing a Major League Baseball team in their 81 home games per year to the city. In a September 18th, 1966, examiner column, Rosenbaum astutely identified the key for a city to attract a major league team and keep them there writing until now the pattern for stadium building has been clear if you want a major league franchise you build a brand new facility or you show the wherewithal to do so only with such a guarantee is it possible to get in the expansion or franchise transfer swim. The article continued by suggesting a few possible teams that could be targeted for relocation, including the Kansas City athletics, the Cleveland then Indians and even the New York Yankees. The fans learned to care with more heart when they have newer seats for their bottoms, Rosenbaum wrote, concluding Oakland is ready if the American League is. The city's gamble paid off a year later when athletics owner Charlie Finley announced plans to move his team to Oakland for the 1968 season and now we are back in the same boat about trying to figure out if the a's will stay in Oakland and hit they'll play in the coliseum. It was ever thus, I suppose. All right, well, that takes us to the end of this. I will mention one clarification, which is that the Gary Cohen, who was a writer producer and the baseball bunch, not the same Gary Cohen, who is the mets announcer currently. It's a different Gary Cohen. So the Gary Cohen should edit his baseball bunch Wikipedia page so that Gary Cohen no longer links to the mets broadcaster, or maybe someone else can do that because Gary Cohen's not supposed to. So a lot of thank you very much for joining us. I meant to mention this at the beginning, but if you want to share anything about yourself or what you do or where people can find you or plug anything, we gathered before we started recording that there are some aspects of your work that perhaps you can not talk about in this forum. But anything you would care to share about yourself or what you do, please do. Sure, thank you so much for having me on. This was so, so much fun. I would encourage everybody listening to join the mic trout Patreon here and get your own episode. That'd be great. Really fun. Thank you. As you said, I am a national security analyst. I do saber metrics, but for the army and trying to analyze how they do things, how they're going to need to do things in the

central Illinois collegiate le Dave Steve baseball buddy bell Rafael palmero Jim sunburg Tony Fernández Jesse barfield Jimmy key Lloyd Mosby Vlad Guerrero Tim walk Anthony Rendon Javier Vasquez Gary Cohen Oakland Ian kinsler Rosenbaum Jose Bautista Max Scherzer Carlos Delgado
"ian kinsler" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:39 min | 3 months ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on WTOP

"Is the blizzard of the century. The most snow ever deposited in a 24 hour period in the history of New York State. Among the 27 weather related deaths were three people who were trapped in their cars, a travel ban remains in effect in the buffalo area. We're now hearing from congressman elect George Santos about reports that he made up much of his resume. Santos has now granted interviews to conservative owned media outlets the New York Post and WABC radio. A lot of people overstate in their resumes or twist a little bit or in grand Jake themselves. I'm not saying I'm not guilty of that. I'm just saying, I've done so much good work in my career. He says he won't resign and plans to be sworn in next week. Matt piper, CBS News, New York. This is the final frantic week leading up to the rose parade in Pasadena, a week when thousands of volunteers apply rose petals to the 35 floats in the parade. John Baird of K and X radio Los Angeles reports from irwindale. By this weekend, each float should blossom into a world of color, Stephen Pollock is with fiesta parade floats. So some of these floats have 10,000 roses, 20,040 thousand roses on them. He takes roughly 7000 hours to build a float from start to finish. The U.S. is going to allow Major League Baseball players from Cuba to represent their home country in the world baseball classic in March. The decision will affect Jordan Alvarez Jose Abreu and Randy arose arena. If they accept a possible invitation from Cuba, final 30 man rosters do February 7th. This is CBS News. Brought to you by clear of faster easier way through airport security, try today for two months free by visiting clear me dot com slash CBS 22 or use code CBS 22. It's 1203 Tuesday, December 27th, 2020 to the high today 39. Good morning, I'm Stephanie gaines Bryant, the top local stories we're following this hour, a plane crashed into icy waters in edgewater, Maryland, Monday morning shortly after taking off from Lee airport. And now we're hearing from the kayakers who helped the rat to rescue the pilot. When the plane crashed into beard's creek, John jolene and his son John jolene junior immediately went out and made their way across the ice over water in two kayaks to try to rescue the pilot. I used the shovel to just dig into the ice and just kind of slid the kayak. When they got there, they helped the pilot get out of the sinking

George Santos WABC radio Matt piper Stephen Pollock New York New York Post Jordan Alvarez Jose Abreu Randy arose arena John Baird Santos irwindale CBS News buffalo Cuba Baseball Pasadena Stephanie gaines Bryant CBS John jolene
"ian kinsler" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

03:49 min | 10 months ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Let's get a helicopter home. Now that loss, that loss, because that Red Sox team, it was such a peaceful season. They went a 108 games. I couldn't believe they were that good. All year long. Wait, they're this good. And then it was at least stressful. Season of my life. I don't know. I had like a weird feeling after the exterior one, because I just went like a was a superhero. Yeah. And then go, hey, they didn't have to ruin everybody for the rest of the series. This could actually be, I mean, it wasn't thrilled when they lost, certainly. But I don't know. We got into Ian kinsler throwing errors and I didn't expect that to happen. So you can take over again. Well, it's purgatory losses. What's the worst loss of your career? You can't have them and you can't have them in football. Give me your worst losses. For what? Just ever? Anything. Yeah. Oh, it's 86. Red Sox. Right. That's number one for all of us, right? It is for me. Not only number one, it's not even you can't even come close to it. There's no way to even approach it. And then 78 playoff game is probably two for me. Yeah, I was too young for 78. So wait, so O three game 7 Yankees? That's going to be closer to game 6 than any Celtics laws is. O three, which one? Yeah. Boom. Oh, the 2003. Yeah, yeah. No, that's in the top 5. I think that's number two. It was weird though. I had to work the next morning. I was doing morning and afternoon at the zone. I don't know why I said yes to that because I'm such a hard worker and everybody. I knew it would pay off sporting as a reward me for all my hard work. It didn't happen. No, it was the opposite. I was sleeping in my car in the parking lot between radio shifts and when they lost that one, I was just like, at least I don't have to do these double shifts anymore. So I had like this weird selfish thing because I remember just watching it and I knew it and I go Wakefield's probably gonna get the problem with him is that one pitch goes awry and then Boone hits it out and I just like turned off the TV and was like fuck it and then set my alarm for four in the morning can then because I knew so like because that part I was at that stage a year prior I would have gone crazy a year later because I had to get up and then go talk about it and then my co host cried. We started the show at 6 a.m. and he was crying. Which doesn't happen a lot. Wow. Radio. Yeah. I had to write a column that night. I don't even know if I had to. I just did. I was up till like three in the morning, ran a column. The next day I went to Kimmel because I was working for Kimmel. And I went in and around two 33 o'clock, I was so bummed out despondent that I called them and I was like, I need to go home. I'm going to take the rest of the day off, and I left. I left work. And I went home. That's a good personal day. All right, so what up? One of the other ones, what's your worst Celtics laws? 'cause I'm trying to figure out like, this would have been it. If butler hit that three, this might have been it. Which I think we already covered, but I don't know if we covered it well enough because if they lose, that's I think one of the worst collapses. What are the worst NBA collapses ever? It's like Portland Lakers, Ray Allen shot. I think it's worse than the reality. Because shot has to be number one. Okay, but the thing is, is at least it was LeBron and wade and Bosch and Ray Allen. Yeah, but this is true off a curls. I know. This would have been unquestionably the worst Celtics loss of my entire life. Right, because at least when magic hits the hook shot, it's Magic Johnson. And they were better than us, but at that point there was this irrational confidence in that banged up Celtics team. Bird was at the absolute peak.

Red Sox Ian kinsler Celtics Kimmel Yankees football Wakefield Boone Portland Lakers Ray Allen butler NBA LeBron Bosch wade Magic Johnson
"ian kinsler" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:36 min | 10 months ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Buddy hench, we were texting. I'm saying, if we end up losing this series, I'll look back at that game's sake. That's just going to be a catastrophe of a home loss. But if we get by Miami, it just kind of goes away. And the example I used was 2018 Red Sox. They had that crazy extra in a game and gets Dodgers that evolved through like a 120 pitches or whatever. Went to the 17th inning and Ian kinsler had to throwing error. And it just felt like the worst loss that had ever happened since 2003. And oh my God, I'm going to see this game for the rest of my life in my head. And then they just won the next day and then they won the World Series and then that loss just kind of vanishes. There are these purgatory losses you have that they don't haunt you because the season turned out okay and I think that's how I'm going to remember the game 5 Milwaukee and game 6 of Miami where it's like just the horrible rock bottom but now it's okay. I was like, all right, they're fine. I seriously thought because of all these saved their ass in a loss. I'm not rational with baseball. You have those tough bases. Did you stay for that whole game? Were you there for the whole thing? I didn't go the extra earnings when I went the next day with my son, which was the Steve pierce game. That was amazing. You would have stayed, right? You got it. It's a World Series, right? Oh, 100% would have stayed. All right, just making sure. No, are you kidding? Things are going well for you. Stop it. Okay,.

Buddy hench Ian kinsler Miami Red Sox Dodgers Milwaukee Steve pierce baseball
"ian kinsler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:46 min | 11 months ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Symbol you've deemed war stripes. So talk about your design aesthetic. Oh boy, when I was in my 20s, it was just way too much. It was my design aesthetic. Like, you know what I mean? And this logo is probably the best example of the opposite idea, kind of more the eastern idea of taking things away until only what needs to exist can exist or the idea that I use the least amount of pixels and create the most amount of impact. Most baseball bats, they put their brand name on the front of the baseball bat. You put it on the back. Yeah, like say shinkansen baseball bats or whatever. You put it on the front because that's the billboard and everybody wants to see it. And I was like, you know what? That doesn't look cool though. And when I'm staring at a hundred mile or fastball that might hit me in the head and kill me, I'd like to look at something that actually helps me calm down in that moment and not freak out. And seeing your name on the baseball bat isn't going to help me do that. So I thought, well, let's put the name on the back, like a great piece of a modern piece of furniture, the designers are not sticking on the front and root it. He puts it on a cool label in the back. So it actually said war stick in the back. And the line started is just a feeling, like literally a decor on the bat that to me would be calming. So it's like a focusing mechanism. It actually we teach kids now that is a focus thing method. We have a breathing technique where they go, they count down from one to ten going up one line. And then back the other. So we do pitch it as kind of a focusing tool, but we teach kids. And it's amazing what kids pick up. I mean, 6 year olds going, hey, what's the logo? Well, the left side means the past, and the right side means the future. And it's all about staying in between the lines, being in the moment. So it kind of tears me up. Because I can super plan it like that, but that's real to kids. And you're helping. And I understand. Become who they are. Yeah, and I understand how hard it is to be in the batter's box. But then to see kids go through much more traumatic things than I ever had to go through. You know, where this native kids we work with or something like that, but they get that it extends beyond stupid sport of baseball. So it's the dumbest simplest logo I've ever designed that just had the most meaning, you know? And it just so cool to see it permeate kids lives like that. So it's super cool. You have a worst day creed where you outline how there is an ongoing conversation happening at worst egg with your tribe about helping future generations of stick warriors connect mind and heart. With mechanics. So it seems like while you're selling sports equipment, you're also really helping to train young minds to be able to use sports to become stronger as people. Absolutely. And that goes back to me being a bad baseball player and realizing that. I mean, on paper actually did have the physical abilities. I was super fast. I was strong. I could hit the ball a long way. I could throw the ball like a rocket. I mean, I had all these physical abilities. But my brain did not let those things work often enough because a perfectionism because of lack of belief in my own self for, I don't even know what reason. And I'm very aware of that. Once I finish playing, I really looked back and go. Oh, and knowing major league players now, I clearly see the difference. It's not the physical, especially in baseball. It's the mental. That's the warrior, like a warrior is not so much, oh God, a big guy with a spear and kill you and this and that. It's the mentality of a warrior that I mean, I'm the biggest Karate Kid fan I grew up in the 80s, man. Karate Kid, mister Miyagi. He didn't teach the kid how to do all these techniques. He built self confidence in this kid to do incredible things. Yeah, he taught him how to think. Talking about a thing, right? So I don't know, that just felt like what that was. I basically said, well, I'll make this brand out of my weakness. In 2016, wars take bats were approved for use in Major League Baseball. How did you make that happen? I acquired two business partners at the same time. Jack White and Ian kinsler. So I'm from Texas and everybody knows who Ian is. He's Texas Rangers Hall of Famer. Yes. Yeah, this kind of thing. How did you approach him? Because you approached him before Jack. Strangely enough, I had to reign Friends with the drummer of my high school ban. And he's a good businessman today. And I said, hey, man, I think I need to take this war stick project kind of seriously and make it a real company, but I am going to need funds to do that. I'm going to need partners and in brainstorming with him one day. He said, oh, I know some pro athletes. Would you want to meet Ian kinsler? And I was like, oh, why not? So how weird is that my high school drummer introduced me to Ian kinsler, who introduced me to check white kind of thing. It's just very strange, but and for my design listeners that might not be following baseball. Is the four time Major League Baseball all star in Texas Rangers, great. So he's a big deal. He's a big deal. He's a big deal and then played for the tigers and stuff. So he's one of the best second baseman that's ever played the game. And he just looked at it in the same way that Jack said and said, hey, we need this in baseball. We don't have cool stuff like this. We don't have these same old choices, right? Yeah. He goes, I feel this. I can feel the energy from it. I relate to it. So he then took that bat into the major leagues and risked his own reputation and proceeded by the way to have one of his best years ever, which was scary, but he did it. And he proved it, and that's kind of his thing. He's like, think the bad has something to do with it? I think it actually he was getting a little older at that point and I do think it put a little new energy into him. And he intakes into the highest level of baseball that you can possibly be and hits 28 home runs with it. And all of a sudden, we're like, oh, now we have both. We have performance in Ian represents that. And we have creativity in Jack represents that. And I tell them that's why the business partners. They represent the two halves of what war stick is about, which would be really great design and creativity and doing whatever we want. But paired with the highest level of performance. And that's also, that's the threshold that I wanted to cross was like, I didn't want to make toy bats or just things that you put on your wall or something like that. I want to make things you use in real life that happen to look beautiful. Despite 300% year over year growth in 2021, worst operates with an estimated consumer awareness of about 20% in the baseball and softball markets. And as I mentioned, you really up against century old crusty brands. But you're growing every year and you're president Christine edgington, as you mentioned, has stated that you know you're ruffling feathers and you're not letting up. How are you ruffling feathers? Well, us designers know, I think we have weapons at our disposal that non creative people don't have. And those baseball brands don't have those weapons. So it's just our creativity and our ability to express things in a more human way and exciting way than the other brands because they branding one O one, man. You can take, let's say that biggest 8 brands that have existed for 40 to 80 years and you put them on the same bucket, you could throw any one name and the names are interchangeable because they don't represent or stand for anything. And the best thing you can do in branding is stand for something. The other brands heads are spinning because we have a story. We have a conversation that we can have beyond, oh, this bat's made out of a P 99. It's so boring. It's so boring talking about bats. You've evolved from exclusively making.

baseball Ian kinsler Texas Rangers Hall of Famer Major League Jack Jack White Ian Texas Rangers tigers Texas Christine edgington softball us
"ian kinsler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:35 min | 11 months ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Sacrificed a lot in her life with her own world and her own family and all that trying to keep that train running. And I give her a lot of credit for that it's a hard decision to make. And that's what happens with music, especially or if you're an actor and films like that. I think any creative person. Yeah, and if you're getting a lot of stuff happening in a lot of attention for it, you are making big mistakes if you take too big of a break from it. So that absorbed the idea was like, okay, well I want to do this, I want to direct short films and I want to design more things furniture and interiors and et cetera, but I can't stop this music train right now because if I do that, then I'm not going to be able to pay for any of these other ideas down the run won't be able to afford to do it. So you just kind of keep that train moving and then so that was the one nice thing about the pandemic for me in my own little world was that I had a lot of free time not to finally work on some of these other things. Fear of the dawn actually shows up in several different places on the album. It's not just the name of the album. It's also the name of a song. It's also you use the scientific word. For another one of the songs. And I'm wondering if you can share that word with us. Tell us why you decided to choose it. And then why do you have a fear of the time? You're talking about the word iosa phobia. And that was a word I read in an article somewhere, and I wrote it down, say, oh, I got to come back and read about whatever that is. I do that a lot when I'm reading it, I'll just save them into a folder on my computer and I'll go check on this later. And that was something when I was working on a couple songs, I saw that word pop up, and I thought, oh, I don't know what that is, and I had to read reread the definition of it. And intense fear of the dawn, which I thought, what a horrible thing to have an intense fear about it's going to happen. It's not like a fear that something that might happen or probably isn't going to happen. That's going to happen. I like every day. Yes, every day. So what a horrible thing, if that's a true feeling, I don't know if there's people out there who really have this fear. You're reminding me of something I read about people who don't experience pain who have the inability to experience pain and how dangerous lives are. And I got more and more into the idea of how dangerous this idea would be about being fearful of the dawn or having anxiety attacks or the sun would come up. Then I didn't realize that maybe to other people it was just a simpler concept more of like vampires. I didn't even think of the vampire connotation of that. Until later, but yeah, I just got a lot of I got a lot of thought out of it, I guess. It's a great album. So inventive, so unusual and really so crafty. Thank you. Thanks. Let's talk about worst dick. How did you meet Ben Jenkins? And what made you decide back in 2016 to invest in a business designing and manufacturing baseball bats? It's a great question. It's interesting. I got really involved in baseball. I had gone through a divorce and I was going through a long sort of lonely period that spending a lot of time by myself. And I ended up watching baseball games, Detroit tigers games for the first time since I was a teenager. So that started that in like 2013 area somewhere. But I'd seen these baseball bats in a design website that I was reading and I saw these different color bats. And I remember thinking, oh wow, obvious idea, of course. A baseball bat so you could get in any color you want. Why haven't they? Well, it took so long for that to be a thing. And then down the line, we were opening the third man records building with shinola watches. Together in the same building in Detroit. I co bought the building with the owner Tom Karzai. And they were doing a bat with worst day. They were doing a shine a baseball bat with war stick. And I went in there shop and was looking at stuff. I was like, oh cool, I know that company. I read about those guys. I was really cool that you're doing that. Then I came back to Nashville and what it was a few weeks later and somebody in the art department there said, hey, we have this idea about some ideas some new merchandise for the store because we're always trying to think of something interesting and turn people on. Somebody said, look at this. There's this company doing we could do these yellow and black and white bats, third man records, baseball bats. Since you like baseball, Jack, would you be interested in that? I said, oh my God, I am, and I like that company, but I can't do that because shinola did that with them already. So we can't have these worst take bats in both these stores right next to each other. It looks like we're ripping off shinola collab. They did. So just tabled that. And then he had reached out. I think Ben would have to tell you, it takes place next. I think that he might have reached out through Ian kinsler, who was a Detroit Tiger. He was now co owner of war stick that something about, I don't know why my name came up, but I think Ian mentioned my name to him. So Ben, how did it happen? I mean, I like to explain to people that definitely would have never thought of it just out of the blue. What he doesn't remember probably is that their men records had reached out, literally like, hey, would you make a cool black and yellow third man bat with war stick? And I was like, yeah, we'd love to do that. But I did go. Hey, by the way, who at third man knows about us, because I was just very curious. Oh, of course. And the guy was like, oh, Jack found you on the Internet. And I was like, sick. But it's funny thinking back. That was enough for me. I was like, I actually felt for one of the first times in my life that, oh, I made some art that are really great artists thought was great. Art. And maybe pat myself on the back a little bit, and I thought that was it. When I met Ian a couple weeks later, that's when it kind of got weird, which was I mentioned that to him because he was exploring what Warsaw was about. And he said, why is it cool? And I say, I don't know, it's just cooler than other baseball bats, which aren't cool. These are cool. And I said, you know, like Jack White reached out and wanted to do something, you know, no big deal. And he goes, oh, I know, I kind of know Jack a little bit. I kind of joked all, why don't we reach out to Jack and see if he wants to be the big investor wink wink? And he laughed, and then we looked at each other and we were like, oh, why not? Yeah. And that's very much our all of our personalities. It's just explore what's happening and go for it. He emailed him, and then we were in national meeting the next week. And it was like very quick and natural. So before we talk about how you both work together for and with this brand, I'd love to just go and talk a little bit about your background and how you even got to developing a baseball bat manufacturing and design company. Then you were raised in Texas where your mom encouraged your creativity and your dad as a lawyer inspired your work ethic and you've said.

baseball Ben Jenkins Tom Karzai anxiety attacks Detroit tigers Detroit Jack dick Ben Ian kinsler Ian Nashville Jack White Warsaw pat Texas
"ian kinsler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"It's that head dot com, use the code while 20, so that baseball reference will be happy that they have resumed the sponsorship to continue their relationship and otherwise happy to have them back in the fold. Yeah, very happy to have them back in the full happy to be able to do like, you know, a sponsorship like you said with a tool that we use that is baseball related and keeping with the pod and you don't have to hear either of us read you ad copy about underwear. So exactly. Everyone wins except for me undies, I guess. Yes, sorry. All right, so the step blessed today does rely partly on some data from baseball reference, just by coincidence. So I was kind of wondering about and this was actually prompted by a question from a listener and effectively wowed supporter, but it is timely, I think, because of the José Ramírez extension. And I think at least up until this point has been extremely underpaid if you are just going by his market value or free agent value or what a win goes for on the open market. He is not been on the open market. He is taking himself off of the open market because this is the second extension he signed, right? He signed a 5 year $26 million extension before the 2017 season. And since then, he's been what a top 5 player in baseball. And also two team options for another 26 million. So that just given how well he played. I mean, that cemented the fact that he's been relative to just how great he has been. One of the most underpaid players in baseball. So if you go to his fan grass player page, there is a value tab at the bottom, which will just sort of sum up well, here's how many war he was worth. Here's what the going rate for dollars per war in that season was. And just multiply it and if you do that for José Ramírez, you get $275,000,000.2 and he has made a small fraction of that in his career. He has made 37 million. So now he will hopefully equalize things a bit over the life of this current contract, but probably will not make up much of any of that deficit that has already happened. And that is partly his own decision he decided to sign that extension and partly it's just the way that baseball's salary structure is set up. Where you just don't get paid much in your early years of service time. But we got a question from listener Matthew, who says, we hear so much after contracts about how the team overpaid or the player underperformed. But what about the all time most exact values? Is there any fun in searching to see if a player in a year or a contract or a career made close to how much he should have quote unquote made? And so I looked this up with help from people at baseball reference and fan grafts. Multiple stat sites working together to produce the stat last year. First, we have these fan grass dollar values going back to 2002 and baseball reference has pretty complete salary data going back to that point. Things get spotty a bit before that. So it's okay that we're only looking to 2002. But I asked Dan hirsch friend of the show Patreon supporter baseball reference employee to first send me the total money made by every player who had a complete career between 2002 and now. So everyone who is no longer active whose career started in 2002 or later. And then I also asked fan crafts Chan dolinar to send me the totals over the same span for the player dollar values according to fan graphs. And then I put all of that together in a spreadsheet or to be transparent. My wife did. She is better at spreadsheets than I am. And she did some magic and we ended up with a spreadsheet that has both what the player would have made in theory on the open market based on the fangs dollar values and what they actually made. And so I was able to just match them up and see who came closest. And so if you're curious about who is most quote unquote underpaid or quote unquote overpaid over this period, Chase Utley shows up as the most underpaid. So he made about a $125 million in his career. And according to the dollar values, he was worth more than 400 million. So a difference of about $280 million for a chase outly. And then some of the other guys at the top are players who do very well according to fan graphs war because of framing. So Buster Posey. Wrestle Martin, Brian McCann. They are the next few who are all around $250 million under what their market value would have been, and then benzo brist at about 230 Ian kinsler two 25 Curtis granderson two 15. Now, interestingly, if you want to look at overpaid quote unquote players, the numbers are a lot smaller. Like the gaps are a lot smaller because the way that this works is, I mean, look, people look at Albert Pujols, for instance, and they think about the angels contract and how he was paid more than he was worth on the field during those years. But he was worth so much more than he was paid during the cardinal's years that he actually comes out as being like a $110 million underpaid. By the end of this year and the end of his career, which would be the end of this year. So he just racked up so much surplus value during those early years that even if you play like and are paid like Albert Pujols for like a decade after that, it's still just like doesn't really come close. So if you look at significant size contracts like they're just aren't many that are really underwater, so to speak to any great degree, it's like just a handful, really. And the most quote unquote overpaid according to this, well, it is the flip side of the framing value question. It's our old friend, Ryan dot. Oh no. Yes, sorry, Ryan. So right of it was paid $22 million in his career, which does not sound like a enormous number. And, you know, you would think that, well, he couldn't have been self overpaid only making $22 million. But if you factor in the framing and the fact that he was the worst framer on record basically at a time when the ranges of framing value for very wide according to fangraphs, he has a negative 9 war for his career, which again, like he was a league average hitter, but the framing was so bad. It was so bad. So bad that he was like hundreds of runs below average on defense. And so therefore, it shows up that he should have been paid in theory like negative $55 million and then therefore he is like $77 million under. So sorry, Ryan dot. But not so sorry, because hey, you made $22 million. Yeah, he's doing fine. The others at the bottom of that list are Chris Davis at 75. Yasmani Tomas, Hector olivares, Ryan Howard, 50, 3 million under, I guess you would not be shocked to hear those names dumb and young, et cetera. So again, though the numbers are so much smaller on that side of the scale, just because of the way the salary system is set up that is so much easier to cumulative, be worth way more than you're paid than it is to be worth less. So that's worth keeping in mind. Yeah, well, and it's a funny thing too. And I guess you could say this about the contracts that are quote unquote underwater, but it's like when you look at the team, if you were to look at this on the aggregate level of the value, the teams enjoy relative to what they end up spending on payroll even when they spend big money..

baseball José Ramírez Dan hirsch Patreon Chan dolinar Wrestle Martin Albert Pujols Chase Utley Brian McCann Buster Posey Ian kinsler Matthew Curtis granderson
"ian kinsler" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"With Aaron Boone. It was the three of them. Aaron would describe it as Frank. Here at cold discrepant is productive and I actually spoke to Josh Allen quite a bit about it. And he said, you know what? I think a lot of people on the outside make a lot more about this than we do, right? This is one of those moments where Ian kinsler used to tell me all the time there are certain players that when they're in your team, you know, if you're part they were your uniform, you really love them. But we're very opposing side their intensity could be a little difficult to deal with and that certainly has been Josh Donaldson. And that's precisely what Kurt Cole said. He said, this is water under the bridge. We're fine. We talked it out. He has an opinion his opinions on his mind. Right up there and straight up said, you know what? I said what I said. MLB addressed it and from now on, you haven't heard me say a word because I do believe that the issue has been addressed, but we know that at one point Josh Donaldson called the use of foreign substances on the baseball. He called it directly the new steroids. So it's a big deal, but they say that it is buried now they've both wear pinstripes. So coincidentally, I was in braves camp yesterday where Josh Donaldson played and let me tell you something. There was a lot of chortling among the brave people I spoke with about the idea of Josh being in New York. 'cause they said he's had no filter. And whether it's an issue with a player with the media, it's going to be out there because that's just like every day. He's so intense and he's bringing it to bringing it to bringing that and that's part of the reason why the Yankees acquired him. I do feel like that like that type of personality is needed. And the comparison I made yesterday, Marley was to Jorge Posada, who I felt like, you know, in the years I covered him. He's intensity in a day in and day out basis and Tino Martinez as well. They're intensity on an everyday basis was really good for the team. You know what buster you've covered the Yankees for a very long time and you know I have two and there is one and I'll say and.

Josh Donaldson Josh Allen Kurt Cole Aaron Boone Ian kinsler MLB Aaron Frank braves Josh Yankees New York Jorge Posada Marley Tino Martinez
"ian kinsler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"I guess I'll go with yelmer Sanchez. Formerly of the White Sox, former gold glove winner, yelmer Sanchez, how often do you get a fairly 2020 I guess? 2019. Yeah, one a gold club. Who knew? How often can you get that kind of hardware in a minor league free agent draft? He was not in the big leagues in 2021, which is a strike against him, but he was an MLB every year from 2014 to 2020. He's still only 29. He's played everything except catcher and center field. So this is just your standard plays every position has been given chances before hopefully will be given chances again. I'm sorry, he won a gold glove at second base where all the other second basement dead? Did they become youth pastors briefly? Like, what are we doing here? Do you think that's crazier? Or do you think it's crazier that the 2018 winner was Ian kinsler? Well, really old. We're like, you know, sometimes we're really guessing, I guess is the thing. I mean, he had a good DRS rating that year, I guess. He was leading, he led second basement in the ale and defensive run save, so I guess there was something there, but that's shocking. I'm shocked. Yeah. He was with the Atlanta, I believe in the miners last season, but yeah. Don't know where he is now. Don't know if he's anywhere. I mean, he must be somewhere, but I don't know if he's been signed by a team yet. Hopefully he will be. Wow. I've learned something today. Yeah. That was truly surprising to me. Wow. Glad to blow your minds. Yeah, jeez, Ben. I don't know how you're gonna recover from that to make your next pick, but I guess we have to soldier on. All right. I have a pick that I found very enjoyable. It's been in the news. He's been signed by the two best teams in baseball, this off season. That's John duplantier. Yeah. Giant scientific deal only to have the Dodgers select him away from them in the minor league free agent draft four days later. I don't actually know. He's going to get any major league time. I think the Dodgers like to use their triple-A shuttle enough, they'll probably get some. But the fact that both the Dodgers and giants wanted to sign him, makes me think he might be good. Yeah. Yep. He was on my board, albeit further down, but yeah. Here's floating around. Oh, God, I gotta go now. Yep. Oh.

yelmer Sanchez gold club White Sox Ian kinsler baseball John duplantier Dodgers Atlanta Ben giants
"ian kinsler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"ian kinsler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Ryan Sandberg. Craig Biggio. And Ian Kinsler. Very good company. 11 years of Cincinnati Red and nobody had any reason to believe when he was traded here from the Cleveland Indians in a in a deal Wayne Krivsky engineered after the Indians had d F ate him. We're tired of it. They don't know what to do with him. So the idea fade him and Wayne Krivsky swooped in and made a deal for a player to be named later. It turned out to be Jeff Stevens, who got a couple of cups of coffee and the rest, they say is history in his time with the Reds is a three time All Star. And just The ability to Who kind of plug in to the fan base in Loveland, we go. Hey, Ben. Welcome to sports talk. Hey, Lance idea, man. I'm well, Thanks for calling. Yeah, well, I just want to say and I'm a little younger, so I might be biased. But Brandon Phillips is my all time favorite Reds player. Yeah, on it. It is not because of his baseball, though his baseball is amazing. It's just his personality on the field. I think that's what makes them so likable the fans. I mean, I met the guy a couple times and Just a great guy off the field, and I think, especially in Red's company. That's that's what makes you a favorite. That's what that's what makes his legacy so great here. Cincinnati. You know, that is exactly what I'm looking for. Ben. I'm glad you called. Do it again sometime. Yes, thank you that that's that's what I thought I might get. That was good, and we'll take a time out of continuing. Want to add some new stuff into the mix. But I'm looking on Twitter. Dan mentions BP sign until first pitch No fan young, old or from the other team was ignored. Uh, Jim, I like that was BP's personal driver. Many stories can't be told laugh, he said. But Brandon is a great guy. Uncle Willie on Twitter. My favorite red of all time I watch Rose Larkin Sable. Parker loved them all. A Davis cow Daniel's Pokey Reese rolling all grade faves, but nobody carried the swag every night. Like Brandon Phillips, surely a Reds Hall of Famer. Absolutely no question about that. When we continue, I have a Ivan Innocents observation about grocery shopping. I discovered something on Sunday. Discovered I'm not alone. In the way I do it. I will explain and the eye contact I made on Sunday as we continue to get in on this date and reds history in the back end of the hour as well. We're rolling through this eight o'clock hour. Arnell Carrier Sports talk presented by Kelsey Chevrolet 700 WLW. My summer. Who's your summer? Boy? You're surely bill cutting into great American bask in the summer sun as we go one on one with the issues you want to talk about the guest you want to hear. And, of course, the last you wanna have. Let's have some fun this summer. Just like the song says I am your Summer boy, Billy Cunningham. He's your summer boy. Tomorrow at 12 noon on 700 wlw. I am here some herbal.

Ian Kinsler Ryan Sandberg Wayne Krivsky Craig Biggio Billy Cunningham Brandon Phillips Jim Jeff Stevens Dan Brandon Cleveland Indians Sunday 11 years Ben Lance Ivan Innocents eight o'clock hour Tomorrow at 12 noon Reds 700 WLW