20 Episode results for "Ian Fleming"

No Mr. Bond, I Expect You In Court

The Industry

37:01 min | 1 year ago

No Mr. Bond, I Expect You In Court

"The rights to certain characters and stories can be a funny thing in the industry. Let's say for example that you wanted to make your own for a lot of homes movie and release it for sale. Put it in the theater to get it on digital. Make a buck. This is something that you can absolutely do without any worry about some companies suing you for infringing on their IEP or intellectual property. That's because Sherlock Holmes is in the public domain and anyone can use that character for free. There's a lot of characters in the public domain actually aside from Sherlock Holmes Dracula Frankenstein Allison Wonderland Zorro and Robin Hood are are all public domain characters. This is one reason why you see those characters popping up in different versions back in theaters on television every so often now if you wanted to make your own spider man Batman John Wick or say Captain Jack Sparrow movie and released that for sale now that would be a different story. Those guys are all copyrighted and each copyright comfort. Its own lawsuit. Should you decide to try to make a buck off. This is probably not news to you but there is one character whose history includes much disputed heavily litigated copyright and even lead to a rival movie being released the same year as the genuine article so to speak and that character is James Bond and that disputed often litigated copyright is all thanks to one man who some bond fans might think of as 007-style True Arch Villain Kevin Glory and today eight. We're taking a look at the convoluted story of Kevin McClary in an episode that we're calling no Mr Bond. I expect you in court. Welcome welcome to the industry. At the time of this podcast outcast. There are twenty four official James Bond Movies out there with the twenty fifth on the way in the year twenty twenty. It's the one franchise that never seems to end and wealth. Health never says never bond movies have been going strong now for over fifty years and the two thousand fifteen film. Specter James Bond faced off against the villainous Ernst staff wrote blow felt it was blow felt first appearance in an official bond movie since nineteen seventy-one before both fell was a mainstay the James Bond Universe universe and evil guy always looking to blow up the world for some reason or another back when Sean connery was playing bond back when Sean connery was playing bond loaf loaf elvas popping up all the time. He's just a shadowy figure in the second bond film from Russia with love pulling the strings. You don't even get a good look at the gop you you can finally see him up front and center in you only live twice here. He has that signature look of a bald head facial scar and seemingly always sitting in a chair petting heading a white cat that whole doctor evil look the next bond pictures are also blofeld heavy on Her Majesty's Secret Service with George Lazenby as bond and in connery's final bond picture diamonds are forever and after that he was just gone James Bond of course would return he always this does but blofeld was nowhere to be found as a series moved into the nineteen seventies with Roger Moore as bond. He wouldn't officially reappear until twenty fifteen so why did blow fell disappear. It's all because of one man Kevin McClary and one bond story in particular James Bond is in operation and what an operator he is in Ian Fleming's thunderball Ian Fleming the creator of James Bond. Everyone knows this the movies love to remind you of Ian Fleming by constantly throwing his name on the screen in every single movie and making statements like this Roger Moore as James Bond 007 in Ian Fleming's live and let Die Fleming Rhode is I bond novel Casino Royale in Nineteen Fifty Three by mid nineteen fifty-eight Nate Fleming had written six teams bond novels and was looking to get his creation on the silver screen. There was one version of bomb had already appeared on American television but the unless said about it the better this is when Fleming gets introduced to Kevin McClary McClary had been working in the industry already for a number of years. He'd been a part of John. Houston's crew making the classic the African Queen he had also been a production assistant on around the world in eighty days and when Ian Fleming Madame Kevin McClary was writing and directing his own feature a war film called the boy in the Bridge Fleming McClary and two friends named Ivar Bryce and Ernest Cuneo all to work on James Bond screenplay over the next few months ten different scripts were written different titles were tossed around like James Bond around of the secret service and longitude seventy eight west. Eventually things got shaped up when McClure brings in experienced screenwriter named Jack Whittingham into into the fold in one thousand nine hundred fifty nine Whittingham have been writing screenplays for years at this point had over fifteen British screenwriting credits to his name Kevin and an awful lot of time for Jackson was Jack was a writer for hire so I think having had known jock before he got involved with Fleming Fleming scavenger being in the film industry actively since forty seven so he don't quite a few people he knew Jack and he wanted to to bring in a third party to just kind of get this screenplay off the ground so I haven't found that Jack. He always said that Jack was able to speak. Fleming's life that is Morgan Film Morgan Fulham. I worked for the estate of McCoy of course so I was hired after he died is kind of tidy things up for Mandy last quite a substantial archives kind of dealing with that too but I was it was a lawyer at the time so it's dealing with more kind of company law things just making traffic was going fine and then I sit up process I became a bit of an expert birth on intellectual property was involved so then I became a consultant when we did that settlement in two thousand thirteen and that settlement in two thousand thirteen thirteen that he's referring to is the one that returned blow fell to the world of James Bond but let's get back to nineteen fifty nine in November of that year. Fleming Fleming leaves to travel the world for a non fiction travel book during this Time Screenwriter Jack Whittingham completes an outline that McClary says is ready to shoot in December fifty nine Winningham Amick Lory send Ian Fleming the completed script for longitude seventy eight West Fleming receives leaves. The screenplay likes it but changed the name to thunderball then something kind of crazy happens plumbing decides to head home to Jamaica in January worry of nineteen sixty and starts working on a novel two months later in March. He's done the novel that he was working on thunderball and when thunderball the novel is released one year later in March of nineteen sixty one the only name credited on it is Ian Fleming's so what happened happened what caused Fleming two novels thunderball screenplay and essentially cut out McLaren winning. It is a story that it had to do with Kevin McClure feature the boy and the bridge that picture came out in one thousand nine fifty nine and did not do well at the box office or with critics. Fleming had wanted McClary to serve as producer on thunderball but now he was maybe starting to see Mkhori as a liability. That's one side of the story the other side of the story it is much more controversial heaven had an option to produce and Kevin had talked to talk to some golden junior in talk to another big producer. Who's named unfortunately escapes me right now? I'd he was trying to get the film done. They were going to find on this and they needed. Fleming's assignment on Fleming wouldn't give the assignment to there's all these excuses and delays and he rang down the clock and and it emerged the slamming had actually done a deal with the MTA it became a member who they became but there are big production company at the time of the day our agents at the time that they had done a deal around these James Bond Properties not unless that's why so I mean that because he was going to go ahead with another party but it wasn't to do with the boy and the bridge really. I don't think so I know the Boina Bridge didn't do huge well but it went to represented Britain to Vienna Film Festival. You know and it was never supposed to be a blockbuster. Was this RT picture the boy and the bridge was never meant to be a fake so I think that line that idea idea that side of the story is there to kind of deflect from the stuff that there may have been some shenanigans. Mr Fleming just prior to thunder of all the novel being released luck chlorine wittingham filed a lawsuit against Fleming for plagiarism and attempted to have the novel stopped. This doesn't work thunderball. The novel is released and it's it's a huge hit at the bookstores it sells out and becomes the highest selling bond novel of the time. It's also in nineteen sixty one that producers. Harry Saltzman and Cubby Broccoli Rockley come together and make a deal to start making James Bond movies. They formed two companies in order to do this one Danjaq which is basically basically the company that owns the rights to James Bond and eon productions. This is the company that will actually make the James Bond movies. The first movie they WanNa make is of course thunderball but McLaren Whittingham are still suing and through this complication eon productions ends up having to choose a different body novel to adapt tapped. They decide on doctor know eventually Jack Whittingham drops out of his lawsuit and instead becomes a witness for Kevin McClary. I think traffic goes very frustrated and very upset by the whole thing but he was a he was in the original action with Kevin so he was going to at sixty three cases. It's none but he left back case and I think he left for a couple of reasons. One was it was a hugely expensive pace to the in and I think he had a separate cause of action because Kevin effectively owned the copyright anyway because Jack was the writer for hype life you know he didn't have rights in perpetuity on that particular piece of material but he did have maybe another claim within the kind you've broader intellectual copyright on New World but if it was a different claim to have so I think it was terrible Jackson. It didn't have the time get his day in court with Fleming but his decision not to go with Kevin was one that happened much earlier he he had originally being on the hot in the same pleadings whiff cavern and then chose to leave the posted the case went to court in late one thousand nine hundred sixty three and nine days later it was settled. Kevin had one fleming paid McClary damages of thirty five thousand pounds and his court case of fifty two thousand pounds and future versions of thunderball were credited as based on a screen treatment by Kevin McClary Jack Whittingham and Ian Fleming in that order but more importantly than a credit and money. Kevin McClary won the rights to all of the different different scripts that were written during the collaboration for a better way of putting it. Kevin owned thunderball. It was his movie to make and says the character actor of Lohfeld was introduced in thunderball. He owned him to with his rights. Now Secure Kevin makes an interesting play. He initially seeks out making thunderball on his own so heaven wanted Connor cabinet known connery from way before so Kevin wanted connery to star in his thunderball without Brooklyn but each other to to Sean Connery Hunter said all I'm. I'm actually contracting for a few more films not available so Kevin was thinking well connery's conic after our time he was like the perfect James Bond or is there any other actor in the world the could compete with them to have the the Gravitas in the presence that connery has on Kevin settled on Richard Burton so Kevin went to Canada where I was doing the play and say agreed to add Richard Burton would do would play James Bond however Kevin Enrich burrowed Rhode Friends so it was re the idea of was just to put some pressure on Broccoli so that Broccoli negotiate with Kevin on that they would make make the movie together so after initially making some noise about making thunderball mclarens of signing a deal with Danjaq slash Yang beyond productions the official bond people for the rights to thunderball in nineteen sixty four okay Harry. We're at Dublin airport in. I thinks it's probably sixty four sixty five on the CO.. Kobe's come to Dublin to to meet cavern to do this. This deal on thunderbolt so they agree on the terms except Kevin wants to have defend the rights back in says ten years and covey will be says the rights back in ten years said well because I want to make my own James Bond films and ten years and he said and Cubby said nobody's going to be interested in James Vomiting Compton ten years nineteen sixty four is notable in the James Bond World first of all McClary scientists ten year deal for thunderball. The Third James Bond Movie Goldfinger was released in one thousand nine hundred sixty four and was a hit and last Ian Fleming died of a a heart attack at the age of fifty six in nineteen sixty four in nineteen eighteen sixty. Five thunderball is finished and released. It's billed as the biggest bond of them. All says it right there on the poster and Kevin gets a producing credit dr no big from Russia with love. Baguer Goldfinger. Even bigger now here comes the biggest of all under ball now James Bond doesn't everywhere. Look up look down. Look out here comes the biggest bummed at all Albert Broccoli and Arizona Present Sean Connery in thunderball produced by Kevin McCloy panavision technicolor. A united artists release undergo and thunderball is a smash hit. It's the highest grossing James Bond Film at the time. This might not seem that impressive considering there were only four movies by nineteen sixty five have however what is impressive is that adjusted for inflation thunderball is still the highest grossing James Bond Picture in the US the adjusted box the office number for two thousand eighteen listed at six hundred seventy three million dollars blofeld after just being a shadowy unnamed character makes his full debut in thunderball and would appear the next few movies. Thanks to the ten year agreement McClary had made and after the huge success of thunderball Kevin McClary kind of disappears at least from the James Bond world ten years later though Kevin Jumps back into the bomb world fully expecting to exercise his rights at this point. It's the mid nineteen seventies and Roger Moore has taken over as bond in the series and for Kevin that means that Sean Connery is now available to star in his bond movie for this Kevin Not only recruited connery to play bond but also to help help write the script along with Len Deighton a novelist who had written the Harry Palmer spy series and the movie they came up with is a variant on thunderball called warhead head. There's a few version would certainly one was that Spector had kind of become these ECO terrorists unday our disgusted ostad how the world's oceans were being destroyed so they were going to hold the rest west around some that was one story element of they were going to threaten to blow up significant structures in Manhattan the newly built a World Trade Center on the Statue of Liberty and they were going to do it by using laser guided mechanical sharks and sources of New York. Yes that's right mechanical sharks that shoot laser beams in the New York City sewer sewer system is also a bond girl with the Groan Worthy Justin loves it and fight on top of the head of the Statue of Liberty Paramount pictures on board to distribute attribute and quite honestly. I really want to see this movie so what happened or had. The greatest bond film never made so often described yeah okay so I'm not in a position to actually have access to the archives so familiar enough with what would have been. We'll be fantastic but sadly this is the kind of sequence of events so is going to make warheads breath believe power mind or going to provide financing and distribution they make an announcement in the press on these he's Fleming Estate through the trustees and you a props Jacksonian nuttier seek an injunction against Kevin that scares parliament allstate well. It's not so much dot com. I GET SCARED OF IT Steve. The insurers for the film gets nervous. I think fire mistrusted so they're beginning to get worried because they're a point. I don't know how much money money don eon made but it was significant. Hiring Plan didn't want the hassle. They didn't want to worry the trouble so they pulled out and they and having an starts negotiations with Kelly and frank wells from warner brothers and they're going to it just has put a limit on the time she Asians the time runs at the conference in agreement so Kevin polls stop field so often described as warner brothers pulled up but it was actually Kevin hold up to taking their deal. I'm not long after or put of even being slightly before that Lorrimore lorrimore make a pitch to Kevin About Doing Bong. I'm Kevin doesn't like the term that they're offering whatever so the deal stalls but the vice president of Larmar at the time was John Schwartz anzacs Workman's role and the deal was to investigate Kevin's Pied Jack's watching the Dino Motion Picture Malaria Foods Twenty five years or something that point so he had been a guy who investigated investigated the title of the Kevin. How these rights came to have and he could see that he did so. That's how we get through up but unfortunately originally started warhead. They figured that the safest route was to go as close to the thunderball script as possible because that was the least disputed CBS Chinese territory so that's why warhead got parked was that it was to actually gas failed made the decision session was to go the route of least resistance and that was to do something much closer to thunderball while Kevin Unquestionably had the rights to remake thunderball bought the warheads script veered too far away from it and that's why it was never made instead a new script that was basically a remake of thunderball was ready to go by the early nineteen nineteen eighty s all this time that warhead is being sorted out by lawyers and producers the James Bond Series keeps on going with Roger Moore as bond however bonds main villain villain Blofeld hadn't made an appearance nineteen seventy-one diamonds are forever the last one star Sean connery but when it was apparent that Kevin did have his thunderball remake remaking production the more series made an interesting move in the pre title sequence to Nineteen eighty-one for your eyes only an unnamed and only shown from behind Blofeld makes an appearance trapping bond in a helicopter he controls by remote control of course the tables are quickly turned. That's the shot over on Vince heats up his nemeses and robson down an industrial smokestack killing him sending a clear message to Kevin McClary and his thunderball remake and that message was was have fun using Blofeld. We don't need him here anyway. McClary thunderball remake was called. Never say never again a play on the fact that connery had one. He said he would never again play bond and it was set to come out in one thousand nine hundred three the same year as the next official bond picture octopussy project more originally wanted out of making octopussy. He was tired of the role and felt he was too old to play it anymore. He was right by the way producers started looking for a replacement and a couple of guys. Most is notably. James Brolin came close to getting it once never say never again with an actuality bond producers then felt they couldn't compete against Sean Connery the original double o seven with a new guy coming up as bond so Roger Moore once again strapped on the Tuxedo go to war once 1983 eighty-three rolled around in both movies ready to roll the media dubbed it the battle of the bonds and a number of newspaper and magazine articles popped up going over both pictures both with more and connery were constantly being asked about the other Ad Nauseam. Here's part four part piece. The today show did on both films well. I don't know whether you're a fan of Sean Connery Andrea Roger Moore but you're going to have the choice this summer to pick either one because since last fall more an connery have been shooting new James Bond movies around the world at one point both both were filming in London where I caught up with does more no. There are two sevens at work. Would you like to tell you about the got to get started up there. Talk about that and that's amazing well. It's not only amazing. It's amusing because the competition is none other than Sean connery returning as James Bond in never say never again. Are you amused by the fact that at this point you and Roger are shooting bond films at Simultaneously Yeah. I bumped into him. Actually he was staying being in the Arlington House. In London with well director is cuts non bump into Joni streets and we talked and it was just it just started and conversations very brief news really son and he said what are you guys going off to location and I remember it was somewhere some dreadful town just on the outskirts of London and he said what are you going inside. The south of France Advan is said then going and and I said I'm going to Nassau Bahamas sitting in India then well. That's nice while I'll see you back in London. Are you surprised to find yourself back here. Meaning playing James Bond Yes i. I am in some ways. I mean having said you know never again as it was when I was approached by Kevin maclaurin he had the rights. After ten years to remake thunderball ended all the lawyers come out of the woodwork and the legal ramifications became far too complex. I've had enough of these last few years that I chose not to proceed and out of the Blue Jack. Schwartzman approached me with a view to doing this. One and I said well. D- do conditions one is that it is totally clean and I have no more dealings as lawyers is it well though he happens to be a lawyer and I have total indemnification from yourself and he provided both so these clauses and we are the producers of both bond films had the good sense to keep them away from each other on the calendar. Roger Moore and octopussy would open. I on June Sixth Sean Connery in never say never again wouldn't hit the until October seven and it shakes out like this never say never again. Dan scored the higher opening weekend ten point nine million dollars versus eight point nine for Octopussy however overall box office never say never again would lag behind in the US octopussy one out with sixty seven million versus fifty five million and worldwide it was victor with one hundred and eighty seven million to never say they never against one hundred sixty put make no mistake both pictures were highly successful and even though it was a hit never say never again and did not spawn a new bond series with Sean connery or with anyone else for that matter and for the rest of the nineteen eighty s Kevin Glory wasn't out really looking to do that all that would change the nineties though Kevin's last go round with James Bond would look like this in one thousand nine hundred ninety six one year after Pierce Brosnan in made his debut as bond in Goldeneye. Kevin decided to announce that he would be making warhead two thousand. AD basically another other remake of thunderball and once again he had a former James Bond star this time around it was Timothy Dalton in one thousand nine hundred seven Kevin entered a deal with Sony to to not only make the new version of warhead but an entire James Bond franchise this did not go over well at Danjaq which was at the time working with with MGM and they quickly filed the twenty five million dollar lawsuit to stop Sony from going forward. Sony then countered with the claim that Kevin McClary was the CO author of the cinematic James Bond and was thus owed fees from mgm and Danjaq at some point. Kevin would even claim the sixty eight year old sean connery would be coming back in his version of James Bond. This played out in the trades for a couple of years until in nineteen ninety nine Sony. MGM AND GM settled MGM would pay Sony five million dollars to settle the lawsuit and ten million dollars to not make any James Bond movies MGM would also get the rights lights to Casino Royale. Bond novelty did not own the rights to previously a few years later in two thousand four Sony would end up vying mgm and thus owned the James Bond Franchise Anyway. There was no need to have Kevin McClure Ian his thunderball rights blow fell would return to the bond franchise with Spector released in two thousand fifteen fifteen and I wondered what Kevin might have thought of this version of blow fell that came about James Bond film which I think he would read for. We got on very well with 'cause. I thought it was appalling. Given Heavens get Kevin always thought lowveld should never have been seen phones back to the original thunderball Tahseen and her petting the cat he was always wanted to keep him. I'm very very mysterious and they they just they didn't do that one very well and recently again so he would have been appalled. This is Jack Elam. Jack is an old drinking buddy that Kevin met in the eighties was currently running a twitter account in Kevin's name so of course the first question. I had to ask him was. How is it that you're running A? Kevin McClary twitter account you know I because he'd want me to I mean he never discussed twin around but but he was always one for like making sure a truth got out and so I I I set it up right after Spector. I didn't like Spector I knew was not the specter of the Kevin would have liked the reason the reason for that. I would have thought Kevin would have liked to have some some say back for and it was funny his son Bram well you know the MTV and Said who you to run this. I said Abrahama track. I met you in How do you Paki latkes and we were talking about F. One and so forth he goes. I I know who you are. Do you mind if I keep doing it because it. It didn't give me a ringing endorsement when Jack I met Kevin in a pub over thirty years ago. He quickly learned about his connection to double o seven. I mean he tells you very quick the number one and he such storyteller that he and trawls you. I mean the best Regalia I ever came across he he would like to be known as Shannon key which is an old. Irish folklore verbal historian and Storyteller Kevin was full of stories especially about working working in the movies he would talk about John. Huston John Huston set of African clean and he did they as soon as they arrived. He got into his head. One of the bull tusked elephant tusks have a habit went and bought the biggest elephant gun and they went out hunting hunting and he says they were out for weeks and he says John Hughes you can't the porters to to beat the bushes literally elite one or two of the Puertas died doing that and of course Liz Taylor how you introduce Elizabeth Taylor to Richard Burton and I really and subsequently I found out I think he dated Taylor and anyway he told the story once and then I was going he was staying at John Huston's house in Galway often Ryan. I would go up on weekends me and some friends and we'd hang out. She showed me he mounted the letter from this with Taylor Saint. Thank you Kevin Trench using me to that lovely fellow richer at a party and yes Kevin McClary introduced Liz Taylor Richard Burton. I know I know after speaking with Jack Listening to historians. It wasn't a surprise to find out that Kevin was quite a character. I always considered him a bit like doctor who because he always had an assistant and this poor core ever suffering the system would be doing filing upon upon filing and I I don't know I've known about ten of his assistants over the two years and they were you'll make Kohl's do this. Kevin would like you to come along where there's party to comment so yeah he was a force of Nature Jack. Jack also told me about a charity event that Kevin held in the nineteen seventies called circe Asia which featured Eric Clapton Burgess Meredith Shirley maclaine and of course Sean Connery as circus files. John Huston was the ringmaster. Look it up. It's crazy. He also told me about his fascination with tech. You see it in the James. Bond film I was always I said that was a cool aqua lung on us in Thunderball and and he had keys and radar detector radiation detectors and the Raskin so he had he always had the latest garrick. I mean he had the first I hard disk. I ever saw he bought twenty megabyte hard disk for some insane amount of money like fifteen hundred Irish Irish punts at the time so he was a guy just here and that's how we we loved tech which does fit right in with James Bond and his gadgets Kevin even died in two thousand six and die hard fans who likely know everything consider this podcast already they've you. Kevin not blow felt as James Bond's taste constantly suing trying to make his own version of a character. He didn't really create that's not everyone's view but we became a fast friends and nobody's drinking by these and he he was always very warm. Great Guide and I miss them a lot. We're GONNA fill. 'em Our mcquarry historian who helped settle the thunderball writes from. Kevin's estate back in two thousand thirteen has a different view of Kevin's complicated legacy the way I see it as so. I'm not sure if you were but the first film that Broccoli's we're going to wanted to produce was under doc. I script connery. Got Was Thunderbolt. Thunderball was template for all the bond films. Don't forget that the Kevin Kevin's sounds idea was that this character needed to be rewritten just for the screen and they needed a vehicle that the vehicle was thunderball so thunderball under bowl is the daddy of the James Bond. It's not the first one but it was supposed to be the first one eight under sane writer who Richard May who wrote wrote this script Broccoli's would font for juice sorry Brooklyn Enforcement Echoes back then towards Musto so involved that were supposed to produce at the time had been written by Richard May and then when they realized they didn't have to write the fewest with the same writer to ripe doctor knows so he had all of them material had gone to create this new vehicle the visual cinematic James Bond thunderball so I would say that if if thunderball didn't happen thunderball wasn't written a Fleming Kevin on and Jock Hutton creativeness screenplay James Bond. We know now would be very fixed. Thank you for listening to this episode of the industry. This episode was written produced and edited by me. Dan Got Special. Thanks to my guest this week. Morgan Cannes film and Jackie Gillan music in this episode was by Kevin mccloud. Dj Williams Silent Partner and audio not ix are awesome cover. Art Is by by Kathleen Mansfield. If you haven't seen it you could check it out at our website at the industry podcast dot com. If you enjoyed this episode feel feel free to let others know about it. I could use the download you know you can also help out by reading and reviewing the show on apple podcast but no pressure on that one okay you have a comment or complained or just want to say hi. You could send me an email. The address is Dan at the industry PODCAST DOT COM and we'll be back again soon with another episode detailing some of the lesser known things that went on in the industry good night.

James Bond Storyteller Kevin Specter James Bond Kevin McClary thunderball Sean connery Fleming Fleming James Bond World Kevin McClary McClary Kevin McClure Kevin Glory James Bond Properties Ian Fleming Roger Moore Jack McClary producer Kevin mccloud Kevin McCloy Fleming Kevin
Time Capsule Episode 79

Sci-Fi Talk Time Capsule

27:47 min | 4 months ago

Time Capsule Episode 79

"Hi My name's Aaron Douglas. In Battle Star Galactica Joseph Lachey former executive producer and writer. I'm striking st one. Strike Atlanta's stargate universe. Hi I'm Brad Durham. Hey this is Edward Rogers on the composer on warehouse thirteen. I'm earning Barbara's director of media and hardwired you're listening to sci-fi talk this week time capsule look at the film sinister. Amanda Tapping Talk to me about life after sanctuary comcast taking over NBC Japan. And therefore you know kind of it changed the parameters for them that they weren't able to make decisions as quickly as they would've liked on spotlight. James Bond producer. Barbara Broccoli talks about making this franchise and also what Bond Creator? Ian Fleming told her father Cubby Broccoli sadly fleming only really saw the first two films and when he was in Istanbul with my father Who's young man? Only in his fifties he said to my father he said you know. These films are going to go on way beyond me and you're GONNA have to get people into right after I'm gone. That's what's ahead an episode seventy-nine of Time Capsule which is my magazine. Style energy. Show an out. This weekend is sinister about a House. That has a bad history. What a demon that stalks. Whoever lives there and just make sure you don't see him otherwise he'll enter our world and wreck havoc to the piano had a very big role in this particular score. Now I should forewarn you in advance that what? You didn't get a chance to read little notes that I wrote about that seedy and what I ended up doing for that much res- it's it's being really stunned as Sarah von. Cd is you know. I went back to original material and I was like Solo inspired by the score and the picture itself and I had some extra time. I said you know what I'm sue I'm going to do. Here's reinvestigate this material and use it as a as a springboard and for the CD manipulated ways that I had for the movie. Yeah okay so what you're hearing on. The CD is taking. You know a lot of tracks from the movie or the sounds and then reworking them to. I think. Make much more exciting hopefully much more exciting listening experience on its own. When you see the film you go that one and this why is value though that whole thing and you go us works really well for the movie? I don't understand why you want to change it. I always felt that you know. With sound design scores. Schools that are that are more about about sonority and they are about fiends that the that used the holds them together is definitely not the same hold scores together that are based on themes and courts and whatnot right. So that's what I felt. I needed to try to bring in the school more more courts. I mean for the CD. More hordes more structure in the sounds like the whole experience was much like you would expect from a more traditional score L. K. Okay for the films. I guess he went. Did you use more? Sounds for the film or did use less for the actual. I'd say for the CD I expanded. Sounds like more sounds of CD okay. Okay 'cause I use it as a springboard on on I just restructured things and added some new material to make the CD itself. I think a more easier and more logical listening experience right Bravo Zan Zan just giving you know the exact Hughes I did for the movie bride recently. I had a chance to catch up with Amanda Tapping about her busy schedule and we also chatted about sanctuary. Have you had a chance to process? All of that You know since that happened we go so many factors at play that comcast taking over NBC and and therefore sci-fi you know kind of changed the parameters for them that they weren't able to make decisions as quickly as they would've liked or And so I think that that that delay had a massive effect on us In the time that they that Seifi wasn't sure when they were going to bring us back if they were going to bring back what was going to happen are finding answers. As you know we're privately financed got and every year we struggle with them anyway as to whether or not they're going to you know paying this season as a show and with the delay from Scifi it made them very nervous now we see TV on board. We had other networks around the world onboard but without the US sale our finances were like That we do this and then in that time in the time within decision. It's a great time of indecision what I call it. We are studio came up. Police and the finances were absolutely and rightly so unwilling to sign their year lease without a commitment from Scifi so we had to release the studio which releasing the asset restoring them which was such a big deal because she's in for ended. But we certainly want to keep that set alive to revisit so I think when when things were being pulled out of the studio and we had very little time to do it. That's to me when the Death Knell Really Ray. You know either you know. I can't see our finance or suddenly going okay. Let's find another studio. Let's get her back up to me like that was kind of it. Even though we had pitched a really great miniseries Saifi. And I I don't know I would love to think that there was still potential reese to do the mini series which I thought was was really cool. Damian and pitch them on a really neat idea but I don't know You know again in sub finances on the intellectual property. That is yeah. Is there a chance you might kind of go back to the beginning and go to the Internet and do something like that even? Yeah even if we were to do that we would still need to get the approval of the okay okay. They'll be more with Amanda on a future sci-fi topic actually airing this Wednesday talking about a new film she has with a former sanctuary after Christina. Canepa was an actor who recurs on true blood and also recently guest starred on grim. We chatted about that role and she gave me some secrets of the makeup process for the series. You've been onto things I watch a lot of and that's true blood and and and you're going to be upcoming on grim too so that's GonNa be a lot of fun for you to why actually aired and there's some confusion the air date because they switch back to Friday you've for lack of air attack Friday the the Good Shepherd. Okay yes separate. Yeah so it was Think they they kind of went dark a couple of weeks there in their transition than they were back fighting last Friday. Oh yes you were the you were the the woman who was betrayed by the Reverend. Yes of course. Of course I was. I was like I mean they do that. Great Transformation did actually make you up was that was that digital. It's all digital Sanofi time or May Times. You need to get the really really well. And then you had actual thing you know look knows. Tgi affects the effect that up visited his dream. Dot fell over your face and you do that. The transformation are a few times so they feel like that yeah so the jocking building but they need transformation and that's was this that's fantastic interesting character You know she Like everybody else was kinda taken in by him. A little bit How did YOU How did you approach her? When you? When you got the part that Bush Nagin I I mean I think he's a pretty self explanatory character and a lot of ways and I think we've all had where we've gotten to see by somebody deceived by a wolf and clothing. I called on my own experiences and immerse myself and character. I mean were they different. And a lot of ways as well but Now the producers and the writers and the director but at the verge of wonderful talk about contraband. Everything a lot and Shape NECK. Listen to my complete conversation with Christina POW in the future sci-fi Talk I also recently spoke to the vicious brothers known individually as Stewart Ortiz and Colin Minivan about their film grave encounters two. This is a little different for both of you because you just wrote the screenplay what was that like to watch somebody take what you ridden and make You know their own vision of that film. There's a stereotype and I'd say it was. It was a good experience to his car. Never done that before. And just kind of taking the producer rains and you know it's it's interesting because you know we watched. Gp who really think is a great director and we both really enjoyed a lot of his Commercial Music video stuff that he's done and and he came up with a lot of things that we never would have thought of that out of the lot of the film so it was. It was a good experience. You know ask someone else. That's on board with the thing and then they come up with like new ideas and stuff like that. It adds to the project a lot that we wouldn't thought of. What was your approach? And writing the sequel. What is it. What did you have an idea in mind when you did original? This is calling. I think that in general I do. I just want to stray away from from Doing anything there would be a very traditional sequel and follow to similarly in the same footsteps says the first time we didn't want to rehash anything we wanted to come at it if we do a sequel when we were first discussing it and it was kind of a possibility. We were like you know. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA do this. Let's not on right something that's just say let's push it in a new direction and You got a lot more creatively. It's more creative. Legal filling by Exploring area that we hadn't already gone before and as far as the script Did he follow it closely? You did say he made. He brought some of his own thing so he brought in some elements set to script as well we had written me and Colin written two drafts together and then once we had GP signed on than we do though like a full on their draft where JP was actively involved with a lot of stuff even just the script stage adding ideas and new ideas and stuff like that so jp was also involved at that point in addition to you know coming up with new stuff just on the day onset. I know it's rare. But did you have a chance to visit? Set at all when they were filming. We were there actually every day. Yeah we were because our our production schedule is so tight. We actually need to be editing the picture while we were shooting in order to achieve our delivery in any of the October released. That's coming up here pretty soon. So doing I actually set up a mini edit stationed inside the mental institution and would edit jeans as they're being shot so he's constantly walking back and forth from our our little makeshift at. Its sweet as you Set itself and kind of just keeping our eyes on think very much involved. The entire process look for grave encounters. Two now on bailable on demand a very special spotlight this week as we have. James Bond producer. Barbara Broccoli. Who along with her husband? Michael G Wilson now runs the James Bond Franchise and starting today at eight PM. Epochs a new movie channel will be showing a very special documentary. And it's called everything were nothing the untold story of double o seven. And it premiers at eight o'clock tonight. Check your local listings. So we had a chance to speak to Barbara Broccoli and a round table setting and as I said along with her husband. Michael G Wilson. They now run the James Bond Franchise. Now where is the famous Sabban archive that stores props and costumes from the series? We have an archive just outside of London where we store most of the things we've over the years we've been collecting things you know because a lot of things disappeared early often. People didn't really mean keep things which is kind of crazy when you look at it and also when United Artists Closed their offices here in New York. A lot of stuff was just thrown out original artwork. Poster I mean it's just let's make you sick. Oh it's just awful I know a lot of fans tried to salvage things out of the dumpsters but it was just too tragedy. Anyway we've kept stuff over the years and restored stuff and also in some cases bought things back So we restore restore them and we have them in a storage but one of the things we like to do. We like to exhibit them so that the fans can see them so we had a big exhibition at the Barbican in London. Just gone to Toronto We are doing an exhibition with the spy museum in Washington so we and then we also on Globe on day on Friday. We are having a big Charity auction of some of the things To benefit UNICEF in. London Christie's. Can you tell us about some of the prize items that were there well? There's some pretty extraordinary things I mean. I suppose the most fun one is Daniel Craig's swimming trunks from Casino. Royale shot. I'd like to bid on myself. We'll see you there. Oh you will. And you know one of the Aston Martin's that Daniel drove in quantum So it's GonNa be a big event and we thought it was a good way to celebrate by by making a charity beneficiary so UNICEF is the major charity but then some individual live auction items will be for other charities as well as anyone discussed using a former James Bond as a villain in the newer movie. It's kind of been talked about. I don't think we want to keep them the way they they are. And what dictates a change in attitude regarding the tone of the films? I guess the the two major things are one is the situation within the world The other is the actor playing the role and Both you know take both of those. Decisions will influence the direction in which the series goes. I think you know for example when we were making die another day with Pierce Brosnan which was an incredibly successful film. Nine eleven happened and when we went to write the next one really. You know in struggling to come up with a direction to go in because we felt von couldn't be frivolous. We couldn't be too fantastical because the world situation had turned so serious And so that was why we then decided Michael and I decided that we would make Casino Royale which was obviously the the original the coming of age story the original the first book about bond that Cubby in Harry Didn't have the option to when they got the rights from Fleming and it had it was the was the Sort of the Golden Fleece. So when we actually got the rights. We thought we needed to do it. I think it was an appropriate decision for the time to to take bond and a far more serious direction and to go back to the Fleming books. And that's why the casting of Daniel Craig. I think also reflected that that he's brought a lot of humanity to the role and you get to see more of the inner turmoil and the conflicts within him and I think It it's much richer portrayal and appropriate for this time in history. The Twenty First Century Barbara Broccoli talks about Heineken. Coming in on board as a sponsor for this film we're very happy to have Heineken. Involved with us. They've been partners with us on a promotions for several films Bond you know likes to drink. That's part of his way the way he unwinds and He's over in the books and films. He's he's had a variety of things that he's been drinking heinekens. One of them he drinks vodka MARTINIS. He drinks biology Champagne Well in this particular film he does. Drink Vodka Martini. But we don't specify the the vodka brand I mean Fleming. Writing the books in the fifties was dealing with a post. War rationing a situation in Britain. And so he you know in the books he would describe luxury items and exotic things in great detail and and I think that was part of the readers. Pleasure was that they they get. They got to live vicariously through bond the character. And that's something we've carried into the movies that you know. He likes really luxury things that are you know. If you'RE GONNA drive a car and you're GONNA have drive it like a bat out of Hell you you know you'd better have a reliable car in a fast car. So let's have asked Martin if you you know. Bond doesn't know from one day to the next. He's going to live or die so he's going to eat well he's GonNa drink the best things. He's going to eat the best things he's going to wear the most beautiful tailor clothes that are going to be durable and reliable. I mean that's the kind of world he lipson. I think it's part of the fun the enjoyment. What about Sean Connery? She has some interesting memories of the actor. Going back to. You only live twice. If it wasn't for sure Sean Connery. We wouldn't be here. I mean he obviously He started this franchise. He was the first person to play the role in the cinema. He is you know an indelible part of this he is an icon and I think you know he without him. We wouldn't be here. I haven't seen him for many years. I obviously knew him when I was a child and well he was wonderful. You know I I remember when we were doing You only live twice. I was about six or seven and I got very sick. We were in Japan working on very remote island and I was there with my parents and I got very sick. They thought I had sleeping sickness and we were on an island with traditional bed. mats and You know no Western beds. The only western bed that was there had been shipped in for Sean Connery by the production and He you know he went to my mother and he said you know look you have sick child use my you know. Take US my bed so I actually slept in Sean Connery's battery tampering. Happy to say does that true. He did not want to do from Russia with love. Well he he. Did you know He? He did do several movies. And then after you only live twice. He hung up his holster and he didn't WanNa come back and he was after on a Majesty's secret service. He was wound back to do another film and diamonds are forever and and then he decided he wanted to call it quits again and did not return again until he did never say never again which was a non eon productions. Still one of the things that fans look for the bond moons. Yes has he the trays literally ripping apart because of just come Sean Connery? Just as flower diamonds are forever. Is that something you very conscious of putting in order to do it or just part of the fabric? It's kind of a combination of the actor and the director. And when you see an opportunity like that it's it's a lot of fun when you can pull it off and you know Daniel has that wonderful swagger and charm About him and so he usually is the one that comes up with those kind of moments to do those those touches. Now take us in the room when you are deciding on who the girls will be. It's one of the most fun and exciting parts of my job because what we what we have been doing on the last sort of ten films is we have a casting director. Who travels the world we employ other casting directors in different countries and huge search? Goes on and they're they're film to add on tape and then we look through them all and we get down to a shortlist and the shortlist are invited to come to London. We have them come in. We meet them. And then if we find a few candidates will then test them sometimes with the actor sometimes not and It's it's it's really interesting because there's probably half a dozen of us. You know the director my my brother Michael producer myself. Castro's probably six people and You know all from different backgrounds different tastes all different ages and so to get you all to agree is you would think would be very difficult. But it's it's surprising that when the right person walks in for the right character how it becomes so evident as it did with baroness in in this film In Sky Fault because she we had been searching the world. We wanted someone exotic. We wanted someone who was Heroic Vulnerable and obviously beautiful and talented. She walked in the room and we all just looked at each other and went. Well that's it that's her that's our girl and she's fantastic and here's her take on the success of the franchise it's a combination of you know. Ian Fleming obviously who wrote this extraordinary character Complex character that you know has been able to change through through the generations I think a lot of it is down to the actors who played James Bond. They've carried it forward and I think also the audience are fans because we make the films for them and We find they come to the movies with a tremendous amount of goodwill and. I think they've kept us going. What about the viewer's choice for their favourite bond we find that it is a generational thing that it goes from parent to child to grandparent? You know so many times people come up to me and they say the first movie. I went to You know I bond. I went with my father or we used to go as a family at Christmas. It for lots of people. It's sort of a rite of passage. That going to a bond film on an outing with the family is a right of passage and I think because of that I think it's gone through generation to generation and it's something that I find very touching argument. Who was the best bond all over the place? A lot of that has to do. We've found over the years with the first person that individual saw on the screen Usually the first person they see is usually their favorite and scrape. Now that in Fleming's novels have all been done on the screen. How do you develop a new stories of that? Still play into the bond franchise. Sadly Fleming only really saw the first two films and when he was in Istanbul with my father Who's the young man was only in his fifties? He said to my father he said you know. These films are going to go on way beyond me and you're going to have to get people into right them after I'm gone and I think that showed you know his his foresight or his belief in the character and the cinematic character Ms Sad he died in sixty four so very young. Very young man and here. She discusses everything or nothing young told story of James. Bond the documentary that's going to be airing on epochs. This movie came about because the Producers Simon Shannon John Patsick Contacted US and said We Know Your fiftieth anniversary is coming up. Have you thought about doing a documentary? And we said Michael and I said well it's a complicated history And they said we meet with us so we we met with them and they said we think you should do it and we thought long and hard about it because a lot of it is very personal. It's a personal story and There's been it's been a roller coaster and we made a commitment that if we were GonNa do it we were going to want it to be a balanced depiction of the story and you know it's hard And we trusted them. And we trust Stephen Riley who was the director and so we eventually agreed and We I think we're very very pleased with what they've done. There's some cool. Things are being planned for. James Bond Fiftieth Anniversary and she discusses that well we have a lot of exciting things happening The academy is doing on the fifth Global Day is going to be doing music celebration in Los Angeles. We're doing the auction in London And there are all kinds of events happening all over the world from Rio to Paris. The Guard Denard Award. It's got lots of all the old posters in Rio. They're doing something at sugarloaf mountain where we shot so Everyone around the world seems to be planning events and the documentary is obviously one of the other big components of decisions being made goes well you're novels dramas well. Well they are being commissioned by the end Fleming family who have publishing rights and we work very closely with them and and those novels are available to us to film. We haven't yet made any of them. But it certainly a possibility in the future. She talks about Daniel Craig's appearance on Saturday. Night live. He's a really funny guy and in person he's incredibly witty and funny and charming and And he he's a lot of fun so I think it's quite for anyone to do it But I think people are going to get to see a Daniel that that we all know him see and love. He's a piece of really fun. Guy Till next time capsule this is Tony Tomato. Have a great weekend. I'm Michael Service. The Observer from fringe and Jebediah `love from stake land. And you're listening to Sifi Talk.

James Bond Ian Fleming Daniel Craig director Barbara Broccoli producer Amanda Tapping London Michael Sean Connery Istanbul comcast US Cubby Broccoli NBC Edward Rogers Christina POW writer
Under the Covers with M.L. Huie

Charlotte Readers Podcast

24:52 min | 6 months ago

Under the Covers with M.L. Huie

"Welcome to this under the covers episode of Charlotte readers. Podcast authors. Give voice to their written words. This is the Friday version of Charlotte. Podcast where hosts land is Wade and his author guests. Get under the covers. Thus Roy we get in and out because they're just too many interesting books engaging authors in the region and not enough town and just like the longer version of the show you'll learn interesting facts about the authors and their books and the authors will read their work and also like the longer version you will find images links and information about the authors in the show notes Charlotte Readers podcast dot com support for Charlotte. Readers podcast is provided by park road. Books the oldest and only independent Bookstore in Charlotte conveniently located in Park Road Shopping Center and by Charlotte Mecklenburg Library a connector of readers leaders and learners with twenty locations and a twenty four hour online presence raw so grateful to those of you offer member support for trump leased off return member only contact curated with our authors and myself. You find out more about this member only content how you can help authors give voice to the written words at Charlotte Raiders. Podcast DOT COM. When Landis is not getting under the cover it bookstores at events and on the road he does it in the well-equipped podcast studio at advent co working located in the Belmont community near UPTOWN CHARLOTTE. But enough where the prologue? Let's get under the covers. I'm your host Landis Wade. Thank you for listening listeners. Today on the under the covers episode. I'm with M. L. Hughley that's Michael to me for today. We're at the bookmarks bookstore here and listen to Salem He's the author of the book. Spitfire Mike how you doing. I'm good how are you? Yeah and you're from this area right. I am a Winston. Salem native. A Deacon right you went to dig. I'm a proud demon. Deacons Damon taking this great so You're a writer and a teacher and an actor Jonah. Had all this things. Well if you're an actor you've got to have another way to make a living too if you live in North Carolina. Thanks if you're right or to exactly exactly so adjunct theater professor and now novelist. Yeah that's great and you said you've worked. Ten years is features journalist You've written plays. You're actually got an actor's Equity Association card I guess does that get Yeah it's acting union and so it means you're eligible to you know. auditioned for certain roles and work in certain theatres. And they have to pay you a certain amount of money. Let's good we're going to be talking about England and Because of your book. Spitfire you say Like your protagonist Living Nash. We're going to talk about who? Who that you love the northwest of England? And and you have a yanks. Appreciation for Good Lancashire hotpot. Yup what is there is basically a casserole meat casserole In Lancashire especially one town of spent a lot of time You know the hot pot kind of like a festival thing. So it's an annual thing. Yeah so yeah so is it. I mean as a vegetables decibels and when when you're in that cold northwest part of England. Probably we'll look we're GONNA be By the way the show. Thank you very much pleasure to be here. Talking to bookmarks is a nice bookstore is a fantastic book or hiding in the back corner here so listeners. If you hear some people talking they're just instant buy books. Let's talk a minute before we get under the covers. Michael about the book cover itself for Spitfire. It says Spitfire a living ash mystery your first debut novel and you get This this can't see this cover but about describing it for our listeners. Well the cover is beautiful and It is Sort of silhouette of a woman's face and That's intentional there's a thing now In in book covers that where you see the back of the protagonist so you don't see her face and I think they wanted to get away from that and in the silhouette of her face is Sort of CPI version of the skyline of Paris With an RAF Spitfire flying Near the Eiffel Tower Having said that I don't even want to think that this is an aviation story We're using spitfire as it relates to somewhat derogatory name for a woman. So yeah so it is. I mean you say the Silhouette you see the darkened skies you see the Eiffel Tower Paris beneath the Spitfire this flying. And you're thinking right off you know this looks like the kind of book that If you if you enjoy a good war yes you know that you're gonNA find that Here yes A lot of good price for the book. Congratulations on that. It's a fast paced Book I can tell you that listeners. Because preparing for this and I had like Six books to read in about a week and I can't do that all the time. I read two or three chapters but I just stayed up all night and read this. We'll be right back. In the meantime you love to read. You might want to check out. What's new at Warren Publishing Are Episode Sponsor Today Warren Publishing a Premier Hobbit publisher since Nineteen eighty-eight right here in Charlotte Community. The offer books for every reader find him on facebook instagram or website. Warren publishing dot net to learn more about new titles book events and author workshops. Warren publishing books done wisely. If you like our mission of helping authors give voice to their written words. Please consider leaving short written review about Charlotte Readers podcast on Apple podcasts. Or The podcast platform of your choice because when you leave a review. It helps authors reach more listeners. You can keep up with news about the show and members only content for our member supporters joining our email list. We promise not to spam you because well that takes too much time and if you do join the list we will give you a free e book written by Me Charlotte Readers. Podcast is a member of the twin city podcast network powered by Ortho Carolina for more information. Go to Queen City PODCAST NETWORK DOT COM. You're ready to get under the covers. Yes let's get under the covers a spitfire. Let's talk about the title. Is Okay well as I said Spitfire. This refers to Not The plane or the super cool British sports car the sixties and seventies but as it relates to a woman And this is somewhat. The whole book is based on a lot of history Livy was by during world. War Two There were a number of women who are recruited And served as spies behind enemy lines And it's based on specific specifically one woman. Nancy wake who had such a reputation among the German and say she was known as the white mouse so when it Catholic has a formidable reputation as well and they've decided to call her spitfire after the plane Which the accomplish comment because the Spitfire was arguably won the battle of Britain and she did some pretty both things in the book she at one point in the book she walks into a German prison and it has pull somebody out of the pretending to be someone else's she is also based on a true story as a real woman who did that. Simple hunting similar. Yeah there's this podcast out there. I went to alive version of code. Nevertheless she existed. And of course it's about women of history and they did a spy version. She might even been one of the ones featured in in that podcast. It's it's about the women that made a difference. Yeah and one of the things. I found interesting when I was reading. The book is how you open the book after the war is over right and she is in a low place. And you're GonNa read about some of that a few minutes here. She's in a low place because she had such excitement. Such adrenalin filled life. Or She's fighting this war and she comes back and she's was like a copy editor for a third rate news. Bear might sell you. And she's treated like pretty much that yeah doormat much She's just a woman right right at that point in time men rule right. They make all the decisions and so immediately. You're starting to pull for her right right. You undertake take some early book isolate. Let's set the timing here because about the book itself It's the day of the London. Victory celebrations in nineteen forty six. The war's over former spy living Nash celebrating with her third drank before noon right She went toward kill Nazi. She dropped out enemy LAS currier. She quickly became one of the toughest agents in France but our war ended with portrayal and the execution of the man. She loved pretty good. Catchy START THERE. I think so. Now let's talk about who she meets You're gonNA read about this. Let's talk about the man that She's GonNa meet in this. Read that you do hear people have heard of him right. I hope somehow they heard of well. She meets Ian Fleming The man who wrote the James Bond novels in one of the most influential three thriller writers of All Time Really and I have to say when I saw that I started thinking to myself. Okay what's Ian Fleming really involved in this way as you portrayed him in this book talk about that Yeah he was very much based on. What Fleming actually did. He was in naval intelligence during the war as a planner but then after the war he went back to journalism which was his field and he Ran Foreign correspondent for the London Sunday Times and Fleming himself said that some of those correspondents were spies. I also came across wonderful Tidbit of information. That in his office. He had a framed map of the world with little twinkling lights in the capitals of all these countries where he had correspondent. Put that in the book. I did what I saw that I thought. Oh my gosh. She's more like em from Bonn novels. So that's part of the fun is also playing on. Fleming's problematic reputation with women and how women are represented in the bond novels as well as his own sort of English upper class privilege opposite a character like Livy who is far from being a bond girl or even Jane Bond for that matter. She's working clash is direct. She's very tough so the sort of their relationship is kind of influenced by guess those gender politics as well. What made it also interesting for me. It didn't really register until just now. But I you know the attractive Assistant Anthony and had sort of now thinking moneypenny. Right absolutely yeah there. There are a bond Easter eggs throughout. If you know bond yeah so and Also a few people I know through college. Their names are in here. Always did that. My books to drop them into save the X. Ray To read your book. I'm hoping somebody that people are not reading this book. They tell you read your book. So what did you did? You catch your name. That's interesting well so we got Let's do this like to introduce the audience to the characters with a with a read from Yoga and so you got a little section here. It's always it's always great to start. You know where at the beginning of the book is. That's where you try to pull people in Radio and so you're to have a little just set this up force if you would because We set the date and chapter. One IS LONDON JUNE. Nineteen forty six a living ashes She's been drinking a little bit right. It's been a bad day. Everyone the king is having a parade on the strands She's in a pob drinking alone when someone suddenly shows up and just to set up even further She had gone to ceremony right or yes trying to to Otter There was honoring one of the male spies that she had been in league with the man she loved. Yeah it was receiving the George Cross posthumously because he was right and and she's turned away from the ceremony at the palace because They're afraid she's going to call the same and because his wife has actually his wife there. Yeah exactly and so. She's now in a bar drinking because she's yes. Yeah so levies. Mind race to all the possible angles. A man walks into a pub finds a lone woman drinking and manufacturers the job that just happens to be in her line of work all in an attempt to seducer. What else could it be? Newspaper work no one even remotely familiar with proofreading. Job would ever consider giving her a promotion much less track her down. Pob and dangle foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times in front of her sloshed knows this might rank as one of the most elaborate flirtations in history or it might be something else entirely grays inroad. That's right so we have a modest office there. The man swirl the ice in his glass lazily com as you. Please not a policeman either. She reckoned far too sophisticated like he owns the world. It's one had her landlord. Six summer owner no tough who collected written and pronounced their vowels like the Patricia. Oh tools of the world. I know the area. She said finally nothing about this. Talk right to her. But that's precisely what made it intriguing. Excellent shall we say around too then? Livvy took another drink. If I can get away from work I'm sure you can manufacture some excuse. Oh and IDA suggest you clean up a bit before tomorrow? You're about to step up in the world. Miss Nash. The man down the last sip of his drink in turn to go you. That livy called of his back stranger turned. How'd you find me? His mouth dropped down a bit as if he was disappointed she'd had to ask. I'm a journalist. We ask questions then. Step out into the street in the pub return to. It's dark silence an interview for a new job just like that. She wasn't a writer at this bloke knew enough to find the POB and he obviously knew that as well whoever was she looked down what he handed her the simple printing match the UNADORNED card. It read chemically newsgroup. Mercury Service. Get it I get it right foreign manager Ian Fleming. Hey Mark will get good work on the accents in the nineties. I'm not even practicing that actress. That's what we do you know so and so's we're going to be par for someday playing Ian Fleming. When you like to do that. That would be pretty great. Yeah I think there might be some people who are a little better than that to me the So inflamming he comes all of a sudden now. She's got an opportunity but she's not sure about it right but it but anything can be better than where she is the moment right right. And then she goes into this Meeting and he makes a proposition to her. What's the proposition? The proposition is the traitor. Who Killed. The man that she loved has in charge of this best spy network during the war The spy network is still in place and is open to the highest bidder. So Libya's given the job to go and meet with him and try to arrange for the British to receive the list of names of the people in the spy network. Livy though has vengeance on her mind. So that is she's torn during this She also runs into two other spies American whom she sort of has a somewhat romantic encounter with and older Charming Russian spy so she is Asking constantly who cannot trust so most of this book is set in Paris and You got England sort of as the background London specifically as How did you acquire your knowledge of these settings to kind of enrich them in the book here? Well I've been to both London and Paris figures to in March. The am I pronouncing that correctly? Mon- Morcha among not yet moment. Yeah lawnmower yeah. That's part of. Yeah Yeah I think a big thing takes place in there. Yes yes yes the Yeah I've been to both those cities but never in nineteen forty-six obviously so Most of the research is from books. Google Also films I mean films as a way. You can go back in time. But my best and coolest research Really came late in the process because Two years ago I happened to meet a guy here. Winston Salem who is a French veteran of World War Two He's ninety nine and a Kind of miracle of nature ninety nine His name is Andre Rochet. His wife was in The French Resistance while he escaped France and served in the war. So when I need to find out where would someone use a telephone on the streets of Paris in nineteen forty six? I would email Andre Andre where we do. You know so That's so she supplied you. Some antidote that you're able to use absolutely there's a whole section where he goes to a Not a cafe restaurants and I wanted to have her eat a specific thing And he said We're GONNA HAVE HER. I think she Base and he said well. That's only in the south of France from Marseille. So I've had. The proprietor of the restaurant is for more. Say So. And there's a reference to Andrea entered as. Well I kind of already diving into the writing life here. So let's just keep that going to have a little writing life segment. What did you find most challenging about writing this book going to the computer and typing work that I do not mean that sarcastic way at all but as a writer? I feel like I had the same problem as well. Procrastination is your friend Oh I need to do some more research. Oh maybe this idea is a perfect to hand. Eventually you've got to just put that away and go so let's dive in. So how long did you research the book before? You stop procrastinating. Maybe a couple of months. Okay banana research along the way during the drafts right Routine did you retain this. Because you got other things you're doing right. So how'd you? How'd you balance that ideal writing day go running have breakfast right The re- more realistic Writing Day is right when you can like in the waiting room while my daughter's having dance class so you say you're an adjunct teaching theatre later had is that headed that sort of infused itself into what you did here as a as an author while actors have to research their characters. If it's buried play you know about the time period that environment and so as the same thing you do as a historical fiction writer There is There's a lot of theater actually in Spitfire leave. He goes to the notorious Gongqing. Your one of the one of the characters is As an actor yes right and Which is a infamous theater in the Pigalle? Which is Probably Dettori a section of Paris and live herself kind of has a a theater background. Her father was a circus performer. actually in book two. There's even more Theater so it's that's in the book books so authors have to decide okay. What am I? Don't write this book on right so you could have chosen. Lots of topics is where you draw out of this John Laura as as a child I mean and had you come up with this. Yeah I've always been interested in crime novels and spy thrillers. I mean In Tenth Grade I had an English lit project and I did it on the big sleep by Ravin Chandler I've read all lemmings. Mon- novels At least twice And you told me I thank you went through to agents before you saw the book right and yes correct. Actually read the second book before the First Book. That's the sole right. That's correct. Yeah my first agent. Sorta kind of encouraged me to write a second book But then felt he couldn't sell it because he had not sold the first Okay the second books out. I mean it's it's getting close to its out in September and it's it's you know we're in the editing process rights. Great so we're going next Livy comes thank God to America So it's Washington DC And has a I would say probably more dangerous assignment than she doesn't spit. Fire is Ian Fleming's Dylan Ball. Oh yeah her handler so to speak for yes In Fleming has a larger role even in the second book. Yeah so what is this What's writing this book? Sort of meant to you on your journey as a writer. Has it affected your life. What is it done? Just tell me about that? Yeah well having yeah. I was alone at the house when the box of the verse books came and so I was sitting there and I opened the box up and pulled it out and held it in my hand and looked at it and went. Oh my God I wrote all of this I hope no one reads it. Because I think it's terrible. You know because you have this impostor syndrome but you know since it's come out I mean it's been wonderful and surreal at the same time. I mean you you. You're a good writer and you the pages move and you've also got some plot twists and you've got the reversals. You know this kind of a hero's journey right. Says he liked that story? Absolutely which a lot of people do I mean if you're works use it right by Ms Theater? Does that all the time to yes. Yes so So we're going to. This is going to be a series right. We got living ash coming back. Hopefully we'll see her third book and a fourth book. Maybe fingers crossed fingers crossed. Okay well Michael has been great. This with you today listeners. You can find out more about Michael in the show notes You can pick up his book pretty much anywhere. It's Is called Spitfires not a name? That's hard to forget this. Also the code name that the Nazis gave to this very formidable spa known as living. Ashu just keeps on spying right as she does her life. That's been on my pleasure. Well that's it for today. Another fun author giving voice to the written word. Landis will be back next Friday getting under the covers with another interesting author but before then coming on Tuesday we'll have another long-form episode with readings and conversations about the written words and the writing life with a local or regional awful landis loves helping authors give voice to their written words. But he can't do it alone if you're a clown to help me help authors give voice to the written words. Please consider becoming a member supporter. We'd love to have you as a member. Now when you join at certain levels will give you access to memory content curated by the authors in mid. Would you like to hear more from the authors? Perhaps a variety of presentations on writing cracked or additional readings or tips on marketing and social media. Would you like some behind the scenes insights and reflections from me or some edited content from previous episodes without interruptions? You can find out more about these member only benefits and how to become a member supporter at Charlotte readers. Podcasts DOT COM. Thank you for your sport and thank you for listening until next week. I'm landis wait for Charlotte readers podcast.

Ian Fleming writer Landis Wade Charlotte Livy Paris Michael CHARLOTTE Miss Nash London Sunday Times Winston Salem North Carolina Charlotte Raiders London Warren Publishing Salem England Spitfire Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Jonah
E67: Vesper, David Edward Maust, and Joesph Chester Palczynski

Killer Cocktails

58:48 min | 5 months ago

E67: Vesper, David Edward Maust, and Joesph Chester Palczynski

"Hey guys you are listening to kill her cocktails where the drinks are stiffed. The buddies are stiffer. This is a casual true crime. Podcast to friends get drunk and talk about gruesome murders each week. We pick a different drink. Whose name or ingredients set the tone for our stories. Hey guys it's true and Jackie and another week. A killer. Cocktails is coming to you know this week. We are doing the vesper. Yes the vesper. Tell me about this vesper dreyer. Okay so I've never had one and apparently you have a false memory of me drinking them with you. Because I was at camera it just felt like a time you would have been there. I'm not always everywhere. Sometimes I've nowhere them everywhere. Okay let me tell you about this vesper cocktail. It's also known as the Vesper Martini. It was created by author Ian Fleming. And if in case you don't know he wrote the James Bond Books and he wrote like Casino Royale which was published in nineteen fifty three and it gets its name from a fictional double agent called vesper lined Oh. I don't think I knew where the name came from. Yeah interesting though. The author Ian Fleming created this cocktail on a whim on his own accord in the book and Win Bond Orders. The vesper comes with very strict instructions. That must be followed by anyone. Who makes it so bond is like you have to use three measures of Gordon's which is gin one vodka and a half of measure of Kina lewer Leila Little Delay Lillay and you shake it very well until it's ice cold and then you add a large thin slice of lemon peel but if you were to talk to a professional bartender. They'd say that you shouldn't shake the cocktail sends. It's mainly just an alcohol because you'd over dilute it with the ice so instead you should stir it which I get. I understand that from a purist standpoint but I sometimes it is too much of a bite. I I like it when it's shaken. I like when you get the little ice flacco and it's aluminum watered down. I'm not A. I'm not enough of a stickler. Yeah I think I'm still a baby cocktail person in that way baby. So what do you think? Oh well I guess you didn't have had one very if you like Martini's there's no way you don't like a vesper like like Vodka Martinis and then. I learned that I liked GIN MARTINIS. And it's kind of just those two together. Yeah so it's three ounces of GIN in an ounce of vodka very boosy and then you have the lay which is like kind of lemony kind of not and then realize I thought was like a completely different spirit but then it's it's You know what do you put in a Martini? It's our mouth. Yeah type of Vermouth. I don't I don't really get that. Yeah so it gives it that vermouth taste and it's just really boosy and talk out but if you like Martini's or if you have removed that your house Like a driver move. You could probably make a version of this cocktail. That'll be similar enough. You'll you'll get the idea most definitely. Yeah so that's the history of the cocktail. We'll wait a minute so I had. I don't know where I got this. Somebody told me this. I feel like if someone at work that James Bond the reason that he would specify that they shake because otherwise they would stir it was that he was trying to alert attention to how many drinks he was having because the bartender would be making his dream for him in like shook shook like everyone knows when a shake and drink is being made because he wanted people to think he was drunker than he was. Oh and then so say. He's ordering all these cocktails as you not drinking all them not necessarily sometimes he would have the make fake drink and be shaking it. And he's Outta. Oh James Bond you sneaky bastard sneaky and then just a fun fact. Vesper also is a hail to Catholic religion For their evening prayers. It's called vesper. Oh Yeah you learn something every day. Yeah there you go fun fact cocktail hour. Jackie do you want to jump into your murder? I will jump right in pack me. Pull it up here. I got to go on C. side by side. All this technology already ready. Yes all right so Ton Of this is just a wikipedia. APPEA- Kinda sprinkled in This website learning history dot com and I listened to an episode of. That's why we drink Which was pretty much just kind of what everything I learned from the wikipedia but kind of a different way of freezing some of it so it kind of made it stick a little bit better than just reading it. Yeah All right here. We go. I'm going to tell you about David. Edward Moss He was born in Connersville Pennsylvania. So it's like an hour away kind of south east from Pittsburgh so it's kind of in while he's not amish and his family wasn't amish. It's kind of amish country around there He was the second of four kids in his dad left when he was seven and then his mom was like you take David and then a day later. He's like no no no you take David and she goes I. I'm just GONNA drop him off at this mental institution because he's a little too much. Oh so it's fair to say that like he had a really tumultuous childhood it was pretty unstable like he felt very much like nobody wanted him. So is mom drops him off. And she's saying that He's super disturbed that he tried to set his brother's bet on fire then he tried to drown his brother And that he needs to be not at home and the social workers. Yeah and this is like I sure. This isn't being made so the social workers that are interacting with the mom are like She's disturbed she psychotic. She's functioning marginally. She's really narcissistic needy herself The MOM had been in a mental institution for a month. And they're like I don't don't necessarily see what she's seeing but they take David in this place kind of has a reputation of it's where a lot of kids get dumped by parents or caretakers that can't take care of them And so all the people. They're kind of like he's one of those kids that doesn't have these issues but is kind of being dropped off here so while they don't really observe anything There's definitely other people who are like no David. David was violent kid like his brother said that he watched David beat a squirrel with a baseball bat. Just done then. There was a time when David had friends over and twice. He did this twice and neither of them died but he just randomly choked them for no reason later in his diary he was like. I can't explain it. We were just watching TV. And I just looked over and I had this urge to. I mean joke him. I think we've talked about this in the past like as human beings you have these weird urges like I shouldn't drive off the cliff term. I can never remember. It's I think it's called an intrusive. Thought Yeah and act on it correct and he was saying I had to act on it. Interesting okay so he kind of has these these violent moments. He's in this instance again. But he's able to behave himself when he's in the institution like he's kind of on the and all they really had to say about it was. He seemed really distraught that his mom wouldn't visit that it was really sporadic when she would come and like on visitor days he would stare out the window and wait and she'd say she was gonna come but then she say she was sick or that her back hurt or she'd have all these excuses and David was just like sad. Yeah so he finally gets out of the Mental Institution and. Then he's put into like a I like now you'd call it like a group home but it says it's like an orphanage e kind of Group. Homey deal And when he's there he so this might have happened. Also at the institution so David's brother basically said He was molested when he was young. But it's not really known if that was at the home if that was in the institution of there are other instances but it is known that he was in the group home when he was about thirteen. That another boy in the group home molested him. Okay and so The he gets out of like he escapes from the the group home and he comes back. Mom scared of 'em like she keeps not wanting him in the house and later when she talks about she's like I was terrified of him. He was so violent. I didn't know how to protect my other kids from him. I didn't like I just. He was scary. Eh One them around. Yeah and so At one point when I think he's done being in the group home and he's done in the institution and like he needs to be home. She sends him down to Georgia To go live with an uncle and things are kind of going OK in Georgia for a while like he starts working for the uncle's construction company. Doing all right and by all accounts. He's kind of a skilled worker But then he ends up crashing the company truck somehow so he got fired from that and sent back up to Pennsylvania so he tries coming home and his mom on. I know you're still just as scary as you always have been. So it's like nineteen seventy-one so she takes him down to the army recruiting office because he's like seventeen gonna be eighteen and she gets him like in the loops with them and when he turns eighteen he enlisted in the army. Okay so then he just turned eighteen. Yeah after all this. Yeah okay. So then he goes into basic training here in the states and then he gets stationed over in Germany. And he's a cook any kind of. Oh He's a really great bowler like at one point. His average was like two ninety seven. What like he's any has all these bowling records on the base. I could barely get to one hundred. I know it's a good game with the bumper. That bad he kind of. He's kind of serves without incident until about nine hundred. Seventy four okay. So in seventy four and the search kind of muddy. I'm not really sure he somehow befriends this like thirteen year. Old Kid named Jimmy. Closer and Jimmy's in American. His parents are like Ex. Pats living over in Germany. And he kinda. Hey he has a relationship with Jimmy that like I. I don't think I think there were times when it was sexual. But not necessarily like he gets. He starts becoming uncomfortable with how he feels about Jimmy and so he decides that he's going to kill Jimmy and there's a no. There's a note in his journal. That's like in seven months. When Jimmy's hair is long I'll kill him then. Jimmy don't grow your hair. Jimmy does his hair and so cut your hair. Yeah I'm like I'm just. I'm so unsure of that like if if there was more to that than he was just hanging out with a kid or but he he takes him on a moped ride out into the forest. You know like a moped Your leg ridiculous. Like a VESPA. I Hey I hate Yale. Oh Jacqueline is that you're tied by sounds like vesper. Yeah it does. Yeah he takes them out on Goodbye. Goodbye. I am like a Mr Toads wild ride out into the forest own. He ties him to a tree. Any he just attacks him and he ends up killing him. His body is found like a month later and they figure out the ties David. He's Court Martial. These brought in David has this whole story about how they were out riding the moped and the Jimmy was on it that there were these like wild hooligan teenagers. Who through a screwdriver into the spokes and so so David tells the story of like there? Was this weird freak accident. That wasn't his fault that did kill Jimmy And they're like probably not buddy but there's no evidence really otherwise and they don't have any witnesses and so he's he receives a four year sentence at Fort Leavenworth prison so he comes back from Germany and he serves this in the states And I think it's a a manslaughter charge And when it's time for so he gets out for your charge so all of that happened in to do. I can't remember what year but so in nineteen seventy seven. He's supposed to be released from prison and David is pleading with them. He says please do not let me out. I don't know how like him he's like I don't know how to be around other people don't like please please. Don't let me out at essentially. They're Kinda like well. You had this sentence you've served. There's nothing to keep you here on. Even though he's saying that he's dangerous and I feel like we've accounted that a couple times where they're like I just. I Know I can't restrain myself. Just keep me on here. Yeah which is So then in nineteen seventy nine in an apartment in Chicago He. There's like a friend staying over who sleeping and David just like stabbed him The guy doesn't die so he's he gets attempted murder and he's like in for a little bit but then he's released and then in nineteen eighty one. He decides that he's going to go. He gets this like vigilante kick. Where he's like. I'M GONNA find that. Thirteen year old kid. Who molested me at the child's home and I'm GonNa go murder him well because he kind of blamed him for everything he's like. I'm that's why everything's fucked interested. So he goes looking for this guy and he doesn't find him any wall on this hunt for this guy. He meets this fifteen year old DA. Donald Jones decide. Just kill him instead so I think he's just kind of transposed all this other person who's the same age kind of as who is looking for own Because now that that guy's an adult now. Yeah Yeah so He's drowned like they find his body drown in a quarry and then later there's another boy who stabbed so he just kinda starts killing all these kids and like later in his journal like this is a quote. How many kids At least four five on maybe maybe six This is a quote from his journal when I got locked up in the army and then especially when I got locked up in nineteen eighty one. I knew I should never be let out again. I didn't know how to act around other people I was never taught how to make friends or keep them When an inmate says that they don't want out somebody has to listen. Yeah so in. Nineteen eighty two. This is after he's been let out again. Eighty one He's so he's in jail in Texas than it gets extradited to Illinois because he's got these bodies in different states And he like at one point. He ends up in a mental like there. He ends up in a mental institution. Where they're like he's Kinda nut since he doesn't know what he's doing he's begging for help and then finest like at one point he so in the very end he ends up Hanging himself in jail and any leaves a note and he says I killed these other people and these other kids. And here's you know their names and where their bodies are so you kind of get closer to the families after the fact But like at one of the points there was a guy I think. It was one of the transplant. Like jail. Transporters who was like this is the most heels this is like a John Wayne Casey type. This guy's scary. Yeah and like. How much interaction is I do really having with them. And then there's like more paperwork like there were certain social workers and like people once he'd been in the system that will I? This is the most dangerous man we have in custody. Whoa and he just kept being let out. Yeah Tha that's the kind of there's people want to look into it. There's a little bit more detail he stuff too. But that's essentially stories. He just like kept begging to stay in and they kept letting him out and he kept killing teenage boys. So what are your thoughts so like if an inmate is saying. I know I'm going to repeat offend like. Keep me in jail like what are you. What do you think about that like? Should our system keep them? It's so hard because you have these Like you I wonder what the current system is like. Can you go? You commit yourself to a mental institution. Can't you or I am. I think voluntary Nia like maybe if there's like a prison style. I don't know how many people are going to do that. But maybe if it's not that many people like how many resources it really taking. If you've got one small little campus of people who are like I am telling you I'm not cool. Put me in there and it's injured at one point. Do you let them out like okay. You said that in nineteen eighty two. But now it's nine hundred ninety four and your stir crazy and you don't want to be there anymore. Are you stuck there forever? Because you said one time that you're dangerous. Are you not allowing yourself to re so? It's a really it's muddy. Yeah and it's interesting to have the wherewithal to be like I know what I'm doing is wrong and I know I'm going to do it again so I want you to help me to like stop me I think very interesting to have that mindset. Yeah sadly I think that's. That's why took his life is. He's like well they keep letting me out. I don't WanNa keep murdering people like that's a way to end it. It San Yeah. I mean. It's sad what he did to all that. Yeah Jackie thank you. Yeah we are going to take a short intermission. We're going to refresh in our cocktails and we'll be right back Hey guys. It's me new for accuracy intermission. Jackie what are we got going on in intermission? Land Today. Well I think we're going to address the fact that the world is upside down. Everything is not. I haven't seen like hung out with you guys in weeks and it's nuts. Everyone is stuck quarantining or staying home staying healthy trying to limit their exposure to people. People are losing their jobs and I just got furloughed from our job for months. It's crazy out there and What I wanted to say was. We'll get messages from people that are telling us how much they appreciate the the break from everything by having something light hearted even though it's kind of dark to listen to and that while it's you know it's nice to hear that from people it's also it's nice for us. We appreciate hearing that we. It's fun for us to do this. And it's a nice way to stay connected with you. Kim Marie Andrea So I guess I just wanted to say thank you to everybody for for listening and appreciating what we do. Yeah one hundred percent. Thank you guys so much like I. I think I've been interacting with more and more of you on social media. I think we have a lot more time on her hands. And it's just been really awesome to connect with you and we actually got a couple more reviews on itunes to which was really you aid to ratings which is super cool. We finally hit that hundred mark and I was GonNa Redo the latest review by scoffs off. And he's like what a what a fun show. Or maybe it's a lady but this person what a fun show. And so the goofy. Take mixologist murder. What a treat the very casual and funny so our s our slogan casual and then also Like we were saying this is a crazy time and we know that you know some of us are out of work and some of us are still in work but we wanted to give a big shout out to those who are still donating thank you. Kathleen a means so much that you have a recurring donation with us and also stacey and Kerry. Thank you guys so much. That truly means a lot especially right. It's helpful because it you know we. We have to buy ingredients every week. In it to pay to host the episodes online to be able to push him out to itunes and all that And then the other thing was if you are tied on its tight times it is free. We all have so much time on our hands Bump over and throw on review real rate like subscribe that does push everything up in the ranking so other people can can see us and can here. Yeah so thank you guys so much and enough about this. Let's give to the mayor and actually the stories. Hey guys we're back from break we go. Are you excited Jackie? Yeah okay very so right off the top. GonNa stay my sources so I'm going to shout out Baltimore. Sun Did a really deep investigative work on this about that. Why because the guy who co creator writer Baba Blah everything for the wire worked for the Baltimore Sun? You the wires. How's IT Goin'? You're watching it right now right. Yeah like picking it. I'm not like me through it. Okay Yeah. They didn't article called tragic trail of violence by a little Smith and also shout out to murder Pedia Right off top trigger warning. My case is really heavy and domestic violence so just a heads up right now. If that's something that you've dealt with in the past and don't think you want to listen to you right now go ahead and turn off our show If you feel like that something that you need to contact someone about please reach out to the national domestic violence hotline at one. Eight hundred seventy nine safe one. Eight hundred seventy nine seven two three three or you can also do a chat function if you don't feel comfortable calling them And that's at the hotline dot. Org so I'm GonNa Jump Brennan and I'll try to give you another warning once we get to those parts so I'm going to tell you about Joseph Chester Polinsky But his friends call him jobe. I will not be calling him. Jobe. I'll be calling him just because I am not his friend. So he is born in nineteen sixty eight and he kinda grows up in the suburbs of Baltimore Maryland in he becomes quite the ladies man. Those who know him say he has this kind of G. Q. Kind of He's five foot. Eight one hundred seventy five pounds. Sandy Brown hair Hazel eyes and he has like really buff physique from practicing martial arts. He has expensive. Sports cars It's like a Nissan three fifty. It's not that crazy. He likes to flaunt his money when he has it in the beginning. He's overly polite. He's clean cut He's almost got like a preppy kind of looked to him He's always looking fresh and clean to the point where like jeans or even press. Oh my God he's very social and he has a lot of friends and they're very loyal to him and speaking of his friends. He has a lot of younger male friends. Probably because he has all these sports cars and money and he also has a collection of guns that he keeps it in around in his room. Okay he's also really attracted to younger women and they're attracted to him Um probably because he has his bad boy kinda streak to him as well is twenty is right now like we`re. He's a senior in high school. Okay right now. Yeah so But as he grows older the girls stay the same age so John Reid. Alright I'll run on so they're usually about sixteen to seventeen years old so he has a couple of goto moves when he's courting the ladies one of them is that like on his first date with them he'll bring him back to his house and he'll introduce them to his mom and his mom is really pretty and personable and like they get to know her and they're like oh like he has a good relationship with like this is really sweet and then he would also show them like this photo album of him and like all his previous like girlfriends but kind of like kind of showing them like look. I can be with any of these beautiful women choosing to be with you and then he would. Everything's very like a very intentional manipulation. Yeah yeah in like. When they started dating he would like call them all the time he buy them flowers. He'd take them horseback riding and like go on picnics. He take him out on their on his jet ski and he was essentially being the best boyfriend he could be in the beginning. Another little fun fact about Joseph is that you know back in the day. We used to have pagers and so he would he would call you on the Pager The number that would flash across the pager would be double o seven because it's because his hero was bond. Oh my God and that goes back to the best. That's good. Do you ever ager code did I? What did you paid your code. I never had a pager. I didn't either. Yeah No. I wasn't allowed to because I was born in eighty nine lead to have a phone until like ninety nine nine two thousand and think. I had a phone till I was in college. Maybe yeah yeah I just remember. My parents definitely have them in high school. But I my dad was like no way no way Jose. I had to stock up on minutes. Yeah I don't think my dad's say I don't know that it was about independence or anything like that. I think it was just like I'm not paying for that and you couldn't as a kid getting yourself without your parents like putting their name on. He's like no. I'm not cosigning anything with you get. I don't celebrate Father's Day I'm not gonNA buy your Goddamn find it at one of those old emails. Or he says silly things about father Okay so back to Joseph over the next thirteen years. Joseph has a seven like prominent relationships. That like all. Start off at this perfect fantasy But then turn into him being overly controlling and abusive. So we're going to start with amy. So Amy Gearhart. Heart is fifteen years old when she meets Joseph Joseph Senior at the time and he's going to Perry Hall High School Joseph As always in the beginning is very polite and has old fashioned manners and he even meets Amy's parents and they agreed to let amy date Joseph and the even like allow her to go to prom with him and so during the They're five months of dating. Joseph tells her about the guns he had hidden under his bed and in his car. And once they get into a fight He gets physical with her so again. There's a trigger warning coming up He holds a knife to her throat and so on June. Twenty four thousand nine hundred eighty seven. Amy Kind of leaves town. She's going to go hang out with some friends at like a Condo that her friends family owns. And she's there with the family and the friend and they're hanging out with a couple of people like a parking lot near beach and ocean city and they're like all sharing like ice cream from this container and so they're all just taking scoops of ice cream. And Amy takes a spoonful on she feeds it to one other guy the group and just then she looks up. And there's Joseph and he's walking just like determinedly right at her and he comes up and he knocks over and he starts kicking her and hitting her and he's just yelling at her. What is with people do? Oh they're trying to get him off there but event but he's nineteen and they're like fourteen fifteen. Oh my God and so. Eventually the police show up and Joseph grabs amy. He's like you can't tell them what happened. You like you know I love you. You know I just got out of Control. And so- amy tells the police it's a misunderstanding and they leave and then Joseph actually makes amy and the boy that she was feeding ice cream to which he's fourteen years old and his name is Jason. He's the brother of one of her friends. So he makes Jason and amy walk down towards the beach and he makes them hold hands and he starts kicking them and like forcing them along and they do this for about a half a mile and Joseph is just screaming at amy. He's like in my life. You betrayed my trust. He starts interrogating Jason. Amy about where the boys and girls sleep in the Condo and who have spent time with the last week and he finally forces on the sit down on their hands and like like sit crisscrossed and he's like has their backs up against a chain link fence and he's like threatening to break their legs and he ordered Jason to hit amy but Jason Refuses. He's like I'm not. I'm not GONNA do that. And so Joseph Grabs Jason's hand starts hitting it into amy's chest himself at that point. Amy Tells Jason to run because Jason is fourteen years old. Yeah smaller than Joseph. She's like get go. Just go. And so Jason takes off running. He's going to get help. And this makes Joseph even angrier and he turns to amy and he's just like how would you like to die today? Oh you WANNA drown. Do you want me to choke you to death. You want me to be you in. The heat starts threatening her and her family. And then amy finally sees some fishermen off in the distance so she takes off running towards them and at this point in stark. Yeah and so. She gets to them and she's like a flashlight near them. She grabs him. She grabs a flashlight and puts on her face. And she's like helped me. I need help like he's attacking me and Joseph comes up and it's like hey guys just a misunderstanding. We're GONNA take our fight up here. Don't even worry about it. So he gets amy and they go up and there's like a street light up at the top and they're under it and then Joseph sees all all the chaos he's brought on amy like because he's been beating her for the last couple of hours and he starts crying and apologizing he's like. I'm so sorry I didn't mean to do this. You have to forgive me. And so they they eventually leave. And then amy has to go to the hospital and she gets x rays and photographs for taken of her and she has a contusion of the left eardrum so she can't hear correctly for a couple of months and she has lacerations and swelling cheek and knows. She has a contusion of the right eye that caused it to hemorrhage and she has bruised. she has a bruised ribcage and so her amy's mother immediately presses charges against Joseph Joses mother like tries to get her to drop them. She's like kids will be kids. They didn't mean anything. In the meantime Joseph meets a sixteen year. Old named Kimberly. If you're if you're you're nineteen year old son lead up a fifteen year old girl. Where should he go to the hospital? That's some real mental jumps. You're making to justify kids. Yeah and I couldn't. I couldn't find anything of his earlier life. I don't know if he had abused from his mother. It seemed like they had a tight relationship. But I don't know to what extent that means. Yeah they know exactly like if your child is beating up another child like something going on g something needs to and so Kimberly Kimberly Kimberly sixteen years old and they start dating and kind of the same scenario. It's great in the beginning and then it turns sour again trigger warning. He ends up hitting her in the face which gives her a black guy because he got angry when he found her birth control pills. Because he's like why are you on birth control? He just wanted to control out of their life on the severed occasion. He knocked her to her knees and threatened her with a razor blade and he actually was sentenced to two years of supervised probation at this point. And this is one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. So He's he's about twenty years old in January of one thousand nine hundred nine Joseph pleads not guilty by reason of insanity for charges against amy and a psychiatrist would find him competent to stand trial and he was sentenced to four years in prison while in prison he received regular counseling and their and they cannot like described his behavior as having like a Rambo kind of like personality just like he wanted to be the hero kind of when he was twenty two he was released from jail in April of Nineteen Ninety One. He returned home till with his mother and stepfather and he worked part time at an electric supply store and he kinda worked part time as a life guard and then he would also do construction work. August. He had moved into an apartment with two other roommates and he started dating Girl named Sharon and she's also in her early teens or sorry late teens Joseph would end up attacking her at school and Threaten to quote. Blow her brains out in one thousand ninety one so he was like outside of the high school and he was just attacking her like tons of people were there. The principal actually came out and made he was barred from campus And then so for this. He's arrested again. Once he is released he is told not to contact Sharon but he obviously doesn't listen in. He starts call. Her repeatedly inserts grasser sharing files additional charges describing the threatening calls and Joseph is again arrested But two days after arriving at the facility he escapes and flees and he like leaves the state by using a friend's ID card A month later. Joseph is found in a gooding Idaho and a woman actually files a complaint against him because he assaulted her fifteen year old daughter and threatened to kill The girl's brother In police were told that he was unstable and possibly armed with an automatic rifle in a nine millimeter handgun and a shotgun and on the morning of January seventeenth. Joseph Barricades himself alone in an apartment and tells police That he would kill himself and shoot people in a nearby parking lot if police advanced and then after nearly sixteen hours of this a Swat team hits the apartment with tear gas and they apprehend Joseph and they take him back to Maryland for a months. Long evaluation wow yeah so it just escalating. Yay this point at lake he has standoff with Swat for sixteen hour. Yeah that's insane. So he kind of goes in and out of the system. At this point he would later say this point when a-. If he's had I'm not getting into a whole gun debate thing but he's been in a standoff with police And he's attacked several people and I'm sure he's had charges now and he went to jail for you said four years. He was three years but he didn't serve the full sentence. Okay but I feel like he shouldn't be allowed to have guns now anymore. Yes okay yeah yep I feel like once. You're in a shootout with police. You're done but wait. There's more so he kind of goes in and out of evaluation so while he's in there. They're kind of like diagnosing him with schizophrenia. And he's later saying two girlfriends that he played the system and like he cut his own wrist to like play it up so he seemed right incredibly manipulative grayness on both sides so he gets this diagnosis of schizophrenia which leads to him being found not guilty on federal weapons charges so all those charges are shocked and he's released well In January of Nineteen ninety-five Joseph receives a three year. Suspended sentence with five years of probation. So he doesn't have to serve in jail but he is on probation so now we're going to tell you about Michela so he starts dating Michelle who seventeen at the time and so she's seventeen. He's twenty-seven but he tells her and her family he's twenty three Michelle is family is. He's got a Lotta crows fee like It seems like the twenty three and he's like her dad would be like I can see him outside and like the bushes like looking into house. He's being a real Weirdo in so finally both. Yeah Yeah and he liked. The family could tell that he is like trying to be very controlling. Michela and so finally. The data confronts him and they get into this altercation at the house and they get into a physical altercation have used an. Have you seen the movie? Fear Marky mark and Reese Witherspoon. Oh wait you told me about this and then watch and then you watched it. Oh I felt so uncomfortable it is. It's this it's this part of the story where the DAD is like is bad and breezes like Oh my God he's so cute and he's older and then him and all his buddies go to the house right. It's fine. It's so what do you what do you do when you're a dad. Yeah and you don't like who your daughter's dating and you'd think he's like mildly dangerous Teenagers are GONNA teenage and there aren't gonNA listen to you and like how do you get them to be safe? Yeah it's almost like the harder you push the more they're going to be into that like that it well. What a nightmare. Yeah Yeah Yeah. There's a catch twenty two. You'RE NOT GONNA win. You're welcome dad that I didn't horrible people that you look try and get away from so Joseph's being real creep and Michelle and Michelle's dad in him confronting each other and so they into this physical altercation to the point where Michelle's dad ends up in the hospital with four broken ribs split in a split lip this surprise. You're on my podcast. Let me tell you about a movie is crazy but he ends up not pressing charges against Joseph Wei. So tell me about that. No just keep telling you all listen. It's fine a couple of months. Go by and then it's Christmas and Michelle has at this point been enduring other abuse from Joseph but she has been telling your family but on Christmas Christmas night. Joseph gets so angry with Michelle Michelle that he chokes her and slams her head against Some shower tiles And then she finally goes to her family and then they're like boom we're done we're pressing charges and but it's crazy so they start going back and forth with pressing charges against each other like Michelle his family and Joseph drove. It's like oh no they're the crazy ones. They're the ones who were like a tell me to be here. He stands in the street and he's punching himself in the chest. All WanNa say you did this. It's crazy I you remember things that I I know. Here's what here's wild to me. If this dude beaten up dad and dad ends up in the hospital. Michelle on fucking house arrest. She's on lockdown. No opportunity that she's supposed to this is crazy. Yeah I'M NOT JUDGING THEIR ACTIONS. I'm a mild like the tone I have. Is this crazy? Yeah okay so they press charges in this obviously goes against dress. Joseph's probations he's kind of like in lock up a little bit for like a little bit of time but in the meantime while he's locked up Gerry. Whose Michelle's father so Gary Gary's at home Monday and he goes outside to his car and he sees all of his tires have been slashed. All of them you know who else slashes tires OJ. This is dangerous and someone has poured ten pounds of sugar into his Gas Tank uh-huh but Joseph's jail right now so Other hoodlum friends. He does mahood rat friends. I'm going to go do hood rat things. Oh my God. So just gets out of He post bail. He gets out of jail and In the meantime Joseph makes friends with this seventeen year old girl named Lisa in east. He starts doing her and they're like in the midst of the romance and then he gets sent to detention center but he's then like calling her like all the time to the point where she's missing school so she could be at home to like get his calls and like talk to him all day in so at this point. Joseph wants to put Gary in his place. Michelle father he's like you know I've had enough of this. I want to put him away in so he tells Lisa. You know what you should do. You should go to the police and say that Gary has been threatening you and family with a bomb and Lisa's like no. I don't even know Gary I don't know what you're talking about like I don't want any part of this and he's like you know what if you screw you. I'M GONNA kill you and your family and he starts threatening Lisa and so Lisa get so scared that on April ninth of Nineteen ninety-six. She goes and files charges against Gerry. Oh no we'll know about wrong person against Gary who? She's never met Lisa so it's going to be good on you. Lisa's I pronounce like here. We go now and the crazy thing is they took her test or they took her like charges when She's underage and she needed like an adult with her but they didn't check her a D. or anything they're like okay. We'll just take your statement and then we're going to go arrest scary time so on April. Eighteenth the police go get Gary and they arrest him and they charge him with making bomb threats and like a nuts and so then his wife has to come down and post bail for him so she gets him out of jail and then over over the next month. Gary is arrested three more times because he has multiple friends pressing charges against him. I am annoyed. Yeah yes and at one point while being held in the Baltimore County Detention Center Gary had to wear a badge that alerted guards to keep him away from Joseph. He's like. Hey guys it's me again on here and false charges jump anywhere near Joseph like he's insane discipline and so and then Joseph is released from jail and he is put on probation and he's ordered to stay away from Michela and her family. They're like stop it you. You're being ridiculous. Stop it okay. So now we're going to jump into Stacey story I'll be good. I know Again trigger warnings. Stacy is going to have a whole thing happened with her as well in one thousand nine hundred six. He starts Seeing a seventeen year old named stacy kind of same story. He's courting her her family doesn't believe he's twenty years old. Her Dad looks into him and he finds that he has three three like three criminal charges and he and Stacy's like Hey Joseph like my dad looked at noon. Sees that you have a criminal record. And he's like Oh yeah did he will. He didn't see the kidnapping charges. He didn't see these like he starts rattling off his like checklists right. Oh my God and he's like I can't trust your parents. You need to tap their phones. I need to know what what's going on with them. I need to know like every conversation. Stacee what are you doing in Nineteen ninety-six so Joseph's around twenty nine years old at this point Trigger WARNING WE'RE GONNA get into the bad parts of St Story In one thousand nine hundred six Joseph gets an altercation with stacy. He gets so mad that he grabs her and he shoves her up against a wall and he threatens to throw her off a balcony another time he's traced to her and her friend while they're walking on the side of the road like he's thinking he'd like to kick them out and was like you guys can walk and then try to hit them with his car. Good Stacy's family Finally files charges against Joseph and luckily for them. He sent to jail for violation for his other probation. That he any sense to three years So from jail Joseph has his mom hand deliver a letter to stacy at work and he's like mom her family can't see this letter like this. Is My love letter to my girlfriend. I need you to hand deliver to her so his mom goes to stacy and was like here. You have to read this. Occ READS IT and And then justice. Mom takes the letter from her because he's like new evidence in it he's just like. I love you so much we're GONNA be together at some point again. Baba and she's like swoon. I love you too and so sees like okay. I'M GONNA keep up this long. Distance relationship with Joseph within then one of their mutual friends Brings Stacy a letter and Joseph had written this friend a letter that essentially said that his relationship with stacy was a big joke and she was just another notch under his belt. Move so stacey was like whoa screw that and she writes a letter was like it's over. Joseph loses it when he reads this. Yeah he starts. Having friends follow her he has them cryptic notes and like leave him on our car and like real specific stuff that only heard. Jovanu about and he would like call her a bunch like hang up just kind of taking over her whole life becoming like all considering her mind friends his age or the younger like. Who are these friends that are willing to like spook people and press charges and and I don't know for sure but I'm pretty sure he keeps younger friends so he can manipulate them like I think he does that? Whole bad boy persona got money all these beautiful women because he didn't just have one girlfriend at a time he would kinda according bunch ladies But he wanted complete control over them. So Joseph is released from prison on June twentieth of Nineteen Eighty Eight. When he gets out he meets a twenty year old Tracy Whitehead and kind of same story. He wounds her the court each other They fall in love with each other. He gets very possessive She eventually does move in with him. He ends up again attacking her and he's arrested but then released on bail the very next day and he goes and buys a rifle and a shotgun tracy at this point is very scared so she moves out of Joseph's apartment and she goes and stays with family friends and their names are Georgia Georgian. Gloria Schenck Schenk and Joseph ends up finding her at their house and he enters the home and he ended up shooting and killing both George. And Gloria we've now we've jumped. Yeah it was unfortunately in front of their three year old granddaughter. Twelve year old son. He then drags Tracy outside of the House and towards his van and a neighbor. Here's all the commotion going on. And His name is David Myers and he comes out and he tries to help Tracy But Joseph ends up shooting and killing him as well in for the next ten days. There's this massive manhunt out for. Joseph and police are setting up barricades and blockades and somehow he evades capture twice. Like there's a couple of barriers. He should have been caught at but he ended up. Getting away somehow In during the evening of Wednesday March Eighth Joseph tries to steal thirty six year old Jennifer. Mcdonald's car and her two year old son is actually with her at the time and during the altercation he ends up shooting and killing Jennifer And Her son actually lives He is injured but he ends up leaving that car. And he hijacks another car nearby and then Joseph Takes Tracy to a motel where they're hiding out watching the news and he's like watching the news of the night and they're reporting on the latest car that he's stolen and he's like. Oh my God that cars like right outside this motel door all my guns. I need to get my guns out. So he's like Tracy come outside with me. We're going to get all the guns out of the car. Move them inside the motel room and so the got side and Tracy sees police officer like he she sees dancer and she just bought towards it and he that and he bolts towards the woods. So he's now too is GonNa Answer. He runs And she now she's safe and so he eventually he's running through the woods and finds a house any knocks on the door and the young boy let him into the House. Any ends up taking the family hostage for several hours And he like ties them up these kind of terrorizing them for a little bit But then he eventually leaves on Friday March Tenth Joseph Heads to Virginia where he kidnaps William Tyrrell and orders him to transport him back to Eastern Baltimore County and he also has William stopped to get them like supplies. He's like here. Here's a lot of cash. Go inside this Walmart and give me food and supplies and if you don't come back like he starts he's like I'm going to start shooting people out here in the parking lot. So William and ends up coming back and giving him the supplies but eventually he releases William and then on Friday march seventeenth. Joseph once again escapes a police barrier and he gets to Tracy's mother's house and her mother name is Lynn. And she's there with her boyfriend Andrew mccord and he also has his twelve year old son Bradley mcchord with him and for the following. Ninety seven hours Joe holds the family hostage in their home with police outside trying to negotiate with him and during the standoff no one is permitted to enter the neighborhood and the only thing that Joseph is asking for is to talk to Tracy and they're like we're not going to allow him to talk to tracy because that's the only thing he's he requesting and if we give that him. There's a good chance that he'll just start killing everyone in the house and so on the evening of Tuesday March Twenty First Linen Andrew. Find their opportunity to Slip some Xanax into some ice tea. Whoa and they give it to Joseph and he drinks Any kind of like passes out and they sneak out through a rear window but they leave Bradley Asleep in the kitchen next to him. Yes they'll get flack for that later But once outside they're like hey. Hey police officers were free but our son is still inside. So the police charged inside the house But once inside police say that Joseph had woken up and that he started charging at them so they ended up fire opening firing fire on him and they shot him to death well The Kid was twelve hours. What you can't throw twelve year old out a window a K. Yeah we weren't there. It was ninety six hours. I know I know. An autopsy revealed that he Joseph had been shot twenty seven times And then a toxicology report that there is no drugs or alcohol in his system but there was some Xanax so that Kinda cooperates their story shortly after the shootings constant and Wa. She was forty eight years old at the time was charged with illegally purchasing firearms for Joseph. I was GONNA ask where's is making guns So he was having different like acquaintances go by him or something else. I'm going to throw out there now. I'm a rule follower so I'm probably a bad person to talk about this but you know if I'm walking into a seven. Eleven and underage kids want me to buy them alcohol. I'm not buying them alcohol if somebody comes to me and they're like hey. I can't legally get a gun where you get a gun from. I'm also not you know what I mean like. You're not you're not supposed to reason. You're not supposed to have a gun. Why getting a gun. Yeah yeah plenty of people that can should have guns. But if you're if you're on that bad list you don't get one I And so Andrew Andrew. Who was the husband of Lynn? During this hostage situation he tried to collect a ten thousand dollar reward offered in the apprehension of Joseph but he was denied because he did not call the metro crime. Stoppers tip line that offers the reward. I've heard of this before. Do you tell me very wealthy. Yes or did I tell you know? There's another one that I read and I was like I got so mad about it Yeah and it sounds like you have to like there's lawsuit like Oh If you don't call that proper tip line yeah get that reward which is crazy because you went through this ordeal. Yeah like give this man some money but yeah that was the story of Joseph Ploenzke He was actually. I think I don't know if he still holds the record but he at the time. He held the longest hostage situation for one person. Oh I thought an interesting fact. That is interesting. Yeah when you tell me how long it was like well. He's got to go to sleep. So yeah he's gotta be like tying people up The heat you know and then you like as hostage when it's when they're sleeping like this is my time. But how do I get out of all? Its or is everybody staying up and they're starting to hallucinate. Lack of sleep is a form of torture is yeah people. Go Kuku Jackie do you need some self care? Yeah on ongoing. Gave you carry ready? Okay I got a I got A. I got a thing for you here. Okay what does spy do when they go to bed? I don't know what they go undercover. I'm okay Jackie. Don't be worried about your smartphone TV spying on you. Your vacuum cleaner has been gathering dirt on you for years. Why you see those by Kim. Raise feeding me jokes. Okay ready did you hear about the spy who shit his pants by the end of his mission. No he had a debrief debrief a family. One is good. That's a good one that's that's your takeaway from this. Agree Jackie. I had a great episode with you. With you. As well. Perfect stories were somber. But you're all riled up there there's a lot of riling up and again during my story if anything resonated with you and you need to talk to someone again reach out to national domestic violence hotline at one eight hundred seven nine safe. That's one eight hundred seven nine nine seven two three three and again. If you don't feel comfortable calling someone go to the hotline Dot Org website and they have a chat now feature those. I read an article this morning last night. That was about People being concerned about the shelter in places and then abuse children and abused people in relationships in jeopardy. Because they they're not. You don't have kids going to school regularly where they can be seen and be fed and there's people with is on the situation and same with the you're just isolated in a home so that people are concerned. Should you feel like you're in one of those situations to reach out people that'll yeah can get you do reach out with you guys during this time and our guys will wrap up episode? We hope you see you next week. as always this podcast where the drinks are stiff. And the bodies differ tuning into this week's episode of killer cocktails as always on our talent. Jackie Andrea we sure to check out her instagram at cocktails podcast or stop by our website. Kill cocktails podcast. Dot Com for up to date information photos contests and more. Our logo was created by Michelle firm whose amazing art can be found at Michelle firm designed dot com. Our music was created by Nicolaas. And we'll be back next week on Hashtag Murder Mondays. I can give you guys. Did you mute it telling secrets and here? I don't know what you're talking about and we'll see you next week. Where the Wrangler?

Joseph Joseph Jackie David Myers murder Jimmy And amy Mental Institution Michelle Michelle wikipedia Ian Fleming Martini Vesper Martini Amy Kind Germany vesper Joseph Joseph Ploenzke Gary Gary Tracy Whitehead
14 Villains & Monsters Created To Insult Real People

The Cracked Podcast

50:49 min | 9 months ago

14 Villains & Monsters Created To Insult Real People

"Welcome to another episode of the cracks. podcast the PODCAST. All about why being alive is more interesting than people think it is. My name is Alex Schmidt and I'm the head of podcasting here cracked. I'm also known as many the clam I'm also known as Schmidt e that champ and I am also also hoping I have never pissed off today's guests or or any skilled writers including today's guests because I'm joined today by two fantastic comedy writers to returning guests to the show. They are ben Joseph and Chase Mitchell. All three of us are writers writers as all three of us have the ability to bring a character to life from her keyboard and if a writer gets mad that writer can bring a character to life. That mocks a real person. Listen or or insults a real person or even immortalizes a real person's name and likeness and personal details as one of the most evil fictional characters actors of all time and so our topic today is villains and monsters created to insult real people one more time that is villains and monsters created to insult real people because that hypothetical just said is very real and it's happened a whole lot throughout all of the pop culture like movies and shows and even books you they wrote a whole book just to be mad at somebody which is amazing. I do not write a book for any reason. Not Worth it. But that's one of the ways. Being alive is more interesting than people think. Think it is That vengeful writing process. We described where somebody created a villain or a monster just to insult someone who's really in the world and we are talking about huge you entertainment properties on this one things that reached millions or even billions of people. And so this will be things you recognize and love and it's going to be a really good time. You don't need anymore more setup than that so please set back or pull up that word document you have the one with the file name enemies underscore list underscore final underscore or final dot doc X.. Because that thing might have some story ideas baby either way. Here's this episode of the cracked. podcast with Ben Joseph and Chase Mitchell. I'll be back back after we wrap up talk to you then when we've got a lot of bills here I like to talk about James Bond as soon as possible in the Pop Culture Atkinson just any time we could do it chasing. Thank you picked out both the James Bond on villains that we've got here. Yeah I figured we could do a little bond block. Goldfinger is probably the most iconic one. Maybe we do that. Yeah this coming from a cracked articles six famous. This works of art. You didn't know where vicious insults by Bennett. Rea- I always thought as a kid washing Goldfinger. I always thought this is such a kind of strange choice for a villain like you just. has this just like farm estate and like yeah. His big plans to radiate gold like drop a drop new Fort Knox in some way and then all his gold is worth more Just real elaborated and it's a lot of like NPR's marketplace sort of living. As a kid. I was I had a real hard time with it and then I always kind of felt when when I was reading about the movie I kind of felt bad for the actor playing him because his voice is dubbed in the movie. Like that's not even his voice so that guy came to set it all those did did you know performed for for months and stuff like that and then his voice just gets replacing post. Apparently his accent was too thick or something like that. So that's why they replaced it but Yeah yeah he's based on a on an architect who Ian Fleming just didn't like right Jerry kind of a severe looking at the style of architecture is called but lister yes exactly. Yeah it's very harsh lines and stuff like that. And he was this. This guy who building these like apartment complexes land is and his last name in real life was Goldfinger Goldfinger. They made up name the one thing that you would think that he had made up was actually true. I think he and Fleming instead of one point to like oh well if you you know from change it or something I can call him gold prick as they're going to do that and it's like wow the third Austin powers movie The central the central joke in the entire movie Ian Fleming came up with it. I gold brick. I think is funnier than gold member. Yeah yeah the. It's this guy. Earn Goldfinger I was a kid that Goldfinger was a made up. Name names Goldfinger. Arnaud is maybe a better first name. They ended up. I think is maybe is the symbol for gold on the periodic table. A you or something like that. That's why and that's why it's all right. Yeah first name is actually a better feeling for his name. Yeah it's almost most Ernst which is blowouts first name so it really feels like the right five. Maybe that one's a double a mockery of the guy could be and yet he was really really hated. Those buildings man yeah. He was a Hungarian born architect and the UK who did very tall. Blackie towerblocks like Vega in her buildings and he built one too close to Ian Fleming's house and in Fleming thought it was ugly and so he's savage this guy in Goldfinger Book and movie for White Collar. Burn that you can do. I am going to mock you in my art. Yeah I guess with with a lot of these that at that is sort of it right like maybe maybe. This comes from writers not wanting to Frontier everyone's a tough off guy when they're off making their stuff. He ever confronted him in a bar or something like that he'd Ohira know And Yeah like you said he The actual real goldfinger got mad and were threatened to sue and then Fleming said I'll change it to gold brick. How does that sound like never never mind stick? I don't know if that's how the law I mean. Worst case thread the guy with making it worse we also against the real architect was a little over six feet tall and apparently in the Fleming book. Goldfinger is five foot zero. Yeah like Oh what a weird short and so that's maybe that would have helped him legally I don't know exactly what dating APPs Just the worst thing you can be in the world short man the ultimate freak. It's fine that's okay. Just goldfinger feels like such a made aide update and it was just inflaming was mad at an architect who also apparently. We'll have a link to a guardian article about him. The architect like believed these blackie ugly ugly Apartment buildings at are very efficient and so he felt like if we build like this weekend Lift the most people out of poverty that we can actually good man man influence like no thank. You don't care for that exactly. Yeah he was like I don't like looking. Yeah and so he he got mad at the guy. Yeah and then the other one we got here is from much more more. Recent James Bond I. I don't think it's Fleming himself. I think it's the the ninety spont- people have never dies. Yeah which is funny because Yeah the tomorrow never dies villain who is played by Jonathan. Pryce really really good actor. I've always liked a lot. He was in game of thrones as well they played that priest guy later on in the series. Yeah I it is the president of both the Gi Joe Movies and he's also the guy trains also get you impersonates the president so he gets to like have a fun little really good. He's got a good blake villain voice. Take journalistic phrase like if it bleeds. It leads and they like make it like. Oh I'M GONNA make this super literal like I'm GonNa actually cause the news and then so I can be the one under report on it. I it completely absurd but you know I think looking back on it. I think it was one of the more fun villains. I mean he's definitely different. Yeah that was like literally was I think in that movie. He's literally just reading the headlines for his newspapers on an IPAD. which is now Rupert Murdoch? Yeah he's a because if people don't remember ever dies. This villain is based on Robert Maxwell who ran daily leader the character. Elliot Carver in the movie. Like you say Ben. He's like walking around this enormous warehouse a layer and like yeah like very rapidly typing headlines that pop up on the screen and James Bond frowns at them to the rest of the world. He's just running parties. Imagine that a media mogul just writes all kinds of paper like underpaid like contributors something. It's like a weirdly. Both very farsighted and very stupid Dylan all at the same time because it's like if you manipulate the media you can overthrow world governments varies. Yeah but then. It's also really stupid. Because he's typing it all himself through. It feels like a much more. I think because the villain ended up being kind of a successful villain and I think one of the more successful ninety s bond movies. I think it's a little more toothless of an attempt to like. I feel like they were going for the way Randolph. Hearst in citizen Kane type nothing like making fun of. Yeah and it's like not quite as cutting and the Daily Mirror this Guy Robert Maxwell among other things he embezzled hundreds grids of millions of pounds from the employees pension fund and was caught publicly calling it his fund at one point. And No. That's your like the British 401k. Okay for your people and he. He also was apparently pretty bad husband to his long suffering wife and also he real-life died in a yachting accident and in the movie stereotypical rich phrases from the pension fund. Long suffering wife died a yachting. He had a top hat and a sack of money. With dollar sign on. It was another thing you would have survived. The sack of money dragged down by the ocean. lego breath so he dies on a yachting accident in real life. And then the this character Elliot carver when he dies of being killed by James Bond The coach he gets like super killed. They a superpower Austin superpower drill. Yes and it's like this massive thing and it ends up getting I'm like I don't even remember the Mac nations of how this how it gets pointed at him but it ends up drilling through him. which would have just destroyed a human completely? No Dizon yachting accident. Sounds much better in the movie. He dies the Maxwell Way. Yeah Yeah and like you said extremely grisly sleep really went for it so whoever whoever wrote this movie in the late nineties really really a whole lot. We have other villains from here. We can stay in Britain for a bit because you picked out the Douglas Adams thing here. Oh yeah because hitchhikers guide to the galaxy. Everybody's favorite book and Radio Show. Yeah I've always been a huge fan and when I was fourteen eighteen I read or whenever I read it as a youth. There's a point where you get to the vogue on's who are the villains of the piece they They torture people with their poetry and in Douglas Adams and demolish the earth. I believe but Douglas Adams says that they have the third worst poetry in the universe after some other alien race and wrote the name down. It looks actually looked it up in my copy of the book it's Paula Millstone Jennings and I wonder kid like Oh is that a real person and because I didn't have the internet or Goule I just forgot about it. They're doing research this. It turns out. That's not a real person but who is a real person. Paul Neil Milner Johnstone. who was a classmate? Douglas Adams the head of Paula right instead of Paula Millstone Jennings that he used in the radio play version and then after Paul sued him mm-hmm he took the name out and replace it with fake women's them. Yeah so he. So he said that the absolute worst poetry and all of the Galaxy and Universe is by a real guy he knew new memo GonNa show apparently depending on. US either sent a polite request or filed a lawsuit to his name taken out which really really seems like all these stories it depends you know like how angry the person actually got we. I actually tried to look up to see if it was that bad and it's actually very hard to find because because now the thing he's only famous for on the Internet is being hitchhikers guide to his such an absolute destruction of a person's reputation but the two lines. I did fine gene. We're all the crippled swan slowly. Easing his stiffened wings feebly trying to discourage death stalking shadows with whispered his. And I don't know anything about poetry. That sounds fine. Sounds good to me. It sounds like plagiarize get an A.. And and actually I did. I did also look interview with some classmates who did say that. This guy. Paul Johnstone was unbearably pompous for in nineteen year old. But Douglas Adams wasn't far behind him They're both kind of astles solstice again like rich white people working out their problems by taking shots at each other in their art. Yeah people forget that the hitchhiker's guide was I a radio show and China was book and apparently according to the crack article like Douglas Adams. A little bit improvised in a radio. Taping right at this guy was the worst one and you know we all improvise crazy things who knows But then he committed to novel. No no the whole world will read this. I think it's in the TV show too. And and I think there's actually there's a fake palm home of his in the TV show. That's also about a swan dying. Somebody that just some detail he latched onto that like. Oh Yeah Paul's. The Guy Writes Shitty poems about swans dying. And you're probably right. They're probably both dicks in high school As we all are but yeah. It's it's a crazy to that it's a it's a book where you go all over the galaxy and meet all sorts of fictional people and then just one real guy gets shit on and then due to maybe legal threat that he barely changed the pollen. So Bala Way Yeah. He made it Paula Yay Paula Nelson Jennings the original arson. Was Paul Neil Milne. Johnstone phases uses made female. Change The syllables around. I'll fix it and just shown a woman. Don't worry a woman gets Hertzel it. It's five when there's a lot of other books here I think especially authors. Maybe they just they just keep finding reasons to be like no. I met someone one so I'm going to print copies of it on dead tree everyone. Yeah it's because writers are the most passive aggressive people on the planet rather than have words with any if these people just waited several years and then just put it in writing. I wonder if it like helps or hurts with the writing to be like mad as you're doing it because I feel like the anger can fuel you know and it can also lead you down a rabbit hole of of just harping on how bad this person is is or not wanting to like do good redrafting on seems like it's a tricky balance but these writers were talking about succeeded because one of them is J. K.. Rowling who who wrote the Harry Potter books and she apparently got really mad at Stephen Fry because Stephen Fry did the audio books for Harry Potter. And so when he was taping the first one he got to meet Jake Rolling and somebody told Stephen Fry. Hey there's going to be a sequel to this first Harry Potter Book and he said To. Jk Rolling good for you and apparently she thought there was some staying on it or it was an insult or something didn't like it and so then it turns out that Stephen Fry has a really hard time saying the phrase pocketed did like he adds an extra ed too so it's like pocketed it. Sure sure and we'll have a clip in the footnotes where you can hear him. Say this in five Harry Potter audiobooks. Because he just can't do it and so she angrily at him kept putting that phrase in the books as much as she could as revenge for him being like probably a little too Kurt at a brief meeting that as far as I can tell. Yeah that's that's in Harry Potter. Just read Harry Potter. You'll see I guess. Yeah I guess. If you're a wizard you're always pocketing stuff. I guess you'd have go to go out of your way. Yeah Yeah Potions. I'll even realize that cloak would have pockets. Yeah I guess it seems like the British ones do microbes. I'm talking in house. We all are but I think if you told me a cloak was a British red for jacket. Ah believe that to just something completely different. His revenge on her was just allowing her to go on to write the fantastic beasts. Moving Jake also plugged some other people into the books That she just doesn't like apparently a very vain person she knows is the definite Senate basis for Gilderoy Lockhart claims that person will never realize it and it's fine and there's also a teacher she hated who dolores umbrage is based on writers are also very lazy. The and that's just how writing work you just like when you create a character you don't just created by like. Hey here's a person I knew I'm going to change their name slightly and put them in the script easier because instead of having to think what would this imaginary characters say what Steve Say. Yeah to Israel. Astle met inspired my character Matt with one that she was like the person that this one gear just based on. We'll never never realize it because it'd probably made like eight different people. They'll just never know and they're like Oh God was it me. I don't know she was really really annoying. I told you good for you. I meant it too. I feel like maybe the first book I had that feeling with was a a farewell to arms where we were reading in school and I was like. Wow Hemingway we did a really evocative book here and then when you find out what happened. It's just like his life he wrote it down It's not like like that impressive. Come on shots at Hemingway good. And then we've also got a story about Stephen King here. JC picked up. Because Stephen in king had a horrible accident happened to him he did. Yeah and I had not read the so I was just reading his column that he wrote about like just recounting. What happened to him and and he should have done way? Worse than this also Stephen King you know. He's like misery and Cujo and stuff and it's like man. You had some real sadistic staff Steph in the chamber. Strap this guy to a bed and broken his legs and Right now so yeah. This guy made the horrible mistake of killing Stephen King and turning his body into what happens to bodies and Stephen King books come up with a board or something you know. He hit him with a van. I believe he was intoxicated. I I know he was as a driver. Yeah yeah he was a drug addict and Stephen King in and he writes about how he looked down in his lap was at like the wrong angle. Like entire body was just broken. Yeah and Yeah it sounds really really horrible. And he says that the guy was Stephen King writes that this I I felt a lot like one of his own characters that he created he was just this kind of country yokel type dude. Who had been the reason why he got? The accident was because his dog bullet was rifling through his like cooler or something like that and are there. Yeah Yeah Hey you can't have one of my beers. Ah got distracted and hit Stephen King and yeah it ruined his body and says it like when he came to. He's it sounds very he was in and out a lot and says says the guy was like sitting on a rock nearby and was kind of looking at him like man. Look at this spot that we both ended up in. Isn't crazy Mondays like Eh God. Yeah and it's like help is on the way or whatever so Stephen King ended up making character varied directly actually based on him. WHO has a dog named bullet? The Guy's name is Brian Smith with a y a case look him up at her as he has passed away. Actually Yeah Yeah. Yeah but yeah made him a character in his dark tower books and the characters name. Brian Smith Yeah. So you don't Miss. Is it but the dirt books end up going on long enough. That Stephen King ends up making himself a character in them and stuff. They're very like self referential kind of like the dead pool of Steve. If you will be using that comparison it'll be printed on the next one. Yeah Yeah I don't know the guy in the book he actually hit Stephen King. Yeah Yeah and and I think also but in the book kidding Stephen Stephen King Cut it destabilizes the universe which also maybe that's a very good night shyamalan level like lady in the water at night. Shyamalan makes himself like he casts himself as a writer whose destiny is to like. Save the world or something like that. It's like if somebody hits me. They destabilize the universe. That's a very eh healthy opinion of yours. That's another writer. Bad Habit to taking shots at your enemies is making writers very important characters. Yeah contribute almost nothing to citing one wants to see our faces years to hear Our Name. We're the only ones looking for news. I feel we like also like a protagonist who wears a had whiskey. It's like okay. That was a male writer. Yeah got that this This accident that happened to Stephen King. His has hip was fractured. His leg was broken in nine places. He had eight chips in his spine. Four broken ribs and thirty stitches for his head together so this was very savage and then I believe the character Dr Tower is like a raving awful terrible person who like hurts a kid and and really really leans into it but it was also a horrible accident. And so it's it's just this cycle between Stephen King and Brian Smith. If you piss off Stephen King and that's the worst thing that he does to you probably made up all right. There's one other book here which really quick. Because it's Edgar Allan Poe as a very old story the Cask of a month lotto which is where a guy gets basically basically bricked into a cellar to his death. And it's because Edgar Allan Poe hated another writer who made fun of Him with this Guy Thomas Dunn English who wrote a story where there was a character called Marmaduke hammerhead who was a Dryness Tommy Dunne English Marmaduke. Are we do camera ahead. This guy my new writer. Sorry sorry pretty. He should be at schools and and so he wrote a this character. Marmaduke camera had as like a drunk crazy person who writes much dark stories and is in love with his own writing you know say is in love with his own cousin because Eh that would work now and so then Poe wrote this story. The cask of a month Lotto after suing Thomas Dunn English over English is story and winning so po already ready beat him legally and then was like I'm just GonNa keep going and write a story where he gets like buried a seller to his death. That's spoiler what happens in this book. Basically basically anyone who writes books they seem to be doing this. Avoid Authors. We've also most people do just naturally. There's one more book here. Here which is BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA DRACULA is sort of a villain who you feel like is is from almost like old and lower like just goes that back got hundreds of years or something Bram stoker was an Irish writer who was in London and then his day job was to be the personal assistant to the actor? Sir Henry Irving and apparently Sir Henry Irving was a jerk. Good boss he made brand silk or do a Lotta work for him and like right all kinds of letters for him and it was really mean and so then Bram mm stoker went ahead and designed Dracula in his eighteen. Ninety seven book to have is like Irving and long hands like irving and just any Sir Henry and people whose irving ask very funny to know that like it just makes it it feels so much more recent but to no bram stoker was basically just like a PA.. Yeah Yeah. He claimed written half a million letters irving's behalf and would joke to people like people it'd be like Hey Henry Irving did you go to college and he'd be like no but my assistant has two degrees and Bram stoker would be like I'm I'm a PA WHO's too smart for my which is thing in Hollywood. And so then. Yeah so he built Dracula after this guy. Yeah Yeah Dracula and what else probably other stuff. Oh boy he needed more bad Boston's once the book took off. STOKER OFFERED OFFERED THE PART OF DRACULA IN A stage. Play and Irving turn it down so as he did he like was he wise to me me. It's it's unclear but I feel like you have to at that point. Eighty five breath smells what the important in in Dracula never gave anyone health insurance ca and so yeah. So that's another one that I just thought Dracula was from from like Eastern European legends. But you know. He's like supposedly based on Vlad the impaler or whatever but it sounds like that was just a cover story now or at least he's like only one ingredient and the rest was angry. Productions is the impaling Theri everything else came from those Punch Dracula that he you know this. This famous MS romantic movie monster. He was just a bad boss. Just Kinda Jerk Yeah Stoker felt that irving was taking his life force by by making it work for them Eh Empire. Yeah there's one other monster here. This is Five legendary monsters. Who are based on real people by Eric many? And it's the story of Godzilla and specifically the name not that someone new a big lizard. Godzilla is sort of an anglicized version of Japanese name goes. Zero goes. Era is a Portmanteau of two Japanese words. The word go re-re which is the word for gorilla and then the word Kushiro. Which is the word for whale and apparently apparently At Toho Studios where they made the Godzilla movie. I there was a PR guy who was really fat very thick who just worked in the PR department and had a large body that was his entire crime and director issue. Honda and some other people at the studio. Apparently were joking around one day about whether the guy was the size of a guerrilla or Aweil and then decided you know what guerrilla whale. That's just a smaller whale man. Yeah I don't I don't know if if they know that two sizes of it pretty different either a big or small. Well it's not. It seems kind of security route but that kind of Portmanteau name of guerrilla whale became what they called the giant Lizard and the movie they were like. That's a fun name. Same gotta wish. He would just go gorilla whale. When they translated to American they take closely translated to guerrilla? Well that would have been great man. Matthew Broderick's thousand nine hundred movie. The appearance just very confused. Thank you are there. When are the gorilla in the whale gonNA fight the Lizard? It's it's toward the end of the movies. Very funny to have it like every shot of God's a little walking through a city knocking over buildings is just fat shaming patching asking for Guy. Yeah it's a it was a pretty cool thing to do. Frankly we know because we found out but yeah just one day so we're actually actually. We are spreading information. No one needed to know I guess. So Yeah Yeah. Apparently one day Ichiro Honda's diary contain the Word Goes Era Because of this conversation he had making fun of a CO worker just ended up that because the Americanized version godzillas seems like it. It seems like it's has gotten it. You're like Oh that's a large being a odd and Zilla feels like it comes from Lizard so like I've never questioned it because it always is. It just seemed like oh I see where they got there but it's just not from that at all right right. Yeah like God lizard but no it's a it is. There's a fat dude. It was a fat dude who is just being not hurting anybody. That was all he did. That was done then. we've also we've got a lot of TV stuff here but one more movie before we get there. Is the Shrek films classic unforgettable. We all still still think about them. Yes Dave aged well all their pop culture references. No Man I remember that Matrix joke in the first one. Yeah Love Them. I mean the success of that led to dreamworks more explicit. You guys are going to get that right actually. Don't know if this is a real finger today. Joke good point kid. I Yeah I would have believed you. Dreamers track also the first movie ever win the best the Oscar for best animated feature can you. Oh that's fun. It wasn't one before categories because Disney had done ten years amazing work the Disney Renaissance at half. And they're like Oh. My God was nominated for an academy award should any more of this work. Let's create a category and then Shrek stomps in some body. I believe at Smash Masters. Yeah I really hope. They got played to the stage with that. Yeah that's very apt that Disney creative that a word because the entire villain of Shrek is just from behind the scenes Disney fighting. There are two guys Jeffrey. Katzenberg Michael Eisner and Eisner was the top guy and Katzenberg was below him. They both did all this amazing Disney work. And then Eisner decides to fire Katzenberg Katzenberg sues a three hundred eighty two million dollar lawsuit and then It's very brutal. Eisner admits and the depositions that he said I hate the little midget about Katzenberg and Katzenberg called Eisner Psycho and while the lawsuits are happening. They start dreamworks animation does. He's like I. I Hate Eisner but I'm GonNa Start my own whole thing. And so then the first movie Katzenberg makes his Shrek Trek with this new company. And he builds Lord Farquaad and Farquaad sounds kind of like fuck wad. Yeah I just realized this like two weeks ago and I was like Holy Shit Shit. I can't believe the characters walking around movie saying Fuck Wad like basically yes the whole movie. That's ridiculous you can see in the footnotes that Lord Farquaad has Michael Eisner's face on a very small body. It just looks just like an animated it so we was calling Katzenberg midget right. Yeah and so I think hugest decided to make Eisner short retaliate. Again this is the second or third. NFL episode of like the worst thing you can do to a man is like make him small literally. Yeah that's way too casual or any small listeners. I believe in you you can accomplish your dreams. I don't think less who've you and you should be getting matches on dating APPs that was uplifting and yeah then the entire layer town castle that farquaad lives in is like a a dig at Disneyworld because at the start of the movie. They're basically selling Snow White and Pinocchio and Tinker Bell Into Slavery and then there's a bunch of Disney style merchandise and it's it's just all like the entire movie was made to be mad. At Michael Eisner it was just executives fighting each other things for audience. They love it. They they're like what's going on in the C. Suite. That's what I want as a child. I feel like that was the perfect time for when you were fourteen. You wanted that you were like Oh yeah. Let's take Disney down a Gotcha. I'm fourteen. I'm beyond all that Kitty Shit. That's true I feel like Disney one in the yes. I feel like that kind of that. Sort of irony has faded out and that's kind of messed up top OP is like the those movies I mean I personally was. Never a fan of destruct films but lake. They really haven't you know what's their legacy like the look ugly like they have. I'm an age. Well Sir I you know I don't know if there's any dreamworks as you're listening. But they were never really my bag and they suck the third iconic meyers character. It seems like the entire thrust of DreamWorks animation when he started company. And you have a I hit so you kind of. That's your company now and yeah like it steered the entire company. Just because Jeffrey Katzenberg was mad at old boss. That's crazy. Yeah yeah literally starts with a Shrek ripping a page fairy tale book and using it to web zest the most two thousand and whatever when we come out Two thousand one thousand one thing of all time. Yeah Yeah nine eleven thirty is probably number two with you we have a lot out of TV. Here it's very exciting. There's one one story here about veep. Everybody knows veep chase you picked out the The story of Jonah Ryan Character Timothy decided I wasn't aware of this but apparently I guess not the entire run of the show but I think once he once he goes from like an assistant to start having political clinical emissions of his own they modeled the character on Ted Cruz. which is it's very funny? Obviously it was an amazing show and the character is I think. If if there's anything unfortunate that Timothy Simon's is such a likable actor. Even playing such unlikeable character. The characters still managed to be more likable than Ted Cruz. That's true yeah basically. They took the idea of him being the most disliked person in Washington. DC basically and just used that they just folded that into the presidential ambitions and Ted Cruz is truly the least likely person in Washington. As far as I know one guy has never been higher Al Franken in his book. Okay he he talks about Ted Cruz. Being the one person everybody hates truly nobody can deal with. And then Lindsey Graham even and this was a little before he became a trump robot about but he said like if someone shot Ted Cruz in the Senate and no one would be a witness at the trial and no one would care. They were in the same party in his. Ted Cruz represents Texas just blows my mind that you can go to a big gun real man Texas. Yeah and there's enough he was a yes I'm proud that this blob man represents this. Yeah right like you think. There's other Republican around this Voice Simpsons Fan represents me in this man his videos where he does does his impressions of the Simpsons characters are like just horrifying to watch. Yea I think I've seen one and that's like A. Let's actually he does. He does is it does homer. Yeah all bad just recite scenes in a very Yeah wrote perfect way like yeah hard drive someone who you you knew in high school who thought they were funny but really was just quoting things like. That's his brand. Yeah they just create this character in the show who has somehow somehow able to run for president even though absolutely no one in the entire world likes the which which fits one person in all of Washington when this story is a dark story ultimately but at the time it was less dark from Ren and stimpy and Benny pick this up because John Creek. Lucy Chris Chris Felici Yeah Sarbaz. Ain't John Lewis. The first time I've ever heard said out loud voice I always only ever just seen it in print for my entire life. I look it up but I'll start off by saying that we now now. I know that he is a rapist. He had groomed and flew out Young Women Ages Sixteen seventy to date him while he was running Ren and stimpy yes. Yes starting as young as thirteen. I think John he was eventually fired. Not For that because I cannot later. Yeah it also came out so weird word because people do I mean you know. He was not fired because he was always bringing his younger friends around. He was fired because he was unreliable. Difficult call to work with and because he was kind of this era of the genius cartoonist. He thought that no one could replace them. And it was fired in one thousand nine hundred two from Ren and stimpy which he created aided started ninety one right and he tried to get the entire staff to walk with him. I think about half of them did maybe like twenty or thirty and did a lot stay behind man and to run the cartoon without Adam and he said handing it over to them would be handed over to Milkman. which is weird analogy? I'm not sure particularly being bad at drying. Yeah so what this staff did in return was make a cartoon where Ren and stimpy go to work for a cared reverend. Jack is a man who sells meat but as unreliable liable and never finishes at work on time and the main joke from the cartoon is that they put cheese and lunch meat on their head. They build sandwiches on their head which is apparently pulled from an actual all thing. John Chris Lucy did at a party when he was saying sandwich on someone's head I mean sure that's a funny thing for you and your friends but it just makes that makes it an incomprehensible cartoon which is why because without knowing the back story. It's just nonsense but it was mostly nonsense so it's okay surprised. There's not more revenge. Art like that where somebody is just so mad about something that they shoehorned without establishing it or making it makes sense but the final. Oh fuck you to him. was that every episode every episode. After John Chris Lucy left. They ended with a logo of which one's the dogs at renaissance with stimpy as a Milkman. So no the cat. The cat ran is the cat. No Iran is the doug six cats all right sorry to break in here. Yeah yeah the Big Red One justice Milkman. Remember that I never knew what the story was. Again it's fun once you learn it but it's so weird that they could just make aac these insane inside jokes and the Youth America was like yes this is. This is our favorite thing right now. I grew up thinking that like oh like once he was the Creator was pushed out. Like oh you got a raw deal. The show is a creatively. A shell of its former self yet billy western doing both voices and I was like Oh man. The show like sucks now. They've pushed out the guy who it was the genius who created it and then like spy TV like revived ren and stimpy I think around lake two thousand four or something like that and brought with John Chris Collusive like shepherding it and it was like oh the guy the guy who created it's back and charge and again this is before all the creepy stuff and then he made it and it was like super weird it was like Oh maybe we were just better off here with billy West doing all the voices and whoever took over after that like writing and everything again. Yeah the the ninety s or an amazing time for TV nation. It's in cartoon network started. It's only got dexterous laboratory. We got a powerful girls but it was also a golden age for Corny men and in their thirties. Drawing drawing boobs. Yeah just gross characters of women which I think. We started to phase out of animation. But it really was if you go back and watch laddis early rents tempe. There is like there's multiple gags were like. There's a woman whose body is obscured by like bathroom steam or something like that. The time I was like hell. Yeah but then. Now it's like Oh wait. A person who wasn't right on the head was nickelodeon anyway. Okay I have a have an animation cel that I got it New York comic con a few years ago from Ren and stimpy and I can't I paid a lot of money for I can't frame it now. I don't want to having rid of it either but I'm like I don't know what to do with this now. I mean that show was so centralized like the powdered toast man character. Oh Yeah at some point. I just started watching it. 'cause it was on Nickelodeon the only channel I watched and then powdered toast man. They grabbed his buttocks. And then my parents like didn't let me watch in a lot of characters with multiple characters would like wagle their asses directly at the camera. Yeah it's like really pendulous. But's it's the children's show someone was having to animate the but flap like Rocco's modern life also a lot of buts. Yeah but heavy CONTAC- oh affeldt very rents timpee influence. Yes yeah but has has aged better. Yeah it's also good because there's the grounding of Oh this is a show show about a guy in his twenty s who said Yeah. An instant be is just a Balsa Wall Insane Tex. Avery cartoon like there's nothing grounding it. Yeah I remember Mr Big had trying to bowl successfully and can't get in my life. I was like Oh. I'm really connecting with this middle-aged man struggle cartoon cut it out and yeah and then we've got a little bit more. TV here because one of them is two different characters in South Park. Of course South Park would make fun of someone do it all they. They rebound on the news. All the time don't they but they also too long running characters one of them is Leeann who has cartons mom and that is just Trey Parker being being extremely extremely mad at his old college fiancee. Who did cheat on him? Oh her name was Leeann and so when he made cannibal the musical he made a character. Victor who was a horse named Leeann that everyone rides and then he proceeded to make carpets mom who is in all sorts of Sexual exploits and and degradation named Leeann. Because because he's mad at her without. That was the show Mister Burns early. South Park Right was who was carbons dad. Yeah Yeah right right and the extremely now problematic twist was that his mom almost dead sounds sounds like South Park Hermaphrodite and yeah. I don't think they quite had the science missile that totally totally forgot about they let that sit for a whole summer. They were going to remember. Remember that so now they were going to satisfy the twist. And then when they came back did a whole terrance and Phillip episode. They didn't announce troll everyone. That's funny yeah. Because it's also like they have a point like why why should you care. It's just silly thing. Yeah and then. The other character here is butters who's a little bit more of a later period southbound character this is a situation where butters is based on a producer of the show named Eric. Stowe and his entire crime is being to like calm and polite and sweet When Parker and stone are dealing with him they initially kept calling calling him our little buddy and the were saying they were buddy over and over again it sort of morphed into butters and then they were just like we're going to? We're going to make fun of you. Who through this character and stow ask them to not do it? And they said we're doing it. Yeah so very butters move. He was a producer on the show. Yeah so he was like like you know helping it. Keep running and everything. Yeah that's but butters has become I think arguably one of the like a definitely a fan favorite and I would say like one of the most likeable characters like he's that's not that's not that bad of a legacy to have. I don't think yeah. Also his thing is that he's so sweet like he's just so naive I mean I guess they've had episodes say the show's on so long that like we've seen butters darker side as well come out but you know at his heart the baseline the character is like a really sweet character. Yeah he is. It's maybe maybe a little bit of Flanders they're not the same by like Flanders is respected. It's good yeah yeah. Let's do who won last character here. The character Basil Fawlty from Baltimore. Yeah which is a classic British Sitcom they only made twelve episodes but John cleese plays Basil Fawlty. Who who is a hotel owner? WHO's an asshole and there are farces? That's all I would not have guessed that there were only twelve episodes of fawlty towers. I just I feel like I just remember my grandma always saying saying like I'm GonNa Watch Tower because you would watch it on PBS. Or whatever like Oh this must be like eight years of that show to watch or something. No there's just guess she was just rewatching the same fucking in twelve over and over we had vhs growing up and so it's still like six tapes you now we will watch them over and over again. Yeah that also may be may shed some light. I'm the person that turns out Basil Fawlty based on because in one thousand nine hundred seventy one at the whole group Monty Python That junk was in. They stayed at the hotel. Gleneagles in Torque. Which is the town fawlty towers on the show and the owner of the hotel was a guy named Donald Sinclair? John cleese called him the rudest man I've ever come across in my life life and he was just basically really mad that anyone was staying at the hotel off. Time like Basil Fawlty. He at one point through Eric idols briefcase case into the street because it could have been a bomb key saw Terry Gilliam holding silverware and told him he was holding the silverware wrong and tried to correct him. When Terry Gilliam was like trying to eat he knocked on Michael Palin door one time to ask whether Palin meant to put up a do not disturb sign or not which is great? They're really really bad and he he he would Generally just march around demanding explanations whenever somebody wanted to get hot water to heat up a baby's bottle or get an early alarm call or late dinner or a taxi every time he would just be like well. Why justify this even though they were guests about Dell? That's amazing yes the antidotes that you included the research. Incredible that they sounded like Sitcom plots. Yeah it's all it's like. Just the logical extreme. Oh what's the comedy opposite of a hotel owner one who doesn't want anyone uh-huh like but it's real. It's not just like a an extremely simple premise. He also would do stuff like if a guest was trying to go out late. He would yell after them. And where do you think you're going which is just like sketch comedy show. He's also their dad. Yeah well apparently all the pythons left the hotel. As soon as they could buy clothes state a few more days I guess just to research the guy taking notes and then that was his. I like big thing after my made made his career to have done a second thing on top of it. Sounds like enough material. For more seasons British shows the either like are just twelve twelve episodes or they run forever like another one that my grandma into knows younger was red dwarf and just ran for like years and years and years better originals. Or they're yeah they're Sifi common. Yeah Yeah High Ground. LSU Yeah is cool. She's still love. Jesus Christ uh-huh yes she She turned me onto a lot of British comedy. British show either like okay you get two seasons or eighteen hours. They had six episodes in one thousand nine hundred ninety five and the other six thousand nine hundred seventy nine. Oh so they even like stop for lunch break probably to go back to the hotel and get margin. Yeah I feel like something like fawlty towers. It's almost more inspiration then revenge but other ones it's people who are just mad like it seems like it either does lead to some good art or it only does once in a while in these times it worked. It's hard to you know I don't know yeah. There's a lot of mad stuff that was written about people that it was associated. You know none of us know of yeah. Yeah so like the rage burns out after you go get a snack. The folks that the episode for this week my thanks to Ben Joseph and Chase Mitchell for being such funny and writer Lee people about all of these stories. I love the way we could examine it from every direction in every angle and like think through the steps that the person took hook to insult their former boss and make them dracula. also I think ben and Chase in advance for Never Dracula ING ME. I really appreciate it and I mean that in both so vampire way and the writer way you know you never know what'll happen anyway. In our food notes you will find all the revenge villains that we talk about. I particularly encourage courage to check out the articles about Basil Fawlty. The John cleese main character in the British TV show fawlty towers. We've got an article from the Guardian and also article from mental mental floss. About how a fateful hotel stay that. All of the rest of the pythons could not tolerate at all. CLE- stuck it out and built an entire show out of this really crazy wacky guy. A few weeks back. We talked about how the idea of a stupid doctor is. One of those Just extremely fundamental extremely extremely almost two straightforward comedy ideas like. What's the extreme opposite of a doctor? Someone's stupid the extreme opposite of a hotel owner is someone who doesn't like guests and somehow that was a real thing in the world and John cleese just kind of put it down on paper really fun and of course in the food notes you will also find more information about what Ben Joseph and unchaste Mitchell are up to because they write a lot of comedy everywhere and beyond all that our theme music is Chicago Falcon by the Budo spanned. This episode was engineered by Sam Kiefer Kiefer and edited by Chris. Sousa if you love this episode. That's great if you hate it let me know about it on social media. That's right social media. Space where chase and ban are extra funny Just really good especially on twitter chases at Chase Mitt. That is met with one letter. T and Ben is at Gen boasts. If so what's what's his name but you flip the two first letters you get. I guess a lady's name very fun. My own twitter account also a slight variation on my name is at Alex Schmidt. -I so Alex Schmidt Schmidt with wire on the end my instagram at Alex Schmitz degrom. I'm also on the wider Internet at my website. ALEX MIDDAY DOT COM. That's gotta show dates my email newsletter of free Internet stuff stuff tips and more and I'm here to say we will be back next week with more crack podcast. So how about that. Talk to you

writer Stephen King Goldfinger Goldfinger Katzenberg Michael Eisner Ian Fleming Katzenberg Katzenberg Ben Joseph Disney James Bond Harry Potter Alex Schmidt Schmidt Basil Fawlty Douglas Adams Sir Henry Irving John cleese Austin fawlty towers nickelodeon Guy Thomas Dunn
Spy Books Coming Soon

Spies of London

02:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Spy Books Coming Soon

"Welcome to Spies of London. This is a short trailer or teaser episode looking at our book reviews coming soon. We're going to have a book special on spite of London in September 1st off on the list is the secret life of Bletchley Park by Sinclair Makai all about the World War II code-breaking Center and the men and women who worked there looking forward to that one because it's near me in walking. I'm sure a book. I didn't know existed never heard of a game of moles the autobiography of Desmond Bristow written with and by his son Bill Bristow. This is about a 1993 and it claims to be the first full-length personal account of MI6 written by a former agent known as Desmond Bristow are telling portrait of the divided life led by a secret service and undermining the myth of Steely High trained professionals. I don't know why this book wasn't banned but the fact that it came out in ninety-three and hard back in ninety-four in paperback coincides with the new intelligence act that led to her birth. It's becoming more public and more that's not use the word transparent but more accountable. Apparently, it did provoke a written question in the House of Commons to the Prime Minister who at that time was, you know was John Major gain later on that one. I'm really looking forward to this one a book recommended to me by my friend. Tom Cole is Ian Fleming by and Rule I said Ian Fleming should need no introduction at all. But this book is meant to be a very good biography of a famous spy writer. Perhaps the first movie Spy writer who is still going after his death and to book. I read some time ago a spy named off by Roland Phillips about the life of Donald MacLean who is buried near us here in buckinghamshire in the pen churchyard. So two books with a local connection the Black Sea part one and the Donald MacRae one one book and Fleming which has got wide appeal and an unknown book to me. Anyway a game of moles, which I'm really looking forward to getting stuck into so we'll bring all of these to you over the course of the Autumn start off. With a game of moles recent episodes of focused on my spy walks, and they have been marketed as virtual spy walks, which means that you can if you wish walk around London listening to them, or you can stay at home. Listen to them at home anywhere in the world. The show notes for each of these spy walks includes a link to Google maps to make it easier for you to find the landmarks on each walk. If you prefer something less active then stay tuned for my boss view of a game of moles. See you soon. Thanks for listening.

Desmond Bristow Ian Fleming London Spies Bill Bristow writer Bletchley Park Sinclair Makai Donald MacRae Donald MacLean MI6 Steely High House of Commons Roland Phillips Black Sea Prime Minister Tom Cole buckinghamshire
Drinking With Bond - Literally!

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

57:49 min | 5 months ago

Drinking With Bond - Literally!

"Hi. This is Dan Sylvestry and Tampa spy movie navigator DOT COM Today on our show cracking the code is fine movies. We focus on well drinking. James Bond seven trae a lot, and we intend to do the same, and he drank a large variety of drinks, not just vodka MARTINIS. We're going to have a drink with Ian Fleming today to selecting a couple of cocktails from the pages of Ian Fleming's novels about the most famous fictional spy in history bond James Bond. We're not gonNA cover every drink that bond ever sipped in the novels and movies, but we will look. This would be a long podcast. We're GONNA look heavily into the novel's because this is where I lived and breathed through Fleming's works after all. In the novels were safe because there's no question this is. This is where it came from and Tom I. Tom, you remember. We went to Lilly Library. In Indiana University and what we do there. We read the manuscript where Fleming this stuff for original manual originals, original manuscripts. Yeah, where he actually wrote down this. Recipe for the vesper that I'm making now. So before we get to our shakers, we WANNA shakers and movers, but literally. He Shakers We want to give a shout out to Michael Pablo Hausky who helped us a bit with the drinks here? Thanks, Michael Here's to you tears. Also. Also in our north by northwest podcasts the two-parter that we just did recently, one of our listeners responded to us that his wife as a girl was an extra in the movie, so we contacted her, and she told us about her role in how she started, and that she is one of the little girls who walk in front of Roger Thornhill as he exits. Exits the bathroom at Union station. Chicago you gotTa love that enter mother was in the same scene just behind her holding two other girls little hands. Cynthia told us that she had been selected as little Miss Pageant in nineteen, fifty six in Chicago. It's a Qantas Club promotion that they had every year then and one of the prizes was a scholarship to model school. In Chicago so here's a clip from Cynthia. Telling us all about her starring role. I was a child model. At the time. The movie was being filmed. They did a three day segment at the Union train station in Chicago. I was selected as an extra and my mom and I were both in the film. Just snippets, the most notable was walking by cary grant as he exited the restroom, it was a wonderful experience, and I met many of the stars in doubles. who were especially Nice when I met Mr Hitchcock and ask for his autograph he bent and asked me my name I said Cynthia to which he questioned. Symphonia I politely corrected him. An responded no Sir Cynthia. Years later. I moved to New York as an executive in the radio business I went to the Oh group as often as I could entertain clients, but sadly I never did see Roger born again. That was great. Thank you, Cynthia! Really, was Cynthia. Thank you that it's really cool to hear real world people that have actually been involved in these things in whatever role in effect that she was willing to share with us. Those those awesome fun. She sent us pictures, too with with an Arrow with her walking right in front of Roger Thornhill, and at one point she said Hitchcock. Tola do not look at the camera, and she sent us a picture of her looking right at the camera. When she was walking, they had to Redo it, but she also said that when they were filming the Mount Rushmore scenes that they had huge paper Shea sculptures of the President's faces on the studio floor, and they crawl all over them, and then and it was filmed, and then she said the film was rotated. Vertical so again. Since since the O'Connor. Thanks, for the comments, we appreciate it, and it adds greatly to our cracking the code of north by northwest all right. We're going to get to one of the famous drinks ever in spy movie history dry Martini. Of Gordon's one of vodka off measure of Keanu Lilla check it over rice, and then at a slice of lemon. Yes you know I. Have One of those. So. something. And you know what? I Tom I think I. Think so. Yeah, actually I, just I. Just actually. Did you hear the? Finish pouring myself this one I made it while we. All right. I'M GONNA. Pour my now. That looks good. It looks good. It smells good all right now we're having. We're having the vesper and says obviously one of the big ones as you said. All right. I got my cocktail in my hand. I do too and. Tom Can't clink glasses together yet here because we're still because of COVID nineteen recording remotely, but here we go. Can we bump our glass to the Mike and have EPI virtual clink? Here. We go onto. All right all right so so the vesper here it's only it's only mentioned twice in bond films. It's in Casino Royale. Which is the book that it appeared in an quantum of solace? Yeah, when he's on the flight with with. And Mathis walks up to the bartender and he's he says what are you drinking and the bartender tells them the recipe for the Vesper, which will get to in a second, but they never mentioned by name, right and Komo Solace. They sit he. He names it and Casino Royale. He's drinking it and quantum, but he's not I know I now know why he didn't mention vesper in quantum of solace because he's still in quantum of solace. believed. Vesper had betrayed him, and so he's not going to be calling the string vesper anymore. He he likes the combination of stuff that we're GONNA. Go over in a minute, but he wasn't going to call it a vesper quantum of solace because of that so I I just thought of that and I think that's true. That's exactly why he didn't. Go ahead okay. So I'm GonNa I. Talk About What's in this thing so three parts gin. Yup, in the novel. Bond calls for Gordon's Gin. And then one part of vodka, and he says in the novel Grain Vodkas better than potato vodka, but he never calls out which brand now and you know it is true. Yeah. And then one half part of Keno Allay okay, so we've got three parts gin dry of course. One part vodka grain bunker preferably in half part Keno Lillay in the book in the movies now. Okay, wait before we go on I'm going to try. This Because I talked all set mine while you're sipping yours, and if you're out there with us, put this on pause and go make one. Here we go. That's at him pretty good. Now, the thing that's interesting to me is. He calls for Kina Lay, but you can't get that anymore. You can get something Kala Block. which is a French white wine kind of close to keep Malaysia? You want this instead of Vermouth and don't don't forget. You want to add along lemon peel to this. On the recipe? Now, one of the things I was reading in a book, a great book, the complete guide of the drinks of James Bond, and when he talks about the Vesper, Martini, he's talking about it and the fact that you can't get the Kena anymore. He talks about some alternatives you might use. Because actually the KENO was more and it was better than than what the current Lily blunk is, so it has slightly slightly different things, so there's some things in the book. If you. If you get that book talks about different alternatives, you might try. Wrote the book, and what's the name again gave? The book is called the complete guide to drinks James Bond by David lay not good. So it's it's A. It's actually a book that breaks down every drink by every movie. That's pretty good. It's actually very very good. Yeah, my daughter gave me one for Christmas call shaken drinking with James Von and started. The official cocktail book now this go over the cocktails in the movies it goes over cocktails that would have been inspired by things that happen in the movie, but it's very clever, and there are a couple in here from the movies, but excellent shaken drinking with James Bond and inflaming as we continue to podcast drink here we go. Tom And I we these vesper Martinis in many different places and a few. In the world. We drank them for instance at the bar in the pilot CEO Hotel in still Portugal. Which is those are great? They really made a good Martini now. This hotel is the one that appears in on Her Majesty's Secret Service where Tracy goes, and we're bond follows her after the chase on the road and the beach scene and all that. These were superb drinks and. This bar. In World War Two was really a headquarters for spies, and even Ian Fleming drank in this bar, and I think he met dusk of popoff there. Yes, he did yeah. In the Casino, which is right next door to this was the inspiration because there were different things going on the Casino Germans were betting it on there, and there was. That's going on that. We got to go get the money from the German so that they don't be. They won't be able to fund stuff. Whatever let's go get their money in the casino. So all of this betting and stuff like that in the book is is really partially dependent upon Ian Fleming's real experience here at this hotel where we were drinking these vespers, and it's a great little bar. And we drank him in Sardinia. Do you remember that? Sorry in Sardinia, we had them there Sardinia right right the little resort we were staying at their the bartender that no one vesper was was kind of a private BARF, just for the guests, and so we taught him. As pretty damn good ones. quickly. Yeah, those were good, and then we. What was the place in Amsterdam? We went to the we went to the best bar actually called the vesper bar. Actually mixed the vesper in where selling them know bottled or canned or something like that. That you could buy, yeah. Yeah I recall, there were different maybe. A different twist to it then they didn't have the exact recipe thing. They had their own little twist on it, so it was good in that sense, but it wasn't like one of the problems with Ali's thinks you go into these places even when we had the one dukes is an orange peel instead of lemon peel. Yeah, not mentioning Dukes Dukes is the Bar dukes hotel in London where we. We had vesper MARTINIS. and. It was really rumor that that's where you and Fleming hung out and invented the vesper. Martini although I thought he got it from either. I've are Bryce was friend, but I mean they may have talked about or whatever, but there was issues. Maybe it was Jamaica that he invented it, and that's where ever and he hung out a lot together, or maybe it was in this bar, but maybe this is where they mixed them officially for the first time, whatever with that Italian bartender anytime and drink. Everybody wants to say. They claim they did every. Time, we were drinking there. Where of course he and Fleming definitely was at certain times at this bar, and the bartender invited us to combined barn. Shake Mortiz with them, so we were shaking vespers at Duke's Bar, and actually while we were talking to Caroline Munro. who was Naomi in the spy? Who loved me, so that was fun and she has that fact. That was a great experience all around. Yeah, so. So the book, The book that I was reading was the complete guide to the drinks. James Bond by David Lay in. He's the guy who also runs the James Bond dossier dot com, which is a good website. He's been running for eighteen years or something like that cool. All right, so we're drinking the vesper and it's pretty damn good. This is it's an excellent drink. Some people don't like the vespers. I I think it's an interesting combination of stuff. Some people just think it's crazy, but it makes gin and vodka and everything else in the l'ilet with with with twists. With are you think it's delicious especially today? We have to also remember how tastes have changed. Vodka was something that really didn't hit. The US and Europe until World War Two. It pretty much states something that was those consumed in Russia in in Holland in the Balkan states. and. It really didn't hit until after. World War, two, so when somebody would order Martini in the past. They would order GIN Martinis. And people started making them with with vodka, adding vodka to them trying to. Twist them a little because I mean if you go to England, now is what I've I've found. Jen is still extremely popular. Drink where in the US. It's more vodka than Jin for pretty much everything. And of course, Fleming is writing this stuff. In the early fifties after World War Two and so Vodkas, becoming a little more popular and so on. Anyway, it's really interesting because bond drinks, all kinds of drinks in the books. This is really where bond comes from in Fleming's books, and so we're talking here, okay? The vesper is the biggest one everyone knows, and really he doesn't ever order another vesper Martini in any other book or Any other movie right now. That's as far as I am aware. That I've seen him. Call for it actually in in quantum like I said he doesn't even call it by name he right right. So weird, but of course we'll tell you if you were one of these when you're at a bar. You may get a look from your bartender may not have the lay. And this isn't they? Throw some rum and coke into a glass and serve or for a little bit of there's more. There's more work for the bartender. Yeah, there's there's the aware that when you were a lot of Mars are not going to have a little a little. Give you Dr Ruth instead. As the bartender on the plane in quantum of solace. While Matheson bond are drinking these drinks and gives the recipe he says. Canola which is not vermouth. So -actly, there aren't a lot of ours that have maybe the high end bart. There is one in Chicago here that. Makes Fabulous Festival routine and they do have that they block so. Excellent. It's called Stephanie's Great Place. You're in a busy bar and you WANNA. Drink like bond, but they're really busy. You might move to a vacuum Martini instead of the Vesper, because he orders a lot of vodka MARTINIS and the books they're quicker to make. And they're more likely to have the ingredients so just you try to help your bartender out, but you still wandering like bond baby the next thing. He moved to his Vodka Martini. Yeah and he drinks a lot of those like just a couple of examples doctrine. No, he I'll quote. I'm to give you a few quotes here because it kind of is insightful into how bond was thinking here and when you say doctor. No, you're talking about the book. The book I'm talking about these are all from the book. Okay, the the novels by Fleming. I would like a medium vodka. Dry Martini with a slice of lemon peel shaken not stirred, please. I would prefer Russian or Polish vodka. Okay that's cool in from Russia with love in the novel, he orders a Vodka Martini. In goldfinger bond says vodka. Martini please with a slice of lemon peel thunderball, while in the Bahamas lighter checks in, and they went to his room, and sent for to double dry Martinis on the rocks. Now Hang on a second, though yeah, those probably would have been Jin because they didn't specify back then. If you order to Martini, you would have gotten a gin. Martini that could be true, and I could not verify that in the book thunderball except when I searched for Jin, it didn't show up very much so. It could be jen but I think maybe they were vodka in on Her Majesty's Secret Service. He sat down in order to double medium dry Martini. On? The rocks was a vodka Martini with Lemon Peel Nice Moon Raker, even buying orders Martini made with vodka large slice of lemon peel, so he specifies their live and letting guy and remem remember. You. Didn't have to worry about him going into space after drinking water these because in the book, it wasn't the same as the movie. Yeah, I love the moon. Record book. That's a fabulous is really. It's one of my favorite Fleming Bond Novels. Really the mood rancor. You gotTA. You gotta read that one in live. Got A slow down, yeah! Yeah I, my vesper is three-quarters. Gone already aches all right. In live and let die solitaire. This is cute. She mixes them both. Vodka Martini saying I hope I've made it right. Six to one sounds terribly strong. I've never. I've never had vodka MARTINIS before. Okay all right and it's kind of interesting. If you look Martinis, though is spending. especially, you know really either. Jenner Vodka how they've gotten dryer because it used to be that it was Leeann original Martini was equal part, and then it got less and less. And, then it was kind of like some bartenders would actually what their finger with the Vermouth, and just lined the rim of the glass with it and called Martini. Very. Obviously by the time they got the live and let die. That were making them very dry. Even diamonds are forever which. The great novel, it's actually a fund novel, and even more fun than the than the movie, I. Think the Movies Pretty Good bonds sat at the long bar of the era and sip the Vodka Martini and examine the great gambling room with a professional I and in other parts of the book. I'm GonNA stop you yeah. Well you just said there is why I love reading the books. As well as so if you're one of those one of our fans who just watch the movies I mean we are spy movie navigator, grabbing the code of spy movies, but sometimes reading these books just the way he described that. Get that out of a camera Lens Yeah and. That reminds when we're looking at the manuscripts. At the Lilly Library we examined eleven of the original ones you could see where Fleming scratched out certain things and put in other words, and these are the words that made it into the final versions of the of the book and. Thoughtful. He was about what he was saying there. This descriptions I think our fabulous well, just thinking about how you would see this in a film is. He's sipping the Vodka Martini. He an examined the great gambling room with a professional I in the movie. He would just be sipping Martini looking around in. Yeah, yeah, but when you get this out of the, it just adds a depth to it, which is really nice. Yeah, it does I mean professional means a lot of stuff in those couple of words. Professional I you know a lot about bond. So he drinks a lot of GIN MARTINIS to in the books nine. So, but we're going. To stick, WITH VODKA Vodka tonic to now. We've attention to this one much, but bond drinks it up in a few of the novels. So. I have a sample here that I will drink now. I don't have any time here at home with. Leftover from Christmas party, so I'm GonNa just town then. Okay well, I'm going back to my vesper. Okay well. We'll here doing that. Right so in Majesty's Secret Service the book. He drinks a vodka tonic with betters. Going back to the conversation about Keno Away. Yeah kind of makes sense because if you're shifting, you don't hear you're back. You're not doing the Jin, but he liked that. undertone of the bidders at the KENO would give it. The kind of makes sense that he'd carry that over into the vodka tonic like to try that I haven't tried it. I! Don't have Augustino or whatever it's called bidders. What's IT GONNA August? There's there's a few different paint. A big winner! Is. Having under drink all right, yeah and. Eat Drink Angus Angus. Store bidders. I with the Dash Bidders I. Think is an interesting little twister, and he does that in Thunderball to in book. He has a Buchan tonic with with DASH BIDDERS And we're else's drink that I think. From with the bidders, yes. or No it just just a whole vodka tonic thing. Oh, yeah, the vodka tonic. He also I! Think from Russia. He emerged with love. He does but remember. We talked about the potato. Versus the greenback, and that one he says the local vodkas alright if you drown with tonic were. All Right? It just shows you the kind of subtle Palette. That bond has right. He's like the local good. That's great. That's a that's a good one. I think there's one more reference that I can think of in the books which was in Goldfinger He has a Atkin with a slice of lemon peel. He likes his lemon peels. Yeah, I I think it's great I. Think it's great with the Limit Bill. And then there are well. That's well you know for me. I. Don't have the lemon peel here at home so I'm used. AM drinking the Bombay Sapphire Gin instead of the Gordons, which there there is a slight lemon undertone to the Bombay Sapphire which is one of the things, I like about it and instead of the Gordons. But I don't have the lemon here with I ordered lemons from Mariano knows the other day and there was delivered yesterday. GROCERY CHAIN Grocery chains Chicago and they're delivering stuff now during this whole Cova. Dang thing and I wanted them for this drink for the podcasts and so. Is this a damn good drink? I have to say good vesper. Okay. Anyway we're talking. We're talking to finish up vodka. Okay, so if you're, you can have it in in a Martini, you can have it in a vesper. You can have it with tonic, and you can, of course just a straight. Like. You weren't wh when I go. When I go to the theater, I normally have that because it's less liquid, but still you're saying before they got drier and drier, and in a couple of cases, he orders. I think in a Casino Royale the book. He orders a small carafe vodka very cold. I love that very cold. Very cold because his whole concept of why does he want something state shaken instead of stirred is that it's GonNa Colder Yeah, and a little bit watered down with the shaking versus stirring yeah. He likes it cold. Yeah, and then in Moon raker. This is my one of my favorites. 'em tells grimly some vodka, please and he turns the bond and says not to stuff. You had in your cocktail. This is real. Prewar Will Schmidt from Riga. I don't know what happened the Wolf Schmidt. I mean maybe at the time. This was like fabulous vodka, but when I was in graduate school at Marquette University in Milwaukee Wisconsin, we would buy Wolf Schmidt Vodka because it was like five dollars a quart. Anyway. Digress you also have to realize that as tastes have changed. Some of the beverages that have been product placements in the movies. Yeah, have kind of lost their luster and. We're taking this from a US perspective. I'm not sure internationally, but. One thing is in Europe getting. Isis kind of unusual. People drink their drinks on ice. Yeah, yeah, but if you think about Stolk Nyah. Which is a vodka? That was that. was prominently was a lot of Bonfield was huge. And from product placement? In. There are some people here in the US who are like. Oh, I won't drink that I've got a drink. Belvedere, I've got a drink, a chopin or something like that. Where it's a very serviceable hot gut. Does it does the job so where when is a product? Thought of highly verses not. Sometimes just as wary society at that point in time, and what and also thinking about the Europe from the European influence that Fleming would have for, says the US tastes which are different. Yeah, we have to think about that. When we talk about this a little bit different this. It's different for us here in the US. Yeah Yeah and product placement has always been a big thing with Fleming actually in the in the actual novels, he mentioned brand names all the time, and whether it's watches or or drinks or whatever so. Carry this over to the films to the movies. Of course where it's obvious that they're going to get money for product placement is is is is cool, so you? Folks I'm not sure back then if they were doing a lot of paid product placements I. was paid. Manning depth but Fleming? Because I think for Fleming, it added to the description. So that people were familiar with Gordon's vodka, accordance gin or whatever they had a, they had a better read on what they were looking at on the pages of Fleming's novels. They thought Oh. Wow, yeah, I could get that. That's good. Champagne, he drinks everywhere. We're not gonNA even talk, get into the champagne volunteer Donyo perignon. Whatever he drinks champagne, okay, so product placement again everywhere. Yeah, well especially in the movies for Champagne. Right exactly, but there was a time where I pretty much would only drink bollinger. Right and I wonder where I got that from. You give them a good bullish recently disgorged Bolinger are D.. It's a good champagne. Actually, in fact, actually last year, I drink. My last I had one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty nine. R D and it's still was good. Yeah, I remember in doctrine. No, I think Violence GonNA smash a bottle of doff. Dom perignon fifty six and then doctorinal tells them you know it's dom perignon fifty six, and he says I prefer the fifty-three myself. I love that crap. That's good stuff. Vintage does matter. We're talking about GIN and he does. He does drink gin MARTINIS. When are we talking about you and we're moving? We were talking about the vodka monkeys and GIN Martinis. We're just talking about paying. I know we're just talking about champagne, but he does drink GIN MARTINIS and we were talking about. MARTINIS and Jin sometimes in the popularity of Jim Before You know and the World War Two. So I'm going to have more of this gin and Vodka Lily, combination near I finished my vesper. Finished Mine, have you finish yours? Yet I'm working on anyway. Gin Martinis in the books in live and let die Felix. Ordered medium dry Martinis with a slice of lemon peel. He stipulated lords genuine and Martini Rossi. Okay, this is a twist on the Bond Martini though Felix orders in Bonn thinks the American gin in this particular case is harsh, so it's particularly like the House of Lords Gin. In quantum of solace bond. His drinking and Felix asks what he's drinking. We mentioned this before, and he gives the recipe and Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah. and. It's a GIN Martini basically, because three parts gin in a vesper. Dominates the one part vodka so late? I I I think you can call the vesper really. Gin Martini. And now the the the other thing, too. Is The in you talked about the House of Lords Jin here. It was a brand booths. Jen put it out and it's been around for a long time and like. Like I don't know three hundred years or something like that or close to it. I in London. Fleming actually referred to this as an American gin. Yes he did yeah, but it was made in London. So House. Sound like an American Gin. No, but it was just something that was cheap and imported to the Americas or was it. You Know I. Didn't I didn't understand what he meant by that, but they do call out that he thinks the American gin is harsh. It's yeah, it's well. It's good, I mean even the the concept of the the Martini you talked about house. Awards, Gin Martini Rosy. Why is it called the Martini part of that is because there was a vermouth maker. Ver- Martini and Rossi that made vermouth, dry and sweet, and so that's kind of how the Martini came about original ingredients. The Gen and the Martini and Rossi Vermont. So it's it's kind of interesting when you look at when we use these names that we all know. Where they come from yeah? So, it's it's Kinda Fun. Because now you're looking at the books and you look at the movies, obviously drinking vodka Martinis a lot, but in the books he's stricken everything and we've. We've drinks a lot. We don't. We're done with the vodka stuff and everything and I'm done with my vesper. Let me. Finish my up here. WHO Was a good. Glass to and I, he joins us in. Eat Drink Scotch, Soda Drinks Whisky and Soda. We're recording this one o'clock in the afternoon. Yeah may have to take a nap after the swearing. All right. My take a nap during this. I've only had one so. So anyway drinks, he drinks a lot of stuff. In Drinks Scotch and soda in the novels bond drinks a lot of Scotch and soda, actually for example in live, and let die fixing bond there together at that nightclub, and they ordered Scotch and Soda Hagan Hague Pinch bottle. So that's okay. I. Don't have one here ready to go and I don't have Hagan hate pinch bottle I've got some pretty good scotch here, though and but I. don't have that mixed up ready to go, so I'm not going to drink that right now, so he mentions Hague here in today. That's a good whiskey. I'm not saying anything bad about it. But if you look at the the echelons of Whiskey, and where these things rank haggis fine, it's not the top tier, but it's still pretty good, but it is considered the oldest whiskey brand in the world youngest whisky brand of the World Yep at least according to their website That's what he's drinking when he's when he's going on ordering this whisky and soda. Wow all right well. I mean things have changed. Look at vodka itself up from you see wolf. Schmidt and you see Schumer Nov and everything else, which were the high end Vodkas long time ago. Now you see six times distilled vodkas that are tremendous. That would kick ass. Original Vodkas and even some of the Russian Vodkas like Tito for instance time still. It's fabulous five, so the technology has changed to that has made drinks, better and better which yeah Tom Earl Four. Yeah okay with that. Drinks Whisky and soda to in. Whiskey could mean lots of things but. He Drinks Whisky and soda in the novels, like in Moon raker both and drax whiskey sodas, and bond orders, a large whisky and soda, please. He says and waited while the bartenders poured to measures of black and white, and put the glass in front of him with a Siphon Soda. Again, you drink lots of different things all right. Brandy and Soda I never had a Brandon Soda, but in thunderball there's never I've never thought about putting soda with Brandy me neither I long three nice could snifter a brand. Yeah, wintertime saw you need Pranzi and soda well in Thunderball the novel of course bond while talking to miss moneypenny before leaving for Shrub lands remember he had to go get. rehabilitated. He muses that he needs a double brandy and soda. It's always a double. Right okay, he's not drinking it actually here talking about it, but the dialogue is classic. Moneypenny says James do you really drink and smoke as much as that. It can't be good for you. You know to which bond replies. It's just that I'd rather die of drink than thirst. A lovat. Cigarettes it's only that I don't know what to do with my hands. In money says about the hands. That's not what I have heard. Okay. That's great. That's great. That's Great Fleming writing. That's just great stuff. It's that interplay between bond and moneypenny is just fabulous and take this to include the drink and the cigarettes, and if you think about Fleming wrote a lot about drinking in Bonn smoked lot. Right, so in the in the Sean Connery bonds. He smoked cigarettes then Roger moved that to cigars right, but in the books and it's you know it's like if you think about on her, Majesty's One of the first things you see when you see him lighting a cigarette. Yeah, right? He's in that. He's in that car. Fleming Rhode, a lot of vans, characteristics, and personalities based really on himself because. Fleming. Did both of those things a lot? Yep, so we didn't when it comes through in the books. Yeah, we talked about Brandy and soda is kind of weird. Brandy and Ginger Ale. Okay I'm not going there. I don't have Louis Mix. That actually sounds like something I might try. Why don't you try ginger? Ale here? I think I might have might have some brandy in the basement. Try in the novel in the Bar in the basement I might try that and the novel and Her Majesty. Secret Service Bond has a double brandy Ginger Ale, instead along from the handful of other privileged passengers. A double brandy, a double randy, do you a lot of double drinks? and he drinks brandy straight up in Casino Royale Bond Orders Coffee, and of course with brandy straight up Felix Whiter drinks this to in L. and Moon Reicher. The novel m tells bond will have coffee and brandy on the car. That's a combination that makes more sense to me and again coffee and brandon great I haven't thought about doing it with a ginger. I'M GONNA have to try that, but. Coughing brandies fine, but Ginger Ale that interesting yeah! Off To try to. Of course straight stuff, straight Scotch, straight Bourbon, straight whiskey I mean bond saw sometimes in a hurry, and he needs a stiff one the throwback so there you go in Casino Royale. For instance in the book again bond was finishing his first straight whiskey on the rocks Dr No in the dusk, she came across the lawn to where bond was sitting, finishing his third glass of Bourbon the racks. Thunderball in his room, Ban I. ordered a club Sandwich, and a double bourbon on the show doubled urban man with the golden gun bond wandered over to the little bar on the waterfront in order to double walkers Deluxe Bourbon on the rocks and watch the pelicans diving for their dinner. Oh Yeah, in live and let die. Wait wait wait Dan. Remember you and I were sitting in. Saint Thomas. Oh Yeah, US! Virgin Islands in the Caribbean diving for dinner and we're sitting on that one that one. Bar, that was overlooking, and you could see saint. Thomas from it. That bars changed hands about five times since then. We were watching the Pelicans just come diving down half into the water looking for the fish. Yeah, so this is a great end descriptive thing. We should have been doing that with a double walkers. ooh, yeah! It was really good. The way we did it, but it would have been better with double walkers. I think yeah. And continuing and live and let die. He took a deep draft of his whiskey in Goldfinger bond leaned against the Jama the door. He took a long pull. It is whiskey in you. Only live twice. Suntory Whiskey is mentioned in the movie. Bond drinks it in Nakas Garden. Okay, so and Tori whiskey has gotten very very popular lately at least here in the US, and so it's. It's kind of interesting that you think about back. The time that this book was written him drink drinking this I don't know if it was exported back then. I'm not sure. But. It's a very very good whiskey maker so props to him for coming up with that one at that time. And drink other stuff, too like Burma Noir. You're talking about the fact that the sketches bourbons and stuff like that. Sometimes. He put some water in the BURBOT. In on her and Her Majesty's Secret Service. He's if you actually look at the type manuscripts that we did. Yes, he scratched out. There's Bourbon and changed it to Jack Daniel's Bourbon while so he poured himself a drink on the rocks and adds water is. Stats being coming from Tennessee. That's kind of Nice to see. The project handles pub publish there, and then even in on Her Majesty's Secret Service. Bond poured himself a stiff Bourbon and water with plenty of ice. He was meeting with DRACO for the first time, and draco pulled out a pinch bottle. Hey. And another of I W Harper Bourbon. Cool, so you've got bond with the Bergman. You draco with the Bourbon it's. Scotch it's it's kind of fun how he actually ties these things in here. Yeah and. It was yeah. Times are forever. Right, yeah, he walks over the Bari, orders himself a Bourbon and branch water now branch water isn't something that we In the US we drink a lot of, but he wants to Bourbon and branch water. I looked up ranch water because I thought what the Hell is branch water andbranch water they say is like. If there's a streamer or river, whatever it's the highest part of that stream or river that they're taking that water from because it's supposed to be the purest, so I found. Okay, that's kind of interesting. I mean he does call it out another way to church more for water. I mean he he actually in in the book. He says he orders this Bourbon Bridgewater bomb guest. In the that in fact, the water was from the tap behind the bar. Later said that. Real Bourbon drinkers insistent, having their whiskey in the traditional style with water from high up in the branch, the look where it's the purest. So just what you were saying there? Yeah lighter talks to him about here and it's it's kind of interesting. Because the the only time I know of that I've ever heard of ordering a whiskey IMP-. Ranch Water Bourbon and branch water. is in a fleming novel, and specifically diamonds are forever. It sounds so damn, Hoti and good. Things with. Is. There's a little highfalutin. To the way, he describes some of his things. And This is one of those yeah. Bourbon and water that was drinks, Gin and tonic in Dr. Drinks, Gin and tonic. Here's a different one old fashioned. Now old-fashioned are popular again now, and they were very popular a long time ago, but they're. They're popular again now, so you don't see bond drinking. A lot of old fashioned, I mean in the movies I don't think we ever orders an old fashioned I'm. She's I'm not aware. Let me while you're talking I'M GONNA go. Ahead look. David lays book here. But in diamonds are forever. Bond took a shower and change and walked down the road and had to Bourbon. old-fashioned and chicken dinner in thunderball back in his hotel bond took a shower, swallowed a double bourbon, old-fashioned, threw himself down on the bed and live with die on the train bound ordered old-fashioned stipulated old granddad Bourbon so weird, but there you go. There's three instances in the books where you were all. Only in the books they are not in the movies and one of the things keeping on our theme of what we've been talking about throughout. One of the key ingredients in an old fashioned. His three dashes of Angostura bidders. Author Go. So keeping it keeping it real. That's good. That's good. Well he does. He doesn't drink any of those. In the book we see it of course in one movie and Die Another Day were jinx and bond meet on the beach. I think I've watched that movie twice. I missed a good. That's a good moment where he drinks the Mojo there, but not in the books Negroni now this this is something. In the short story. Published in one, thousand, nine seek or RISCO. Italian stuff in Italian ingredients in and the second syllable is mostly stressed in Italian. Salmon Sabre Seco. Now that that was part of the for your eyes. Only short story collection bond drinks a Nagorny. This is equal parts. Jin's for move and Campari over ice with an orange twist, okay? You hear this. I've got that's that's when you actually. I think need to acquire a taste for it i. have it the first one I'm not sure when you taste in the first time you're like? Yeah, this, is it? But after you had a few of them. I'm drinking one now. And it's delicious now you have to. It is an odd combination of flavors, and it depends on how you stir it or shake it or whatever you do with it a lot of times people stir it to to imbue the flavors. More. As they mix and so on, but. It's damn good in my opinion so again. Equal parts GIN sweet for moving Campari over ice with an orange to us, and that's exactly what I have in this class. Right here, then drinking. He, Yeah! That's good. And by the way in in the story were Seco Christos and Enrico Colombo are the characters in the story, which of course we know, they were extracted from this story and use in the movie for Your Eyes Only, so there you go, there's another little tidbit for you. At the good drink drinking as fast as I can, so we can get onto Irish whiskey. This is this is not a race of okay. All right now. What's what's the difference? Between grown in? America no dino. Yeah. Is Gin for Moose and Campari. The Way Zano specifically, but yeah okay. Yeah, the don't forget the lemon peel the lemon or orange. You could have lemon orange. I like orange with actually. and. The. Americano on. The Americano is Campari in Vermouth Cinzano again with over ice topped with. Soda It's right Peres Soda Water so I I've got. I've got both of those here I'm almost finished with the grown already. I got a little bit left a hang on. Good thing, this isn't a race. It's a damn good drink. Our local bar here neil tap tom and I go to. they didn't make a lot in GRONYEA's. But. They made them for us. And now it's like a drink. They serve all the time because we're in there all the time and. We liked them. It's it's I want to get back in. There once turned corona I. Know I know I know. We're in touch with owners all the time. That's what I love is when you order. Somebody's drinks in some of these buyers know what's in it. That's why I call out what's in these drinks, because they likely have the ingredients, but some of these they may never have made before so if you can help them especially especially like a bar like the nil tap to yeah. It is. Crowded sometimes not crowded others, and we just have to be kind and only order a drink. They don't know how to make yet when they're not crowded. And the new and patty inland will make it for you. It's Nice, so I go on with risky because I'm GONNA. Take a sip of my Americana while we're talking about that. 'CAUSE WE'RE GONNA come to them. Okay. I'll absolutely talk about that I remember. We talked about the fact that you might have. Was Brandon Coffee. What are we say? Yeah, we talked about the fact that there was brandy and coffee, so coffee can be used for other things, and you know if you're gonNA, do brandy wine, not an Irish whiskey? So you know here, we will we call this an Irish coffee here in the US? The place I'm aware of him. Ordering one of those is in diamonds are forever in the. In the Book Yeah Yeah now now you know Dan I've been to Ireland. Too, so the first time I went there in Dublin. We're at the hotel, the first night were a-block from the temple bar region, and I said the concierge I wanNA. Learn about Irish whiskey because I didn't know it. We're GONNA put Irish whiskey coffee. Let's figure out how they work. And the CONCIERGE said don't go to temple bar. He pointed me to this bar two blocks away. I was like the only person in there. And I went in there and I said okay complex that's. So I'm like okay. Help me understand Irish whiskey. So He poured me nine little taster. Glasses tone could do a podcast on that. Yeah, what was tastes are mean. These weren't full glass Isis tastings for us to go through then he taught me how Irish whiskey works? So, the the big brand that everybody knows Jameson and that's fine. Yeah, right, I'm actually partial to. To others and the one that the bar we talked about before. In Chicago has something called red breast. That I think is really good. Yeah, that is good. And the other one that I really like. Is something called Green Spot, which is actually a well less expensive, but actually just for whatever reason really like that one as well, but if you're going to do whiskeys and coffee. You to do an Irish coffee. How are you? GonNa? Do that what we call an iced coffee. Take some time to learn the Irish whiskeys. They're very different. Yeah, and there's a like really any. Any of these categories, Scotch whiskies, or even the or whatever? There are very wide variations between them and spend some time trying them out all right so here. Here's a drink. I. Don't think we've ever seen bond order in a movie. A Stinger really a Stinger mind where it's a Stinger. Where the heck is! Is Bond ordering a Stinger? This isn't boundary. Is it well? Yeah, he orders one in the novels in diamonds are forever. Tiffany orders. Stinger made with White Cream the myth. And bond orders the same. Oh, white cream, dement in either brandy or Cognac. Cream I mean. That's not Bondi. Any if if you WANNA make one of these yourself. It's one and a half ounces of brandy and a half ounce of white creamed amid. Okay! All right so bond has one in diamonds are forever the novel in, thunderball. At the NASA Casino. The governor's ADC is presented bond and lighter with membership cards, and after they have had a coffee and A. At the bar they separated went to the tables. Another stinger diamonds are forever and thunderball all right, so we're going to go on we we've. We've covered a lot of different drinks to bond drinks. Of course he drinks. Sake in you only live twice. And in, you only live twice. Bond laughed. Alright Tiger but I more sake says and not these ridiculous thimbles. I love that part. I twenty five 'cause stuff, and its effect is about the same as one double marquee. That's a nice line. Now we actually we were as in Vegas once Las Vegas and we went and did a soccer flight thing where we went through against similar to what I did in Ireland and tried a variety of different Sakis and did the tasting that way and if you're trying a liquor for the first time, do this if you can. Sometimes you're you're at a place and somebody says Oh let's do this and they say this is what we're going to have. If that was your first time after that, go back and try and see if you can go to a place that you can taste of variety of different to these because again, just like with all of these drinks, there are very big differences and Sakis Young, and so if you want to learn these things, take time to do it. And it's fun. In the meantime right so absolutely we're moving an. Americano, that's per will. We're moving on all right. Make another vesper. All kinds of stuff here three parts in one. I've got by the lay the GROWNEY ready to go. I mean Oh. My God on the Cronies Gone I in Casino Royale. When bond and math is are sitting in that little outdoor cafe bond orders in Americano. Americano is made by pouring one ounce of Campari wants a sweet for move in an old fashioned glass, filled with ice and topping with Soda and we talked about that a moment ago, and you can garnish it with either an orange slice or a lemon twist whichever you like and I have mind today with an orange slice and. Thumbs. Vesper. I'm sipping the Americano. Which I happen to like. This is a great summer. Warm weather drink. And you drink it with the soda floating on the top, and then the flavors of the Campari and the Vermouth, the sweet tooth start seeping through the soda. It's delicious. So you got to try that and then Cova, those Colorado's is an apple brandy. I think it's also brandy to right Oh. Yeah, absolutely I mean the Normandy region of France any drinks one on her majesty's Secret Service in the book of again. Now you do you do remember of course Dan we can. We had that when you and I went to Normandy in France right. We stayed in Baio. Yeah and I. Don't remember the name of the Little Bar. We were in a restaurant. I remember this. Yeah, the the bartender, their suggested. We try something again. It's when we go to these places. We commonly will ask what's a local. You know what's a local drink that you guys have. Kalvitis so he poured That's good stuff. It was good I. Remember we had a couple as far as I know. And then they closed because they closed earlier than we like, but you know that's. Good it was fun, and then of course Goldfinger amid Julep and in from Russia with love. Wait you just say he drinks. A mint Julep and then from Russia. Where does he drink JULEP? He's at Oracle fingers. Stud. Farm right when he's out there with with Goldfinger and the drinking and Mitch eloped doesn't want to Tart or whatever. and. He's in Kentucky in the United. States in Kentucky in the United States, which is. Shrink the mint julep is the big drink they drink. Yes, at the Kentucky Derby, Horse Race The really famous horse race. Yeah, so he. You know taking taking that concept and he's Got Goldfinger in Kentucky. Because a Fort Knox if you're going to be having him, be related with horses tying in the Maju, it makes absolute sense. Yeah, and and he knows a lot about Mitchell which is. A southern drink in the US? Every drink and it's an amazing because the Colorado's very regionalized especially back that the the mint julep, his very rejoiced, but Knows them all of course in from Russia with love. He has some Turkish rocky at the Gypsy camp and I forgot about that yeah. which is which is Kinda, cool and beer. Fans going to drink beer well. He has red stripe beer. You think okay. He's going to have red stripe beer in Dr. No, because it's in Jamaica, that's Jamaican beer which we've had many of. and. And No, it's in the man with the Golden Gun. We need to do more of that. You make him beer because since we started doing. He's podcasts in this website. Women been back to make a yet. We gotta get back. Now when travel is back again, it would be nice to get to Jamaica again. And Anyway. He drinks low brow in Goldfinger actually sat by the window drank. NCAA on I, don't know what that is washed down with a pale loan, Bro! And then wait wait. Bond Drinks Miller highlife. An American. Bureau of Milwaukee Wisconsin. Hat what? In double seven in New, York? He's he's in. New York Yeah. The the short story in the Octopussy and living daylights collection bond, says something like Miller. High Life is one of the best parts of the best meal in new. York Oh okay all right there. You go a Miller highlight. We've had enough of the drinks of bond in the novels and Tom and I have consumed several of the drinks during the podcast. I still have a little bit of my American. Spurs but Mamer kind of I still have about half left. Wait one more SIP. Good? Great summer drink and I think does go conclude our coverage of drinking with bind literally. On the podcast right so kind of wraps up where we're going with what bond has drunk in the books and we've had a few cocktails here, we. This we encourage you to do the same. If you're into Baden WANNA. Try with some you know. Maybe there's one of these we've talked about that. You've never heard of before. Go hadn't experiment when Dan and I go across the world and go to these different places. We try the local stuff we also see. Is there a drink? The bond drank here and we go ahead and included. We strongly encourage you to do that. If we've missed something that you think is really a good one. Let us know because common I will be very willing to try it and and report on it. Okay on our website. We have the big red button on the right side of the screen. Send us a message and we may include it in the future podcast. Let's assume get some direction of what you are looking for. All, right? This has been canceled. VESTRY and Tom Pizarro and we'd been drinking with bond as we're cracking. The code is movies. Thanks for joining us. We really appreciate you. Listening to many of these Dan I can't crack the code. Let us know what you think and please subscribe to our show and tell your friends about it, too.

James Bond Vodka Martini Great Fleming Vodka Martini US Chicago Tom I. Tom Russia Dan Sylvestry Casino Royale Fleming Jin Vesper vesper Martini Roger Thornhill Bond Sir Cynthia Little Bar
How James Bond got his name: Summarizing effective ministry in seven words

The Daily Article

06:16 min | 10 months ago

How James Bond got his name: Summarizing effective ministry in seven words

"This is the daily. Article podcast published by the Denison Forum or culture changing Christians to receive the daily article directly to your your email inbox week day morning. Visit the daily Article Dot Com. Now here's Today's news discerned differently the trailer for no time to die. The latest James Bond movie came out yesterday. The previous movies in the franchise generated more than seven billion dollars in worldwide worldwide. Box Office sales. Have you ever wondered how the iconic spy got his name. Ian Fleming the writer of the novels that birth. The movie franchise was an Avid Bird. Bird watcher on a trip to Jamaica after World War. Two He noticed a book on birds of the West indies by an ornithologist from Philadelphia named James Bond Years. Later Fleming wrote to Mr Bond's wife. It struck me that this brief unromantic Anglo Saxon and yet very masculine name was just what I needed needed. And so a second James Bond was born however like a spy novel. There's a twist to this story. It turns out an intelligence officer named James is bond served under flemming secret elite unit that led a guerrilla war against Hitler. James Charles Bond a metalworker from Wales died in nineteen nineteen ninety-five without revealing his spy past his family suspects. That Fleming used the bird-watching James Bond to protect the identity of the real James Bond and one of the reasons I pay attention to popular movies is that their popularity reveals so much about us. Sean Connery's connery's British secret agent first appeared during the height of Cold War Paranoia and offered us the assurance in film after film that the West could defeat the Soviets hits in the decade since James Bond has taken on our most frightening enemies and save the world with his unique mixture of brash courage and technological wizardry. The westerns of the Nineteen Thirties gave a solitary heroes who inspired us during the Great Depression. The Comic Book Superhero Films of recent years. Typically make far more money overseas than they do in America highlighting the global nature of our economy and the exporting of Western culture. avengers endgame earned more than eight hundred seventeen million dollars domestically but earn more than one point nine billion dollars overseas as long as our culture needs. Heroes Hollywood will supply them at least the fictional kind yesterday. We discussed the existential crisis facing our the world and God's call to demonstrate his love to hurting people today we'll explore a real world strategy to do just that the key is to find a need and meet it with the love of Christ the greater the need the greater the opportunity. The first Christmas came in a day when much of the world was governed by one of the most heretical oppressive regimes. The world had ever seen and yet that was the dark moment out of all dark moments across all of human history when God chose to to send his son into our world. Frederick Beekman says of Christmas God visited us. The world has never been quite the same sense it is still a very dark mark world in some ways darker than ever before but the darkness is different because he keeps getting born into it the threat of Holocaust the threat of poisoning joining the earth and sea and air the threat of our own deaths. The broken marriage the child in pain. The lost chance anyone who has ever known him. mm-hmm has known him perhaps better in the dark than anywhere else because it is in the dark where he seems to visit most often The Birth of Christ highlights the difference between Christianity and the world religions the latter offers US various ways to climb up to God or the gods us or whatever they believe to be our ultimate destiny. Buddhists strive to follow the four noble truths and the noble eightfold path Muslims observe of the five pillars of Islam. Hindus seek to advance through multiple reincarnations by practicing aesthetic rituals in good deeds. Observant Jews work to keep their six hundred and thirteen laws at Christmas. By contrast God climbed down to us. Jesus birth to lowly peasants in a lowly stable table prefigured his ministry to come for instance touching lepers going to demoniac initiating relationships with Samaritans Gentiles and choosing to die for our sins early. Christians followed his lead rescuing abandoned babies from trash heaps and ransoming slaves and prostitutes Medieval Christians preserved literacy founded universities and built hospitals. Christians in recent centuries have worked to abolish slavery champion civil well rights and took the compassion of Christ to some of the darkest corners of the world. I believe God wants us to see. The problems of our day is our responsibility since we are the only salt and light in a decaying dark world. It is our job to take the transforming light of Christ to those who need it. Most effective ministry three can be summarized in seven. Words meet felt needs to meet spiritual needs help hurting people to show them. God's love in our compassion see their problems as spiritual opportunities and remember that the darker the room the more powerful the light and explaining his desire to defend mere Christianity rather than engage in matters of academic dispute Cs Lewis stated that part of the line. where I thought I could serve? Best was also the part that seemed to be thinnest I and to it. I naturally went. Where in the line will you serve today. Would you consider sharing during this podcast with a friend family member or CO worker in order to help build community of culture changing Christians. Thank you for listening to the daily. The articles podcast today.

James Bond Ian Fleming James Charles Bond Denison Forum Mr Bond Nineteen Thirties Sean Connery Jamaica James Frederick Beekman West indies America Hollywood writer Cs Lewis officer
IT WAS SIR HOROWITZ, IN THE CONSERVATORY, WITH THE COOKIE with ANTHONY HOROWITZ

Free Cookies

51:48 min | 2 months ago

IT WAS SIR HOROWITZ, IN THE CONSERVATORY, WITH THE COOKIE with ANTHONY HOROWITZ

"Just a little love note to all of our loyal free cookie listeners into anyone who might be new to the show. This is an ad free podcast and we WANNA. Keep it that way. We WanNa make sure that we can just give you guys the awesome content, the great interviews and stuff that you have to fast forward, but in to do that. We need your support so if you could join us over at Patriotair Dot Com. com forward slash free cookies and become a patron of the show. There are many tears that you can join. You can throw a dollar. You can do five and it turns out. We're going to start putting some content up for those of you. Who are hard core reporters or make this worth your wild, so if there's some of you out there, who just listen to the show and you feel like. Hey, you know what I could. I could spend two three bucks a month great. If you guys needle something as incentive. We're going to put some videos up on patron that are going to be exclusive to those of you. Who are free cookie monster's and I mean we're talking some good content like I'm GonNa. Take you inside my sneaker closet like that kind of content you know and I will contribute recipes, and perhaps every now and then our dog will give you so ugly so again. Monologue tree on dot com forward slash free cookies. Thank you, thanks. I'm Catherine viewed and I'm Kate Fagan. Greek cookies, humorous podcast filled with thoughtful conversations and offerings religious tacos. Today, we have A. it's incredible superstar. Show I am baffled in a way. He couldn't get over the fact that Anthony Horowitz usually just get to the people right out front. Don't even drag to you that. I was going to start the. Who and now you've perhaps? About Song. I didn't think it was bad. I didn't think it was good though. It was like inbetween. That's fair enough. I wasn't really trying I was gonNA actually pull that thread a little longer and be like this author has sold over thirty million copies. This author. This author has three. Books that have been turned into motion pictures this author, but the thing is is that for American audiences? I'm not sure Anthony Horowitz's actually like common parlance. True he is I would say he is a gem in British crowd I mean he's been knighted culture at war, or what will be well okay, and what? We decided we. We figured it out with that was. We are very American and we had to Google ob we did, and we google deserve the British empire instead of asking him. We Google that we decided it wasn't a very good thing to start the interview with. Yeah, but Anthony Horowitz so his one of his series Alex Rider the Alex Rider series, which is launching today on Monday. On Amazon on Amazon prime the TV show is launching on Amazon prime. He wrote the. Both of the most recent, Sherlock Holmes iterations Moriarty is the most recent. He was also tapped to write for Ian Fleming for an Fleming as James. Bone the new James Bond that book is trigger point, so let's just I mean the honesty, modern day. Modern Day modern day he he is the modern day conon doyle I mean he absolutely is or Agatha Christie or or Were Travis. Scott got his hand everything to. I would not have guessed that, but thank you for expanding beyond my very narrow lane of what I was mentioning A. He's just a master of the WHO done it. Yeah, and he magpie murders, probably one of his bigger hits over here in America, and he has a follow up to magpie murders coming out, in November, which we're very excited about reading and he also has the sentence is death. And the word is merger. I read that one which earned to fabulous books that he actually rates himself into He. He is quite the approach when it comes to his writing, which it's not just the traditional you know clue board who done it which Sutil, Cluedo it turns out. That's what they call it in England. Cluedo quite charming as things are and one of the. The one of the interesting parts of our conversation with Halfpenny Horowitz is that he writes every single day, and probably has for Hilton Facie in the interview. How much time he takes off and it will blow your mind yet, you you? You'll be very surprised by that because we. There's all different kinds of approaches from writers. You know you'll meet some writers whose almost seasonal? They might absolutely glennon doyle put up a post. A few months back episode one of the season one of the season. She wrote the Amazing Number One New York Times bestseller untamed comb more manifesto perennial, Number One New York Times bestseller because it's been number. One for nine weeks isn't saying yeah, it's kicking. Thanks, the point is the Glennon. Put up a post the other day. Saying and I mean obviously if you have a number, one New York Times Bestseller I'm sure you want to take a break, but she was saying. How like you know loves. Don't worry if you're writing the great American novel during this time. I haven't even written a single word throughout this. Town. Not, the best example because. She is the number incomes this other forever, but there's all different kinds of approaches to writing is what we're saying, and it made us think of this really fantastic book written by Stephen Press fueled, and it's called the war of art, and we're not confusing that the art of war, but this is called the war of art and. He just all these little amuse Bouche size chapters. It's great to keep next to your bed. You don't have to read it in one sitting, but it's about resistance and in finding stoking your creativity basically all the. Way of US achieving what we want to achieve and there's this one little tiny pages is one page it's paid forty-three and the topic is resistance and bean a star and he says grandiose fantasies are a symptom of resistance, and that's with a capital are by the way. They're the sign of amateur. The professional has learned that success like happiness comes as a byproduct of work. I think the line is so crucial. The professional has learned that success like happiness comes as a byproduct of the work which Keeton I interpret that as. I think it's so easy to. Go after some kind of pursuit, because you long for the results instead of the experience, and yet when you actually home into what it is that you know percolates underneath the surface that fuels you the happiest. We've ever been when we're in the process. Yeah! And we still daydream about what may come out of it, but it's the concept of every day both of us. Wake up scared at the prospect of city now and working on what we're writing. There is a fear I would say daily injection of fear when you're looking at the page and to computers even do this anymore, or the little cursor would blink. I think that's an old computer. Talking about he sees listening to. Two Thousand and one. Freshman year or anyway, but I'm just saying that little. The clock ticking in front of you waiting for you to put pen to paper or finger pad to keypad. And every single day it's the same. It's what I'm going to say. What am I going to write how I'm going to get these words out and then fast forward to thirty minutes to six hours later for on top of the world, oh, yeah. No one's read it. No one's seen it and we're just so fulfilled. And the the thing that I find interesting about resistance with a Cap, resistance or the capital are like in the war of art is that it's almost unlike anything else in that no matter how many days you sit down, and you actually do the thing. The resistance doesn't lessen or go away. Like. If you work out a lot of work out a lot. If you go and run a three mile loop in the beginning at dawn sue, but if you've done it for a year, there's a part of you. That's like Oh, I got this. And some of that fear lessons to the point where the gap will always exist maybe commonplace, but like every morning the idea of writing as scary as the first time you right, and so that is the the resistance, and it's like it's so confusing. Okay when I go for a runner, my heart rates like one sixty. That's actually literally painful for my body free, whereas like here I am I'm sitting back I. Have My computer lead. There is no physical pain in my body. That I can name and yet it feels sometimes. It can feel like you're getting ready to go out to be tortured, even the while. While I'm doing it. It isn't torture, so that's the resistance with a capital are, and it can be a special type of torture for sure in the same way for example, meditation is Torture Yeah Right I mean if you say hey, here's a super fluffy cushion, and I want you to rest your little. Kiki's on it and to sit here and do nothing like. No big deal right and yet you sit there, and you try to clear your mind if these thoughts and it's just self inflicted punishment because you're torturing yourself and punishing yourself for not thinking because you shouldn't be thinking and that's the point of meditation well. I mean it's happened with you and I. where. You'll get up and you'll be like I just can't right now. No matter what I do, it can't clear my mind, but it does make me wonder with a writer as prolific as Anthony Horowitz if we didn't ask him this it. Anthony. We must talk again, but I wonder if if he feels any of this resistance right when he system to work because the way he makes it sound. I feel like. That man is just. Continuously, bursting at the seams with creative juice, it's just he's like a like a ripe Florida orange. As me and you can tell listening to him that even though he has had pieces of his work, live out the grand fantasy over. TV's what fuels? No, no, no, no, no I mean. You can tell you guys. You'll be able to just from. Hearing how he described. His work, his process and his writing like he's sitting down to write for like the nurturing fulfilment. It provides him in the moment. And I hope I know. This season has been focused on writers and books and authors, but I truly believe that behind each author. All of the stories that they're telling her so applicable to whatever it is, that's going on your life and what you want to grab and what you want to go after so. Let's bring on Anthony Anthony. Horowitz is on the show a Kipah. Leave it from London. Jammy dodger I called him on my phone that probably cost a fortune. We'll get that bill. Anthony Horowitz is the author of the near Times Bestseller Moriarty in the internationally best selling the house of silk as well as the new. York Times bestselling Alex Rider series for young adults as a television screenwriter, he created midsomer murders and the BAFTA winning foyle's war on PBS. He lives in London and he has an OB. We are now joined by Anthony Horowitz Amir's so excited. Anthony, thank you so much for taking the time today. Next be talking to you so. We wanted to start just by seeing how the last couple months have of this worldwide pandemic have affected maybe pros and cons of how it's affected, either your process or worker writing. What do you see as the? Good and the bad of of how this is affected you. Percival mainly bad, I must be honest with you the notion of so much unhappiness now there are people losing their loved ones and of the National Health Service, doing extrordinary work and sacrificing themselves for the common good. The world picture is a very unhappy one, but in terms of my work well. On the plus side I've worked very well I mean I didn't quite know why, but I think to be very much more creative in a way for a long time I mean in the sense of ideas of flowing in and and I know that what I seems to be good on the negative side, I do find it difficult to. Maneuver. My way through the DAF had this combination with other writers. We used to work in a more intense sort of way. You know where you you grab the moment and you work very very in a very focused way for an hour over two hours, but now it's twelve twenty four hours because there is nothing except the work, there is nothing to the outside world, so it's both there are. There are some silver lining to the situation Arba broadly, speaking I would say which is not very happy, eight or nine months. You mentioned there, just the concept of ideas flowing in, and I'm curious as someone who's listened to a lot of like Ann Patchett, Elizabeth Gilbert Writers who have this theory that ideas exist outside in the world and certain writers. If you don't listen to grab your. The moment they kind of appeared your as they're knocking at the door, you. Will think we're exactly on it. I. Mean You know the joke is already been inflation all their lives and that is true. On my own in this room four pretty much credit for years but the truth is that you all connected to the outside world to the energy to the buzz of the humanity to the good things into the panting to news happening, not just news about about hospitals, and about our isolation of mosques and Donald. Trump or whatever it may be about the the world will omit suit of cylinders firing, and says so much is happening and releases are connected into that, and if you take away those connections your left in a very very strange place, but he. was saying my I I have been you know in order to support young people in Britain give them something back into into this sort of cancer I've been writing a new dumb and brothers story, which is a a a story full of jokes is this is my strand of white, just bad job after badges. Really. Bizarre is no matter what I'm feeling. The of just being flooding in the mid four. There's four chapters which are free of charge online on my on my website Einstein, Horowitz, dot com, and I'm really proud of what I've done. I haven't diamond brothers book for for ten years, and then suddenly eligible pause so that I go I'm trying to explain the sense of this and destruction verses somehow in all of this. You know a creative. Juices flowing. And at someone with your with a career, it seems like your juices must be always flowing because. At least from outside of perspective, it doesn't seem like you're running out of ideas and I can absolutely see what you mean when you're as a writer, not out in the world, maybe not getting the same inspiration that you would. In a different place way we can expect to the mystery of the exam witch coming from you soon from the field, the mystery of the exam, which perhaps making one of your diamond brother. I'm trying to keep up with. This. Next. One can. You will not get for me in a description of this period. We're going. I will never find myself wrangler I. mean the funny thing is I will be honest with you. I have thought to myself well. I do a really good murder story. Set around a zoom court. On your screen, one of those little somebody gets killed and another of this little box, it contains a murder. And how do they get from the little box in Maine to little box in New York in the blink of an eye to commit the crime and I thought it was something quite fun to write there, but broadly speaking I'm look particularly wishing or inspired by co to write about about the about the times where. Well, clearly what you're doing is working and if I seem a little discombobulated, that's your fault, because I can't go to sleep because I'm in the middle of magpie murders right now and I think I can say things without giving anything away manuscript within as a mystery within a mystery, all these twists and turns and user are to me a bit of a mystery within A. Mr Writer, but you seem to be this fascinating enigma yourself and the. There's this bit of Virgil Dante thing that you have going on when I read your last book and You wrote yourself into the story, and if your goal is to have the reader, go down the Google machine after reading your books and trying to figure out it works because I truly could not figure out what was fiction, and what was truth and I love that about your writing, it was that kind of the intention behind it too beautifully confused us. Kind remarked minded. Right here, here's the thing I'll tell you what connects mcquay. Mother's with his mother sentences death entity without moon from this, which is my next hour? Who got it coming out in in the fall and it is this I love Aleutian magic I love puzzles. I love tricking people I love anything that isn't what it seems an in writing murder mysteries something I've come to. To I'm not been at all. My life for TV I used to write. The Christie's Poirot I've gone close wall. I've got a midsomer murders, many many mysteries on TV but Kinda reitman books. My one determination is to do things that have never been done before them. The form over murder mystery, which is a four hundred, particularly like there are many many writers particularly in. In the Golden Age detective fiction, who whom I have loved to read all my life, but to try and find something that really takes you either Siegel pens and surprise you so so all the three books you've mentioned have done things that have never been done before. One is related to have been Orissa the author to be the narrator inside the book which changes everything. Everything completely turns on its head. Because nobody the author is the person knows the most who knows everything about the protein knows who Kenner is before the first word that even written, but if the author is inside the book of course, that also is ignorant, and there's nothing it doesn't even have a book, and this is detective solves the crime, so that sort of turned? One way, but the Magpie Murders and William Flambeau is with the idea of a book inside a book. Allow you to. Enjoy to, he done it. because each one contains two completely separate murder mysteries. But also to look at the whole process of raising a murder mystery and And to look at the. Just the way the foreign the structure actually work. So that too I think he's quite an original way. Right? Let a mystery and you know what was who comes down to his authority had many many years ago. which is that as much as I love murder mysteries and writing them at reading them and watching on television I. think it is possible to use your to use the form to do something different to give something to give the Rita more than the Butler did it. To to give you get the puck at the pleasure of clues and suspects. Twists and turns little, but who served the end of the day? There is something more to the book than just that and then I guess what I've been. Doing influence war and it's what I'm doing now. It's so delicious and please keep doing. Speaking of classic misery when you were originally approached by the CONAN Doyle Estate to your commission to write Sherlock Holmes speaking of the most famous detective possibly ever written. A. John to do something different teams. Did you really WanNa? Shake it up or because obviously, that's hard to do because it's Sherlock Holmes and you have to believe and yet you're Anthony Horowitz. So expect you to shake it up. To him today, I mean there are two books I read the First House of Silk in the second one was moriarty never houses silk, which was a pure amush to shuttle comes to doyle to his writing. I didn't want to shake anything because. My job was to to write a book that the doyle himself correct in other words to be none of us myself. It's the exact opposite of the word is murder where character in the book in the House of Silk I have to be invisible, both as the author of the Book Voice Within the book it is Doyle, and it is it is. It is Watson and Holmes and I am not part of it, so I was very very true to what had now. The Laws of the House of silk a mutton plot. It's not something that the wants them would ever have written then. I came to morality well. I really was feeling a little bit more devilish because. Having done what I considered to be, the best world could writing shuttle comes story this I took some of the characters in the Holmes books, but not what's not home and did this time? Do something very tricky? Indeed, the the book is cool morality. It is about the most evil man who ever existed origins as my determination from the start was to write an evil book. It, isn't it? So. Across your different John Ras books why to Sherlock Holmes to to the to the bond. Did you. Do you plot all of them in the same way? Is there a strategy that you deploy? That is kind of universal across your books, or is it different depending on the genre? It's something pretty much the same I. Just food out of the next book I'M GONNA. Right and what happens is this is With being commissioned like a James Bond novel or Sherlock, Holmes Story or even a new wolf. Oh now you know. I knew what the parameters are I. Know I need to write a murderer I need to start thinking well. WHO's going to get mud? What's the military and I? I'm doing work or walking around. London all or just relying in bed at night. I'm always just turning over my head, but pretty endlessly drag twenty four seven. The these questions you know what what Kinda do that hasn't been number. Wasn't you know basically murder mystery a very simple. Formula One, person kills another person for a reason. Why don't you go ABC one person another person and the reason why AK will be, you've got your murder mystery, and so I spend hundreds of hours toying on that little formula and trying to come up with interesting people doing interesting murders, the interesting reason, so for example the murder the begins wooded matter as far as I know, there's never been done before the reason why. I've get her name now. Diane note that. Whoever killed. An undertaker the funeral. Goes home and somebody murdered. Those two things are connected. How To me is the pleasure, but I'm engineer. My sandwich boosting on the phone to you I, didn't intend to I. Am very excited about these ideas I'm not saying the best ideas ever created. I'm the best writer, but for me running much. I do I've got to have that sense of excitement in high? Hey, this is never be number for. Yes, this will surprise people, also they maybe number, but going to do it differently, and so so that's what gets me going once wanted clicks once the idea falls. Falls into place then I start chasing it. How do the research I start structuring the book I start thinking about the other characters I think about the red herring I think about the whole world, and would you take place, and and then I begin to write I I was reading my pie murders. When we go from the original manuscript, the book that the reader thinks they're reading, and then it actually flips. It's up on its head and we realized that we're with the publisher and editor and the author. I was wondering when the I believe it's the the editor starts to write down all the potential people who could have actually been the murderers, and she writes down all the reasons that they could have been, and as I was reading it. I was just thinking. Wow, I wonder if this Anthony's writing process. Does he take every character and give I mean because it's so it's like you just dissected it in such a beautiful way showing all the reasons that each person could have done it or not done it or why? It's too obvious, so it can't be this way too obvious and I sometimes feel like what these books we're climbing into your brain and the process of how you create. A little bit. I. It is true that that that is. Sort of how I To be honest with you win Susan Ryland sets out with different people and why they done it. What I really doing there is because this is quite a complicated book. It needed to company books at the interleaving with each other, eventually, trying to help the reader to by giving them a shopping list and sharing where we are now. Quite useful 'cause I can use it to deflect singer from the real killer and make make you think that it's another killer has a double purpose, but in terms of that you'll of the book. I didn't sit down and write to seven characters and give them more emotive and say this is what leading the book. I always think to myself but my books. Form themselves a little bit like a flower blossoming, but you start with your core idea plus B. who see one person does none of reason, and from that everything sort of opens out, so you know if if a if a woman is murdered for for reason then you start thinking washing married. It wasn't sure this. She was married a husband, is he? What was his connection to this lady? You know seeming. He's not the killer. What is history? What makes? MAKES HIM INTERESTING? What was their relationship? So now you've got him, but maybe he was things somebody else besides maybe out of mischief, so then you, you you then go to show him i. mean whatever I and and expand the bat direction so I always think of it as like a flower, blossoming and more ideas fall in, and it'll also occurs me. Hey, we'll be quite fun if this character had this secret or whatever I'm battle folded itself into. Isn't it? Isn't a it is a suit of a IT IS A. Moving Process Rav of a more Richard Mathmatical. Since we're sticking to, we're talking about process here. I'm going to stick to it because I read somewhere that you right longhand in a notebook for your for your drafts and I listened to Neil Gaiman talk about doing that as well and and he had this interesting idea that he said that he felt like. Writing, with like a Fountain Pen Writing Longhand, it changed the rhythm, and the flow of his writing and I was you know I don't know how much writing you've actually done longhand verses laptop, or if you've noticed a difference in the in the the effect on you in those different mediums and how you right? I'm a I'm always going to fountain pen. For many many reasons, the first thing is I think country paints, a very beautiful instruments and I love the way the inflows free or hand was like blood I would say was a the old wrenches have. Kind of blue we, the original, being bloodied stock like near Chrissy I'm and I like the idea of being very very close to the words, if you type House of word on a on a computer screen, it's to Zillions of connections inside a metal box before it actually appears. Virtually doesn't actually exist until you down on the paper, which means sending it. To another machine, whereas when you write it is you and the piece of paper that something very intimate about that very attractive about it I the, but all the rights I most admire who tend to be nineteen sixty writers used Inc, really never compare myself to them. I like to walk in shadow to be like them on and. I think very much about the physicality of books, books and films looks just a word they do. And I think that lit the that handwriting is in its own way, even though my writing is not that lovely, but there is something very very attractive about handwritten page and in my office here, which is you're talking to me I? Have you know literally hundreds of over the files? Old Notebooks, who of my novels hundred. When I'm dead. Two of us is one of them. And they're going to be very lucky to get those collections well I know that if you do and and it sort of. Doesn't using. Won An Oscar that somewhere might actually look. I always put a little doodle in just for him over her. So! I'm going back to my theory that you are still a bit of a `Nigma so and. Anthony, let me have it. I think you're a negro wrapped in a mystery sandwich. Sandwich exam, which evidently, but I was reading one of your BIOS again when I was reading it, I couldn't tell if you Rabin serious or not. But you talk about your upbringing and your father, being very secretive man and something about a Swiss bank account, and there was a half million dollars curried by you across the Sydney on a motorbike. How much money was lost? Yes. As far as I'm concerned. The `Nigma is I've been successful as a writer given where I came from, I had A. I had a very wealthy, very privileged childhood or I don't like to hear myself. Complain about it because there are many many. Hundreds of thousands and millions of children around the world who are hungry into a paw. Who aren't happy, but I always say the rich kids can be unhappy to I was I. was a failure as a child I, had a very peculiar family I had I was sent to a really abusive unpleasant school when I was badly eight years old where I spent five very unhappy years and This did it also damage to me and the one lunch line? Who all of the circumstances one thing that can't be going and made me think that even was a reason to live was story. It was in the books I read in the library, and in the writing I began to do what I was ten years old, and discovering my ability to tell stories convince me that I had a reason to be alive to be on this planet, and it is all pursued now for the sixty years that I've been talking about and. Sue Sue you know, use it. Will mysteries around me I mean I still to this day. Khan. Tell you what my father did for a living I. Don't know I'm fairly sure it was not entirely legal all the time, so he certainly has some very very shady associates The is the story of the fact that he managed to lose to hide that say. Maybe, two million, all three I don't know how much money was involved again. We never found the money, so I can tell you I am to go from sort of wealth to having nothing pretty much was an interesting experience. But the point I think if you look at my writing. My first ten children's books are allows the graphical they they sort of they play almost the risk of the to the unhappy rich kid be with parents in big houses, and they did okay, and there's books are still in print to this. But. It was when I drop to when I just gave up talking about myself began to write by Alex writer, and then later on shutout combs bombed and the other murder mysteries, going to actually found myself with a writer so so so kind to your question is your observation about me being an ruptured river, or whatever it may be I, just think work. So. You mentioned writing as a lifeline. A lot of things I I've read. Leads me to believe that you've never really taken long breaks from writing. Maybe maybe that's right or or not right. What is the longest you've gone without writing? You know some writers will tell you. They'll go sometimes yoga three months where they just kind of put it on the back burner and live. There is barely a day in the year. Maybe hardly ever even one day in the year when I did rise. If we day I'm always working on something today. For example I've been rewriting. Twelve scripts and have to go out to a to America. had conference on on numbers and I have been writing my next book, which I mentioned I've begun to think about it and I haven't done much writer there, but I've been researching honey, not phase now so. CAN'T SLEEP IF I don't write and. I love writing I. Mean the one thing that hasn't changed. My life is the mood I discovered I was going to be a writer was a mere writer I'm I've always listen and so even if I'm not writing something, which is you know? Major like a major number major something I'll find something else to write and Have notebooks as well which which I scribbled stuff down in. If I fancied I the moment writing this story, online I making the beginning of conversation. That tomorrow I've actually I've got to it whereas post another chapter of the weekend and dumb through, sue between. Contractual obligations and a busy diary and the shift passion for writing I. Never Take Time Off. To Twenty one thing I do when I finish novel. Big Novel I definitely do not write anything the following day. That's like a marathoner who takes the next morning off of work like that? Of running well, that leads me yeah. So as someone as you said, who who bleeds, blue would insinuate that very this writing very much is your life force, but. How? How do you relax? What is your well? I don't want to business and this conversation that somebody who is just doing nothing in his life except writing of course I have friends I have I have family I'm very luckily have been married. Thirty. Gosh wrong now. on and and I have two wonderful suns. Time with my family I have a house that little tiny house in a place could suffer on the east coast of England where I go loud there the moment unfortunately I miss it very much where I go for very very long walks with my dog, and you know for me. A Walk is a wonderful opportunity. I took the working process about turning over ideas in my head. It's great to be able to do it. It when I'm walking with dog and sterling this and then I can turn off and I come to a beautiful. I can sit and look half an hour. And that is relaxation looking at a flock of wild geese, taking off the winter or seeing the ever set, so we always catches in the water, and that sort of thing is it gives me a new of pleasure and such I read of course I'm with. A cinema So you know I I always say, don't even if you, if you allow me to write for ten hours a day I'm sleep for. Six hours a day. That still leaves eight hundred day for plenty of urbanizing. We're excited for Alex Rider. You kind let us in on the the challenge or the process as a writer of turning or bringing something from the page to the screen, would you? Would you like about it? What are the struggles in it? I did not write the new TV series about it. Try to point blank was the guy burt. Is that a very very good job with the scripts I was an executive producer, and very much in the backseat, the reason being that while they'll show is being made in. Rickman filmed I. was wasn't nightshade, and you try to number. One couldn't do both at the same time on so. For me, the process would be one million sort of guiding it and checking the the the series is sort of tree vaguely to the books and. I think you'd have to accept the when you take a book and tell him to television you not mailing something toward. It's going to be different. It's an interpretation things that you love. Go and things that you may not love so much. Come in. A lot of it is down to budgets with with down to walk Cannon Kennel be thumbed. What is possible? What is not possible? I'm in terms of the Alex Rider Series I. Haven't seen it yet. I haven't seen four episodes out of eight. I did love those four episodes and I. Did think Little Low TV series is much more adult when the books that I wrote, which are really going to eight fifteen sixteen. Sixteen year olds I'm I thought that they had number, not any native, a earlier audience, and had hopefully reached out, and we'll continue to to to reach a brutal in. I have to remind myself I mean reading these books now for twenty years. People who read those books when they were twelve on now married. Some of them have children. They're in their first jobs. They are adults who TV series will appeal to them to. Sit speaking of being in a relationship with Alex writer like you said for twenty years, and I know every writer is different with their relationships with their characters, but as we both right and I just wrote my first novel and. I have such a deep relationship with characters and I know it sounds crazy, but I feel like they talked to me, and we have our own little conversations that nobody gets to know about and I just. I'm so intrigued by what it's like to have a character in your life for that long, and do you have there been moments where you're just like Alex's? It's time for you to die. It's time to give you a proper burial and respect. or Written about the love, which I think is quite interesting with many great writers who had a very off on relationship with that lead characters famous really talked about CONAN doyle dislike shallow console much. He's frame off the right foods to get rid of him at any had to bring him back in very peculiar circumstances. He needed him to pay off the mortgage. And Ian Fleming also had a sort of a love hate relationship with James Bond and killed him. Twice once at the end of from Russia, with love, and again for at the end of you only live twice I'm always looked on him, but suit of somehow embarrassing in a way he could add to. That also has another great love my creative Tinton who have felt very much suit of our? Town by his own creation. Wonderful cartoony drew a picture of of himself, the writer being beaten with a wit by Tinton. It's crazy. I never had never relationship with Alex, rider. I've continued to like him. And I always enjoy going back to his adventures and I've now done thirty books about him so I wouldn't have done that I didn't find him an enjoyable character to spend time with I sometimes envy him. Twenty years is that I've been writing about how try to only go twenty years older. He's gone. Twelve months older, so then thinks he's a little bit on fair. Also I think he has probably a more enjoyable life for ninety. He gets amazing adventures. That have you know? He's constantly saving the world I'm sitting in my room, writing stories. Envy for him. But I'm very funded the carriage. I'm not like you cactus that I do not have conversations with him a fuel that my relationship to annex writer, and for that matter Hawthorne and also. Susan Ryland in in the in the Magpie Motors and. Voters is I'm more of a Watson character. I mean the real listening I writing down, but I'm not particularly participating. So before we get to the quick hit questions, I just had a short one. I wanted to. What does it take for you in your mind? When something's in idea, and then it starts to mature into something. Do. You know that it's going to be a book or other assuming there's a lot of ideas that get thrown out, or or maybe there aren't. Maybe it's just that you keep working on one. How does that process work for you? I, Lt. it's interesting I had besides his new book. which I mean look no now thinking about for three or four months. And! I just kept talking about thirsty ideas, fully ideas, and each idea that land in my head stays there for a second time I-. I- batches around imagine a suit of a marble bouncing around in my skulls and side to side, not going away until the middle when I realized that it doesn't work for some reason, and then and then I just have to just let it go. Movement when you just do. windflower murders in the new book written, I had a whole murder mystery. about don't even tell you what it was. The idea was the main character, and he does appear in the book and Michael Frank Paris. My idea was was a lovely trick. I was GONNA play. was a Paris would be so. On S. You need the man with the killer wanted to kill was going to be. I double S in other words. It's a mistaken identity and that trick is right in front of you. Paris Paris two different ways of spelling it and the wrong person is killed. I will on that for Oh, I guess about ten weeks thinking about doing it I'm going to flesh it out and I. Suddenly realized the entertainment. It's not working you Colt! Make this work. It's just it's too difficult to trick the audience. It's too far fetched for the killing. It doesn't work. And I threw it out and the moment I did not the moment it went after my head. The actual murder mystery that I have written came into my head. It was almost as if one door had to open I'm and somebody had to leave my head for the next door to open. Someone else to come in and I. think that to gives you a good description of it in the book. Book I'm writing for a long time. I couldn't get it to work, but I liked the idea so much that I just researched in research and finally found a way that it would actually work and this so this time I've been able to stick with it, but not search process it's testing is fighting it. It's wanting it. It's it's it's shaping, and then finally realizing you can use it, or you can't use it, but not being too upset when you. If you were as you called, it was a moment. It's going another idea we'll take it. So Anthony. We have a few questions that we ask all of the authors that come on the show, just quick, little fun, questions but I. If I did not bring this up. I'm assuming at some point in your life. You've played the board game clue. Before. Oh Yeah. Have you ever called Kuda we. A man. In America included in England. All. Day. Instantly You just to give you an idea of how my head was. WHO so a clue! But if somebody is in a murder mystery, a narrow first to the world tour gamers clue. We now know they're American little tiny. Little. But, yeah, anyway, what about to continue on the American side of things ever watched the film based on the board game called clue also Kaku. long-term ago. Squeezing twenty five years old. Maybe actually it's probably longer than that is one of my favorite movies growing up, and whenever I tell people that clues favorite movie I. Give me a little scorned. There's some derision. I feel that if anyone could commiserate with me, perhaps it could be you that you think it's kind of. His favorite! Memories that it wasn't the one of the films that I love. But. You're right. You're right. It wasn't very. Come on you. Don't get better than men. Right. It was a great cast. Okay, WE'LL MOVE ON TO A. Cold. What was he called nine out s grains. In in. Similar! To that earlier film? which we love to that, we actually well done version of clue. That's not. Okay all right, so we'll move away from CLUEDO. Anthony was the last book you read. The love book I read was I'm actually the middle trilogy so really in the second part of the trilogy, the begins with the first one is the power of the dog which is Don winslow trilogy about the drug wars in Mexico. what we know them. They're extremely violent. Tough stories about no codes and about and sort of the the the DA and the people pointing ivdr was expends about thirty years, and they are epic, books and Don Winslow is A. An I I'm I'm embarrassed on short taking these years to discover his work, but I read the first one pair of adult them next book I read was called the Contel, which was the second of the series at the moment I'm reading the frontier, which is the third and final part between the and I've already bought the next book. Of a series which is titled Very Strange Tangible with. My Desk? Calls the Winter Frankie machines, and after next one trying to read I remember going Don winslow extravagance. If you were to move into a new genre of writing, what would it be? Could move into a new genre of writing if you moved away from thriller. Pretty much every your where that is right, I, think I would like to write one work of literary fiction. I have one book in my head, which is which is not a big set. It's not a major story. It's not gonNa Action Adventures murders suspense. It is just a story of somebody's life I'm that's a different issue. That's next book. High time to write the next few. Out of all the books any time period that have been written. Is there one book that you wish you had written? That already exists. I. I'm not committed to the person field, but if I love a I would say I wish I'd recent the booklet had some most admire is great expectations Charles. Dickens I, wish I could write a book as good as. An unreachable because as profound fad and bringing these structured. We've talked wonderful characters to turn a book I've always loved. Sherlock Holmes or James Bond. I. Think you're asking the wrong person just. James Bond to have dinner with. Both be quite awkward. I. Think happened. With your arm to to. To have a drink quiz. I'll go for James Bond. Good and a question that we ask everyone who comes on the show, chocolate, chip, cookie or oatmeal raisin. He's not one. Meal Ridden. As far as you. Right into your now, okay, I love him, but that seems to be the consensus. Is that chocolate chip is superior, and do you have a favorite British biscuit? We recently a few years. We go to London. I teach there every year and we learned about jemmy dodgers. which we call. Owned up near the end. If you've been to a private educators, you can't fail to have loved Germany coaches the cheapest they gave you if I have a choice of biscuits and I i. I am a fiend. Get! The good old good old mcvitie's choke it, I, just still. The take if killed in the fridge. The Hot Cup of tea milk chocolate is preferable to dark chocolate. They're both are Nice and that's probably my number. One choice concave test that out I'm going to go. Get my digestive biscuit and put it in the refrigerator. Anthony, thank you so much for making the time. To promote brand down on on. But that that is a classic I just because I am on it. You been so lovely. Thank you so much, thank you. To apologize again or have a difficult to to make into happen it was I was mortified by technical challenges, but I I. It will record it okay and I want to say that these little turtle pleasure talking to you. And Good luck with the upcoming show, and we will be first in line in November with your new book. Thanks, thank you very much have a good day and faith. By. And that was. Colonel Mustard in the conservatory was lead pipe. No, no, no, it was professor plum with the iron. It was professor, plum and Mrs White Behind the curtain. Oh Jin Doctors Vago A. Semi and the closet the big takeaway you guys is everybody. Stop what you're doing. Yes, read Anthony Horowitz Book. Go Watch clue. Go Watch Clue Christopher guest! It's meddling con-. It's it's. Don't be suckered. Don't be suckered into Catherine, no, Sir Clue, could, and they have the old music, too. Yeah, it's Gulf. Shake, rattle and roll. Going Schick. No, okay so anyway, that's it. Go Player Board Games. Go read your who done. It's tune into Alex writer on Amazon Prime TV evenly Horwitz was on the show. What I know he was so lovely. It's People's lovely. He was lovely Anthony. We Adore you. Thank you for your time. Thank you to Lindsey Collins for producing our podcast we would be. Lean and see of clue weapons without you when you provide the structure to our murders. There you go. You know that's the way I think of it. You're the thread that ties together. That makes us understand so we can drop the MIC and walk away because that's what detectives do at the end, and that's what the listeners would hope. We would do right now and just like detectives. Don't get paid. You know like you read a detective novel and it's like. Where do they have all this money? How do they have this like really Nice Loft? Well! Maybe they have a patriot. Count. We have a patriotic count, and that is how we stay advertisement free so that we can rattle on like this in. Nobody tells us to stop because when he you know whatever we want, nobody owns us. That's right so patriots dot com forward slash cookies, or you can find us on instagram. FREE COOKIES PODCASTS orange email. If you WANNA email us, free cookies podcast at gmail.com, please follow at the inky. Phoenix as well. Yes, that is my book land rate in review this show on apple podcasts because it helps others, find us and a big. Thank you to two of these beautiful five star reviews role. You're the best Rolla you're always so supportive of. US, thank you and. Okay. K to a sits Z. J. F.. Thank you to you, thank you to you. I am going to solve this now. Are you gonna read any of them or just? Is that a little too self? INDULGENT NAVEL-GAZING? Hey does sits sits. We're GONNA. Let the people go. We're going to let them go because they've tuned in long enough. Angry. Dangling notifier. We should let be. By by CADENCE. Jay.

writer Anthony Anthony murder Anthony Horowitz Alex Rider James Bond Sherlock Holmes Google London Moriarty England Amazon US Ian Fleming Agatha Christie Catherine America New York Times
PodQuiz 795

PodQuiz

14:30 min | 3 months ago

PodQuiz 795

"Nine hundred. Book to Quiz Sieff nine hundred and ninety five. Before, we start. I would like to thank helmet. Who came up with different one this week? Thanks to pay Paul Donors Kelly and billy. Round one. It's a connections me screwing this week, so there are four pieces of music to listen to for which I would like artist and title and number five is the connection between them. These. Western one. Japan. Used to stand on the corner. was. Were Stream. Not. Good. As the people when? The side crops. To Sing. A. Ending. THINNING MY RHYMES! Question. took. This. Shiver. Ocean. Western four. Swings. You shoes. Question Five! US If. We're looking for the connection between those full pieces of music. Round to? Rent to is on ice. Question Saves. Own the Celsius scale at one temperature this ice melt. Question Seven. What proportion of an iceberg lies above the waterline? Ten percent. Twenty percent. Or forty percent. Question, aid. Dry Ice not frozen water, but is the solid form of which gas. Questioned nine. We each unusual property of ice aced the course of pipes breaking when the wolves are inside them freezes. Question ten. Which US National Park lies on the border with Canada in northwestern Montana. Round three. Threes famous voices your bow. Take five show clips of people speaking Antony. Case I'd like you to tell me the name. Question Eleven. TO INTEREST KID! He's seven or eight nine years old Junior high, school. switching to something else because he doesn't have any black heroes. And Except for outfitting, Gibson, the only one, they would have to define right now. kids. And their spare time recess or something they. They're playing basketball or Or touch football. Or baseball after school. Any of them. Play tennis question twelve I'm doing great daughter Jamie suggested that I do this interview with you, so she says hi, and we are working every day with the cats sanctuary. My husband night live about five miles from the sanctuary, and my daughter lives next door to us, and so my daughter and I still come into the sanctuary every day because we have to take care of all of the big cats here question who team where we are in Toronto Canada. at my at my house, one of my friends sent me a video the other day and it was just like all the top numbers from the last years and the people I. Don't know if you saw that video where all the artists start moving in taking over different spots, and that was pretty crazy because it was like for the. Last two minutes of that video I was sitting at sitting up there with the exception of like getting. ps Cy remember. Question Fourteen, but I tell you why. The you know the American people they fully understand. What's at stake here? I mean this is the most important election. Anybody's life, not because I'm running because of the circumstances were. We've lost a lost thirty six million jobs. We have over. Was it ninety three, thousand dead, and the numbers climbing and the ways walked away from the rest of the world question, fifteen, we subsidy ending publicity for the. Holy Grail, so you of sit around and nothing to talk about what we're gonNA. Do next and. I think you suggested well? How about? A life of Christ. Called Jesus Class Lust, glowing. We will was shocking. Then! Anyway and so we decided to do something like that. Round for. The Fun run this week is a he? Who Am I round? There is only one answer in this round, and the questions come in the form of clues to a person's identity. The fewer clues you need to identify that person, the more points, Euskal. Question Sixty. I was born in Nineteen, Ninety, eight to parents Eveland and Fantine in the wealthy London district of Maitha. Question, seventy! While looking for Britain's naval intelligence division during the Second World War I was involved in operations, planning and oversight of two intelligence units, thirty assault unit and t false. Question Eighteen. As famous for my books for adults, I did write one children's book called Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Question Nineteen. After the wall I moved to Jamaica living in a house. This I had built cooled Goldeneye, where I wrote my novels. Question Twenty. My most famous character was a spy who I named. After the author of a book on Caribbean birds because I thought the UNROMANTIC name suited his character. I should back in two and a half minutes with the answers. After St Peter's with a song called to the ice. School! So. Melissa. saw. Soon. Own. Now But one was laid by the Beatles. Number two was nickels and dimes by Dolly Parton. It's. Three calls in the cloak five fifty Sept.. Z.. I'm full of kiss. Me By Princeton Thunder. And number five the connection. We had any lane nickels and dimes, fifty cent and sixpence number richer. Penny. Times sent at six months. The connection is coins wrong. Round. Two. Was On ice and the answer to number six vice melts at zero degrees, strictly speaking the triple point, zero point, zero, zero, seven, five, or something but Sarah to fine. The Pacific. ICEBERGS are ten percent above. Eight dry ice is frozen carbon dioxide. Benign ice closest punch to break because it is less than than water, most salutes are Morton's. The NELLIE quits. Ten that National Park was glacier national park. Round three. Three was famous voices and the answer to number eleven. Number. Twelve Carol Baskin. Section thirteen was drink. Yes, I remember. Number fourteen was. Biden. Walked away from the rest of the world and number fifteen was terry. Jones sues that. Round Four. Thought, the WHO am I round has just the one on the mystery person was Ian Fleming. If you go out on question sixteen. You get all five points. Christian seventeen is four points eight hundred three point nine hundred two points. If you needed all five clues to get the answer, right, you just get one point. That's the least of nine five. Thank you very much for listening and the hook. You enjoyed it. quizmaster at crystal is my email address. We can find quiz on twitter or FACEBOOK FOR CRYSTAL COM. Fee just before. Go Happy Birthday, Kate Love Mark Harrison. Arthur. Happy Birthday Corey, you out of my life, love, Taylor. And I'd like to wish Lauren happy birthday from. Until next weekend. Bye Now.

National Park Canada. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang US Paul Donors Kelly Japan Ian Fleming Dolly Parton baseball Beatles Toronto Jamaica Antony twitter basketball Cy Gibson Britain Euskal
Operation Mincemeat

HISTORY This Week

25:55 min | 2 months ago

Operation Mincemeat

"History this week, July tenth nineteen forty three. I'm Sally Helm. It's a few hours before dawn on Sicily's southern coast. The Italian island sits between the toe of the boot on Italy's mainland and the northeast tip of Africa. There's no moon tonight and on the Mediterranean Sea. A storm is raging. In the dark waters there is a fleet of about twenty five hundred allied ships speeding towards Sicily. Armed to tackle. Its World War Two. Sicily is access territory because Italy is fighting alongside Germany in the war. And this will be the first allied invasion into German controlled Europe. If the American and British troops can pull it off. Sicily will become a vital stepping stone for them to enter mainland, Italy and then the rest of the continent. Italian and German troops mammy. Island. But the allies think. Maybe they won't expect us to attack in the middle of this huge storm. And, they're right. The access powers are not ready for the assault. When the attack begins. Hundred thousand lands stormed the beaches. Paratroopers round troops airman, six hundred tanks, hundreds of planes, raining out air sport. and. They mean little resistance. The Italian, forces start retreating and everyone's thinking. Where are the Germans? By the end of the day British, troops have taken the shoreline and they're pushing inlet. Over the next two months, the allies led by us. General George Patton and British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery. Push the Axis forces back and back. Up The island towards the Italian mainland. On August Seventeenth General Patton and his troops reach Messina in northern Sicily. They're expecting a final showdown. But the axis troops are gone. They evacuated at the last minute. The invasion is officially a success. Sicily the gateway to Europe. is now firmly in the hands of the allied forces. For such a pivotal battle in world, War Two. Sicily went down pretty easy. They expect you to ten thousand casualties in the. Real Madrid of the allied ships would be sunk in the first two days. In fact, the casualties was just attend that number and they lost twelve trips. All those lives and ships were saved for one simple reason. Most of the Germans had already left just a few weeks before the allies attacked. and. It wasn't luck that drew them away from the island. It was planned. Deception pulled off by a small group of British intelligence agents. Including a man who would become best known for creating the most famous British spy in history. Today. Operation Mincemeat. How did a deception involving a corpse? A false identity and a single eyelash save thousands of lives and change the course of World War Two. We are at the story of Operation Mincemeat from Nicholas read. He's a historian and the author of the book spy runner, which is about deception during World War Two. He said it's a little bit of a departure for him. I'm saying the an auditorium written ten books now about art history, but he wrote about Operation Mincemeat for a very personal resent where my father. Was a bit later. That story starts in nineteen, forty three about three years into World War Two. Germany controls Poland. Denmark. Belgium Luxembourg the Netherlands. France Yugoslavia and Greece basically almost all of western Europe. And Italy has joined the axis powers. Great Britain though has sided with the allies. They're essentially surrounded by german-occupied Europe separated from their merest allies Russia by almost a thousand miles of nazi-occupied territory. German forces are in control just across the English Channel in France less than fifty miles away. So the British thinking. So! At some point, we'd have to invade Europe. But. Germans had really built up enormous. Fortresses with guns inside to fight off any possible attack. Retry landing on the beaches. The army's likely to be slow search German forces are making it tough for the British to attack Europe via France. And the Axis powers are using their submarines. The German U boats to take down any help coming across the Atlantic. The so called Battle of the Atlantic has been slowly. Draining. Allied supplies enforces since nineteen thirty nine. We were doing pretty badly. Vindicating sinking a lot of these ships, which were breathing supplies, troops, and everything else from America to England, but early in nineteen, forty-three, another opens up. The allies successfully defeat access forces in northern Africa, which means we could have invaded at what they call the soft underbelly of Mediterranean and. The soft underbelly. That's the term British and American forces are using to describe the islands of the Mediterranean Sea. Those islands are another way to get into Nazi controlled continental Europe. So American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and British Prime Minister. Winston Churchill have a decision to make. They are in charge of the Allied Front in Western Europe. While Russia is busy fighting the Germans in eastern Europe. And Churchill and FDR have to decide whether to invade via France across the channel, taking on the full strength of the term army, or if it's better to go through Italy in the south, where a mix of German and Italian troops occupied the Mediterranean. See the work of fighting. A war goes on with weighty decisions to be Wireless far-flung fronts. Anchors drop off the North American coast and two nations leaders prepare to shake hands with each other and with history. The decision is pretty fraught. Some of the allied generals think well. Maybe we should just full on invaded France. Face the German's right. But Churchill eventually convinces them that the islands of the Mediterranean. The soft underbelly. Way To go. But where exactly we could have invaded Greece in the East and not Horse Occurrence Hal Deniau to islands in the West. Then though as Sicily. And the interesting point about Sisley was that it was occupied by the Jones finding, but it was quite close to where Omi was in Africa. Sicily is just sixty miles from a British controlled airbase, so the island becomes the obvious choice. The problem is it's obvious to the axis powers to meaning. They're prepared to put up a fight. So. A few members of British intelligence start thinking. Is there some way in which we can mislead the Germans to get them to think not think that we're going to invade. Sicily, which seems obvious point but to. Invent a story saying why what we really want to invade Sicily and. Instead we're going to invade Greece and also Sardinia. British intelligence officers Charles Charnley and you and Montague are working on a plan. Charnley has been reading. Something called the trout memo. It's a military document that had circulated a few years back in nineteen, thirty nine. It basically lists ways to trick an enemy army might catching trout with a worm on a hook. In just a few years, the memo's Co. author will become famous in his own right as a spy novelist. He's a young officer. In the Royal Navy named Ian Fleming. In nineteen fifty-three hill rate his first novel about. James Bond! I remember twenty eight in the trout memo bears this title, a suggestion, not a very nice one. The suggestion is this. Quote, a corpse, dressed as an airman with dispatches in his pockets could be dropped on the coast. And Charlie thinks. Yes. We could plant a body in the sea for the Germans to find. Make. It look like a British officer who died in a plane crash. And on the body, we could plant false dispatches about the war. A letter detailing a fake plan of attack. The letter was going to say we felt we should explain what we're actually going to do. In the Mediterranean, and we're going to invade off in Greece and half in Sonya, but we've got a cover a plan. Which we want to mislead the Germans with so we'll try and make it look as if we go to invade in Sicily. The Germans are expecting the allies to invade Sicily. And the idea is to convince them that they're being played. That the real invasion won't be in Sicily after all. Charnley and Montague decide. This is worth a shot. And they start putting together one of the most bizarre deception plans in history. Operation Mincemeat. First they need a dead body. Finding the right one is a grim task. They need an unclaimed body that looks like a drowning victim. They START CONTACTING LOCAL MORGUES IN LONDON! And they find someone. The body was actually found in a warehouse. Dead, and in fact, they think he probably some bread, which he found in the warehouse where he was sleeping. Tonight I suppose, and the bread, and being poisoned to get rid of rats, and that's thoughts of. That's probably what killed. This was likely the body of Glendower Michael a Welsh man who had been living on the streets. He had known relations and was in about his early forties when he died. Montague talks to pathologist. Who says this could work? The poisoning probably won't show up on an autopsy. It could look like this man drowned. So they've completed grim task number one. Now. It is up to Montague and trauma to create a false identity for the courts. German, intelligence is pretty widely, so the story has to be airtight. They decide. The fictional officer will be named Captain William Martin of the Royal Marines. There are a bunch of Real William Martins in the British military. So if the Germans go looking, they won't get suspicious. Then British intelligence has to invent the last two weeks of Martin's life all on paper to be stuffed into his pockets. There's sided to make him more humor. They would invent a girlfriend for him. They would write two letters to him from fictitious girlfriend one of the clues. She gives him her. Letters I. I hear rumors that you might be sent off somewhere I. do that's not true. We've only test found each other. We don't want to lose each other now. In addition to that, they then got a photograph of one of the women in the. Office and as they had just got engaged, they then had a bill from jewelers for the engagement ring cost several hundred pounds and details of the inscription on the ring, which way that costs even more in espionage circles? This stuff is called pocket, litter, and Captain Martin is loaded with it. Theater ticket stubs bank statements are receipt for clothing. He supposedly bought a book of Stamps, Pencil stubs cigarettes keys. They also plant a silver cross and a medallion of Saint. Christopher on the body to signal that Martin Roman Catholic. A faith that doesn't believe in tampering with Corpses Aka autopsies. And of course they plant false letters. Saying that the allied attack is coming for Sardenia and Greece not Sicily. The, final piece of the puzzle is an ID card. If the Germans are going to recognize Martin as a high ranking British officer, who would have this information about the attack? They need the ID card to confirm it. Turns out to be very difficult. Have the body, but there was no. Have heard a girl from so many of you. Go to produce identity card so some time montague is actually stumped he. He really couldn't find anyone who looked anything like the body that they got. They tried taking a photograph of the dead man, and he really didn't look very dead. This roadblock is holding up the operation. And there's a clock ticking. After all they're dealing with a corpse. was too long and it will decompose. They, think maybe we can just blur the photo. But that might tip off the Germans. That something isn't quite right. And then. Something sort of miraculous happens. Monarchy was at a meeting to discuss. A double agent goes agent Zigzag A. my father was in charge of agent Zigzag for eighteen months. Reads father worked at five managing German double agents, and so he's in this totally unrelated meeting with Montague and as soon as want to give soul. My fault while I can quote exactly what he said. Is he said then we had a stroke of luck sitting opposite me at a meeting to deal quite Informatica I saw someone who might be the twin river. Of course, he was readily persuaded lessons. Growth That noted that difficulty. and. That's why follows photo appears on the identity card, and that's how my father gaming involved in the home a whole plot. Read wouldn't find out his father had been involved until he just randomly stumbled across the ID photo in a book about Operation Mincemeat, so when I was about twenty. I've been reading it. And when I saw that Trento I could easily recognize my father at each and said that's you. Isn't it? And he he? Wouldn't quite say say. That may say since then there's been a couple of books official. They all say very clearly that he was man in the photo. The problem is finally solved. The last hurdle is convincing the British military to go forward with the plant. Montague makes the proposal. The cramps were really quite divided. Some of them don't very good. Idea might as well try it out and the other half surveys of dangerous to try to in like that. Eventually, the question goes to Churchill. Hell make the final call and Churchill is supposed to say well anybody, but down would know invading Sicily anyway in other words. Jones expected us to invade. Sicily and we knew that was going to be applied ball, but if this section plan worked. If, we could get the Jones to distract their forces. Then we'll have far smaller casualties. It's decided. Operation Mincemeat. Is Ago. If you are enjoying history this week, you should check out flashback a new podcast from the iheartradio podcast network and Ozzy. The creators of the Chart Topping Webby nominated podcast the thread, the law of unintended consequences is a simple, but often misunderstood rule of the universe. Flashback explores the reasons. Some of our best laid plans have gone awry from policy making personal lives from the courtroom to the environment, and it reveals those surprising stories that the history books never told you about Ozzy's Sean Braswell takes on a journey through history that will change how you look at the world today. Listen to flashback I. Her radio APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. In the early hours of April, seventeenth complicated season begins. The agents dressed the body as Captain William Martin. Plant the two weeks worth of pocket litter on them and chain a briefcase to his wrist. Inside the briefcase, our top secret documents about the plans for Sardinia and Greece. As a final touch, the agents place a single eyelash among the documents so that if they're returned to British authorities, they'll know right away whether the envelope has been opened and the documents read. With that Captain Martin is ready to go. He's packed in dry ice and. Large metal contain which and mopped medical instruments, and then loaded aboard a submarine, the submarine the HMS, Sarah. Banned for Spanish waters. Spain is officially neutral in World War, two. But unofficially, a lot of Spanish authorities are Nazi sympathizers. They would just as Fascist as Nazis Germans. And therefore we knew that if a body secret British plans landed in Spain, there was thirty could Shawn's Spaniards in charge would let the Germans have all those details as soon as they could. Their fellow fascist work. On April thirtieth the HMS Sarah Surfaces just off the southwest coast of Spain. The commander opens the canister and pushes the top secret cargo into the waves. Almost two weeks later British intelligence here's that a Spanish fishing boat has picked up the body and delivered it to the authorities. They Hunt and waited, and then eventually within a couple of weeks three weeks they got stay briefcase and the lettuce back Spain is maintaining its official neutrality. And, so under the unwritten rules of sportsmanlike warfare, expected to turn something like this over to the British and they do, but. The eyelash is missing. Six days after the briefcases returned, a German communication is decrypted by coke breakers. It's a warning that the allied invasion is coming for Greece. That is the confirmation. They've been waiting for British British dear. Leslie Hollis sends a message to Churchill. mincemeat swallowed hook line and sinker. The cryptic message is a reference to the trout memo. That list of deceptions co-authored by Ian Fleming. Germany? Thinks they have this secret communication. The real ally plan. And so they start quietly moving troops off of Sicily. Clearing the way for an invasion that comes just a few weeks later. When the allied troops land on Sicily the Italian forces surrender pretty quickly. Though Prime Minister Benito Mussolini is a strong Nazi. Many, regular Italian soldiers have reservations, so they don't put up a super strong fight. That leaves just two German divisions. Try and fend off one hundred and fifty thousand advancing men. The allied invasion of Sicily is the largest invasion in the war to date. It'll be eclipsed only by the invasion of Normandy a year later. Even before Sicily is securely in the hands of the allies. Mussalini is voted out and arrested by his own grand council. Many of the German troops managed to evacuate before they can be captured. Still the victory in Sicily opens up Italy, and the rest of Nazi Europe to later invasions from Sicily. It then meant we could. Trust the mile wind channel between Sicily and Italy, and then there's a whole series of landings in Italy and the allied armies of the moved up on the coast. The Allied invasion of Italy won't be easy. It's a long struggle. But it does in the end. Knock Italy out of World War Two. Losing Italy is a huge hit to access morale and to access military might. One year later, the invasion of Normandy on d day is a success ushering in the end of the war and the Allied victory. Day itself is a success in part because the allies deceive the Germans. By Convincing them to send tanks to a dummy location north of Normandy read told us the importance of operation. MINCEMEAT is in part, the lives and resources that saved. Those troops, ships, planes and tanks. They went on to fight in Italy and beyond. But another part of the operations like AC- is how we think about deception in warfare a hundred years ago. If you tried to deceive the enemy, the enemy would say well. That's not cricket. You know we're always. We're here to fight. We will fight the only way to win. Spying has been around forever, but even that was supposed to be sort of sportsmanlike. gentlemanly. Deception is really rather sneaky. Your going to deceive. You're going to be telling lies to let's not a very good example to set to anyone. But operation mincemeat and dozens of other World War Two deception plans proved that deception could save thousands of lives in battle and dissection can work in deceiving the enemy and defeating a much bigger enemy. It might not have been sportsmanlike, but it worked. So well. That trickery is now a regular part of military operations. Operation mincemeat changed geopolitical history and heralded. Change in warfare. The most important soldier in the operation. WAS ALREADY DEAD A man from Wales, who had accidentally eaten poisoned piece of bread? It's a surreal turn of events one. You'd only expect from well. A James Bond movie. Thanks for listening to history this week. For more moments throughout history that are also worth watching. Check your local TV listings to find out what's on history today. This episode was produced by mckanie Lynn History. This week is also produced by Julie mcgruder, Ben Dickstein and me Sally Helm. Ar- researcher is an Fredericks. Our editor and sound designer is Chris Yellow are executive producers are Jesse can and Ted Butler. Don't forget to subscribe rate and review history this week. Wherever you got your podcasts and we will see you next week.

Sicily Italy Greece Europe. Montague Winston Churchill Africa Mediterranean Sea Mediterranean officer France Jones Captain William Martin Poland Charles Charnley Ian Fleming Germany George Patton Sally Helm
THUNDERBALL - A Deep Dive - Part 1

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

33:47 min | 2 months ago

THUNDERBALL - A Deep Dive - Part 1

"Lawsuits, plagiarism, murder, misogyny, sharks and underwater battles. Only one movie can lay claim to all of these, and of course we're talking about the fourth Yan Productions James Bond Movie The and sixty five movie thunderball. Hi, this is Dan. Silvestri and Tom Passat, spy movie navigator DOT COM join us. Reach episode of Our podcast cracking the code of spy movies. Please subscribe to our show. Give us a five star rating on your favorite podcast, APP and tell your friends about this show, too. That helps us get more listeners and do more shows. Thanks, okay. Tom We got some good feedback from some listeners, and they said Hey, we want more thirty minute type PODCASTS, or around thirty minutes for commutes in that kind of thing working on. We've been doing some longer ones. Yeah, we're going to do a few more shorter. Shorter, let's not the same. We're going to not have any longer once because sometimes when we will, but this thunderball podcast will be cut into two parts. This is gonNA be part one. It should be around thirty thirty five minutes, and we're going to try to shoot for that in part two as well thirty thirty five minutes, so let's see how this goes for you and hopefully you like it all right, so I've got a question for the audience. Here's a trivia question for you. One thousand, nine, hundred, fifty eight movie was also produced by Broccoli so technically cubby was executive producer on thunderball. This nineteen fifty-eight movie was directed by Terence Young screenplay was done by Richard Maiden Okay Cinematography, by Tadmor and one of the stars in it was. Lucina pollutes. Wow, familiar names. So, what would you know what that movie was No I. Don't okay in the US. The movie got the title tank force ever heard of it, but in the UK. Yeah right all these bond people associated with it. Back in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty eight. The movie was called no time to die. No kidding I'm. Making that. Oh Wow. Here we are again. Nice no time today. We're wasting. Yeah We WanNA start the show with the tip of the hat to the late earl cameron. Who played pender in thunderball? After a long life of one hundred two years, earl, Cameron pass away on July third. We'll miss you, earl. All right, we all know the controversy around producing thunderball and the lawsuits with Kevin McClary and so on. In, productions wanted thunderball to be their first film, but the legal proceedings delayed this possibility until the film came out in nineteen sixty five. So. This is a topic that we're assuming if you're a big James Bond Fan you probably already know this. There are many James. Bond focused websites that have covered this controversy in-depth, so we're not gonNA actually retread that story. It's WanNa, really deep dive into this trauma checkout Robert. Sellers excellent book called the battle for Bond. It's where we got some of today's discussion points. We also got some of them from the complete James. Bond movie encyclopaedia newly revised edition by Steven. Jay Rubin. Now Not Harry Saltzman of course, one of the producers of the James Bond movie along with Cubby. Broccoli was born in Canada. He emigrated to the United States, and he became a high ranking intelligence officer for the US. Yeah, maybe that is why Ian Fleming entered into the movie deal with him, because really up to that point, Harry head produced any big budget films. There's a great article online about this. In Vanity Fair called Harry spy the secret prehistory of a James Bond producer by David Camp. From September of two thousand twelve celery teeth now I'm also intrigued with Harry's background because he actually produced the Harry Palmer movies the hypocrites, file. Funeral Berlin. And Billion dollar brain in between when he was producing these James Bond movies. Kind of overlapping, so it was kind of interesting, he was doing the two very different spy movie types, and those are pretty good movies. They Harry Palmer yeah as cool stuff. We're GONNA do a couple of guests on those two in the future. Okay, so we're not going to go through every scene in thunderball, but we're going to select scenes in order where we think there's something important to point out or bring to your attention that will enhance your next viewing of thunderball. The massive extensive underwater shots inspired by the silent enemy have A. Out On that is what makes thunderball unique. We just released our podcast on the silent energy, and that talks a lot about how it inspired thunderball. In fact, at one point, we even Fairchild, who wrote and directed the silent enemy was up for the screenwriting and directing jobs on thunderball. Yeah. Who's going to be an underwater movie might as well have a guy who did a really good job with some underwater Syria. It's an they did that. Yeah, I mean the story line is straightforward. It's about the hijacking of a military aircraft that's carrying two nuclear weapons and the the hijackings going to take place by Specter, and then specter will hold the world through NATO for ransom for the equivalent of one hundred million British sterling, or they will use one of the bombs to destroy either a city in the UK or in the United States number. Two at Specter is in charge of this operation. Emilio Largo now. We should point out that many of the. The scenes that Austin powers movies parody are from this movie, and we'll address those in our podcast on Austin powers when we do when we do that podcast similarly due to the lawsuit. Kevin. McClary pretty much did a remake of thunderball in the nineteen eighty-three movie. Never say never again and again we'll address those similarities when we do the podcast. Never say never again okay I. Like this story line. This is something that was a relevant threat. Then in nineteen, sixty five and even more relevant threat today, the pre title sequence is intriguing and revealing actually Dan before we talk about the pre title. I want us to talk about one quick thing here, okay? They shot the previous bond movies in a standard format. Right in thunderball. They moved panavision. And that changed the aspect ratio to wide screen, and it force them to re shoot the gun barrel sequence Yeah, so for the first three movies. We've talked this and other about this another podcast Bob Simmons. The stuntman is the person you see turn and shoot the gun. And you can tell a stunned. Mayfield noticed how stable he is. Yeah Yeah. Sean connery comes in and he turned kind of wobbles a little bit. But. Going forward than they used panavision for the next sean connery movies, and then they kept that format where the actual bond was actor was the one who took over going forward. Yeah, I like what the actors! They're doing their own gun barrel sequence. I think that's that's good. What one other little more subtle thing is in thunderball? The pre title sequence starts with the white dots that we're used to seeing. And then it makes it of gets into a white one white dot. They merged into one white that from the gun barrel. And the starts within that DOT, so it's like it's masked, and then the then the the circle opens up and you see the whole frame and they didn't do that until thunderball. Okay so in the pre title sequence. There's a funeral going on, and the coffin is emblazoned with the initials, J., B.. For a second. We're supposed to be thinking. Wow well. Jeez, this could be James Spot. Of course with as being dead, yeah, of course we must think for a second so until it's reveal of course at James Bond is watching the funeral procession, leaving from the church from an outdoor balcony of the church at the funeral was for Jack Pouvoir. Specter number six who bond reveals had killed two of his colleagues, so standing with his French I six contact. He's watching the widow going into the car opening the door for herself switched to the Chateau, the widow, arriving and entering a room in which James Bond awaits. Yeah, wait! How did you get there? Yeah, beat the widow how the heck did bond get there ahead of the widow when he was watching the widow, get into the car. We all wonder that little bit i. mean you gotTa wonder that well? It's really answered. Bond Confronts. The widow is expressing his condolences. Then boom punches the widow. Of that, I love that part. And as we know, the win over really is Jack, Bu Var, and a very good fight ensues. Eventually, bond gets the better of JOCK and strangles would've fireplace poker. Nice okay. That's cool now. That means the movie actually starts out with a fake funeral. Yeah, where have we seen that trump before and after this movie? Let's see if you listen to our podcast on the movie, the secret agent which was a nineteen thirty six movie. Yeah, you'll find something very similar where there was a fake funeral to start the movie, yeah! The bond movie right after thunderball. You only live twice. Bond is part of a funeral at sea. And then in the movie, box zone. His own. And then in the movie, live and let die. It starts out with a fake funeral procession really that ends up turning into a real funeral procession. Yeah, so there are other movies that fake funerals in them. Many of them aren't spy movies, but this is a trope. I'm sure we'll see again and again. And so as bond leaves the room, he stops and throw some flowers on Var as the doors are opening and blue vars guards are coming in. This is classic bind and we're going to see this in future movies. Do One more thing before I leave I'm. I'm ready to leave, but wait. I gotTa stop and do something and I always wonder and we'll talk about this moment. Yeah, those extra seconds can cost you anyway. Bond escape any extra room. He straps into his jet pack, putting on a helmet of course and up. He goes with Vars guys shooting at him. He descends near the five, and he escapes love him spraying water at his pursuers from the Aston Martin Water, like they could not sight to streams of water. That always got me. It's like you. You. Know step aside. You won't get knocked over, but now they get over, but anyway he does it, but it's water. That's the important part, and that morphs into the title sequence with the women's swimming underwater, and we know the whole movie is about water and underwater fights, yachts planes in the water so fine shooting streams of water at his pursuers, end of the pre title sequence was clever and foreshadows the rest of the movie, So yes, water is key element of this movie, but I wanNA know how much water was used to spray these engine. Right I mean in reality. They actually had like firehoses. I mean it seemed like a lot. Where would all of that water fit? Would all of the gadgets that are in the? Clever that Q. Willing suspension of disbelief. Yeah, exactly exactly so we assume he got to the Chateau ahead of move are gonNA. Come back to that by jetpack. That's why it was waiting on the Veranda form. So that's cool, but. Escaping bond dons his safety helmet before taking off. This always gets you and you're looking at that thinking. Wait a minute. You can stop and put on your safety helmet when guys are shooting at you, yeah, why well the jetpack being a real device was cool us in the film and productions brought in guys who can fly this thing. And it was flown by bill suitor who demanded using a helmet, which is why Sean Connery as bond puts on a helmet when he takes off. So. We covered the jet pack in our earlier podcasts spy movies in the real world connections part one, so we're not going to go over that turf UNAI. More detail. You can listen to that podcast if you want more details of the jet pack in that movie now the thing is the other thing about the jet pack here, Dan you say that. We think that that's how he got to the Chateau faster, but the DB five's outside. So did he take the jet pack and did the agent well try the DB five over six agent is there waiting for him when he lands with the jetpack so I'd say yeah. That's a good interpretation, yeah! Now jet packs have been used in movies as far back as the one thousand nine hundred forty nine serial king of the rocket man. All the way through the rocketeer Ironman Star Trek Star Wars or of skywalker. You turn on the. jetsons among others right? The the concept is Kinda big, but the first movie to actually show you a real one. Yeah, here. This is real right. This thing really worked I think he can get by thirty seconds out of it or something like that. Yeah, some. It was something that very short time. Yeah, let's. All right so that ends a pre title sequence, and as Dan said we morph into the title sequence, and it has a few interesting tidbits associated with it i. we haven't Maurice Binder's use of nudes for the first time swimming. So, we have the first time we see in the bond title sequences. The naked female body yes sub projecting. It was filmed in black and white, and then in post production. They added the color to it. The second tidbit is that the singer of the theme song who was Tom Jones? Well, the song ends with a very long note after a very forceful singing, and it's allowed last note. And supposedly Tom Jones passed out seeing that now. and. He said you know. I started singing and he works. I started singing and the next thing I know I was doing something else. And, but it was only a nine second note, which is a long not when you've been singing his fall as he was a long loud note. Yeah, there's a long loud note, but if you look at the late bill withers, who just recently passed he had lovely day he held a no for eighteen seconds almost immediately after holding a note for ten seconds, and then with a Ha- we get. Get Twenty second note out of Morten. Harket, in the in the song summer moved on. We remember high because they did the theme song for the Living Daylights. Okay, so we see Emilio. Largo played flawlessly by a Adolfo Celli I mean the guys great. He parked his thunderbird in Texas Zone on the street in Paris, the gendarme sees it and tells a starts approaching them, and he sees overweight. Largo and he lets go so. Then the look that Largo shoots him is priceless I love that. Yeah, it's kind of like kind of felt to me like you're talking to me. Yeah, he didn't have to say a word. It was eleven years later with the movie. Taxi driver you talking to me. Sorry go ahead so anyway. Largo enters the building, but on the on the building. There's a sign that reads in French Sondra. Internationale Doc- stones persona they play, say are the International Brotherhood for these systems of stateless people were staying personally. You have the hard to say. A stateless person is one basically without a country, so I think so. This is kind of a play on Specter. I think being this international organization, not affiliated with a country. This building is actually still there and number thirty five Avenue Day to do that's hard to say the apostrophe. E, y. l. you in Paris, so you can actually go see this thing now Ian Fleming. Actually taught the concept of the originally specter was gonna be a Mafia group and. Actually the first cut, it was going to be Russians. In Ian Fleming decided. They didn't want him to be Russians. Because with a Cold War, he didn't want to years in tall of the cold, War go away, peace breakout, and then them going against the Russians would look bad. Yes, inspector, this international gave them a lot more flexibility to in future stories be able to just not tie it off the Russians all the time all right so largos. He's going to enter this conference room and he has this remote control. He pushes a button. The doors opened up revealing this wonderfully designed can adam design. Now if you listened to the PODCAST, we did earlier on the spy next door in that movie. Bob Ho has to go into a secret room to meet the team. He picks up this pan from this assortment of pens in the doors. Open it up for him. These scenes inspired by Thunderball I. Don't know, but it came after. Who knows I? Mean you see a lot of remote door? Things in many movies and star Trek and everything else, but anyway it's kind of cool at Largo is doing this in one thousand nine sixty five, so he enters the conference room through these secret doors, and it's a specter meeting and many of the Specter. Personnel are sitting in chairs alongside a long walkway. No table so and that was actually kind of had them when he was looking at. He's like we've seen this before and so many movies where you've got the the big conference table and everybody around it, so he decided. Let's not have to table yeah. It looks awkward. Actually. It looks like a little weird, but then you know Largo can walk up and down the path between everybody, so it's kind number. One courses hidden from the up on the screen Largos number two. He's revealing his. About this hijacking of the nuclear weapons, just after number nine gets electrocuted for embezzlement. It's a great scene in the book. Now note that there was a woman that was being held for ransom and number nine agent raped her, so they changed that to embezzlement here, so it's a great scene as you see everyone, sweating it out before nine chair sizzles him and afterwards, and as the chair lowers beneath the floor, and then comes back up empty, and smoldering with the residue all over. It's just a great touch a great set. It reminds me of Sanchez in licensed to kill as he tells the president of business that hey you just have a jumper life. Is How long it's going to be. How long it's going to be no taking some something from the real world here. Number five actually has the line they added later. Later into the script process our consultation fee for the British train robbery, two hundred fifty thousand pounds. The great train robbery was a real train robbery of two point six million pounds from the Royal Mail train heading from Glasgow to London. On. August eighth nineteen sixty three. And this means then that Specter got ten percent cut of the hall as a consulting fee. Yeah, again it shows how he in productions and their writers integrate real world events into their films remember of course Dr No the Duke of Wellington Portrait at Dr No's Lair. That was cool to Brent Liz. Great they just he just says we're something that's happening in the real world. Let's tie this into this movie. Yeah, perfect Argos Plan of course. Course? The hijacking NATO flight with to nuclear weapons aboard and hold NATO and the world ransom for a hundred million pounds sterling, meanwhile, bond is rehabbing shrub lands when he meets Count Lippi now he notices this tattoo on his forearm, and it's a square with a spike through it. Think Calls Moneypenny to check it out, and he says I think it's a tong sign, so he wanted money to check it out. You know wines rehabbing in off duty. So after some talk about how you're supposed to be rehabbing, bond tells moneypenny something that. You would not say today in a bond fill. In this movie that you wouldn't say? If? She doesn't do this for him. When he returns, he says I'll put you across my knees, which she says on yogurt and lemon juice I can hardly wait. Okay. That is not happening today. The rightfully so. Right. So bond snoops around as room. When he's out and. The hidden face, bandaged guy starts to walk in bond is there and then he retreats before he gets through the door. I love the scene because it shows bond doing the more mundane spy stuff. Yeah kind of snooping around checking things out here. He's just checking things out. and I wish they did more of that today. And then, but again before he leaves the room here, he comes back and takes a grape out of the fruit bowl and eats it, and then he leaves just like through the flowers on Bavaro. I'll take an extra moment to do that, but as the excess the room, the head bandaged guy sees him now timing, I'm asking this if he didn't Cooley stopped for the grape. With the bandage ended guy of missed him exiting. He might have I think he might have so. Being cool has its price so. In Rehab and is getting examined by Patricia played by Molly Peters. She was fabulous and she was. She was terrific, and he kisses her against her will. And he finds out from her about the bandaged guy that it's this mystery Angelo guy recovering from a car accident supposedly. Yeah, hang on, let me stop you there because you just said. Mr Angelo I know that's what she says. Yeah, maybe at troubling. That's what they called him, so they called him so that they didn't know who this guy was. Yeah, but his last name. Name was really Palazzo in the movie. Yeah, and so he was Angelo Poissy, so it wasn't Mr. Angelo. Really should have been Mr Poissy or just Angelo, yeah, or maybe awesome Mr Mr Angeles. I don't know it was a ruse on shrub lands. Yes, something else going on there. Yeah, maybe that, so she puts on a rack for ten minutes and someone comes in Lipa. And turns up the speed so high that it almost kills by I. Just immediately. Wonder why. Why is a speed like that on this thing if it could almost kill you, but Nonetheless he turns away up. Patricia saves him just in time, so he says Oh man I must be six inches taller. And she says we'll put you in the steam room. That might shrink back to size nap. I think this is a double entendre here. Come on. I'm sure as he's been making advances on her all day. She says something when she puts them on the rack. Something like it's the first time I felt safe all day. Oh. Yeah Shrink your back down the six inches whatever? All right fine returns the favorite Olympic in the steam machine by turning up the heat, and blocking the opening of the doors with a mop handle, which is okay Ali when he walks out, he says see you later, alligator. Then ought to be a trivia question somewhere. Does bond ever say anywhere you later, alligator? It's like okay after awhile. Crocodile, don't get wise bbi's knows. See You later alligators here. Okay, we got that. So anyway, bond being. Trapped on the rack use that as a way to have sex with Patricia. Boy. This is one of those scenes that doesn't translate. For at least the decade. Longer yeah opinion. Bond Pretty Much Rapes Patricia. Force her to have sex with him by blackmailing her about her, having her boss. Find out about this. May Have worked in the sixty's, but it's one of those things you always hear. The bond is too misogynistic. This doesn't carry over for well in today's. Environment now and I think it's even compounded later when after he blackmail rapes her and again my words yeah. He's in bed with the mink glove massaging her and she's very compliant. There so. That just doesn't feel like that would work. That would be Kinda raped, and then all of a sudden all. That's happened real bad now. All Right? Did you file Angelo switch so we're still back at troubles all right? We know that the plan is the switch mystery Angelo for major divall who was to fly the NATO flight with the two nuclear weapons? Angelo has undergone plastic surgery. Voice lessons all this stuff to get ready for this assignment I. think somewhere along the line. They said two years or something which I always wondered. How can they be planning this two years ago? Knowing this guy was gonNA fly NATO flight with nuclear bombs, but nonetheless I think I heard. Where's your willingness? Willing suspension of disbelief? You gotTa have that, so the plan is for him to hijack the plane and deliver the nukes to Largo and Specter and he's being paid well for this one hundred thousand dollars, but as this begins to unfold, he wants more money. He wants two hundred fifty thousand. Okay Green Kills Damn Yeah greed kills. That's going to maybe be his undoing, so devil is killed by Fiona Volpe LIP A and Mr Angelo and the switch is. Person Doubles as another person in this case by plastic treatments. He says yeah. We. See Doubles and a lot of films including the man who haunted himself with Roger Moore. About twenty other movies that have this some sort of this premise either by plastic surgery masks Sir twins. In Our podcast mission impossible taking a television show to the big screen, we've discussion on the use of masks for concealment or for taking over somebody's identity. We see this a lot mission impossible and my favorite example is in mission impossible three when they they kidnap Owen and Davey, and play by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Essex rate. That's a great scene. The they do that now. To be fair to thunderball. Most of these movies don't use plastic surgery, right? You generally are using masks for twins probably is the most prevalent way for them to be able to assume somebody else's identity, yeah! All right so divall change into the pajamas at the bandaged man had been seen in before and pretending Angelo died, and is being removed so bond the fines vol's body and Lippi sees him so the new d'urville. Mr Angel- The to raw lookalike gets through security at the military base. He sits through the breathing and gets aboard the Volkan with the two nuclear bombs of course by nineteen sixty one. When the novel was published, we have lots of atomic bombs in the world, and there were as an arms race between the Soviet Union and the USO atomic weapons were on everyone's mind, so the basis of story really is based. Based in real life, people were worried about a nuclear war and atomic weapons here to atomic weapons are hijacked by Spector, who threatened to destroy major city so even though Ian Productions did not make this their first bond film. In nineteen, sixty five world was very aware of the threat for major powers building up supplies of nuclear weapons, so the topic was hot the Cuban. Missile crisis was just a couple of years before and also free for you. Trivia players I've been a few trivia nights where the question what type of nuclear bombs were used in thunderball in actually two of them worked even changed Trivia contest and the answer. I think they were MOS types I think they changed the name of it later, but it was Ministry of Supply type. You call them MOS types yeah one of those. Keep in the back of your mind. If you ever go to a trivia game. They won. I. Hear quite a lot. Yeah, now it's Ministry of Defense, but yeah cool all right so the nuclear weapons are being hijacked by Specter and they'll use them to extort one hundred million pounds as the storyline goes. This is a believable one. Really nuclear weapons disappearing come on. Have nuclear weapons ever been lost in real life. yeah, basically time Ian. Fleming writes thunderball. There have been three incidents where the United States nuclear weapons or the core of nuclear weapons hoops he. What does that go? And just about? When he and Fleming was writing thunderball in January nineteen sixty-one, even though he had conferred already with Kevin McClary and others, here is what was happening in the real world. In January sixty, one, A. B. Fifty, two, carrying two twenty four megaton nuclear bombs crashed while taking off from an Arab base in Goldsboro North Carolina. One of the weapons sank swampy farmland, and the core was never really found, and of course the military light about this thing and so on, but they actually had to buy an easement to the property the military so that no one else would go snooping around. Trying to find this nuclear weapon that they couldn't find. And there are two previous incidents of loss, nuclear weapons or cores before this nineteen fifty and nineteen fifty-six, so there's a detailed article on this might mental floss. November twenty thousand seven excess on this very subject, so a hijacking of a nuclear aircraft is very believable and the US lost nuclear weapons without anyone even trying to take them. so yeah, we got a good core for movie here. So other, really quick thing. If you look at the bombs there stamping on them that say handle like eggs. In one, thousand, nine, forty-five, rfu's the stamp do not jar handle like eggs on the gyroscopes and you actually see this still stamped on gyroscopes today. High. Ban is troubling rehabbing a discover something's going on. There's some exchanges of putting bond in jeopardy and bond pudding, countless in jeopardy, and their bonds discover something happening with Mr Angelo, but he doesn't know exactly what's going on. So as we said before you'll ban sees this this tattoo on ebay with the spike in the square and any thinking. This might be this tong thing. I always say it's interesting. How this sophisticated enemy! Whereas Specter rings tattoos all this other stuff to let everyone else know who the? Okay secret organization but yeah. Yeah As bond will say later. Vanity has its price. All right, so we the audience know a lot of stuff that's going on before bond those before my six knows NATO or anyone else. We know Angelo have switched. We know that he's he's had plastic surgery. We know the they're gonNA. Take over this flight with the two nuclear weapons and so on. We know all the stuff that's been going on at troubling and. Okay now these guys have to figure this all out. I kind of like it more when we discover it with the characters in the in the movie. I think it's more exciting, but. If. You see a TV, show Colombo. Yes, you, what happens and then Columbus to figure out how yeah, that's true. Yeah, it was a pretty good show. That's actually my favorite TV show ever. Yeah, all right so now. This all happened at troubling and we're GONNA leave shrub lands here in just a second. At the time they filmed this. It was a hotel. And now it's a corporate office. We know that because you and I got there. Yeah, we were there. We got some great pictures from the outside of the building of course and we saw where the car was parked. The thunderbird we saw were his defy was part and stood in the very spots we saw the hearst was taken out Mr Angelo, which was really divall, very cool great, and there is a shadow of there where there's a Rolls Royce in that parking lot and it's cubbies. Araki's I miss that. One other thing as relieving shrub lands. I want to point out this one little thing. At one point he's talking to to Patricia and he says to her another time another place. Oh yeah, that was the title of a movie that Sean Connery did with Lana Turner earlier well, actually one of his first movies Oh cool with me another time another place. This a great place to wrap up part one of Thunderball, and we're GONNA release part two of under ball next. This dance. and Tom Pizarro. SPY MOVIE NAVIGATOR DOT COM thanks for joining us for part one of thunderball tune in next week for part to join us for each episode of Our podcast show cracking the code of spy movies. Please subscribe to our show. Give us a five star rating on your favorite podcast. APP and tell you friends about the show to that helps us get more listeners. Do More shows, thanks.

James Bond Specter Bond Mr. Angelo Ian Fleming Dan NATO Sean connery United States Kevin McClary Emilio Largo Patricia Specter Angelo Poissy panavision James UK Broccoli WanNa
Guest: Grace Helbig - He Wants to Borrow Money?

Don't Blame Me!

1:10:41 hr | 1 year ago

Guest: Grace Helbig - He Wants to Borrow Money?

"Buffy makes betting that is earth, friendly, and cruelty free. Their latest product, the breeze is comforter made entirely from one hundred percent eucalyptus fiber to regulate temperature and keep you comfortable all night, long, and Buffy offers a free trial. So if you don't love it return it at no cost for twenty dollars off your Buffy comforter, visit Buffy dot co and promo code blame. That's Buffy dot CO, and enter code blame for twenty dollars off. Today's show is sponsored by the audiobook of stay sexy and don't get murdered written and read by canco gaffe and Georgia hard star the voices behind the hip podcast, my favorite murder Karen and Georgia delve into their own passed. True. Crime stories and more to discuss meaningful issues with fierce empathy and unapologetic. Frankness the audiobook includes a special guest appearance by Paul giamati guys. I'm up says my favorite murderer, if you follow me on Twitter, you know that they're fantastic, if you listen to podcasts, which obviously, you clearly do your here. Welcome to my podcast. Also listen to their podcasts. It's amazing. I am so excited to listen to their bug and by the audiobook edition of space, Accion, don't get murdered wherever audio books are sold. Welcome back to the other episode of don't blame me featuring my sick voice, but more importantly, grace Helbig is here. Yeah. Man with a vengeance. You haven't been on so long I know years, I think literally maybe like a year to your place looks great. Thanks different. New york. Loss, ear recording and looks. Awesome, just exudes wealth. I mean I zoomed well, so I needed the place also exude wealth when I think of you in this day, right now I think opulent doing the most. Doing the most sneezing coughing diet. What do you have a head cold situations? Think. So I don't know. I got sick on mom. They've heard this story saying I got sick on Monday. I thought that it was a popcorn kernel lodged in my throat at the Jonas brothers concert. Oh, it was not if it's truly feel sickness that it took me by surprise because I of cough and get it out. It was like four days later, and I had a fever. And I was like, maybe. That Colonel really disease. That's what it was. So I'm assuming that's what it is. I'm going on an international trip next week though. So like me, take it overseas. And like be better and not seasick grace was sick for, like Saul still learned that like slim is my natural state. No, I mean, it's one of those things that if anyone else was in my body, they'd be like, oh, I'm going to adopt immediately and I'm like, it'll fix itself. Eventually patient with it. I forgotten the Netti pot. Have you done that have not done that, that's a good time? Is it? Oh, it is, especially if you're like, really mucus Ian Fleming. Yeah, it is. It's fun. From the only actual it's like when you put when you really have to, but your so like light and like now. Like it's like weights out of your nose and like your head gets lighter. Wow. I will have to, you know, save a Friday or Saturday night. A real fun time. So fucking terrible. Because the feeling that you get when you get water and your nose. That's what you're just intentionally. I think I'd be freaked out with Mel, hey, you have to do it in front of a mirror, forcing myself to watch myself pain, drowning yourself, and you're like you, you're actually like your dying comes out. Yeah. Okay. One day one day, I'm going to do that later. Do the prostate things. Ear when stuff I haven't done that either telling me about all these different tricks, but I did take a Bobby pin to Magas ear and cleaned up the air wax. That's what she told me to do. I did it when I was a child and. Santer not so much out of his erase. It's also. But I do like I do like eardrum damage or something. It doesn't you can see it feel it. So you're hang operation on your ear by. None. I have no fucking earwax. Humble brag. That's the wax. That's what I wouldn't wanna do it because I don't want to see what's going on, as somebody who loves to pick and loves pas, and everything when I was like, I have nothing. I, I was so sad. But his and he was can you please get out of my ears and we held there's more. This is so and putting it all on, like a white piece of paper. It all. And he's showing him his shame. You're discussing and there's proof. You're googling what different colors and consistencies men. It was a good time. A romantic night. That's a real bonding goodwill. Honestly, though, that is like for me. I'm like, yeah. This is this is what it does. Well, guys, this isn't advice podcast. If you're new here, welcome, if you want to give us a call for an upcoming episode. Our phone number is three one zero six nine four zero nine seven six. Michael medicine, did not make me forget about, even though I thought it did impressive listeners, you can send us an audio. Meghan podcast. A g mail dot com. Okay, I'm ready. Hi, I am twenty years old. And I just finished my sophomore year in college, and I recently, well, not recently probably like six months ago, I started talking to this guy, and it was nothing serious than like from the start. I just didn't want to be in a relationship as I got out of a toxic relationship, not that long beforehand like before I started talking to this guy and, you know, things were going smoothly. It was a fun time. He seemed like a good guy and recently, he tried asking she borrow probably about, I think one hundred twenty six dollars for me, we've kinda freaked me out as we're not that so. And I've talked to my friends about it and they all freaked out. You know, tell me, you know, get away from him because unfortunate and like I've used before for like money reasons and it's not. I wouldn't mind helping is kind of I, I can't help feeling that he signed to use me. I don't know as the keep talking to him or not. Because, you know, I never got the feeling from him that he seemed like he had, you know questionable intentions, but now I can't help. But think that he does sorry for rambling and talking quickly. But I don't know what to do the situation because I kind of just that seeing something more with him like after a while. But now the situation is just kind of scared me, too. She pays him. It sounds like she didn't. Yeah. Or sounds like she's in the middle of deciding whether she should or not. I mean your sophomore in college, you don't wanna relationship this guy hasn't from what it sounds like propose, the relationship. He's just sort of seemed interested in you and then asks, you for money, which is a red flag across the board. It can be the most prince charming of prince charming, but, like I think you just say flat out, I'm not comfortable lending, you money, but that doesn't mean I don't like you any less, and then if he goes, cool sorry, and like backpedals, and like, actually wants to hang out with you, then there's possibility for something there. But if he gets weird and starts like distancing himself after you're like, no, I'm not comfortable lending someone money in the situation. Then that's a bad dude. Yeah, I mean, I think is weird that he asks I'd be done. I'd be done just now because like if I if I was going on with the guy for even frankly a little while. And like how do I say like a like as? As opposed to like, if we were out at a restaurant, we've gotten to know, here's a coli fucking left my wallet. Oh my God. I'm so sorry, but no, no. I got this. It's fine. But, like if it's like, hey, can I borrow it's just odd because not like you guys you guys are like casually dating or whatever. But like you shouldn't be like your relationship with him, shouldn't be the first person he would ask there should be like a lie, if you, they can, there's no shaven, like not being able to make ends meet, and like needing to ask someone for a loner for money. But, like there's like a like a list of people. Hierarchy of people like if you're the first person. So, like no matter which way you go. It's bad. Like if you're the first person that's fucking weird, but I feel like if you weren't the first person and he got turned down by all of these other people, and he still asked you like that's really fucking weird also one hundred twenty six dollars. What is it for so specific if it's a parking ticket, and he's like, I can't pay my parking ticket. Is there any, I'm embarrassed? Even ask you. This is there any way I could borrow money still weird. Like you said there should be other people that have the capability to lend him money, and if they don't then that's another red flag. Ms relationships with other people, also hundred twenty six dollars to a sophomore in college as a lot of money. That's like my mind immediately was like, what do you need? Like, yeah. What do you absolutely need that, for that, like, your also the person that he's asking, and like, I'm not here to, like perpetuate the toxic masculinity, like thing of being like, oh, guys need to be strong and pay. Things. But, like even if the roles were reversed, it was like a heterosexual guy calling in was asking for that. Like the we're yeah, I think it's just still weird because like your especially if you're casually dating somebody that's when it's like best foot forward. I don't fart in so cute. I'm the best. And like if this is like him being like the most like, polished like best foot forward version of himself in the best foot forward version of himself as asking for money like what is him like a year and a half into a relationship. Like, also, she's been used for money in the past, so the some sort of emotional conditioning that, like giving money as a sign of like love to the person that you're with, and just you need to be really confident in the factor understand, it's fundamentally probably easier to understand, than actually believe that you not giving this person money doesn't make you a bad person, and doesn't make you any less attractive overall to someone that's really gonna be want an genuine relationship with you, especially this is something that. I've gone through in the past, like, sure there's conditioning of like, if I give them money who like me more, that's not the case. No, I say cut your lot like just be done with him now. And like just say, like yeah. Like, I'm not comfortable like giving you money. And then if he gets weird, if you can look past it like move on that, I think that's fine. And if he can to, but, like be wary of it. But if it was me and the situation, it would automatically be like I don't think you're hot anymore by about attracted to like this is gross. Yeah. I think I, I also like one of those people that wants to like help everyone wants to make everyone feel good. But I think at this point I just be like that's weird to me. Yeah. I mean, do you wanna talk about, like that's weird to me? I feel bad for you. But I don't have been used before. And I don't like this situation. And so this is a weird thing that I have to kind of create a boundary for. Yeah. Yeah. It's just fucking weird Disney Buchan weird foster on the college campus. There's probably tons of other people move onto someone that has good credit. Yeah. Good credit. Boy, you pay your car. All your payments on time, you can pay your issue so hot. Let's pretty hot. I'm wet. Sounds like you have good friends, if they're all like, telling you mmediately like I don't trust this hers them number lie on them. More seems like they care about you. Yeah. So that's good for you. It's not like you're alone in this, and I think it's okay to be generous and want to treat people to things, but it's like I'm a big fan of treating people to suffer being generous. But, like most of the time my friends, I please stop, like I don't want you to do this anymore or but, like if then they ever turned a really. Hey, can I have this? It'd be like, like, yeah. It's just like an odd thing especially if you have been taken vantage of before to me that sounds like you're probably a pretty generous person. And then if someone can see that your generous. And then it's like ooh, how can I squeeze more out of her? Like that's how you know, they're fucking shit. Yeah. Yeah. And sometimes it's like hard and devastating to like see to not want to believe that someone's good and it's might be a hiccup and then to see that like oh, they're actually like this is part of their personality. And that can be a huge bummer. And it's hard to walk away from that. But it seems like you got more stuff going on. That's good, and your world tallow boy by. Everyone tell. Why by onto the next hi, Megan and melon special guests? I have a decision that I definitely need helpless. I am turning twenty one in two days, and I've been with my boyfriend for about three months. Now, his parents only yoga studio and his ex girlfriend works for his parents after yoga studio. There could be much worse situation. However, Sisley it gets better. I he'd been in bar, a difference studio. And she comes to my classes, she's really sweet and difficult time. Not being nicer, especially in the professional setting where I Nance director. However, there have been numerous occasions where she's had one on one conversations with me. Either trying to talk poorly about my boyfriend to me or hells me about times that she was spend the night his house or health perfect of fit. She would have been for his family, because she is so involved in the community my boyfriend and his family don't see a problem with inviting her to dinner or even just going to dinner brunch with her separately. However. It makes me really uncomfortable. And it feels wrong that it makes me uncomfortable. I feel like I'm expected to be okay with the entire situation. Even though see his she is his axe and not isn't gonna chain, but also, I don't feel I should have to compromise with everything. And I'm not really sure how to handle the situation, especially considering my birthday is coming up in two days, because I'm really scared. That's no one's gonna invite her to go out with us, and I really just don't want her there. I don't want my boyfriend's back there, and I don't like to wrong of an expectation to set. In fact, she was at my classes morning and asked me what I want is for my birthday. It's a really nice way said and that's fine. But I like my life is six Kalma, like, Hello friends here I am and my life. It doesn't make sense and it was weird ironic mess that I sincerely, genuinely need so much help with. So if you have any amazing by for how to handle the situation where my boyfriend or parents or his act. Please let me know. Because at this point I'm resorting just killing her with kindness because I'm a little bit of petty bit. And, you know, I don't want her having her hand. So please, let me know what you think I could do in this situation. Oh, first of all dude, that sucks addict. So so hard. How? Yeah, that's a meshed to the max. I'm just like I feel like I okay, I mean, have you belated birthday? I feel so bad for you because this is one of those situations when, like if there's, like, if you're just talking to one other person you like disagree on something. And you're like you really think you're crazy if there's a whole fucking family, Andrew boyfriend around one five, and it's just you, and you're like wait am I being like you're not being crazy being so reasonable they're being fucking insane? It's yeah. It's, it's bunkers all the way around. And like you said, it's probably you feel like an island of one right now in this situation, especially when there's a dolts adult parents, that seem like this is okay. Like turns out, like sometimes parents are bonkers God, completely insensitive and way backwards about the way that they handle situations. I think first of all everything that you're feeling is good and genuine and reasonable and normal, and healthy and the right way to be thinking about this, but it is also as a twenty one year old now. It's hard to like put. Your foot down, especially with, like parents of someone. If you're I mean, there are only three months into dating relatively new, so you don't wanna be like, I'm jealous girlfriend when you're not you're being reasonable human being. Yeah. It's just like it's exactly that like they're being unreasonable like the idea that like I'm not friends with access, but, like more than that. The idea that I would want like my like boyfriend to be friends with my ex and be cool with me being friends with my ex like there's all these levels here, like it doesn't matter, no matter how cool and chill in great. They think that she is like she doesn't serve the same purpose in his life. So it's not like a childhood friend that like they had a flirtation, whatever like that. They were introduced to her as his girlfriend and you are now his girlfriend like they don't. Oh, the relationship with her anything. No, there's a certain imbalance of respect going out right now. Like you're being so sweet and thoughtful, and like even considering that the way you're feeling feels wrong is so sw. Sweet of you to have those laws and the, the fact that they're not trying to make you feel more comfortable is a bit of a bummer. And maybe it is just a really direct conversation with your boyfriend. You have to talk to the parents at the boyfriend talked to his parents on your behalf. Maybe it's like just be as direct as you can. And then see what happens from there. That's all you can really do. I've had that in relationships where a boyfriend has called me out on talking too much about previous relationships and not in the way that I was like longing for them or anything just in storytelling about like events and things. Yeah. And he was like I'm kind of uncomfortable hearing about all your previous relationships and I got defensive, I but then realize, like no, if the tables were turned, I would feel the exact same way that he does. And because I want to treat people how I want to be treated. It's up to me now to make changes to meet this person comfortable. So if I mean, I would say, just presented as bluntly as possible. Yeah. And I think if your boyfriend than is like, no, but like it's fine. It's cool like you're you have every right to be not cool. And not. Okay with it. And like the way that they're presenting it to you, and talking to you about it is, as, if like you're the crazy one. But if he had another girlfriend, this is exactly how she would feel too, like this is not a unique. This is not you being hypersensitive or anything like that. So I think if you tell your boyfriend and also like you can't even tell your. Yeah. And like as much as you guys say that she's cool like a puts me in a weird position because, like I'm nice to her when she comes to my class all the time, which is awkward enough, because she comes in wants to talk shit about you. But that's the thing that's what gets me because like you, I'm friends with my ex is like, yeah. Friends with their girlfriends like her and girlfriends, too. But I would never talk shit about them. And that's why I would never go out of my way. Like there's something a little off a little buggers about her showing up to your class one showing up to your class, you can spend somewhere else. I'm sure to like then talking to you and inserting herself into your relationship in a way of like, what would you like for your birthday? There's a little like petty weird stuff on her. I'm gonna wear your skin. That was. Like single, white female actuation, and also, like you don't know this girl comfort like you don't need to make this will uncomfortable because she's making you uncomfortable killing someone kindness is obviously like a great philosophy, but I think that there you can be a little bit more assertive. And if you're, you know, if you're brave enough, this is easier said than done like let her know, like I'm a little uncomfortable like with you being so close in our relationship, hopefully, respect that I know if like tables were turned in this situation, you probably wouldn't want someone like feeling like they're encroaching, on your relationship, as it's in the building stages of it. And that's not invalid like feel or say, yeah. Because I think like you're especially if your friends partaking in it, and if he has any sort of like gripe with you wanted to have the separation to me, it sounds like a guy who wants to keep his options open. And it's like sucky as that is it's like he's okay with his parents still romanticizing her and keeping her around, because he isn't totally done with the idea of her. In the long-term Leon, because it sounds like if she keeps saying how she could have been a great fit that he probably broke up with her. Yeah. And then it's to a meshed for the parents in the business to, like, have her completely leave, and he's not squashing it. And that's what happens when parents still attachment to like Xs and whatever, like that's the their child who has been in that relationship. It's their responsibility to be like, no. That's my relationship. That's done. I don't want you to talk to them anymore. Like we need that separation. This is my new girlfriend like ask you to respect her. And if he's not doing not to me that sounds like he's just not a good boyfriend like that. Yeah. That I think like you need to like it's not even just necessarily about like, oh, she needs to stop doing this, like he needs to not want her to be doing this. So they lack of maturity in that, like understanding, like if this is going to be a serious relationship, and she's trying to be mature, respectful, like he owes her that, too. Yeah. I think it's just like in general if your the person you're dating is too close with their ex and it makes you uncomfortable your boyfriend or girlfriends number on priority for person who they wanna make. Feel comfortable as you like it's not their acts like he doesn't always act like, well, I don't want to hurt my ex's feelings. It's like, well you're not dating her like early hurt her feelings. So she clearly wants to still be with you broke it up. You don't have to see her all the time. It's like the person that you have that, you know, it to the person that you're actively pursuing and like, in a relationship with, and if he's not going to give you that level of respect that he's giving her, and like that, like niceness, I think that you just you need to be able to feel confident to walk away from the situation, knowing that it's not you. And that this situation is like an unrealistic, ask, yes of anybody like. And if he dates somebody else like he'll date a girl and then she'll be like, oh, what the fuck. No, I'm not down for this whole. Yeah. Q matching celebrating our twenty first birthday. And she just showed I. Wondering my, there's a girl who works out at my gym that my boyfriend hooked up with, like years ago. And when he told me about it, I was like, oh, I wanna find out what girl it is. And he was like, no, please don't. And I'm like, I'm going to find out and then the next time I was gonna work out 'cause I could tell quickly because she was death glaring me. But it was like one of those things that I'm key literally was I what should go. I don't wanna fucking. Go is a void like the way. That's how it should be. And he's like, I'm really sorry. I don't like you hooked up with a girl, and you're like twenty three when I didn't even know you and your apologizing to me like, that's not on. Yeah. Let's like avoiding those situation that you should never wanna put your significant other in a situation where they could potentially feel uncomfortable. And then if you're doing it then being like, why do you feel weird like this is fine. Yeah. And it doesn't matter how nice this girl is, that's also sometimes kind of worse like when like your access like a really nice girl on your call. When I hate you so bad. But you're so fucking nice. It doesn't even matter if she's like chill and cool and nice. It's also so fucking weird. Like, okay, I mean, she's definitely doesn't sound nice though this, she's a fight related and. Scorpio or she's a Leo, ex-girlfriend sounds like she's going out of her way to make you uncomfortable. And she knows it like there's no doubt in which is an accident that she's showing up and you happen to be the teacher of these classes. And it's an accident that she starts word vomiting like that. She could have been perfect for their family, like then out. It's crazy. It's like very much an intentional. She's trying to make you insecure new relationship to. She's try to insert herself and keep herself around. So then you become the girl who goes fucking crazy and insane. And then she's there looking like this stable, like, oh my gosh. And how this happened and then suddenly like she's the light and everyone's like, oh, he should be back with her. Hold on. And if she can't get to the ex-boyfriends, she's getting to him through you anther his parents. And that's not fair. No weird. I think you can continue to killer with kindness because it sounds like you sound like a very sweet person in generally don't sound like very like ruthless in that sense. But I think having a super honest direct conversation with your boyfriend is like the way to go. I think your boyfriend needs to hear you out. And if he doesn't hear you out. I think like fucking kick him to the curb. Yeah. Let's go on to the next. Let's do it. Hi on genius own, and I am calling for some advice, basically about healing. I guess you could say like moving on from previous relationships. So basically this recently broken up with and and my one. My fresh relationships is very like physically abusive. Second one very like sexually abusive, and I guess, just in a lot of my relationships, I've dealt with a lot of people kind of I feel like using me or facts, and, like, basically, being like predominant, Dr Mollie and just recently with the person who broke up with me. It's been kinda hard because in previous relationships, I've had considered angry was a person, but. In this case, like there's nothing really wrong with the guy he never did. They seem to me. He's just just really didn't have to for me. So I guess what? I'm calling and asking about is I've just I get like a lot of. Diety about these kinds of things. And like does this kind of feeling like I've only been used for sex? For the past like few relationships and just on a lot of relationships in my license stuff. So I've just calling, and I guess asking for vice about how to be physically, like move on from the relationships and encounters and kind of, I guess, avoid being used and kind of ended up heartbroken. So thank you so much of podcast, like have a few of the big sisters. So thank you. So nice. Yeah, that's rough, it is. I think like how did you say? She was a teenager. I heard a team. Yeah. Yeah. You're very young. Yeah. I think like one of the saddest things that I think we've learned in the last year or so is like, how incredibly common it is for just like women in general, to have ended up multiple relationships or situations that are just like not healthy. And I think now is the time that like were like, X not that, like, not, not that we were accepting of that kind of behavior before, but then kind of realizing that it's not that as much as that was the no that has been the norm for so long and for so many people that that's not. Okay. Yeah. And I think like while it might be hard, especially when it's like time after time after time for you for a while. I think like if you look at your life, and like the scheme of how much more of your life, you have to live like this short, this tiered of your life is going to be relatively short. And I don't wanna like victim shame or blame it all. Because like it has nothing to do with you, and like any like. Predators. Or like a salt at any like shitty people like they're going to be doing that, regardless. But at least for me, I got into the habit of one, I would hop from, like unhealthy relationship to unhealthy relationship like it was because I didn't give myself the time to think that I deserved more than that, about her than that, and it wasn't that like I was letting these people do this to me, but it was like the first time that someone treats you really shitty and really bad. I sat as it is like there's parts of you that are like, oh, this is what I deserve. This is all that. I'm worth. And then it's not that you let other people do that again, but us tend to seek out other people who validate that really negative thought that you have yourself and not that I think that like you brought this upon yourself at all. But I think at least for me, I got into a really terrible habit of dating people who fulfilled like the worst. I image I had of myself, and it wasn't until that I took like a year long break from dating anybody. And I always said that was like it was like my picker was off. And that yet I would I was subconsciously seeking out these people. And when I took it out like. Long break and I started like dating so many different kinds of people not that the not the people that I was immediately attracted to and not to be also like super fucked up thing that happens with, like, if you like any anytime with toxic relationships early emotional, abusive anything like that, like your psyche can then make you attracted to those things, which is so fucked up in like your like brain. This is so not nice to me. Like, why would you make me like Ben be attracted to these people or someone who reminds me of, like self harm? Exactly. And I think like, once you for me, it was taking a huge break. And then it was like, I'm not gonna mmediately go after the guys that I'm interested in, because that hasn't done well, for me because I don't think that I'm attracted to what's good for me. I think like it's like fulfilling this terrible thing. And so that for me was like, Ben dating people that were nothing like might hype and just like a really broad range, and also like taking my time with it because I think that was also like wouldn't you jump from relationship to relationship. You can tend to put a lot of a lot of importance on someone else, like fixing you and making you feel validated and worthy you. Okay. And not like you're never gonna get over this, like bad relationship, or like this toxic abuse in less like until you get into a good relationship when in reality, like the doesn't have to do with a partner like you move on from all that stuff solo and by yourself. And until you do that. I just find that like, no matter how great guy is he's never going to make you feel better because this is something that you have to deal with on your own which or and like as as I'm learning in therapy like not by yourself. But like with, with somebody who's not that role that you're trying to fill like no one is ever big enough to fill that role because like you've had these things happen to you, and like you need to process and deal with them, and what they mean to you, as a person who you are. And how you deal with your feelings, and emotions and relationships. But you can't process that and deal with that in a relationship with a romantic partner. Yeah, I agree. I think first of all, these people that used you in that way, suck the terrible people, and clearly have their own problems to I was going to say, I think if you have the means or any sort of resources to talk to a therapist or a counselor. There's probably a lot of lingering trauma, from those situations, that's going to affect the way that you approach relationships moving forward. And I'm sure you feel devastated right now because you just got broken up with a relationship where you can't pinpoint something that they did wrong that you could, which is what we'd use a lot. I know anytime I re- relationship ended, I would look for all the negative things at that person did to me so I could move on. But it wasn't even really moving on the guy wasn't I was just using excuses to move forward and same, I started going to therapy consistently of last year. And that's like the biggest tool that's helped me find a relationship that feels strong in its foundation and makes me feel valid and I feel ballad feeling great about myself in the relationship that I. Think that and I'm no specialist to talk to any of the trauma that you've been through. But I think. Eighteen recognizing that you had really toxic Schutte using type of relationships is huge. Because now you have a tool to start talking and working through all that. And to be able to pinpoint when it when if it happens in a future relationship, because a lot of people like you were saying now in this culture, it's been lots of things been brought to light. So I think a lot of people these realizations that they had all these shitty experiences without even really knowing it because they had no way to like they didn't truly believe that, that was as bad as it was, like, we rationalize the good out of really bad traumatic situations. So being able now to just start like here's your jumping off point. I think you should really work on yourself and not worry about having defined like you said, a great partner that, validates, quote fixes you. Yeah. No, I think that's exactly being eighteenth sucks. Anyway, this guy, but like you said like the realization of knowing that, like, it took me therapy, and way longer to realise like. Oh, wow. Like to unpack all those situations. Like so much of this stuff that, like I was like I was carrying baggage on from these other things, and like, and you have no idea. And then it's like, oh, I didn't realize that I had this, like, like bomb minefield of triggers that come from other things that have affected the way. I've interacted in a relationship in my like now present a hat, as my one of my I have two therapists, but I was one of them says my favorite line if it's historic if it's hysterical. If it's hysterical. It's historical. And now for me, I was like, oh, wow. Does that mean is that basically like if you're in an argument with someone or something happens, even if it doesn't regard anyone else? And like your reaction, it just feels like so blown out of proportion. It's because your as opposed to being the base level, like, if for audio listeners, I'm doing hand gestures, but for the base level being here, instead, it's here, it's because this has happened so many times before that your threshold for it, like just go from zero to one hundred like so fast as opposed to getting, like, if someone says something so essentially triggers, like, if someone says something that would make anyone else like sad. But it makes you absolutely devastated. Because it's not the first time you've heard it. Yeah. And like it just takes your mind right back to that. And I think that for me was like incredibly helpful in, in dating, especially was like the fact that I was like. Oh, wow. Like I've had since I've had, like like I was crazy guys like I love to. Guy who would like show up like Dr three states away and show up where I was for my birthday. I was like so romantic any insane. But like, then there are certain things that like when are an I would then get into this habit of like playing games with them because like they would play mind games with me. I play mind games with them and that became exciting and what I liked. Yeah. And when I tried you that for the first time with Mike her boyfriend he was, like, what are you doing? And he was like, and I was like, oh, I'm out of town makes sorry. I can't come. No know what? Like we still have the same calendar. Like I know you're town, like, why are you avoiding me whatever? And I was just like oh, and it just became this whole thing that it was like when someone else presented as such a rational thing. And then even same thing in therapy. It's like when someone says something, so, like when they say that these things that you think in your mind or like you spiral in your mind. And someone says it in such a rational way that you're like, yeah. There is there is no point from the reason why I'm doing this because this is what I've known I guess is what I've done before, and it becomes a habit. It's not the only way to do it. It just means it's the only way you really know how to do it. And the way that you. You probably feel the most comfortable and like the guys that you probably feel the most like immediately attracted to, or comfortable around, or you feel like you have like a repertoire with mmediately are probably similar to the guys have treated you like shit because that's what you know, and as much as like it's the devil, you know, versus the devil that you don't and like as scary, as that is, I think, like the most important thing you can do is like you said, like you need, you need like the space away from trying to find somebody to fill that and to make you, I don't know, at least, like, with relationship in general. Like they all fail until one doesn't. Yeah. And I think like for me, I definitely every time I would have a bad relationship like I wanted, like in my mind to know it's like if you get like rejected or something you're like, oh, I wanna get on a dating app. And I wanna like I just want to know that I'm still cool so fulfilled by attention. That's positive. And so then, when it comes to relationships, like, that's just so much harder, because it's like we have a bad relationship, you want to be validated knowing that you can have. Good relationship. But then you're hopping right back into something that's not like a quick fix sort of thing. And I think like it's gonna fuck yourself worth. There's this whole thing and the Ecker totally books about pain bodies like we all have these pain buddies, jurist centrally like the negative views that we have about ourselves and a lot of times we just caught we just feed those pain bodies because like you said, it's super familiar. Yeah. So I'm sure you're, you're subconsciously seeking out certain type of person that makes you feel certain way that you're so used to feeling albeit completely negative and shitty and use. And so it's like talking to someone outside of a romantic relationship to start figuring out. Like why do I seek this out? I these have been really terrible situations in the past. I want to move forward. And I know you asked about healing. Everyone's healing processes totally different. So it's hard to be like, here's the actual formula of exactly what to do, and this will be the outcome for you. It's just starting to ask yourself more. I guess deeper questions about. Yourself? And it's so as someone that's a monogamous like cereal monogamous like dating person. It's so so easy to seek out a relationship after a break-up justify fill fill that stent like the distraction and not wanna feel alone because when you're alone your face with all of your pain, buddies, your face with all the negative things your face with all the memories of the bad stuff that's happened, your face with all the self loathing of like not feeling enough. And but if you're in a new relationship, and someone's validating that you're like pretty and fun and stuff like that, then you don't have to you can ignore working through any of that. So it sounds like you're ready to start doing the work. Yeah. Which is unfortunately, what it is. It's work. Yeah. And it's not necessarily like fun which my therapist, always laughs at me when I'm like, I shouldn't fun, just like, well, it sounds supposed to be fun. Yeah. I don't like it. She was like, well, I think it's helping my God. But I'm not having a good time. I have waited therapy for so long. I knew it was not going to be bad. I knew I'd be lying, and I've gone to therapy in the past consistently. Lying to my therapist because I don't want to reveal how bad I feel any of the bad situation. So I'll just give her like ten percents. Yeah. Yeah. Then it's like, oh, why am I not getting better because I'm not actually participating one hundred I'm giving this person a lot of money, not helping. The thing of cool, my shoes, like I'm, I'm like, kind of like a little bit of a mess. But, like I already like, I'm really self aware. Yeah. You hear I mean calling into you, I think is a really great step to even be able to be like I feel shitty right now. And I don't wanna feel shitty. That's like literally, the first step. Yeah. Well, best of luck to you, lots of love. Okay. Guys. It's time for a quick break, and we'll be right back. Of is obstruction service that delivers vitamin supplements, customized for your specific health needs just take a short quiz and answer questions about your diet lifestyle, fitness, and health goals, and care of puts together personalized plan just for you. Upgrade your health routine, the summer and make health and wellness a priority with care of their fun online quiz only takes five minutes to find out your personal scientifically-backed vitamin and supplement recommendation, then care of delivers daily vitamin and supplement packs, all customized to your recommendations. Super only taking what you need. It's so customize that the packets even say your name them care of also offers protein powders available at individual on the go packets personalized fitness goals in dietary preferences, the individually wrapped vitamin packets are now made from composed -able plant based film, so your vitamins are cut fresh and they're better for the environment. I'm a fan of care of I took this quiz, and it was cool to see, like I mean first of all, I was just happy that I could put I like exercise five days a week. And I was like ooh. Whoa, cool. Go me, but what was really cool about this? Is I got a lot of supplements to help me with my hair, skin and nails. But then also with gut health, because gut health is so incredibly important, something that I any time I take a health quit. I'm like it's going to be about my stomach, isn't it? It's going to be about that. And also one of the other things I really like these energy packets that you can that was one of the things that hide in mind, which is great because I usually get like hit us some midday. And that was something that I really, really loved. So for twenty five percent off your I care of order, go to take care of dot com and enter promo code blame. That's take care of dot com promo code blame for twenty five percent off your first order. If there's something interfering with your happiness, or preventing, you from cheating, your goals better help online counseling can help better help offers licensed professional counselors for specialized in issues, such as depression anxiety, relationships trauma, anger family, conflicts, LGBT, matters grief, self esteem, and more connect with your professional counselor to safe in private Orland environment and can help your own time and at your own pace. Anything you share is confidential and it's so convenient, you could schedule secure video, or phone sessions, as well as chat and text with your therapist, if for some reason, you're not happy through counselor though, you can request a new one at any time for no additional charge. Best of all is a truly affordable option. Don't blame me with mega listeners even get ten percent off your first month with the discount code blame. So why not get started today? Go to better help dot com slash blame. Then simply fill out a questionnaire and help them assess your needs to get mashed the council you'll love, that's better help dot com slash blame. Did you that fashion as one of the top polluting industries in the world? I actually did know that a more Vert, which is French for green love. Oh, I didn't know that though is sustainable clothing brand that thoughtfully designed pizzas using sustainable fibers nontoxic dies and local production. So you always feel good about what you're wearing their clothes are made in limited quantities to limit access ways ensure the highest production standards, and they've worked directly with mills to develop a signature fabrics that are soft beautiful and durable. And of course, sustainable with impossibly soft. He is comfortable dresses. She jumps, shoes and accessories. More Vert has classic and fluttering pieces for work and play. Right now, a more is offering our listeners fifteen percent off when you get your first order, when you go to shop green love dot com slash blame. That's shop green love dot com slash blame. For fifteen percent off your first order. Go to shop green love dot com slash blame. Onto the next I am. Twenty two years old. And I am currently talking to a guy that is twenty I've been talking to him for what's going to be ten months in about shoo weeks, so nine and a half months, and we are still not dating. So I met him in the summertime we talked about two weeks before we got. You know, like we started you can't thing and stuff like that. And he did tell me at first, like he told me he's like, I'm not looking for a relationship right now, but I want to like, enjoy this with you while we can because I do really like enjoy your president and I wasn't looking for a relationship either because I had just gotten out of a series three year relationship at the time not have been over for two years old. So, like I wasn't just it's not a rebound but we were honest, not front about that. And so I didn't think that we would be talking for very long. But here I am. It's been nine and a half months. And we really do have feelings for each other. We both say that we care about each other a lot. And we talk every single day all day. We hang out every weekend. I sleep over at his house, like we haven't had sex yet. But that's like a personal thing. Neither one of us are really ready for that if we're not going to be in a relationship. So. I don't know. Okay. The big problem is he still won't take me. And like he said that he likes me and he still wants to talk to and like. I don't know. I feel like we both have so much love break other, but he's still not ready for that. And I personally feel like he used to go to therapy, because he has he had like a really bad relationship before he met me and like a year before he met me, any still not over that. And so I'm not going to date him until he's like ready to gate but I don't know how to bring out saying, like, hey, dude, you need to go to Sarah, p because this is like an issue when I say, it's hurting you and also like we wanted eighty other, but that's never going to happen if you don't like the bottom of what you're going through. God stop talking to him. I know you won't stop talking to him us. All this advice is a moot point. All right. She's already been like stop talking to him. I don't want to stop talking girl. I've been there, I tell you, I could scream as loud as possible that this boy doesn't like you and is taking you wanna ride for his own benefit, and you're not getting as much out of this as he is. But you're not gonna hear it. I don't think. Yeah. Like, and that's the thing that like sucks. When it comes to fuck boys, it's like we have selective hearing. We're like this. The thing he likes you. He's told you he likes you. And he does. Like you. Sure. He just doesn't like you that much. Yeah. He doesn't like you as enough to not want to date, and he doesn't like you enough to date. You and like as much as that sucks. Like, it's, it's a true fact, and like I'm sure you've probably been in positions in that same way. We're like there's but guys like you've enjoyed flirting with and you like you wouldn't date. But, like still fun. That's who you are in this situation. Yeah. And it sucks. It just sucks all around. It's uncomfortable. Who knows if? Who knows if whatever the chaos or drama is from his previous relationship, if that's even real, I know. That's like at very convenient excuse. I'm not ready today. I had a traumatic previous relationship. I've used that excuse because I was too much of a pussy to tell a boy that I don't think this is going to go any further, and, like it, it happens with people, all of the telltale signs, are there that this guy is just kind of if you're willing to keep you around at arm's length because the shittier thing is like you in this mentality if another girl swoops in all of a sudden, they start dating it's going to be jevon aiding. So you I think need to start separating now and like move on a little bit who knows in the future. If the stars align and work separately, has been done on each other that it makes sense and you guys like hit back off and let go right into a relationship. That's what happened with the guy. I'm dating right now. Like we hung out in the past, and it wasn't the right time. And I, I was very much the one that like wasn't ready. And so. Now the stars aligned and it's like a much solid healthier situation. So it's never out of the question. But for now it seems like this guy I mean as really been ten months nine and a half months. So many years, three years. He also told you from the very beginning like what he that he didn't wasn't looking for anything serious, and I think, like a lot of the time in general. I think we should all just be more honest with ourselves when we, when we respond to things like that, like, I never think you should go into a situation like when you're like defining the relationship, whatever asking for someone what they want. I think the most important thing is just laying your cards on the table and be like this is what I feel because your feelings can't be conditional and how they feel. So it's like they're like, oh, it wasn't casual in, you know, like, if you don't want something casual. That's why you need to be the one the opened the conversation. I k I really like you. I really care about you. I would really love for us to like actually date and that's not going to happen. I need to leave. Yeah. Because it's not fair. Because I think like as much as you said, like back, then you weren't you're cool with it at the end of the day, I think you have been prioritizing him versus any other guy that you've been dating like as much as you weren't ready to date. He was a convenient guy to kind of be there and like you to hang out with no pressure, as you got over your break-up. And then you didn't put any energy and into anyone else. And so it's all in him. And so now you're waiting being like okay, well, I'm ready to date. And he from the beginning told you that he wasn't ready to on his end. He's like, I haven't ever lied to you. Yeah. And it's really also a convenient lie. We tell ourselves because it's embarrassing to be the one. That's more than the other person. It's very easy. When you meet someone that you genuinely really liked to lie to yourself, and say, I also don't want a relationship, but like you said you were checked out of your three year, relationship two years before. So you've already like moved on emotionally from that situation. So I don't think you're grieving, the loss of that relationship since you're mentally checked out already. So you probably were ready to date this person. And you because he wasn't tried to make it cool and chill. And like not dramatic by also saying, yeah, yeah, on paper, I just got have a long term relationship. So I clearly probably I'm not ready today. You even though I secret. If you wanted to date me, I have probably also say, I want to date you and it's just not like I don't think it's fair to future you because, like, yeah, the more that you stick around it, totally sucks. What exactly like you said, he's going to meet some girl, and he is going to immediately start dating her. They voted to there for two weeks, and he just knows if you've been around for nine and a half months, and he doesn't know that's because it's a no like that doesn't that doesn't just stick around that doesn't just happen in that way. And you can really care for somebody and not can still not be your person. And like he might wish it was you. He might really wish like you know what, this would be so much more convenient. I really do like you. But like I don't like you enough in that way. Like that's just like it's just not what I want right now. That's not what it is. And if it's not enough like you never wanna be that person who's, like tugging, the person that you're dating to like like you as much as them like you don't want. You don't want to have someone to play catch up where you have to dial back, your feelings, because you don't want to come off, too strong and be too crazy. That's not how it should be. The truthfully is like if someone wants to be with you, they will be with you, and, like, especially after all of this time, like I also think, like I've had I've had friends who've like started talking to guys when they were in going through like breakup, and like we're dealing with it and they've been like, hey, I really like you and I am not in a good place right now. So, like, I'm let's not talk like, yeah, let's separate and when I'm doing better. Let's go out again, but it's not like oh, I can keep you if he's okay with keeping you around as a friend through that whole process to me. That's not that's not gonna go anywhere. He wouldn't have done that if he truly thought that you guys had a future together at all of that stuff. He wouldn't have wanted to have all of this time in this weird limbo, like it's just not worth it. And I think he's just he told you what his intentions were on what he wanted from the very beginning, and that doesn't mean that he doesn't care about you. And that everything else, he said is ally. But it just that rings, true, his actions and all of that stuff and the therapy and all of that stuff. Like, I think, like a somebody who preaches therapy hard. Core. I don't think it's a case of him. And even go to therapy to get over this relationship, I think you need to realize that he's not that into you, and you need to get over that she's trying to fix him. Relationship trying to fix somebody, and you can't yet if he I mean you guys have been nine and a half, ten months hanging down a ubaid. But also, like, if that guy wanted to go to therapy to fix himself, he would have signed himself up all ready would have done some research. It's not your job to be his secretary that looks up therapy, and it's like here if you go, then we can be in a relationship like the coolest most mature thing you can do at this point is be like, brutally honest with yourself and recognize that either one, you really do want a relationship, and if he's not ready. You need to start opening yourself up to other people more to if you really do not want a relationship right now. Like just be super super like uncomfortably honest with yourself. Yeah. Because it's like it's not like this is a comfortable situation for the last ten months. Anyway. Why not make it a little bit more uncomfortable and walkaway? Yeah. Because I think you're trying to find excuses and reasons to get him to be where you are. And if he's not there now you don't want to, like, it's all these wishes that you're like an all these, like, fairy tales that you tell yourself like if he just went to therapy, we could be a couple and. Be so strong and Salva that's nut, he could go to therapy, and then, cut it off with you immediately after and also at the end of the day, it's like as much as like really think all of that out in what you're what you think that you want, because you want a relationship with somebody who let's say, if everything that you said is, is true, if the who he is in to you, but, like he's still so years later still so hung up over his ex that he can't even get himself to go to therapy. He needs you to force him to go to therapy. So he can realize that he does want to be in a relationship with you. Do you want to be in a relationship with that guy f- like when you are so sure and solid of your emotions in your feelings that you need to hand hold him to get to where you are that to me is just like that's always gonna that doesn't feel like a secure stable love that I'm going to be like, oh, I hope you still like me away. Hope you so like me. I don't want to say anything that like freaks you out, because that's not you don't feel secure in that. Yeah. Also, I think none of these answers were giving you are a surprise shoe. I think called because you already know. What the answer is you sound very intelligent in like you've done some of your own personal work that I don't think anything were saying is isn't something you've already thought of a million times. Yeah. Who God let him show you know that? Yeah. If she if she kept listening. I thought it I've done, not the answer. I wanted. But I wanna hear, I'm going to go ask anybody white hating out. What would they be Brad? Oh for sure. Brad, Brad with like a. B. R. A. Y. D. Brad. There's a hot. Okay. Onto the next hin twenty I just finished my sophomore year college. So. Here's what my life has been like so far, I generally should shiftless guy in January and have like talking to beginning of December everything was goes every day, it was like, oh my God. So me like ridiculous level connection. And like I m after I was I can, you know, friends, it's because we had mutual friends like wanted to do is make it awkward like pressure. And, you know, you're mazing loan. So. I don't know in a way he just made it seem like you know, was betrayal. And like you went on vacation family, and like he face on the whole time, always into me, and he starts parents go me, all of his friends, new vote knee. And like we dated for, like, officially dated after is open their leaks. Like a fairly big by any broke up with me, and then I can him and turned out July like the whole time, and he then try to get in trouble and say that I was him. Because of it, and like a bunch of people, my life lies and try to seem like has to the hospital and he had a room. He and when I asked, how he said, we all have our talent you have I have mine. He's my question is I so really must about it. And like I think maybe hurt or the should be and I don't really talk about it because I think when it happened, it was okay for me to be Matic, and for me to be like, not okay. But now I think when I brought him up people like like Roy's, but also like a sexual thing he off and I had to figure out the situation. He put me in that. And I just think that, like I still feel like I feel about it. I still cry about it. And. Essentially, try to ruin my life and some maybe more. But I saw Dr Ed, it really sucks. Because he bide admitted to manipulating everybody in like everyone, like yeah. I would I would have regretted it right after that vision. And like I like her personally is not her body. So anybody could have for me? What should I do because I don't know cry about it. And I think I even him more power than he deserves in this moment. But at the same time like it hurts, and I was like, really, really love him because my I get that he was, like, maybe folding. I don't know anyway, she can help you. What? Helping fuck Lassie about. Yeah. That guy what a loser. What a fucking scary loser. I know how that first of all this happened January. So it's right now June. That's not a ton of time. So h totally normal to still feel like traumatize and to still be processing what the fuck just happened to you. So I don't think your friends tell you like to get over it. Like tell them the fuck off. It's if there's more to the, there's a lot of vague things you said, so I don't know fully all the details in the context of everything. But it sounds like there's a lot of intense layers to this, that I'm sure you probably like a lot of embarrassment about when he broke up with you. And then also, it's the one of most embarrassing things is like one getting broken up with a person, but to really liking that person, and then finding out that they dropped you and that they're like, bonkers in the brain a little bit and feel like I chose. That person I was attracted to that. I can't even trust myself and my instincts. But it's not use it sounds like it's a lot of chaos happening there. And I think it's totally normal and find that you're still crying and thinking about, like you shouldn't feel that's just going to you're going to cut yourself off from actually, like, grieving, the loss of what happened, it's intense. Yeah. And I like I don't think I really don't think this is an amount of time that I would if I was a friend, get over it. I think like also one of the important thing to remember, just in general, especially if it's like you're talking to your friends about really heavy traumatic things it can be really also hard for your friends as hard as that is for you. I mean we preach their Bahir like crazy. But that's one of the biggest things that I think has been a great discussion as of late in general, is talking about how like your friends aren't your therapist, and you can talk to your friends at confide in your friends, but also with? Traumatic and triggering things. You also don't know everything in your friends lives, and like it can be a law. Like if your friend is really dealing with something even similarly or not similar at all. And they've a lot on their plate, and they're not opening up about it can be a lot to require that from your friends, I think, in general, though, like you should be able to have coversation befriends about it. And if there are friends who are more able to talk to you about it and, like, not write you off as being stint, like ridiculous with it. I would lean on them because any judgmental, also I suppose any friends, we're still friends with him are not your friends. Yeah. I am not here for if I anyone who has treated me like shit, or has been like a fucking toxic. Terrible person me, if anybody friends are still friends then, like, no, like, then friend. Yeah. And someone that's admitted to manipulating your friends like that's a foof like you're just cool with it. Like you're like, oh, no. I mean it wasn't me and like they owned up to it that people in the world to be friends with so many other people. So I would say, first and foremost, like, I think you definitely need. Goonies. I'm gonna talk to who is going to listen and be compassionate in like help you pack everything. Because it hasn't been that long. And you're when you date someone who, like he sounds like a sociopath, and that the whole thing associate pads is, is the facade is like, when they're you fall for the image of them, and they won't you to who who they are portraying themselves to be. And then when you start to see, like behind the behind all of that, and you start to catch glimpses of that it becomes it's like, when thinks impacted my therapy session a lot. It becomes a whole thing like you said trusting yourself and then it becomes whole internal thing of being like I don't know when my brain is telling me the truth. And when it's telling me what when it's lying to me because when you're with somebody, and you spend time with someone who's incredibly manipulative to your own reality. You've a really hard time grasping reality because you've listened to what someone else told you as reality for a really long time. And even this relationship wasn't necessarily super long. It made you question yourself, and I think that's going to seep into every. Aspect of your life. Not just your own Antic life is because like it does make you like second guess everything that you're saying or you're thinking that you're doing that. You're interpreting. This actually is this is this, this, or then, also it can make you like I'm definitely like, I'm such a mistrusting person because of that stuff. Like, yeah. I then would like if someone was just like nice to me. I'm like, I don't believe it had like, and then I would sell sabotage new relationships because like I was just being nice like I'm sorry. I did not know what that was like. And so it could be really, really hard. And I think the most important thing to do is to talk to professional about that look, and we plugged in the last one, but all of them, we always have the affordable therapy listed in our show notes. But I think like also first and foremost, like give yourself like give yourself like some time to breathe, and some space from this, because like this is it's it wasn't just like a break up. It was like motion and mind fucking you. Yeah. And that's something that's going to take a little bit longer to get over a specially when it someone who was, like, so charming, and that is associate like, there's so charming, and like it was like, felt tailor-made to you. It makes you feel like a fucking idiot. Yeah. And then it's really easy to play your own mind games in yourself romanticize, the person that you were like I that I thought he was gonna be my soulmate. You can think that because that's what they sold you on when you first start up. But then you really have to look at the reality of what did to you as they. Unfolded, all their layers of like sociopath -i, also I always think that an under my myself in the time that, like getting over a breakup, especially something that is traumatic like that. It's like morning death. And there's five stages of grief, that if you look it up, it's so maps over, like getting over a breakup like you're in denial, then you're angry about it, and you rationalize and then something in the new except or you bargain, and then you accept, and so it's of course you're now still having these moments because sounds like you're angry about it. You'll probably in denial for a long time. It's finally hitting you and you're mad and you're sad and you don't know why you can't get over it. Quick enough or pretend the are just cut it off. 'cause sounds like you're not associated pats. You can't just compartmentalize your feelings like he probably can. So it does affect you deeper and it affects your relationships with your friends. So yeah, go do your work for yourself realize that you've seen this guy's true colors. And that ultimately people like that. Like it'll come to light for people. You don't have to do any campaigning for your friends to tell them that he's a bad guy. They can't see it eventually find out in some other way. And hopefully you've moved away on by that point. But good luck. It's okay. Your feelings are valid. And it's like, yeah, it's gonna take everyone's got different timelines on how they get over relationships, too. So don't feel stressed out that you're not completely over it overnight. Yeah. I don't even necessarily think it's about him. I think also about like what he record like. Yeah. Person that he was. I don't think it matters duration someone's sales. Someone's car salesman sold you on this image. That turns out wasn't what it was. And then right when you were about the by the car. They're like never mind. The car's not available by get off my property. Exactly. Fuck that guy that guy should we is time for don't blame them. Okay. This is don't blame them. This is when listeners calling with their own advice from previous episodes. So if like someone dated associate path, they would then call in and be like, here's my two so cool. So what does this one from? This is from the episode with Jocelyn Davis season three the twentieth episode from that season. And the original caller had called because her boyfriend's friend was being like a bed into once on him. Okay. And so do you remember I do too? This is someone calling with similar experience. Hi. Megan and guests I am calling in on the most recent podcast with Jocelyn. I'm calling about the caller said that her boyfriend has a friend who's kind of bad influence. I'm kinda seating from experience or AMT thinking from experience on this, my boyfriend, I together for six years. This may and his best friends since they were like in middle school is air was not the best influence on my boyfriend, and it came to the point of where I get really nervous every time that him and his friend would go and hang out in. Go out drinking or even like hanging at home, something always this kind of ended up getting a little crazy when he was with him. And my by and what that was. Something that I've learned is that when I stopped making a big deal about it. And when I got trying to control him he realized on his own how stupid it really was. And it ended up also not being a fight between the two of us anymore. Because again, he was realizing just kind of how foolish it was. So when I stopped making a big deal about it, and when I stopped bringing it up, when I'm not trying to say in what he did, and who he spent his time with he actually stopped making those decisions. Because like I said, he just kinda realized that it was kind of land. So I don't know of any help, but now. It is definitely not an issue between us anymore. So anyway, love your podcast. Thanks so much help. Oh, that's really sweet. And it's also a tremendous beautiful amount of trust that you put in the person that you chose to be in a relationship with have like the wherewithal to recognize it on their own said, of you badgering them about it and getting mad that they can't see from like an eagles view like what the situation is. So that's really cool. Good for you guys. Yeah. That's so much are, and like, just like such the smarter way to do it that I never would have thought of. Yeah, I would never trust them one to recognize. That'd be like you don't see what I mean. But no, that's like that's genius. And like the idea that yeah, I mean, I always say, which apparently should preach works. I would never thought this like expect more of the people that you surround yourself really like them and you really care about somebody like you should hope that they're good people. And that there's mart. But I think that's like. Yeah, that's that's incredibly impressive. And it's also like it's the same thing when you let someone like come to the conclusion on their own, then you're like, oh, wow. I never thought of that. And you're like I'm not at the evil bitch. Right. And I'm not the controlling girlfriend that's trying to because there's also imagine that, if you consistently bring up something that bothers you and they can't see it, then they kind of, you know that you want what you can't have they wanna hang out with that person more just to spite you. So they have their independence in some regards. So letting them feel their independence and then come to their own conclusions. Pretty mature and RAD. John, I'm very impressed by the what happened with the original caller. Let us know. If you did, I will be so, so impressed these things. I don't think any of us had to do that. None of that. Guys. That's it for this episode grace, plug your shit. Oh, yeah. I got a couple podcasts going on. Most impressive, not too deep. The Melissa works on that comes out every Monday, and then this make it weird. If I'm Mary Hart blooms out, every Wednesday and then just I'm at grace Helbig cross all the social media's. Yes. And we're I'm watching you cook food, once a month. Thank you, somehow, I got a brand deal that is consistent is bizarre that they support me like very into it, though. If you guys want to call it to be an coming episode. You can leave us a voicemail at three one zero six nine four zero nine seven six internationalists can Email is an audio file at Meghan podcast. GO dot com. Falls on Instagram at don't mean pod. And check out our patriot for bomb ASA -clusive content chat rooms talked to us talk to each other make some new friends throw stocks. And people like more like we can talk about, you know, like you're like, is my boyfriend cheating on me. And then we can only deep oh yeah. That's a great way to use your disquiet on people present like secret agent. Immediately like this is what we call it secret agents. Well, we'll see next week. Whatever struggles you're facing from depression anxiety, trauma in grief. Better help connect you with professional counselor in a safe and private online environment. It's so convenient. You can schedule secure video, or phone sessions, as well as chat and text with your therapist in anything shares completely confidential best of all, as a truly affordable option. Don't blame me if Meghan ranks listeners even get ten percent off your first month with discount code blame. So why not get started simply go, better dot com slash blame and fill out a questionnaire to get mashed with the council, you'll love today. Don't blame me as a production by me executive produced by Melissa demont's camera operator. Amanda Lechner production assistance by Julie. Carleen and music by Ryan hunter and Giacomo Picasso part of the her pod network.

Buffy partner Georgia grace Helbig Paul giamati Twitter Saul fever Ben Accion sneezing New york Ian Fleming Mel Bobby canco murder Meghan Karen Michael medicine
Charles Cumming

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

28:43 min | 1 year ago

Charles Cumming

"Hello this is meet the writers. I'm Georgina Godwin. My guest. Today is the best selling British thrilla writer he's been described as one of the best of the new generation of British British spy writers who are taking over John Kerry and Len Deighton left off. He's won the C._W._a.. Ian Fleming still dagger for Best Thriller and The Bloody Scotland Crime Book of the year and was actually approached by the secret intelligence service to become a spy himself Elf. He tells us it was an opportunity. He didn't perceive but then he would say that wouldn't he charles coming welcome to meet the writers. Thank you for having it's lovely Alita to finally get you in the studio. We've had conversations in many places around the globe as befits a glamorous thriller right we we've been we've been in Dubai and Sri Lanka and clamorous Buckingham Glamorous by the thing is I'm terrible in the mornings and you would want to do this interview nine o'clock in the morning and I I'm. I'm barely belly out of bed by then it's shaming I get to work. I do work but I tend to stop quite late and go through till about seven so I'm no good to anybody before about eleven o'clock. When did you start the writing putting in terms of of your life not in terms of your daily routine quite a long time ago now? I've always been a writer of SORTA. I worked for a long time at the week magazine <hes> while at the same time right in my early novels spy by nature and the Spanish game and typhoon and so on so I've always had a a right as routine solitary life of the novelist of of the writer from the age of about Twenty Six expos twenty five twenty six where did that spring from what you Ernie influences your parents literary they want. I grew up in my my parents. Were divorced and I grew up in houses without books. I mean my dad had a copy of the fourth protocol beside his bed for about fifteen years which I think he did eventually read and my mother was not a great read Emma. She's quite hard work. She was running a hotel with my stepfather so she pretty enough time to read but it was really quite late that I came aim to to to literature to reading remember actually I'd I'd already left my school in a friend gave me a copy of the beautiful and damned by ESCO Fitzgerald asset of a transformational affecting me but by then I was already eighteen and I'd always read but I was more of a sort of cinema guy I was quite similar trip but not particularly illiterate then I went. I read American English Literature Emory University and sort of caught up quite fast and right after university. That's when you were approach to join them. I six for was it. Am I five not allowed to tell you say I m I six. It was a family friend who my stepfather hadn't seen for for a long long time who came to dinner at my Momma Stepfather's house down in England by then and of course neither my stepfather know anybody else knew this man who had actually been in my six just thought he was sort of pure diplomatic foreign office and he I talking them well and so forth and then a few days later he bumped into my mother and supermarket and this is exactly as it is actually an by by nature when I sort of fictionalized story <hes> he bumped into her weight trolls and <hes> and said has Charles of being diplomat and my mother said no but he has now so she says she could put us in touch and then I went along and it turned out that this initial interview wasn't for what they call for stream dream diplomatic service it was for secret intelligence service better known as my six and how did it got. I'm still working. No I didn't get in I went through very sort of hoops and exams and interviews and blood tests that that's not true the loss but and I didn't get in but I had enough of an exposure to that world and a fascination with what would have happened to me had I stayed in it and what would have happened to my relationship. At the time I had a governor racers governor then later married and what would happen to my friendships friendships and my relationship with my mother and my father and so I created this character Alec millions who was sort of nights move away from me a more ambitious more Venal I hope plus myself who who goes through this process but stays in it because it was a sort of odd moment at the end of my lost sort of interview exchange with them where they said we haven't exhausted every avenue. There's always the chaps across the river. I am I five and I just said I said I'm done thank you. I don't want to go anymore so that that sort of triggered something we've had gone to the chips across the what would have happened and that's where Alec Milius came from and how did it affect Alex relationships and indeed how might have to do. Are you allowed to tell you family you are. I mean you have a choice. You can tell them that you you don't want anybody to know they might advise you. I suppose if you're going into very deep cover with a cold nonofficial cover knocks. Let's say you work in the pharmaceutical industry and they want you to spy while doing your job. It's probably best that you don't let your nearest. There's I know that but certainly as it was explained to me that you can have a conversation with with them and then let let your parents know whoever you choose find a stand that M. I.. Five they have days where officers are allowed to invite that that partners into who tim's house so that they can look around and see where the husband wife with boyfriend girlfriend is spending time because once they're inside temps has for the day you'll you'll off comes. There's no not allowed to be texting using mobile phones inside the building pretty obvious reasons and and you can't this is one of the great pressures of the secret life you you can't tell your personal with whom you'll sharing what you do. During the day it's an official secret so that can build up stress within a relationship and therefore as a as a valve release they allow partners to come in. I don't know if that applies to six minutes so writing that first thriller and writing about all of this not actually having been part of the service must have been quite a challenge. I mean a lot of research to do about something that you will not really allowed to know much yeah. No you're right and it's no coincidence that the sort of the the best spy writer certainly in English spy fiction purchased by fiction. I should say Worrell at one point or another employed by the secret services so Graham Greene some more officer Jonah Keri Dayton ever worked for them but but I may not be up to speed on that so yes you can't just open the yellow pages and as it was then you couldn't just open the yellow pages and look up spies ain't GonNa talk to people I did get lucky met a couple of people who were very very useful to be who had experience of that world but also a lot of it is common sense. If I want to recruit you as a source spying a relationship business and so I would cultivate you either with money or the author for all of whatever it is that I think is your sort of weak spot so to speak and it may just be that you'll ideologically driven and like I can use that part of your you know the better part of your nature to to persuade you to work for me and so all of that stuff is is basic human interaction actually sleep. Spying is often been compared to seduction you what you're trying to identify what it is about somebody that they want an which buttons are most usefully pressed and and you go ahead and press them. How was your first novel received it was I think it was well received? It had quite a lot of tension largely. Largely because of <hes> I it was basically flagrant. Breach of the Official Secrets Act that I've written written on account of what had happened to me and it wasn't the first time that somebody had done that. Andrew Robots historian had written a piece in the Sunday Telegraph describing more or less exactly what had happened to me how to him maybe ten years earlier and he had received a kind of knock on the door and a rep on the knuckles from special brunch saying this jump don't do that again but I've never had anybody right to me over will ring me up and put the phone down what I've never had any reaction but suddenly I can recall that I was a piece that I'd written was in times to supplement subsection of the Times I was on radio four this very new in very exciting and the book did quite well largely because it had a lovely quote from Robbie Harris on the front which gave it a big kick down the field helpful then he moved off to Madrid trade. Yes not to spy nicely listening <hes> they had in mind that came out of experience yeah the Hitman and then the members of the difficult second novel when you sell a book you go along into management and they said we'd let you to do to books or three books have gotten ideas for anymore so I had this idea that walked up as a screenplay which then later became plot of the hidden man which is pretty flawed book I think but then the Spanish game is the sequel to us by nature and any set in Madrid Spain it lodge and came from from the three three four years that I was living there. She's making me think of an experience I went. I used to go and see Rail Madrid the Bun Abou- Stadium and somebody was <hes> in town who did work for a branch of the security service and I was with them and I'm toll on six-foot five and that time had quite a bad back doc sitting with them watching Real Madrid they're playing and I had to stand up at one point and just stretch my backout GonNa lean left and right and so I could feel more comfortable and this present said to me. Are you sending a signal. I mean I I wasn't ironically. It was joking. You have my mind what the Spanish game was described by the Times as one of the six finest spy novels of all time that's alongside tinker tailor soldiers spy funeral in Berlin and the scarlet pimpernel is praise indeed that was a fantastic moment moment. Yes sadly that critics soon after he laid down his pen and no longer reviews times it would have been great could've carried on. I'm saying there's one of the things about me. The that was that was high praise indeed there was also this. We're going back to sort of two thousand and four. I think too so it's just off the nine eleven but spy fiction and spice stories was sort of just at that point changing and becoming more commonplace through the one thousand nine hundred immediate sort of post Cold War period spy fictions was considered to be dead. You had James Bond but even he was struggling along sort of Timothy Dalton and I think it was myself and Henry Porter with the only people who published spinal was in the U._k.. And in the late nineteen ninety two thousands and the nine eleven is the big game changer in the culture and you have borne on and you have some sort of James Bond ripon and you have homeland and and now you can't move for the night manager or killing evil whatever it might be spying as a huge industry now so back then it was. It was just quite there was more room to. I completely forgot what your question is fat. I guess the other great watershed in spy fiction or indeed in in any fiction is the advances in of technology suddenly when you have to lose your mobile phone in order the thing to happen or at least it has to be incorporated. The plot in somewhere technology is is is the single biggest shift in my career and in intelligence in the wider world so when I started writings by nature it was one thousand nine hundred ninety five ninety-six eighty six. The hitman is a pre google novel. The mobile phone was just not as ubiquitous it is now and it it has affected the way that you tell stories I mean if a person can send a message or or make a telephone call or let somebody we know that they are endangered or find out a piece of information very very quickly. Look at a map on a phone. It's very difficult to isolate a character makes it much more difficult to create jeopardy because they they have that that phone with them that buddy but at the same time a phone owned can could work against a spy or work against somebody WHO's trying to escape counter Savannah's and so forth obvious reasons they can be. They can be followed. The phone is admitting signal that can be tracked can be used as a microphone it can be a all of the things that flow from that's just that's just phones and then this Wifi online banking records twitter facebook linked in. I mean this does it. Where in the old days in the Cold War days the business of spying was to build up a file on a man or woman over long period of time surveillance photographs photographs and where do they eat an now? We are all willingly creating our own files. I mean every single individual listening to this this program just Inau day-to-day lives with with oyster cards or whatever it might be in London the way we're leaving a snail trail of data about ourselves and obviously that is a rich resource not just for spying agencies but also Google facebook and anybody else he wants to get the things into those pies now of course at the moment Emmett this big row about highway Chinese Technology Company and just how much it has to do with the Chinese state and is it safe to go with five G. and the company now. You've written about China your next book typhoon think that came out in two thousand eight it was about a C._I._A.. Plot to stabilize China and that was on the eve of the Beijing Olympics and it looks at the decade between the transfer of power from from ninety seven that's very much in the spotlight now with the protests going on in Hong Kong now that book was listed by The New York Times is one of the one hundred notable books the two thousand and is clearly all of these fabulous reviews and will these accolades not flukes that was another wonderful compliment. Typhoon was by far and away the most difficult boulevard ought to right because I sort of started from zero in terms of my knowledge of China and Xinjang the Tuck Muslim province in in the large Turkey was in the province in the northwest of China was sort of handed to me on a plate by a journalist New York Times journalist. I've met in Beijing. You said this is what you should be writing about and back then the week problem. If you want to describe it that way was small fry compared to the way things have turned out. Now I mean there was the Chinese government claiming that the were we guitarist on this sort of post nine eleven context manifestly it was not the case and slowly slowly slowly. They have done everything Chinese government on everything that can't to crush dissent but to really erase weaker culture in inching Jackson now you have hundreds of thousands of children young men young women families who are in turned in camps where they are being program deprogrammed from <hes> Tuck Islamic culture into good Chinese communists and it's an it's it's costly what's going on and two little written about and two little articulate in the media so forth and there's fairly obvious quite complicated reasons for that which is that people don't want to offend an upset the Chinese you see that all the time and film culture and Television Culture and books in the Chinese are funding a lot of things they will in the context of Hollywood a lot of Hollywood studios of bankroll by Chinese money so you don't want to offend the Chinese I mean this is a conversation first of a different program but I was just sort of with typhoon. I was just the very sort of edge of that. Complicated problem that we have we have now and yeah you say that it's a C._I._A.. Plot to stabilize China that came really from neo-con intervention in Iraq that was was rolling at that time in post nine eleven with oversee the Iraq invasion. I was so like so many people in in in the U._k.. In and around the world with so pulled by the Bush administration yoked together with black going into Iraq those this was a way of writing about Iraq without biting about Iraq and I mean the loss of you'll fixing and indeed most spy fiction I suppose to an extent follows on from existing plotlines using real organizations like the CIA or am I six and real events like nine eleven in the Trinity Six you talk about the discovery of the six member of the Cambridge spiring yes so that was really sort of hard hard tone in the road from WWLTV shop ton of the road from from Typhoon Twenty six what Graham Greene mud colas and entertainment I just had this idea of any to really good sort of commercial ideas out of a clear blue sky and this is one of them which is what if that had been an existing surviving undetected sixth member of the of the Cambridge spy sell who who was still at large he would he would be sort of in his late eighties at this point here in the in the thousands and if he was still making making mischief in his in his dotage and so the trinity six sprang from that there's a historian who goes on the trail of this mysterious man but it's not a historical novels on historical thriller. It's IT'S A it's a post Cold War thriller about Very Putin esque Russian leader who is complicated reasons embroiled with this member number of the of the Cambridge spiring. It was your next book based on Elisa manningham-buller because it's about the first female head of 'em. I six a foreign countries the book. Do you know what I'm ashamed to say that when I was planning a foreign country the head of my six was a man and my editor Taza Julia Wisdom arbuckle and said Charlie Charlie. It would be much better if you much more interesting if she was a woman and I went to talk somebody who used to work there. I said I'm thinking you've doing this. I'm thinking of having a female head of my sakes and he said it would never happen. The glass ceiling is is too high. Even though there's been Stella Rimington Elisa Manningham Buller. There's never been a female head of my six and the reasons that he gave. I didn't think we're particularly convincing which is that heads of other foreign intelligence services in other parts of the world their sense of their own sort of self numale heads this sense of their own. <hes> Southworth self-esteem would be offended by across the table at a at a female colleague about again. This is a eight nine ten year old conversation is having some sure his views of changed since then and but it's still the case. There's still hasn't been a female ahead of us. I had a room that was somebody who was in line for it and then she jumped ship to work for some enormous oil company Google or something in America for nine times to salary not may just be that might not be true this book a foreign country was actually the first of agility yes about a a Michael Thomas Kell who at the beginning of a foreign country has been involved in the aggressive interrogate or associated with the aggressive interrogation of suspected member of Al Qaeda Man. He's he's been working alongside the Americas alongside the C._I._A.. And so the book is trying to look at the special relationship between our two countries and that Bush line you're either with us all your against us by definition if not our ally if you're not agreeing with everything we do in say then you are all enemy which is very dangerous philosophical position to take so the books at the very real difficulties that and my five and then my six offices faced during that period that you're you're looking at it usually men with the potential to cause huge destruction both in that region the Middle East but also obviously here back home and the sorts of compromises in the sorts of very very difficult decisions that they have to make in order to keep people at you and I mm safe op-eds. How does it work then having the same character running through several books? You've done that twice now in in two separate. I'm about to do it again. It's simple answer is easier because you know the characters characters your you know how they're going to get dressed in the morning and what they like to watch on T._v. and the favorite restaurants and so you can you don't have to start with a totally blank page you have to start from zero in terms of what would she do in this situation so just in terms of getting the look it's more straightforward but there's also increasing a huge commercial pressure on particularly crime through mystery writers to to write series because simple reason the reading public develop a fascination with an assortment addiction to a Jack reacher or a Sherlock Holmes and they want to revisit go visit new stories about those characters as regularly as possible I at least once every year so almost any crime onto writer now who hopes to have a meaningful long career is going to have to write a book every it's it's <hes> that's the demand of the of this very <hes> converse culture we live in now because there's so many distractions for if whether it's a Netflix or ams in primal podcasts or just tinder whatever it will love island you know people than not buying books with the sort of regularity and with the same same numbers that they were in twenty thirty forty years ago just because there were so many any other distractions and so much pressure then for the writer I mean I is that in your contract with your with your publishers. It is actually yeah the only a new thing and it is pressure but it's I think it's quite good pressure. I mean the only thing about writers it's possible to be quite lazy not lazy exactly but to sort of think have another gin and tonic and wait for the Muse to visit but it is work like any other job like you like you do your job but what is it book. One hundred thousand was have you have one hundred good days in a in a year and two thousand words a day. You'll get it done so it's not it. Yes it's about start doing booker via so it it is it is daunting but I don't think that it's unachievable. Let's turn that to the man between which is also called the Moroccan girl in America and this is a standalone thriller. It's just come out firstly. Why the two titles my American publishers felt that it would have more chance in the in the American marketplace? If it was not called between school the Moroccan go and I was persuaded aided that was a good idea. I'm not yet convinced and it has caused chaos and I just anyone who's into this. We both books expecting them to be different because I've had quite angry and those awful one-star reviews on Amazon going. I have never buy another so I do slightly regretted. I wish I'd sort of kept the whole thing to between but yes in America at school Moroccan girl and it was purely a commercial decision I think largely because in America things like the girl on the train all sales right now exactly the woman in the windows so yeah so carrying hardiness he introduces us to and this is presumably the character that you are also going to your next book about no nausea I I was initially thinking that I would keep going with kit but the man between the Morongo is going to be a standalone just to sort of one off it was it was sort of an experimental book. It was designed in two ways wants to sort. Homage to <hes> lovely old Eric Ambler thrillers about an ordinary man who finds himself in extraordinary circumstances in in the ambler world on remand say an engineer or a Finnish director who becomes involved in the world of spying so in the man between Kit Carradine is a is a writer of spy thrillers of mystery stories who is in his late thirties. He's not married doesn't have kids and he's written maybe three four books one of which has been a huge sort of international success but he's a little bit board with the kind of groundhog day routine of writing. which is you know get up hit the desk? You're always on your own your communing with your own imagination you might break for considerably long lunches to give yourself some time off but he's not entirely sort of professionally personally fulfilled old and then Lo and behold what happened he top on the shoulder from somebody who says kit. We know that you'll going to literary festival in in Marrakesh while you're there. Will you do a little piece of work for us and Morocco helping with this great great cause of counterterrorism etc and Kit who is is is a Patriot but also has an adventurous spirit leaps at the chance to to get involved in and obviously vanishes down the rabbit hole as they say in Hollywood and things don't go the way that he thought they would but there was it. I mean that might sound up outlandish plot but the other thing I was trying to do was <hes> was looking at the history of British spy writers who have been recruited by am I sick so the most famous example would be summits that Moore who was already well well established as a writer and dramatist in the early part of the twentieth century. I'm was going to Switzerland to write a play. I'm was tapped on the shoulder by message and they said while you're there using your covers a famous writer will you make payments to agents and do very little jobs for us awesome and helping the good causing some of that said yes and then wrote a series of short stories about it called Ashington some of which were destroyed on the orders of Winston Churchill there was a pulled at this breach of this of the secrets but then more recently Frederick Forsyth also worked as a support agent agent for my six because they knew that he was going to interesting places and meeting all sorts of people and that he could either just report back on the state of mind or what he saw or could ask that person a direct question am I six wanted aunts and forsyth actually <hes> in his memoir six Goldie outside describes a very exciting but quite dangerous moment in former East Germany way. He's going to passing a document under the cubicle of of a bathroom somewhere. Call much dot or something like that to an agent on the East German side so there's previous on this big So-so kitties is fitting into a kind of long distinguished edition of Writers Grand Green is not a good example carry another obvious example of writers who've worked for the secret services. It's tremendously exciting book. Thank you very much and I think that in life imitating literature I think we must find a nutri festival in Morocco so I can interview there and you could be undertaken secret missions. So what are you working on. Now so I'm starting. I guess you could call it. A sort of spy saga obviously very different books but you know one of Atlanta Ferenci books in Sicily over a period of thirty years following the lives of two women to great friends but I thought could you do that in the context of the spinal so what if what I've done is is created a particle lackland kite who is working for a very secret branch school books eighty-eight so the book is called Box eighty-eight in the present day and and he forms that finds that something that happened is pasta sort of come back to to bite him and so we so with flash back to his recruitment straight out of school in Nineteen eighty-nine because he is being asked to spy yeah on the family of if his best friend with going to stay for the summer holidays is I. I'm holidays out of out of school. In the school is is is fairly closely based on the school that I went to Eton College and I thought the people read it would be interested to know what life was like in this in this strange strange infamous institution the nine hundred so this is produced Jacob re small and Boris Johnson and find out public figures like <hes> back grills so I could give them a little glimpse into that a fictionalized is glimpse so lackland is he's working class Scottish boy who because his mother is excessive socially ambitious finds himself parachuted into version of eaten in in one thousand nine hundred and then there will be a series of books following lackland through his his grew in one thousand nine hundred but with a contemporary story running at the same time and finally before we go what's your obsession with Cuban chess does chess-playing figure in the way that you workout the plots of your novel so it's not Cuban just but I do have this this chess club. It's it's not sexy gold. The Jose Will Cup a Blanca memorial justice was a was a Cuban chess grandma's to one of the great just plays of time and I used to play a lot of chestnut living in Madrid when I came back I missed it because it was a whole sort of cafe life and I play with boys in Madrid and so when I came back I just got on the phone and onto the email so forth and found fifteen twenty like-minded souls all middle aged whites British guys. There's no women tool for some reason we interesting playing chess and we meet every now and again and play at a cup of Blanca tournament but it's I have actually been to Cuban. I've played chess in Cuba and it was fantastic experience. There's something very romantic about the game and very satisfying and there's nothing more than to sit in my garden with with a beautiful staunton chessboard with a friend drinking glass of wine and either winning losing losing but it's just a very civilized way to spend an hour view of your day but is it the same mental muscle that you flex in in playing chess in when you working out a plot. I think I'm better at working at plots playing chess but yes this. There are similarities in your writing stories writing writing these novels. You're you're keeping a number of different plates spinning at once you need people to be continuing to turn the pages you need to have the stakes need to behind that people are invested in this cards. I WanNa find what happens next. You need to be writing good interesting sentences power graphs. You need to be creating realistic compelling characters atmosphere almost so this so all of these things need to be happening at once and in playing chess yes if you sort of one foles move will one plate it drops in your your in big trouble because you'll get checkmated in three moves so there is I think it must be good for the brain muscles. It must be good for the for the gray matter playing chess out again. It's also a fantastic aversion sport. Even if I don't WanNa right just go online in play online just for an hour and pretend I'm still at my desk doing something useful well. We need you to go back to us because we're very anxious to see what you come out with next tells coming. Thank you so much for coming on to meet the writers. Thank you so much for having me on the man between is published by Harpercollins here in Britain in America. It's called the Moroccan go. You've been listening to meet the writers. Thanks for the production team nor a whole and Rory Kudrik you can download this show and previous episodes from our website or APP from soundcloud.

writer the Times Americas chess Google official Ian Fleming Madrid China Graham Greene Georgina Godwin Iraq Alita charles England John Kerry Hollywood Dubai
 Featured Property Podcast Storyteller Tours 2020: March 14 edition. Avoid open houses. Start here!

Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

34:03 min | 6 months ago

Featured Property Podcast Storyteller Tours 2020: March 14 edition. Avoid open houses. Start here!

"Good Morning Paul Griego here. Toronto REAL ESTATE UNFILTERED recorded at real estate. Podcast SHOW DOT com. Many of you have been guests of mine on my property tours for many years in fact I've been doing these tours on some level on some In some way for over twenty years. That's a long time to practice and get my routines pretty down and I feel like this is where you guys all need to be before you ever open your front door and step outside and see a property with me. You need to know the details. You need to know the behind the scenes of these places and these properties. I don't think it's acceptable. Regardless of the current situation. Right now to be heading out and to be going to random open houses to possibly Review Properties before you make the educated before you get educated about these areas about these properties about the good. The bad and the ugly is okay. Now for the purposes of this podcast. I'm going to do a little bit of behind the scenes of the property in the area. He'd be a little history. Tell you a little bit about the property. If I say much more than that I might lose you guys before we ever get to the actual tour. And I don't WanNa do that. I don't WanNa bore anybody off. The off the podcast. I think I've been doing pretty good about making sure. That never happens because right in front of me. There are my rules. My rules are don't be boring. That's my rules. I don't ever want this to be boring. Not only not boring but I just WanNa make sure that for each of you because my experience buying a home back in nineteen ninety eight. I was twenty four. I'd save money for five years. I was so excited my experience and I wasn't a realtor them. My experience with a realtor was the biggest letdown. In the history of home-buying. I was just so disappointed. This particular agent was just the absolute worst I didn't know anything about how they were or what was the. What was the qualifying factors any of that garbage. So the moment I had the opportunity to become more than just a realtor because again you if you're hiring someone in two thousand twenty. That's just a realtor you're getting ripped off. You're only getting one piece of a very important global pie now. The realtor part again. That's that's one part of it. But this podcast to the marketing that goes into it reaching out to you guys connecting with thousands of you across the world twenty-five thousand plus total place so far storytelling goes far. Go so far back that again. It's literally part of each of our DNA when you hear these four words once upon a time for many of you. You'll remember a story that you heard from when you were a kid or just yesterday. There are billions of stories told since again since the beginning of time the telling of stories as soon as spoken as soon as the spoken word as soon as it was you know people speaking there has been storytelling long before any writing. So this is part of all of us so you guys coming along with me on these storyteller tours. I hope is the beginning of a new smarter way of doing things right now especially in you know in the world twenty twenty in in March. We're under we're in the pandemic situation so going out in large groups are going to open house right now is actually irresponsible to be even having one in my opinion is irresponsible. There's better ways and there's and there's very little education as far as I'm concerned done you know out these properties there. You're not getting a full history lesson. You're not getting the details. I believe you should be getting when you show up at one of mine. You'll actually see that I've got a story board. You actually see that. I'm focused on giving you the history lesson of the area and the property so that you're educated about it and this is the part that doesn't always make sense to people. I am not that concerned if you buy that property even if it's my list it's it's not my first concern. My first concern is to make sure that you're educated enough to be able to pick the right place. The right area the right home the right price range all those things. I would much rather those be in place before you make a choice. If it happens to be where you've got a good fit with that property that's great but normally most of the time you'll meet me at a property that I'm showing you in very often what you described to me and what you're looking for is something completely different. Maybe in a different area or whatever and that's the good thing about me. I will make sure that that is where we go versus. Just you know being focused on that property. I don't do that. I don't work that way. And that's again. Maybe his kept me in a very modest position in my life as far as you know not becoming a not not focused on the on the plastic trophies. I've been focused on relationships for twenty years. All focused on during that time is the relationships sales. As far as that part you know goes it's it goes up and down but the relationships part for me has been constantly going up and better quality. And that's really what I want to keep doing. I hope that's going to be with you too so now. Let's jump into today's podcast. Featured Properties Today's property podcast tour starts in the town of Whitby. Whitby is named after the seaport town of Whitby in Yorkshire England the township of Whitby is also officially twinned with two other cities by the way around the world. One is in Quebec and another one is Austria when I first started going to. Whitby with my clients It was actually as a result of the fact that I had family in these areas for many years for back. When I was a kid so I would be going up to these areas in in Durham region. In general almost every weekend. One of my favorite parts about going up to this area is we would go to the pickering town center. A parking lot and there would actually be a huge garage sale yard sale. Whatever YOU WANNA call. Every weekend and my dad would take me up there and we would spend the day there. I don't know why I liked it. Some kids don't like doing this stuff. I I did and I still to this day. Like antique shops and vintage record places. That's you know where I will usually go if I've got an hour to kill before an appointment I've got a sort of a policy if you're if you're if you're earlier on time if you're on time your lights and not only that if I've got an appointment at two o'clock in Whitby I'm probably nearby by noon and I'm just like hanging out and maybe checking out a few shops or whatever just supporting the businesses that are in the area before and after indefinitely something I do on a larger scale when those businesses are also podcast guests hint hint and I am able to work closer with do promotions with you guys. It's a huge huge thing to be doing right now by the way I'm inviting all of you in the Whitby area who are listening to join me for them. So the good thing about learning about whitby before you ever hear about the property that you're going to hear about for me today is that he's got such a cool background that a lot of people don't know. Did you know that during the Second World War whippy was the location of camp x? This was a secret spy training facility. Yes this is exactly why you can't make the same mistakes other people have made in go into one of these tours not knowing how many things are going on in that area. Good bad and ugly. I mean it's all part of the story. Have you ever read a book where one chapter is like completely depressing in the next chapter is like really inspiring? I hope if you've read any amount of books you probably have read many like that. That's life and that's also realestate like you can't. You can't leave the house until you get the stories about these places the behind the scenes every you know great band and every great movie. The behind the scenes for me of those is way more interesting than the movie. Sometimes I'll be honest with you so in Again this was during the Second World War. this was a secret spy training facility that was established by someone by the name of Sir William Stevenson and the nickname for this person was the man called intrepid so some of the buildings have been demolished since then. So you won't necessarily see what's going on I. Also I also heard there was some sort of a connection between Ian Fleming and James Bond. The writer of James Bond and Camp X as well. That's something we'll talk about when we get together in person again. This is not designed to bore you. This is not. I don't want this to be like my life story and not always but it's going to be. It's going to have something to do with me. Because it's this is. This is part of keeping you guys informed. And not just again letting you go out and again right now so important that you're focused on educating yourself about neighborhoods in about properties way before you leave the front door and there's so much more by the way than than what. I'm telling you here but this is again supposed to be your introduction to the property which is all an open house ever was so without even having to go. You're thankfully you're able to listen to this in your living room Going a long walk. Which I've been doing you know a lot of Not just because it's healthy for you but it just because I enjoy go for like two or three hour walks whenever possible In in the neighborhoods around the city from Durham region. All the way out to halt and region. I'll just literally just You know get myself there. Transit or go train whatever's convenient to end you know spend the afternoon they're talking to clients Having a coffee whatever. This is something that again. I'll always do is just part of WHO I am. So the one of the featured property podcast That's on my list on my website right now so you just have head over to real estate podcast. Show DOT com. And you'll see it there. It's a stunning four bedroom. Three bath home. That's for sale in Whitby. This property is listed under eight hundred thousand dollars. I'm going to say that part again. Four bedrooms three baths under eight hundred thousand dollars. So we're talking about you know reasonably speaking thirty forty five minutes to get over to Whitby. Obviously many of you especially right now and this is why this is so important. Many of you are finding out some of you. Some of you can do your work from pulp from from location. Work so you can. Actually some of you can do your work not everybody can. I certainly can't do all of my job from a location. Sometimes it's showing you an I personally One on one through these places which is the way it should be done anyways because again. You WanNa be in a position where you're surrounded by one hundred people even if you know even if you thought that was normally I it never has been for me far. Prefer these grand opening one on one tours one at a time we go in together talk about the property and then again because of the fact that it is this property is under eight hundred thousand where it is a lot of you with one or two bedroom condos in downtown. Toronto CA- trade that in move here you've got four bedrooms and the key both the bedrooms and this is about an whenever you're dealing with this kind of stuff is you. WanNa be in a position where you're in a that protect potentially has multi residential usage. So that you're not just buying another property that you know only one or two of you can live in right now more than ever. You need to be more concerned about. How would you bring in income if your job was eliminated completely the saying goes if you're relying on one jobs income you're one step away from no income from possibly poverty? It's it's scary to think about it. I'm talking about any job even if it's a good job if you only have one income you limit your options by having a property where you can either a. Have you know other people living there could be people you know could also be you know people that are renting the property or or parts of the property. When you've got a few doors to work with and you've got the ability to have a separate unit. That is a game changer. And that is what's going to protect you insulate you. You know as time goes by so leverage is so important so whatever you own right now. I hope you're also thinking about how to trade that in for maybe some added protection and it could be literally could be a single parent that wants to have a secure place for their family and their kids could be a renter. Who's just tired of making rent payments? Because again the rent payments situation is it never ends like you'll never see an end date for a rental payment schedule when you sit down with a mortgage professional and you have a breakdown of payments. There is an end date. Could be fifteen. Could be twenty twenty five years that's what Amortization is they? Don't teach this stuff in school and it's just. It boggles my mind but let let professor Paul and I actually have a story about that all end off with. Be The one to teach you this stuff to make sure that you understand. So the last thing I'll say about the property. The estimated mortgage cost is twenty three sixty six per month for four bedrooms. Do the math twenty three hundred divided by four a little over five hundred bucks apiece if you've got to families if you've got your family you've got older kids and they're bringing in five hundred dollars a month which is probably not that much of a stretch that they can do. You're in a position where you're covering your housing for something. I would believe to be very reasonable less than some two bedroom. Rentals that I've done recently by the way in Toronto twenty-three sixty six per month is what the estimated mortgage costs so head over my site. You'll see more information there. Connect with me specifically because again. I'm only going to give you some. You know some basic information on this and professor story that goes along with what I've been saying is that in in my first year York University. I I would often be on the field in when I was playing rugby team where she played for the rugby team. My my my my for my years there. Stay very long still experimenting with what I wanted to do. On my first year there we had an incredible year. We had like a completely undefeated year. Which was just awesome. But because a lot of a lot of times I would actually be practicing weirdly enough with my glasses on. I'd be in rugby. Practice and beheading people have had my glasses on and my glasses wouldn't fall off just because of the way that I would hit people and it'd be very conscious about my technique and Tuck my shoulder in and make sure I do right so I got this title of the professor because they almost always worn my glasses. I think I'd gotten tired of contacts at that point so I just said fuck it when it came to you know the game of course took the glasses off during the game but during the practice. I just didn't feel like anybody was going to hit me hard enough for me to have to worry about my glasses and I just never did so. I got the nickname professor and they kind of just went through an comes up once in a while when I see the old guys here and there. Hopefully you enjoyed this again. New Way of doing things I try to make it as interesting as possible and if anybody wants to connect with me and have a look at this property. Let's make sure we get together today. Hello Paula go here again. Our next stop on the storyteller tours brings us to halted region specifically oakville Ontario. The behind the scenes for me and Oakville go go back a long way not just from growing up in Ontario and visiting all these great cities for family functions and friends and sports obviously with sports There was a lot of time spent in Oakville If you play rugby in Oakville you'll know the oakville. Bumblebees you'll know about that You'll know what that means and I've had the pleasure of playing there many times My favorite OAKVILLE related story is that I was able to Take Part and was invited to the trials for the Ontario under nineteen rugby squad. I was very much into rugby in my teens. That literally I would say probably saved my life. It gave me a very good direction. Wait a point. A lot of my misguided anger into a something very productive and that in the long with weight training probably kept me focused to the point where. I'm still focused now When I just sort of you know go go back into my comfort zone. Which is doing that Kinda stuff. Staying physical for me that works so with Oakville had a lot of really great history of a lot of people. Move out there over the years. I've had people trade in their King West townhomes to move to oakville. I've had condo owners sell and move their Ville sort of has this distinction as Being for the most part everybody or or a lot of people who work on Bay Street live in Oakville and I know enough people that have proven this for me over the years. That's still the case. So joining me on a tour for properties in Oakville will give you an idea of again the fact that this is a very well established area so let me go a little bit into the history of it of course again. You know my specific history has to do with the The rugby element of it. But there's a lot more going on. Obviously this goes back to seventeen ninety. Three Dundas street was surveyed for a military road. That's when things began in eighteen twenty. The crown brought the bought the area surrounding the waterways over the years through the eighteen hundreds Things like the Grand Trunk. Railway were added on later on on top of that there was a lot of manufacturing. They decided to move into the area. Of course the Ford Motor Ford Motor Company. As you will know if you're driving through there is in this area. There are just a little over ten independent neighborhoods within OAKVILLE. And this is an important thing for you to do when we're touring and we're going through the different neighborhoods and price ranges. Of course there's going to be you know it's GonNa be some variety there a having sold properties in this area. I've been doing tours for example in the Glen Abbey areas. For those of you who are yes. Glenn Albie Glen Abbey Golf Course. Golfing fans You'll want to be part of those tours. You'll want to be You know getting the inside scoop from me about the behind the scenes of not just the properties. And that's I think that's the the main difference that I bring to the table is I won't talk as much about the properties as I will about the people who live there. You need to know what life is like there. You need to know the stories that go on behind the front door. You need to know way more than what you might be seeing again. The the the traditional approaches you see something on the screen you click on it Blah Blah Blah for in and you end up seeing it with just whoever yes just about anybody with a licensed can show you. The property opened the door. And let you in. But what you want and what you should demand especially now because of the way. These things are taking off in the way podcasts. And of course the way I do it specifically is changing the way I think things are done. You need to demand more. You want to know what's going on behind the scenes. You WanNa know what the people are like. As I've told you before I know who the people are. I know their stories. I know where they came from. I know where they're going and I want you to be one of the people that's going to be in on this with me. So one of the properties you'll see on my featured properties and you'll have to head over there to get the details but it's a four a three bedroom. Four bath house is a brand new one. That just came up this week on. This is in the Orchard Ridge area. There's over twenty six hundred square feet of total living space. And this one is under one million so with this area I've got properties on tour here from one million to two above three or four so really a matter of getting in if you're in the position where you're looking at possibly moving here and your budget is between one. Usually I would recommend for Oakville a one to one point five budget depending on the property just to sort of you know. See what's out there For the five hundred. Two million budget Durham region seems to have a lot more properties for for that range. So again no problem with either one. I WanNa make sure that you get as much house as you want in the area that you want for a lot of people. Oakville and region. This area is the one to go for. So this particular property again They've got a really large. Eating breakfast is a granite countertops stainless steel appliances. All the usual stuff a professionally finished basement. Which isn't always the case will walk into some of these houses and unfortunately sometimes the information's there either is mentioned or talked about and we walk in and it's an unfinished basement. That needs a ton of work for some people. That's great because they can customize but for other people they want move in open the door and be able to you know put family put kids put an office workout area. Whatever especially now with what's going on in the world is a lot more focus on making your home your castle and it doesn't mean you don't have to buy a three million dollar home to have a castle. I think everyone who has the ability and of course with what you're looking at for monthly payments mortgage payments on this one is approximately three thousand one hundred and twenty four. Estimated mortgage costs Again with everyone and what? You'RE PUTTING DOWN. You know you'll have to decide on which how much down you can you know? Put with any of these properties. That's going to be your call but to turn your home into your. You know your Jim your office. Your you know your workout area. Whatever whatever you decide to do. Yoga rooms music rooms. I've been apart of thankfully everyone those the scene stories and a lot of them in Oakville so I wanna make sure that you guys understand what you what you could be doing. What sort of a life you could be having in these properties and making sure that you get all the details behind the door so once again over real estate podcast show dot com. Check out the featured poverty podcasts. And you'll see this one there and if you want to get more details or specifics by all means reach out to me. I'm available and I'll make sure that you're getting the inside scoop behind the scenes of all the properties that you're hearing about here our next stops takes us to the Bedford Park area of Toronto. This is the young and Lawrence area near Lawrence Park One of the most desirable. Neighborhoods that you're going to be on tours with me if you're going to be looking at properties in this area obviously you're looking in the two to three million range and this is where this property sets so this particular property on my storyteller tours. Today's a four bedroom. Five Bath Property. This is a modern A modern custom-built home tons of natural lights all the latest upgrades everything you can imagine. You'll walk in when you do walk into these places with me because of the fact that I've got such a really good connection to these neighborhoods and I don't mean the traditional connection with a lot of realtors Yojiro yes. I sold five thousand homes in that area last month. No that's not what I'm talking about my connection to these neighborhoods goes way for the actually goes way back to when I was a teenager. So here's my storyteller tour about Bedford Park Lawrence Park Rosedale these areas. That are downtown Toronto. I was working as a labor as a construction worker as a laborer in a in my teens and it was something that was really enjoyable to me at the time. It was really hard to wake up at six in the morning. Ride my bike over to wherever the site was in the city and start my day. This is especially hard when you are. Let's say partying with your friends at night. Sometimes and you're out late you're out until one or two and yeah this is this is. This was my life. I wasn't really chained down very much. I got to have a lot of fun which means I don't have any regrets because I just did a lot of stuff. Not Bad just you know. Push the limits. So I'd be out until to wake up in the morning at six. Go Work Construction and then go to the gym afterwards and this. Was You know what you could do as a teenager? The it would probably kill me after one day. Now so part of the one of the places that I ended up working on ended up being this amazingly architecturally significant home actually. It's been written up in newspaper written up in magazines and it's been talked about for years in the in different areas. So I was working on this home. I was Bringing in wheelbarrows of concrete like all this really hard stuff we were helping build this house and then it wasn't until years later that I found out this is from a couple different resources. I'm I'm looking at this picture of property. I'm like wait a minute. That's the House that I helped built there was like four furnaces again. I know everything about this house. Way More than the article was saying and reading it and reading it and then I read it in the article that David Bowie and this has been verified at some point in including from my own father who was one of the main construction workers on the property that David Bowie wanted to see this house when he flew over which to me was just like. Oh my God David Bowie and if you're a music fan and you don't like David Bowie just cancel. I'm subscribed to me right now Because there's no way we're going to get along if you don't like David Bowie or tin machine if you've if you've never heard tin machine. Which is the band that he was in for a short while they will blow your mind Incredible MUSIC. They only made a couple of two albums machine. One was great. Ten machine to was pure gold. My absolute one of my top five favourite albums of all time. And this is something you've got to listen to. It's really hard to find. I'm still looking for a vinyl copy if anybody has one but I'm not willing to pay five figures for it either so hope me up if he if you've got a vinyl copy but the story behind this property and again it's architectural significance. There was actually metal. The House is actually covered with metal. That actually ages naturally so it kind of looks rusty. Now if I take you by the House and it'll be something that we might go on walking tours if we're in these neighborhoods put. This is part of again understanding why I have earned my seat at the table in far different way than a lot of other people do. I mean I I can tell you the four hundred plus components of a home. When we're in the home I can tell you things that you will never ever here on on a normal two three four five million dollar tour. You just won't hear it. You'll have a look at me and you'll know that you know. I don't come from any money. I don't come from any special circumstances I was not. I was not handed a Rolodex at nineteen. And and you know put into this business. There's a lot of people that have come from that place and that's not me at all. Every single contact every single sale. Every single relationship has been earned. Nothing and I have telling you right. Now nothing's been given to me. Which is why to this day. I'm as grateful as I am so this particular property again. This is on my two to three million dollar tours. In this area I need more listings in this area by the way because I'm getting so many people emailing me about looking for the next property because and the reason is the the the people were talking. I'm talking to are in the one to two million range. They've got properties in that range. They're hoping to trade up to the next stage and that's just what happens and that actually is really good if it happens because it frees up properties in that one to two million range which is for a lot of people these days as much as you know not a number that you might WanNa pay. It's just what a lot of homes are selling for so the one two million range the more spaces that become available the better. It is and of course that ease pressure on the below the sub million dollar ring which. I handle again plenty properties. They're condos and lofts mostly but that's how this is supposed to work especially with interest rates having dropped again. This is March fourteenth at your hearing this interest rates the the the the base interest rate has dropped two point seven five percent not one below one percent. Ask anybody who's ever had a mortgage ever how often they've seen this and it hasn't been often so I would say your window of opportunity. Right now is better than it's ever been in some ways. It's a terrible time. Otherwise but the opportunity that might exist the fact that you could get into a property with this little of a mortgage this little of a mortgage interest rate to pay down your debts. Maybe when you sell your property you might be able to wipe off your debts. I'm working on that for a few clients right now. I want that for you guys to so again. This is The featured property here on the property tours that I'm doing in the Bedford Park Lawrence Park Area. All include this as well as others that you should see when we get touch so make sure you email me. Paul Dot Injury Go. I N D R at sea twenty-one DOT CA or most importantly head over to real estate podcast show dot com. You'll see the featured property scrolling along the bottom but make sure you sign up there get your email in there. Make sure you don't ever miss another one of these because this is the way it's going from here on forward. This is the way to do it.

Oakville Toronto Whitby rugby Durham Review Properties professor David Bowie Paul Griego Whitby OAKVILLE Bedford Park Lawrence Park Are Paula York University Sir William Stevenson Golfing Ian Fleming
10 Great Movies & TV Shows (That Were Almost Disasters)

The Cracked Podcast

57:46 min | 1 year ago

10 Great Movies & TV Shows (That Were Almost Disasters)

"Hey there, folks. Welcome to another episode of the cracks podcast podcasts all about why being alive is more interesting than people think it is. My name is Alex Schmidt, and I'm had podcasting here. Cracked also known as schmead the clam also known as smitty champ. And I am also also getting you straight into this week's topic. It is great movies and TV that were almost disasters. One more time that is great movies and TV that were almost disasters. Because it turns out almost every massive global hit movie and TV show went through enormous close calls in their first step in the ideas stage of making that thing you love. And I think it's fascinating knowing about him. It's it's both like a creative journey. You know, like how they got from a really strange often monkey driven idea to where we are two day. Not there's anything wrong with monkey based entertainment. But you know, what? I mean, it's all about the ideas. And today speaking of ideas, I'm joined by two amazing returning guests who are full of super super cell. Ideas, one is cracks columnist and editor New Yorker contributor and more. Dan, hopper. The other is sketch comedian TV writer, and so much more Candice mardell aero, and you're gonna love this episode, by the way, I could not be more thankful to all of you who came out to our live episodes on the road just a few days ago in Chicago, and in Saint Paul Minnesota to be honest. I am taping this little bit before we did that. So I'll have more to say about it on future episodes. Also, I have a lot to say about it on my social media already. See can see it there. Either way. I'm very excited right now about this episode today, it's tons of fun movie things TV things and journeys into how weird the past was. It's a good time. So let's have that good time. Please sit back or sit in your most creative posture for inventing ways that, you know, the darkest idea in the world could become a Disney movie 'cause it's happened a lot either way enjoy this episode of the cracks podcast with Dan, hopper and Candice Marta, Leo. I'll be back after we were. Up talk to you, though. We should start every show. Some. In laughter. Dan. I think we're really going to use that. Great. And I'm so excited to talk about all these movies and TV shows, and I it makes me feel like every show or movie I've ever seen almost fell apart until like the last moment like they're about to film and insane script, and then rewrote it very rapidly. It certainly makes you feel better. If you've only been in like high school plays and crap and your dislikes. This is a total disaster until like the night before. And then it's like fine. And it just comes together. It's like, oh that happened in mind too. Yeah. Just every play that's ever been made. But then you see this. And you're just like, oh, like every Hollywood movie with a million people working on it and big budget and everything was the same way. So we're all just winging it people I feel like anyone that gets into the entertainment industry learns, very quickly, everything no matter, how brilliant it is. It's all by the seat of our pants. Oh, yeah. Phone into place of like, I guess that works kinda reminds me in film school when you would have you'd make short foam, and it would screen, and you'd have to sit in front of the class, and everyone would give you notes and people would always project and be like you or doing this really deep thing with the water in that shot. And it's something that would happen completely by accident and youth lean into it'd be like, yes. Yes. And if you like this is kind of the same thing like it seems so brilliant, but really it's just really Kenner the boom was visible in for shots. Yeah. That was kind of like the world is a film and. I just start using French words at that point. Oh, yeah. Verite, you know. Crook. Madam. You both know more French than I do. I've been to brunch. Don't want. Brag. Ham sandwich. And you know, I'm jealous about it. Well in terms of especially by the seat of the pants. We won. We were looking at here is rocky original rocky, nineteen seventy six which turns out Stallone wrote the first draft of in three days, and Danny thought there was really crazy way. He was going to go with the original ending of rocky. Apparently was that he throws the fight at the end. And it's because he he has an epiphany where he realizes he doesn't want that life. And you know, he doesn't want to be a big boxer with lots of attention, and whatever and wants to just go back to live with Adrian and his little suburban Philly life beating up people for his loan shark, like it's Lynch, his quaint loansharking life. True. Funny funny, like Piff fifty. But yeah. So he was going to throw the fight at the end. And then does the Adrian thing. And that's it. And that's the end of rocky forever. And then it turns out he's like, well, what if I liked tries hard as I can. And it's a split decision. And then there's forty seven sequels, and they all made a billion dollars. So right. This really lucky last-second switch which is really funny too. Because it's the idea of rocky spawning a franchise is kind of funny when you go back and think the original movie is such a small film. It's like, you know, a lot of takes place in one night. It's like about Polly is like really abusive to Adrian and rocky has this terrible life, and he has one shot at one nice thing. And and then it's like, okay, here's eight big budget sequels, basically, it's almost like if like call me by your name had lake five sequels or something like that. And like after the first one, then it was just like these five like blockbuster movies or something. It's like, it's a very weird thing in retrospect, the sequels would be increasingly emotionally risky love. You know? It's very fun for me. Mr. T is in one and the Russian guy. Indestructible and yet because I saw the original rocky again a few years ago, and it it's like the boxing just kind of happens at the end late. It's a lot like you say it's a lot of just like them being at the zoo and being sad. You know? And it's a really really takes time before the punching. It's amazing. Yeah. There's like one fight near the beginning. It's like a really local gym, and he just beat some local guy. And then he walks around telling everyone like it wasn't my fight today. And then like, then there's like the Apollo fight pretty much. Yeah. Yeah. That's how they pitched that movie. He gets one small fight and he walks around Taiwan here. I want my fight. And we have a big fight. In writing this at the zoo, he said. It's also funny 'cause paulie becomes like a a joke character like the later movies like a huge asshole in the first movie, and it's like, very serious. And then it's like in the fourth movie, he's total comic relief. And he like is in love with the robot, Butler and stuff. It's like. So off the rails. And really the first ones almost never on TV. I feel like on TV you see four most of the time or like, maybe three or two. But like one is so different from the rest of the series. Yeah. Yeah. Because I didn't see two through four for a long time. I had only seen one and five five is really sad. Too weird. Yeah. It's it's franchise arc and he almost ruined it by just making rocky guy who takes bribe from bettors to lose a fight in the very first one. Yeah. I think that art lets you know that when he was conceiving rocky like no one had any idea. This is going to be a franchise of any kind. I I can't think is there another Oscar winning film that then went on to have a bunch of blockbuster sequels. I mean, I know the godfather had two and three, but like godfather to another Oscar movie. Yeah. It just imagining lake forest Gump two and three, you know. It's like oh that Oscar movies a big hit. Let's just crank out. Sequels forever is like a very funny backwards thing that Hollywood hasn't really done that much. Yeah. That's true. It's like once in enters narrow prestige. They don't touch it. Too late moonlight too. The to instill. My brain. I thought like tune squad Space Jam. I did the same thing when immediately to like toon town. You guys in the studio have the same note for me. Two hundred million dollar moonlight sequel like this lost a little of the spirit of the original. Well, and with that original rocky version, I feel like a lot of these part of the initial potential mistake is almost trying to make it to gritty, you know, like, maybe it's somewhat realistic that a guy like rocky would be approached by bettors and convinced that throw it and Kansas. He'd also picked out Pretty Woman nineteen ninety as a movie where just the way they were gonna go initially is like gritty and such bad way. Kind of fascinating to me reading the article about it. It was never meant to be around com. Yeah. Hit originally ended where he shows up. He gives her an envelope full of cash instead of arose and was very clear like, yeah. I just paid you for your time. I am a sleazy a prostitute dynamic. And then she takes the cash she's hurt and she bangs on his window. Crying throws the cash all goes into the gutter and she breaks down screaming and crying. I hate you in your money, and then he drives away, and then she stuck with people spectators watching picking up the cash out of the gutter, and that's how it was supposed to. Very different than like the movie, I grew up with all my friends, quoting and. It just it kind of cracks me up. But in a way, I'm almost like this is actually a case from like would that movie have been worse? It would have been different. I don't know. What about worse, it just wouldn't have been the movie, we know? It feels like extra believable and realistic in world where Pretty Woman has never been made. Just no obviously prostitution is sad. And and this is the only thing we have not demonize sex workers or something. But it's the understanding of it. It's like the movie. Yeah. No. And I in the original script to she also had a serious drug problem. I think it's interesting that they they made it around calm the cast Richard Gere. So he's not like he doesn't need the. I think he can he can get what he needs fine. And then they went this very lighthearted route. And it's kinda just interesting that one it wasn't even necessarily like I said, I don't even know that the original one was going to be a disaster per se. It would just would have been different. It would have been heartbreaking. But it would be one of those super sad. Indie movies, right? Yes. The one where my like fast bender is a sex addict or some one of those very dark movies that that you you really really got it through. Yeah. It's funny. That's Disney that are Wien went. We we read this really tragic. Scripts breaking we think this should be a rom com. Larry was so. Yeah. And then Julia Roberts became what we all know in love. Reginal script teddy conic line. I'm just a sleaze standing in front of a prostitute asking her to perform prostitute. Yeah. Yeah. Sex in exchange for money. She's I know how it works. Good. And let's do it. And also feels like that's part of the badness of be original pitch to like not just that it's dark, but also that it's just a very bare description of thing that happens sometimes like it's not a story, you know, like well a man hires a prostitute. And then and then throws money at her. And that's that's. That's a that's our pitch. That's it. What do you think? It's like, I I don't know that that's all I guess, I guess you'd have to have like some kind of tension where it's like they both were in love with the other ones. But neither expressed it. And then it ends, sadly or something like that. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Like, peer tragedy. Like oh. Like, this was serious. But I have to pretend you're prostitute. And she's like I can't cross boundary or you know, because otherwise. Yeah. It's just someone hiring a prostitute. Why is that ending a problem for either of them? Right. And why is it a story? You know? That's just the thing. Again. It makes me laugh the idea that came in with that pitch, which doesn't even tell a story. And then Disney went you know, what there's a rom com in here. When I think prostitutes, think lighthearted love. And also that that's amazing with Pretty Woman that I feel like their their various stories of like somebody is about to do a pitch. And they just redo it for the people there pitching it to like, I think the story with the Simpsons pitch was that Matt grain eg realize he didn't wanna give away the rights of the thing. He has he just kind of made up a family in the lobby and then switched it. You know, I'm I'm amazed. They went to Disney with this at all. And didn't like sit in the lobby and be like oh God. It's Disney, obviously, a happy thing. Instead. Already a written script and everything. And it was the Disney intervened and said, you know, what we we're gonna make this. But we think it should be a rom com. We're gonna make some changes. Be just some tweaks. Some minor adjustments. Exactly part of the she's trying and picking up cash, and then it smash touch to papa's got a brand new bag like we need to. Cleanness out. It makes me wonder though, I've only read the last page of that scripts. What was the whole story, but lead to that? Because obviously, we're missing context of sheets heard because she cares about this person. And what have you, but I'm like, wait a minute. Because the Pretty Woman we know is anything where they go shopping and she listens to walkman in the tub. What was their story people when the actual movie he thinks she has cocaine in the bathroom, and it turns out to be dental floss? And and in the original when it was just she has cocaine to it. And so I imagine it's just a lot of very cold descriptions of sad things in the world. It's about. Sounds like it was just a sad biopic of a sex workers life. Yeah. Yeah. Missile businessmen who hired her for service. It is interesting to like how I feel like that thought process reveals that they think that drug problem is like irredeemable for character. Right. We have to get rid of that. If this is going to be a likeable heart of gold type character. And it's like weird. What lines you can't like cross for you know, like we can make our prostitute? But she's really nice like we can't make drug addict. Because then it's like we can't bring her back from that or something like damaged beyond repair in a way that like forced dump in the book. He like swears all the time. He like swears nonstop and like is really into having sex with Jenny and stuff like that. And in the movie, they make it he never says a bad word, and they like and then like the sexist kind of like just happens. He doesn't like talk about how awesome it is like because there's like lines. You don't wanna cross if you want your heart of gold character to remain Wyan like? Is very conservative, isn't it? Yeah. It's like oh drugs are moral failing. They're not a thing that some people end up in and some people get out of. Yeah. Prostitute. We can't give her two problem. It's such like odd thought process on their part. Yeah. And we we've also got TV shows here, and I feel like we can look at some of these where they were just going to dive into again a story. That's just a very bare dark thing. But I don't know how it's a story. And Dan, you picked out an episode of cheers. That almost was on television and everything. Yeah. Yeah. Apparently, they almost made an episode of cheers where Sam gets eight. Yeah disease. Yeah. That's a assistant. Yeah. He's ran this bar myself. Steaks also clearly to other people. Yeah. Cheers. Early seasons did some serious episodes. Sam was like a was an alcoholic who ruined his baseball career. And there's a there's an episode actually written by Sam Simon in the first season. Speaking of the Simpsons where he like he like almost relapses, and it's like really dark, but it's still like a sitcom. Right. And then as the series went on it just got lighter and lighter. And then it was like then someone pitched freakin aids episode like at a time where like the whole country was probably talking about it in such a tone deaf way, even for the aero like, I couldn't even imagine. What a very special episode of cheers where Sam gets aids at the time. When no one knew how to talk about it or how to deal with it or anything, and it was in the it was in the thick of it happening because it was late nineteen eighties. I wanted to do this and the season six. Yeah. Even like, you know, the movie Philadelphia things that tried to actually tackle it have like aged in some pretty cringe ways. So. I couldn't even imagine a thirty minute sitcom with a whole bunch of laughs. And then like the very special moment at the end is like Sam has permanent death sentence in like this era of terror and confusion for the country like China what a written. Yeah. How like wouldn't have been no laugh like every very special episode has to be like mostly still the sitcom. Yeah. Then the third act there can be like sad turn. And then usually they bring it back like usually it's like even the alcoholism episode. He at the very end, he like, you know, he's back on the wagon. And it's like he like just resists the beer, and there's like an audience applause, and then it's like probably some jokes. And then it's like credits where we did it, and they're brilliant at it. They always found a way to imagining them doing that with an incurable disease that no one knew anything about at the time. And that was like affecting thousands of people's lives like. Like, so ill conceived from the get-go, and if that existed now, it would be a YouTube thing that people are like have you ever seen this show each other the the terrible? Cheers aids episode. I was literally just thinking about that. Funnier died as a series. That's basically that where they take the very special episodes and do a hike down of why they're. They just missed it. Like they made it to like previews, right? Yeah. They so the plot would have been Sam finds out an ex girlfriend is HIV positive. And so then just hanging over the whole episode is does Sam have it too. And they got all the way to rehearsing the finished script for the entire episode before they scrapped it and series, co creator less Charles said, quote, be specter of aids was taking all the humor out of it. And like to a lot of people at that time aids was a new concept to them. So I can understand how they they started down this road. I can't believe they got almost all the way to shoot. Again. That's amazing. I like mentioning less Charles being like the studio audience was mortified, I think I think the warm up comedian. Cold crowd in eight. Away. Kills me about that too. Is that Sam doesn't even have aids in the episode? It's just the looming. Like, he might. And it's the site DEA to me like we're we're still going to soft at the end because it's a comedy, and we have to. But it's like why even tackle that subject? Don't touch that. One. If they if if it ended with him, you know, being like, oh, I don't and then there's like jokes and laughter and tenjin release. And then he goes back to living his life the exact same way in the next episode where he sleeps with thousands of women. It's fine. I bought a new brand condom and works, really? Well. It is interesting just the ark of of TV shows like that that are, you know, start a little serious, and then they get wackier and wackier. But then they tried to get back on the rails with serious episodes like way too late. I mean home improvement was the ultimate. Remember that because it was like they came back for one last season at the end. And all the cast was like, we don't want to just make a sitcom. And every episode heavy, you know, raise a Brad gets caught with pot, and like Marcus Goth and stuff it was just like one after the other, those are real plugs. And it's just problems off. Problems family or kit wears a lot of dark. I'm afraid your son is God. Dr. Like an x Ray. It's just real. As you could see. Matassa the whole. Yeah. Just like putting it there. You can kinda see like an af is t shirt like like ribcage. It's funny to imagine. Cheers, which was so wacky. After the first couple of seasons being like, no, no, no. We gotta get back to our roots. What made us good like a weird aids episode? We have to get back to our roots. Cheer started so dark about aids. Dialogue topical disease. Humor makes me wonder though is shows today 'cause I'm immediately thinking of Brooklyn nine nine because they do a very good job of taking on serious subject matter. But it's still as any sitcom. Oh, yeah. And so they've done like a black lives matters up. So there's like a too up and stuff. But I wonder if that's going to be one of those things where like right now, it feels like, wow, you really did this. Well, and you really took it on if it's something we'll back at years later and go they did want. Why didn't they just stick to comedy? That's a really good point. I wonder I say that having friends at right on that show. Like, I'm not bashing on it in any way, love Brooklyn night. But yeah, because you, and I think the first episode of it there's like a whole conflict about Holt the chief had been like held back because of his sexuality for his whole career. Oh, we're at a dark point for this thing where it was like just Andy Sandberg doing wacky jokes. Seriously. Do there was a black lives matters up sewed where it was they did it so clever because it almost verged into the territory of being a very special episode. But it didn't and. Yeah, I mean, I think they handle that subject balance. It very well. But it makes me wonder if it's because this era feels like they're balancing while or if it's something we'll look back at years later and be like, oh, they've made that choice, especially because like, you know, if cheers had done that it probably would have been claimed at the time. Yeah. Just for taking on the subject. But now you'd be like, wow, they really probably handled it in such a weird way. I do wonder what stuff from now is going to have Timofey this probably not a good show to get into. Cheers. And Seinfeld Paul and I'm from five scrapped episodes almost ruined famous. TV shows by jam McNabb. Seinfeld. One of the biggest comedies of all time along with cheers. They almost in their second season. Did an episode called the bets where it would have been the titular bet is a lane buying a handgun because cherry better. She couldn't do it. But then she ends up, basically. Threatening to shoot herself. And they try to do it as a joke, and they had a cast and sats, and they did a table read. And then the basically the actors revolted and refused to do it. Because it was an insane idea for an episode. My initial thought when I read that even like subject matter aside is imagining being that writer. You wrote was. So over the line that the cast literally was like, no did a bad thing. I'm not. So more. Yeah. The the extra critical pain point was there's a part where Elaine is for some reason. It's just Elaine and Jerry Jerry's apartment and she's yelling at him, waving the gun. And then she is says where do you want it? Jerry, the Kennedy and points that our own head and says the McKinley and points at around gut, and then apparently in the table read, the next thing anyone side was Julia Louis Dreyfuss dropping character and saying I'm not doing this. Like. Just mid read. Like, no, I quit. This is not gonna have. Now, you cannot make me do. That's so weird. It's also like crazy out of character for Elaine. What the hell is she doing that? Like, yeah. It doesn't. It's it's hard to describe. Because it doesn't make any sense of what we know of the show. We've all seen hundred times. Yeah. Yeah. That sounds like a lane doing like sophomore year of college edgy sketch. That's like not like, oh, it made fun of Kennedy being assassinated. And it's like that wasn't really a joker have any point. That was just like an offensive thing. You said something upsetting. The other like weird thing with this episode. We kind of have to guess added. But Seinfeld does that classic thing does of there'll be two things going on. And they interlock beautifully at the end which allowed shows do, but Seinfeld in particular. And apparently the other thing in the episode would have been Kramer claims he had sex with a flight attendant, George doesn't believe him and that pays off and George dragging everybody to the airport to confront this flight attendant and find out if it's true. But that almost definitely means the gun would come to the airport to. I don't know what happens there like that. Can only get worse. Yeah. And laying gets put on a terrorist. I don't know if we had anything happened security was a lot more. We. That's really funny. I didn't even sitter that. One of the things that's the right or to or you just an abiding yourself into a corner right now, they're all the airport with a gun. And I don't know what to do. She accidentally shoots a child in the back. Altro him doing stand up about it. We're talking about disney'll before. And we've got a whole range of classic Disney movies and Kansas. You've got a couple of that jumped out his favorites. Yeah. First of all, I just want to note in before we even talk about the darker version of Peter Pan that almost became talk about Peter Pan. As is that we know my nineteen fifty three film. I have a friend that I'm going to get this made into a shirt, I've already made plans for it. But our favorite line that we quote back and forth as we were only trying to drown her. Never never land. When forget the circumstances. But Wendy is left with the mermaids and they're trying to kill her and he comes up and catches them. They just very cavalier. We were only trying to drown her cruise. I didn't remember that at all. Yes. Favorite line from the move. And it's funny anytime, I'm in a situation where women are being caddy towards each other. I'm always like we were only trying to drown. So, you know, we'll set the stage with that of that is what we ended up with right? Right. So to begin. Originally, it was supposed to be that Wendy didn't get taken to never never land willingly she was kidnapped and the the whole setup of how Peter was going to take her was very violence. He's like he and Tinkerbell plot together all the boys. I never Neverland like we want a mother to take care of us forever. Which is like every man in my life. They all fly also. So he makes his plan to kidnap, Wendy, and it's very violent tinker Bell's pixie dust, which we now know a thing that makes us fly was originally meant to be basically like a date rape drug. It was too. Subdue her then he rips off part of the curtains as a rope and ties are up, and like are we going to link the article? The article is six creepy. Details that were almost in classic. Disney movies by jam McNabb. And it contains some storyboards folks look him up. If you look at the storyboards like he looks the distant he's standing over her with the rope in his hand, and it's like this violence, anyway, she's originally Scott, she looks a lot younger than what she even ended up being. So just this whole very twisted thing. But it's just interesting to me that Disney evolved into something that we look at us so late hearted. But even even what Peter Pan ended up becoming Walt did step in and go. This is too much. And why don't we make it that she wants to go and it's an adventure? But even at that, it's still at arc movie. I can't believe they the movie week out was a lot of compromise in terms of tonal darkness fine will peel it back to just attempted drownings fine. Yes. Good message to send to two children that like an amazing adventure always begins with you being kidnapped by a stranger. That's real. What's funny? I was talking to my roommate about it this morning. And he goes, you know, you could make an argument that those kids were still kidnapped. Really, you know, like, yeah, I guess it's true. They have Stockholm syndrome. And it's another one where if you watch it now like a lot of Disney a lot of things in general like were talking about the sitcoms. It it doesn't each. Well, it's definitely a very racist movie as well. They don't do pick native Americans the best. Few things. But it's yeah. It was it was a dark movie, it could have been really really dark and said it was just really dark tie. It's a Pretty Woman because like from the fifties to the nineties, maybe Disney's move is like receive the darkest source material possible, lighten it up make the movie, you know, like, maybe that's maybe that's their magic Peter Pan is the fourteenth Disney animated feature. So they've made a bunch of before that, and they were mostly Grimm's fairy tales, which are so dark, and then they were probably just like they're singing, you know, now, it's good. Cool. But no, that's that's exactly the grim stuff is really dark. And I love when Disney gets it. Just right in the little mermaid the original grim story. She lives their voice because her tongue gets cut out of her mouth. That's crazy. This see which cuts her tongue out. What happens? But if you watch this is the point where I think Disney does walk that line of dark and the light perfect. If you watch the little mermaid from nineteen Eighty-nine. There's a power Ursula is throwing a bunch of stuff in her cauldron, and if you pay attention at subtle she throws them tongue. Oh, that's awesome. Yeah. And I love that. That's the first line of like, oh, the darkness is still there. But we it doesn't make me sad. She cut out someone else's tongue. Offscreen? What is it tripe count on? Oh. Non-human tongue. Whatever. Just like Delhi or something. Right language is the Mexican food. I yeah. Yeah. She in the story. I think she she doesn't win over the prince and also doesn't ever voice, and then just dies and cries herself to death and turns into seafoam. It's fun. Yeah. Yeah. Can't believe they wrote Pretty Woman that way originally. On the streets. Sunday. It's me your pal out in a hotel room in Chicago. We are gonna do these live shows of very very soon. But in the meantime, support for today's show comes from green, chef a food. I don't get to have because I'm traveling right now, but you can get yourself a box right now. And I'm very jealous of you. You have so many options paleo vegan vegetarian Pesca -tarian Mediterranean. There's more heart smart leaning clean Kito gluten free and omnivore with green. Chef it's easy to eat. Well, and discover new recipes every week that you'll love to cook. Enjoy clean and greediest you can trust seasonally sourced for peak freshness. As wells recipes that are quick and easy with step by step instructions, chef tips and photos to guide you along. There's even premade measured sauces, dressings and spices. So you can get more flavor. And last time again, I am traveling. I'm thrilled about these shows were doing but in the build up to them. I have to look at these wonderful photos of green chefs food. It looks very good. I would have a lot of fun making it probably I would be like, we skillets and stove Top's and other things I don't have in a hotel room in Chicago. But you have those things in probably wherever you live, and you can use them with green chef to have delicious time. So for fifty dollars off your first box of green chef that. I am extremely jealous of to green chef dot US slash cracked to be clear. That's a dot US domain name because they're in the future. And they're really cool. That's green chef dot US slash cracked for fifty dollars off your first box of green shop. And also got Allison wonderland here. Which is such a kind of impressed with how outside the box. They wanted to go with it. But it's still probably huge mistake. But they didn't do I think it would have a huge failure. Especially at that time. There's a few things about this that I find particularly amusing so Ridgely Allison wonderland or no Alice. What is Allison? The adventures of the amazing, Mr. Carol, Alison, the mysterious Mr. Carrel fit, and basically it would balance between her going to wonderland, which would all be animated as we know it and then coming back to reality where there would be a live action basically pedophile that follows her around. And then it it's like a whole thing between basically, it would have been PAN's labyrinth. Oh, wow. Was interesting was that Disney read the script realized that Mr. Carol was creepy wouldn't admit it and his plan to like get around that was he wanted to cast Cary Grant of like, you know, he's a man's man. Nothing weird going on there. And then to drive the point home. They gave him like totally unnecessary girlfriend that was like super attractive, and my favorite part of this whole article, and I don't wanna upset anybody. But he said this was a direct quote. I don't want anyone to think he's a queer. And that's why they wanted to cast Cary Grant. Which is so funny because there's definitely a running theory that Kari grant was probably gay. Like rock Hudson. We know I mean, it's never been proven. But it's definitely something. We've talked about a lot in film history. And, but so it just makes me laugh of the whole idea of like, no, we're going to cast Cary Grant to do, you know, people won't assume this which I also have the idea that just because someone's gay that doesn't make them a pedophile. A lot of problems. Yeah. There's also the problem. Just if you're doing ten things to make your character. Seamless pedophile just maybe lose the character at some point. You just alternately what they did. But. Yeah. Those words came out of somebody's mouth in some meeting, and then we were saved. But otherwise that would've had it. Yeah. Yeah. That's what words that had to be said, how did we get here? We mentioned that his girlfriend is thirty five like ten times keep adding these notes. News it one way as a song because it's Disney five thirty five. Animal's things that I don't know. And I'm not Disney. You right. Alex, soft pitching Disney. I'll known animal comes into some shit guys. You know and Kennedy you mentioned that like the live action version of Lewis Carroll would have like a pedophile kind of elementary. That's because there's rumors and and things by life that that either by Victorian Sanders, are our standards are gross and one of them was that he Lewis Carroll real name. Charles Dodgson took thousands of pictures in life, more than half of them were of kids and thirty of them were of nude or semi nude kids, which was also apparently Victorian style because the past is, you know, weird. It's it's a thing where he also had like a very close relationship with a bunch of kids one of them named Alice Ladele, and then suddenly June of eighteen sixty three that relationship was broken off. We'll Lincoln Smithsonian article with all the things about it. Nobody knows for sure what his deal was. But to dramatize it in just like a chill away. Also, do a bunch of weird things to try to make him seem like straighter and more masculine and and. If people don't know Cary Grant, he was a very suave, dude. That's such a weird way to make the movie we have now, or it's just a crazy cartoon trippy fun thing. But yeah, Hello this. I not a pedophile. Too much. Stuff accusing me of pedophilia. I didn't say anything. No one you keep coming up with no one said anything. They clearly had that awareness of all of those things. And yeah, it's like really tips their hand like, well, we gotta do it. But we have to change it this way this way this way. And it's like all right. You're aware of the dynamic that you are creating your and then you're just trying to save it. So I don't know uneven ended even kinda pushed innovation that seems like doing a live action animated thing. I think they did it with the original Mary Poppins may be a bit. But but otherwise that would be pretty revolutionary for the fifties. And they were like we'll go that far. If that's what it takes, you know, which is weird who framed Roger rabbit meets pedophilia. I don't know. This is the don't enjoy. This elevator pitch getting off. This elevator. Don't worry. We got the actor from north by northwest. So it's okay. It's totally fine. Nobody'll does. Yeah. There's more Disney movies here to Bambi nineteen forty two in the real movie. Very very sad Bambi finds his mom's body, but in the original draft. He was also going to find the body of the human hunter who started the fire that burned the forest problem. Oh, yeah. John wick revenge on mankind. And also, then the lion. King nineteen Ninety-four. There's that fun thing with the lion. King kind of hamlet, you know, and it's all just Mara wing story beats from Shakespeare's hamlet, and I don't know about you guys. But when I see hamlet, I'm like hamlets kind of a Weiner. He's kind of lymph dude, you know, I'm not a kind of lame guy. And so the original. That's my only Alex a four hour play. A weiner. Yeah. Let me, you know. It's on the marquee. A real Weiner alad shut it. We didn't get a lot of good quotes that one of them are key. But original Lion King script. Scar was a bad boon, and he basically would have manipulated Simba into being a lame weak slavon lake character described as quote, a lazy slovenly horrible. Character was the plan for Simba because of scar. Basically, just like Lucille blue raising BUSTER blue kind of making him a week lame figure, and that would have been the whole movie would have been crazy does he does he find his inner strength at the end. Or no, it seems like he doesn't have very young. But like there's a lot of him just being like, which is kind of in the movies. Like he reaches that point with tomato Puga. But but then he gets out of it and saves the day. Like the justification for why he did that makes more sense than it's just a small part of that movie. Not the whole Mufi. That'd be the most boring movie to watch. Yeah. It'd be like watching hamlet. Weiner. Cima goes to this blue blooded private school for a while. That's weird. And his parents have to get him out of like, you know, some firecracker incident that he did this is so boring. I hate this character. When two we've got a other non Disney movies here to e t the extraterrestrial nineteen eighty-two Candice, you pick that out in particular. Because because it could have been scary base is fascinating to me because e has been one of my favorite movies since I was a small small child. And I did not know about this. And it really blew my mind to find out so close encounters came out was a huge hit spill still very young. And so the studio started pushing for a sequel and after what had happened with jaaz. He didn't want to just hand it over to them to have a sequel, but also want a sequel to be made. So he pitched a movie, I think it's like night skies guys night skies. Yes. Where basically it was about aliens that butchered cattle like mutilated cattle, and that was the theme of the movie, and they made it far enough where it's in the article that I'm assuming we'll be linked that they designed the actual aliens. Like they were made like they had already designed them. It was made it that far along. But it wasn't working Melissa Mathison looked at the script. And basically said, you know, there is there was a subplot of a little boy befriending one of these evil lands, and they becoming friends, and she goes there's a story there and Rhody tee off of that. And it just blows my mind to think that this charming little boy and his dog story that I've loved my whole life originally came from this monstrous thing about liens than mutilate cattle. Yeah. Like alien scientists terrorizing farm family, and in the in the article that designs of them are really spidery and horrible lookin. Yeah. The only thing that state is the fact they were kinda Squatty. That was literally a boy his dog movie. It was the biggest movie of all time. Like, literally the. Thing to change. Yeah. Totally change. Maybe the kennel movie would have been huge. It's another case of like that would have been a different movie. Would have been a bad movie. It just wouldn't Benny Tina. Yeah. Yeah. And again, butterfly effect. We never would have had drew Barrymore 'cause I'm assuming it probably a little sister character probably wouldn't have played the same away, Pepsi would not have existed. We we would not enjoy reece's pieces. No, we wouldn't have. Maybe gone out of business. Such a struggle and get our mouths around whole reese's idiots. Enjoying eminem. Also bad in this counterfactual. Geez. Farmer watching his cattle getting getting horribly butchered. And he says, oh man and then reaches eat some receives fees. You're good. Let's get into Dr. No, let's do the first JAMES BOND movie nineteen sixty two based on the Ian Fleming book, and they wanted to go a whole crazy direction with it, man. I love this jury and talking about because doctor no's cared about by seven people in two of them are and Alex. Dr no the first big screen, JAMES BOND film. Sean Connery pack prime doctor knows this mysterious character on a Caribbean island and eventually is revealed, and he has dinner with bond, and it's the first, you know, bond meets the villain sits down to dinner, and it's really tense kind of thing. Yeah. Like for for people who don't know bond movies that first doctor. No, it really template at a lot of what the series does a lot of the things you think stereotypes, you you only see him in shadows for most of the movie. Yeah. Elaborate layer. Yeah. Elaborate layer. And then finally there's a big didn't reveal where he's there. And he's like he has a big scar. I think you're right. Yeah. Yeah. You know? He's just weird. Looking basically is a weird looking doctor. But in the original draft, I don't know how this would have worked. Dr. No, the big reveal was that. He was a monkey. Right. What the like like an animal not a person. I don't know if that means a figurehead, and like, and they were all someone else's running the show, and Dr no is the steak thing or like this monkey was the doctor who was masterminding everything simple. Intelligent, monkey in like Hammett. I don't know. Sits down and has dinner with bond and like tries to convince him to switch to his side. And it's just a monkey through. Throws poop. Yeah. Because the because they're also they're drawing on Fleming's book. And in the book, the character of Dr now is name is Julius. No. But it's it's sort of the old stereotype of like a Asian man who has hyper intelligent and powerful in devious and a lot a lot of racist things there. And also in the book, he has like metal hooks for hands. So there's a lot of crazy stuff with it. And the writers of the treatment of the movie were like, we don't wanna do this like Asian stereotype, we see all the time. It's stupid as they went with a monkey who's on guys shoulder. And so then they were gonna fight where do we do like, I kinda racist villain or a Bill that as you say makes no sense. 'cause like in the treatment, it would have been bond takes out the guy that the monkey is on the shoulder of. But then the monkey jumps on Bond's shoulder looks at the camera is like Dr no lives on. But, but it's a monkey it doesn't make any sense. And so those were the two ideas there are bad options for. Literally, Simpsons episodes end that way. This homers idea for the dog, right? And he like rewrites Mel Gibson's, Mr Smith goes to Washington. Yeah. And he's like we want zoom in on the dog, and people know people suspected like literally that and and yeah, the producer was like none. We gotta hit book. We gotta do the thing. And they they did tone down some of the Asian Bill stereotype part they failed to find an Asian actor to play them. But they made it less of a I believe they gave him regular hands or at least regular looking hands mutated hands right from radiation of that's it. Yeah. Radiation, clippers or not like flippers. But he's he has messed up hands and gloves, but not like medal hand, if people don't know this movie and only know Austin powers, like doctor evil is in the funny radiation suit where he tried. He kinda doesn't fit in it and his shoulders are weird. It's from doctor knows radiation SU there's a lot of radiation stuff in the movie. Yeah, I like the idea to kind of like the rocky one but times a million like what if this movie happened and was the campus dumbest thing ever and it like, right? Torpedoed the existence of a bond franchise before it even got off the ground like, yeah. Yeah. Or they would have had like punt for fifteen years and then start over in the mid seventies or something like that. Like, oh, probably something. That's stupid. Could have just been like, whoa. What a weird lark. And then we're not going to touch that for another ten years, and Sean Connery's not the star that he became and stuff. Like that by crazy. They really could have got off on the wrong foot imaginable or the right? I mean, I don't know. Out of all of our examples. That's the one that suddenly like the butterfly effect in my head just went crazy of civilization, as we know it would have been entirely. Dr no. Keeping. Yeah. Or maybe the bond franchise still happens. And it's just it's just a different animal reveal every single time. Goldfinger some walrus. Bon doesn't see it coming every time. This time. It's probably a person. Bon became Scooby doo animals. Pretty sure to person this time. You've been burned before just zoom in on an otter like. But then and then casino royale, they've they rebuilt it with a gritty realistic animal. Like a dolphin. Yeah. Nice can be vindictive. Smart cutting swims. Well, like, all right. It's a dolphin then. We'll reverse engineer how this is possible. They really right it. Well, and you're like, oh, they really made the dolphin make sense in this universe. Wallace. Can't be than the Brosnan ones. I don't know. It's just squirrel is the dad guy. I. Bon went through school with a squirrel archenemies. This is gotten so ridiculous. Join me seven half of these coins will be ause I'm not for shale. Even the movies. We have are like they're not that different from the books, but they do like tone down some of the especially sexual politics of them. But there's so many ways franchise gone like there's a previous podcast episode where we talked about an attempt in the fifties to make movies before these and the writers did kind of like these writers were they were like, oh, there's a horrible objectionable thing in the books, but they didn't like JAMES BOND himself. They thought he was a sexist and a bad guy. So they tried to make it a lady spy, and so would just be a ladies by franchise, which could have gone great. But like they're all these near misses all these franchises. Like do. We know too much lays is it. Good knowing that all of these things could have blown up, you know, on the launch pad or I don't know. I like knowing it's very fun. But yeah, Kanneh said like that butterfly effect thing is in your head where you're like, I don't know if it's just we know how things played out. So we can't imagine them any other way or for like, no, this would have fundamentally changed everything. Like there would have been. No rocky. Franchise that would have been no bond. French is some other thing would have taken its place with bond. Maybe it's mission impossible movies like right away, like the TV happening there like boom movie. Yeah. Yeah. England has no cultural. Exports. The Beatles are American. Take that. Names like, Hank? It's a little liberating in a way just to know, how close everything always is to disaster. And like again like I said like every I feel like every production ever made feels like that. You don't have any money. It's a total disaster. You're just like, I hope this is thing. And then it becomes the thing. And then people like it or don't like, but you know, that we're not evident how close it was to being completely one hundred percent different in a bunch of different ways working on TV shows. There's been times where they'll be something in the scripts not bad, but something will happen production that completely derails what you're going to do. And then you're by the of your pants, you come up with something. More brilliant on the fly ends up being you know, this great thing that wouldn't have happened. If everything went the way it didn't. Dr no being a human was an onset improv. It was like the monkey didn't feel right. And then they were just like just wing it for a couple of weeks. And then I just threw out that he's a human now. A lot of fun onset, fixing horrible problems. Fitting sense broccoli get upset that part of the thing is he was like, no, no, no. You're going too from my, but but really, yeah. He said, and we'll link it's a new statesman article about it cubby broccoli said quote. I don't remember a monkey chitter around in Fleming's book. And I agree believer in not tampering with an original winner. Yeah. British accent unto these guys, and they did it. Yeah. Not not only are bad. Yes. The studio has his probably correct. Colin monkey villain. Right. They were your mailing. Books. The episode four this week my fakes to Dan, hopper and Candice mardell aero for journeying into aliens and spies and Boston bars and more with me just having having a wonderful time spitball in ways these things could have gone and pitching itself is funny. You know pitching in the sense of presenting an idea trying to make it happen. It's just a good time. And I'm very entertained that we dug into these I hope you're entertained to. And you can entertain yourself further with our food notes where you will find links about Dan in particular, his very very funny Twitter account also New Yorker did. And then Candice you've seen her writing on stand against evil on IFC. Also, her sketch group fem PHD is amazing and all around Los Angeles and elsewhere, sometimes so I recommend you check those things out and then with our footnotes from the episodes material, we have cracked articles on everything from the Peter Pan story boards that are very creepy to the ET, that's very very creepy too. Also, some fun visuals because we do it every way something else. I think you'll enjoy is a new album that dropped on Friday. It is called Budo spanned five it is by the Budo spanned on dab tone records and it gosh darn shreds. Listen to it put it in your years. Also, our theme music is Chicago fell can by the Budo spanned a prior album. That's also very good. This episode was engineered by Devin Bryant edited by Chris Sousa? If you love this episode. That's great. If you hate it. Let me know about it on social media. That's right. Social media a space where as I said at the top I say a lot of things about our tour. We just did right there. I'll talk more about it in the near future on the show. But this is like past Alex who is just very very excited to see all of you in the mid west either way. I am confident the main takeaway my thoughts on that tour is just endless thank yous. Just an end let like a like a Moebius strip of thank yous if your if your way into conceptual physics, I think that is it's some category thing in terms of my social. Media category. My Twitter account is at Alex Midi. My Instagram is at Alex Smith's degrom and on the wider internet at my website, Alex, midday dot com. It's got my free fun and occasional Email newsletter of ten things you alike, you can enjoy for free. So check that out. And in the meantime, I'm here to say we will be back next week with more craft podcast. So have out that talk to you. Then. This has been an ear will production executive produced by Scott Akron. Chris Ben and Colin Anderson for more information and content. Visit ear wolf dot com. Hey, guys. I'm I saw the host of fake the nation where we talk about news. We talk about politics, and where we ca- vet about democracy. If you or someone you love wants to know what's going on in the world. But would rather year that news from around table of comedians were smart funny, and you know, like gin secure fake, the nation is the podcast for you. Our panelists are people like John Lovett, John Fugel, saying John Hodgman and just like a bunch of people named John. But also people like W Kamau bell Maeve Higgins bear today. Thirst Judah Friedlander, and like just the funniest people in America. So find fake the nation on apple podcast Itcher or wherever you get your podcasts. Oh, and we will tell you exactly who's gonna win the twenty twenty election. Like were that good?

Disney Alex Schmidt writer Dan Cary Grant Hollywood Sam Simon Disney Chicago JAMES BOND Kansas Simpsons Ian Fleming Adrian boxing Kennedy hopper Verite
First Anniversary Show!

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

36:00 min | 3 months ago

First Anniversary Show!

"This is Dan Sylvestry and Tampa's Outta am spy movie navigator Dot. COM and we're one year old now. L. Girl little older, but our website and podcasts and video shows cracking. The code of spy movies is a year-old. Join us. We celebrate, and we thank you for getting us here. We'll hear from a couple of our listeners and colleagues. Good morning, Mister Sylvestry and Mr Zodda the menu are listening to his John Cork. WHO's reliably learned from sources that spy movie navigator and the podcast cracking the code aspire? These is celebrating its one year anniversary. Your mission. Should you decide to accept? It is to continue to entertain an illuminate on the subject of the spy. Genre, As always should either of you. Or any member of Your Sim in team be called. Mispronouncing names are incorrectly citing film titles the Secretary Will Disavow knowledge of your errors. This audio file will unfortunately not self-destructing five seconds. Happy the anniversary. All right John. Thank you, John You got to know John Kirk is. He's an amazing guy. He's a very cool guy and he's co-authored three James Bond books including the James Bond Encyclopedia. And a couple of others James Bond the legacy and bond girls are forever. He did that one with actually marry him. Dabo and combine these books sold over three hundred thousand copies, but he. Says that's not bad. He's just a great guy. He's got a multimedia company with offices in both California and in Florida. If you own like James Bond, ultimate edition sets of the movies you'll, you'll notice the special features discs with have a lot of interviews with stars and things like that and special features, a lot of that was produced and directed by John. Cork Cork again. Great Guy. He owns clover land. That's the name of his company the Multimedia. Company and we thank you John so much now. The reason this is a great message in time smiling while the this is a little inside joke here that he gave us. John and I spoke on the phone. Just after we recorded, and without the thirty nine steps podcast, and and he said to me Dan mispronounced the name of Robert Donut. The STAR! And I just did it again on purpose. He said it's not Robert Dot. E corrected me and said Robert Donuts. Anniversary. Is Right on. Thank you John. That was great. Ever really was thanks John. So June seventeenth, two thousand nineteen is when we launched the day before Barbara, Broccoli's birthday, and we've been rolled over the last year to put out forty four podcasts which have been downloaded in forty five states in the United States in about sixty six countries throughout the world is pretty cool. I'm just shocked when I see that, thank you, everybody, thank you so much. We focus on the spy movies from the classics like the thirty nine steps, which generally regarded as the I spy movie released in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five to modern day spy movies, including of course, James. Bond mission impossible born. We've done some hitchcock's by movies. Some kids spy movies and a whole lot more. But we don't just do movies. We spy movie topics. We've had fun putting together and recording podcast for things like James. Bond is despised with Sherlock. Holmes is two detectives. One. We have what I love. This title James Bond is like Coca Cola. Which is why for bond? It's no time to die. You've gotTA listen to it. It's a really interesting taste of fun with it's. It's a fun on the no time to die movie and bringing a little coca-cola history into the podcast. So it's it's. It's a fun. We also have a bunch of podcasts on the no time to die trailers. Unfortunately, we're here and waiting for November for them to release this hopefully after the coronavirus pandemic, so we put out a bunch of no time, trailers and videos, and we did podcasts on those we also did a podcast on the title song from no time to die, which they released right before the pandemic it. We also did one on team Fukunaga and Waller Bridge. This no time to die Dream Team, work. Kind of an interesting question, will they work for us? We talk about that in the podcast. We even have a couple of podcast on examining the original Ian Fleming manuscripts which Dan and I did. When we visited the Indiana University's Lilly Library they own eleven of the Fleming Type Manuscripts with his handwritten edits is task. It was it was just amazing. Read the words and see how he scratch things out and change things. As as he was writing. A piece or touching the pages that Ian Fleming typed in Jamaica and then hand written, and it's it was that was. That was a heck of a trip. was. We doing that? We did to podcasts on it. Because it was too long to do one podcast, and we also have podcasts on spy movie locations that we've visited to yeah, I mean. We're always looking for connections between SPY MOVIES WHICH? have influenced others and similar ideas seen in multiple spy movies, so we have a lot of podcasts where we're connecting all of these different pieces, and also how real world events and historical stuff finds its way into spy movies. We actually have two podcasts out on the real world stuff already. They're really fun to listen to had a lot of great feedback on them. We've done videos on spy movie locations as well as compiled fun videos like the top twelve uses of lasers and spy movies, and we did another one on. Where did mission impossible? Come up with the idea for that volt seen? That's a cool one. We've got three different movies in that one, and it's pretty cool. And we visited and filmed. The Spice Gapes by museum in New York City interviewing the GM there and we did a nice little video on real art collectibles, which is a great movie. Memorabilia shop in Illinois, and it's got tons and tons of movie memorabilia. Stuff in there and all great funds, things and a lot of spy movie stuff. We've enjoyed our first year and we're looking forward to more. And you! Our listeners have enjoyed it as well. We've got a few comments besides what you're going to hear throughout today podcast in terms of the audio recordings. Here's a nice little quote. We got from one of our listeners Eddie. He said you're the men with the MIDAS touch engaging and fun as always a Eddie. Thank you. And then we had Shane reached out and said just a shout out. You guys are killing lately with the great podcasts. We love getting that feedback. It really helps. Keep US going. It's great to hear from you, so let's hear for more of you out there. Let us know what's going on. We're GONNA. Go to a another audio clip here from the double o files are. Are Friends out in the Netherlands, and if you haven't heard podcast I've got a really good one. The double o files Hello Tom and Dan. This dones adamant from the double files. Congratulations on your very first anniversary, and what a year it has been a lover. You put spy in general at the center of your show where we've focused pretty much solely on James Bond. Bond medicine possible, just born Alfred Hitchcock can even the reasons animated films highs in disguise which a have to admit I enjoyed more than I should have. And besides that you visit iconic locations. You're living the good life and you even record well. You're there Tom and Dan I salute you for Jimmy Bring something new to the community, and your show is always a pleasure. Pleasure Happy Happy Birthday! Cheers, guys, thanks so much, yeah! Grand Test Don the rest of your crew out there there's for you guys all together and we really appreciate that message that means a lot to us to hear that and again the double o files has some great podcasts on bond as well and some really cool stuff. They're really a bunch of good guys. Thanks. We'll continue trying to come up with unique topics. We released our first podcast, featuring Roberto Schaefer the director of photography of Quantum of solace on June ninth. It's a two part podcast, and the second part will release on June twenty third. And we are honored that Roberto took the time to send us a happy birthday and anniversary message. He took some good time to get to the podcast with us, too, so we're surprised. We got this message from a to of Great. Yeah, we spent a couple of hours worth Roberto so here's Roberto again. Hey spy moving aviator I want to wish you happy anniversary first year of doing some amazing podcasts and crawl a spy freaks out. There also wanted to use this opportunity to wish. Barbara Broccoli a happy birthday. Which is the day after your anniversary, so keep it up wall, 007 fans. I'm one of them all the best happy anniversary. Happy Birthday, keeping up, thanks all right. Thanks for that was terrific. Yeah, we like Thomson. We spent a couple hours with Roberto on zoom doing our podcast with them. Great Guy. It was like talking new just a friend that we've known for years and years. It was a real. I love that conversation. It was great. Yeah, so look for those two podcasts as well. They're really fun. Fun and Roberto has a lot of insights into quantum in some of the other films. He was involved with like finding Neverland, and so on great stuff so very happy that Roberto sent us that. Thank you, thank you. Thank you very much and if you want to find out more about Roberto, you can go to Roberto. Schaefer. Dot. com, right. It's all one word the Schafer's S. C. H. E. F. E. R. Yet dot com. It's great, so check some of his other movies out to finding Neverland Monster's ball. Stay in a whole bunch of others that he did stays. It stays a really interesting movie, fantastic cinematography and quantum in the podcast again Roberto reveals a few very fun facts, so take a listen when you get a chance. If you love Sunsets, you've got to see the opening to his movie rattlesnake. Best Sunset I've ever seen in my life and it was a real. It was a real video. All? Right, WE'RE GONNA go to another little clip here. This is Raymond Benson Happy Anniversary to the spy movie navigator. Cheers guys all right Raymond. Benson Raymond is a great guy to. He was the first American author to be authorized by the Ian Fleming publications right the continuation James Bond novels, so that's pretty big. He wrote six continuation novels plus three novelization of three Pierce Brosnan bond films, which were not novels before the film's. So. That's a lot of great work by Raymond Benson and his bond novels include zero minus ten the facts of death, high time to kill double shot, never dream of dying and the man with the red. Tattoo and he wrote the novelization 's from the Pierce Brosnan movies. Tomorrow never dies. The world is not enough in die another day. We're GONNA have a podcast with Raymond as a special guest. Upcoming very soon, he actually started with James. Bond bedside companion first published in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four very cool book I haven't. It only goes up to the living daylights, but it's packed with great information, and it's available now in e books. Only we met with ray and a couple of already, and he has a great music. Background is well. You can find them on facebook. Sometimes with a little piano concerts during those pandemic stuff. It's a nice little bit of entertainment, so thank. Even though he's not doing the anymore of the continuation novels for James, Bond. He still is writing, so he still is putting out books, which which are really good. Yeah, he's got a lot of great books out now. That are not bond books, but fabulous. Great writer terrific, so we've been having fun making context traveling to spy movie locations researching recording podcasts and doing videos as well. It's been a pleasure to meet some folks in person like remembered. In that time, we met Caroline Munro. Naomi in the spy who loved me and she was gracious with their time. We met with her in at Duke's bar in London. was. Meeting with her. Yeah, we're also meeting people online doing things in twitter, instagram, facebook Yep, and even on our websites by moving advocate or dot com. It's really a great community of people out there. They're really friendly and knowledgeable, and it's just been a blast so far. The. James Bond Double O, seven guys who aren't twitter is at Bond James. 007 T sent us a written message because they were in a place that was too noisy to record one. He said anyway. He says hi spy movie navigator. are going to be just fantastic for your anniversary. Day I visited the website and everything looks in order very professional, looking you guys. Keep up the good work and you have my blessing. Congratulations on your anniversary and many more to come. Enjoy your celebrations the best to you all as Nice. It was nice. A, time, we also met a gentleman who works at the Palazzo Hotel Industry Real Portugal when we were there on our trip when we visited, that was Jose Afonso Jose Afonso and of course on our trip there, we visited a lot of the on Her Majesty's secret service locations and the Palazzo Hotel in Israel. Portugal is one of the places and Jose. Was Actually in the movie. He was in the movie. He was dormant in the movie, and then he was a doorman for like sixty something years at that hotel. Yeah, he was still there a couple years ago, when Tom, and I visited there since retired, and there was another guy who works there as well. And he was the bellboy. WHO hands the key to the manager to give to bond when he's checking in the hotel? In the movie, they actually used people who worked at the hotel early, some of the minor roles, which was which was kind of fun, and the fact that these two still there, it's like wow, yeah, and actually they did that a lot when we when we visited the wedding reception location for the honor, magic secret service to in the mansion when they had it in the courtyard and everything when Bond Mary's Tracy and tobacco's mansion there and we talked to A. A young gentleman there, who is the Gardner and his grandmother, was servant in the house at the time, and they wore these special uniforms, and they actually used the servants in the movie wearing the same uniforms that they actually really were so. There's a lot of cool stuff there. Yes, a beautiful thing! Yeah, so all these people. It's been a blast traveling all these places has been fun. It's just a true delight and so nice to meet some of these people. Either electronically or in person and so on, and then I get a chance to tell these stories with you and share their experiences with you. Even if you didn't get a chance to get there yet, and we love, said Yeah. We'd love to help you get there too as well. There's so many so many wonderful places to go. We probably a visited a hundred spy movie film locations already, and I must say that really one of our favorites was piece Gloria from honor. Honor Secret Service I don't think it was one of my that standards my favorite so far it is fantastic in chiltern Switzerland. It's gorgeous. It's like ten thousand feet up into the Alps, and it's just gorgeous up there and it's pretty much looks like it did in the movie so a lot of fun stuff there. We talk about that trip in the first podcast. We did all about spy movies. Yeah, where we talk about that trip. Actually was our impetus related to get. Get going with doing something on spy movies. Yeah, we've been to some fun fun places, and certainly on the imagine secret service. We've been to all of the major locations for that. We've been to the jewelry store where he buys the ring. We've been to the wedding reception the mansion. We've been to the bullring. We've got boring. Yeah, don't forget. The voting were DRAKO's birthday party. Was We have pictures of us in the bullring and right up where the party was standing exactly? Exactly, where bond was and everything all that stuff is so fun to do. And we went to where Tracy the the road where tracy gets shot and killed. We've been to virtually DENIA. We went to Sardinia well. Ask Sardinia Italy where the spy who loved me. The Lotus Esprit where off that's we we. We visited there. We found where the Lotus spree got delivered by by Q.. We found where the chase was a motorcycle, chasing and the whole chase scene of the. We saw where it plunged off the pier. We were on that very pier. Where plunges off into the water and becomes a submersible, and where shoots down they only who we mentioned earlier, Caroline Munro. Who was the first woman to be killed in upon movie actually by Bond? And then we found the beach where the Lotus comes driving out of the water that was the name of that beach was spazzy Cap Chili or something like that I have no idea. I wrote that down over here somewhere because I can never remember I can never remember it, but that was fantastic. That was gorgeous and we have some pictures as well so. All that's a lot of fun and we've done other things to. We've gone podcast on hitchcock movie when we did a two part podcast on Alfred Hitchcock's north by Northwest cray movie. Yeah, yeah, and they were. There was fun to do. The podcast and we've had a lot of great feedback on those podcasts as well so take a listen to lows. After they were released, we heard from a woman Cynthia O'Connor, who was a little girl at the time of the filming of the movie in One thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight. The movie came out in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty nine. and. She sent us a nice voice message, and we included her voice message in our podcast drinking with bond literally so listen to that little podcast drinking with bind literally, and you'll hear a little piece from Cynthia telling her story about how she was in this movie as a little girl, her mom was actually in the movie, too, and she talks about that as well so it's pretty pretty fun so Cynthia. Counter was kind enough now to send us a nice little anniversary greeting as well so here. She is whole guys. Happy Anniversary. The year really flew by right. You clearly know your stuff and have a blast when Shariat and ensure that all your followers feel the same. Keep up the good work and looking forward to the next year of fun at thanks. It was so cool we when we got her first message to because this was somebody who had a bit part in a movie that we were talking about. When she was when she was a child, and we put our podcast and she responds to us. It's like out of the blue. We get this. It's amazing how tight the community is around the spy movies. Yeah, she's fantastic. She's got a great voice. She does she's doing this. She's out in New York now. I think actually she was the. She lived in the Chicago area at the time of the movie and it's the. The filming. They were doing at union station in Chicago with a train station part. So that's the part she was in. So it's been fun and we've had a lot of opportunity to talk to other people as well. These poked with some authors like Dave, holcomb who wrote his world never dies the evolution of James Bond in the movies, and it's a great little read. We have a nice podcasts out with Dave called. His world never dies the evolution of James Bond Movies, and that's actually one of our more popular podcast to yeah, it's been great, and we have a number of additional authors lineup for podcasts as well from different parts of the world. All people we have met one way or another this past year. Last year Dave Holcomb was kind enough. Leave us a message as well. Hey Guys Dave. Welcome here in the author of his world never dies the evolution of James. Bond just wanted to say happy. One year anniversary building a website in hosting a podcast. Today's environment is really really tough, and you guys are doing a wonderful job so congratulations. You guys become just a hub. For any spy movie Fan and I've really enjoyed watching you succeed, and and I look forward to celebrating again with you next year on your second anniversary. Thanks Dave, that was that was fun and thanks for taking the time again to send us a message. I know this takes time for people to do this kind of thing, and we're really thrilled to hear from some of the people we've talked to over the years over the last year, and it's just been a blast and David was one of the fun guys to that. We spoken with so that's pretty cool. Yep, absolutely, another author Kerry Edwards is scheduled with us for a podcast, and he was very nice as well to leave us a little message so here we go from Kerry Edwards Is Carry Edwards overall. He disagreed with something. The nighttime wishing only navigated. Very Happy Birthday. You Lung Kee cracking the code of spine. Thanks Kerry Kerry Kerry very knowledgeable guy as a PhD and his focus is cinema. So when we talked to him. We better know what we're talking about. He's GonNa be good, but his he's got a nice little book that is called as he mentioned, he disagreed with something that Adam and it's. He loves Timothy Dalton as bond, and so do we so we're gonNA. Have a fun conversation with Kerry Edwards, so that'll be coming up sometime soon as well so I, like I like the hotness pond now last night I actually watched a movie called. Hot fuzz truly stars Simon Pegg. Who Benji in mission impossible series. But one of the big roles as well as Timothy Dalton plays this really bad guy couple years later, or then when his last bond was, he's got a mustache, but he's got a devilish role. It's real it's really fun. I liked him. Yeah so. You know carry like in Timothy. Dalton I agree gotTA. Like Timothy Dalton and here I literally fourteen hours ago, just watched him in a different movie. Those totally different, so we're looking forward to the cat words interview and Tim Guccione left us a nice little voice message as well and so we'll play that now. One of our lists happy one year anniversary spy moving alligator. Guys put out a lot of great content in the last year and I can't wait to hear everything else. You have coming up for the next year in many years to come. Cheers guys. Thanks Tim Yeah. Thanks. We love hearing from our listeners and from anyone out there. WHO's a spy movie fan? Let us know what you think we should be doing next to. If you have a suggestion of a movie, we should cover. Please let us know and we'll try to do that as well so and I can't stress. How important those messages are I I, it's helps keeps us going, but then if you give us an idea of hey, you know. I was thinking about this or I saw this in one movie, and it seems like I saw something like it in another movie. Tell us about it and let us see if we can help. Put that together for you. The thing that's been a lot of fun is getting to know the people we've come across over the last year or so, and we met with Corrie Glacier. Sin Who runs real art collectibles we. We had mentioned a little earlier real art collectibles as in a suburb near Chicago great movie memorabilia from all genres of movies, including spy movies of course and we got a video on our youtube. Channel of that interview is well great posters. Toys Puzzle Nielsen Lyles ship anywhere in the. The world, right, yeah, see anywhere just shift the poster from A to France. of someone who is listening to the podcast and heard about the posters we talked about so, and after after you record that video, we were at the show. See to easy to here in Chicago Oh. Yeah, we saw him. He had a booth there and we. We saw him there and record. It recorded some more audio and video with him, rocking and rolling at the at the show that was. Really was so it's. It's fun to just run into everybody like this. And like I said, we got to know Dave Holcomb who wrote the his world never dies the evolution James Bond movies again. Fund read East from Lanta Georgia in the US. We've interacted with anders frayed. Who Manages George Lazenby and would match Sherman? One of the bond experts in the world who runs bond cruises, and and lots more events and Matt just left us a quick little messages well, so we're GONNA. Cut To that clip. Identified Tom and the SPIVEY NAVIGATOR DOT, com crew, listeners and followers. This is matched chairman of bond FAN EVENTS DOT com. Wish you all very happy. First anniversary you are cracking the code of the spy genre and cracking good when it comes to bomb locations in spy movie locations. It's been exciting to follow your progress in partner with Bond Fan Events Dot com and I join my friends and Bond Luminaries Raymond. Benson and John Cork, you wish you, and all your followers best a great anniversary with many happy years to come long may rain. Thank you spy movie navigated. al-Qaeda man thanks, Matt, that was fantastic man. It's a great guy. He's got a bond. Crew's coming up in October. Providing cruises are still running in October. We're planning the beyond that cruise and supposed to be on that cruise. Assuming it happens. Yeah, doing a presentation on the cruise, but he's a great guy. He's been very helpful to us. In some of the bond locations, we visited and just a terrific guy. You could check out match Sherman. Website Bond Fan events that com, great guy, good stuff, so then even even worked with a Guy Steven Jay Rubin. Wrote Complete James Bond Movie Encyclopaedia another encyclopedia. which really we used as the basis for our spy. Database and our website so if you do a search on our website, you'll actually find information from his encyclopedia. Coming back as a result results from research, a lot of rates stuff a lot of really interesting stuff. One time today. It'll be. Having his book. Got, a multimedia company out of California and he also has the twilight zone encyclopedia. If you're twilight zone, big twilight zone, Van Yep. So and of course we've talked with John. Corcoran Roberto Schaefer. We've already mentioned yeah. And we got another great Guy Mardi Mackillop. Who Runs Thunderball Dot Org? He's out in Scotland and he's got a great collection of James Bond. Photos movie posters lobby cards and more online, and he's helped us out a lot. Forgetting things we've needed over the years for our podcast and for our video, so thank you, Marty! Yes, thank you. Marty Marty was also kind enough to leave us a message so. Let's cut to the clip of Marty Hai. My name is Marty and I found it. A website called the thunderbolts James Bond Picture Archive. I want to say happy first birthday to the spy movie navigator podcast. Has Given a big thumbs up to Dan Tom for the sheer dedication and passion that they clearly pour into this project whole amazing work fellas very well done. I raise a glass of macallan whiskey in your honor gentleman slider. I wish I also especially being enjoying seeing all your James Bond location visits on your instagram account, which everyone should be following of course on twitter. Just follow the law. May a good work continue guys anti, keep safe. Thanks again Mardi and keep up the great work. You're doing at thunderball dot org. Fantastic stuff is really a good stuff. And I had a glass of macallan in my hand. Which I wish I did I raise it right back at Ya I've got coffee, my double o Seven Cup, but here's the. Coffee. Goods, mcallen's. Hey. We got the no Steve Salomon to now Steve Salomon is. A talented young man and he wrote the music for our podcast show. He's out in Los Angeles. And Steve just left us a message a little bit ago, so I will cut to the thirty second clip of the music that Stephen Roach us, and then we'll hear his message. And loved that Song. Yeah. That's fun stuff so Stephen. Leaves us a nice voice message kind of telling us how he was inspired writing that music can how each candidate it? It's kind of cool. All right, so let's cut the Steve and see what he says. My Name is Steven Solomon and I had the pleasure of writing the theme song for spy movie navigator. I thought I'd share a little bit of how I went about writing it. Of course, it had to be inspired by the original bond theme, so it's also in a minor key. has note similar to the scale as the double o seven theme as well. The theme song for the show also inspired by the Twelve Bar Blues or in music theory terms. It's twelve measures long like many old Mississippi Delta and Chicago Blues Songs. An example of the blues form. Song Sweet Home Chicago. Then wanted to build it up at the end with a big ending and and on the highest note of the whole song with trumpets crash cymbals all the fireworks. and. That's pretty much it I. Hope you enjoy the theme song for spy movie navigator Happy Anniversary. Thank Stephen. We love you. Thank you and I actually learned something that clip. 'cause I didn't know how he built it. All I know is you and said Oh? What do we wanted to song? We talked about it and then all of a sudden, said Oh here. Steven wrote this for us and I'm like us is Great Yeah? Great stuff so you could check him out at Steven Solomon. Music Dot, com, great, talented, young man out in California. Cool stuff thank you. In an another guy that actually has younger helped us. Do some of the work that we've done is curve or broker. He did all of our major graphics. Though that? We've got on the website. Another really talented young man, and a courteous left us a great message when he found out was our anniversary and we really appreciate it. Yeah, you go. Hey guys. It's Kurt. Graphic designer congratulations on being one year in. A year ago when we were emailing back and forth and working on the designs for the various parts of the page I told you that I knew this was going to be amazing and I was going to be a fan from day one and I have been I've turned my brother in law and my dad and my sister onto the podcast. We literally love them. Love listening to mom. Working site is great. The videos a great and you guys are truly the masters of all things clandestine big congratulations and I can't wait to see what comes over the next year. You guys rock. Rock to Kurt Man, that's great stuff you. Thanks for the comments and for the great work you've done for us. Yeah, we would also be remiss on our anniversary. We didn't mention the name Jeff McNair. Actually did the development and maintenance for our website. Another great guys been really super helpful getting all of this stuff up and running, yeah! And our biggest thanks is to all who have listened to our show, cracking the code of spy movies and watched our videos on cracking the code of spy movies channel on Youtube. And Use our website on a regular basis to watch our curated videos and read comments, read articles search our spy movie database and do more, and of course to all of the social media, followers and supporters on facebook, twitter and instagram that has been tremendous, and we're going to do a lot more in the social media market in this next coming here. This has been an adventure. The adventure will continue plan on doing more location trips once I can start traveling again. Get some great pictures and videos for you I'm dying to do that and to me more people including our listeners, we will in the next year. Do Some live chats with our facebook group members. If you're not a member of our group, it's called. The worldwide community is spy movie. Fans go to our facebook page. WWW DOT facebook dot com slash spy movie navigator. In Click the visit group button asked to join. We also post in the group information on upcoming podcasts and videos and more before they're out to the general public. Hey, you can also follow us on twitter at twitter dot com slash spy navigator, and on Instagram at Instagram dot com slash spy movie navigator. We're going to do more fun podcasts on a variety of spy movie topics all with a twist, more interviews, more classic spy movies, lots of mission, impossible bond and born to. To and what you suggest, send us an email or leave us a message on her web sites by moving navigator dot com, just click that big red button. Leave us a voice message and tell us what you think we should do or what movie you think. We should take a look at if you'd like to be a sponsor of our website or show. Send an email to Dan at spy movie navigator Dot Com yeah and once again. Thank you, thank you, thank you. So, thank you all very much fastening to our show for your support and your enthusiasm about what we're doing. We truly appreciate it and it does sparks on. Do more creative stuff. It does so thank you, thank you, thank thank you. Please subscribe to this show on Apple podcasts. spotify or wherever you listen. Thanks again. For the past year, this has been designed and Daniel Vestry, a spy movie navigator DOT COM. Check out our website. Watch our videos on Youtube and join us for each episode of Our podcasts together. We're cracking the code of spy movies. Thanks everybody.

James Bond Roberto Schaefer twitter Chicago Dan Tom James Alfred Hitchcock John Dave Holcomb James Bond Encyclopedia Dan instagram California facebook Ian Fleming John You Raymond Benson Barbara Broccoli Caroline Munro Youtube
10 Surprising Trivia Questions

Trivia With Budds

11:34 min | 6 months ago

10 Surprising Trivia Questions

"It's ten trivia questions unsurprising Trivia for my friends on the Quiz Quiz Bang Bang podcast. This is trivia with buds. It be welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast. I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thanks for checking out my show today. We have some very special guests. My friends from the Quiz Quiz Bang Bang. Podcast are jumping in. And they're gonNA take over the entire episode so get ready for some great trivia from that crew they are from Lisle Illinois not far from where I grew up and I think you'll enjoy their stylings of Trivia on the show. Make sure you check out all the links in the show notes for today's episode. So you can subscribe to Quiz Quiz Bang. Bang and give them a listen every single week when they put up there show. They have a bunch of other podcasts in the works to check out all the stuff at Quiz Bank pod Dot com another quick note guys before we get into the episode from those guys. We are going to promote some things today. While we're in the quarantine lockdown. Here's a couple of great artists. You should check out check out. My friend drew blank at drew blank. Dot Com drew. Is it amazing pop? Culture artists? He does are everything from the big Lebowski to Shits Creek to parks and REC to the office. Die Hard and everything in between so go check out. He has these great fake album. Artwork covers that he made and he makes a track listing as if that character came out with a record. And you could frame it and put it on your wall like a real vinyl that you collect in your house. So he has dozens of those bookmarks. He has dresses. He has pillowcase. Covers uses great supersized twin pillow case. Cover OF JEFF. Goldblum sitting like naked on his side. A with some drastic part quote on it. It's really cool. And he does a lot of fun stuff that I give away all the time on the show and over the years probably last five years or so check out drew blank dot com also check out Brad Albright Illustrations Albright illustrations on instagram. And just Google Brad Albright illustrations. He's based out of Austin Texas. He does great three D prints if you want like a three d poster usually comes with glasses and the image pops off of the wall so very cool stuff I have a ren and stimpy Wanna Rocco's modern life one and a Bob's Burgers one at my house and Brad does awesome. Work does these great stickers as well and a lot of the stickers are characters wearing three d glasses and things like that and we'll be giving away a lot of his stickers for the Patriots Sticker Club over on my page at Patriotair Dot com slash trivia with buds. If you donate three dollars or more per month you're going to get an amazing sticker for the next three six months from Brad Albright Illustrations. So be on the lookout for that and Go over to his site and see if there's a certain sticker you love and if you're a Patriot subscriber let me know and say. Hey God I really want that. Rocco's modern life sticker and I'll make sure you get in your next batch of male couple. Podcasts you should listen to on this. Lockdown are my friends over at vhs bandits if you like collecting old tapes and watching things on a VCR style which many people do these days for the nostalgic kick. Go check out. Vhs bandits my friends toepfer and Dane train and their crew go over different tapes every single week and they have great patriach pages. Well SO CHECK OUT VHS bad it's inaugurated check out my friend's Jordan Zeilinger Cam malador and the whole crew at wreck my podcast. They are probably my best friends in the podcasting world and we talk about in like all the same stuff from POK to. Are you afraid of the dark two different snacks and beards and things they review and have fun with around a roundtable? Go check out my podcast if you like in the stale all right without any further. Do we're GONNA jump into today's episode with guests hosts from Quiz Quiz Bang. Bang enjoy and here. We go everybody. I'm David Flora and I'm Anne Flora. Were the hosts of the Quiz Quiz Bang podcast and how has practice show that hissy pal right nuclear? We'd like to think Ryan witness guest hosting episode and a little bit about us. We do a weekly Trivia podcast of questions and answers on General Trivia everything from art and science to geography and film and all the good stuff in between in once a month we have friends come on and we do a little group episode. We also do special bonus episodes from anything from Harry Potter. To rugby on our bonus episodes. Sometimes we'll have special guests on we've had the archivist from the Chicago Symphony. Orchestra in brewers from Goose Island Brewery. And they write the questions for those episodes you can find this in all major pod platforms are just searching. Quiz Quiz Bang Bang. We're also on. Facebook was bank podcast Instagram Quiz Quiz Bang Bang and twitter at Quiz. Bang pod and you can find all that at our website quiz bancard DOT com. We have a fun episode plan for you today. Ten questions where we think. All the answers are slightly surprising. Not Super Surprising. The slightly surprising answers would jump out at you from behind a car but like you might be like that for students that make you do a sensible chuckle when you hear the hits so we will read all ten questions and then we'll go back through and give you all the answers here. We go question. One what Ian Fleming novel was turned into a Disney movie question to in which Board Game Does Edgar? Mallory appear question. Three which country has the most islands question four? Which country did Celine Dion Sing for? When she competed in Eurovision question five which country was the first to have a female Prime Minister Question? Six? Who was the first? Tv family to have a home computer question. Seven American Gothic. The painting by grant wood shows a farmer with a pitchfork and a woman standing next to him. What is their relationship question? Which company makes the most tires in the world? What which to. Us states are named after a queen in question ten where did Caesar Salad originate from? And now the answers question one. What Ian Fleming novel was turned into a Disney movie? Chitty Chitty Bang. Bang the magical car question to in which Board Game Does Edgar? Mallory Appear Edgar. Mallory is the police officer's name in monopoly question. Three what country has the most islands Sweden question four? Which country did Selene Dion Sing for? When she competed in Eurovision she cut through the competition like an army knife. It was Switzerland question. Five which country was the first to have a female prime minister Sri Lanka question six. Who was the first TV family to have a home computer? The addams family hugs built. One named Whiz. Oh question. Seven American GOTHIC SHOWS. A farmer with a pitchfork and a woman standing next to him what is their relationship father and daughter question. Eight which company makes the most tires in the world? Lego which two states are named after a Queen Maryland in Virginia? If you WANNA fight about West Virginia being an acceptable answer. You win accepted. You might be asking who is queen. Virginia Virginia was named after Queen. Elizabeth which seems odd but she was known as the Virgin Queen and Question Ten where to Caesar Salad originate from Tijuana Mexico. It was invented by Caesar Cardini at his hotel. Caesar when he ran out of his regular ingredients that one was brought to us by one of our listeners. If you want to submit a question to us please feel free to go to quiz. Bank POD DOT COM and. Check out our contact page and send us some questions. We really love listener questions so please check us out over at his bang. Thanks again to Ryan for having on thinks I am. We appreciate it. We hope you guys got a sensible chuckle out of this. Episode founded mildly interesting once again. I've Been David I've been any. Here's looking at you quiz there. It was a great guest episode from David and Anne from Class Quiz Bang Bang. Were you surprised with that surprising? Trivia? I hope you were and I hope you learn some stuff and had some fun. Remember to check out quiz quiz. Bang Bang on their website quiz. Bang pod DOT COM and subscribe. So you never miss one of their episodes if you liked their trivia. We'll be doing some of their guests episodes on the show very soon. So if you WANNA take over the airwaves and you want to host the show yourself promote your own stuff let me know. I'm always looking at switch it up and have some fun guests. Take over the Trivia with buds. Podcast to shoot me. An Email Ryan buds g mail DOT COM. All right guys one more question for you for today's episodes the question of the day. The question today is what area of Disneyland features the Auto Pia Ride? Tweet me your answer at Ryan Buds or email Ryan buds at gmail.com to be eligible for prize. Yesterday's questions that they answer was Orson Scott Card author of Enders Game. And you're trivia team name up. Today is tricks are for kids. Tricks are for squids. Thanks for playing Trivia with me today. Thanks for telling a friend about the show. Thanks for leaving tunes reviews and supporting me at Patriot dot com slash trivia with buds. We'll see you tomorrow for more. Trivia with me cheers took.

Ryan Buds Quiz Bank Brad Albright Chitty Chitty Bang Mallory Caesar Cardini Celine Dion Rocco Ian Fleming Prime Minister Disney Edgar Patriot dot Lisle Illinois Anne Flora Patriotair Dot Patriots Sticker Club Google Goose Island
Espionage Rewind: Alan Turing Pt. 1

Espionage

52:53 min | 7 months ago

Espionage Rewind: Alan Turing Pt. 1

"Welcome back to podcast rewind. That's when we play a episode of espionage that you might have missed. He was a mathematician. Computer Scientist Magician cryptanalysts philosopher theoretical biologist and the subject of our rewind today. Of course I'm referring to part one of our episodes on Alan Turing. Originally airing on May tenth. Two Thousand Nineteen touring had a truly remarkable and tragic life and probably doesn't get the credit. He deserves as being one of the great minds of all time. It's one of our early episodes of espionage and still one of my favorites. If you'd like to hear part two after this episode you can search for it. Within the espionage feed in the meantime enjoy Lieutenant Commander Ian Fleming of the Royal Naval Reserve stood on a tarmac outside of Dover watching a German bomber on the runway. He checked his watch anxiously then pulled his coat tightly around his body. The fall air could be bitterly cold next to the sea. Tired of waiting. He turned back to the control tower. Once inside he commanded that the Ensign dial the head intelligence office once he had them on the phone. He demanded to know why they hadn't received their target yet. Hadn't anyone told him? The mission was off. There were no suitable boats in the strait. Fleming slammed the phone down. This was his operation. Dammit he hated to see it fail looking out the window at the bomber. He felt intense disappointment. Tonight's mission was supposed to include a dazzling display of aerial acrobatics subterfuge in hand to hand combat. And in the end he was all supposed to result in the recovery. One of those Damn German rescue boats. The boat itself was of no use. It was the code books within that were valuable. They held the secrets to bringing down the Nazi U Boat Network but even the information that those contained was useless except to one man and that man wasn't even a high ranking member of the Government. He was a mathematician named Allan touring this is espionage new. Par cast original exploring the missions behind the world's most incredible spies and what brought their covert operations into the public eye. I'm your host Carter Roy throughout the show. We'll explore real world spy tactics required to impersonate exploit and infiltrate the most confidential places in the world. You can find all previous episodes of espionage as well as all of podcasts. Other shows on spotify and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. New episodes come out on Fridays. We're also on facebook and instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast networks. This is our first episode on the cryptanalysts. Who TURNED THE TIDE OF WORLD? War Two Alan touring from nineteen thirty nine to nineteen forty. Two touring worked at the top secret government code and Cypher School located at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire England. His genius theories regarding the potential applications of a thinking machine led to the creation of mechanical devices. That were able to decrypt intercepted. German communications in the process. He laid the foundation for the rise of the modern computer this week. We'll explore. How Allen began working at Bletchley Park and set about trying to crack German enigma machines will also explore how the flow of enemy intelligence from Bletchley Park allowed the Royal Navy to gain the upper hand in the war next week in part two will follow Allen as he completes his mission only to be put on trial for homosexual acts his heroic work and subsequent mistreatment at the hands of the British government would not be common knowledge until decades after his death as Great Britain entered World War Two on September third nineteen thirty nine it faced a seemingly insurmountable problem intelligence knowing what the enemy was going to do before they did it. In the wars of the Victorian and Edwardian era a slow moving battalion weighed down by cannons and muskets could be spotted by scout on a horse days in advance of an attack but in World War Two the rapid approach of a German looped vodka plane or the submerged body of a u boat. A German submarine could not be preempted by Scouts. And spies alone. The British would need to intercept German communications and both World War One and World War. Two communication was sent in Morse code over both wires and radio signals. Radio messages could be intercepted by simply tuning into the right frequency and wire communications could be intercepted with a wiretap but both sides of the war knew this and so they encrypted their communications using ciphers on. This was not a new practice. Ancient Romans would encrypt their wartime communications. With what is now known as a CAESAR CIPHER? This simply involved offsetting the letter in each message by a certain number of letters in the alphabet for example the word cat cat with an offset of five becomes H F y but by nineteen thirty nine decrypted German. Communications had become infinitely complex rumors abounded of an incredible machine cryptology the study of codes and how to break them had really only entered into the spy tradecraft of global intelligence services in World War One which took place from nineteen fourteen to nineteen eighteen mechanization from the industrial revolution. Meant that encryption. Machines were only just beginning to be used and so the simpler forms of encryption the substitution methods. Such as the Caesar Cipher were still common. Indeed the British Secret Service of World War One had really only been able to crack German encryption after recovering a complete set of German code books if the British were going to survive the Second World War they would need to put considerable resources into cryptology and so the day after war was declared on September Fourth Nineteen thirty nine the government code and Cypher School or G C and C S invited. Its best trainees to convene at Bletchley Park a mansion fifty miles north of London. They didn't know it but they were developing the future of global conflict information warfare. Alan Turing arrived at Bletchley Park that same day. According to biographer Andrew Hodges he was put up at the crown in where he received considerable judgment from a landlady who thought he ought to be doing his part for the war by fighting overseas. It was easy for an older woman of course immune to the draft to suggest that a young man go throw himself to the MEAT GRINDER OF WORLD WAR. Two but little did she know Alan would be far more useful to the war effort at this country estate than on the battlefield at twenty seven. He already had degrees in mathematics from both King's College Cambridge and Princeton. His papers on what he called the universal computing machine placed him at the forefront of his field. As he entered the Mansion Allen was greeted by a mix of familiar in new faces he saw dilly Knox who had been the one to recruit them into the G C C s Knox was a well known figure within the Classics Department at King's College in world. War One men like Knox who are trained in the classics were well suited to decryption. Their understanding of ancient literature meant concepts such as the Caesar Cipher came easily but Allen's brand of theoretical mathematics was about to prove much more useful. However the two men did share certain commonalities. Knox was bisexual during his time. At University he had been lovers with famed economist. John Maynard Keynes among others. This may have been reassuring to Allen. He himself had what he identified as homosexual tendency but homosexuality was still a crime in England in the nineteen thirties. This weighed heavily on Allen. Who would have known that the government would consider his homosexuality a liability if they were aware of it? The general idea was that a gay person could be blackmailed by parties threatening to reveal their sexual exploits to the public. It was a secret of enough thing to work as a cryptanalysts was something else entirely to work as a gay cryptanalysts when unfamiliar face when Allen arrived at Bletchley Park was Gordon Welshman six years older than Allen and a Cambridge alumni though he had risen through the ranks in the mathematics department at Sidney Sussex College rather than King's College the recruitment of Alan Gordon and other mathematical geniuses was indicative of the problem at hand the Admiralty the group in charge of the Royal Navy in the branch of the military from which the GC CS had initiated brief the mathematicians on the Germans. Secret weapon `NIGMA machine a series of rotors reflectors and plug boards. The enigma machine was created in the early nineteen twenties by German inventor. Arthur Sherby's over the years it was improved upon and eventually adopted into wide use by the Nazi army. It was essentially a complicated keyboard that allow the user to type messages that were then made unreadable to all except those who had the key without the key there were one hundred fifty. Quin tillerson possible settings that would have to be tested in order to decrypt the message. The fact that the British government even had one of these machines at its disposal and understood how it worked was owed to the efforts of Polish patriots. Who had since been forced to flee to France in particular Polish cryptanalysts Marian? Riots ski led a team that in nineteen thirty two correctly. Deduced the internal makeup of the enigma machine. And even that team owed a debt to German turncoat Hans Tequila Schmidt who passed on German documents to the French and the Polish. With that in mind. The bletchley Park Team were but the new torch bearers of a years long quest to subvert German military operations their mission crack enigma. Come up with a mathematical solution to decrypt any German communications generated by the machine thus allowing the war office to anticipate every loop Fafa u boat or land attack. The U boats in particular were already sinking up to two hundred thousand tons of British freight a day. This included food oil and other essentials. If this wasn't stopped then Britain would starve cracking a `Nigma men being able to read messages. That told the war office where these boats would be and win. It was not a problem that could be solved on pen and paper by a classics Major. But it was potentially a problem that could be solved by one of Alan Turing hypothesized universal computing machines. Alan new just as a machine could be used instantly encrypt a letter. Six Times a machine could be built. That was capable of testing millions upon millions of permutations in a short amount of time. But if you couldn't figure out how to build such a machine and fast then within the next few years everyone in the British isles would be speaking German. So as Gordon Welshman and others said about analyzing the intercepted message traffic where messages were coming from. How often and so forth. Alan drew up mathematical models to express the idea of this theoretical machine. It was top secret spy work though. Visually looked no more exciting than a student taking a math test. Alan analyzed Polish data and found plans for a device nicknamed the Bomba supposedly named after an ice cream. Filled cake dessert. Though why remains unclear the device used mechanical processes? That worked toward decrypt enigma. But not nearly. The scale needed to quickly decipher any and all German communications Imagined deciphering one word a day when hundreds of messages were coming in each hour however seeing that others had also considered a mechanical solution to the `Nigma problem gave Allen confidence that he was on the right track over the course of September nineteen forty. The numbers at Bletchley Park quickly grew the cryptanalysts would need a large staff to help them make their vast and complicated calculations meanwhile Alan came closer and closer to a design for a machine that could work through many permutations of a `Nigma. His scribblings look like madness to an untrained eye. Lines led to dodd slid them more lines all fanning out in an array that suggested some sort of science fiction device from the future and incredibly. It only took Allen a few weeks to complete design. He called his machine the bomb named after the Polish Bomba in order to discuss the machine concisely and in a way that most of us can understand. We'll have to grossly simplify its inner workings from the outside. It would look like a peculiar massive cabinet on its side where three panels each featuring twelve by three grids of drums round dials representing letters of the alphabet that were attached to one hundred eight internal shafts. These shafts each contained hundreds of wires rings and other materials that interacted with the other shafts Allen theorized that if a portion of an intercepted message could guessed at than that guests could be entered electronically into the machine and using a series of if then type deductions. The machine could arrive at whether the guests was correct or not and thus provide the `nigma settings being used however guessing a word. An intercepted message to feed in. The machine was no easy task. Obviously if it was as easy as guessing the whole Bletchley enterprise wouldn't be needed but again allen's genius proved itself. Has It dawned on him? That many of the intercepted messages were weather reports or in German veteran for hair saga he theorized that he could electronically input. This guess word which he referred to as a crib into the machine. If the guess was correct then the machine could break that days codes engineers. Bletchley got to work on the machines. Construction and the first one was installed in March nineteen forty. It worked Allen's guess word was a success unfortunately progress was slow. It was still just one machine against a plethora of data and again. German encryption changed every day messages. Could not be decrypted in time. To make use of them immediately even still there was something to be gleaned from a delay decryption knowing of a ship's position from three weeks ago was still better than knowing nothing at all but that was small consolation for some as in April nineteen forty across the North Sea. The Nazis invaded Denmark then Norway conquering both in short order. Soon after perhaps most devastatingly in May nineteen forty. Germany invaded France from the east. While they're ally Italy invaded from the South on June tenth of that same year. By late June most of the country was in Nazi hands. The darkness grew while the candle of hope that was Bletchley. Park continued to plug away. Gordon welshmen would come to form a solid working relationship with Allen. Designed an addition to the bomb called the diagonal board again grossly simplifying. This was a series of cables that help the machine to eliminate certain possibilities based on the nature of the Enigma's plug board. Everyone at Bletchley Park was motivated and working as hard as they could to improve their decryption capabilities but soon they would experience the greatest motivation of all in July nineteen forty. The Battle of Britain began. I'm next. Britain falls under siege. I par cast listeners. We realized that there are a lot of par- cash shows to choose from each day and sometimes not enough time to sort through them all in our new feed podcast daily. We filter through all of your favorite podcasts series to highlight the most timely and relevant episode premiering each day every Monday through Friday. Discover a new and captivating episode curated specifically for you. That's one new episode from our slate of content handpicked with you in mind. Time is precious. And we've got you covered follow. Par cast daily free on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcast you can check out more par cash shows and a full library of episodes in spotify by searching for podcast in the spotify. Search bar or by going to spotify dot com slash podcast now back to the story in August. Nineteen Forty Alan Turing and Gordon. Welshman of the British Government Code and Cypher School perfected the design for Allen's bomb machine a massive computing device. That could aid in the decryption of German communications. Unfortunately just as the machine was manufactured in large quantities and installed at the schools based in Bletchley Park the German invasion of Britain began. It was almost entirely an invasion from the air. Has the German air force known as the looped? Fafa engaged with the Royal Air Force above the English Channel. Meanwhile Alan Turing had reached somewhat of an impasse with his bomb machine. The machine operated on being fed cribs or guests words that allow the machine to decrypt the rest of a message. The challenge of guessing these words combined with the constant challenge of the various possible combinations within the enigma machine. Meant that through nineteen forty. Alan was only able to decrypt about five days worth German Communications on. This was a huge achievement. But it wasn't enough. Bletchley Park received thousands of German communications a day. What Alan really needed was documentation that spoke to the rotor. Settings of the `nigma machine but this was top secret information that only German officers had access to and if they felt they were going to be captured or killed. Their orders were to destroy their machines. And they're code. Books Allen was undertaking top secret work but he was not himself a secret agent. Others would have to retrieve the necessary documents from the field. Enter one of the most well-known espionage figures of all time Lieutenant Commander Ian Fleming of the Naval Intelligence Division. This was essentially the spy arm of the Admiralty. It was a very fluid department at the time as the navy was still largely playing. Catch up in this fast paced technologically advanced war men like Fleming knew that more aggressive clandestine tactics were called for naval officers. At bletchley. Park Ran Allen's needs up the flag pole and Fleming took action. He devised a plan. Code named operation. Ruthless delivered to the Admiralty in September nineteen forty. The plan was fairly straightforward consisting of four steps step one obtained from the Air Ministry and Air Worthy German bomber step to pick a tough crew of five including pilot with operator and word perfect. German speaker dress them in German air force uniform. Add BLOOD AND BANDAGES TO SUIT. Step three crash plane in the channel after making SOS to Rescue Service in German Navy. Step for once aboard Rescue Boat Shoot. German crew dump overboard bring rescue boat back to English port. It was a bold plan to say the least. The admiralty wasn't even sure of a bomber could be crashed without killing anyone inside and they were pretty sure it would immediately sink to the bottom of the channel but Alan hoped they would go through with it. This might be his only opportunity to get his hands on German enigma documents. Fleming flew to Dover to prepare for the operation. Only it wasn't long before intelligence called him to tell him they could find no suitable. German rescue boats on radar. The Battle of Britain was still raging in the skies above the channel after all. It was a disappointing outcome. Frank Birch a naval officer at Bletchley Park wrote that went. Allan heard the news. He came to me like an undertaker cheated of a nice corpse. And so Alan would have to spend the rest of nineteen forty and the first part of nineteen forty one confined to a small office at Bletchley. Refining machine in coming up with new ways to crack a `Nigma Bletchley was no longer a single stuffy. Mansion inhabited by six male academics. It had become an institution construction on the huts had finished at least until they needed more. These were ugly barrick looking edifices. That inside gave the workers. The impression of attending summer Camp Allen was located in hut eight where the senior CA panelists all worked. His desk was a small affair with a lamp and mounds of papers. There was little in the way of decoration. In addition to hut eight eventually there were nearly two dozen additional hots all housing different aspects of intelligence operations for indeed by nineteen forty one bletchley had become about far more than cracking enigma. This was a world war after all so different team set out to crack the communications of Italy. In Japan. Not to mention the Germans were using other forms of encryption. The required their own teams at Bletchley to address Prime Minister Winston Churchill who had only just replaced Neville Chamberlain in May nineteen forty saw the great value military intelligence. He was supportive of Bletchley outgrowing. Its roots as a branch of the Admiralty and allowed it to become more of a centralized intelligence hub. A civilian workforce of several thousand mostly. Women was brought in to handle a plethora of duties for many it was a very mechanical process that simply required them to type or operate a machine or analyze disparate pieces of data each day. Most had no idea what they were working on little. Did anyone know they were performing the work? That in modern intelligence agencies is the bedrock of spycraft intelligence analysis the United States Central Intelligence Agency teaches its officers to quote challenges refine and challenge again and according to CIA Veterans Preston Golson and Matthew F Ferraro to analyze competing. Hypotheses draw reasonable inferences and reach conclusions essentially analysts parse the near limbless information available to them from enemy countries and deduce what is true and then further deduce what is of importance to their government on. This is exactly the service. Bletchley Park was performing workers would translate sort and assign priority to different communications and it would then continue up the chain until it reached the correct parties. There was even a special box filled with messages. That waiver Churchill's is only but no matter your role at Bletchley. You're keep your service top secret to reveal your position at the park was to open yourself up to possible blackmail by German or even Soviet forces. Allan always feared that being a gay man would put his work in jeopardy perhaps out of a desire to create a cover for himself or perhaps out of a genuine desire to lead a quote unquote normal life. Allen began dating Bletchley Park Female Linguist Joan Clark. In the spring of Nineteen Forty One. Joan was by no means an unattractive match. She received a title of degree in mathematics from Cambridge. In one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. This was the closest thing. Cambridge offered at the time to a full undergraduate degree for women. The skill required to accomplish. This was impressive enough. The determination required to achieve such an honor in a male dominated. Society was something more altogether. She'd actually studied under Gordon. Welshman Allen's fellow cryptanalysts at Bletchley. Who helped him perfect the bomb and so her transition to Bletchley was a natural extension of that work when she arrived in June nineteen forty. She quickly proved herself more adapted understanding the science at the bomb than any other recruit as a result Allen. Stoler away from Welsh. Men's hut bringing her too hot eight to work on his team. Despite Jones significant contributions to the war effort she was paid a fraction of what her male co-workers were Alan and the others actually worked to get her the title of linguist so that she could get paid more even though she didn't speak any other languages. According to the BBC she would humorously have to fill out paperwork by writing grade linguist language. None as the work began to hit speed bombs through the first half of nineteen forty one. Alan and Joan had time to turn their thoughts to other matters. They would frequently go on dates together to a nearby cinema. Though Jones said there was very little physical contact between them. This was not so unusual for Nineteen. Forty one though. Of course Alan had his own secret reason for keeping his hands to himself nevertheless they were engaged that same spring much. The excitement of their fellow hut mates the next day. Allen asked Joan out for a walk around the grounds after lunch. He was likely filled with anxiety at the prospect of what he was about to share with her. Some saw him as being a very serious unemotional. Man Concerned Only with mathematics but that wasn't true. He contained a depth the feeling that extended to many of those who worked with most especially Joan and he wanted to be honest with her. This was not him trying to break often gauge man. No he thought they could go ahead with it if she was willing. They hardly be the first married couple. In England to share and exclusively emotional bond in absence of a physical one they were walking through an isolated section of the park when Allen Turned Joan telling her that he had something important to say he watched her face closely so that he could catch the slightest reaction to what he was about to share. He told her that he wasn't sure their marriage would work because well he had a homosexual tendency. She was worried by this revelation. Of course she knew. This wasn't a sort of thing you grew out of or moved on from. But it wasn't a deal breaker for her. As Alan had expected she still loved him. She could still imagine a future with him. And indeed according to biographer Andrew. Hodges they shared a full life together through those engagement months. Joan taught him how to knit. They used meager wartime materials to fashion themselves. A chess set and would play constantly. And of course there was the work the decryption of enigma. That allowed them to stand next to one another every day and work to get the letters to dance in just the right way on the off chance that if they did so then they might ensure the continued liberty of the free world as it turned out march nineteen forty one would be a pivotal month in that regard as news came down. The Navy had finely done it. They'd recovered German enigma documents. Next up top secret. Commando Operation Claymore leads to a breakthrough in the cracking of a `Nigma now back to the story beginning in September. Nineteen thirty nine mathematician. Alan Turing served as a crypt analyst at the Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire England. His invention of the bomb machine helped the British decrypt German enigma messages. However the machine required wasn't perfect Allen needed more information to be able to accurately decrypt German communications within a day of receiving them. This was essential as certain military. Intelligence was only useful within a short window if the Germans were planning to bomb London within twenty four hours that information wasn't useful seven days later but then in March nineteen forty one a raid conducted by the British commandos yielded unexpected results. The commandos were an especially unique unit. Within the British armed forces recently commissioned by Winston Churchill in June nineteen forty to conduct harassment missions throughout Nazi occupied territory in the early morning hours March fourth nineteen forty one a coalition of Commandos Royal Engineers in Norwegian freedom fighters descended upon the low Foton archipelago in northern Norway. Their mission code-named Claymore was to attack multiple fish oil production centres along the coastline. But they're ultimate prize would prove to be far more valuable than some destroyed. Factories British tribal class destroyer. Hms Somali cut of the German trawler. Krebs the Somali immediately opened fire crabs was hit with three shells destroying its boiler room wheelhouse and exploding stored ammunition on board the Somali cautiously approached pulling up alongside crabs. The commando swept the deck finding multiple dead sailors. Their bodies had been riddled with exploding shells and bits of debris but most significantly as the British forces arrived in the wheelhouse they found the captain dead slumped against the wheel. Clearly the Germans hadn't had time to destroy everything has the British soldiers swept the room. They found three strange gear type devices decorated with various notches. And the letters of the alphabet. Next to the strange gears was a stack of books. They were labeled a `Nigma. The sailors collected everything they could but soon had to flee crabs as flames consume the decks and caused the ship to sink. The Somali turned back toward the archipelago. Where massive black plumes of smoke now rose from where the fish oil processing centers had stood a few minutes before operation? Claymore was a success once. The convoy returned to England. The war office realized what the Somali had recovered and immediately delivered the materials to Alan at Hut Eight. Allen's work was clearly valued. He was receiving recovered intelligence before even high ranking members of the military had access to them. This discovery was so classified that even the official dispatch to the admiralty summarizing. The battle excluded the discovery of the enigma materials. There was always the fear that there could be German or Soviet spies embedded in the government according to the facts and details project the concept of double agents or moles wouldn't hit its stride until the Cold War years decades later Mole is an agent of a government that is secretly working for an enemy government. Oftentimes these agents are native to the country in which they are embedded and are thus traders to their own countrymen it was potentially inconceivable to stiff upper lip. Brits who would never betray their country. That fellow elite might be working for the Nazis or Britain's political rivals. The Soviet Union and so- figures in parliament in the military question Churchill's extreme insistence on secrecy. According to journalist Paul Mason many of the elites in Britain were not necessarily even anti-fascist and wanted to make peace with Hitler which is perhaps why Churchill was more willing to trust middle-class mathematician. Alan Turing over the upper class officers in his military. He was right to be wary years later. It would come to light that. British intelligence had been subverted at the highest levels by British elite born Soviet moles and it was imperative that the Germans in particular not know the real value of operation claymores discoveries because the materials were just what Allen needed. The recovered routers allowed Allen to see exactly what settings had been used in February for German naval enigma. And even better. The code books gave him the exact key for all messages from the last month by March Twelfth Nineteen forty one. They didn't even need the bomb for that months worth of messages. Bletchley park workers could simply set up their own enigma machines using the directions in the code box and decode all the Intel. They had intercepted in the previous weeks. This was extremely useful but it still wasn't the instantaneous. Decryption that Allen is working toward being able to read enemy. Communications from the previous month was one thing being able to read enemy communications that day. You intercepted them was another but that was exactly why Alan was working at Bletchley. His skill set but that he could use what had been recovered to come up with a method that would allow this kind of near instantaneous decryption by analyzing the settings used for February and the content of the messages the bomb could be adjusted for accuracy and better cribs could be fed into it. According to biographer Andrew Hodges by April nineteen forty one. Alan had reached a supreme understanding of German Naval Enigma. This allowed him to program the bombs to break the encryption of any German Communication Bletchley received and by May bletchley realized that there were two German weather ships in the North Atlantic that they could rely upon for a consistent source of cribs whether reports always contain the same predictable words for the first time. British counterintelligence could produce information in time to actually affect the battlefield. Bletchley Park's data put them at the forefront of the war. They even had a hand in sinking. Germany's most famous ship. The bismarck the BISMARCK was the largest ship in the German navy. It was Hitler's pride and joy. And because of that. Churchill wanted destroyed as a folk song from nineteen sixty would later put it. Churchill told the people put every ship. Assail Kaz somewhere on that ocean. I know she's gotta be. We gotta sink the Bismarck to the bottom of the sea but the first phase of that plan had gone disastrously on May twenty fourth nineteen forty one the day before Jane received the message at Bletchley. The bismarck fired at the hood a British warship. This shell struck ammunition in its belly and devastated the ship essentially blowing it up in one shot for any sailor watching. It was the largest explosion they had ever seen. Nearly all of the hoods one thousand four hundred eighteen crewmen were killed. The Hood was the pride of the Royal Navy. Its destruction was met with uproar. Among the public back in Britain Churchill then issued his famous order to the Admiralty. I don't care how you do it. You must sink the Bismarck. After that practically the entire Royal Navy and royal airforce searched the Atlantic following the sinking of the hood. The bismarck needed to sail to port for repairs. But the Germans now controlled a majority of the Northern Coast of Europe. So port could be a lot of different places and that's when Bletchley came into play on May twenty fifth one thousand nine hundred forty one a young analyst in hut six Jane Hughes intercepted a message from an officer aboard the German battleship Bismarck. Too Aloof Vodka. General in doing so the officer may have just sealed his fate as well as the fate of his whole crew. Because in the message the officer let slip that the Bismarck was sailing to brest in occupied France for repairs. It was a phenomenal fine. For Bletchley as this was the information that led the Royal Navy to the northwestern shore France where on May twenty seventh. A fleet of battleships in a swarm by plane sunk the German ship for good this time over two thousand. German sailors were killed. Churchill announced the sinking of the Bismarck to the House of Commons provoking thunderous applause. But Allen wasn't satisfied with the sinking of a single ship using cracked a `Nigma intelligence the Royal Navy was able to sink seven more German ships in June. Nineteen forty one valuable supplies such as oil were failing to make it to Germany. It was their turn to starve. Bletchley Intel code-named ultra also allowed British supply ships to sail around no no -cations of German U boats. No longer would tons of freight be sent to the bottom of the English Channel. Historian Ralph Erskine writes that Bletchley Intelligence Save More than twenty British supply ships in many lives Winston Churchill later wrote in his memoirs that quote. The only thing that ever really frighten me during the war was the u boat peril and quote coming from the man who had coordinated literally the entire war effort who bear the greatest responsibility in defeating the Nazis. This was saying something and yet despite this massive victory despite all Allen and his team had accomplished their celebration was a short lived one. Their work already weighed heavily on them when they were too slow. People died when they worked. Well people died their actions lead to death no matter what but only now did they realize that not every piece of intelligence could be acted upon if the allied forces performed too. Well if every move was anticipated if ever you boat was sunk and every loop Volva plane shot out of the sky. Then the Germans would know the British had cracked enigma. And all of their work would have been for nothing. Once again the Bletchley Park team was encountering what would in later decades become the foundation of spycraft in this case the most fundamental spy lesson of all the importance of secrecy master spy in KGB agent. Kim Philby told Soviet forces in Nineteen eighty-one that he would avoid publicity of any kind similarly the G C and C s now needed to avoid drawing attention to themselves. The best spies only reveal as little intelligence as they need to end the exact moment. They need to reveal it due to the extremely classified nature of their work. It's hard to know exactly how often or with what level of severity certain intelligence was ignored. It is well documented that British military forces would use certain strategies to mask the use of Bletchley Park Intel if Bletchley located the position of a particular battleship. The royal airforce would send reconnaissance planes to that location. Making it look like it was the plane's not Bletchley that it spotted the craft essentially. It was a matter of making it. Look like the information had been gleaned from different source but supposedly if no proper cover story could be devised and the. Intel wasn't of paramount importance than the war office would have to allow Tom to befall their own troops according to Andrew. Hodges the Germans actually did suspect something after the sinking of the supply ships in June. But they weren't willing to consider that enigma had been broken. They thought it more likely that British spies had been particularly successful that month. And that was technically true though. Their definition of spy likely didn't include a gay math genius from Cambridge. Sitting at his desk making calculations attitude speaks to the precise reason British cryptology in counterintelligence was successful and why Nazi intelligence floundered the men and women working at Bletchley Park. Weren't the strapping blonde haired. Blue Eyed Superman that the Nazis valued. They were outcasts queer men like Alan Dilly Knox or women like Joan. Clark who rebelled against societal norms. Their enthusiasm for their work and diversity of ideas meant they could attack the `nigma problem from many angles. Hitler's Doggy Dogg. Survival of the fittest. Philosophy men the German cryptanalysts were less likely to collaborate. In the way that for example Allan in Gordon Welshmen had in Nazi Germany. Such an ECLECTIC group of thinkers was more likely to find themselves in a concentration camp than at the front lines of government intelligence work and so it was no easy task to ask such a thoughtful passionate group of people to accept that some of their intelligence findings would have to go unheeded. Perhaps it was this moral weight on his shoulders or at least the addition of it that finally pushed Allen to call off his engagement with Joan in August nineteen forty. They were on a brief vacation together when he told her that he couldn't go through with it. He knew that he would never be attracted to her in the way that he was attracted to men but he also had genuine feelings for her. It was difficult for both of them. Shaun Wylie a fellow hut AAC cryptanalysts in colleague of Allen's while he was at Princeton suggested in a much later interview with the BBC that he was very upset when the couple broke up. Allen attempted to explain the break-up to Sean but he wasn't forthcoming with the true reason for his split. With Joan Life may have seemed quite bleak for Allan. Donnelly was at war with himself but the war that was raging across Europe was only going to get worse in June. Nineteen forty one. The Germans had invaded the Soviet Union breaking the nonaggression pact. That had been in place since one thousand nine hundred thirty nine by August Bletchley was decoding German messages. That suggested something more than just war was playing out in the Soviet Union. The Germans weren't just conquering. They were executing thousands of innocent people on August. Twenty four thousand nine hundred forty one. Churchill's spoke in the House of Commons and made an impassioned speech against the Germans risking bletchley secrecy with some of his comments he specifically revealed to the world that the allies were now aware of. Hitler's plans for those he deemed inferior. Churchill said the following as Hitler's armies advance whole districts are being exterminated scores of thousands literally. Scores of thousands of executions in cold. Blood are being perpetrated by the German police troops upon the Russian patriots who defend their native soil since the Mongol Invasions of Europe in the sixteenth century. There has never been methodical. Mercilus butchery on such a scale or approaching such a scale in. This is but the beginning we are in the presence of a crime without a name Winston. Churchill himself actually visited Bletchley Park in September nineteen forty one and though he had nothing but kind remarks and support for the group. It's unclear whether he remembered Alan Turing after the visit. He certainly wouldn't be there to support him after the war when Alan would face his most difficult battle of all but that battle was a lifetime away as the nations of the world now needed to band together to fight a war unlike any humanity had ever seen to lose meant the death of culture the death of diversity. The death of Freedom Allen's bombs and Bletchley is larger intelligence operation would be a key tool in the effort to stop Hitler for two years they had been working tirelessly and now it was time to roll their sleeves up and work even harder as Allen arrived at eight on February first. Nineteen forty two. He expected to continue his research like any other day but as the analysts went about their work. It soon became clear that something was wrong. The machines weren't delivering normal. The messages weren't coming out right. Nothing made sense. It would take time before everyone became aware but Alan likely recognized what was happening right away. The Germans had added a fourth Roeder to enigma. There would be no more Intel. All of Alan's methods of decryption were now worthless. Thank you for listening to espionage. We'll be back Friday with a new episode. Join US says Allen works to crack the new and improved German. Enigma is sent on a mission to America and after the war faces persecution at the hands of the very people he worked to save for more information on Alan Turing amongst the many sources we used. We found the imitation game by Andrew. Hodges extremely helpful to our research you can find all previous episodes of espionage as well as all podcast other shows on spotify and anywhere else. You listen to podcasts. Several you have asked how to help us if you enjoy the show. The best way to help is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at Parkas network. We'll be back next week with another deep dive into the world of clandestine. Operation espionage was created by Max Cutler is a production of cutler media. And as part of the podcast network it is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound design by Michael Lang Sner with production assistance by Ron Shapiro and Paul Libeskind additional production assistance by Carly Madden. Maggie Admire espionage is written by Greg Castro on Carter Roy. I hope you enjoyed this. Podcast rewind episode of espionage. You can hear more podcast rewind on the last Sunday of every month right here in the espionage. Feed free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

Bletchley Park Welshman Allen Bletchley Alan Prime Minister Winston Churchi Admiralty Andrew Hodges Britain Allan Government German Communications bletchley Park Team spotify Cypher School Royal Navy Alan Gordon Lieutenant Commander Ian Flemi Alan Dilly Knox German Navy
THE SILENT ENEMY (1958) - a THUNDERBALL Inspiration?

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

52:34 min | 2 months ago

THE SILENT ENEMY (1958) - a THUNDERBALL Inspiration?

"The enemy in war is always real and this film, the silent enemy deals with special enemy force that must be silenced once and for all let's dive into the silent enemy from Nineteen fifty-eight one of the best. Hi this is Tom Dance. VESTRY spy movie navigator DOT COM. Join US for each episode of Our podcast show cracking the code spy movies. Please subscribe to our show. Give us a five star rating on your favorite podcast APP and tell your friends about the show to that helps us get more listeners and do more shows, thanks. Now before we get started into the movie Malta plays a part in the unfolding of the story here in the silent enemy now I've been to Malta and to the underground war rooms in Valetta, were Eisenhower Cunningham in Montgomery, met and plan the forty-three invasion of Sicily Malta was the strategic island in World War Two because it sits between Italy and the northern coast of Africa. So this was a key island to hold. The war rooms are now our museum, and it is exactly the way it was. During the war with Florida ceiling maps of the area air defence war rooms, the bridge commander's office, overlooking a map of the sea with ship deployments, and so on, it's fascinating. If you have a chance to travel in that area, be sure to head the Malta. It's about sixty five miles south of Sicily by ferryboat. Great so Dan with the war room that you're talking about here. How close to that is some of the things you see in some of the sets and some of the James. Bond movies where you know. They've got the big map on the wall and all of that. Literally is exactly how it was in World War Two and there is a movie, called the multi-storey, and it's basically exactly like the multi story, and in some of the bond films, and so on you can see some of these kinds of things where the maps or there, and so on, and it's all certainly a reference to what the real stuff looked like this bunker kind of war room. Thing in Valetta, Malta? Probably somewhere between one hundred and two hundred feet below ground, so it's it really is amazing to see this and see again where they were planning the invasion of Sicily, and we'll see later on as we're talking about this movie, the silent enemy how important this particular thing was with the with the planning of the invasion of Sicily because Sisley was put out there as a ruse as to why the allies we're GONNA end invade in Greece and Sardinia and not Sicily, and that was put out there as a ruse to throw off the enemy so pretty cool stuff. That is that does sound pretty cool? Yeah, I love to go down two hundred feet down into a bunker like that. That's cool. Yeah, and the cool thing. There was when when they were digging it. They didn't want the Germans who were on Sicily. Only sixty five miles away. To know that they were digging this bunker and so was the Germans were bombing Valetta which they did around wrong, basically twenty four hours a day. They would. Mix the debris of the digging. The tunnels up with the debris on the on the surface of the never knew what was going on that they were digging. This tunnel thing is. The whole story is fascinating, so deception is important. Yes, which brings us back into the nineteen fifty eight movie The silent enemy. Yes. No, now we should also state before we dive into this. We are talking about the nineteen fifty-eight, the silent enemy, not the nineteen thirty movie, the silent enemy, which was about native Americans correct. So just when you look. If you look up the silent enemy, there are two different movies with the same name. We're talking about the one from nineteen fifty eight. Yeah, so the silent enemy here that we're talking about World War Two movie that in the Mediterranean in nineteen, forty one and it's about British ships in Alexandria and Gibraltar being mysteriously blown up. The ships are both warships like British battleships and merchant ships that will transport needed supplies to Malta the strategic island. We just talked about in world war between Sisley northern the northern coast of Africa in are they also mentioned something called Algeciras, which is actually one of the largest ports in the world It is on the author. And what I really like is in this movie which we're in about, but a minute isn't a documentary, but has a lot of historical fact than it. They do get these fax right, yeah! There's a lot of facts in this movie. Some of it is exaggerated and interpreted and poetic license to to change some things, but a lot of the stuff is based on real facts like Lieutenant Lionel crabb. He's an explosion expert and he's brought into figure out. What's going on here? And the rest of the film details his exploits, the team that he assembles and the skills he has fusing bombs and at becoming an underwater diving expert. So it's interesting to note like we said, some of the stuff is real. Lionel CRABB also noticed buster. CRABB is a real person. He was active in world, war two and beyond, and there are some interesting connections between this film, and some James Bond films the silent enemy based on the book commander Crabb by Marshall Pugh. Contains historical facts, but again like toms. It's not a documentary. The details depicted are not necessarily accurate as they unfold in the film, but crab was real, and we will share an interesting real life story involving his disappearance. Now Dan. This is the same Lionel crabb that we refer to him in podcast. How events in the real world effect what goes into spy films? Part One and we talk about some of his historical. Happenings and how he really was a real person, and how he actually made a pretty big influence on how things worked and World War, two. Yeah, so check that podcast as well so back to the silent enemy. The acting here I. Think is really solid. The cast lead by Laurence Harvey as Lionel CRABB. Don Adams as the third officer Jill Masters John. She's she's phenomenal because she's got this great. I'm in charge but I'm not really in charge. Attitude me. Yeah Yeah. She's Great John Clements. He's the admiral. He's great and Sidney James I love Sidney. James. Chief Petty Officer Thorpe He's Fabulous in this movie. You cannot have selected a better person and he could not have asked him to act any better than this. He is so believable. Character and Michael Craig is seeming knowles is also excellent. The director William Fairchild does a spectacular job. As does the underwater camera expert, aegile walks Holt, which is not so easy to say and the director of photography. Otto. Heller now I hell her. He did some great films including the Nineteen Sixty five spy movie. The file with Michael Cain so there you go. Yeah, I was actually surprised. Egypt was not used in the TV series sea hunt, because a lot of these guys. Who did this underwater camera work it was. Yeah ended up on that TV series. And then a bunch of them ended up moving into the bond series. Yeah, the opening scene is immediately intriguing and draws you into the Phil I. Love this film. I think it's terrific. It is nighttime and you see some tight some kind of activity in the ocean. There are frogmen on some type of powered watercraft on the surface. Then they dive with the watercraft. All in the dark of night, apparently heading for the harbour at Alexandria. Underwater. We see the Frogman on this craft. It looks like a two seater device with one seat behind the front seat. And it's being propelled forward, and we see each of these crafts is carrying an explosive warhead with a propeller at its rear, almost looks like a torpedo. Now you mentioned the opening scene here Dan actually the title sequence. When they start with that they've got this close up of. A dark murky water at night. And it's it's really dark with with the light above it, and probably you know zoom ably the moon right, and it's all rough, and you're looking at it, and there's an ominous feel to it before you then get into seeing the actual frogmen. Human Torpedo, do create a a mystery and intrigue immediately with with those scenes that you're talking about, and that is during the title sequence which is pretty, cool. We see them approaching the whole of this ship, and they fix these lines to the whole, and put an explosive device just below the L- the whole line of the ship. It's suspended by cords or wires. We see these two British battleships on the surface. The HMS Queen Elizabeth. And the HMS Valiant. After the frogman complete their tasks, they retreat using these these underwater craft again they and they the some kind of ship, and at daybreak, these two ships, the Queen Elizabeth the valiant explode in are heavily damaged. And now we're discovering something about these frogmen. We discovered that they're part of this Italian brigade, and that the other quarter crafts that they're using here called chariots. And these chariots were altering the balance of power in the Mediterranean. Now Dan. We talk about these chariots and we talk about Lionel CRABB. We're talking about the fact that these are real facts that happened although this isn't truly a documentary. In real life, the Queen Elizabeth and valiant were severely damaged by these Italian teams using these human torpedoes chariots. Yes, as a way they got to the to the ship and to plant these explosives. They also mentioned the a ship called the Willow Dale. And this was interesting to me because trying to find any information about that ship was tough. Although I did find one entry on this one website. Saying that will Adele was moved from Canada. Spain Gibraltar in November of nineteen forty two. So this movie was supposed to be nineteen forty one yet open this summer, nineteenth, nineteen, forty one. The ships blowing up in Alexandria. So this, this one actually is one point where. It's almost like 'cause they imply that the Willow Dale was one of the ships that then blows up in a little bit later. They never explicit expressly state DEP, but it's kind of implied, but here finding that this ship actually did exist in November of forty two. Okay, we're GONNA look at several connections between the events of the silent enemy in the film itself to other spy movies, particularly James Bond movies. Yeah I think there might be a connection. In here, Okay Bond Fans, this movie is Nineteen fifty-eight based on real events that took place in December nineteen forty one. Ian Fleming published his Ninth Book Thunderball. In March of one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty one three years after the film, The silent enemy and twenty years after the real event. And the and productions film thunderball was released in December nineteen, sixty five. HA The British developed such a chariot that we're talking about here in real life in nineteen forty two. So over a year after the events of this film, but the Italians they were the pioneers of this technology, and the means of warfare and sabotage at least a year ahead of the British and certainly Ian Fleming knew about this, and that pretty much guaranteed, because in his novel Thunderball, nine Hundred Sixty one, Fleming mentions the chariot several times, and in one particular instance you can check this out. Look on page one. Oh, one, he writes. A tiny worm of underwater light was creeping out towards the jolly boat. It was a two man underwater chariot, identical with those used by the Italians during the war and brought with improvements from Ansaldo the firm that had originally invented the one man submarine. It was towing an underwater sled used for recovery and transport of heavy objects on the sea. Okay it and let me stop you right there. Okay you and I could talk about the chariots and their influence on Ian Fleming and thunderball. In fact, we were actually prepared to do that here today. We are how yeah, but when you're doing your research, you came across article. On James Bond memes DOT BLOGS DOT COM. It actually talks about this influence, so you reached out to the author of the site Edward Butt off. And got his comments and the influence of these chariots Ian Fleming yeah, it was it was a cool article. He had written and I thought okay. Let's ask if he could give us a couple of comments on it, so let's go ahead and let's hear his thoughts. Is We bring back the segment that we call the smartest spy in the room? All Right Edward. You're the spy in the room. Let's go. My name is Edward. Pill an independent researcher for aspects of Ian, Fleming and James Bond, and on the author of two blogs James. Bond memes and James Bond food. When he came to write to the James Bond books in Fleming often harked back to the Second World War drawing on his own experiences, and those of the agents and commanders. You mentioned quotas duties. One case in point his thunderball. In Chapter Ten Fleming tells us that Spec to use the two men underwater chariot identical with those used by the Italians during the war. To tow a sled to transport the captured atomic weapons from the submerged vindicator. Later in Chapter Twenty three at Leeds, a unit of submarine as The Samaritans in an underwater battle against spectators, Frogman James Bond encounters will in Emilia Lago sitting astride the chariot. We. Don't know whether Lago himself served as an Italian frogmen during the war, but he certainly seemed comfortable on the machine. And it's no wonder. The Italians were the pioneers of the chariot when engaging an underwater sabotage and it and it was only an Italian charities as we know successfully attacked in ships in the Mediterranean, nineteen, forty, one that put Britain. I became aware of this special means of warfare. The Italian Tarit, also known as the human torpedo was a twenty two foot long cigar shaped craft at incorporated detachable. Warhead containing five hundred pounds of Explosives Truman sat astride the chariot, and by means of battery, powered propeller and compressed air tank directly depth. They move slowly toward a target ship once said the frontmen fixed lines across the ships whole tied the warhead to the lines, released the warhead and made their escape. Realizing the threat from Italians are not without a little grudging admiration British. Naval chiefs time that the technical divisions in early nineteen, forty, two to create a similar craft and a range of other equipment, including rubber wetsuits and breathing apparatus. The British managed to acquire talion machines and buster CRABB was one of the famous early testers of these weapons. Buster, crabbe mysteriously died in in circumstances while trying to Escaping a a Soviet ship later. However the British, not if that were to stand any chance of the maritime threat and also conduct their own underwater operations, especially in cold waters. They needed to research and develop of practically from scratch, their own capability by some nineteen forty to the British built to Manchuria known as a jeep, was waiting for operations long with other machines, such as x craft or four man, a four man, midget submarine and a single seater under watercraft. At this time, the CO occur went out the volunteers for special service, who after period of intensive training began the work? Base also included setting minds. thunderball gives us a little insight into the secret underwater world does gives us an insight into influence own mind. He was fascinated policy. There's plenty of wonderful traction in in Lebanon during for instance and in the novel. In Fleming alluded to another aspects of the frogmen's work, planting limpet mines, and of course changed himself. himself plant limpet mine. On Mr Big ship in Nineteen fifty-three, inflaming visit Shack Cousteau's underwater excavation of an ancient Roman wreck in the Mediterranean off the coast of Marseille and wrote about it for the Sunday Times. Even died with cousteau, but being a heavy smoker and drinker was unable to reach the wreck before being forced to resurface. Still he made up for it at he's went to home at Goldeneye in Jamaica where he swam it in the c everyday and became something of an expert on the local marine life. Most intriguingly in nineteen forty one. He told more Russell a colleague of his at Naval Intelligence. But he was considering resigning from his intelligence duties and joining a motor torpedo boats. Motor torpedo boat crew where he would see more action. Of course the idea, my never been a serious one, but it does reveal an early interest with underwater action that would be expressed in his late novels. All right. Thanks, Edward. That's great stuff. You could find Edward Bid. At Bond memes that block spot, dot, com, and at James Bond Fhu dot com, and you can also find Edward on twitter at at Bonn memes, so thanks a lot. Eddie, one little addition to this story, ever kind of mentioned Largo in his talk, as well now in life, and this is true part of the WHO of the sinking of the two British ships in Alexandria. Included this guy called Emilio Bianchi. And it is believed that Emilio Bianchi inspired. The character Emilio Largo in Thunderball of. That's pretty cool all right. So if you WANNA find out more about these chariots, or the human torpedoes go to Youtube Search for Italian S. LC human torpedo of World War Two that's essence Sierra, L. Ellison, in Lima and C. as in Charlie Italian. S Elsie human torpedo of ww two. There's some really good videos up there and they actually let you see what these things look like. And what they look like is what they look like in the film as well so it's. It's Kinda cool it. They really did a good job of of using the the actual stuff when they could. Now, that's the chariots in the silent enemy. Let's fast forward to thunderball if for a spot fans and the underwater sleds chariots that they use, there were actually inspired by these chariots from the silent enemy. But we have to also remember the timing of things. Three years before Fleming World Thunderball this movie. The silent enemy came out. In remember you know underwater crafts and stuff change all the time. And the crafts that they use in silent enemy were actually from the nineteen forties. And they've changed. They've updated them over time. And so the the sleds and stuff that we see in thunderball are definitely updated from what we have in the movie the. Silent enemy, certainly based on the silent enemy and World War Two stuff so Tahmina when we were at in London at the bond in Motion Museum saw a couple of these underwater sleds that they have in the in the museum. Fascinating stuff got to get there some time. There's also a great book that Edward Mentions in. His article called the frogmen the story of the wartime underwater operations. And it's by Tj Waldron and James gleason. The Italian Frogmen's next target is Gibraltar the gateway to the Mediterranean and key supply routes to north, Africa and Malta. The British generals know that across the bay in Spain. Someone is watching or spying on all of the moves that the British are making when the ships come in when they docked for the night. ETC, so there's a spy in Spain informing the subs when the convoys going to arrive gotta remember, Spain was neutral in World War Two so this is kind of an intriguing little part of the film, but an intriguing part of real life to. And I love how they're. They're doing. They're showing these spies with these big telescopes looking across the bay, because it's not that far and trying to understand exactly what's going on since British and potentially merchandiser, cargo ships are being blown up the British call in this explosive expert Lieutenant Lionel Philip Kenneth Crab. He makes his way into the Admiral's office in Gibraltar Kidding appointment. and. He's you know he's trying to do the center. You you've gotta get permission from Jill. Masters to see the admiral, and there's a bunch of humor or around just that little bit there, but he kick it in, so he heads down to the docks. there. He finds these two divers. Actually has the whole force British have to stop the car, and it's only two people. crab knows to divers won't cut it, so he decides on the spot to have a dive with them even though he got. He's an explosive expert. He's yeah, you just. I'm going to become a diver now. He does this really well and impresses the other divers. And then the admiral shows up. And he sees what's happening and tells crab. You're on the diving team. So crab does his practicing with the ships. He's examining the holes for explosives. We know because we've seen at the bombs that were attached to the Queen. Elizabeth and valiant were torpedo-shaped. They had a propeller and were attached the whole of the ship. Buy Clamps and cables. So again this is reality showing up in the movie here. So crab heads out on a night mission to ship to see if it has any bombs attached to it. So crab is about to dive to examine the ship when the captain says to, it might be booby-trapped to crab says. Kind of very bond like here Gaza. You'll know it as soon as I do. Yeah I mean this. This guy's calm, but I guess you would have to be if you're an explosives expert. You better. If, it's booby-trap. You know it as soon as I do. It's great. Well there is a bomb attached and crab and another diver. Loosen it, and you can hear ticking, and they drag this other bomb ashore. Now remember crab is an explosives expert and it's going to be important right here. Yeah, he's again very calm and cool. He's on this airstrip and he's about to remove clock and detonator device. There are three detonators and to forty eight hour clocks in this device and crab pulls out gingerly the detonators exactly. Like James Bond does in octopussy written in one, thousand, nine sixty to. The movie in Nineteen eighty-three. It's almost exact copy of the way that he does the removal of the the detonator in the pussy. Yeah, there's other movies were there are bombs and so on in bond movies like Goldfinger of course bond fails to defuse the bomb there. In world is not enough. Bond Kinda defuses the bomb when he has the plutonium, morality checked forcefully at the last second killing. Renard! If you remember that Gold Rod. So, it's kind of diffusion, but not exactly like this. The crab incident in the silent enemy and Octopussy. That's. The identical. And you see in the spy who loved me bomb? reprograms the bombs, so the blow each other up and stuff like that, but octopussy and the silent on me exact. But in the in the spy who loved me though Dan, if we remember that scene there on the leprous, and he's there with Captain Carter who the guy played by Shane, Rimmer Shane Ray Grid, and so before the reprogram the bombs they had to remove the detonator, and there was that the magnetic pole in the detonator that. Best Right, so it's. It is very very similar with the addition of this magnetic pole thing that to the scene of crab trying to pull that detonator out of the bomb. Yeah and I would imagine that if this is the way you have to really diffuse bombs, then okay, that makes sense, but anyway you see it here. Nineteen fifty-eight. Grab doing it and you're going to see it in bond films as well so. In this particular film crab discovers that these bombs would explode one of two ways. At a satine, due to the clock timers, or and this is clever. If the ship started moving before the timers were set to blow after so many revolutions of the propellers remember, we said propeller were attached to these bombs after so many revolutions of two propellers that were attached to these bombs. The bombs would blow most likely out at sea, so it looks like maybe ship torpedoed. This is clever so absolutely because they're really trying to hide the fact that they've got these frogman down there attaching these bombs, so they can do it where it looks like. Yeah, the thing just got torpedoed at see what a brilliant way to kind of mask that yeah, and in the beginning you you did. Hear them. Say that there was some activity around. How the heck are they? Blow up the ships in Alexandria. So that's true. Tom that they were there really were looking first for for subs, and so this would be another smokescreen, basically to say, and these might be subs blowing these things up and not the frogman, so you have all of this going on and. The, British and crab have a lot a lot of work to do. There's a report no subjectivity, so they're. They're baffled with all these things blowing up. It's like how are these things going up? If there's no subs around, or how are we missing the subs again? They know that there's the spy network in Spain again. A neutral country in world. War Two and they're spying on them like you said with telescopes and Benach Yars so they could see the ship movements and so on. The Italian team has been at this villa in Spain. Specifically L. Cirrus for about ten months so. They're led by this. Guy Antonio Town Malino one of the Italian experts at underwater warfare and this is in. Spain, where you know parts of die another day we're film. The Cuba scenes as you recall. Again they're using these large binoculars telescopes to see what's happening across the bay. which actually got me thinking about? Where our telescopes used in other spy movies and I was so I am research on looking into all of the James Bond movies all the mission, impossible's and all of the Jason. Bourne movies okay so. What can I say so? I was trying to find these things I, know did discount gun scopes? Okay, being used so if you think about in on Her Majesty's when it looks for the gun scope. When they're at the beach or when Jason born inborn identity is using the gun scope kind of as A. Telescope kind of thing. So in James Bond, we see. Bond using telescope to see the Goldfinger cheating at cards and Goldfinger. Also bond. X out the flying. In never say never again. which is the remake of thunderball fuel? It's where he sees domino dancing on the deck. Right the flying, so so they're. Aren't they? I'm sorry as opposed to the disco Volante, exactly which? Flying Sauce yeah okay. So you have Sean Connery bonds? There's those two in moon raker Roger Moore's bond is on the observation deck, and he turns, and he's looking at looking at holly good head. WHO's looking at him through telescope? And then finally in the barn ultimatum Jason Bourne has a small hand-held telescope that he uses when he calls Pam, and that's really it I was really surprised I couldn't find more telescope use and spy movies. So? Chances are then I've missed some or there are other spy movies that have had telescopes in there, so if we have, please leave us a comment on spy movie navigator Dot Com and let us know where we missed one. Yeah. That's good so back to the movie. You have a situation here. That is baffling to crab and the crew. They don't know what's going on. Crab is Kinda stumped he. He's thinking that they've got to be using frogmen and not some kind of a watercraft because he's thinking if they used watercraft like. Or whatever they would need a base in workshops for maintenance and all that kind of stuff. He's thinking they can't be doing that. It's got just be frogmen, so crab is watching them through binoculars, and there are watching the British through binoculars and telescopes as well as you said at the villa where the Italians are in Algesiras, they become aware that British cruisers are coming into Gibraltar that evening and they say their job is to sink them of course. They have one cherry at the US for this job and the Italian frogmen are on the way. There's a citing by the British that of this chariot, and so a siren goes off and hand thrown. Charges are thrown overboard. Try to sink this underwater craft. They get it to the surface and one of the frogmen is killed, and eventually the British fine the chariot could be. Useful later, but one of the frogmen gets killed. One of them gets away. So the British being nice provide a burial at sea for the dead Italian Frogman. Crab is now looking to recruit more diverse because he knows they're going to need them. The cruisers are planning to leave for Malta. Chief Petty Officer. This guy named Thorpe see some crabs divers, and he tries to give them some important tips because he had history of this. Crab wants Thorpe to join the underwater working for which is what we're going to be called. He does join, and is now in charge of the divers for training in more, even though crab is still the guy in charge of the operation, and Thorpe played brilliantly, we said before by Sydney James He's a tough believable character with this gentle side to him as well so it's so fun the way they do that like the way they're doing the exercises and stuff. There's I. Mean it's serious. You've got to get in shape and everything and the way he's doing it. There's almost a comedic element to it. Yeah, with the way he does it, but it's still doing the serious. Yeah, and of course the Italians across the bay are watching all the stuff, and they're laughing, thinking the British or diving for bombs that don't exist. Of course they're practicing and on the Italians. Also spy merchant ships coming in to bring supplies the Malta and that will be their target tonight. So they're not giving up. So that night the Italians succeed in sinking three of these merchant ships and crabbing the team remove limpet mines from many other ships prevent them from blowing up, but fundamentally they failed because three of these merchant ships got blown up. The history of Malta and this is cool and I learned this when I visited Malta that it was a critical island in the Mediterranean seas again strategically located between Sicily Italy. And the North Coast of Africa, so it was very important to control Malta in reality, merchant, ships, aircraft and military transports. We're all targets in world war, two to try to bring to. It's knees and surrender, and in real life was days away in reality from doing that from having to surrender, because they were out of supplies out of ammunition out of airplanes that defend Malta, and so on very very strategic island control, so it's amazing. How often think you? They were almost out of stuff? The war when something happens, it was just kind of amazing. Yeah, so here in this film. They're blowing actually ships that needed to get them all to. Yeah you mentioned. These three merchant ships coming in one of those was the willow Dale that I referenced earlier. So they're going to blow up. These merchant ships began. Doesn't that one's the one that just doesn't feel and we talk about the fact that they seem to get their facts right? That's the only one that really doesn't feel right for me. well I mean again. It's not a documentary, but it's it's giving you the essence of what really happened in terms of undersea warfare. That wasn't submarine warfare in World War Two and these things were strategic so in the meantime one of these British planes comes in and crashes, in the Bay, and it's no that official in top secret papers were aboard that plane. So crab in his divers must retrieve these papers before anyone else does or before wash up onto the Spanish shore. All Right? This is this kind of reminds us of the real operation. MINCEMEAT in World War Two where the British intentionally washed up a body of what looked like. To be a British general with many falsified documents that the British news when washed up on the Spanish shore would be turned over to the Germans in this briefcase, cuffed to the wrist of the dead person was really a cramp who died of rat poisoning? We're all these fake documents about the invasion of Greece, in Sardinia. And that the invasion of Sicily was just a ruse. So this really happened in nineteen forty three, so the important thing is here in silent enemy. They're afraid that the real documents in this plane that just crashed would fall into enemy hands in operation mincemeat they intentionally wanted false documents to fall into the enemy hands, and all of this is important because of the importance of Malta and again in Malta if you recall Eisenhower and his staff were planning the invasion of Sicily and so. They wanted the enemy to think it was gonNA. Be Sardinia Greece and not Sisley. All of this is tied in together. It's pretty okay, just frequent, so so then crab and four of his divers are going to head down. To where this plane crashed in, find the plane. Find the briefcase Yay. So here we have frogmen. They're underwater looking for the wreckage of a plane, trying to retrieve something of immense value to the safety of the World Yeah Um. We've talked about that before. There's some great underwater shots of the divers, the sunken plain with the ocean water flowing through it, the divers inside the sunken plain. Just some wonderful shots especially since this was filmed in nineteen, fifty, eight I mean this is the work of the underwater camera man who you mentioned before Ishaq's halt, and the Schatzer absolutely spectacular. They really are these are fantastic shots, and it's nineteen fifty eight as you said of course. US Bond fans are going to think of thunderball again, and that's where we're going. Bond in thunderball dives to the sunken plain to see if the nuclear weapons are still aboard and thunderball. Fabulous? Underwater scenes was preceded by the silent enemy seven years earlier diver magazine in two thousand twelve rank thunderball as one of the best scuba diving movies of all time. And in the silent enemy in his diverse enemy, divers, coming after the sunken plain and the briefcase and magnificent underwater fight ensues the enemy and black wetsuits. Crab in his divers shirtless in shorts. Some great fight sequences inside the plane with the briefcase, changing hand, and and number of times, Nats, which is Kinda cool, and then at one point, one of crabs guy sticks and knifes through the face mask of one of the enemy divers, and another cuts the air hose of an enemy diver cramps. Guys still have the briefcase in recovered it after some great underwater action shots. Both of these moves are duplicated in the fight in thunderball. Harpoon, through the mass killing a guy, multiple hoses, getting cut so again in nineteen, fifty eight. We're seeing these scenes. Great underwater fight scenes with scuba divers, great stuff, and then you see see them use those same themes in Thunderball, which is really neat. This isn't going to be the first time you see Frogman fighting underwater. There was a movie nineteen fifty one called the frogman with Richard Would Mark Dana Andrews, and there's some great underwater scenes in that film as well and with the nights rendezvous with submarines and frogmen, and all kinds of stuff is cool. It's not the first time you're seeing it here in silent. Emmy but. The underwater cinematography is pretty damn good here. Yeah exactly. So the Italians have failed to recover the briefcase and crabs team was victorious. Yeah, now, the leader of the Talian Brigade wants to target that ships from Algiers and Morocco carrying the British army troops. He's GONNA use the chariots in the warheads to do it. Crab wants to learn to the enemy's plans, but he's told he can't do anything. In Spain because it's a neutral country, and this drives him nuts. He knows the convoy coming in needs protection, so he in another one of his men had to Algeciras with the help, of Miguel, which is really some funny stuff with this. This guy who has a boat name. Name is Miguel pretty funny and they they bribe them with a bottle of Scotch looks like Johnny Walker. It looks like Johnny Walker, and he's GonNa Bring Crab in the in his guy in the morning, and get them out and back into Gibraltar in the evenings, so gonNA, take them out. Let them do some reconnaissance and then get them back by evening. Now Crab has a history of being a maverick in real life, and doing things he feels should be done and apologizing later so it heads. Tell just Cirrus pretending to be suites. They walk around this town market and you had to a cafe that Miguel said to go that everybody goes to. They didn't know exactly what they meant, but they thought okay. We'll. We'll go there because everybody goes there, so they're listening for people speaking. Italian get a lead on the Italian squad doing the bombings. They finally hear some guys, speaking Italian and follow him to this really this large tanker ship, and are these large oil drums that are gonNA get loaded aboard the ship and they're like. Is that an oil thing and they did you actually see the test? The drum and there's oil in it list as far as we're concerned, so the Italians go aboard and one of the trump's. Hanging and then it starts breaking loose while it's being hoisted onto the boat, and the look, and every one of the Italians faces as this thing starts wobbling and getting ready to fall sheer panic. Right, they're just like. Oh, my gosh, this is going to hurt us when it comes down. So, thinking this may be rigged with explosives because that's what the Italians made it look like they thought this was going to explode. He wants to check the whole of the tanker to see if there's bombs down there. Yeah, this was an Italian. Ship I think had an Italian name. I can't remember off top my head, but some I was wondering why crab is is. Is Buddy wanted to check for explosives since it was an Italian ship Italians the ones blowing up ships, they wouldn't blow up their own chip, but I was a little confused there as to why they were doing it, but then okay I understand okay. Maybe they're just GONNA, check the ship and see anyway. I don't know I. didn't I was a little confused there? But. The cool thing is they do go underwater. Check this ship and they find. They think it there. That's important. They find an underwater hats. And they fine. The chariots. Go through this whole in this hatch. Now wonder they're thinking. No one ever sees where they're coming from. Wait clean. Does this reminds us of anything else in a bond film particularly thunderball? Largo ships. In all. has another water hatch and his sleds and chariots enter and leave. Without detection from that hatch. You remember that. They swim up into the hatch crab and his. Cohort. And the holding area and I have to say when when they swim into this little holding area. It reminded me a little bit of bond and Pam. Bouvier, swimming up into the wave crest. If you recall in licensed to kill very much similar setting very similar setting to that, yeah, definitely had a similar feel to it and on a smaller scale. Maybe it reminded me of Stromberg ship in the spy who loved me that could swallow up whole submarines. But. This is the key thing aboard the ship in this holding area, they see a large room where there are bombs and chariots and equipment, so this is where they're maintaining these things and where they're loading up with bombs, though the drums of oil in reality didn't contain oil, they contain machinery and explosives to build warheads so. Others from the ships are filing into the room and crab in his guy. They have to hide. And they hide below in the water below the deck again. I love that. It's like okay. We're GONNA hide and. We get into the water. There's a little bit of noise when they make water. But who, when they make it into the water, but she don't hear anything. They're absolutely silent well. There's a lot of people walking around, but the grid they're hiding under is is a grid you could see through. The courts would've looked down. They would have seen or two heads there, but they didn't look down. But again is reminding me again of licence to kill. Would bond and Pam in in that little hole area hiding? And the Italians put chariot in the water here with the propelled propeller bomb and crab is thinking. It's like a giant factory carved out of the hull of a ship. Okay, this is like sh romper ship in the spy. Who loved me? So that's the Lupus, yeah. And this Italian ship is actually called the Altera from Napoli okay. So you know so, that's pretty cool. That absolutely is cool, and I love the little Tian's. We can see where it appears that when they made some of these bond movies. They took some of the themes here from the way they fill these in the silent enemy and tweak them a little bit into the bond movies. Yeah, now part of the convoy back to the theme right so part of the convoys going arrive this evening. and. There's going to be more tomorrow in some. Supply ships are GONNA come in. Yeah, so crab gets back to Gibraltar and he read. He readies his capture chariot. Capture the Cherry right again. There's some great underwater shots the Italians with their chariots cutting through the water, trying to get to the ships. Ship blows up then another and more. and. Curve again. I mean they stopped something's happening, but more ships getting blown up. They failed again. It looks cracked crab, actually like Oh, we failed, and the admirals like well you actually. Saved Exit, how remember the number? You saved a certain number of of ships by doing what you're doing and to me? That's that's a that's success. Yeah, okay, so they talented teams going to have six chariots and warheads by the next night so this this this night they were going out with one the next night. They're going to have six chariots warheads ready to go. Crab gets into the captured chariot and wants to blow up the Italian ship that they'd been aboard. That had the factory and the chariots and the bombs on it. Now again. He has no permissions to to this new, but he goes with another one of his team members. And the Italians plan to start their mission and nine PM, yes. I think again again. This maverick guy is is going to go do this because he thinks okay, this has. Got To be blown up. This is the causing all of our problems so I'm GonNa do it whether he has permission in that, so he's. He's off doing this, so he sees ship out there and he sets. He goes out with the. Cherry and his cohort, he sets the warhead for a short delay. They fixed the bomb to the ship. Just before nine o'clock actually. And I don't know exactly why they're chariot surfaces the Italian spotted. But then the bomb explodes beneath the ship and they swim away. That's the end the boom. The Italian ship is gone all the chariots. All the warheads everything else. The fleet is save. We're okay, so the end now let me jump in here for a second because you're saying how everything's okay, but if we think back to another thing that happened in the war with the enigma machine, where once we figured out how to decode it. We couldn't let the Germans know we knew how they were doing it. So by crab exploding this boat here. He lets the Italians No. We know how you've been doing this now. So just interesting from a as as the war progresses in his plans happen the fact that crab went out on his own do. This may actually have ended up causing some problems. South a short term problem, but. If you look at if you look at the two different things, we know how you're doing this in this one case and we don't want you to know we know. They would have machine. They'd have to change their tactics the Italians or whatever, but now they know. Hey, you can have a ship out there. We see ship out there than we see bombings happening. We're going to go check out their ship, so I don't think so I. Think it's Okay I think it's good that he did it and I think it ended well. Of course. The British develop their own sleds. After this GPS, they call them chariots, and so I think it's fine I think. This, this kind of ended the veiled threat, and now they knew they saw ship again. Hey, we're going to be suspicious. I think we're good. All right. All right, so the the ending here is kind of cool. Thorpe assembles the team and they tell crab that he's been awarded the George Medal. Actually happened in real life. He was awarded the George Medal. So that wraps up our look at the silent enemy. We highly recommend this one thousand nine hundred eighty eight spy film. It's got great action, and it definitely appears to impact other spy movies. Yeah, there's one other interesting thing about crab. And, this is again for real and another connection to thunderball really. If you can have one more connection thunderball. In Nineteen fifty-six a Soviet. Cruiser came to Britain now. We talk about this in the other real world podcasts that Tom was talking about earlier. But in fifty, how real world events and other movies find their way into spy movies? Part One. Yeah, we have two parts on that and you can check out part wanted to. It's kind of fun. How real world stuff gets into these movies? Many ways. Nineteen, fifty six is Soviet cruiser was coming to Britain and Nikita Khrushchev. was on a state visit to Britain on the ship. He was the former premier of the Soviet Union. And it was also nineteen fifty-six. Same Year when off said we will bury you while addressing Western ambassadors at a reception at at the Polish embassy in Moscow in. November eighteen of fifty-six. So how'd that work out? He didn't. He didn't like the West so much so here. He is in England visiting England, and so be it. Western relations were not good. So on this visit to Britain Britain wanted to take a look at this new Soviet ship and some reports say to examine mine ling hatches or sonar equipment, and other reports like from Peter Wright's book spycatcher. Britain's naval intelligence wanted information on the potential new propeller system that this ship may have had so am. I six sent a diver down actually to reported as being sent down one of them. Was this great diver? Lionel CRABB? Crab never return from this mission. And unfortunately a headless Hanley's body was found fourteen months later dressed in scuba gear that he had worn on that date in April of fifty six. Am I six covered up the mission, saying grab was lost in some underwater exercise, and there were a lot of theories floating around one being that so yet centuries were stationed underwater to guard the ship, and they caught crab, cut his air hose and brought them aboard and later died other theory say he was shot underwater by Soviet sniper. K. You remember in Thunderball Bond, center inspect the hall of the Disco Volante the villain. Margot ship is boat in under what he's taking pictures on their water member with the camera the infrared camera. And he's discovered by Largos frogmen. And as he was taking these pictures, and of course he sees the underwater hatch bond was a little more lucky than crab. He escaped. The photos showed another water hatch, which leads bond. Think that LARGOS, entire operation, it's after the plane carrying the nuclear missiles, etc might be an underwater operation including the plane that was hijacked. So. Is there a connection between the crab event and these scenes in thunderball? there. Can't be. How could there be right well? Okay, the. Officer in charge of the Lionel crabb underwater deployment, and that mission was Nicholas Elliot. A friend of Ian Fleming's. Thanks for joining us today. As we dove into the silent enemy from nineteen, fifty eight, please do us a favor and subscribe to our cracking the code of spy movies. Show through your favorite. APP Give us. A five star rating Intel. All your friends about the show to. This has been Dan Silvestri and Tommaso. Thanks for listening. Please join us for each episode on cracking the code of spy movies and Voice Mail through our web sites by movie navigator Dot Com with your feedback and suggestions other podcasts.

James Bond Malta Lieutenant Lionel crabb Spain Mediterranean Alexandria Thorpe He Dan Silvestri Ian Fleming Sicily Gibraltar Lieutenant Lionel Philip Kenne Frogman Tom Dance Willow Dale Sydney James Britain Pam