20 Burst results for "Ian Elsner"

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started for the past six and a half years more or less weekly museum. People gather on twitter for something called museum our together. These people form a peer to peer community supporting discussion and debate between those who work in enjoy and challenge museums society. That's the beauty of museum. Our is entirely independent. It is not an organization is just about holding a space so other people can talk with each other. This is dr to meena car who co-founded museum our back in october. Twenty fourteen gosper also founded the curatorial research center. Hello my name is to mean a costco. And i am the director and curator of the curatorial research center and that's an organization. I started back in two thousand eighteen very much to support fellow curator's from around the world and also to make progress in modernizing curatorial practice this month gosper officially steps back from her role in museum. Our i wanted this to serve as both exit interview and a chance to highlight other projects that she has founded based on her curatorial. Philosophies museum i started can october two thousand fourteen sophie balancer. Who was the co founder with me got together over twitter. We've never met in real life. Goodness knows whether we ever will. Sophie was based up in the north of england. I'm based in the far west of cornwall. That we both decided we'd give the idea of the discussion based hours that were kind of finding their feet on twitter at that time so we decided to give it a go and it's grown and grown and grown and changed a lot since then of course twitches also changed hugely in terms of who participates. Who feels confident about speaking out. Who likes in the background. There is a lot of polarization on the platform. Now and so we've changed adapted museum iowa to all of those trends that we've seen happen including it's growing politicize ation as well. If i'm being honest i've kind of treated the whole thing. Even six and a half years own as an ongoing experiment in trying to understand how it is people like to communicate with each other and how it is that you can provide some kind of support for this peer to pay contact is what we're really after on museum archipelago. We look at museums as a medium and twitter is also a medium one that has changed since museum. Our started six and a half years ago since then. Twitter has shifted from a simple subscriber model. One we you see all the tweets from the people you follow the order that they tweeted to a system that uses algorithms that optimize for other factors such as engagement with the tweets. This can make a global conversation about museums. Difficult with the change in. How twitter is managed. And how the concept of driving engagement and algorithms are dictating. What we see on our timelines. There has absolutely been an impact on museum our because of that. We've got to work much harder to try and get ideas for topics for example people's ideas out to as broad an interested audience participation group that we can and that has proven very difficult in fact particularly of late because people's timelines also manipulated by twitter's algorithms and because they're so much more noise on twitter than there was so. I'm kind of glad that museum. Our has managed to hold its own. It retains a light structure. It does support those intimate conversations as well as supporting bigger thoughts and opinions and even ones that people disagree about in one space. I've participated in even hosted a few museum hours. And the thing that reminds me of the most is a museum conference or at least the conversations that you might have at museum conference which is yet another medium but interestingly docker says that museum our has never been about recreating that experience. That certainly isn't the kind of experience you usually get unless you Fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to very expensive. Large international museum conferences. For example like the newseum association conference in the uk or any of items conferences but we've never really perceived if museum hours to fill that kind of gap with still kind of exploring what it is that we think we're doing and that's just by way of being very honest about no having an agenda and letting sort of the emergent process of museum our happened museum. our is just one of the volunteer projects. Goss car works on. She is first and foremost a curator term. I still ask for the definition of.

ian elsner Sophie Twitter october meena car six and a half years twitter six and a half years ago uk Each episode sophie balancer fifteen minutes both one One north of england first one space this month gosper
"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:10 min | 2 months ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"For the past six and a half years more or less weekly museum. People gather on twitter for something called museum our together. These people form a peer to peer community supporting discussion and debate between those who work in enjoy and challenge museums society. That's the beauty of museum. Our is entirely independent. It is not an organization is just about holding a space so other people can talk with each other. This is dr to meena car who co-founded museum our back in october. Twenty fourteen gosper also founded the curatorial research center. Hello my name is to mean a costco. And i am the director and curator of the curatorial research center and that's an organization. I started back in two thousand eighteen very much to support fellow curator's from around the world and also to make progress in modernizing curatorial practice this month gosper officially steps back from her role in museum. Our i wanted this to serve as both exit interview and a chance to highlight other projects that she has founded based on her curatorial. Philosophies museum i started can october two thousand fourteen sophie balancer. Who was the co founder with me got together over twitter. We've never met in real life. Goodness knows whether we ever will. Sophie was based up in the north of england. I'm based in the far west of cornwall. That we both decided we'd give the idea of the discussion based hours that were kind of finding their feet on twitter at that time so we decided to give it a go and it's grown and grown and grown and changed a lot since then of course twitches also changed hugely in terms of who participates. Who feels confident about speaking out. Who likes in the background. There is a lot of polarization on the platform. Now and so we've changed adapted museum iowa to all of those trends that we've seen happen including it's growing politicize ation as well. If i'm being honest i've kind of treated the whole thing. Even six and a half years own as an ongoing experiment in trying to understand how it is people like to communicate with each other and how it is that you can provide some kind of support for this peer to pay contact is what we're really after on museum archipelago. We look at museums as a medium and twitter is also a medium one that has changed since museum. Our started six and a half years ago since then. Twitter has shifted from a simple subscriber model. One we you see all the tweets from the people you follow the order that they tweeted to a system that uses algorithms that optimize for other factors such as engagement with the tweets. This can make a global conversation about museums. Difficult with the change in. How twitter is managed. And how the concept of driving engagement and algorithms are dictating. What we see on our timelines. There has absolutely been an impact on museum our because of that. We've got to work much harder to try and get ideas for topics for example people's ideas out to as broad an interested audience participation group that we can and that has proven very difficult in fact particularly of late because people's timelines also manipulated by twitter's algorithms and because they're so much more noise on twitter than there was so. I'm kind of glad that museum. Our has managed to hold its own. It retains a light structure. It does support those intimate conversations as well as supporting bigger thoughts and opinions and even ones that people disagree about in one space. I've participated in even hosted a few museum hours. And the thing that reminds me of the most is a museum conference or at least the conversations that you might have at museum conference which is yet another medium but interestingly docker says that museum our has never been about recreating that experience. That certainly isn't the kind of experience you usually get unless you Fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to very expensive. Large international museum conferences. For example like the newseum association conference in the uk or any of items conferences but we've never really perceived if museum hours to fill that kind of gap with still kind of exploring what it is that we think we're doing and that's just by way of being very honest about no having an agenda and letting sort of the emergent process of museum our happened

ian elsner Sophie Twitter october meena car six and a half years twitter six and a half years ago uk Each episode sophie balancer fifteen minutes both one One north of england first one space this month gosper
"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started to lose. France has many memorials covering hundreds of years of history. there's a statue of joan of arc. There's monuments to the soldiers of the franco prussian. War memorials to the dead of world war. One but look closer and you'll also find sites covering a very specific slice of history the years between nineteen forty and nineteen forty four. The period of nazi germany's military administration of france. There's the building where the gestapo secret police made their local headquarters. There's a monument to the glory of the resistance. And there's the shoah memorial the hebrew word for the holocaust that honors the jews. Who were deported and killed during this period to lose on a gallon. Gal i in black to lose during world war two was originally stone. Herb in the south of france a lot of resistance fighters came to to lose to former. Is you need and many then left for the rest of france or pain. A number of escape networks. Beginning to lose and took english airmen for example or is he stops fighters across the beauty. Nate london or the united states is it has unique. This is your home blah sean. Speaking french blah. Sean is the head of the museum of resistance and deportation in home france which is right down the street from many of these memorials into loose. The museum brings together these sites as well as artifacts stories and witnesses from across the region and oliver france both war drama pendulum. My name is jalen bless sean. I am in charge of the museum of lizzie. Stockton deportation in a gallon. Foss the museum actually in nineteen seventy seven. It was first a community museum. The museum was initially a community museum. Set up by former members of the french resistance and in nineteen ninety four. It became departmental which is to say it is now funded by the regional government into three themes of the museum. Engage collect transmit. We collect to store and transmit this memory of our ancestors from our elders to future generations. Memorials that defend. The memory of the resistance gives us access to people who have objects in their homes and documents and some of them and trust them to us. The museums focus onto loose and the surrounding region is not just because it's under the authority of the regional government. It also reflects the uneven an ever changing military administration of france under nazi germany until november. Nineteen forty two. The nazis only had direct occupation of part of the country. Mostly the north of france including paris and the western coast. The south of france was under the jurisdiction of the vichy regime. An independent ally of nazi germany which promoted anti and practice collaboration with the nazis. Most specifically by deporting jews to concentration and extermination camps so when it comes to the fighting this regime the resistance. It's tempting to present history. Like story with clear cut intentions and the simple narrative but the history of the french resistance was anything but simple. It's not like there was a single unified resistance with one single outcome in mind in episode fifty one of this show. We examined another collaborationist regime bulgaria in the early nineteen forties by visiting the sylvia. Jewish museum of history. Today one the galleries there is named the holocaust and the rescue of the jews in bulgaria. Which even the museum staff say as an overly simplistic title khuda visitor in your at many visitors are in fact unaware of this fragmented structure of the rizzi stats. We the gaullist on one side and communists on the order so in the museum we do. Indeed present. The different forms of lizzie stars to present the complexity. The museum of resistance and deportation focuses on presenting objects gathered from witnesses. These include resistance newspapers of various subgroups and photos and testimonies of those who are fighting whether with acts of sabotage by providing shelter to those who needed it or even through building the logistics of feeding fighters in other parts of france. There's also catalogs names and photographs of people deported and accounts of reprisal attacks against resistance fighters and collaborators alike as control of the territory ebbed and flowed la la brea delayed gambled do period of world. War two is quite complex to explain to the younger generations who often have a rather manichean view that is to say in black and white. You are either busy. Saas fater or a collaborator povey. She nazi that's it. You are either a good guy or bad guy who she says. Only on air mission. The museum was closed for an eighteen month renovation from two thousand eighteen until twenty twenty the renovation modernized the museum and also reflects. Our moment in time was fatigued. Amisi today these type of museum has a new dimension we the disappearance of the last witnesses since they can no longer testify in front of students scholars and the general public. So it is our mission to transmit this memory to do so we have collected and we continue to collect objects and especially testimonies. Actually timonium the renovated museum features. Two floors of permanent galleries and space for temporary exhibitions. Special programs are available to school. Kids who are encouraged to question the sustainability of the spirit of resistance the current struggles for the preservation and extension of rights and freedoms and the fight against inequalities today. It's no longer a museum. Run by former members of the resistance but instead it's focused on being the transmission to new generations. lead oldwick at the weaknesses are now ninety or ninety five years old and we continue to collect the testimonies and to project broadcast and recalled these testimonies in order to get her their precious memories and transmit them to new generations new belgian jassem. This has been museum archipelago. Full transcript of this episode as well as shown notes and links visit museum archipelago dot com museum archipelago is supported by listeners. Like you joined club. Archipelago club archipelago members. Get access to a bonus. Podcast where we've been doing. Indepth reviews of how museums are portrayed in movies tv shows and even video games if you can't get enough of how museums shape our lives. Join club archipelago. Today by visiting joined the museum dot club. And if you don't feel like it that's totally cool to thanks for listening and next time bring a friend..

ian elsner eighteen month Sean Two floors museum dot club world war two paris Saas fater Each episode fifteen minutes Today jalen nazi germany november today first nazis early nineteen forties a gallon hebrew
"ian elsner" Discussed on Podcast Gumbo

Podcast Gumbo

03:40 min | 9 months ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Podcast Gumbo

"Hey Paul this is Hannah Hessman August. . Seventeenth is national nonprofit day. . My favorite kind of nonprofits are museums. . Of course, , all our favourite museums are locked down right now struggling to get through this virus like the rest of us. . So I thought we'd celebrate them a little and I challenge you on that note to find a great podcast created by a museum. . Go. . Well Hannah under most other circumstances, , this would have been a minor challenge. . But as it turns out, , we have a mutual friend that has a podcast about museums and that same friend was my eighth guest on this show. . For my first recommendation, , I'm going with museum archipelago. . When the host Ian Elsner was my guest I mentioned an old episode about the Apollo Eleven landing site. . But I'm not going to take the easy way out and I'm going to suggest to newer and very relevant topic statues. . In this episode and talks about the relationship statues and museums, , he goes into the tearing down toward causton statue and one of his guests talks about the slippery slope. . So to celebrate this National Nonprofit Day learn about a nonprofit consider donating time or money to one that you believe in and let us know using the National Nonprofit Day Hashtag. . Today's guest is Hannah Hetman. . Hannah's the writer and producer of the Vagina Museum podcast. . Yes. . You heard that correctly. . In New York there is a sex museum which I've been to. . In Iceland, , there is a Pinas Museum which I haven't been to. . And now there is a Johnny Museum which opened in London in two thousand and nineteen. . The podcast. . Liked the museum is all about smashing shame and stigma around the vagina through awareness education and route puns. . The first and recommended episode is entitled. . See you next Tuesday as in the letter C. and the letter, , you would you like me to wait for you to figure it out. . As most people know there are many terms for the vagina, , but there is one that stands out as the most offensive if you still haven't figured it out, , it starts with the letter C and ends would Tuesday? ? This episode answers a lot of questions about that specific word. . For last recommendation Hannah recommends if people saw that slavery was getting started why didn't they stop it by Q. and Abe? ? She says and I quote. . This podcast is produced totally in house by President Lincoln's cottage in DC. . They take questions from their guests. . They can't answer at the moment and die super deep into them with the help of historians to address big ideas in American history loosely connected to Abraham. . Lincoln. . Of course, , but it's so much more than a podcast about Lincoln Unquote. . For. . Today's episode hot sauce. . I'm going to relay on link that Hannah gave me. . If I got stuck trying to find an episode related to this day. . Hanna is the owner of better lemon creative audio that produces podcast for museums, , history organizations, , and cultural nonprofits. . So check out the director she created that anyone can add to. . Come back on August, , twenty fifth where I'll be talking about close a topic I have no business talking about. .

Johnny Museum Hannah Vagina Museum Hannah Hetman President Lincoln Ian Elsner Hannah Hessman Pinas Museum Lincoln Unquote Apollo Eleven Hanna Iceland director Paul causton New York Abe London DC writer
National Nonprofit Day with Hannah Hethmon

Podcast Gumbo

03:40 min | 9 months ago

National Nonprofit Day with Hannah Hethmon

"Hey Paul this is Hannah Hessman August. Seventeenth is national nonprofit day. My favorite kind of nonprofits are museums. Of course, all our favourite museums are locked down right now struggling to get through this virus like the rest of us. So I thought we'd celebrate them a little and I challenge you on that note to find a great podcast created by a museum. Go. Well Hannah under most other circumstances, this would have been a minor challenge. But as it turns out, we have a mutual friend that has a podcast about museums and that same friend was my eighth guest on this show. For my first recommendation, I'm going with museum archipelago. When the host Ian Elsner was my guest I mentioned an old episode about the Apollo Eleven landing site. But I'm not going to take the easy way out and I'm going to suggest to newer and very relevant topic statues. In this episode and talks about the relationship statues and museums, he goes into the tearing down toward causton statue and one of his guests talks about the slippery slope. So to celebrate this National Nonprofit Day learn about a nonprofit consider donating time or money to one that you believe in and let us know using the National Nonprofit Day Hashtag. Today's guest is Hannah Hetman. Hannah's the writer and producer of the Vagina Museum podcast. Yes. You heard that correctly. In New York there is a sex museum which I've been to. In Iceland, there is a Pinas Museum which I haven't been to. And now there is a Johnny Museum which opened in London in two thousand and nineteen. The podcast. Liked the museum is all about smashing shame and stigma around the vagina through awareness education and route puns. The first and recommended episode is entitled. See you next Tuesday as in the letter C. and the letter, you would you like me to wait for you to figure it out. As most people know there are many terms for the vagina, but there is one that stands out as the most offensive if you still haven't figured it out, it starts with the letter C and ends would Tuesday? This episode answers a lot of questions about that specific word. For last recommendation Hannah recommends if people saw that slavery was getting started why didn't they stop it by Q. and Abe? She says and I quote. This podcast is produced totally in house by President Lincoln's cottage in DC. They take questions from their guests. They can't answer at the moment and die super deep into them with the help of historians to address big ideas in American history loosely connected to Abraham. Lincoln. Of course, but it's so much more than a podcast about Lincoln Unquote. For. Today's episode hot sauce. I'm going to relay on link that Hannah gave me. If I got stuck trying to find an episode related to this day. Hanna is the owner of better lemon creative audio that produces podcast for museums, history organizations, and cultural nonprofits. So check out the director she created that anyone can add to. Come back on August, twenty fifth where I'll be talking about close a topic I have no business talking about.

Johnny Museum Hannah Hannah Hessman Vagina Museum Hannah Hetman Pinas Museum Ian Elsner President Lincoln Hanna Lincoln Unquote Apollo Eleven Paul Iceland Causton New York Director ABE London DC Writer
"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

06:25 min | 10 months ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Chris Newell Remembers Visiting the Abbey Museum in Bar Harbor. Maine as a kid, his father was hired to put on educational performances to perform songs about their past Mikati language, history and culture at the need of market and the native American Festival hosted by the museum. So every summer, the family would drive the two and a half hours from their home in MMG, Look Newell, look forward to it year after year with an almost giddy level of excitement, but even as a young person, Newell could clearly see the difference between the surrounding events like the native market and the festival, which will run by members of the WAB, Inaki nations and the museum. which was not back then the Abbey Museum was more traditional ethnographic collection, a lot of weddings and things like that, so when it came to the museum itself, and did feel very much like inclined museum was Barbara Institution not necessarily allow mackey institution, so I definitely felt a lot more connection to things like the vessel, native American festival in those, because those were neater run and be supporting them, although I knew what. I knew the special collection I knew the shredder, and they have as far as the history of mind. People's by able as well as I keep. People's in general, always been attracted to wise available in the Abbey. mcdonagh's as a child I felt it was different spaces today, Chris Crystal, a possible quality citizen is the first member of the watanake nations to lead the Abbey. Museum high money. My name is Chris Lual and I am the director of Education for the. Educational Initiative also CO founder and I'm also the executive director and senior partner. Donations for the Abbey Museum in Bar Harbor. Chris! Co founded the ADAMO. Educational Initiative in two thousand, eighteen with Donna Spears DNA ob joy, chickasaw Choctaw and Dr Jason Man Cheney Agamal is a pass quality word for the snowshoe path at the beginning of winter. The snowshoe path is hard to find, but the more people pass along and carve out this path through the snow during the season. The easier it becomes for everyone to walk together on episode sixty eight of this show we interviewed spears about how the initiative was born out of their experiences seen colonial museum practices across present New England. So, what do we mean when we say colonial museum outside the context of Colonial Williamsburg of course, this kind goes off of my colleague Don from. Who was on the museum archipelago before museums are colonial artifacts. The idea of a museum comes with colonization and tribal museums, even in their own right are using that colonial artifacts. As a way to present her native histories, only doing different in tribal museum in a non tribal museum, largely consists of the American conservation movement which started in the nineteenth century, and when came to museums, and especially the way museum content was created colonial museums would oftentimes focus on tribes that they felt at the time were less impacted, which would have been Western plains tribes in South Western tribes so if you go into a non-tribal museum that. That has native content Colonia Museum. Then what you typically see is a presentation of native cultures through the Lens of anthropology and archaeology and a lot of those voices, ninety nine percent of those voices, especially in the past were non native voices that were framing that lends and hot of you are cultures, and so it's not uncommon to see things that out place, so to go to northeastern museum that has a collection and to see only planes. Or only question. Pari and no Wolpe Martino. Ashland basket is really kind of an old fashioned way of presenting things that goes back to a motive, thinking really originated in the idea that native people were going to vanish at one point and that we needed our history saves by an outside force, and that's literally well. The Columbia Museum represents is that mindset and the Abbey Museum is rooted in that. Mindset opened in nineteen, twenty eight. It housed the collection of native American. Objects gathered by radiologists Robert Abbey in a purpose built building. Newell was hired to lead the Abbey Museum in February twenty twenty. Four lockdowns due to cove nineteen began, but the decolonization process had been going on at the museum for the past five years. The Abbey Museum has gone through the fast five years under the previous executive director. The President CEO at the time cinnamon. Caitlyn the good I the colonization, process and car that. Not just in the content of the museum, which centers need voices now, but also in the structure of the way the museum is run in the has overtime restructured as board to become a majority Ebina Keyboard so Columbia Museum that Presents Lab Aki history. We are probably the only museum that has a structure where the voice of the people that we are representing is now centered, and is also governing the institution itself when the change of directorship happened, the museum changed the title from President and CEO to executive, director and senior partner to the watanake nations as part of this decolonisation process and the shift of power the. Tribes today are five times asking. Scott. Avenue tribes in the history. There was over twenty drives at one point, but currently there are five tribes. Nike is an over arching for the cosmetology of the peoples. Tribes in the beliefs and stories. Of Being Liska created on people from Yash reason gave us the name weapon. Aki, which is the anglicized version of impassioned twelve naccache wish would translate to the people of the dawn collectively. That's how we see ourselves. We we understand that we are the easternmost tribes on the consummate, and.

Abbey Museum colonial museum Columbia Museum tribal museum Colonia Museum inclined museum Chris Newell Bar Harbor Educational Initiative executive director Robert Abbey Abbey Colonial Williamsburg Ian Elsner senior partner Donna Spears Nike Chris Lual Maine President and CEO
"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode. He's never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. There's a way to look at history that focuses on the events themselves. And then there's a way to look a history that focuses on the fallout in the Fourth Century. Bc. E So Lucas. Who's one of Alexander the great successors and Chandra Gupta who is the first Moyen Emperor in northern India met for the first time by the banks of the River Indus and there they had some kind of military encounter? What kind of military encounter? Well we don't really know what we do know is that following the encounter. Greek ambassador megacity was sent to the Indian Interior for the first time and he wrote an ethnographic cool the indicate and it described India for Greek Odeon based on personal observation. But also that you need this. Lots of strange storytelling as well. And this particular tax reform the foundation of Western knowledge of India for generations. And you can just imagine that. Soldiers and British soldiers in the nineteenth century took translations of this particular taxed with them to north west of India when they were exploring. So it's a very long life and it's particularly that that continues to resonate. This is Dr Shushma John. Sorry Tabor Foundation Curator of South Asia at the British Museum. I'm talk to central Michigan. Sorry on the Table Foundation Creator South Asia at the British Museum. And when I'm not at work I welcome my podcast which is very much a passion project and this is called the Wander House will get to the wonder house in a minute because it's an excellent podcast but I a doctorate at University College London. Jane sorry studied this ancient encounter of which only Greek descriptions survive. That moment of meeting in connection has been completely transformed it was transformed cleaner period by British and Indian scholars have precious scholars saying. Oh you know so. Give Woman's warned. He defeated this Indian general whereas the Indian scholars right the the complete opposite that take gender. Gupta defeated this incoming European and he became a great leader and ruler. So actually I think because of this uncertainty. I think it tells us a lot about the time we live in right now. And how may have been transformed in the past so that Doesn't it doesn't bother me in the sense that we will never have this Tonic truth because you know we're never going to get that what we can study is the fallout. How people interpret these historic events and how that reflects on the moment. They're living in now and of course what better way to see in the form of a building how people interpret historic events than a museum itself. This is why the whole idea of decolonizing museums and collections is so important. Because I think up. Till now we've all been complicit in telling partial stories under the guise of trying to be neutral and as we know that neutrality is quite problematic and it tells very very partial truth or partial version of a story. Museums are great way to see what historic events meant to the museum. Builders and I can think of no clearer example than the British Museum. We have reading credible exhibitions on. Say you know when you're thinking of ancient South Asia? They're often on Buddhism or Hinduism organism. So they have a very close religious fakers but will they don't tend to address very rarely that I've ever seen anyway is today's collections. Arrive here. What was the clinical interest in that material? How has it been interrupted? How's it been presented at also? Why why Nice particular ways? How how has that changed over the last century or so it? It's too easy to present a cycle neutral view the ancient Pau of ancient religions. But I I don't think that's particularly ethical. I think if you're going to be doing that you need to be telling that full story in episode thirty nine of this show. We examined Hand Sloan and the origins of the British Museum. Funded in large part by his marriage into the enslaving plan Takeuchi of Jamaica and aided by Britain's rising colonial power global reach. Sloan assembled an encyclopedic collection of specimens and objects from all around the world that became the basis for the world's first public museum the British Museum. A place where anyone could freely enter to see the glory of the British Empire the empire and fuses pretty much every aspect of life life in the UK. Whether we're all aware of it will not in a weather. It's the names of the streets. We walked down the the museums that were founded the collections. They hold the structures. We still all inhabit when you look around at the museum's mice museums I'd say UK. They hold the contents of empire objects collected around the world by client officials by soldiers by Salas people. Working Abroad Uber. Count disentangle the two. When you are telling a story you need to be honest. And tell the whole story or at least as much of it as you can possibly share. Because otherwise you're telling a very very partial one. That often overlooks the violence of an object's collection and the situation and circumstances it was created taken purchased and brought him to the UK to be held in a museum today. Sorry is the first curator of Indian descent of the South Asia collection at the British Museum. In the past Tracy Tell Dighton. Do you think about it very much. I think he's signing when I look at my couture practice and how I approach my role. The collections who. I want to work with and how I realized that actually there is a difference between what I do. And what's other people in a whole range of institutions? Bring Two zero and at first. I was really uncomfortable about that. I thought my goodness unit is it. Just because of who I am and what I am. What about you know? My academic side Olifants might use skills knowledge but actually. I think it's my ability to do my job. Is it somehow rich? I bring a slight different perspectives. We'll say in how I do it. The South Asia collection at the British Museum is so enormous that it can capture the sweep of history of South Asia from the Paleolithic period. To the present day. The gallery opened in two thousand seventeen before that it was last refurbished in nineteen ninety. Two it just happens to be the largest gathering the museum so hey no pressure looking say. Try Not to fail on your first go. It was it was really tricky. We started by thinking about who actually comes to the museum and seventy percent of our audience comes from outside the U. K. And if those people a huge proportion than not very well versed in the history cultures religions of South Asia. So how'd you present your collections in a way that shares this really incredible to the world with people who'd About it and so. We decided to have a chronic thematic kind of approach. We started with the Paleolithic. She's about one and a half million years ago and ended at the present day and the encyclopedic collections at the museum permits us to be able to do something like that. As part of that isolated wet on the ancient to medieval sections. Which is the collections? I cover along with the bulk of the anthropological collections. And also the textiles it. It's got a mammoth collection. The Dakota but as Powell fat I was very keen to introduce moments were slightly unexpected stories and people what presented so for example in the main oil. You walk down. One of the first sculptures you encounter is the modern line capital which takes about the first century day and it was actually excavated and request to the museum by South Asian Collector Pokharel Energy on. I put a portrait of him on that label as well as little bit attacks expanding it because I wanted people to be confronted by South Asians in South Asia Gallery. It's not enough to display their culture of their collections in their history. I think it has to be a shared enterprise and an in another section for example in the Janus in western India the Medieval section I included fate graphs of the Jane Temple from less. Which is where I'm from in the UK who wanted to show you know the sculptures on display. They are just as much positive. British culture as it was back then in the medieval period. It's not just a alien religion in Asian culture. It's our shed culture now. I think it's really important to connect the dots so you do. Share this broad sweep of history and culture but then you want to intersperse it with these other reading important moments linking in a WHO and what you might see around you as you get your everyday life in the UK linking it with with the pastas. Well I asked John. Sorry if she's noticed changes in who visits the gallery and how much time they spend there since the update very interesting. Hughes how they engaged with different displays how it can sort of tweak them to make more engaging annoy definitely notice that there are more South Asians in the gallery space the South Asia section. Anyway this is a really tricky one because I hope that a museum is for everybody. The reality is that as you say. A lot of people don't feel that the museum is for them and it's it's terrible because obviously the museum is for everybody but once again when you have very neutral displays and people aren't addressed people aren't consulted people you want working with members of the community. I think understand why they might feel somehow excluded from these spaces and we've all had moments have been chatting to people may assume that museum is not for them it somehow seen as a very different other ring space. A when you see the workforce inside the museum also predominantly white and. There are very few members of your black and minority ethnic stuff in the museum's once again. What sort of message are you trying to share with everybody else? You're saying hey come come to a museum but you can't work How how'd you change that? And I think it's not just one not tweets. I think it's a fundamental reimagining of what exactly a museum is exactly. This museum is full. I'm not sure that we have these answers. But what I think is really really important. Is that we start having these conversations. Are We start experimenting? And this is one of the reasons why John. Sorry started the wonder House podcast. The podcast which is completely independent of the British Museum is away again. Sorry to share the most innovative contemporary approaches to decolonization and so I got in touch with some people whose work I really respect and I asked them if they were willing to talk about their work what they learn what they what they thought didn't work quite so well and share their stories and experiments with decolonizing where they love about. The wonder house is being able to listen in on these conversations. That might not be happening in museums themselves but are happening at coffee houses and pubs nearby and the show explores the scale to you here. John Sorry who works at one of the largest institutions in the world in conversations with people who might be their museums only curators. I worry that the decolonizing museums incredible energy that it has right now. It's quite easy for that. To evaporate every single a movement has its moment and unless we embed this kind of knowledge and approaches it's it's going to evaporate and that that's one of the things that worries me. Most I not just the collections but also you know the the simple fact that many of us who work in museums you often one of the one or two Black Amano. She ethic people in an entire institution. That's not easy. Sorry studies the ancient world. But now she is at the forefront of modern museum interpretation printing not just the event but also how the event ripped through history remember the story about Salukis and Chandra Gupta from the beginning of the episode. The Indian interpretation of that moment has worn out. And actually if you read historical novels modern comics if you watch Indian films and in TV series. That's exactly the vision of John. Goto that we have now and you know what it's evolving over time you know days of being shaped and reshaped day by day at the moment and I think that's.

British Museum South Asia Dr Shushma John India Chandra Gupta UK Tabor Foundation Curator of So Table Foundation Creator South River Indus Ian Elsner South Asia Gallery megacity foundation of Western Asian culture Michigan South Asian Collector Pokharel Alexander Wander House
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Centers before twenty twenty lynyrd features native SSD storage a forty gigabyte network and Intel processors. Meaning you're able to serve your customers even faster than before and so you don't have to stress out about overspending Dan Leno has designed their pricing tiers to feature hourly billing with the added bonus of monthly caps on plans and add on services such as backups a node balancers plus feature two factor authentication to keep you and all your data safe insecure Lynn has pricing options to suit everyone their plan started one gigabyte of Ram for just five dollars a month and they offer high memory plan starting with sixteen gigabytes of Ram and Leonard has a special offer for you as a listener of this show you can go to leno dot com slash NPR do and use the Promo Code talking about earlier that's four months of free winnowed and with a seven day money back guarantee you've got nothing to lose give Leno to try today that's Leonard L. I. N. O. D. E. dot com slash NPR and Promo Code NPR's twenty nineteen to learn more sign up and make the most of that twenty dollars credit our thanks to Leonard for this Report of the Mac power users and all of Rela- FM so in your traveling around your developing stuff you're putting things together <hes> but you also find time to host a podcast yeah and and this is a podcast that sort of balances out what I do and looks at museums in the more critical I <hes> the podcast is called Museum archipelago and I really like to think of it as sort of

Dan Leno Leonard L. I. N. O. D. Museum archipelago NPR Intel Rela- FM Lynn Mac sixteen gigabytes forty gigabyte twenty dollars five dollars one gigabyte four months seven day
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"On one of my favorites is the is the new Infinity Science Center Burlington Mississippi it's a a stephen you'd like it because it has the the lower stage of a Saturn five rocket just sort of sitting outside the building is cool yeah it's not like it is in Huntsville or in or in Cape Canaveral or in Houston and and so many many nights I've just been out there with this enormous lowest stage of this out in five rocket on a trade Taylor just like watching it get more and more moldy in the southern southern Mississippi son there's a reason those are indoors most of the time but I know I know but no that was that was a really fun museum to do because this is a region of of a country that was directly affected by Hurricane Katrina and so one of the one of the interactive's that we did was teaching kids how hurricanes work and we were able to do with in sort of a game like fashion and I think it turned out to be a really successful very quick way a of teaching something that is really complex and I feel like there's a little in the museum world there's a little bit of criticism about it being too mu- too many screens which I think is a very fair criticism You know if we have screens in our pockets why do we need to see them in museums as well but in certain cases like the many many factors that go into how a hurricane forms the high and low pressure systems the sea surface temperature all of that stuff having an interactive that creates this whole world that children can manipulate actually might be the best way to tell that story and to teach them that concept willing to your point there's some things that can just come to life with something like animation or interaction that may allow the click for more types of learners even than if it's just you know static imaging that you're reading or viewing yeah one one hundred percent and there's also there's all sorts of techniques that museums will do to sort of get through to the to the kids because you're right we find in studies that most of the time I'm a big wall of taxed is never going to be effective for for a kid or even an adult but instead instead we like to think of it as like adults like to sound smart so so we like to answer the questions that the that any kid might have love at that particular moment in in the tax that's at the height of what an adult might be able to read so the kid is like Oh why is why is this the case you as the parent can be like and then you look around and you see the answer right in front of you and then you can sound smart in front of in front of whoever you're with this episode of the power users is brought to you by Lynn owed high performance SSD Lennox servers for all of your infrastructure needs use promo code NPR's twenty nineteen to get a twenty dollar credit with Leno and you can instantly deploy and manage and SSD server on the cloud and you can get a server running in just seconds with your choice of Lennox Destroy Resources and node location Leonard serves their customers with the help of ten data centers across the globe and they're about to add more Mumbai India and Toronto Canada will both have data.

Infinity Science Center Burlin one one hundred percent twenty dollar
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

10:12 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Easy and it's one of I mean this is an APP that I've been using since since I've been listening to Mac power user yeah I mean we covered this a long time ago this apps been around a long time yeah I wonder if if you're the one who introduced it to me a victim it start on the Mac I think it's started on the Mac but maybe not it may have but it's got a great us out you can get a sleep session which is basically just I'm going to sleep now and I want you to to wake me up when when I set my arm for you plug in some headphones to your phone and then you listen to this this really really nice sleep scape and the APP does a good job of I believe you can use a large part of it without without having to pay for it but I think that the paid version is very much worth the with the upgrade and another nice thing is that it does naps which are which are sort of a different because obviously sleeping is different from napping it has really good sort of different feeling and I don't know if it's the APP is training me or I have now become so accustomed to the noises that it's really it's it's actually a really good thing to trick my brain into saying oh it's time for a nap so if I'm on a plane and I WANNA get some shut eye the first few notes of the of that sleep scape is usually enough to to put me to sleep but I haven't used up in years but I remember at one point I had an extended trial l. and the L. A. Superior Court and I would go because we'd have these long breaks in the afternoon I would go into the parking structure in position to my to my earphones and just take a nap in my car with it it was great for that and it drops you in and it pulls you out and then I'd be refreshed and ready to go make objections you're on there yeah thank you yeah it's similarly I've really enjoyed a new APP called dark noise and this is just a it's it has all of the colors of of noise that you could ever want White Gray pink etc etc I'm not exactly sure what those details gene but what it does is it it can also give you these nice soundscape so you know things like a forest walk or can't fire or a rainy day or cafe or something like that and it really it really can help you I think even when you're travelling even when you're on a plane or on a bus us on the environment that you're not familiar with to sort of just have something in the background and what I like about the APP to is that it it goes underneath whether ver- audio you're playing on your on your device you know not elapse do that some require you to only have one audio playing at any given time but I found it's really nice to to sort of be in a different environment and I tend to choose the environments that are exactly opposite the environments that I'm in right now so if I'm on the plane I choose sitting at a campfire or if I'm if I'm in the cafe that's really noisy I choose sitting on a crowded train and it's just it's just a little bit of a mind trick to sort of keep me focused and also I doubt that dark noise is one of the most often Asian friendly APPs in this category so if you want to make shortcuts turn that on when you walk into starbucks and connected their WIFI or whatever it can do all that stuff so it's really great if you want to automate some of this Oh that's I didn't I didn't realize that that's excellent they make donations straight into shortcuts so you can very easily automate turquoise I've checked it out I use one called white noise because it will let you blend to see sounds together so I actually looking while he was muted and I use brown noise plus rain I like the combination of those and hopefully the dark noise developer ads feature like that it would it would make me happy because the UI in white noise is really bad but dark noise the APP you're talking about it is very clean and it looks great it's got a really nice dark mode lots of custom APP icons that will remind you of some particular podcast that I may or may not help make but it's a great APP and they've come way with already what else do you use when you travel I really like to get as much as I can out of my my local library this wonderful suite of apps where all you have to do to use them is import your library card number and then you have access to all of this content for free one of my favorites is called Libby I believe this is the same company behind overdrive which is an APP that did something similar but if you haven't checked it out in a while if you haven't used drive in a while because the APP is a little is is a little Jenky let's be honest libby is is the answer to that libby is really clean really nice and it allows you to rent books and audiobooks from your local library using your library card and just like a local library you might have to wait to borrow something out you might have to wait to check it out and if it takes you longer than two weeks to read the book you might have to to ask for a hold or an extension on your rental but I found it to be a really really good inex- offensive way to keep up with all of my books without going to a more expensive solution like audible now do you do that on that on your phone I do that on my phone yeah so I have a whole library of stuff and every time somebody recommends a book to me I now I have my list in drafts and then once a week I go in and search for all of that in Libby and and go ahead and get on the waiting list for those and six weeks later whether you know it I've got that book it's really fantastic not instant gratification but lachey it's Kinda the iphone se how do you feel about reading on the IPAD and a lot of people prefer the kindle because it's got the front lighting and e ink is maybe easier on the eyes does that bother you for whatever reason I don't usually read with with my is I'm usually is reading with my ears through audiobooks and of course I do read articles and stuff on my ipad but for whatever reason for books nonfiction and fiction I just prefer to have it through my ears so so that saves me having to pack a kindle as you know I'm weird that way I for fiction for he is almost always in my ears and nonfiction is almost always with my eyes I like a lot of the nonfiction I want to go back and highlight something are fascinating I want it as a reference but for a good a good yarn give it to me over audible I'll take it every day Stephen don't you Eh eh book reader Yeah I've got the kindle oasis the current one and I read a fair amount on it but I don't really care for audio books which is weird did I make an listen to a lot of podcasts but audio books have never clicked for me for whatever reason and I'm a really fast reader that may be part of that can read something way faster than I can listen to it but I've read anything long for basically solely on the kindle I think that's why like fiction as audio because I want to force myself to just kind of enjoy the story yeah with with nonfiction I will jump around but with fiction you gotta just Kinda hear the story are you a fiction reader I don't I've never talked about this yes some mostly nonfiction though you know my fiction is pretty you know about fiction reading through through your ears is that what one of the things that I remember most clearly is like wear I was walking around the woods or something when I when I learned about the revelation about several snake in Harry Potter you know like those things stick with me and they're kind of more tied to the landscape it's it's it's a really interesting way to go through the world listening to listening to various and like you mentioned Harry Potter the narrator of the American version was Jim Dale and Jim I like listening to him as wrapping yourself in a warm blanket the way he narrates the stories that the the books almost don't compare when you try to read the books in the way compared to the way he narrates them I one hundred percent agree he he is the canonical voice of all of my favorite character and we're going to be hearing from British listeners because I forget who was it did the the British version but Stephen Fry fry I've never heard them but it's hard for me he's great but Jim Deals My man other there are other apps that you can use your library card with one I like is is canopy with Che's kind of it's a little net flicks like it doesn't work exactly in the same way and I find a little a little befuddling at times but it's a documentary streaming service and then as being self taught you know in programming and many other things makes me Uh makes me have really warm feelings for things like a Linda's APP and I think more and more libraries are offering more and.

Mac one hundred percent six weeks two weeks
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"And more a uniform because everyone is using the shared snippets controlled by you and you can make everything you write this useful with things like documents spreadsheets web forums more ready to go anywhere you can type text expand will be there to help and you can turn your snippets into forms with fill in pop fields optional text blocks auto fill dates and times it's I use all the time graphics and more exposure is available on Mac os windows chrome phone an IPAD visit techs expanded dot com slash podcast to learn more and you'll get twenty percent off your first year while you're at Texas dot com check out some of their recent blog posts about making things like invoicing easier and this really great post I enjoyed about wellness at work you can work more effectively and feel great while you're doing it to go to Texas painter dot com slash podcast listeners of the show will get twenty percents off their first year our thanks to Texas vander for sponsoring MPU so Ian we spoke a lot about how you're on the road using this ipad windows compute stick Frankenstein gather but you're carrying an iphone your carrying an IPAD that sometimes isn't isn't a waiver portable pc there are some apps that you have found that make travelling easier to deal with yes I think the first thing and maybe the most important thing when you travel is to make sure that you don't ruin your sleep routine and I use an APP called poses that's PC is.

Ian Texas twenty percent
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

12:25 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"MP all caps and you'll even get twenty percents off thanks one password for all of your support of the Mac power users so in one of the things that's interesting and something a lot of our listeners are interested in is that your self taught programmer I think maybe a lot of your listeners are sort of in a similar situation that all of this all of this tweaking and all of this sort of real interest in the computer is eventually leads you to figuring out how it all works under the Hood Yeah so how did you get started back in the day and And this is around when I was in college which which incidentally David is when I first started listening to you and you and Katie Floyd on this show awesome yeah congratulations on on a decade yeah crazy well yeah it really is what really makes me a little sad in La you used to listen to you in middle school and now I work for apple and I'm like I'm old now I do not say that to make you feel old but yeah so I I went into a graduate program and it was basically something that focused on video game design which was kind of the closest to what I wanted to do who is kind of a digital arts and science program but I wasn't really interested in the video games themselves I wasn't really into making the video games we're making the assets for the video games where I was interested in was the literature that I was exposed to the sort of literature about Game Zayn Theory and in particular educational design theory and my professors were really good at sort of talking to me about this I was hooked it would just seem like the coolest thing to me to take all the strategies that that we use in video games that we employ in video games and actually teach people something about the world using those same techniques I I am such a museum junkie when I go to when I visit any city I want to go to the biggest museums they have and not only do I wanna look the displays I just want to be there I don't know I can't really explain why just sitting in a museum cafeteria to me is a pleasant experience so I very jealous view because when you go out and do these gangs you spend months at a time at them right yeah only very few are that are that long and usually you know I come back home between between weeks were king out there but would it be okay if I told you about my my first one yeah please fells when this museum designer came in to talk to our classes I started thinking well okay this will be a perfect thing to do for my classes is to try and make a museum interactive the people the Museum said that they needed a new exhibit on how birds flew to sort of teach kids you know it's not just like an up and down flapping motion it's more of a uh as if you're if you're swimming the butterfly motion it's kind of a Ford and back and so I I started connecting some of those Microsoft connects which are the controlling devices for xbox games and making little avatars of birds and creating like sort of turning that into a game and the game was could you fly like a bird and if you did it correctly your bird avatar would take off and if you did it incorrectly your bird avatar would say on the ground and it was because of this game design focus that I was really able to turn more into a game okay there needs to be an objective maybe the bird has hungry chicks in her nest so it's really important that you learn how to fly to feed them or that sort of thing or tapping into people's natural competitive nature and sort of make make you have a bird avatar also make your friend have a bird avatar and see which have you can figure it out I and it was it was a great enough museum and it was sort of a small enough museum that they basically just let me come in with my plight would it together interactive and Plop it down in the lobby and and start putting it in front of visitors but definitely pretty good awesome kids flying in front of your I was absolutely hooked and I knew that that's what I wanted to do so can you describe some of the additional types of work we know yeah yes so a large part of what I do is exactly that still and it's in a much more professional controlled context I have I work with a whole team of wonderful people who not only help us develop the content for what we're doing but also provide the assets to actually get look nice unlike what I could do which is literally you know plywood taped together and and so that's sort of a big a big part of what they do but another another thing that I do sort of that that dovetails nicely is just being a general museum technologist because the museums themselves aren't necessarily tax savvy as a whole certainly plenty of them have actually really really good in house support staff in health in house it technicians but usually the process of actually installing one of these kiosks takes a lot of There's a lot of things have to go into it because the museum may have just set up internet once and then no one's ever thought of it again and so it requires that's usually what takes the longest in one of these one of these installs and you know lots of museums do it differently and so when you're on site doing programming is the ipad plus PC stick Combo that you're doing the work yes exactly on the IPADS I use I use an is get client called working copy sure I'm able to edit my code and commit changes to it but here's the thing that I've sort of learned that makes it easier to keep the laptop at home is don't procrastinate when you're on site make sure that your work is done more or less don't rely on being able to just to save it to the last minute when you're actually in the field to program it and so it's also a little bit of discipline that the even if I can certainly make tweaks I can certainly change a few things but there's no there's no tolerance for Disney tolerance for like rewriting the APP from scratch on my on my ipad because because that just wouldn't work sure so you've done the hard work and then you show up with the the light technology to tweak it and get it you know fine tune it it's a process of making sure that everything is configured correctly a lot of these means modern museum interactive's are ex exhibits that tie in with other parts of the gallery so you might be making a post stir on one station and then that poster is sent to a giant wall across the room so that you can see your work or other people can see your work in public that kind of thing and so there's a lot of networking that goes into it and a lot of things I've learned about about the way these computers were almost all of these museums use windows as what runs the kiosks and so there's all sorts of windows settings that I never never knew about as a Lennox head that that I'm very very familiar with give us one more story you had to have something go horribly wrong it's boy so so it's this is not just something that happens once it's the windows updates when those very very aggressive about updating itself which which I think is committed a good thing because of the security risks the problem is that really ruins a visitor's day to see to see the computer go sorry windows is installing updates and it's even worse when this happens in you know the enormous screens in the lobby or or these enormous projections on one side of the one side of the exhibit walls weekly a a pseudoscience of trying to figure out in what ways can you disable windows updates one of the ways that I love doing my favorite thing to do just don't let windows get on the Internet okay so basically make an air gap and of course this works with many museums but increasingly museums are like oh but we want visitors to be able to email what they did in the museum to themselves and so we we were developing systems that require that block certain addresses that sort of have a double hop so that the all of the exhibit computers are connected to one computer which is connected to the outside world another thing that you can do which is probably the easiest for for anybody who has a windows machine in their life is to is to take whatever internet that that is the main the main network go into the market soft settings go into the Microsoft Internet settings and set that connection as what's called a metered connection and this is basically so that windows does it's it's a feature that's designed so that windows doesn't ruin all year tether data by downloading the Norman update but basically it tells it tells the computer that don't try to update on this network and it's not a complete one zero switch sh if windows really doesn't have any way to update it will still manage to find a way to update through that network but really really helps yeah I wonder if we're heading that way on the back all these security buttons were pushing now is that GonNa be the next thing Stephen we're going to have an update every week I mean they've had like two the middle updates to catalina already but I don't think it's quite that bad they're definitely trying to go for a different model they don't WanNa do it every week I'm sure itself they these are unity based applications and unity is a is a giant ide- E for doing game program coming and what's Nice about unity is that it's you can develop you can target forced specific platforms and it makes it very easy you too just hit a button and say export what I've just written to a windows Machine I you see sharp and what I do even on the MAC is I use Microsoft visual studio which is which is actually a really good environment for for doing code and it works it works nicely with unity back to your game programming routes from school yeah what we find is that these interactive's are pretty robust and as so they were asked to do more three stuff and more intricate complicated things because our visitors are used to video games we find that do the underlying technology of it you can just you know ride right on the coat tail of that exactly all of that optimization we sort of get for free and you program it from an ipad connected to a little piece of plastic that's so much fun this episode AMAC power users is brought to you by.

programmer Mac
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Home Mac book pro yeah and so again if if the if there's just that one little thing that I need to do it sort of makes me feel either about not having a laptop with me this episode of the Mac power users is brought to you by one password the simple solution for safe insecure password let's head over to one password dot com slash NPR in all caps to get twenty percent off your subscription it's Iowa's update season and of course one password is all over it the new version of one password has a bunch of new features just for Iowa thirteen including dark mode when you're looking at your screen late at night or maybe right after you wake up you don't want to be blasted in the face by bright screen with one passwords dark mode you can see all of your passwords with a nice dark screen they've even added a special dark APP icon that looks right at home on the dock on your phone you listened to our Iowa Thirteen show you know that one of my favorite new features is voice control and one password makes full use of it the new feature opens up a world of possibilities for users who may not have the ability to interact with their Iowa's devices in their hands with voice control and when password you don't have to lift a finger to search open editor share items from within one password you can control every aspect of your Iowa vice including opening and navigating password just by using some simple predictable voice commands the new version also has additional documents support for a while you've been able to create documents and when password using the camera roll starting with one password seven point four you can create documents from the camera roll or use the directly or even pick a file from the files APP that means you can bring in files from any application that makes its files available to the vials APP like dropbox Google drive the rest they've also added the ability to use the document scanner in Iowa Thirteen to create pdf's from your paperwork so if you WanNa drop something into your one password old all you have to do is point your phone at it if you've already installed Iowa's thirteen now's the time to get the latest version of one password running on your iphone and Ipad and if you haven't tried one password yet you should it's a great application it makes it super easy to have safe and secure passwords and also store so much more information Asian behind a separate security vault on your mobile devices head over to.

NPR Iowa Google Mac editor twenty percent
1Password on Mac becomes even smarter with latest update

Mac Power Users

01:36 min | 1 year ago

1Password on Mac becomes even smarter with latest update

"It's Iowa's update season and of course one password is all over it the new version of one password has a bunch of new features just for Iowa thirteen including dark mode when you're looking at your screen late at night or maybe right after you wake up you don't want to be blasted in the face by bright screen with one passwords dark mode you can see all of your passwords with a nice dark screen they've even added a special dark APP icon that looks right at home on the dock on your phone you listened to our Iowa Thirteen show you know that one of my favorite new features is voice control and one password makes full use of it the new feature opens up a world of possibilities for users who may not have the ability to interact with their Iowa's devices in their hands with voice control and when password you don't have to lift a finger to search open editor share items from within one password you can control every aspect of your Iowa vice including opening and navigating password just by using some simple predictable voice commands the new version also has additional documents support for a while you've been able to create documents and when password using the camera roll starting with one password seven point four you can create documents from the camera roll or use the directly or even pick a file from the files APP that means you can bring in files from any application that makes its files available to the vials APP like dropbox Google drive the rest they've also added the ability to use the document scanner in Iowa Thirteen to create pdf's from your paperwork so if you WanNa drop something into your one password old all you have to do is point your phone at it

Iowa Google Editor
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"I am I've got the the IPAD pro eleven inch so this tells you I'm not shy about getting expensive helpful hardware and and frankly the IPAD gets more power bill but we have something special in this episode very special episode Amac power users because he's not only telling us about his MAC hardware he's GonNa talk about his windows machines so yes I'm I'm glad you're welcoming this little this little windows machine and it is a little windows machine this is something called the Intel compute stick and it is basically a dungle but it has a full windows computer inside of it a and Gosh it's so hard to it's so hard to explain but in the theater of the mind imagine a imagine an Amazon fire TV v stick or a couple sticks of Gum bolted together and that's what this that's what this windows machine looks like and because I don't take my laptop when I travel I just rely on the IPAD pro which works really really well ninety percent of the time but occasionally I just need to compile something on an Intel processor or do something with with with a with an operating system that isn't Ios and that's where this little stick of gum sized computer comes to the rescue and and it's really something now explain how how does that work don't you work with the IPAD on that absolutely the way this works is with an APP called Duet display this is kind of similar to the new sidecar Catalina feature will there's one main difference in that one main difference is that it is it works with windows it works with a windows computer and so it's it's sort of a two part of the APP one of it is the APP that runs on your device and one of it is the APP that runs on your windows device and it's also tethered so you have to have a way to go from the windows device to the irs device so with the IPAD it's a USB to USB see or USB to Usb a I'm sorry for the IPAD pro it's something that goes from your spic to us the L. A. or USB depending on what your windows computer looks like and then it basically allows windows to be another APP on your ipad which is Which is really really fun I'd like to get into the details of that just a little bit more though because you've got a stick of gum size p. c. that you're now driving in your ipad yet so just so how exactly are you are you connecting what are you connecting the stick of gum too so I'm connecting the gum to two things one of them power and it's powered by a USB port and the other is the IPAD and with the ipad sees it as a as another computer and on the latest versions of IOS it'll say oh you've plugged into a computer do you trust this device and I say why yes I do trust this device and then I opened at display and there is my windows so there's no monitor connected to your stick right that's correct that's what got you on the show when you told me that I'm like we have got to talk to this guy isn't that like tickle all your nerdy own Stephen just put up a picture of it in the show notes I mean it's it's pretty wild because what you've effectively done is you've got an IPAD It is an external display for like a headless pc all in one and like you said traveling every device every pound account so you have made the most of what you can do it's pretty wild in fact when I saw this picture in the show notes I was confused like we it's running windows but that's definitely an ipad not a surface device and I couldn't quite work out what was happening until I read the description underneath it in the show notes Oh that's very clever very clever indeed and Steven it kind of reminds me of the for for some reason I did this it reminded me of the UH the Apollo Soyuz program which which I knew you'd you'd appreciate a dude because there's these two design languages you know in the case of Apollo Soyuz was the this American design and this Soviet design and and yet they're sort of docked together in space and you know I'm sure you know all the nursery about how the how to how to make a doc that would fit both spacecraft it's kind of similar to bring these two worlds together and I admit it's not always it's not always clean but there are there are certain issues which I'm happy to get into you the way I look at it is this you know a lot of people say well why don't you just bring a why don't you just bring a a a Mac book or Mac book pro along with you because that's the gene that can run both windows and the way I look at it is that what's so great about the IPAD is just being able to pull it out of your bag and start using it and that's ninety percent ninety percent of the things I need to do on it are just in IOS itself it's only that last ten percent it's only that occasional use that I actually need to sort of do this do this plug in plugging in plug it into a power source etc etc etc and that actually Loyd so it's a little more annoying but it's only a little more annoying for that last ten percent and there's so many listeners that like work in a windows environment in usually they've got some kind of business APP it's not like you're running the high end graphics card game on this is this is not a machine made for that but it's very the power exactly but for a lot of the stuff people used to make a living this is fine and it allows you to work off an IPAD but the drive that one windows app you need in order to pay for your shoes and so here's a tip for anyone who's doing this even though the touch the the the even though the IPAD pro works is a a monitor and actually even as touchscreen because windows supports touchscreens natively so you can actually just touch the screen with your Apple Pencil and move files around that way I like to have my mouse my little portable mouse so they bring along paired via Bluetooth directly to the stick so that there's absolutely no lag so it says if that IPAD is just a monitor my keyboard my external keyboard is Bluetooth paired to my ipad and that route's all all of that when you when you have to do at display open to the windows machine so it's really nice because the say the spotlight search still works even when you're in the windows machine it'll just throw you back out to Hiawatha in which again boggles like I was so happy when when it I worked I guess you have to do a bit of context switching mentally because you're you're you're kind of in both once exactly but it is kind of Nice to be able to put windows in a in a in a slide or review and and have the rest of your machines where they've been the native IOS style is so you seem to move pretty fluidly between windows os Mac Os assumed that forces some decisions about the this offer you use every day yeah it's it's interesting I I feel like I was I was platform agnostic since since before I should have even known what that meant you know like in middle school my my father would occasionally bring home the ancient Lennox machine from his university and you know he knew I knew I loved to tinker with this sort of thing and I would spend and I would spend all day sort of installing various Lennox distributions on these ancient you know pentium one bay Asia boxes I mean this was this is peak beige box and it was it was to the point where like looking I don't even know what I was doing or why was doing it 'cause I would spend days trying to get the system up you know I would say oh I wonder if I can install Ubuntu on this machine it would take two or three days and then I'd have it I'd finally finally get it working in the night spend five minutes rearranging the desktop icons and then think I wonder if I can install a red hat lennox on this and then just completely blow it up and start over from scratch and and that's why I didn't get anything done and in in high school but that's what gave you the imagination to come up with this awesome idea it really does make me appreciate it's sort of not being tied to anyone system so what next year you're gonNA run on your ipad you know boy I would really love to be bowl to to natively develop something on the ipad to compile something on the ipad I don't know when that's coming I don't know if that's part of the long term plan but I do know what I do know is that if apple gives an inch of we'll take a mile uh-huh and they know that too yes they do I wonder if this new swift you know initiative is heading that direction I mean it seems to me like it's inevitable at some point you're going to be able to develop on an IPAD they're so powerful now they match the beat exceed the speed of some macbook pros so why not yeah I hope I hope that's the case I was talking to somebody once said they thought that the problem was just the number of assets it takes is to develop you know all of the digital assets to have a development environment are pretty excessive and that the IPAD isn't really good at that yeah that's I I think that's an interesting theory I think I think that very well could be the case it's it whatever whatever solution ends up happening I really feel like it will open up the world of programming to a lot more people than than it currently is in the same way that you know Iowa's itself opened up a whole world of computing to people who weren't exactly comfortable with with keyboard and mouse it's a I think you're probably right do you have either one of you played with that was swift playgrounds application. I haven't no me neither I downloaded it when I came out but I didn't really get very far into it honestly I I've gone pretty far into it and it's really fun I look at it like a game because it's like a puzzle oh you got to write code to solve a little problem and the further down the stack you go the harder gets and I would recommend that some I don't think it's preparing me to be the next great programmer but it does give me a little taste and it's accessible to anyone another made for kids I think but for this this device but how do you look at the bounce I was interested when you told me that even though the macbook pro it doesn't travel with you and I know you spend a lot of time on the road yeah I think I think this is just part of my might travel philosophy which is which is really like don't bring few things possible because it's it always is to me at least it's always easier to to carry less stuff I think one nice thing about the world that we live in is that it's possible to to get to computers remotely from wherever you are and you know there's all sorts of remote access solutions out there but the one thing that I've been really loving and just the past few months is chrome remote desktop coming remote desktop used to be a browser extension that worked in chrome and nothing else you know one of those chrome APPs but these days it just works in the browser which is which is mind blowing to me that they're able to put this fully featured remote access sweet right inside the browser and I'm I'm kind of pleasantly surprised because chrome is not my sort of day to day browser and the I keep it around for this purpose but I've now actually used in in various museums to be able to access their `puter 's from remotely just because it's that reliable and now you're accident from chrome on ipad or on the plugged in windows machine sorry it is on I can access it from a web browser on the.

Intel programmer ninety percent ten percent five minutes eleven inch three days
What is the Intel 'Compute Stick'?

Mac Power Users

07:31 min | 1 year ago

What is the Intel 'Compute Stick'?

"But we have something special in this episode very special episode Amac power users because he's not only telling us about his MAC hardware he's GonNa talk about his windows machines so yes I'm I'm glad you're welcoming this little this little windows machine and it is a little windows machine this is something called the Intel compute stick and it is basically a dungle but it has a full windows computer inside of it a and Gosh it's so hard to it's so hard to explain but in the theater of the mind imagine a imagine an Amazon fire TV v stick or a couple sticks of Gum bolted together and that's what this that's what this windows machine looks like and because I don't take my laptop when I travel I just rely on the IPAD pro which works really really well ninety percent of the time but occasionally I just need to compile something on an Intel processor or do something with with with a with an operating system that isn't Ios and that's where this little stick of gum sized computer comes to the rescue and and it's really something now explain how how does that work don't you work with the IPAD on that absolutely the way this works is with an APP called Duet display this is kind of similar to the new sidecar Catalina feature will there's one main difference in that one main difference is that it is it works with windows it works with a windows computer and so it's it's sort of a two part of the APP one of it is the APP that runs on your device and one of it is the APP that runs on your windows device and it's also tethered so you have to have a way to go from the windows device to the irs device so with the IPAD it's a USB to USB see or USB to Usb a I'm sorry for the IPAD pro it's something that goes from your spic to us the L. A. or USB depending on what your windows computer looks like and then it basically allows windows to be another APP on your ipad which is Which is really really fun I'd like to get into the details of that just a little bit more though because you've got a stick of gum size p. c. that you're now driving in your ipad yet so just so how exactly are you are you connecting what are you connecting the stick of gum too so I'm connecting the gum to two things one of them power and it's powered by a USB port and the other is the IPAD and with the ipad sees it as a as another computer and on the latest versions of IOS it'll say oh you've plugged into a computer do you trust this device and I say why yes I do trust this device and then I opened at display and there is my windows so there's no monitor connected to your stick right that's correct that's what got you on the show when you told me that I'm like we have got to talk to this guy isn't that like tickle all your nerdy own Stephen just put up a picture of it in the show notes I mean it's it's pretty wild because what you've effectively done is you've got an IPAD It is an external display for like a headless pc all in one and like you said traveling every device every pound account so you have made the most of what you can do it's pretty wild in fact when I saw this picture in the show notes I was confused like we it's running windows but that's definitely an ipad not a surface device and I couldn't quite work out what was happening until I read the description underneath it in the show notes Oh that's very clever very clever indeed and Steven it kind of reminds me of the for for some reason I did this it reminded me of the UH the Apollo Soyuz program which which I knew you'd you'd appreciate a dude because there's these two design languages you know in the case of Apollo Soyuz was the this American design and this Soviet design and and yet they're sort of docked together in space and you know I'm sure you know all the nursery about how the how to how to make a doc that would fit both spacecraft it's kind of similar to bring these two worlds together and I admit it's not always it's not always clean but there are there are certain issues which I'm happy to get into you the way I look at it is this you know a lot of people say well why don't you just bring a why don't you just bring a a a Mac book or Mac book pro along with you because that's the gene that can run both windows and the way I look at it is that what's so great about the IPAD is just being able to pull it out of your bag and start using it and that's ninety percent ninety percent of the things I need to do on it are just in IOS itself it's only that last ten percent it's only that occasional use that I actually need to sort of do this do this plug in plugging in plug it into a power source etc etc etc and that actually Loyd so it's a little more annoying but it's only a little more annoying for that last ten percent and there's so many listeners that like work in a windows environment in usually they've got some kind of business APP it's not like you're running the high end graphics card game on this is this is not a machine made for that but it's very the power exactly but for a lot of the stuff people used to make a living this is fine and it allows you to work off an IPAD but the drive that one windows app you need in order to pay for your shoes and so here's a tip for anyone who's doing this even though the touch the the the even though the IPAD pro works is a a monitor and actually even as touchscreen because windows supports touchscreens natively so you can actually just touch the screen with your Apple Pencil and move files around that way I like to have my mouse my little portable mouse so they bring along paired via Bluetooth directly to the stick so that there's absolutely no lag so it says if that IPAD is just a monitor my keyboard my external keyboard is Bluetooth paired to my ipad and that route's all all of that when you when you have to do at display open to the windows machine so it's really nice because the say the spotlight search still works even when you're in the windows machine it'll just throw you back out to Hiawatha in which again boggles like I was so happy when when it I worked I guess you have to do a bit of context switching mentally because you're you're you're kind of in both once exactly but it is kind of Nice to be able to put windows in a in a in a slide or review and and have the rest of your machines where they've been the native IOS style

Intel Ninety Percent Ten Percent
"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Mac Power Users episode five hundred seven Elsner and his stick of gum welcome back to the back power users I'm David sparks joined by my fellow Co host Mr Stephen Hackett how are you today Stephen I'm good days when he makes applications for museums using his apple hardware kind of interesting and tells us a little bit about about you do yeah so that's exactly right I make those kiosk interactive's that you see in museums you know everything from from childrens museums from science museums to historical museums and You know it's not just a kiosk sometime sometimes it could be something that's rejected or sometimes it could be something that has a novel interface like connect based thing but but all in all it's about teaching in teaching something Mostly kids well Ian every time I try to reach out to in he is like in some other place in the world uh-huh where he gets to spend months at a time at a museum which I would think that is kind of awesome to sell you the truth and so it's been refund kind of coordinating with over I don't know how long we've been working on the scene about six months now and we did nail him down and he is going to tell us today about how Oh he got into development how he goes about making these kiosks and other museum exhibits he's also road warrior of course because of all this we're gonna be talking a little bit better travel and and other fun interesting topics throughout the show but I think in the starting place every Mac power user is you gotta tell us about your gear yeah sure thing so I'm rocking first things first the Mac I'm rocking a Mac book pro thirteen inch which is great the Stephen did that make you happy when he said first things first and then said the Mac I do appreciate that a lot I thank you for that what generation are you got a pretty recent one or you got one with like ports and a good keyboard yes who is it that said that Mac power uses it's kind of support group for the Keyboard David said it actually what it feels like every guest show starts out with the discussion of does your keyboard still work and sadly offended is no will mine is a mine is a twenty seventeen thirteen inch so it has the keyboard and the four thunderbolt three ports but I use it in clam shell mill road with External Keyboard So I'm happy to say that it's working just fine you're always getting ready to ask you what you thought about the touch bar but if that things in clam shell mode you never see it never ever so it's great then it's out of the way it's not bothering you of course the only thing I miss about it is the is the touch ID yeah I really wish apple would put that stuff on external keyboard it just hasn't happened yet wouldn't that be cool you think security is the reason for that I I've I've thought about about that and I'm not an spur in how the secure enclave stuff works but I could imagine a world where all that's in the keyboard it'd be a very expensive keyboard and then it just listen some sort of signal to the MAC to unlock but I don't know I even if it was USB I'd be fine with that like I you know I mean your your macbook pro most of the time ACA desktop people have desktops like I'm fine plugging something in if it would give me that functionality it well I mean I was thinking about the the problem as well how do we do it because I look at this every day and I love the ability on the macbook pro DJ finger to authorize things But okay so let's so you did it with a secure enclave in the keyboard and so it gets the it gets the fingerprint at some point at wirelessly has to send a thumbs up or thumbs down to the Mac I mean isn't that spoof -able I feel like it's gotta be security with the watch right so if you're at your I MAC and you WANNA do apple pay you can perform that on your watch and Catalina unlocks a bunch of stuff that's a good point yeah so I don't know why they haven't done it but we're we're off the weeds now but it makes me sad saying so so you've got keyboard number one in because you never use it that works for me and can you know tear discussion I do wonder because the Bluetooth keyboard seemed fine and we're typing in sensitive information all the time in the form of past words true well I I'm looking forward to a guess sometime in the near future says Oh yeah I have the new keyboard and I'm still on keyboard number one I've been using it every day for three years I'm looking forward to that guess some data anyway so you're using the Mac book pro and then what else sir what are the devices are you carrying Oh my my every day is the iphone se which is just perfect just perfect is absolutely perfect I love it so much and I've only I've only ever had an iphone with this form factor I'm sure at some point be wowed by the latest greatest but for now the iphone se just makes me so happy every time I use it how was that on Iowa's thirteen still fast it is still fast yeah and again I don't I don't actually know what it's like to use Use a knife eleven again I I fully expect my socks to be blown off when I when I finally get to it and the camera is getting really long in the tooth I'm really starting to To envy those new those newer phones but in terms of what I do on a day to day basis I just love of having it there I just loved that it's always with me and you know we can get into some of the things I do with it I you know I understand the attraction now you have you always been in like kind of enjoying the smaller sized phone is that the reason you've stayed with it or just it's working and why not just keep going yeah you know there's uh-huh satisfaction I think that both of you have talked about about just running a piece of hardware into the ground and and also you know the new phone owns are are expensive and whenever I do get a new one I'll be happy that the sticker shock won't be so bad because haven't sort of kept up with every every update and whatever upgrade that is it'll be huge is true that the form factor the form factor helps yes I think I think I'm really used to it but you know it in some ways it would be nice to have it would be nice to have a larger screen I think I think at the end of the day though it's just as you can see I I'm surrounded by by powerful devices including my IPAD WPRO eleven inch so I'm not really Hankering for for any more power in my phone I wonder if they're ever going to make one that small again no doubt it I don't think so I mean there rumor now here in the fall of twenty nineteen is that there will be another s e but instead of that old form factor it'll take on the shape and size of the iphone eight which is now sort of the classic iphones is 'cause it's been around long so I don't see that that little phone ever making a comeback and fortunately we're just bar there are people who really liked the size but I think that the market has just moved on I could see it being cyclical at some point where they do go back to smaller size but it would be completely different design at that point maybe the way to see if it's GonNa come true you know the iphone se came out and you know about that time I got really flat right no more leather and linen and stuff so if we start seeing leather and linen and Greenfield coming back into irs it's a sign that smartphones are coming Greenfeld harbinger of the small iphone sounds wild but maybe maybe time will be well I love all these heuristic to try and figure out what apple's up to that's right I mean what is it the the Kremlinology of apple I mean that's the whole thing but the I do like the fact that you've got an older phone in your perfectly happy with it and and that's something I do I mean I'm ready for Apple I'll be honest I I like apple and I'm not here to to try and term down at the there are many companies making device that old that people are so using especially for mobile device yeah and it really speaks to move to their quality of both software and hardware that this thing still works you know it's still rock solid and still has the latest operating system I think when it no longer supports the latest operating system which I think might be I was fourteen I think that's when it's time for an upgrade yeah yeah good for you I don't have that kind of staying power have that kind of self control unfortunately it's like wait they added one more Lynn's Oh I need that I can't edge yeah can't wait can't you can't with your titanium member watch by that but but I understand that you don't I use your phone a lot for the important work you do in the museum stuff right I mean that's really just kind of your communication device yeah it's communication device and my Mike let's play podcast and let's play audiobooks device although who would say with all the travel you do I mean I have recently been taken a Lotta pictures with this new iphone and the camera in this one is so much noticeably better than the one that's just a year old you are really in for a treat when you do upgrade I can't wait and and those the the pictures are starting to look at look pretty bad I just took some some portrait pictures of my little niece recently and wow I mean just because I have a big boy camera but the iphone that portrait mode is getting a lot better and the one x mode with a new phone on where you can do it without having to step back three feet makes all the difference ipad ipad Guy Yeah command this this guy is great this is my main travel computer and sort of the computer that I that I take almost anywhere that I expect to be working so it's you know obviously it's not something I I take on a night out on the town but pretty much everything else I've got my ipad pro stashed in a little bag somewhere and and yeah and it it honestly it does it does it does help keep the iphone se where it is because I do have the the latest and greatest hotness and if I want to take a photo in portrait mode look at that I've got I've got it on my ipad pro and if you travel we're going to talk about travelator but it is so much easier to use an ipad on an airplane than any laptops one hundred percent and I think it's trending trending even more that way as airline seats get smaller.

Elsner Mr Stephen Hackett David sparks Stephen I apple twenty seventeen thirteen inch one hundred percent thirteen inch eleven inch three years six months three feet mill
"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:29 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started in the middle of Bulgaria not far from the crumbling boozers monument why as the town of gap reveal situated in the Valley of the Balkan mountains the city prides itself on its unique brand of humor. Many local jokes are self deprecating about the gap ravine obsession with frugality and entrepreneurship and center around the comical links. The townspeople go to save money. The Mascot of the city is a black cat without a tail. It said the bruins prefer cats without tails because then they can shut the door faster when they let their cats out saving on their heating bills. This used to be the kind of humor that exist in data in the region around gobble not owning governable but then abrazos abuse were smart enough to brand it as there's best the entrepreneur does entrepreneurial course this is Margarita Sheriff's. Go hello my name. AMY'S MARGARITA DOT COM. I'm curator by profession and I'm director of the Museum of Humor and sat are based in Gobble Bulgaria. The museum was founded founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy two before the wall fell. This location was known as the Communist capital of humor extending its reach across eastern bloc countries and and also into certain circles in the West. I visited gap radio because I wanted to find out how this political humor and Satire Museum could have started here during Communist Times yes and how the museum is tackling. The global memed driven culture of the world today. There are a couple of precursors that we have to go through to understand how the Museum of two things one is the governor of jokes so someone announced a competition in the newspaper that the municipalities paying certain amount for each job that gets druid into a collection of the jokes so they collected a lot of a lot of these jokes made a book and this book was this absolute bestseller. It was immediately translating of course in the Russian those who in different languages like French English German and it started selling L. Inc very very well and the other thing that happened was car narrowed the Ghabra Carnival which was restarted in the sixties this and it is typical for being a carnival a with a lot of political humor and satire the people running the Carnival and later the museum were experts at walking up to the line without crossing it when we speak of political satire do not imagine that the general secretary of the of the part to being saturated it was very clear to what level of satire can reach so satire was an instrument in the hands of good communists to fight. Dole's who abused power but to certain level so talk to maybe your local exactly exactly 'cause very clear you're aware to set our can reach as to the governor will joke. They're not political they deal with the economy with them and tolliday of the of the local people combining the two or maybe more realistically using the Gabar Vo Jokes as a Trojan horse to present more political satire was what led some entrepreneurial Gab ravines to open the museum typical will style day didn't Butte a new building Aberdeen refurbished old leather factory so the building we are in name is a former ladder factory for secrets cheaper second it could go slightly notice because you don't need the same kind of permissions nations to build and to refurbish and if you wanted your out of the mainstream project to succeed in Communist Bulgaria asking for permission was not the way to go. The museum started to put on. BNL's festivals held every two years which featured invited Western guests. The first was in nineteen seventy three. They immediately started with the bi-annual. The first edition was dedicated to Kerr tools and small satirical sculpture. It was international and they brought in the jury amazing amazing names like amazing petunias international out so how could how could that exist well. If you ooh think of that time most Tunis in the Western World would be critical. They'll be leftist so they'll be very welcome in Bulgaria and that indeed the gathering place for people from East and West but there was a problem with that first biannial the jury selected for first prize a cartoonist from Turkey Berkey a country on the other side of the Iron Curtain Director. Oh well what we did and they started asking themselves between never asked for permission mission to make that make an international together. All these people are going to be a huge problem. What are we going to do and then he thought okay don't think I can do is go straight to the monster. So the museum's director went straight to the daughter of the general secretary very with Mela Sheesh Cova who would later become Bulgaria's minister of culture. She was she was good enough to listen. She was smart to pursue seve good ideas and support them. So it worked she came she opened the be annual. Antidote went to on well and they never gave award award having more to a cartoonist coming from a country. That's the initial. The museum and the bienial kept growing until communism collapsed in one thousand nine hundred nine nine thousand nine hundred nine. They had more than eighty four in guests artists jewelry coming in for a new and that was massive after eighty nine was the collapse indeed at that time there were more than one hundred people working king house of Humour Mark. Because if you think of all the different departments cinema literature folklore it was big enterprise. We need a lot of events tweets amazing executions when I look at photos from exhibitions from the seventies and eighties. I'm absolutely astonished by exhibition designed. You see it's it's amazing. It's so well done. I don't think anywhere in Belgrade Bulgaria exhibitions were so good. After the collapse the museum staff shrink to a skeleton crew as you can imagine until one thousand nine hundred ninety nine my colleagues would insist that humor is juniper very so that whole human being laugh and humor is omnipresent than Union for so and so on the first fight I short of had to have with the team when I came was to say I'm sorry but humor is not universal. Humor is so culture based. It's totally coacher base. Of course it's safe for into say humor is universal and not go into political humor. It's safer but you don't do your job. Our mission needs to be very very timely to very actual to show things that are happening today from their museum can do that. Who else would be able to do that while it has improved over the past decade in Bulgaria. Media Freedom is declining most of the press has been purchased by the guards and corruption and collusion between in media and politicians is widespread. You know there are issues with freedom of expression in Bulgaria Freedom Media media media ownership and so on so at least a museum should be some sort of outlet the museum addresses the Civic Space in Bulgaria with a new temporary Rachel exhibit called Garden Town. The charming subtitle is where mischief has a happy end motive of town where the different neighborhoods address different issues such as you know graffiti. You're invited to draw or voting over. Dare the place where you go by a yourself and it's accidentally a toilet but also voting rule then we have some guerrilla gardening making bumps of seeds leads and then finally is the park where kids because they usually come in groups. They are invited to sit down and have a discussion and reach a decision to give them some advice about how to have a discussion and also explain how they could reach decision like tossing a coin or consensus. ASSOC- or voting or you know different offices including anarchy. It's really something to see how far the museum has come from starting within the Communist system to reinventing itself to remain relevant in ways that are crucially important to a modern Bulgarian audience. The roofs good mitts that the next stage of reinventing interpreting interpreting humor on the Internet to an audience that lives mostly online hasn't happened just yet the first big challenge. I could think of when I I when I learnt that. The museum is looking for director aching to retire looked at it. I was really impressed and then I told okay. How can you change this place. What can you do about it. And how can you make it really fun when all the funny near is on your phone you know you can just scroll. Oh for hours and you wouldn't stop laughing. So what can museum do about that. Are we supposed to show the same things. No I mean you don't go to museums due to look at something that you see on your phone. Internet certainly has changed humor a lot and this is an exhibition that we've been planning for ages and we're trying to to find the right research team to prepare that means different. Thank fully games. It's really interesting to see how Internet has been changing humor and where are we at now. The way that jokes jokes developed in Gabarevo where people told slightly different versions to each other and in the process carefully distilled the most sharable essence of the joke mirrors. Here's the way that memes are forged in online communities constantly morphing to get more attention. Maybe the best chance we have of interpreting communities. He's on line and off comes from a humor museum. The Gabar Vo Museum of Humor and satire which has already morphed through twenty years of communism and thirty years of democracy accuracy is a good place to start. Just close the door quickly when you let the cat out this has been museum archipelago the you'll find full transcript of this episode along with shouts at Museum Archipelago Dot Com Club archipelago members get access to the bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary into the main show fund extras like stickers support the show and join club archipelago today today the two dollars Patriot dot com slash museum competitive. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend..

Bulgaria director Gabar Vo Museum of Humor Museum of Humor Satire Museum Museum Archipelago Dot Com Clu museum archipelago Museum of two Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelag general secretary Gobble Bulgaria Margarita Sheriff Bulgaria Freedom Media bruins BNL Communist Times Tunis Belgrade Union
"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:30 min | 1 year ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner pews. Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. There are many sites on earth that play a role in human spaceflight the mission control building in houston texas where flight engineers communicated with the apollo astronauts on the moon or even the grassy field in south eastern russia where eureka garin landed to end his his mission as the first person in space but hutchinson kansas isn't one of these sites. No spacecraft engineering happened here like in huntsville alabama. Emma no rocket engine testing happened here like in pearling taken mississippi. There's not even a historic exploration related radio telescope here like in parks australia despite this hutchinson a town a forty thousand people is home to the cosmos fear a massive space museum. The cosmos here boasts enormous collection the spacecraft including the largest collection of soviet space hardware anywhere outside russia. How did all of these space are the facts and up in the middle of kansas to find out. I visited hutchinson to talk to causes here curator shannon wetzel. I think some of our brochure say why not us right. The story of the cosmos fear is more or less the right place at the right time. What's all says that the museum museum has had many decades to be in the right place at the right time. Hello my name is shannon wetzel and i am the curators here at the concentrate the cosmos fears. I was a star projector in folding chairs so up at the kansas state fairgrounds in nineteen sixty two by woman named patty carey she was inspired spire by the launch of sputnik and ultimately wanted to set up a space science center in the mid west the volunteers. We have who knew her personally. I did not know her. Personally have pretty not much call her very nice arm-twister. You didn't say no to patty kerry and that planetarium grew to what you say now by the late nineteen seventies his potty carey was making plans to transform the planetarium into the kansas causes fear and discovery center the collection as we know it started in in the late nineteen seventies nasa is looking to a hedge singers unload but looking to get some hardware out there for the public to see and the cosmos fear was beginning its first expansion so we had the space and the connections. That's how we wound up. Collecting eighteen space harbor the cosmos fear was in the right place a big building in the mid west and the right time the late nineteen seventy s the era was a strange time for space exploration. It was after the apollo program but before the space shuttle the smithsonian errands space museum opened in washington dc in nineteen seventy six and and i get the sense of the whole bunch of space artifacts that didn't make the cut for that museum ended up in hutchinson this massoni and nass. I mean they want to get ed stuff stuff artifacts priceless our tracks out for the public to see everywhere and maybe also that's a sign of their success status and they have gotten into the mid west and it's been a priority and we are so grateful to the smithsonian. I don't know if you noticed on our labels. How many of our items on display are from from them and we're just grateful to be. I believe we are the only smithsonian affiliated kansas looking carefully at the collection. You also see another pattern hardware from missions that didn't go exactly as planned. It is heavily damaged mercury boilerplate capsule from the mercury atlas one mission. There's liberty bell seven another mercury capsule. That was the u._s.'s second human spaceflight mission in nineteen sixty one the astronaut survived but the capsule sink into the ocean and wasn't recovered until nineteen ninety nine and then there's the apollo thirteen command module odyssey which was restored and added to the museum in nineteen ninety five live at the end of the apollo thirteen mission. The astronauts were home safe. It was fantastic and then it was viewed more as a failure than success. Apollo thirteen was displayed in france. It wasn't viewed as something that should be around here necessarily and and so yes it was on display in france for awhile and then our guys restored it. I can't imagine any museum turning away the apollo thirteen command module today but but it is the cosmos fears ethos to say yes to an unwanted unrestored artifact even if that artifact is sitting under the water or somewhere in france they see the investment in the recovery and the restoration as well worth the effort to add it to their collection but there's also a bigger point that the museum is making thing with the collection as a whole space exploration is as much about the failures as it is about the successes. I believe that apollo thirteen had come up with contingency plan before it wasn't on the fly and in a way it was testing their contingency plan and it went wonderful. They got home safely. We discuss a lot. I know about how it seems in our culture. There's a fear of failure. We are afraid to fail or if something doesn't work the first time that means that idea should be discarded and i think that that's not what got us to the moon. That's not what made our space program successful so without meaning to. That's kind of become one of our catchphrases around here. Don't want our campers our students to be afraid to fail but the collection it wasn't just made up of american space hardware. The cosmic sphere also boasts the largest collection of soviet space artifacts anywhere outside of russia and this fills in the sizable reasonable gaps of how most other space museum's present the space race the cozma sphere team which included patty carey served obtaining soviet space hardware in in the late nineteen eighty s and early nineteen ninety s again right place at the right time. The soviet union was cobbling. They were looking to get rid of some of their artifacts artifacts. We worked through a broker and we were able to obtain them so they are part of our collection. They are not loaned pieces by the decision to try and collect them. Why why didn't other museums try to in the same way that you did. I think that our early leaders were very visionary in what we could become and recognize that in a sense we were only telling half the story half of the space race coury is colored red and filled with soviet space objects and text about the soviet human spaceflight program and the other half is blue telling the american story. Our gallery is is setup particularly well in the sense that you get a comparison. We split the gallery in a sense where you can see. This is kind of what was going going on the soviet union at the time. This is what the americans were doing. I think that our gallery does a really good job of comparing the two in a linear way so you can say okay during the mercury program and here's the vostok program the effect is striking the causes fear is not a design museum but by putting the artifacts from two different superpowers superpower's close to one another you get an appreciation for the subtle and not so subtle differences in the industrial design compare the design language of the soviet looking at the moon rover on display at the museum with the american mars rovers that americans might be more familiar with and you can see the different ways each program approach the problems of surviving in space even without the color coordination wessels favourite soviet are the fact is the luna sphere a copy of a soccer soccer ball shaped device carried by luna to whose only purpose was to cover its crash landing site on the moon with little pendants embossed with images of the hammer encircle. The soviet sent the luna sphere and it's just a small ball that upon landing it has a small explosive in it and all of these little art gallery calls them cosmic calling cards all of these cosmic calling cards go all over the surface of the moon. What a nice little just such a <hes> a metaphor for the cold war a little stick in the eye wetzel said that it's becoming increasingly difficult to teach younger generations about the political context context of the space race after all. It's been thirty years since the berlin wall fell very difficult to explain. I would even say the cold war is kind of difficult to explain because first of all they didn't live through it. I don't know if you did but i mean i was on the tail end of it. It wasn't isn't black and white there was so much great and i think that's the difficult part especially you've seen. Our gallery is pretty big. A forty five minute tour down there you just barely make it to the shuttle and that's if you're rushing so it's difficult to portray those ideas in a short amount of time to a younger audience no matter what you do do it gets wrapped up nice eight as we change here on earth so too does the way we teach the story of spaceflight what's will give me me an example of the list of items. Humans have left on the moon. A list that includes everything from the propagandistic lewis fear pendants to actual trash left there by the apollo astronauts. I didn't with our campus yesterday. We do a collection sure and i was telling they were appalled. I was like wow the generational it were hauled. What we we trashed.

shannon wetzel patty carey soviet union russia smithsonian errands space muse kansas hutchinson france museum museum soccer houston alabama smithsonian huntsville texas
"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

10:47 min | 2 years ago

"ian elsner" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum. Archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Everything is in a constant state of decay in the past human heritage that decayed, slowly enough on stone, valium, bamboo, silk, or paper could be put in the museum still decaying, but at least visible and today, human heritage is rotting on hard drives, the entire internet, everything from social media to Wikipedia is stored on hard drives on an honest computers, waiting for the inevitable, and not too distant day when they will just wear down, and stop working human heritage lost forever to the sands of time. But there is one potentially beneficial loophole to digital heritage as compared to non digital heritage digital files can be copied, they can be copied again, and again, and again perfectly every time the path between past and future for a digital file is too. Hop from one storage to another every few years in an unbroken chain saying, one step ahead of digital decay. Digital copies aren't like Xerox of Xerox, which just become unreadable over time. And best of all, making a digital copy doesn't destroy the original with lack cylinders, there, you can only do it so many times or then the grooves will be inaccurate after playing it. But then within the digital interface because it's so easy to pick up and throw away. That's where it becomes even a higher risk of deterioration and loss within the file. This is Sarah new Ian, the project coordinator of preserve this podcast, a project that proposes solutions to fight against the threats of digital decay for podcasts. She cautions that preserving cultural digitally while having some advantages over other mediums comes with its own set of pitfalls high. So my name is Sarah new, Ian. I am the project coordinator for preserve this podcast along. Inside the two archivists airy kid and Dana, Gerber Margie, and our producer, Molly Schwartz. Currently I am an MLS student at university of Washington. So I get to bring in kind of the current readings of what people are talking about within, preservation, or within file formats. Preserve. This podcast is a tiny and delightfully meta podcast called preserve this podcast, and it is accompanied by an equally delightful Zine detailing what you can do to prevent digital decay. Podcasts are notorious for being DIY people who are independent story makers audio creators, who don't have an institutional backing usually, we kinda see as preserve this podcast as supporting what we call personal digital archiving. So PDA is the acronym for it. We want to make it so that podcasters are able to be Todd Humous and have the agency to control their content outside of the digital decay as we call it. Personal digital archiving is the idea that today individuals who history might call normal people have the opportunity to preserve via digital methods in the past. It was only the rulers or the vastly wealthy, who could take control of their own data. This is the first time in human history that your data have a good chance to be archived. That's why this whole sub program of personal digital preservation has been this movement. And I think it's like once a year twice a year. There is like a PDA conference host various institutions around the US, we're kind of just talks about, like, what are low barrier to entry practices that people can use to archive their own work because in like how real world works when you don't have the luxury of your job, being archiving any sort of digital files because you have to create these things, and make sure that there is a return on investment, artists, and creators, aren't really looking to save their work at the moment in time when you're creating something. It's a disruption to actually have to think about how do I back up and save things because you're on like a, a wave. And you kind of just want to make it make it happen. One of my other part time jobs outside of preserve this podcast is with the dance company, and when you like, just like creating a piece of work, or choreographing, a piece, while you're in the dance studio, you're not also making sure that your file is backed up off this camera off your ipod or iphone, you know, I will admit it here. I'm a hobbyist PDA, or I've systems that automatically log everything I can about my activity and health to custom, spreadsheets, I built, a private server that my phone automatically updates my location to several times a minute, so that I can always knew every museum I've ever visited you can be sure that the file, you're listening to right now will be transcribed and backed up in multiple locations for the Cording to noon. Automatically backing up is only half of what properly archiving actually means automatic backup. And automatic transcriptions are in some ways making it easier to preserve but proper archiving is also about contextualising. So it's not enough to just record podcasts or my locations, as individual entities, I need to contextualized them, too, and that's one of the bigger bottlenecks of archiving is, like, are you contextualising that object that file correctly, so that it's represented in the correct way? So I think that in certain processing like the manual side of it potentially is becoming easier, but the more intellectual side of representation, and identity of thing is becoming more difficult because especially with podcast or almost anything on the internet, YouTube videos, whatever things are being created at a much faster rate. Many, many hours of video are being uploaded to YouTube every second of every day. And each video is analyzed by machines looking for patterns expecting the machines to conceptualize all. Those hours of content is only going to lock in bias sees either Mirroring societies. Or introducing new ones the way that people have perceived, libraries museums and archives is an educational place space. Right. They think that it's all fun fun and interesting in educational versus like having a specific opinionated point of view. The whole point of podcast is that you have a story you, as an individual have this idea of how the world works, and you want to share it. That's what makes it even more important to be able to assign your own descriptive texts to it. So that you ensure that people know what you're trying to say to them. So like in our most recent episode with Caitlin Bailey who does the oldest pro podcast, she talks about, basically, the oldest profession, which is sex work, and like for her to say, you know, specific words within her podcast, it can be misinterpreted completely by Google algorithm. And that's when then her podcasts could potentially be taken down just because the automatic flagging. They'll misinterpreted as she's trying to promote sex work. It strikes me that we are in the middle of a big shift from archiving tools of the past. Now archiving is in control of the individual you instead of being left to a third party like a museum or library, but changes the Valence of collections if everyone can take over their own story, whether any of this data are going to be useful or interesting to the future is beside the point by reducing the role of chance and eliminating the institutional gatekeeper who determines which data in stories are worth preserving anyone. And everyone's data has a chance to inform future history. We put this under the guise of a PD personal digital archive. Right. So it is up to you, if you want to, and you feel the need, and, and the just want to save your own work for the future. It's. Under your responsibility. I kind of that's kind of where we're putting it at. It's kind of, like if you want to share your story, then you will go as far to preserve it versus just handing it off to someone who might preserve it under the wrong context. So I think that it's important to the point where you as a creator believe it's important. And so if we can give you all the tools and a step by step guide to do as necessary. We would love for anyone to be able to do it in the past museums, and libraries, would control who got to be collected the best way, forward might not just be to force these institutions to open up, but also bypass them altogether by making the archiving tools, accessible to all in, in libraries and archives. There is this whole debate about the archives and libraries are not neutral. We're not neutral because there is that idea that, like, yes, we want to give you the options to have access to all different types of materials. Even if it is racist. Or can be hurtful to someone but should we because are we actually neutral in that way? Like, is it going to actually help? Or is it misinformation at that point? So we wanna make sure that within your podcast when you're creating it, you're able to control so that someone doesn't misinterpreted in a way. That's why we want to give the agency to the creator themselves not to put it under the onus of someone else. And if this does take off, which we kind of hope it does that like someone will be able to fund actual server or institution where people will be able to submit it for the long term versus in the generalize in an archive, first steps are just kind of making it in an accessible way. Zena podcast workshops where people can kind of dip into the waters on feel, if it's important to them, and if they want to do it, and then if not, we're totally fine with that to preserve this podcast can be found wherever podcasts are available for now in the final episode new Aeon and the other hosts acknowledged that. Guessing their podcasts into the future depends on the three one redirect and remembering to pay their server bills. The project is funded by a grant from the Andrew w Mellon foundation and is hosted by the metropolitan New York library council. Preserve. This podcast is also travelling to various workshops and conferences, take podcasters producers, and audio archivists through their curriculum of archiving podcasts, you can find a full list of where they're going at preserve this podcast dot org. Museum.

Ian Elsner coordinator Sarah new YouTube Xerox US Wikipedia MLS Todd Humous Cording Andrew w Mellon foundation Google university of Washington Caitlin Bailey New York Molly Schwartz Dana