35 Burst results for "IRA"

How to Secure Crypto in Your Retirement Account | Bitcoin IRA

Bitcoin IRA

00:39 sec | 4 d ago

How to Secure Crypto in Your Retirement Account | Bitcoin IRA

"5 p.m. Wednesday, November 16th, 2022. How to secure crypto in your retirement account Bitcoin IRA. Trading and investing securely for retirement is a top concern for crypto investors, especially when they hear that the digital asset ecosystem has been impacted by cybersecurity events. Investors of all levels need to know how to secure crypto in their retirement accounts. It's important to choose a crypto platform that can keep your savings. The post how to secure crypto in your retirement account Bitcoin IRA appeared first on Bitcoin IRA official Bitcoin retirement account investment.

The Post IRA
Reasons to be Thankful for Crypto

Bitcoin IRA

00:36 sec | 4 d ago

Reasons to be Thankful for Crypto

"11 p.m. Tuesday, November 22nd, 2022. Reasons to be thankful for crypto in light of recent challenges and high profile news in cryptocurrency, Thanksgiving, presents a perfect moment to take stock of the positive, review the long-term outlook of the crypto space, and recall the ethos of this asset class that made it popular and historically lucrative in the first place. Read on for three enduring, foundational advantages the post reasons to be thankful for crypto appeared first on Bitcoin IRA official Bitcoin retirement account investment.

“Where Do We Go From Here?” Crypto Webinar

Bitcoin IRA

00:36 sec | 4 d ago

“Where Do We Go From Here?” Crypto Webinar

"9 p.m. Thursday, November 3rd, 2022. Where do we go from here? Crypto webinar. Bitcoin IRA, bit go, and Pegasus growth capital are hosting a joint educational webinar on November 9th. Attendees at the 2022 crypto webinar can gain insights from a discussion into finance's hottest topics with a look ahead to the coming year asking. Where do we go from here the future of digital assets the crypto 2022? The post where do we go from here crypto webinar appeared first on Bitcoin IRA official Bitcoin retirement account investment

Pegasus The Post
How to Secure Crypto in Your Retirement Account | Bitcoin IRA

Bitcoin IRA

00:39 sec | 6 d ago

How to Secure Crypto in Your Retirement Account | Bitcoin IRA

"5 p.m. Wednesday, November 16th, 2022. How to secure crypto in your retirement account, Bitcoin, IRA. Trading and investing securely for retirement is a top concern for crypto investors, especially when they hear that the digital asset ecosystem has been impacted by cybersecurity events. Investors of all levels need to know how to secure crypto in their retirement accounts. It's important to choose a crypto platform that can keep your savings. The post how to secure crypto in your retirement account Bitcoin IRA appeared first on Bitcoin IRE official Bitcoin retirement account investment.

The Post IRA
Conservatives, We're Not Doing As Badly As We Think

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:58 min | Last week

Conservatives, We're Not Doing As Badly As We Think

"Even a week or more than a week, week and a half after the midterm election, the result still seems perplexing, we haven't quite put it all the pieces together, figuring out what happened. And we aren't sure how really badly we did. It seems worrying on many fronts. But there are a number of encouraging developments as well. In fact, if you were to say, are we use the old Reagan question? Are we better off than we were before the midterms? And or even flashing back to a year ago, the answer is politically speaking, we are better off. And there's a very interesting there's a fellow who did a little summary of some good things that have happened. He makes a kind of a list. And he goes cheer up. He goes, we're not doing as badly as we sometimes think, or we're not doing as badly as we feel. He goes and here's his list. I'm just going to go through it and kind of comment on it. He goes, Trump is running. So this is obviously a Trump strays excited that Trump is running. He thinks that that is, you know, that brings back the prospect of the Trump era, which despite all the division and all the screaming and even some of Trump's own iras ability, they were very good years economically and very good years, even on the foreign policy front. Number two, Florida completely rad. This is a huge development. This is a state that's been a swing state. In fact, been a swing state going back. Remember the Bush gore election of 2000, which all hinged on Florida, and it was split right down the middle. And it was split right down the middle, even when desantis ran against Andrew gillum, the last time around, and the Santa squeaked out the narrowest of victory. So this is a very good thing, Florida, completely red.

Donald Trump Reagan Florida Andrew Gillum Bush Desantis
John Fugelsang on Nancy Pelosi's Leadership

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:07 min | Last week

John Fugelsang on Nancy Pelosi's Leadership

"That was a great, great night. And leader Pelosi was such a wonderful guest and the energy of the crowd. You know, I had met her before. She joined us on that show. I had done some TV shows with her, but honestly, there's no way to measure how many lives she saved by getting the ACA passed in the first place and by saving the ACA. Her greatest achievement may have been, taking all these Democrats in the caucus from the democratic socialists to the pro lifers and keeping them united in message discipline for the first two years of Trump's term. Yeah. I mean, it's hard to explain what leadership is. You just know it when you see it. I remember that night because you know our filthy little show. It's rockets. But by the way, you can see it on pay per view, folks. If you go to meet hook dot live, but go on, please. Yes. No, but I was just remember that night, don't you that when she came out? I mean, you could have heard a pin drop in that theater. People just hung on every word she said. I mean, she just, and you know, as usual, she just had unbelievable grace and class and timing. I think she did it perfectly, you know, in terms of saying it's time for the new generation. She's going to fulfill her term, but you know, it's not about ego for her. She's not obviously she will be there to pass the torch. Oh yeah. And I will say, though, in fairness, Nancy Pelosi did nothing about crime or inflation by going after Hunter Biden's laptop. I mean, like, there were so many chances she could have gone after his laptop to fight inflation and crime, and she just refused to. So now I think the real reason she's staying is so she can have a front row seat as speaker emeritus to watch Kevin McCarthy's dreams go up in violent bloody flames. It is the two years of a clown show and two years of Democrats saying, oh, by the way, look at all these new jobs, some of the infrastructure Bill we passed. Oh, by the way, have you noticed seniors, you're paying lower for prescription drug prices, thanks to the IRA, they are going to have a record they can run on. That's in play by 2024. And Kevin McCarthy is going to give people a great big commercial while you shouldn't trust Republicans. Thank you.

ACA Pelosi Hunter Biden Donald Trump Nancy Pelosi Kevin Mccarthy IRA
“Where Do We Go From Here?” Crypto Webinar

Bitcoin IRA

00:33 sec | Last week

“Where Do We Go From Here?” Crypto Webinar

"9 p.m. Thursday November 3rd 2022 where do we go from here Crypto webinar Bitcoin IRA bico and Pegasus growth capital are hosting a joint educational webinar on November 9th Attendees at the 2022 crypto webinar can gain insights from a discussion into finance's hottest topics with a look ahead to the coming year asking where do we go from here the future of digital assets the crypt of 2022 The post where do we go from here crypto webinar appeared first on Bitcoin IRA official Bitcoin retirement account investment

Pegasus Growth Capital The Post
"ira" Discussed on Retire South Shore Radio

Retire South Shore Radio

08:42 min | 2 months ago

"ira" Discussed on Retire South Shore Radio

"As a safety measure. Yeah, I bring up a really good point because when people think of a balanced portfolio, most of the time people are thinking of, oh, well I have a nice balance of stocks and bonds. We look at balanced portfolios from the perspective of not only how your money is positioned from an investment standpoint, but also the tax qualifications of your money. So if you have some traditional IRA, some Roth IRA, some brokerage you can't, some money in the bank, some money in savings and CDs and so forth. But different tax qualifications then you can chip away at each of those accounts on an annual basis to try and minimize your lifetime tax bill. It gives you more control over how much taxes you're going to have to pay in retirement when most people that we work with while they're working their W two and they don't really have control over what their tax bracket is going to be. So if you prepare ahead of time, you have much more control over what you're going to pay when you're going to pay it and ultimately how much money you're going to leave in your pocket. I can't believe we've gone this long in the program without the B word mentioned the buckets. You know you're thinking it. Absolutely. I was doing a presentation last week and I must have said buckets of million times I figured if you were in college, it would be a great drinking game. Every time Marx says, I just think that that's the way it should. People should be thinking about positioning their money. And too many people, as they get closer to retirement, their brokers are saying, let's just get more and more and more conservative with all of the money. And if that's comfortable for you, we'll have at it, but we look at it from the perspective of, you grow your money for 2030, 40 years, make contributions put away what you can. And then you retire and let's say you retire on a Friday and on a Monday, you don't need a 100% of your money that day. I mean, if you do, like I said, the other 9th, you didn't save enough money if you needed all that first year. Unfortunately, you didn't save enough. But for most folks, they've saved money, they have social security. They may have a pension plan, and they need some money from their pool, right? From their life savings from their nest egg. But we try to bucket things out and position the money that you need today to be extremely conservative, if not cash, if not savings accounts. And then as you go out further and realistically look at it, while some of the money I don't need till next year, 5 years, ten years, 50 years. And so on and so forth. And the money that you don't need for a longer period of time, make that money work harder. It doesn't mean tie it up. It doesn't mean it's not available to you. But if you have all your eggs in one basket, then ask it has a hole in it and money goes down because the market drops. Well, you've probably still need the income, but now you're drawing the income that you need from an account that's losing value. And that to me is the kiss of death. You know, taking $3000 a month from an account that maybe that $3000 distribution was worth $3300 a week ago. Well, you just lost that $300. You realize that loss, and you'll never get that money back. The pressure that you put on your money if you're distributing income needs on a monthly basis from an account that's losing value, can have a detrimental impact to you actually having enough money and that's what everyone wants, whether your number is $2000 or $22,000, nobody wants to have to worry about running out of money. Everyone wants to know they're going to be okay. So by using buckets and segmenting money out, if an account loses value because you still will be in the market with that account, you just don't take a distribution from that bucket. Roth IRA information continues after this break along with other important issues to help you gain confidence in retirement. We'll be right back. When it comes to making key decisions about your retirement, education is so important. So you're invited to register now for an upcoming free seminar on taxes in retirement. Sponsored by the all hands analysis team at south shore retirement services. A host of taxes and retirement seminars upcoming September 20th at the inn and spa in Plymouth that starts at 6 p.m., then on September 27th and 29th, each of these will take place at davio's Italian steakhouse in Braintree at the south shore of Plaza, and these two are again at 6 p.m., very convenient and accessible locations plenty of free parking and refreshments are served. And you'll have an opportunity to meet representatives from south shore retirement services and learn more about such a key issue, taxes in retirement, register now online at retire south shore dot com. That's retire south short dot com. You can't get a second opinion from the person who gave you the first. That's especially true when it comes to your retirement. You deserve sound advice from qualified professionals, and that's what the all hands analysis team at south shore retirement services is all about Mark roulette, founder and president of south shore retirement services. Nobody should have to worry about running out of money in retirement. Our approach is simple. Build a strategy that can give you consistent income while allowing your money to grow while times are good. Consistent returns are critically important during your retirement, but I would argue that tax management and tax strategy is equally as important. It's not just about reducing your tax bill this year. It's about minimizing and being smart with your total lifetime tax bill. And that takes preparation. Schedule your free 15 minute strategy call today. Visit retire south shore dot com. That's retires south shore dot com. Investment advisory service is made available through AE wealth management LLC AEW M AEW M and sells your retirement services are not affiliated companies. Hello, this is retire south shore radio. I'm Jordan rich with Mark roulette, the founder and president of south shore retirement services, beautiful office in hingham, Massachusetts, but clients from all over with the ease of communication these days. It's really a snap and marks helping a lot of people as is all hands analysis team. Now we've been talking about Roth IRAs and the benefits and some of the things to be aware of. Now, what about the Roth conversion process? That's an important issue. Yeah, I mentioned before the break, you know, there's a lot of limitations to contributing to a Roth IRA. You know that you're only allowed to put a certain amount of money in once you start earning over a certain dollar figure. You can not use Roth IRA anymore, and then when you stop working entirely, you're not allowed to contribute. But Roth conversions are different, where you already have existing IRA money, you can take a portion or all of that money, and convert it, re characterize it to a Roth IRA, and there's no limitations to that at all. You can be making a $1 million a month. You can not be working at all. You can be under 59 and a half. You've got to watch out for that if you're under 59 and a half, but you could be under 59 and a half and still convert from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. Why would you want to do something like that? Well, if you have, for example, let's say you're in the 22% federal tax bracket, but you have $20,000 in that tax bracket before you go into the next tax band. Well, maybe you want to utilize that taxes are really low right now. I think the general consensus is the taxes are going to go up in the future. So take advantage of an account that inevitably is going to be taxed at the lowest probably tax rates that we're going to see for the next decade or so and re characterize that money over into the Roth IRA. The reason I mentioned be careful if you're under 59 and a half is that if you use the money that you're converting from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA and you take the taxes that you have to pay because you still have to pay the taxes on it from that IRA, that's a premature distribution, right? If you're under $15 million. So a lot of the clients, even when they're over 59 and a half, we say to them, listen, you've got money sitting in the bank, you've got cash, savings, whatever it might be. Let's use that money to pay the taxes on the re characterization so we can push more money into the Roth IRA. So if you're under 59 and a half, you can do the same thing. Another huge advantage of doing something like that, especially in light of what's going on in the market right now is if the market is down and you re characterizing some of your IRA money over to Roth IRA, you don't have to sell the holding. You just move it in kind, right? So hypothetically, let's say you are that person who's going to convert $20,000 a year, let's say you build a strategy over the next 5 years. $20,000 a year of your IRA money. And let's just take it a step further and hypothetically say your IRA is all invested in one stock just because it's easier to explain. And whatever that stock is, X Y, and Z company. And you love the company, it's a solid company, your people who are helping you with your money say it's a solid

Roth Mark roulette south shore retirement service inn and spa davio's Italian steakhouse Marx AE wealth management LLC Jordan rich Braintree Plymouth hingham
Harry Mack Explains the Creative 'Gap'

The School of Greatness

01:29 min | 2 months ago

Harry Mack Explains the Creative 'Gap'

"There's this concept, I think it's from Ira Glass called the gap. You're familiar with this concept. Maybe, sure. So the reason that creatives get into making things is because they have really good taste, you know? So they appreciate good art or creativity or good podcasts, whatever it is. They appreciate good media. So we have good taste. And so it inspires you to want to start creating yourself. When you start creating yourself, you realize that what you're capable of making at that time as a beginner doesn't come anywhere near the people that you look up to and admire. In other words, there's this huge gap between your level of taste for creativity and art and what you're actually capable of creating. Wow. And that's a really challenging phase because it's very discouraging. And it makes you feel like what you're making is not worthy of being put out or shared, but the secret to the gap is you can't start closing that gap until you share what you're working on and get feedback. Right. You know, the only way to actually get from what you're doing now to closer to the people you look up to for me, you know, the Supernatural who I mentioned or Nas whoever I put on that pedestal, these people are like superheroes to me, you know? And always will be. And so to think, well, I'm way down here as Harry Mac, like, what's the point of me sharing this? But the only way I can start to climb is to share my work and get real feedback from real human beings. If you just did it in your bedroom every day and no one ever saw it, then you'd never get closer to where you want to be.

Ira Glass Harry Mac
Why Democrats Hate the Filibuster

The Dan Bongino Show

01:08 min | 2 months ago

Why Democrats Hate the Filibuster

"Liberty is zero sum The more stuff the government does means the less stuff you can do that is why the Democrats hate the filibuster It creates a higher threshold 60 votes in the United States Senate for them to do stuff It's a simple majority in the House Simple majority 50.1% That's all you need And you're good in the house Not in the Senate Through process it's roughly a 60 vote Well Dan they just passed the IRA inflation reduction act Hilariously titled by the way which is 51 Yeah because they use this reconciliation scam And you're going to see that use more and more The filibuster honestly folks is probably largely dead anyway But that makes my point that if they're going to do it the Democrats are going to dump the filibuster to put you on a gun list through universal background checks To take away more of your money by dumping the Trump tax cuts to enact more and more ridiculous regulations of red tape so that again more decisions are taken away from you and given the EPA bureaucrats and other stuff then we might as well dump it in advance

Senate IRA United States EPA
Who Is the Sovereign in America?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Who Is the Sovereign in America?

"Is the sovereign in America? It's supposed to be us. That's why they hate Trump. Is that the people were actually sovereign for the first time in a while? No, no, no. And by the way, it's not Joe Biden who is actually sovereign is not the presidency. It's the IRA's, the independent regulatory agencies. That's why they needed to add 87,000 new IRS agents. That's why the FBI is so important. Who runs the country? The national security apparatus runs the country. The CIA who Republicans generously fund by giving them more money to go to Ukraine. The FBI who Republicans do not cut their funding of. The IRS, the EPA, this fourth branch of government, the unelected unknown, unchecked power, and yesterday was nothing more than a show off contest for the fourth branch of government. They wanted the flex their muscles like Arnold Schwarzenegger at a bodybuilding contest in the 1980s. Look how powerful we are. We are the sovereign. We are supreme at the FBI. Fidelity bravery and integrity are the three values of the FBI. No, no, no. It's force. Done brutally in your face. That's what the FBI stands for. So why now? There's two answers to that. But again, we must reestablish who is. The sovereign. It's no longer you and me. That's the structure of the constitution. That's the intent. The national security apparatus runs the country. So why do they have to raid Mar-a-Lago? Now, over a national archives dispute, again, you raid people's homes if you think evidence is imminently going to be destroyed and you could prove to a judge because of that or the other reason you read somebody's home or you read somebody's business if you think there is a crime that is going to be committed at that moment. For example, that did Donald Trump have a thermonuclear weapon in the Donald J Trump ballroom at Mar-a-Lago that he intended to use against an airport,

FBI IRS Joe Biden Donald Trump IRA CIA Ukraine Arnold Schwarzenegger America EPA Donald J Trump Ballroom
More on the Trump Witch Hunt

The Officer Tatum Show

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

More on the Trump Witch Hunt

"I think that we're going to continue talking about Donald Trump in a raid at Mar-a-Lago, it was reported Donald Trump made a statement I read a statement earlier, it's very troubling that the left can use leverage from the government to attack their political enemies. Right after cpac, they decided to raid Mar-a-Lago. You know, it's very weird to me because let me tell you this. Donald Trump has cooperated at least he had mentioned he had cooperated with everything they wanted. Why they got a raid his house.

Donald Trump Cpac
Why Conservatives Should Bring the Fight to the Left

The Officer Tatum Show

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Why Conservatives Should Bring the Fight to the Left

"What are we doing? What are we doing? They are attacking their political enemies, which are us. What are we going to do about it? I don't want to see another freaking Republicans say a doggone thing about nothing. We have the house, the Senate, and the presidency. And we didn't do sugar honey iced tea about anything. Nothing. We actually let them investigate Trump. Mueller should have been shut down from the beginning. It was a witch hunt. We know as a witch hunt, you know it's a witch hunt. Jesus of Nazareth knows it was a witch hunt. And we did nothing. We let him do it. We go along to get along. We want to be nice. We want to be sweet. We want to be diplomatic. I want to cuss. Screw these people.

Mueller Senate Donald Trump Nazareth
FBI Raids Trumps Estate

The Officer Tatum Show

00:23 sec | 4 months ago

FBI Raids Trumps Estate

"All right, back on the Trump train at some point, I guess breaking news, I just got some breaking news, one of the callers of calling in about it too is that president Trump's more like a home was raided by the FBI. Donald Trump made a statement, I'm going to try to find a statement that really to you. If somehow there's a press conference or something that goes on, I'll try to cut to it. As soon as I can,

President Trump Donald Trump FBI
Was Trump's Vaccine Decision a Mistake?

The Officer Tatum Show

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Was Trump's Vaccine Decision a Mistake?

"So I want to address what Tony said, Tony has said, and I'm posing it to you listeners if you want to call in and disagree with Tony. Tony said his hypocritical for us to be so upset about the vaccine and the vaccine injuries and all that stuff. And that Donald Trump, through operation warp speed, takes responsibility for developing the vaccine. Now, my disagreement with Tony is simple. It's that Trump didn't mandate the vaccine. That's the problem. Like if people wanted to voluntarily take a vaccine that was experimental and with knowing that it may have some issues with it and they wanted to take it anyway, then that's on you. That's just like any other vaccine. But the mandating of an experimental vaccine is a problem. And I said it this way, I believe Trump was acting a good faith putting together a team to get people vaccinated because Trump believes in vaccines.

Tony Donald Trump
The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

The Officer Tatum Show

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

"They're evil, these who can defend the Democrats. Nobody. If there's a perspective here, they're not passing, they're not signing these bills into law and doing things like that. They're not doing this just for the heck of it. They have an agenda. They want to take over the country. They want you to be government dependent. That's why I was wondering the other day I said, why would they do this? This is like a death sentence for them. Well, because they're going to rig the election anyway. In their minds, they're going to rig the election, so they'll get who they want to get in there. And then they're going to force this down our throats, and they're going to turn into a totalitarian government. And I said this before, Elon Musk's girlfriend said it, that they're going to create AI to supplement the middle class. Now, it seems like a far stretch today. I don't think it's a stretch for the future. If you have electric cars, what do you need Uber for?

Elon Musk
What Is the Democrats' Agenda?

The Officer Tatum Show

01:00 min | 4 months ago

What Is the Democrats' Agenda?

"Can we not see this coming? I see it from a mile away. They don't want to pay for your school 'cause they love you. 'cause they care about your education. They want to indoctrinate you. If the government is paying for your school, they're gonna pick what you learn. Have you ever been to the military? You can suggest what you want your MOS to be, but according to your testing, they're gonna pick your MOS for you. In many cases. And if you ain't that smart, you feel to do what they tell you to do. Or your education is not paid for. Or they can say, you know, we only pay for your education at these universities. Oh, only the liberal universities that's going to indoctrinate you and make you crazy. Pray for pre care. Preschool. That's what they pitch. We want to pray for priests. We're going to pay for preschool. Government should fund and preschool should be free. Why? Because if they somehow fund preschool, they can then tell preschool what to teach your kids.

The Inflation Reduction Act Will Tax the Poor

The Officer Tatum Show

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

The Inflation Reduction Act Will Tax the Poor

"Elon Musk was worth $250 billion, and he didn't pay taxes why. Because he didn't draw the money. Because his college capital gains tax, if you don't draw the money, you give yourself a little bit of money, even though you're worth, I don't know how much. And God knows how much Tesla is paying for his living. He is not going to pay no real taxes. And then I started finding out from people that I know they got a lot of money they talk about a trust. You put money into the trust, you draw from the trust. I made people put money in a life insurance. I mean, that's all kind of ways that people that got real money, that they divert taxes. So this tax increase due to this quote unquote inflation reduction act is not going to affect wealthy people, they're not going to have a tremendous effect on major corporations. They're going to kill these small businesses and they're going to, they're going to kill the average American person that's the consumer.

Elon Musk Tesla
The Inflation Reduction Lie

The Officer Tatum Show

01:23 min | 4 months ago

The Inflation Reduction Lie

"Welcome back. Welcome back. Welcome back, ladies and gentlemen, we have to talk about the lies that are coming from The White House. The lie is called the inflation reduction act. I have to say that Democrats are really, really good. At making up false words to project a false reality. Planned Parenthood is not planning parenthood. It's planning to eliminate parenthood. That's what it should be called. But they call it Planned Parenthood. Democrats is nowhere near democracy. It's socialism is what the Democrat party has now become. You can go down the list, fighting racial injustice is reverse racism is pretty much what it is. And now they've come up with inflation reduction act. Now I'm not an economist, I would argue that I'm not the smartest man in the world when it comes to what will happen to us economically, given the fact that they have essentially. Added more money to the debt, they're raising taxes on corporations, just the average man with common sense. Can see that this doesn't seem like it's going to go well.

White House Democrat Party
"ira" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:27 min | 8 months ago

"ira" Discussed on The Media Show

"In the Gloria city of Chicago, Illinois, namely this shows your radio playhouse. I'm your MC. I'm your MC. Ira Glass. What were you setting out to do back then? First and foremost, we thought of it as an entertainment, but we also thought it would be, it would be journalism, but it would be unashamedly out to entertain and entertain in the biggest way where we wanted it to just be both funny and you'd get caught up in people and feelings. And ideas. We were saying journalism shouldn't be fun. It shouldn't be entertainment. Were you being criticized at that point? We weren't nobody noticed. Nobody had noticed at that point. No, and honestly, that's hasn't been a criticism. Nobody said, oh, the problem with this is that it's entertaining. And at this point, we do as much investigative journalism as anybody and spend months on stories and break stories and things like that. But even those stories, we really do try to pull people in. And I feel like there are all kinds of topics where you almost have to trick people into listening. Like I remember years ago when there was the flood of refugees into Europe and a degree from Syria and elsewhere, we went over to Greece and wanted to just document how this poor country was dealing with this influx of refugees. And we were very aware that nobody in America or Europe, if you were to start a show by saying like, okay, refugee situation in Greece. Nobody's like, yes, I really want to hear that. And we had meetings before we came over to talk about what could we possibly open this show with that would make you want to hear this show. And we did a brainstorm of like, okay, people who fell in love in a refugee camp. Somebody who's running some sort of weird business and a refugee camp, like we just had like a brainstorm of listen when we were going out trying to document what we were doing, we were all keeping our eye on for what opens this show that would make anybody want to hear it. And I remember the thing that we ended up meeting the show. I remember I was in a camp in rizona in Greece and everybody was showing me pictures on their phones of these wild boars that would come into the camp at night and you want to take your kid to pee. And these are people who came from Aleppo, like their homes were destroyed, right? They'd risk their lives to get there. And then they get there. They're giving attack by wild pigs. There's just both very sad and very funny and also everybody had their encounters. I was like, oh, this is the opening of the show. Over there. You see. This is a handmade trap. Mimi Kramer was the field coordinator running the camp, and she walked me out in the Woods with one of the refugees, to show me the trap that he'd built to catch the Boers. It was a money picture..

Gloria city Ira Glass Greece Illinois Europe Chicago rizona Syria America Aleppo Mimi Kramer
"ira" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

06:20 min | 9 months ago

"ira" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Oh my God, you know what this is? This is, I printed out and sent it chapter by chapter to my parents. And my mother saved it. And she put them in three ring binder. Amazing. And it would just like he says, M and P, mom and pop. To follow what you've got. This is chapter 7. And it's the whole book. And she just saved it as I sent it to them in a kind of serialized fashion. And I think my father function is a kind of editor for me. That's so important to have that, I mean, whether it's as explicit as that or this implied audience, someone that you feel okay. Kind of being yourself with that you're not trying to impress them. Right. I don't know. I think it's like an overlooked part of writing life. Who you're writing for. That you want to say something to somebody is where it all starts, right? Yeah. I'm Michael Lewis, welcome to other people's money, a liar's poker companion. This is episode four and we're gonna call it, but let's call it spell Bond, which is one of the many titles that I considered for the book that became liar's poker. All right, we're rolling, let's go. We're gonna need a lot of throat coat tea. All right. Liar's poker, rising through the wreckage on Wall Street. Do I say this? Written and read by Michael Lewis. Chapter one liar's poker chapter two never mention money. I gotta say that when I was reading liar's poker for the first time in 30 years, it was not entirely pleasant. It wasn't entirely painful, but it wasn't entirely pleasant because I was watching someone learn how to write. By doing, and watching myself kind of become myself on the page. I was determined when I read it, not to succumb to the temptation of trying to rewrite it on the fly, but I swear I would have rewritten every third sentence. Man, was I tempted to. So today I want to dig around a little bit in the whole subject of how someone is trying to say something. Finds the voice in which to say it. Yes, I'm recording. I met Ira Glass back in 1996 when I was covering the presidential campaign for the new republic. And he was starting an unknown radio program called this American life. And he asked me to come and read some of my pieces for a show. Just right off the page. And I loved what he was doing. He was sort of experimenting with narrative in radio. And of course, like everybody else in the world watched his career, not just blossom, but change radio and podcasting. And an entire generation's approach to telling stories on the radio. But Ira wasn't always Ira. He started out sounding something like this. Some analysts say sorghum is representative of a much larger problem in the world economy. As poor rural areas become linked to national and international markets, investors, farmers and big companies choose, understandably, to produce the foods that will make the most money in the national and international economy. You actually think more about your work than I think about my work. You are you're more articulate about it. You have a theory of your work. You have, you're able to teach it. I've done none of that. So I thought I will save myself a lot of trouble by having studio U with me talking about both of our earlier works. And you'll help me understand the reaction I had. But we're going to spend at least as much time talking about your early work as my early work. So that's the reason we're talking. Okay, I listened to you sent me 6 or 7 pieces. And listen to all of them. But I was kind of curious, when you go back and listen to your early narrative pieces, what's your reaction to them? I mean, it's a mix of things. Partly the way I'm performing in them is killing most of what's good about them. You know what I mean? I don't understand how it is I ended up like I really was like in my mid 30s before I figured out how to perform on the radio where I could sound like a person talking. I'm just so stilted the way I'm reading. So that's really hard to get through. Most Americans aren't aware of it, but every time they set foot in the produce aisle of the local supermarket, they're benefiting from some controversial economic policies I did a whole series called supermarket stories. It was the first thing I ever got grant money to do. Every story begins and ends in a supermarket to a scene where I would just like I'm pointing out specific products and saying, when we buy these, we're screwing somebody over. You may be familiar with some of these international grain companies from their products in your local grocery store. Ralston purina makes corn wheat and rice checks cereal Anderson Clayton manufacturers wishbone salad dressing. CPC international is behind hellmann's mayonnaise and Skippy peanut butter. And cargill is one of our country's largest beef packers. It's like didactic, it's like do gooder Y. It's trying to teach a lesson. How did this even end up on the air? It raised a question in my mind, and the question it raised in my mind was, why did you get into this racket in the first place? What do you think you want to do when you start doing radio? I mean, I really stumbled into it. When I started off in radio, it was really just a fluke. I was just looking for some summer job in the media somewhere, and I applied it ad agencies and radio stations and TV stations, and I talked my way into like an internship and the promo department at NPR, which at that point was less than 5 years old and you could just walk in the door. So I was just like, I was just out for fun. And then it's so funny because what it doesn't sound like in the Mexican supermarkets is fun. No, it doesn't at all. It really, it's really.

Michael Lewis Ira Glass new republic Ira Ralston purina Anderson Clayton cargill packers NPR
"ira" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

12:53 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Prescient. It's it's unclear. Why the critical receptions. His work was somewhat kinder outside of london. I'm not suggesting that there was none of that in the reviews from other parts of the uk but it seemed to be at least toned down a little bit also not totally clear why the reviews seemed so vastly out of step with the audience response to his performances. One theory is that in london. The critics knew that he was really an american from new york and not a from senegal. Another is that social conditions in london including the rise of trade unions and class. Consciousness among workers was priming working class audiences to really like the idea of an actor who was struggling against oppression in a way that journalists weren't quite in touch with regardless of what the causes were for this sort of Disparity between critics and theatergoers after his run as a fellow aldridge returned to acting in london's minor theatres as well as in smaller british towns and cities. He started to get more steady work. Developing a following of passionate fans and building up a steady income at multiple venues critics wrote about his having to basically carry along cast members who were not as skilled in their performance or didn't even know their lines. Eventually he began to expand his repertoire into shakespearean roles that were typically cast with white men including shylock. Richard the third. Hamlet macbeth and lear using makeup to lighten his skin. He basically became a victorian era equivalent of a movie star complete with a legion of adoring fans and a steady stream of female admirers. And this was mainly a true still outside of london. He never really caught on an eye of london society but outside of it he was incredibly popular including developing a string of patrons who made his financial life a lot more comfortable in july of eighteen fifty two. He started his first major european tour including royal performances and heads of state in the audience which was again incredibly well received but still did not win critics over to his side when he made yet another go in london he also started adapting works of his own. Including a complete redoing of titus andronicus in which it's morrish character is the hero. I would love to see that. I'm kind of intrigued. Apparently was kind of uneven his execution And if you're familiar with titus andronicus the character in that play is not a hero at all. No i have not. I don't even know if an adaptation of a copy of that adaptation even still exists. But i am quite intrigued. This tour of the continent also came just a few months after. Harriet beecher stowe's uncle. Toms cabin had i been published. I in the united states and britain and this book stoked anti-slavery sentence sentiment on both sides of the atlantic and it started to further shift the perceptions of aldridge's performance particularly in the role of othello. While that eighteen thirty three coming garden theater performance had been met with pamphlets saying that a black man was unfit to be on the stage in russia in eighteen. Fifty eight one review read quote. I am firmly convinced that after aldridge it is impossible to see fellow performed by a white actor. It garrick himself. And that's a reference to david. Garrick who was a famous british shakespearean actor. Although he would briefly return to britain even be granted. british citizenship on november seventh of eighteen. Sixty three his overwhelmingly positive receptions in france and russia meant that he spent most of the last six years of his career there ultimately making a name for himself is one of history's great tragedian and becoming a bigger draw than russia's most famous actors apparently russia in particular loved him a lot france also especially especially russia although shifting perceptions of race and of the institution of slavery had also changed the way audiences and the press were regarding him. That doesn't mean that the racism was magically over. The later part of his career was beset by unfounded rumors that onstage he had stabbed iago's and suffocated desdemona is four real misled to his co star in moscow refusing to take the stage with him in her role as dimona. His response was quote. I have played that role more than three hundred times in my life and all these times i have suffocated possibly to maximum three does owners and i stabbed think one iago. Obviously it was a joke. It rile people up more biographers. Herbert marshall and mildred stock. Who wrote the definitive biography of him. In the nineteen fifties described this whole incident as quote an out and out case of color prejudice. It was like really a completely unfounded. Rumor based on nothing brick as people were. If he had been an actor at the glum ya'll it would have made him more popular. Oh yeah no. He's he's really he's really smothering. People aldridge continued to tour and perform for the rest of his life although his wife margaret eventually stopped accompanying him a few years before her death on march twenty fifth of eighteen sixty four. She was about a decade older iran. Her health had been poor at that point. Aldridge had been supporting her and illegitimate son. Ira daniel who had been born in may of eighteen forty seven and who margaret raised as her own. It's also unclear whether she knew about this but he had been supporting a second family as well. He'd had two more children with a swedish woman named amanda. Pauline von brandt lease were irene. Lorraina pauline who was born in eighteen sixty. An ira frederick olaf known as fritz who was born in eighteen sixty two and similarly to how margaret had been described as the daughter of an mp. Amanda pauline was said to be a baroness. She was definitely not she was the daughter of a farrier over the course of his life aldridge had actually fathered several other children as well in eighteen fifty. Five another actor. William stop third sued him over an affair with his wife emma after she delivered a biracial baby. Aldridge was found guilty of criminal conversation and sentenced to pay a fine. Ira married amanda pauline in eighteen sixty five and after that they had two more children amanda christina elizabeth born in march of eighteen. Sixty six and rachel margaret fredrika. Who was born four and a half months. After aldridge's death. I reside in poland on august seventh eighteen sixty seven and he was buried there although he made specific plans to return to the united states at various points. It seems that he never did when the new memorial theatre reopened at stratford-upon-avon in one thousand nine thirty two aldridge's name was included. Among other great shakespearean actors commemorated with plaques among the seats he is the only black actor of the thirty three included as we noted aldridge became quite successful in his career and he developed a pretty healthy income. He started giving a significant portion of that income to abolitionist causes and he also played a part in an abolitionist work of art outside of the theater which we will talk about after another brief sponsor break. Geico knows there many reasons why you ride from the exciting adventure of the daily commute to the peace of mind that geico always has your back with twenty four seven access to claim service and and legendary customer service but pamela had one reason in particular. My skin is extremely averse to most fabrics except for the soft buttery feeling of leather thankfully. I found my clan of leather lovers in the biking community. It's been life changing geigo motorcycle. Fifteen minutes could save you. Fifteen percent or more fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Is that shakespeare. It's geico that. Shakespeare from one of his unpublished works would be not for awakening. Give it though the berries pull fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more no. It's from geico because they help. Save people money. Well i hate to break it to you but geico got it from shakespeare geico fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Ira frederick aldridge was the subject of several works of art during his lifetime. One was head of a negro in the character of fellow which was painted by james northcote in the first year that ira himself appeared as othello onstage. So although the artist didn't specifically say this is ira aldridge. The widespread conclusion is that. That's who the pink. The painting is of but another came back into the public eye only very recently after having been in private collections for one hundred eighty years. It's by john phillips simpson and it's called the captive slave and it was acquired by the art institute of chicago in two thousand nine before this people knew that the that it existed and there was a really poor quality reproduction of it but the original painting had been out of the public eye. The captive slave was painted sometime in the late. Eighteen twenty's and it's a painting of a young black man sitting on a bench wearing manacles. He's wearing an orange jumpsuit. And for modern were it will probably immediately bring to mind the idea of a prison jumpsuit. He's looking upward. And his face carries this impression of nearly tearful sorrow and loss. Is the painting that i went on exhibition at the royal academy of the arts in eighteen twenty seven and it's injury in the exhibition catalogue included lions from charity. Which is anti-slavery poem. By william cowper. It's clearly meant as an anti-slavery work in the man. Portraying the slave in the painting is ira frederick aldridge. Lot of people don't know that there was an incredibly famous black actor doing shakespeare in victorian europe and especially england even though they didn't love him in london but everywhere else. This super joining us on this saturday since episode is out of the archive if you heard an email address or facebook. Url or something similar over. The course the show that could be obsolete now. Our current email address is history. Podcast at iheartradio dot com. Our old. how stuff works email address. No longer works you. You can find us all over social media at missed in history and you can subscribe to our show on apple podcast. Google podcast the iheartradio app. And wherever else. Listen to podcasts stuff. You missed in history. Classes the production of iheartradio for more podcasts. From iheart radio visit the iheartradio app abbotabad calf. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows didn't catch the latest ruling morton unfiltered guest. Here's the republicans are going to pull you socialist regardless. Look what's happening right now with land. It's real it's raw. It's role in morton. Unfiltered are going to brand democrats as radical lab socialist download. The roland martin unfiltered broadcast on the iheartradio app and listened to ruin martin's daily commentary on the black information network. Hi guys i'm running baiter. And i'm calling her would and we're here to tell you about our new podcast. Talk show with grameen connor. So each week we're bringing on some of the hottest stick creators and celebrities to join us as we explore all the latest things happening on to talk so whether you love to talk and have been using the app forever or if you're new to the world of talk and still figuring it all out come hang out with us on a new podcast. Talk show with remun- connor. Listen on the iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

aldridge london russia titus andronicus geico Hamlet macbeth morrish Toms cabin ira frederick aldridge margaret dimona Herbert marshall mildred stock Aldridge Ira daniel Pauline von brandt Lorraina pauline britain
"ira" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

Life Transformation Radio

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

"Have you been done MMA fighting? Not a problem. I was in boxing and Muay Thai. I've been punched. I've been beat up, not a problem, but but Heights know. And so here's how we translate this. I'm going to give back to the story, but here's how we Translate. Overcoming physical fear to overcome and psychological fear because there's going to be some things that you are called to in your life in the area of your purpose and your dreams, just serve other people that will legitimately terrify you. And it could keep you from being who you were created and called to be your the man of action. And most people don't take action because of some some kind of psychological fear and it has a death grip on them. So I am not impressed by people Who can do amazing things and be absolutely Fearless. That doesn't impress me, show me the man or woman, who does the thing that scares them to death, and they become Fear Factor less, they allow fear to have less control over their action. They can do that, they recalled to do, right? If you're not scared to dive out of the stratosphere from the Moon onto the Earth, some Red Bull guy did, I'm not impressed. Show me the guy who's sweating under his armpits and his knees are knocking and he does it anyway. Oh yeah. That's the guy that I want to follow. That's the guy who can lead me to the stratosphere, right? And so I'm here today to tell you that Ira Davis is not a Fearless guy. I just choose to fear less I love. I know the other side. I'm only other side of what I've been called to do. There are some people who are counting on me. They are watching my example as That will inform what they can or cannot do in the area of their assignment. And so, man, I was sitting there watching this film and I told you in God said, hey, you don't have to become a skydiver and I was like time out. I don't, I'm TJ out of heights and here's what he said to me that changed my perspective. He said I have too many people who were speaking and teaching and preaching things that they don't live the analogies that they don't live. You won't be one month. And so when you start diving out of planes, The whole world will stop and look because you're not the kind of guy who dies out of planes. You're not the kind of guy who does it fearlessly. You're the kind of guy who does it because it's going to be example for other people. And so that is why I dive out of planes. And that is why I take people diving out of planes because it is a commitment and an analogy that solidifies obedience sacrifice investment and going all-in on the thing that you created to do, that's bigger than you, if you've been called to something that's bigger than you, it's going to terrify you. Like I was watching that video off getting short of breath when your dream is bigger than you, it's going to get you short of breath, every now and then it's going to make you pee on yourself. Every now it's going to make you look at yourself in the mirror said, are you crazy or am I crazy, right? Your thoughts, are you crazy or a crazy guy? And so, and so, that's the same thing that's going through the mind when I'm on the plane and on the mind of my clients when they're on the plane, like are you crazy or a month? Crazy. No, we're about to die for these crazy dreams and when we get back on the ground, when I saved you back to the thing that you would call to do, there.

Ira Davis boxing
"ira" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

Life Transformation Radio

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

"Their purpose and die for them. Seems to impact the world through a speaking coaching filmmaking and you see what he did. There skydiving. Ira welcome to life transformation radio, what's going on Rob doing brother? I'm doing good. I'm doing good. Glad to have you here so I guess the theme would be dream. Diving overcoming fear man, I love it. I love it. Well so you've done a life in a very short amount of time. And first of all, I just like to dive in. What was it? Like in the Marine Corps? Like that was so what got you to go into the Marine Corps? First of all, Do you have a great question? First of all, man, thanks so much for having me here on your incredible show, man. I'm honored and I'm humbled to be here with you to serve you. When you're awesome audience, what got me to go to Marine Corps? Well, you know, as simple, Rob grown up really feeling purpose, lost, right? Like feeling like that guy when he was handing out purpose and dreams. He skipped over me. And so I kind of grew up feeling that well, to middle child, you know, got separated from my birth mom, at a very young age. She was, you know, addicted to drugs. And my father took us got remarried to a woman who I called my mother. Today who took us in and rage just middle child. My older brother was phenomenal Rob and everything he touched a scholar. My younger sister was the princess and they were I was in the middle lost in the sauce. Wow the most of my life and so I was kind of just all over the place until I hit High School. I joined the Marine Corps ROTC which gave me a lot of structure and you know, I started to see some glimpses of who I was created to be their birth. I wasn't picking up on the clues yet, but I, I enjoy the leadership. I enjoy the inspiration and I said, man, I don't want to go to college cuz I feel like I'll waste somebody's money, right? I'm going to go there and do what college is for, right? But I can see myself taking this into from pretend Marine Corps. In high school too, real Marine Corps, and, and be a successful and took this video of a drill instructor and recruit training and boot camp. And I was like, wow,.

Marine Corps Rob Marine Corps ROTC High School
"ira" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

"Left on the 401k. All right well. Let's introduce you to another candidate. The ira ira stands for individual retirement account similar to a 401k. You can open an ira with pretax money. And you don't have to worry about paying tax until you need to use the money but unlike a 401k an ira is not offered through an employer. You have to set it up yourself and you keep that account forever and always no matter where you work hence the individual part in the individual retirement account. Ira's are all the rage these days that. How do these darlings of the retirement savings world actually work. I found out by opening one. When i was at cnn. I started a 401k. Because it was recommended to me. I never stopped to even consider that there were other options and now of course i wish i had live and learn from me folks when i finally did look into other options. I found that there were three major prose of an ira for me number one. The money i put in actually reduced my taxes. At the time i was in the twenty five percent tax bracket so when i put six thousand dollars into my ira by taxable salary or income was reduced by that amount that met my tax bill was reduced by a cool fifteen hundred bucks which is twenty five percent of six grant which is nice mean is not that i saved that money per se since tax refunds are. Technically you remember this. Just your money coming back to you. But i didn't have to pay more for it number two. i could still have a 401k. And if i had enough money to max both of them out. I cooled number three. The ira rules were withdrawal. Aren't super stringent. If you're using the money for medical expenses to buy a house for educational purposes you can even skirt around that ten percent penalty fee well. Ira is have a lot of pros. There is one notable con- you are limited by the amount you can contribute each year and that contribution limit is lower than 401k's by a lot in two thousand twenty one you can only contribute six thousand dollars if you're under the age of fifty seven thousand dollars if you're older than fifty you can do all of this at once or you can do it at any time up to tax day following the year for which you're making that so for example you have until april fifteenth of twenty twenty two to make the contribution for twenty twenty one assuming of course that's the actual date. It's going to be next year. Once you max out the ira as you should try to do. Annually the show's over until next year. So having an ira alone isn't going to catapult you into retirement rock stardom when i started working for myself. I really didn't know where to start when setting up an ira so here are the steps. That i took step once call companies that offer. Ira is like vanguard or fidelity you can also do this online step to go through the account. Setup process also easily done online step at three decide what to invest the money in index funds. And jill step for fund the account that is put your money in and woah. You have an ira step. Fis claim the amount you contributed as a deduction on your tax return but wait there is more. I have been saving the very best for last the superstar of the team. The roth ira roth ira's or just roths for short are a lot like traditional ira's except you put money in after you pay tax so unlike a 401k or traditional ira. You don't have to pay tax on the money when you take it out when you're an old sexy lady or an old sexy guy because you already paid for it. This makes your nest egg a lot easier to account for over time. I mean we can't see into the future. We can't predict what tax rates are going to be. In the year you retire but tax rates will likely increase so those investing in a 401k. Or ira have this unknown tax bill looming while those with a roth. Ira are going to have no surprises. The rule in twenty twenty one is that you're eligible for a roth. Ira if you make less than one hundred twenty five thousand dollars as a single person. So if you're given the option you should absolutely put money into a roth. Don't hesitate pas the podcast right now and. Please open up an account seriously. Yes you are paying taxes on whatever. You're contributing now but you're paying it before your money has even grown when you pay taxes later like you do with a 401k or traditional ira. You're going to be paying taxes based upon the amount that it has grown to assume you have eighty thousand dollars in the account when you want to take the money out decades from now with a traditional ira that eighty thousand dollars is all taxable as ordinary income. Which is the same rate that you pay tax on for the salary you make. If you assume a twenty five percent tax rate the amount of money you really have. After-tax is sixty grand in other words. You're going to have to give twenty thousand dollars to the government before you can use it for all the fun things you plan for with a rough you get to keep the full eighty grand. That's right you don't have to give twenty thousand dollars to the taxman when you turn fifty-nine because you already paid taxes on the money when you put it in the account in the first place the only thing you gave up on to get this awesome deal was a deduction when you made the original contribution you can't actually deduct the contribution to roth. Ira's lake you would if you qualify for a traditional ira. That would be double dipping. Sticking with our assumed twenty-five percent tax rate. You paid an extra one thousand five hundred dollars of tax when you started twenty five percent of six grand for the privilege to not pay twenty thousand dollars later. That's a very very good deal if you ask me which you are because you're listening to me right now sued. Don't pass up on making roth contributions if you can. Here's today's tip. You can take straight to the bank. A 401k can be good. It can be great but it all depends on you your death situation your goals and your company plan if your employer doesn't match contributions or there are high fees involved or the plan doesn't come with the right investment choices for you you might wanna rethink it if you're eligible for a roth. Ira start one today. The best time to do this is when you're in a lower tax bracket because you'll pay less now and still not later this money. Rehab is a production of iheartmedia. i'm your host nicole. Lapin our producers are morgan lavoix and catherine law money. Rehab is edited an engineered by brandon. Decker with help from josh fisher. Executive producers are men gap cheddar and will pearson huge thanks to the og. Money rehabbed supervising producer michelle lambs her pre production and development work. And as always thanks to you for finally investing in yourself so that you can get it together and get it. All when the brightest minds at the university of florida come together. Something extraordinary happens. Engineering empowers medicine data scientist rice. Agriculture geology fuel space exploration and artificial intelligence transforms learning and research. The ideas that go on to change the world. They're launching right from here. At the collision of big ideas and massive potential something momentous becomes possible at the university of florida ufl dot. Edu paper ghosts is a true crime. Podcast that returns with a new season investigating the tragedy that took place in a small ohio town where the massive farm house of a wealthy family erupted in flames. All four residents died but not because of the fire. My brother says carol. Something's up there is too much. Listen to pay per ghosts on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

ira Ira cnn Fis roth ira jill roth morgan lavoix josh fisher michelle lambs Lapin
"ira" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

"Left on the 401k. All right well. Let's introduce you to another candidate. The ira ira stands for individual retirement account similar to a 401k. You can open an ira with pretax money. And you don't have to worry about paying tax until you need to use the money but unlike a 401k an ira is not offered through an employer. You have to set it up yourself and you keep that account forever and always no matter where you work hence the individual part in the individual retirement account. Ira's are all the rage these days that. How do these darlings of the retirement savings world actually work. I found out by opening one. When i was at cnn. I started a 401k. Because it was recommended to me. I never stopped to even consider that there were other options and now of course i wish i had live and learn from me folks when i finally did look into other options. I found that there were three major prose of an ira for me number one. The money i put in actually reduced my taxes. At the time i was in the twenty five percent tax bracket so when i put six thousand dollars into my ira by taxable salary or income was reduced by that amount that met my tax bill was reduced by a cool fifteen hundred bucks which is twenty five percent of six grant which is nice mean is not that i saved that money per se since tax refunds are. Technically you remember this. Just your money coming back to you. But i didn't have to pay more for it number two. i could still have a 401k. And if i had enough money to max both of them out. I cooled number three. The ira rules were withdrawal. Aren't super stringent. If you're using the money for medical expenses to buy a house for educational purposes you can even skirt around that ten percent penalty fee well. Ira is have a lot of pros. There is one notable con- you are limited by the amount you can contribute each year and that contribution limit is lower than 401k's by a lot in two thousand twenty one you can only contribute six thousand dollars if you're under the age of fifty seven thousand dollars if you're older than fifty you can do all of this at once or you can do it at any time up to tax day following the year for which you're making that so for example you have until april fifteenth of twenty twenty two to make the contribution for twenty twenty one assuming of course that's the actual date. It's going to be next year. Once you max out the ira as you should try to do. Annually the show's over until next year. So having an ira alone isn't going to catapult you into retirement rock stardom when i started working for myself. I really didn't know where to start when setting up an ira so here are the steps. That i took step once call companies that offer. Ira is like vanguard or fidelity you can also do this online step to go through the account. Setup process also easily done online step at three decide what to invest the money in index funds. And jill step for fund the account that is put your money in and woah. You have an ira step. Fis claim the amount you contributed as a deduction on your tax return but wait there is more. I have been saving the very best for last the superstar of the team. The roth ira roth ira's or just roths for short are a lot like traditional ira's except you put money in after you pay tax so unlike a 401k or traditional ira. You don't have to pay tax on the money when you take it out when you're an old sexy lady or an old sexy guy because you already paid for it. This makes your nest egg a lot easier to account for over time. I mean we can't see into the future. We can't predict what tax rates are going to be. In the year you retire but tax rates will likely increase so those investing in a 401k. Or ira have this unknown tax bill looming while those with a roth. Ira are going to have no surprises. The rule in twenty twenty one is that you're eligible for a roth. Ira if you make less than one hundred twenty five thousand dollars as a single person. So if you're given the option you should absolutely put money into a roth. Don't hesitate pas the podcast right now and. Please open up an account seriously. Yes you are paying taxes on whatever. You're contributing now but you're paying it before your money has even grown when you pay taxes later like you do with a 401k or traditional ira. You're going to be paying taxes based upon the amount that it has grown to assume you have eighty thousand dollars in the account when you want to take the money out decades from now with a traditional ira that eighty thousand dollars is all taxable as ordinary income. Which is the same rate that you pay tax on for the salary you make. If you assume a twenty five percent tax rate the amount of money you really have. After-tax is sixty grand in other words. You're going to have to give twenty thousand dollars to the government before you can use it for all the fun things you plan for with a rough you get to keep the full eighty grand. That's right you don't have to give twenty thousand dollars to the taxman when you turn fifty-nine because you already paid taxes on the money when you put it in the account in the first place the only thing you gave up on to get this awesome deal was a deduction when you made the original contribution you can't actually deduct the contribution to roth. Ira's lake you would if you qualify for a traditional ira. That would be double dipping. Sticking with our assumed twenty-five percent tax rate. You paid an extra one thousand five hundred dollars of tax when you started twenty five percent of six grand for the privilege to not pay twenty thousand dollars later. That's a very very good deal if you ask me which you are because you're listening to me right now sued. Don't pass up on making roth contributions if you can. Here's today's tip. You can take straight to the bank. A 401k can be good. It can be great but it all depends on you your death situation your goals and your company plan if your employer doesn't match contributions or there are high fees involved or the plan doesn't come with the right investment choices for you you might wanna rethink it if you're eligible for a roth. Ira start one today. The best time to do this is when you're in a lower tax bracket because you'll pay less now and still not later this money. Rehab is a production of iheartmedia. i'm your host nicole. Lapin our producers are morgan lavoix and catherine law money. Rehab is edited an engineered by brandon. Decker with help from josh fisher. Executive producers are men gap cheddar and will pearson huge thanks to the og. Money rehabbed supervising producer michelle lambs her pre production and development work. And as always thanks to you for finally investing in yourself so that you can get it together and get it. All when the brightest minds at the university of florida come together. Something extraordinary happens. Engineering empowers medicine data scientist rice. Agriculture geology fuel space exploration and artificial intelligence transforms learning and research. The ideas that go on to change the world. They're launching right from here. At the collision of big ideas and massive potential something momentous becomes possible at the university of florida ufl dot. Edu paper ghosts is a true crime. Podcast that returns with a new season investigating the tragedy that took place in a small ohio town where the massive farm house of a wealthy family erupted in flames. All four residents died but not because of the fire. My brother says carol. Something's up there is too much. Listen to pay per ghosts on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

"Ira is simply having an unknown tax future. If the government changed the rules and tax free withdrawals from a roth. Ira were no longer allowed. That would mean that you end up paying taxes twice as i mentioned. That's very unlikely. But some people believe it's a roth. Ira downside as you can see a significant factor in whether you should choose a traditional or a roth. Ira depends on your future income tax rate and that's.

twice Ira
"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

"That apply when you've got a retirement plan at work and an ira. Another benefit is deferring tax. If you believe that your income or your tax rate in retirement will be lower than it is now deferring tax until you make withdrawals could be a very wise. Move for instance. Let's say you're middle aged or you know that your career earnings have peaked a traditional. Ira may save you money on taxes. Another benefit is timing. Your future tax. You can begin taking penalty free withdrawals and of course pay tax on them. Starting at age fifty nine and a half you get to avoid potential additional taxation since you only pay tax on traditional ira withdrawals that may give you peace of mind that your retirement funds could never be taxed twice in other words tax now up front and later on retirement. It's not likely that double-taxation on retirement accounts could ever pass legislation. But that's something that some people worry about with a roth. Ira in other words. They're thinking okay. What if i pay tax now and then later in retirement the government makes me pay tax again. I don't think that's an issue but again some people worry about it so now. Let's consider the main disadvantages of a traditional. Ira it's paying ordinary income tax rates. So when you take distributions and retirement you pay the regular income tax rate which is higher than the long term capital gains tax rate. That you would pay if your investments were in. Let's say taxable brokerage account in other words investment owned in taxable brokerage account get more favorable treatment than they do in a retirement account another disadvantage is paying our. Md's mentioned once you reach age seventy two. You must begin taking withdrawals and paying taxes. Even if you don't need the money in your traditional ira and paying early withdrawal penalties. That's always a disadvantage. If you take distributions before fifty nine and a half you must pay income tax plus that additional ten percent penalty however there are some penalty exceptions including using the funds up to a limit to pay for your first home to.

ten percent twice first home fifty nine and a half seventy two age Md Ira once
"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

"Out a traditional ira. However some or all of your contributions may not be tax deductible depending on your income so if you're a high earner may be the case that you can max out that traditional ira and your retirement plan at work but it may mean that you just can't get the full tax deduction on your traditional ira contributions but they're still going to grow in the account on a on a tax deferred basis. So you know it's still a good idea as your ira. Investments grow in value. You are never taxed on those earnings until you take them out of the account in retirement or even before retirement if you qualify for an exemption now if you own those same investments in a regular taxable brokerage account you would have to pay tax on your investment gains every single year. You don't have to do that when they're in a traditional ira because that's the protection. That's the tax shelter that you're getting so a traditional. Ira allows you to defer paying taxes. You don't eliminate it you just deferred for both or contributions and your earnings until you withdraw money in the future and you can begin making distributions penalty free once. She reached the official retirement age of fifty nine and a half and you must start taking required minimum distributions or are. Md's after age. Seventy two if you tap a traditional ira before reaching age fifty nine and a half in most cases you must pay income taxes on the withdrawal plus an additional ten percent early withdrawal penalty. So that's why i never recommend breaking. Open your retirement piggy bank. It's just too expensive..

ten percent both Seventy two fifty nine and a half every single year Ira once Md
"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

"That's an awesome problem to have right. I you make a non-deductible which is a taxable contribution to a traditional ira and then you roll over those funds into a roth ira. You won't owe taxes. Except on any investment growth in the account earned between the time of your traditional ira contribution and the roth conversion again a lot more information about this and podcast six hundred sixty six but if you already have tax money in a traditional ira like m does tax has to be pro rated over all your ira's which doesn't allow you to avoid additional tax however by rolling over your traditional ira funds into your traditional 401k at work that does not trigger any taxes and it gets around this problem of having existing. Ira funds so that you won't have any traditional ira funds. Yeah gets a little tricky so always get help from your retirement fund administrator if you think you might benefit from doing a back door roth. Ira and again. It's only going to apply to you if your income is too high to contribute to a roth. Ira and we're going to go over what that limit is in the show 'em also mentioned splitting her. 401k contributions fifty fifty at work. And i love that. There's no income limit on a roth at work on a roth for k. Or ross perot three b. So she can max one out every year or even make a partial contribution no matter your income and that's a great idea because having some amount of tax free income to count on in retirement is a smart move so m and jamie. Thank you for your questions. I hope that helped so now. Let's get into today's topic. Which is should you have traditional or a roth ira. This is a pretty foundational finance topic. And i've podcast it about it before. But i think it's worth revisiting not only because various annual limits have changed but because the difference between these accounts can get confusing it trips up a lot of people and unfortunately i found that many people have questions about retirement accounts that keep them from getting one up and keeps them from accumulating wealth for the future. I know that was the case for me. When i was in my twenties and i was just starting out with my first real job. My employer kept talking about participating in a 401k. And i had absolutely no idea what they were talking about. I kept thinking of that serial special k and it sounded like something that had nothing to do with my job. I often say that a confused mind always says no so. That was me. I was confused. And i said no and i did not participate until a year or two later when i moved onto a new job. That did a great job explaining the benefits of a workplace retirement account and they paid free mashing funds. So that's when it clicked for me. It was like okay. I get it now. And i never looked back. But maybe you don't have a retirement plan at work or your self employed and you're just not sure how ira's work or you're not sure about the traditional versus roth benefits that uncertainty could be the barrier that is stopping you from moving forward and taking control of your finances so my goal for this show is to clear up any confusion. You're gonna learn the main differences between these accounts and how to know if traditional or a roth is best.

Ira jamie today fifty fifty twenties a year or first real job one six hundred sixty six two later
"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

"And i think that listening to other people's questions can be a really great way to learn. So i'm starting to incorporate a few of your questions in each show kind of starting out that way and then moving into the topic so i hope that will give you a little more exposure to some of the things that other people are asking and of course. I love to get your question as well. So let's start out with today's questions. The first one is from jamie. Be who says i have a young daughter just starting her career. She needs a quick reference guide. On how to invest for retirement. I recall you mentioning that you have a pdf guide. That captures the major pros and cons of common retirement accounts. How can i share that with her. Jamie thank you so much for asking. That resources called the retirement account. Comparison chart in the easiest way to get it is for you or your daughter to send a text message text. The word retire. R. e. t. i. r. e. to the number three three four four four. And you can instantly download it. It's a one page pretty handy resource and i know the comparison chart would also be really helpful for today's show. So if you are in a place right now where you could download the guide and review it. This will help because today's episode number. Six hundred eighty eight is called. Should you have a traditional or roth. Ira we're going to be going back and forth between these accounts and i think having the resource in front of you could be helpful. I also got an email from 'em who says i currently max out all my retirement accounts and my husband and i will likely make too much to contribute to our roth. Ira's due to unforeseen bonuses and commissions. Thanks by the way for podcasts. Sixty one where you explain how to correct an ira overage as. We'll be needing to do that this year. Here's my question. My husband has a simple. Ira and i have a traditional ira. Is there any reason not to transfer these accounts into our current 401k. Plans if they take rollovers so we can both do back door roth. Ira's i know we can contribute to ross 401k's at work but we enjoy the tax break. We get from making pretax contributions to our traditional 401k's but maybe i'll consider splitting my contribution between a traditional and a roth 401k. Fifty fifty. I love your short tidbits of just the right amount of information in the right amount of time perfectly delivered. Thank you so much for your kind words. M i really appreciate that and congrats to you and your husband for being amazing savers and prioritizing your retirement.

Jamie jamie today Fifty fifty this year Ira one page both first one each show Sixty one hundred eighty eight Six three
"ira" Discussed on Just Don't Lose The Money Podcast

Just Don't Lose The Money Podcast

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Just Don't Lose The Money Podcast

"Be a long-term cd at three percents. Invest it for a long time but you run into interest rate risk. They're one of the things that as we go through these conversations. This whole thing might just were you. I worry about the future. I worry about the market ups and downs. I worry about inflation. I mean retirement is like looking at a mountain in the top of it is all kind of clouded. Like you know you see in the pictures. You can't see the top of it because it's a cloud and that's kind of like retirement. You can't see all the details because it's kinda cloudy and a lot of people worry about that and that that is a huge thing in our country right now. People just scared of retirement. Larry bank is a guy who runs a lot of money through a company called black rock. He he manages like eight trillion dollars worldwide and. He said most people are afraid of retirement because they haven't prepared for retirement. But you have to say for these long outcomes the outcomes of retirement and it's a process it's a long forty year process and so many people are have been ill prepared for that long process and this is one of the great problems that we have in this country. The fear of retirement. So there's that certain group out there that hasn't saved but you know the people who listen to this show. I think they have saved. I think that they are there. They have the money but they just don't know what to do next and how to make that money into the income that lasts for their entire life so they don't run out so jon so people are nervous about that at what point in a meeting with a client do people just kind of their shoulders go down and they go okay. I got it. That's it that's my plan. How does that happen. Well like you said people are nervous about retiring. Their number one concern is they wanna make sure that they have enough to retire that they won't run out of money that's for the most part the number one concern that we come across with people so the first thing everyone should do is like you mentioned most people that we see have done a very good job saving money but they're saving without a plan so to say so having a bunch of ira's or a bunch of 401k accounts from former employers and buying and selling a bunch of mutual funds. You're doing a great job at saving but are those positions are.

Larry bank jon
"ira" Discussed on Just Don't Lose The Money Podcast

Just Don't Lose The Money Podcast

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Just Don't Lose The Money Podcast

"The great thing about the roth. Ira down the road. The withdrawals attacks free okay. So there's no taxes on the growth but the issue that they have is that you have to qualify there's income limitation. So if you're a mary couple. In you're modified adjusted gross income is above two hundred. Eight thousand you're not able to contribute to a roth. Ira well one of the things that we've talked about in the past is that that limitations kinda thrown out the window if you're going to convert money over right. Yeah so there is this back door roth. Ira so not all is lost. If you're a high income earner the idea is to use the strategy that they called the the back door strategies with that is in twenty ten. I think there was a new tax code. That was created that allowed high income earners to legally make indirect contributions to a roth. Ira using the back door strategy in what it really is an individual's going to open up. An ira account told the pause at six or seven thousand into that account it will be a non deductible contribution so it's not like you put putting seven thousand into the ira and then you deducted that on your tax return so this will be a non deductible contribution then what happens is you'll convert that ira to a roth ira. So you'll take the ira converted to a roth now. That individual has a roth. Ira now moving. Forward that ira. Because the conversion that individual has to keep that money in there for five years before any withdrawals become tax free so that is one way using the back door strategy for high income earners to contribute to a roth. Ira where once before they couldn't another great benefit of a a roth ira is that. There's no required minimum distributions at age. Seventy two as we sting the. Irs has been kind enough to let you grow this money in your ira's tax deferred until eight seventy two then at seventy two. They require that. You take out a minimum distribution that you have to pay taxes on so the roth does not have that. So these are all things that are on. Everybody's mind right now taxes in the way you're thinking about it right now is what's coming out of my check. How much did i pay. How much did i. Oh how much am i getting back but when you get into retirement it kind of shifts a little bit you wanna think about how you're taking your money from a tax standpoint. You wanna have what we call tax forward thinking and putting yourself in a good position when.

roth ira Irs
"ira" Discussed on Elder Law Issues Podcast

Elder Law Issues Podcast

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Elder Law Issues Podcast

"To <Speech_Male> maximize their tax <Speech_Male> savings. The reality <Speech_Male> is that <Speech_Male> most people <Speech_Male> don't get a dollar <Speech_Male> for dollar benefit <Speech_Male> on their taxes <Speech_Male> for charitable <Speech_Male> gifts and <Speech_Male> after the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> trump <Speech_Male> tax law <Speech_Male> changes <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> fewer and fewer. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Fewer people itemized <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at all <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so. <Speech_Male> If you did make <Speech_Male> charitable gifts you <Speech_Male> might not be able to deduct <Speech_Male> them at <Speech_Male> all and <Speech_Male> so people were <Speech_Male> in the circumstance <Speech_Male> where they had to <Speech_Male> take the income from <Speech_Male> there are md's <Speech_Male> and they <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> they didn't get a deduction <Speech_Male> or they didn't get <Speech_Male> the full value of the <Speech_Male> of the deduction <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> On their tax <Speech_Male> return so <Speech_Male> even though they took <Speech_Male> ten thousand dollars <Speech_Male> out of their ira <Speech_Male> and gave <Speech_Male> it to a charity. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> pay tax on <Speech_Male> all or most <Speech_Male> of that. 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My brain <Speech_Female> is pretty full <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <SpeakerChange> call <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> my tax preparer. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Just got <Speech_Male> to the same point that <Speech_Male> you made before i started <Speech_Male> which is the <Speech_Male> cpa needs to <Speech_Male> be very much involved <Speech_Male> in calculating <Speech_Male> how much <Speech_Male> of a distribution <Speech_Male> you want to make <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> exactly <Speech_Male> how you want to use. <Speech_Male> The qualified charitable <Speech_Male> distribution <Speech_Male> but the big news is <Speech_Male> for the <Speech_Male> first time in a couple <Speech_Male> of years even <Speech_Male> though qualified charitable <Speech_Male> distributions. Have <Speech_Male> been around for <Speech_Male> what fifteen <Speech_Male> years now <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> the first time in a couple <Speech_Male> of years. Suddenly <Speech_Male> they're back <Speech_Male> because of <Speech_Male> the reduction <Speech_Male> in deductions <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> For individual <Speech_Male> itemized <Speech_Male> deductions <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> the the return <Speech_Male> of the minimum <Speech_Male> distribution requirements <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> calendar. <SpeakerChange> Year <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> twenty twenty one. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Go talk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to your accountant <Speech_Male> gonna <Speech_Male> give to charity and <Speech_Male> give to charity and <Speech_Male> you should give to charity <Speech_Male> whether you do it through <Speech_Male> from your ira <Speech_Male> or or <Speech_Male> some other way <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> if you found this <Speech_Male> confusing <Speech_Male> and a little <Speech_Male> bit enlightening <Speech_Male> oh. I don't know maybe we'll <Speech_Male> talk about back door <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> roth. Ira's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> next <SpeakerChange> time <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> no says elizabeth. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement>

fifteen Ten thousand ten thousand dollars Ira elizabeth ninety nine ten Robert first time twenty twenty one
"ira" Discussed on Elder Law Issues Podcast

Elder Law Issues Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"ira" Discussed on Elder Law Issues Podcast

"Hey welcome back to elderlaw issues. My name's robert fleming. I'm one of the partners at the tucson arizona elder law firm of fleming incurred ep. Plc one of the other partners elizabeth noble rollins freeman and is it down once a week to talk through various elderlaw issues. And that's why we decided we would call this. Podcast elderlaw issues. Was that clever or what. Wow robert e just maze me every single time we do abroad. I thought this week We're coming up on the end of tax season. Well as it turns out. It's not the end of tax season. Tax season has been shoved off for most purposes into mid may instead. But i thought maybe we could talk about a tax issue that actually is about twenty twenty one taxes this so confuses people so when i say it's about twenty twenty one taxes it's about the taxes you will pay or you'll file and twenty twenty two for the year twenty twenty one. This what we're going to talk about is isn't really about twenty twenty taxes and the reason for that is because it just doesn't apply twenty twenty taxes. If you are pretty savvy you may have already figured out that where we're headed is to talk about Qualified charitable distributions. Out of retirement accounts out of ira's particularly qualified charitable distributions. Allow you to direct that. The minimum distribution that you have to take out of your. Ira could go straight to a charity and you don't have to pay tax on it and you don't get a deduction for the charitable gift. Robert one thing. I want to mention here two very important points one we're talking about. Ira's we're not talking about 401k's we're not talking about for more three b. accounts the other thing which you said in passing which i think are our listeners should really pay attention to is. We're talking about making that contribution directly from the ira that is that does not mean that you're writing a check or that you were the one who's going to.

Robert mid may this week one elizabeth noble rollins Ira about twenty twenty one twenty twenty two tucson arizona once a week twenty twenty one two very important points twenty twenty taxes robert e robert fleming single