35 Burst results for "INC"

Alaska Is Ahead In Coronavirus Vaccinations

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 15 hrs ago

Alaska Is Ahead In Coronavirus Vaccinations

"Alaska appears to be ahead of everybody else getting shots into arms centers for disease control prevention finding that alaska has the most covid nineteen vaccinations per capita of any state. Raising the question. What's alaska doing that. Some other states are not katie. Oh oh's jeremy. Shay has more. Dr anthony inc alaska's chief medical officer first credits estates communities for working together to get people vaccinated quickly. Second she says. Alaska is getting more doses of the vaccine because of additional allotments for the department of defense department of veterans affairs and the indian health. We have the highest veterans per capita population. We have a large military presence and we have a large indigenous population with over two hundred and twenty nine sovereign tribes and because of those regions. We did get some additional vaccine in the state via the federal partnerships in. She says the state's been able to overcome logistical challenges. Posed by it's huge geographic area by arranging for monthly vaccine shipments. Instead of weekly like brother states

Alaska Dr Anthony Inc Department Of Defense Departme Shay Katie Jeremy
Say Yes To Your Kids

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

05:32 min | 1 d ago

Say Yes To Your Kids

"Message is pretty simple. Say yes now. This is not say yes to address the wedding show. This is say yes to your kids. This is yes to the moment that they want to play trains downstairs. This is yes to when your daughter comes up to you in plays wants to play barbies. This is say yes going outside. If you're in the winter playing in the snow this is saying yes to something in your life that you've been saying no to in our conversation. We talked about it a lot. That the ability of dad's just to get lost in the day to day stuff that we do and not be with the day to day stuff that we do is so so profound in core. That message is that we need to learn to say yes more because let me tell you. There are so many moments in your day. Because i have. I'm right there with you. This advice is a reminder for myself as well there are so many moments where my littlest one comes in and she wants ten minutes of my time and do. I just want to do something. I just wanna get an email out the door. And i hear you because during virtual learning if your kids are still at home when you're trying to get work done if you've got a fulltime job i get it. It is not easy. Let me tell you as my kids went back an hour into it on my on tuesday. When the first day it went back. I was already missing him for the idea. That even had that thought. I'm like are you drunk. It was absolutely chaos for the last two months of virtual learning but then my phone damn apple created this memory video of all the different things that they had done during my time with them this past two months and it was absolutely amazing. I remembered all times going sledding. All the time having fun outside all the things we built in the snow. And i was reminded that i did say yes quite a bit at times. Even in the midst of chaos even in the midst of just trying to get some work done and getting ill debt that. I can't do math mountains for my first grader. All of that it was hard. It was difficult and it wasn't easy but learning to say yes is a simple thing and it sounds. It's two words. Say yes but it can be such a shift in your mentality. That i need to leave what i'm doing to go do something else. I want to back this up with a story going all the way back to this past summer and twenty twenty that. There's many moments where i just wanted do work and my wife was home during the summer and i have easily just closed the door. Lock myself in and pretended like our head and eight to five job. But i didn't. There was many times where. I would recruit half the neighborhood to go on a bike ride. And we'll probably have like kids out with me sometimes and people give me a weird looks and i'm like don't worry they're not all mine but let me tell you what happens when i said yes in those moments when i said yes to those moments i had some of my best ideas for this podcast when i'm out engaging with my kids. I've had the best ideas for something next. I'd had the best ideas for new podcasts ideas on the other side of saying us so i want to tell you that on the other side of saying yes is potentially something that can change your life now. That sounds crazy because your mind probably saying casters. Just wild emotions. There's probably a fighting. Why would i want to say yes to that. Because when you enter that chaos and you learn to be calm within the chaos you create this idea that love is surrounding yourself because you're like man breaking super chaos right now but man. My kids love me. I love them. What a great moment in those moments where you can receive the love. The chaos all at once and find humor in sometimes. I remember going for those bike rides and just being like fuck. I'm one lottery amount riding bikes with my kids. It's summer it's just feels like a million bucks. And i mean now looking back and it's winter i'm like damn those days were the good ones but say yes because on the other side of that yes could be. The one thing that is ongoing to unlock repeatedly over time not made it'd be the first time maybe the second time but if you repeat this i am positive that you re engage with your kids on a moment by moment basis ten minutes at a time you can really make a dent in their behavior. You can really make a dent in their loved inc. All of that can be changed on the other side of. Yes so guys say yes when your kids come up to you. I you to do it for one week to give them. Don't tell me during do it. Because they'll probably abuse it but say yes. Every time they come in adult talent. Like i said. Don't tell them you're gonna say yes every time you can try to pause or try to come up with an excuse. Why not but every time. It's possible try to challenge yourself every time the next seven days after hearing this podcast whenever you hear sally yes to your kids when they want you to do something and notice how you feel differently after engaging ten minutes notice after seven days how much more gratitude you have for being a father noticed so much more gratitude you have for life notice. How much more gratitude you have for your wife because you and her both created this abundant ball of anger and love and joy all at the same time all of that can happen on the other side of saying yes

Apple Sally
How to Identify Your Best Customers & Get More of Them

The $100 MBA Show

09:48 min | 2 d ago

How to Identify Your Best Customers & Get More of Them

"Many entrepreneurs when they looked to gain more customers. They don't ask an important question. What kind of customers. Who are you looking for. A lot of us. Spend a lot of time a lot of money and energy acquiring any kind of customer the wrong customer and said well you want to do. Is you want to find your true fans as mentioned in kevin kelly's Blockposts thousand fans. If you're not familiar with the blog post the theory is that if you have a thousand true fans a thousand customers that absolutely love what you do in rave about it. That's all you need for a successful business because you can sell a thousand people something that can make you a living in the whole point. Is that those thousand people of course are going to tell other people when you love something when you absolutely enjoy an experience at a restaurant at a resort experience with a new product or software. You get help. Tell other people about it. Whether it's in person or on social in your mastermind. Whatever the point is is that if you have a thousand people raving about you. You're just going to go gangbusters so you need to find people that are perfect fit. That will do that for you now. Of course it's not easy to get thousand right off the bat you're going to start with one two three four ten twenty one hundred two hundred you get the point. So how do we get to those thousand people. How do we attract the right people what we got to know who they are. We had a densify them. Just like if you wanted to attract talent to your team you'd have a job description right. You put a job post describing. This is who. I'm looking for. So what i want you to do. Is you're going to start creating a description of your best customer that avatar that person now. You don't have to make this up. You don't come out of thin air and say this person is made up and this is what they do and this is the type of business. Just look at your current customer base. Even if you're new you have those special customers. The ones that really are interested in what you do. The ones that congratulate you when you have a new product or new feature via email. They reply to your newsletters there on your weapon ours. They comment on your social posts. I want you to really do some research and identify these people in your customer list. Literally create a spreadsheet and. Write down their name and email address. Even if this is just like a dozen people or half a dozen people that's okay that's start now the dentist who they are. You gotta learn a lot about them. You wanna have a full understanding of who. These people are individually for example. I did this exercise. And i continue to do this. Exercise every single year. And i do customer interviews so reach out to my best customers and i try to learn as much as possible about them. For example one of our customers are the. Mary meeker sisters. Emma and carla pompous there wondering ninja users in the us webinars to grow their business to bring in new customers into their online yoga and pilates school and in the process of that conversation in understanding who they are. We ask questions like what you start this business. How long have you been doing this. How big is your team. How did you discover women are ninja. How'd you hear about it. Why did you choose us another competition. What do you like most about what problems is assault for you. What's next in your journey. What are you excited about in the future of your business. I'm basically like interviewing them. Like interviewing them on sixty minutes or something or on a podcast. I'm trying to get inside their brain. I wanna understand where they're coming from why they made the decisions they meet. What are the circumstances in their business. That causes them to use my product. Also of trying to dig a little deeper find out what is success to them. What are they looking to achieve. I want to know this. Because i want to be able to help them be successful in some way whether it's a now with my product in the future the point here is that i wanna be a part of that success on bought in. So what's the point of this exercise. The reason why you want to get to know your best customers. So well. Because i'm better. You know them the easier. It is to find people like them. If you ever had an employee that Left your company and there are green employees in the job above and beyond your expectations but decided to move on or they're changing careers. It's easy to write a job description for that position because you're basically describing that amazing team member. I'm looking for this person and it's easy for you to do that because you know who that person is. You know what they've done you know their story and you're going to do the same before your customers. Now one of the things that we do in these interviews in these conversations in these video calls is that we actually transcribe them. We actually want to see the words that they use when they talk about themselves and they talk about their business when they talk about their problems with talk about their challenges when they talk about why they chose our product. Why because again. I want to attract people just like them so wanna use the same language. I want to use the same language on my website on my social posts in my email marketing and want my potential superstar customer to read my copy and say they're speaking my language this resonates with me because this is exactly how i feel. How do they know while because they did the research because they did the work and there's nothing like that feeling when you feel like these people get me. It's hard for you to compete with a company that does that so your competition is going to have a hard time competing with you because your target market your customers. Your best customers are flocking to you. Because you're speaking their language now in this process where you're going to find is not. Everybody is your best customer. You're gonna find a thread. you're gonna find. hey home. i best customers have this in common. It could be. They could have established businesses. They could be making at least x amount of money. They have a small team. They've tried other products before mine. This is a really good exercise to make a list of all the things your best customers that you've interviewed have in common and guess what there is your customer avatar. And what you're gonna find is there's a lot of people outside of that and that's okay. Hey because it's better for you to attract the best customers. They're going to save time and money and headaches and problems. What you want are the people that really believe in what you're doing and want what you have is nothing worse than trying to convince somebody. Hey we're number one. We're great trust us. And they were allegedly by then. They're disappointed and it has nothing to do with what you did for them. It just means grizz are not a good fit successful products accessible services accessible businesses. Don't force it. They say this is who we are. This is who we serve if you're gonna love what we have in store for you but none of this is possible if you don't know who those people are if you don't know who are your best customers and what's great about business zandt Success leaves clues right customers that love. You really enjoy what you do that comment on your post. That really liked all the things on social that. Open all your emails. You have their contact. You can reject them. You can ask them some questions some of us when they do this for the first time you feel awkward like man who am i to ask for their time for a quick chat. If you feel awkward dory about it there are a fan. They're gonna love helping you and if you want to be super generous sake. Coffees on you and send them a starbucks gift card. You'll be the best ten dollars you ever spent kaisa. I'm more on today's topic before that. Let me get loved today. Sponsor webinars how well they work to generate new business for coaches consultants and other creators. We know that online marketing is ten times more powerful when you add webinars cheer campaigns but what's right platform to use what's the easiest which platforms can integrate webinars seamlessly into the rest of your marketing infrastructure. And do it all at the right price. Take a look at our very own webinar. Ninja the user. Friendliest eleven our platform ever create. Live automated series hybrid. Webinars make them free or charge for valuable lessons. Send automated emails to promote your webinar. And follow up for more conversions showcase your unique value and do it all without the hassle and stress of navigating pain in the bud software. Try within our ninja absolutely free at webinar ninja dot com and see just how easy and powerful webinars can be. That's webinar ninja dot com for a fourteen day risk-free trial to robert today's lesson. It's really important for you to find your best customers and attract more of them not only because it makes good business and it's going to keep your turn down. You're going to have more customers. You're going to have more money. Come in more revenue more repeat sales all that kind of stuff. But if you don't do that the opposite will happen where you're going to get more customers that you don't really enjoy serve inc than the ones you do and that's a bad place to be in your business where you don't let your customers or you don't resonate with them and you're annoyed by them when you have to answer an email. You're kind of roll your eyes. Oh man this person. That's a horrible place to be. And you have to be proactive about who you want to associate with. We want to work with. We want to speak to every day including your customers. That's the beauty of being an entrepreneur. Is that you get to choose who you serve. Not the other way around.

Mary Meeker Kevin Kelly Carla Emma Headaches United States Starbucks Robert
How to Stand Out in a Fitness Revolution with Khalil Zahar

Entrepreneur on FIRE

07:28 min | 4 d ago

How to Stand Out in a Fitness Revolution with Khalil Zahar

"Today we'll be talking about how to stand out in a fitness revolution because we are parts of a fitness revolution. I can tell you that right now. I mean i've got peleton in my gym right here on thinking about getting a mirror i mean. There's there's a lot of things that are going on. In this world it is a revolution so khalil. That leads me to my first question of why boxing like did you see a trend in the boxing space or is this more born from a passion for the sport. Yeah it's a great question. You know our story really tells that answer well so a lot of people know us for fight camp today but we actually originally started with a product called hicks so h. y. k. S which was like a terrible name But basically are. I started boxing in my life. Pretty late when it was about Twenty one years old and you know my background is actually more in soccer. But i really wanted yet. I fell in love with the sport. And i wanted to compete in studying competitive sport. The twenty one years old. It's it's you know you're kind of behind so at that point. I really wanted to shortcut my way to the east of lucien possible. That was very really adamant about you. Know having the best training regimen possible really tried to optimize single aspect of it and that led us know me to do you want to measure myself on a regular basis and there was not a lot of measuring out there for boxing specific stuff so we created this first version of the product. That's our punch trackers you with them on your race. The calculate the types of country throw measures the speed of every punch and you could recreate performance profile it and that went on to be a very successful product elite community you know. We had multiple olympic teams using it a lot of pro boxers in pro ufc fighters using it And then because boxing anime kickboxing Is a very special sports. Where ninety five percent of. It's not like ninety nine percent of the people that engage in it actually don't entering the ring and get hit but just do it for the fitness aspect of it so we can you know our initial products stuttered to spill two very different. You know typical customer and that kind of drought. It drew us into the fitness world. Fire nation. i really want you to just think that. Hey there's multiple ways to kind of make your start. make your splash. Is it because of a trend or is it because of a passion can it. Maybe be a combination of both. I mean that can kind of be where a zona fire lies. And they can really be a spark. And then of course lease to we can flag ration- and khalil for you. Since you started fight camp how have you seen the connected. Fitness industry evolve. How would just are connected to other people live or you know whether we've got stuff strapped on this. This is kind of connecting all of our stats. What we're doing here. I mean are people working from home. Instead of gyms is actually become the norm. Absolute thing it. It will be for portion of the majority of the portion of the fitness community. I think we're still you know like obviously with covid things have been accelerated loved. But you know we really believe that in the long run working out in a workout room makes a lot more sense to have in your home the same way. You actually have living room in the same way. You have a home theater in a big screen. Tv and a kitchen. We think it's going to be an extension part of our living spaces just because it's not something you you you're doing only once a month you know like a good fitness routine will engage in it at least at least three times a week so you know having to add friction every time that you have to do this with the commute and having to hit the class right on time where it starts. We just don't think it's aligned with the frequency in which you have to engage with it so that's one aspect. The second aspect is like home fitness. Home fitness is very popular today but it started a long time ago You know. And i'm sure some people remember jazzercise tai-bo that was really like the the beginning of the category but you know it led to a lot of like scan products especially specifically like in the late nineties. A lot of infomercial at the end of the night like black and white. And you don't train trying to target people that really wanted to buy a dream but now this silly inc a fitness and a healthy lifestyle and i can feel that this new generation of companies are lot more thin. -tic they're genuine. They're offering a better way and they're not targeting someone who's you know trying to press on the fact that you know you may not feel good about yourself. Look at all these people in shape. But they're they're targeting a healthy lifestyle. And i think they're building the products accordingly as well. I mean khalil. It's critical these days to stand up above the noise to be unique from your competition. I mean that just every industry a hundred percent across the board and let's be honest. Cop is fierce in the fitness space. So what specifically have you done to make fight camp standout. We're yet to see a serious competitor in boxing and kickboxing right. Like we. You know we. There's some concepts out there but you know when we started it was not about. You know trying to beat the competition. It was more. You know like there's a very unique opportunity here and being the first to bring a connected experience to boxing and kickboxing from home. And you know. We thought the power of teaching people how to do boxing. Well was also like you know a statement for you. Know the growth of boxing with a lot of franchise that were growing as well. You know like pre covid. Boxing gyms and kickboxing gyms. The nation were growing very very fast. It was becoming a very big fast-growing exercise that was gaining in popularity. But you know. Boxing is not easily. You know it's not easily accessible in terms of flake. There's a lot of technique you can just get a bag and hit it but it is not proper boxing. You actually have to develop the foundation you have to. You know work on your reflexes and then you have to know why you through a certain bunch and why you don't throw that certain bunch and how to move so we wanted to provide in the centric experience and at the same time naked interactive and. There was nobody else that was doing that at a time. Fire

Boxing Khalil Lucien Hicks Soccer Olympic
Tom Bilyeu ON Why Passion Is For Wimps!

Leadership and Loyalty

06:51 min | 5 d ago

Tom Bilyeu ON Why Passion Is For Wimps!

"As leader whether you're a ceo someone in the c. Suite sales later on in a leader in any capacity you know that today entrepreneurs canada rockstars of the millennial generation. But you've heard me say so many times that i believe that entrepreneurship business leadership about something far greater the money mo- more important becoming the next entrepreneurial unicorn it's about purpose and a successful business kellyanne. If you're in touch with your purpose become a way for you to positively impact the world. I'll guess today is tom billion now. He's the co founder of the two thousand fourteen inc. Five hundred company quest nutrition. It was a unicorn startup. Valued at over one billion dollars. He's the co founder and host of impact theory tons mission is the creation of empowering media based ip the acceleration of mission based businesses. Tom is driven to help. People develop the skills they need to improve themselves in the world and is intent is in using commerce and to address the joe. Pandemic of physical and mental malnourishment. Tell me regularly inspiring audiences of entrepreneurs change makers thought leaders at some of the most prestigious conferences and seminars around the world including abundance three sixty eight fast and freedom fastlane. So i'm has also been a guest on some crappy little show. What was his name some guy. We talked to tell you podcast. He's been at the school of greatest podcast and he's been featured in forbes inc and success and the huffington post and he's currently on the innovation board x prize foundation so lease and gentlemen. Please live the be here man. Thank you so much. Thanks really appreciate you being on now. Listen i know you've done frigging thousands of views i have to. We've been doing it for years. There's some really important things you like to talk about. talk about. And we'll definitely get to however a lot of the things that you're asked podcasts. The tom bill. You fans of bowed many many times and so i want to dive deep. Is that all right man. Please statement somewhere new love good so the first thing i wanna do is a kind of style from the obvious and then go a little bit more so we talked about the question nutrition. It was his unit. Con- up blah blah blah. It's the stuff. That leonard on the tony robbins podcast But you didn't start out being a business builder and entrepreneur. You start out with something that might in fact seemed like the polar opposite of the pat success. Which was your lover. Phil and you went to film school. How did your family feel about you tripping the light brand tacit rather get yourself a good steady job I think that you know my mom lived in constant and still does quite. Frankly live in a constant state of panic that i was going to do nothing with my life that i would Be unhappy in some way and so she worried but very quietly so when i was a kid she was very encouraging. Wanted me to go chase my dreams and so i didn't grow up with that like pressure from my parents or anything. They wanted to see me happy. I was very passionate about film making. They could see my excitement. They wanted to see me. Pursue it So they were very encouraging about that. My dad is. I got towards graduation. Film school he sent me starting at month. Six or five hundred member exactly my senior year. It was five more months four months three more months one month at two when he was not going to be helping me financial anymore so literally the day. I graduated I had no more assistance from my family so that was actually great so from that perspective. He didn't have too many concerns Because he just believed. I would somehow figure it out. So that long story but took me through my remedial jobs phase where you know barely making ends meet but i made some I made some what ended up being quite smart decisions around managed apartment complexes and things like that really cheap rent as why was while you were in films who know right after i graduated. Put again as about weirdness right like all you went to film school you went to film school. I assuming you want to make films and managing apartments. It's a weird mix. I mean we know people go into the arts often wait tables. You managed apartments. That must've been that entrepreneurial spirit in you as well even doing that film time. it's interesting. there really wasn't and i. I am by nature. I am the world's worst entrepreneur. I don't have any real entrepreneurial Instincts in me so even the apartment managing thing was was totally an accident. It was me capitalizing. An opportunity that presented itself and that i will say i've been good in my life about winning opportunity presents itself. I take that opportunity But if that one hadn't fallen in my lap than that it's terrifying to think what the outcome would have been. So when i went to film school i thought that i would. I was showing real promise zone school. And i thought that i had natural talent for it and that shows you my mindset. I was very focused on what what comes naturally to me and so i thought it maitlis gifted filmmaker and so the first half of them school. I did very very well. And then i got selected as one of the four people to direct senior thesis film. Which is a big deal and so when it happened was like oh my god. I'm like bud shows. I'm literally one of four people chosen to direct this film. And i'm gonna make this. It's going to be amazing. i'm gonna go out. I'm gonna get a three picture. Deal from hollywood off the back of how good this film is going to be. And and my life will be. That's literally what i was thinking. And i showed up on the first day of domain with virtually no preparation and to give i wrote the script like to the minute that it was due so a couple of hours before. I jot something down which only feeds ending it gets elected which only feeds into. I'm just naturally good at this. So i roll up onset completely unprepared and i fail miserably very publicly incredibly embarrassingly and then that shakes my whole world and makes me realized that i am. I am not a talented filmmaker like that was the hard realization that i had phase at that moment.

Thousand Fourteen Inc. School Of Greatest Podcast Forbes Inc Innovation Board X Prize Found Tom Bill Huffington Post Tony Robbins TOM Canada Leonard Phil Maitlis Hollywood
Urban Meyer to keep health in mind as new Jacksonville Jaguars coach

Wendell's World & Sports

04:41 min | Last week

Urban Meyer to keep health in mind as new Jacksonville Jaguars coach

"A jacksonville is the best job opening in the nfl. right now. they've got eleven total picks in the upcoming grab first round picks one hundred million dollars in salary cap space. They have the number one pick so all unless unless someone is as a complete and utter fool. that are going to be Drafting trevor lawrence. Whether number one. Pick and trevor lawrence. It's supposed to be a generational great. Come on man come on tomorrow to mark. Among on if sean con come on man is about time you get serious if you can go ahead and get yourself but yourself in the position where hey you know what. We've got a really good thing going here. In terms of the future we covered that bear. And we've got all of this to work with you know. How many times would love to be in that position. Already mentioned the fact in the nba raphael stone in general managers. In general in that league you ask them what would you rather have in terms of rebuilding program. All of these guys who say man. I'm a multiple picks a lot of salary cap space to go ahead and do my thing. Would you get that injectable even with a hard salary cap now. Jacksonville isn't the same as far as free agent destination as a los angeles or the bigger markets. But still you're talking about. The state of florida was no income state tax. You're speaking about ill a situation where you're gonna be working with a generational great quarterback possibly. Hopefully i mean there's a lot of things you have a really really good young talent on that team that a lot because the team one and fifteen but there's there's some ambers within the within the the fire that you can That you can work with. I mean it should be very attractive job for a gm but if a gm any worth of any you know any worth is going to go in there and you're going to be talking about. Yeah i'm going to be in charge of the roster. I mean come on man you know the next bill polian next ron. Woolfe is not going to be like yes. That's pretty good and then since you already hired the couch you gotta make sure that the coach in the general manager president of football operations are together as one as far the philosophy is concerned. And we don't know where myers philosophy because well. He's never coached. He's never coached in the nfl so he might have a philosophy all this kind of stuff. What is it based off of. It can be based on what he did in college because college in the nfl completely different animals. Yeah you might have a philosophy of how you deal with people in college. What when you're dealing with people in college. They're eighteen to twenty two years old when you're going to be different of course and you know this coming central tell you. It's a lot of different dealing with grown men who have mortgages who are building their brands. Who have kids who have other responsibilities lot different way. You work with them. Sure in a college situation. You are of the defacto you are. You are the maker you are the guy you are the when i say jump you answer. How high when i say run through brick wall put your head down and go through that brick wall inc a college. You can get away with that stuff in the. Nfl is not. You're not coach. Employees i mean. This isn't supervisor employees working together. This is a collective understanding in terms of where we're going so yeah you wouldn't have any philosophy and you can have. You can try to find players that are into fit that philosophy but how rigid is that philosophy going to be. If you're urban meyer in college will you can go ahead and you can recruit anybody who you want to. You can text. You can call and you can do all these things and you can go ahead and develop a relationship over the years so you can even have a better understanding it. This young man is going to be able to fit the philosophy that you have in college. You can do that shit and the nfl you can't and the nfl is a business. And if you speaking about philosophy you better think about the philosophy. A win. Because i used to do all that bullshit about. Yeah you know. I bring these young men into the league. And you know these guys are young and some of these come from underprivileged backgrounds and these guys never have a checking account before. These guys don't know how to do this and these guys don't know how to do that so for me as a coach especially being a black coach with these kids coming into the nfl coming in basically as kids even though there are twenty one twenty two years old. I feel it's a responsibility for me to show them the ways of live and the show them how to do things the have them grow and mature of by the time that they retire that they'll be able to have a foundation for them to be successful one. Football is over

Trevor Lawrence Sean Con NFL Woolfe GM Jacksonville Bill Polian Brick Wall Inc NBA Los Angeles Myers Florida RON Football Meyer
Christina Anstead reveals new Maya Angelou-inspired back tattoo amid split from husband Ant: ‘Still I Rise’

Daily Pop

01:39 min | Last week

Christina Anstead reveals new Maya Angelou-inspired back tattoo amid split from husband Ant: ‘Still I Rise’

"Hollywood is going through some drastic changes. You guys take a look at crecy. The fed's new inc. Her tattoo runs down her spine It's inspired by my angela. Maya angelou poem that says still i rise. Now clearly she's been through it This comes after her split. From and and said i love the look of this hat tattoo. I think it chic. I love the message. I think it goes good. I think it works with what she's going through right now. Oh there's not get hot photo. Yeah i i agree with you. I love the tattoo. I love the message. I love the background of it. I just always say when you're going through a life change especially break-up do not make a permanent decision until a year later but it is still i rise and we could you reference to anything in life. Are you gonna want arrived and this. This is this justice conservative side that he pretends he does not have he. He hates plastic surgery. He doesn't like that too. He loves to be extremely proper. I agree with justin. I joan. I really wanna be cooler than i am. I just ironically do not love tattoo and especially not on a woman. I just don't know why like. I don't like their cool. I you know. Everyone's you know free to express themselves. However they want to. She's obviously stunning. It looks great. She got a hop back. I just don't i don't know does nothing for me. I've never wanted to be like today's the day that like. I'm gonna inc myself up with something.

New Inc. Maya Angelou Angela Hollywood FED Joan Justin Gonna Inc
Breakthrough at Home Pain and Mental Health Relief with Richard Hanbury, Founder Sana Health, Inc

Outcomes Rocket

04:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Breakthrough at Home Pain and Mental Health Relief with Richard Hanbury, Founder Sana Health, Inc

"Walk back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting richard henry. He is the founder of saana health. remonstration platform for pain relief and deepak station. Richard develop the technology behind saana to eradicate his own life threatening pain. Problem following a spinal cord injury from a jeep crash near saana in yemen and nineteen. Ninety-two richard has an mba. From the wharton school in healthcare and also a law degree from the college of law in london the original benchtop device removed all his nerve damage pain in three months saving his life. He has spent twenty five years developing the sonnet technology from the original benchtop device to the current device undergoing clinical trials sonnet uses pulsed light and sound and a heart rate variability feedback loop to guide the user in a deep state of relaxation. Clinical trials have been completed in opioid use disorder and fibromyalgia and sauna is launching in fibromyalgia and twenty twenty one however is available today and richard is going. Tell us more about it. And i'm just really excited to have the opportunity to interview richard and have them bring forth this technology to to the the world richard such a pleasure to have you here today to be thank it. Yeah and so before we dive into saana and it saana dot. Io folks if you're curious tell us a little bit about you and what got you into healthcare thank you yes as a nineteen year old kid. I was traveling in in the yemen. And i was given a choice of a head on collision in my jeep next to a petrol truck or two gulf bridge and i chose gulf a bridge. 'cause i figured We would either way. There would be so remains to find if i went to the bridge. Say dance with dry riverbeds sixty foot dying and cheap crumpled up A results in spun good injuries from thc ten. Which is betty button level plus a traumatic brain injury and they say old. That was why. I had to be medevac k. I was clinically dead for eight minutes back to matt intercom a middle of that resulted in damaged problem that was say sparrows given a five year life expectancy sarabia. It was the question of near figure. Something i myself or old. I say that was the mother of invention necessity. It's unbelievable i mean that is crazy. So you're driving a jeep and there's this truck just heading straight at you and you're like explosive beth falloffs bridge and you just made the choice. I mean like when that happened. Richard to win you actually remember like what point jr actually start remembering what happened and gained consciousness. And how did they find you so it was semi passenger was burglary but was in good enough shape to festival shine in arabic. So the people watching the right to danger. Petrol cigarettes is they were running. Schools tile passwords lit cigarettes. In khao is everything was checked in the gasoline tank Say yeah ben. E managed to get them to throw away the cigarettes publicized and transported us to vote what they very loosely called the hospital. And that's my friend. Got the insurance companies to send them back pain coming up. Unbelievable i mean. I mean that is just unbelievable Era miracle the be here spell. And i'm sure that the road to recovery was not easy for you and you know lots of gain. You said i had to do something about this. And that was the beginning of sauna and so you've made leaps and bounds. Since the beginning you're recovered very happy for you. Richard and As i'm sure your family is to so now you have this device and this company. Why don't you tell us a little bit more about what it is how it works and that way the listeners could get educated on it including myself suddenly say basically. All pain is some combination of central mediation. Which has had brain prices pain and prefer plain. Which is the signal coming into the brain. Now with mike pain i had sponging. Tbi and i was on very extreme faction where it was all about how the brain was pricing pain signal. But it wasn't really paints were coming up from my spine. It was essentially corrupt. Data stream is very similar to what you get with phantom limb. Actually being told her in pain is being told your visits we had signal. That doesn't quite make sense. Say with me. I was very rainy. Lucky the original device was able to wipe all by damage pain

Richard Saana Health Saana Wharton School In Healthcare Yemen Fibromyalgia Richard Henry Matt Intercom Marquez Sarabia Spinal Cord Injury College Of Law Beth Falloffs London Betty JR BEN Mike
New York's Broadway costume designers lament about being left out of coronavirus aid

Morning Edition

04:25 min | 3 weeks ago

New York's Broadway costume designers lament about being left out of coronavirus aid

"Shut down in March, actors and stagehands weren't the only ones affected. The Save Our Stages Act just passed as part of the Cove in relief bill and will help theaters and cultural institutions tread water until the pandemic is over. But as W one way sees Jennifer of Anasco reports some businesses that support the arts industry say they've been for gotten John Christians in New York Inc has built costumes for a lot of the big shows Cat's frozen and the new musical six, which was supposed to open on March. 12 the day that all of Broadway shutdown So we're getting ready for opening night That night, Every machine was filled. Every table was filled. People were doubled up. People were coming and going, and then Just like that they were closed. The leadoff all 52 of their employees. Like everyone they thought maybe let me for a few weeks, But in June, they were told No theater won't reopen in 2020, and for us, Everything stopped, like all of our orders just completely stopped. That's Brian Blight, Christensen's life partner and the business manager of John Christians in New York. And it was really a moment of what are we going to do? Are we gonna close? We put everything in storage, Do we? Walk away. They didn't Instead, Blake realized they weren't alone all through the city, small businesses that depend on Broadway and the theater industry. We're figuring out if they could survive the pandemic to And the shops are very specialized. A costumes aren't closed. You can't buy them off the wreck. They're made to measure for specific actors and designed for performers to dance and sweat in them eight times a week. Here's Christenson. But we do is cut your it should be the finest quality. It's the best interiors the best flat linings that we confined to make the product that will last a long time. And be beautiful and worth that ticket price, Christiansen and Blight realized they were part of an entire custom ecosystem. It includes specialty dry cleaners who care for $10,000 dresses made of fragile fabrics, study with sequence or flowers and people who know how to make those flowers and people who put the pleats in the fabric. And makers of tap shoes and toe shoes and beat artists and fabric painters. There are people who make specialty undergarments and hats and armor. The list goes on. So the two men joined with 54 other small businesses to found the costume industry coalition. They're clear about what they need money. Life once a kind of bailout from the government. $3 million to erase the debt of these small businesses for 2020 we have to, I think in this country I'm talking about the arts and culture as something that is a warm, fuzzy and wonderful the for the human soul and start talking about it as the economic driver that it actually is, because the economic between Arkin cultures huge, the U. S. Bureau of Economic Analysis says in 2017. The latest figures they have available. The arts and culture sector was contributing about $877 billion to the GDP. That's 4.5%. It employs over five million arts workers nationwide. In New York state. The sector contributes over 7% of the GDP. That's bigger than finance. It's bigger than construction. Hi, I'm Kevin McCollum. I'm a producer of Broadway shows, including the musical six. The one that was supposed to open the day Broadway closed. Save Our Stages is so important. Unfortunately, the shops are somewhat not involved in that. The venues will get grants, but the shops that support them. They need to wait until the orders come in. They say That's why the government should also give money to the costume industry. And to those who build sets and props. Because this is about more than the question of whether theater will survive. It will Well, the artists who make it the artisans who make it still be able to call themselves New Yorkers. Sure, I guess you could say Let's move everyone out of the city. And if that's the kind of city New York wants to be, I don't think that's the case. I think we want the artist to be able to afford and work and live in New York City. A few avenues over

John Christians New York Inc Brian Blight Christensen Christenson Jennifer Christiansen U. S. Bureau Of Economic Analy Blake New York Blight Kevin Mccollum Government New York City
Episode 67:  the Million Mom March-- Continuing it's Legacy 20 Years Later

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

03:44 min | Last month

Episode 67: the Million Mom March-- Continuing it's Legacy 20 Years Later

"So Donna I want to start with you. Can you talk to our listeners? I know you're going to have to be brief about it. But tell our listeners what prompted you to begin the million mom, March, what was the million mom, March you off and can you take us through your journey? Sure. Well, it was August 10th 1999 typical vacation day on Fire Island. I was with my daughters who were four and five years old that summer they had also gone to a JCC day camp in New Jersey and never what I dreamed that suddenly I would be frightened that they would be targets off from a white supremacist on that day a white supremacist storm to JCC Day Camp, Granada Hills, California. He opened fired on Little Campers and fortunately none of the kids dog. But they suffered great injuries, including a sixteen-year-old day camp counselor and my world changed at that moment at the time. I was a part-time publicist for Late Show with David Letterman. I felt like, you know, I have time to do something serious like volunteer to do PR for gun violence prevention organization. And and really the only one I knew of and usually get through to was was called handgun control Inc then but for purpose of this podcast, I'm calling it by its since rebranded name since 2001 the Brady organization, so I called Grady but I filled a volunteers and it was very hard to volunteer at that particular moment because Congress had just a few weeks before failed to close the gun-show loophole that was exposed when Columbine happened. That's how those Shooters got their guns through a loophole. And so there was a lot of discouragement in the basic. I was told but we still tell people who call your cock. Spend and I was embarrassed that I hadn't actually called my congressman at all since becoming a mother and you know, I knew the number by heart because I had worked on Capitol Hill for years right out of college. So I know the importance of making your voice heard and I even understood the importance when like five women would sit out in our reception area five women used to terrify my boss US senator Russell long. He thought five women sitting out and reception area meant five thousand women were right behind them. So I am going to tell you a secret JK I I wrote a book so I had more detail about how the whole minimum March came together and it's a great book. Thank you, but I left out as a little secret and I know I've told a lot of people that you're not the first person I'm talking but I think it's frozen on a broadcast. My goal was never to really get a million moms. My goal was to get five moms in every congressional district in this country but to Orange Is the 2175 person March just in the sounded interesting so because I'm a pure person million mom, March a little more Pizzazz, but I thought okay million. Mom March million is a thousand million as a metaphor, you know for a lot of people and so we launched it on Labor Day when I say we I get all my friends who I'd worked with. I worked at CBS news for several years. I worked in different, you know different places that immediate mavens and they helped me put together, you know logos slogans a press release and we launched on Labor Day. I was actually shocked on how newsworthy they they considered a million mom March and Mother's Day. It was nine months from the day. I applied to the permit on August seventeenth two Mother's Day that made fourteen. We were the headlines wrote them, you know takes nine months to make a baby nine months to make March, you know, maybe you know, we get congressmen to pass laws to protect those

Jcc Day Camp Pr For Gun Violence Prevention Handgun Control Inc Brady Organization Fire Island Granada Hills Senator Russell Long Donna David Letterman Grady New Jersey California Capitol Hill Congress Orange Cbs News United States
Sweats Are Beating the Pants Off Office Wear

Business Wars Daily

04:56 min | Last month

Sweats Are Beating the Pants Off Office Wear

"More than six months ago producer. Gwen moran wrote this story about the new fashioned way that swept the country early in the pandemic admit it you succumbed as well to the sweatpants craze what we didn't know back in may's how long lasting that trend would be although as you'll hear some sartorial pundits predicted. Then that sweats were here to stay now. Whether that's a good or bad thing we'll leave that up to you. Take a listen back to this story about the rivalry between champion and lululemon. The late great fashion designer. Karl lagerfeld once sneered sweatpants. Or a sign of defeat with apologies to mr lagerfeld. He never had to do as seven. Am zoom meeting as stay at home. Orders have stretched well beyond their original end dates. Our work lives are increasingly blending with her home lives nowhere. Is that shift. More apparent than in our pero dressing down has become the norm as a result sales of apparel and accessories dropped nearly eighty percent between march and april but there is one bright spot on the otherwise dismal retail horizon. Sales of active wear or at leisure are soaring in particular sweat pants or having a moment in april g kua. We are living in the age of sweat pants and never going back. Even the devil is traded product. For more downscale duds folks editor-in-chief in style icon. Anna wintour posted an instagram shot of herself working at home in tracksuit bottoms this despite once swearing she would never wear them. Just how much growth are we talking about well. Data from tracking firm edited found that sales of sweat pants are up a whopping thirty six percent over the same period. Last year it makes sense. A recent harris poll found that more than half of employed. Americans are working from home. At the same time videoconferencing has skyrocketed as meetings and interviews have gone remote. You may need to be picture. Perfect from the shoulders up but down below. All bets are off sweats. Yoga pants were tracked bottoms. Call them what you will. They're stretchy comfortable and exceedingly forgiving of those late night. Pandemic sour dough bread and butter benches wall street is betting on the trend at least for now analysts susan anderson from be riley. Fdr told fortune that what selling is casual active in lounge wear last week. Shares of lululemon athletic inc rose more than ninety percent hitting a record high. The brand is credited with kicking off the athol leisure segment and simeon seal from b. m. o. capital markets call lululemon an at home kobe winner while the luxury leading may be the it brand of the moment. Lou may have some competition from classic competitor. Hanes brands champion during a call with analysts early. May hanes brand. Ceo gerald evans said the champion dot com sales had tripled. He said volumes. Were at black friday or cyber monday levels. Champion success lies. In the brand's cool factor. Being on the upswing recently and company has been smart about partnerships to in march hanes. Brands unveiled an exclusive multi year agreement with amazon to carry its popular c nine champion line which had previously been sold at target in april. The company announced a new partnership with sesame street for the un's but for those who don't care about cool or if you stop carrying when you stopped going outside champion has a significant leg up in another arena and that's price while some lululemon bottoms will set you back more than one hundred. Twenty five bucks. You can score a pair of champions for less than a third of that price. If sweatpants newfound social status is making you think about tossing all your old suits and ties. You might just want to wait a bit. It seems a backlash has already begun the los angeles times. Deputy fashion editor admonished readers. Dress like the adults are getting paid to be and recent articles like thirteen stylish ways to dress up sweat pants on business insider indicate that even the work from home crowd may wanna feel a bit more put together as leisure brands battle to get people in their pants. Some questions remain record. High unemployment will continue to affect consumer spending and more companies announced. That remote work is here to stay casual everyday. May also be here to stay with no nosy co workers around judge fashion choices workers to fault more minimalist wardrobes after all as long as they pass the sniff test how many pairs of stretchy pants does anyone really need. The answers will come as more businesses open and people go back to work. We'll traditional dress code stand or will homebody style find its way into the office while athletes. Your manufacturers are pulling up. They're not so big kid pants and making the most of the moment. Employees may be hedging their bets over memorial day weekend data from edited showed shape wear one of the top five apparel categories. Selling out so maybe all that sour dough bread can't be ignored after all

Gwen Moran Mr Lagerfeld Lululemon Athletic Inc Karl Lagerfeld Hanes Brands Ceo Gerald Evans Anna Wintour Susan Anderson Lululemon FDR Harris Riley LOU Brands Amazon UN Los Angeles Times
Night Time, When You Can Log It and Some Tips

Behind the Prop

05:18 min | Last month

Night Time, When You Can Log It and Some Tips

"What's up while inc. Bobby how are you. i'm good here. We go again another week. Another podcast and today happens to be december. The twenty first. What's special about today well. Today is the winter solstice. It is the shortest day of the year. If you will as far as daylight is concerned and so this would also be the darkest day of the year. That's correct and we are going to talk about. What is nighttime question. That i get asked a lot around. Aviation what are the definitions. And when can i log it and win. Can i land in it and canada's a night landing that kind of comes up around the fly school lot and we'll share some stories and tips and tricks about some nighttime flying as we go through this as well while you're dp probably look at logbooks a lot and make sure people got there three hours of night and there other accomplishments at night I would say as a as a recreational pilot for a number of years before about the flight school. I would make sure i did my night. Flying in my night landings every ninety days. But i really had to look it up almost every time because it's not something that i spend every day thinking about and i. It's confusing to a person who doesn't do this every day for a living it is. It is You know obviously. The requirements to be current tonight is three takeoffs and landings within the preceding ninety days That's that's the daytime requirement and all or or the just normal currency requirement but then To become for night you out to have three takeoffs and landings to a full stop Within the preceding ninety days now The question is well. What counts as nighttime. Yeah i think it is. The definition of what night is is. What's hard for me as a recreational pilot. Probably many others to know when they can and can't log their landings and when they can and can't log nighttime. I think i think what happens and and try to teach this out of all my instructors. The instructor guides all this for private pilots. Right they call you. They say hey solo. We've done cross country. You're getting check ride ready. We have to do this and they talk about three hours night. Nighttime and talk about ten landings at an airport with the control tower and blah blah blah. Whatever the wreck say the cf. I guides that and so then you go do it and they log it on the log book for you and then they sign off on it and you're done and you know now i gotta do that again in the next proceeding ninety days. But you don't know what that really meant because you were guided and that's why private pilots struggle with some of these wrecks because the kind of thrown out into the ocean on their own. And now you've got to figure it out. So i would constantly try and figure this out so i'll refer people back to this podcast forever. There really are three periods. That i think the faa and the foreign talk about these three periods. There is a sunset to sunrise Which is when the sun. I guess i'm not an almanac guy but when the sun crest goes down a row across the horizon and normally i look at weather bug because it's the front app on my iphone home screen and if you scroll down the now it says the sun's gonna rise and set it's got a little depiction and i know what that is right so i know that that timeframe of day i need my position lights on and i need my anti collision on if my aircraft has that pretty pretty simple rules there Far ninety one two nine. If you want to go look it up. The the second period is the end of civil twilight to the beginning of morning civil twilight. So that's a period. That is not as easy to calculate and have to look that up in an almanac. There's a great website. I use probably disco searched. Google for tell me where civil twilight starts today where i'm at and this website will come up and it really shows the daylight and the brackets of night civil twilight and daytime and the. What's nice about that website. Is i know how long it is. So civil toilets. Somewhere between twenty and thirty five minutes after sunset depending on where you're at in the world Let's assume none of this applies to alaska where it might be daytime all day or nighttime all day But the civil twilights are. Are the book ends between daylight sunset and then really what is considered nighttime. And then really what you. What i've learned after looking at up. Many many times is the third period is really that period one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise. And that's where the faa says you can log your night landings for currency to have passengers with you at night and that's far sixty one point five seven b. bravo Which talks about that so really three periods. The kind of before the sun goes down in the sun comes up that sunset to sunrise. Then we got civil twilight on both ends of that as well and then we've got the one hour of time between that after sunset and before sunrise where i can get my currency done to have passengers with me at nighttime

Bobby Canada FAA SUN Google Alaska Bravo
Google hit with its third antitrust lawsuit since October by bipartisan coalition of states

Here & Now

00:35 sec | Last month

Google hit with its third antitrust lawsuit since October by bipartisan coalition of states

"Bipartisan. Mo mentum to regulate the tech industry states have filed a third antitrust lawsuit against Google this fault. Today, 38 states to the Alphabet Inc own company, accusing it of having an illegal monopoly over online search. Colorado's attorney general says consumers have been denied the benefits of competition, including quote The possibility of higher quality services and better privacy protections. The lawsuits against Google come on top of two others filed against the social networking giant Facebook this month. Both companies are among NPR's sponsors.

Mo Mentum Alphabet Inc Google Colorado Facebook NPR
How to Build a Dynamic B2B Marketing Team With Mitch Fanning

Marketing Spark

06:07 min | Last month

How to Build a Dynamic B2B Marketing Team With Mitch Fanning

"With provides marketing software and services for the multifamily industry. Welcome to marketing spark mitch. Thanks for having me on mark. Maybe we can start by telling me a little bit about how long you've been at rent sink and what rents inc does so been at renting inc for about a year and a half and As you've you've already kind of mentioned Rinsing inc provides marketing solutions for the multifamily. So one way you can think about it. One way the listeners can think about it is at its multi it's hub spot for multifamily but just with services. My role is not only to help shape product strategy but to formalize and execute on the go to market and scale operations so what does multifamily just to give us a little bit of color on what that involves okay. So this is interesting because my background is not a multifamily. Multifamily is really the the owner operators the investors the property management firms. That essentially you know by manage and essentially invest in apartment buildings. And what's really interesting to me at least in this space. Is that this industry when it comes to marketing is kind of where the bb space was like ten years ago. Smeeting and what i mean by that is what it comes to technology when it comes to their technology. Stacks and the things that they're doing. They are just kind of catching up to the to the bbc's base so it's almost like history is repeating itself so as a marketer if you're dealing with customers who may not be terribly tech savvy. Does that mean that a lot of your marketing is around education. Because you've got people who may not be using a lot of technology at all. Do you have to win them. Over to the fact that technology is is a valuable and useful tool and then convince them that your software is something that they they should consider. I think just like i would say any Any industry or any situation When things are Kind of Ahead of its time. I would have said that was the case. Maybe three three four years ago Couple of things have Have changed that number one year. Getting into a situation where you're finding a lot of young people are running these marketing company marketing teams in In multifamily and to covid people have had the change. The way they've done business. And i i know that's probably a reoccurring theme on this podcast but Multifamily different so over the years. You've held a number of leadership marketing roles at a variety of companies. And i. i think it's given you some really interesting perspective on the marketing landscape. How it's evolved over the years. Can you talk a little bit about the role of the cmo an early stage company. Because it's really important job but when it comes after the products been developed it comes after a sales team has been created and sometimes the marketing person is to the game for release for burglary speaking. So what is their role and and how do they establish themselves so that they can have a seat at the table. This is a great question and we probably could probably talk a lot longer than fifteen minutes on this one particular subject. I would say first of all having if i'm being honest you as a marketer you really need to be honest with yourself and what i mean by that is you really have to ask yourself. Am i a builder or my farmer. And what i think that means at least to me is not everyone is designed to be in an early stage tech tech environment In not also includes anyone else outside of marketing and conclude product excetera. But if you are that person The one thing i would say is your you need to be really good at standing things up an. That's everything from the technology. That's that's that's everything to do with the programs etc. But i think you also need to be really good at understanding the business and i think one of the things and i would say that no matter what stage of the business. You're in but i think a lot of times early stage marketers come in as individual contributors and they get stuck there and the problem with that is they get siloed and they're not able to connect what they do to business results so i would say that's number one but also say you have to really understand other other functions outside of your own and i don't think a lot of marketers spend a lotta time understanding business in general whether it sas understanding what sas means the business model behind that the metrics that you know investors and ceo's actually track and two. They don't spend enough time outside of their own this one. So what do you mean by that. I think what i mean by that. Is they so here. Here's the thing when you go from a individual contributor to leading marketing the toughest thing beyond the things i just mentioned is managing up and educating internally and i'd say think it's it's something that just marketers Have this infliction over. But i think it's just a hard thing to to train yourself to do in other words continually trying to communicate what the vision of the company is what marketing is doing externally but also internally

Rents Inc Rinsing Inc Mitch BBC CMO SAS
Chris Evans to voice Buzz Lightyear in new Pixar movie

Married With Microphones

00:32 sec | Last month

Chris Evans to voice Buzz Lightyear in new Pixar movie

"Evans takes on another superhero role I news is Jesse Paniagua has more details. Captain America actor Chris Evans is set to voice Buzz Lightyear in an upcoming Pixar movie. The movie entitled Lightyear explores the origin story of the Human Buzz Lightyear. The action figure is based on It's a prequel to the four toy story movies in which Tim Allen voice the Buzz Lightyear toy. The new movie is being directed by Angus MacLean, contributing animator for The Incredibles, Monsters, Inc and ready to Eat. Right here comes out June 17th 2022.

Jesse Paniagua Chris Evans Buzz Lightyear Captain America Evans Pixar Angus Maclean Tim Allen Monsters, Inc
Snapdragon 888 or Triple-8? (with David Imel

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

03:37 min | Last month

Snapdragon 888 or Triple-8? (with David Imel

"Have you. I've had you onstream yard before right like we've messed around with these inc. Sell their plan really easy. And it's this is literally one of those companies that sort of they were around for a little bit and then cove it hit and then it was like this is one of those indispensable tools now. It's so nice. I mean this is of all the subscriptions that i have bought and i bought a lot of them in twenty twenty. This is the one that has paid the most dividends for sure. Anyway david back on the show all right. So i got no i. I figured we would just get on. We haven't really been able to kick it for a little while Busy with stuff. It's one of those like typical things this year. Where like we don't fall off the face of the planet but it's more like one message every five days and very infrequent comparatively. Yeah well. let's see how you've been for for the last like so long. I don't know. I don't even remember when you were on the show weeks. I guess i remember doing my darkroom. But it's been a while. I don't know what has happened in the last few weeks. There been anything that's happened. Did the iphone reviews that took up a huge portion of my life. Because i did all four. Oh god yeah. I did written components of all four. And then i did a video component of the rig the pro in the regular one in the mini. So what were what. Were your verdicts on them. Because i think this is always one of those really interesting things. Because when you and i were working together at andrew authority it was always really interesting for people to hear what andrew authority guys thought of the iphones Yeah i mean. I still like trying to i. O s a lot. It's just. I dunno it's too simplistic in i. Every time i jump back onto like a pixel five or something. I'm just like this is so much better from a software experience but at the same time. There's so many benefits to being on ios if you have other apple devices that just can't be matched by other companies. So it's it's hard because like a lot of people have started messaging me now. Because they saw that i was using an iphone recently and then they just a now they'd like won't message me on the other platforms that i have to do all carey so don't carry phones and it's like you know but yeah. It is a dual career at this point. But i have to admit i'm still doing my my content on the iphone twelve's basically I haven't said this on any platform yet. An david david noses because i've told like him and maybe just isa. I'm trying to log miss. It's not as easy as it's never easy. But i figured this year figure this year is the time to try because we're not going anywhere but yeah i'm going to be doing all the iphone stuff over the next few weeks leading up to christmas. All that stuff. Plenty of plenty of videos in the works. I don't know the iphone. Twelve pro has been a comfort zone. I find myself back to it. Because as you said it's a little simplistic yeah. That's fair i don't know like i. I just keep coming back to it. Though i will say. And i've i've been ranting about it for years that i hate the mac models because they're always like big and loud. I might actually keep this one of the max. Yeah i think the flat sides actually help. Yeah i'm i'm using the mini right now.

Andrew Authority David Andrew David David Carey Apple
Facebook struggled to combat lies and misinformation all year

The 3:59

05:04 min | Last month

Facebook struggled to combat lies and misinformation all year

"You took a look at facebook and twenty twenty and the many controversies had to deal with a lot of which work because of facebook but they still have to deal with it overall. How would you rate how. Facebook handled things this year. So i've always seen social media as a mirror to the real world and human behavior so it's not surprising that facebook had a challenging year because twenty twenty was very unprecedented year with the election on justice protests the coronavirus pandemic. And at this moment. It's difficult to give facebook a specific rating because even though the company gets points for doing new things like labeling and launching these online hubs with authoritative information. And there's still a lot of questions about how effective These efforts were. There was obviously a lot of misinformation that slipped through the cracks. So i wouldn't give them like an a plus for sure or maybe even a b. or c. but the get a better grade than two thousand sixteen. So you're not give abeer is i mean. They're they're right around the d. level like maybe a c. minus. I mean are d- it's it's just hard because there's a lot of information we don't now in in my up their grade if we didn't know more about how effective these measures were ryan. It's all relative if we're using the same scale. How would you grade them back in. Two thousand sixteen It would be really low just because of the fact that they weren't even keeping an eye on these things mark zuckerberg had said you know. I think it's a crazy year. A crazy thing that facebook could have swung the election so they weren't really taking much responsibility for these problems so like it would be like a deer and a half and i may say that they failed. It's i think it's all right. I think it's out that it's all relative like some people think anything below in as is fail inc while when it comes to the impact on our elections. Yeah i would say that. They didn't even acknowledge it was a problem. F is a pretty adequate score for twins. Sixteen to give them credit. They did do a lot of things differently. Things are a little bit better of. Let's some of these big issues. A time of the biggest story of the year is a coronavirus a that hit us hard early in march and there was a lot of misinformation. How did facebook handle the misinformation that came out as a result of course from day. Cares to the do's and don'ts to the origin of the coronavirus. There was a lot of information out there. What was what did it look like on facebook. There was also a lot of conspiracy theories i mean. I saw one conspiracy theory on but said the coronavirus was a hoax was all organized by the government so the way that facebook candle debt was the partner with these third party. Fact checkers that will fact check these false claims including about the current virus and the put a sort of warning label over stern posts. That say they contain false information. And it's been a fact check by its independent third party fact checkers But if they if the information could cause physical harm such as somebody saying you should drink bleach. That's something that could lead to somebody having a heart like some physical harm in going to the hospital because he deflation it'd be drinking bleach That would get pulled down by facebook so they drew the line when it came to how harmful that misinformation as got it that that that element of like amex danger or posing health risks. They started draw a line. You know the the killing of george floyd of set off a national discussion about racial equality. How did that play out on facebook. There is also a lot of misinformation conspiracy theories about george floyd including that the whole george floyd young. The whole death was a hoax. And that george soros. The hungarian billionaire was behind these racial injustice protests So you definitely saw facebook struggle with nece and It sort of fanned a lot of criticism from civil rights activists. Who said you know once again. This is another example of facebook not doing enough to combat hate speech and you know they even launched a campaign calling for advertisers to boycott adams social network in the month of july

Facebook Abeer Mark Zuckerberg George Floyd Ryan DON George Floyd Young Nece George Soros
The History of the Internet

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | Last month

The History of the Internet

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

Paul Outlet Revilla Christopher Stray Wells Newman Inc Paul Baran Established Information Proces Donald Davies Oxford University Information Processing Techniq Unesco Derek Paris Baron Davies Bolt Beranek Defense Department Darpa Charlie Stanford Research Institute
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

02:19 min | 3 months ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"One <Speech_Music_Male> has <SpeakerChange> ever tried. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> This episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> was reported and produced <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by Meg Kramer <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Catherine, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Sullivan and edited <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> by Nick Varsha, VER-, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sound design, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and original scoring <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by Jared <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Paul. The <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> theme music and additional <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> music is by <Speech_Music_Female> Hannah's Brown. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is our last episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> before the election <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but we'll be back <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in here feeds soon <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all new trump inc <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> reporting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the latest by signing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> up for our newsletter at <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> our website trump <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> INC <SpeakerChange> podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot org. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks this week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to Genevieve Smith <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> James Walsh <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Charlotte <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Klein. My <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> habit and the whole <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> team at New York <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> magazine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can find a link to our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> massive list <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of trump profiteers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> notes for at NY <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> MAG <SpeakerChange> DOT COM <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on attorney <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> William Conroy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Checkout Christopher <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wirth's reporting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for recent episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of the WNYC <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> podcast. The <Speech_Music_Female> United <SpeakerChange> States. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks also <Speech_Music_Male> to Dave mckinney <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and former acting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> pardon attorney, Larry <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cooper's and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> former pardon <SpeakerChange> attorney <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Margaret love. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Matt <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Kellett as the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Executive Producer of trump <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> INC Emily <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Boutin is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> WNYC's vice <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> president for original <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> programming <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

07:59 min | 3 months ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"The September eleventh terrorist attacks changed the world. There's a sense that they came out of nowhere they didn't. I'm Jim O'Grady and in my new podcast, I'm going to revisit the evidence in question the people at the center of the story I don't WanNa, use the word panic. Let's penetrate hisself. I. Blindspot the road to nine eleven a new podcast series from history and WNYC studios listened wherever you get your podcast. More back. You're listening to trump INC and today we're looking at how the trump way of doing business has embedded itself into American democracy. act. Three Pardon me. In May something new showed up in the PODCAST carousel. Hi. This is rob Roy. Vich had welcome to the lightning. Rod podcast. This is my first podcast. He's bear with me. I've never done this before lightning rod with Rod Blagojevich the only podcast hosted by former governor convicted of bribery and attempted extortion who sentence was commuted by president trump. That's not the official show description Laghouat walked out of prison in February by May. He was sharing his story that was sitting in prison. Watching the news and following his campaign in two thousand and sixteen once he was a Democrat now blagojevich calls himself a trump crap and I think he's a trump to a lot of democrats around the country working people who the Democratic Party today's Democrat Party have abandoned and forgotten, which has history with trump between his arrest and his trial. He was a contestant on celebrity apprentice Harry Potter facts were not accurate. Who did the research? There was not a specific direction to the research on Harry Potter but the inability to learn the product after he went to prison on a fourteen year sentence and after trump was sworn in as president rods wife Patti. Campaigned on TV to get trump to free her husband, she was on Fox a lot. She linked special counsel Robert Muller to her husband's prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald. She accused the authorities of spying on her husband in much. The same way she claimed they spied on trump's allies the latest revelations about how the Pfizer Court and how they used. slander was essentially opposition research slander against the president to you know to spy on him and just like the allegation that they used against my husband to get six wiretaps on all of our phone lines. The ability to make pardons. Mutations is one of the few presidential powers with almost no constraints. Trump likes unconstrained power and every year he's been in office. He's found more and more cases he thinks are worthy of clemency sheriff Joe Arpaio who defied a court order to stop the use of racial profiling military officers convicted of war crimes, ranchers who committed arson on public land. He sees this as a tool for you know, expanding his authority expanding his influence winning political points, making his enemies, heads explode, and the like Jack Goldsmith was assistant attorney general. In the George W Bush administration. He's a professor now at Harvard prompted by. The pardons ideological allies and sycophants. Goldsmith assembled all of trump's pardons and commutations in a spreadsheet. I just wanted to try to figure out an objective where possible what was different about trump not knowing what they would find Goldsmith and his collaborator Matthew Gluck created one column for pardons that advanced a political agenda. One for cases with personal connections trump one for TV appearances like Patti Goya Vich on. Fox, and the fourth and last one for cases brought to the attention of president by celebrities and so what what was your overall finding then? Basically, trump position thirty, nine pardons or commutations of sentences and an astonishing thirty, four of those. Satisfied one of those criteria and the general in other words thirty, four, thirty, nine pardons were self serving in some way. Since my interview with Jack Goldsmith trump gave clemency to five additional people mostly for drug offenses. Typically, in the past presidents have pardoned criminals who show real remorse or punished too harshly it's rare to pardon an ally and that's really remarkable finding here as I say some presidents in the past, especially at the very end of their terms have issued cell serving pardons. But those are exceptional. Trump has a practice of it and he did it before the end of his term. So. There was Paul Pogue, a Texas construction executive who was pardoned for tax crimes after his family gave hundreds of thousands of dollars to trump aligned political groups, media baron. Conrad Black was convicted of obstruction and fraud and extradited to Canada. After he wrote an adoring book about trump, he got a pardon Kim Kardashian took up the cause of Alice. Marie Johnson who was convicted of non-violent drug crimes after trump freed her Johnson. Spoke at his convention. But by the grace of God and the compassion, a President Donald John Trump I standard for you. Tonight, the pardon power has a cost less act to him. Personally, it's literally involves signing a piece of paper. So, whatever he gets in return is in some kind of very reductive way more than what took him to do it especially since he says, shame listen doesn't care about the political outcry in some cases showing clemency may do a lot more for trump when the president issued a commutation to Roger Stone he shielded appear in the twenty sixteen campaign and someone who became a target of special counsel Robert. Muller. Stone said things that let us Blake this. That Mahler was pressuring stone to reveal instances in which trumpet lied to the Special Counsel that stone kept quiet and this was basically a pay offer as quietude. Now, we don't know that there's some circle edge dental evidence pointing to it, but it shows the extraordinary danger of the pardon being able to use essentially to obstruct justice and protect the president. Even the suggestion of a pardon may have an effect a toppmoller prosecutor enter Weisman believes that trump's public dangle of a pardon for Paul manafort influenced Manafort's decision to stop sharing information with law enforcement. The only real constraint on the use of pardons is public opinion. People still remember the Stink Bill Clinton's part of tax evader, Democratic Party donor. Mark Rich. Goldsmith who just co authored a book called after trump reconstructing the presidency believes that if trump loses in the November election, he won't hesitate to pardon friends and family anyone who may be subject to an investigation. By the next administration for Federal Crimes. Members of this family for example, and others he can just issue a blanket pardon for all of that and therefore take away the possibility of criminal prosecution for those federal crimes. And most significantly, he could pardon himself. he could issue a so called self pardon which has never been done, and frankly no president has hinted at it trump his claim that he has the power to do this. He tweeted in two thousand eighteen as has been stated by numerous legal scholars. I have the absolute right to pardon myself. But why would I do that when I have done nothing wrong. There is no case law on this. A president pardoning himself is so unthinkable not.

president trump trump INC president Donald John Trump Jack Goldsmith Patti Goya Vich Rod Blagojevich special counsel Roger Stone Harry Potter Robert Muller Democratic Party Fox WNYC studios Jim O'Grady prosecutor Joe Arpaio rob Roy George W Bush administration Patrick Fitzgerald
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

07:49 min | 3 months ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"The limits of disclosures. Yeah. That's right. So I'll give you a perfect example of that. So Wilbur Ross on his filings discloses that he has an interest in something and I'm not going to remember the exact name of it, but it's something like D. S. IV four. Okay. Now, that entity holds a company called diamond shipping. dislosures don't say is that another one of the big investors in diamond as shipping is the government of China. So you have the sector of commerce comes in to negotiate trade deals on behalf of the United States and he is business partners. With the government of China while he's in that position and he doesn't have to disclose that on his federal ethics filings. By contrast if somebody does pay you two hundred dollars you do after disclose that if they pay to directly. What is Wilbur Ross have to say about all of this not much about the meetings that he held they've taken the general position that he hasn't violated any laws. You know he failed to disclose not just the greenbrier holding but several other things that he owned as well. I mean in some minor stuff like he. said that he had vested. Stake in his former employer, which is called INVESCO. And he later ended up admitting that he actually still held on more than ten million dollars of INVESCO stock. That's not a that's not a small amount of money. Their position on those issues are that he just didn't realize that he owned him. Democratic. Lawmakers wrote to the Inspector General of the Commerce Department asking for an investigation into Ross's conflicts of interest. A spokesperson there told us that the matter is still under review. Ross has divested his stake in INVESCO and entities that held diamonds shipping. Do you think the rules around divestment are different under trump than in past administrations? Well, the rules aren't different. You know the rules are pretty clear if you are in the executive branch and you're not the president where you're not the vice president, then you have to get rid of stuff that could pose a conflict. Now in previous administrations, the president and vice president have acted like those rules applied to them. anyways even though they don't, and that sets an example you know I mean if you look at like any corporate structure, you know people talk about tone at the top you know what's the example that the CEO is setting and people will follow that example you talk to people who've worked in office, of government, ethics, and they point to the fact that. You. Know they always knew that they could count on. If. Some person in the administration who wasn't doing exactly what they wanted they could place one call to the Oval Office and that person somewhere in some department would be whipped in shape about fifteen minutes. Place call anymore. In trump's administration taking meetings that you have a personal stake in forgetting to divest ten million dollars in stock failing to disclose your holdings. None of these things disqualify you from holding one of most powerful positions in government. Dan Alexander is a reporter at Forbes and author of the Book White. House Inc. how Donald Trump turned the presidency into a business. Act to the Fifth Avenue example. The middle, panel of this trip take a portrait of someone. You probably don't know, but it was very, very important to the President Attorney William. Constant boy. As the Wilbur Ross story shows us so many conflicts sprung from trump's decision not to separate himself from his company. Understanding the full extent of those conflicts that's been nearly impossible because we haven't seen trump's tax returns and other business records. Keeping them away from scrutiny is constable is job. If you have heard of William Convoy. It's likely because of an exchange that took place in a Manhattan courtroom in October of two thousand nineteen. There's a hearing call the white columned. Thurgood. Marshall Courthouse in Manhattan is before the Second Circuit, court of Appeals. In morning you may be seated. The Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Junior suspecting criminal fraud has been trying to get trump tax returns trump sued to block the subpoena. And his lawyer appealed but your your position, as you said, a moment ago is that the immunity is absolute. In. Court. Lawyer William convoy argues for a novel concept. Temporary absolute immunity. Absolutely. Yes. Judge Denny. Chen asked console if the president still have temporary absolute immunity, if say his shot someone on Fifth Avenue. What's your view on on the the Fifth Avenue example. Local authorities couldn't investigate. They couldn't do anything about it. I think once the. President is. REMOVED FROM OFFICE BILL ANY LOCAL AUTHORITY? This is not a permanent immunity. Well, I'm talking about while in office now the HYPO- there. Could be done. That's your position. That is correct. Cancer boy lost. Each time he lost, he appealed the case kept going up and up and up and the whole time trump didn't have to turn over his tax returns. In the very first court hearing back in the fall of last year Vance's lawyers argued that for trump a delay was a win. They were arguing that still when the case got to the US Supreme Court in the late spring, trump lost their to. Constantly delayed the reckoning some more. He went back to court with a new case lost again and appealed again. We will hear trump vance and now the hearings or by phone because of the virus. Your And good more mortgage Raymond. Asks if there's any request for documents, convoy wouldn't consider overbroad request documents. In this case. That would not in your view the over. What? Happened No. I think the answer probably million or here's why would just go back. Because problems. You see the problem. I see why you're concerned like the you guessed it. Lost and appealed. And this trump vance investigation it's just one of the cases over trump business records that convoys firm has worked on. There was an emoluments wrought by the governments of Virginia and Washington DC alleging the president is unconstitutionally accepting money or benefits from farner domestic governments. Constantly lost in the Fourth Circuit and is appealing. then. There were two cases involving congressional subpoenas one to trump's bankers Deutsche Bank and went his accountancy Missouri's USA. Convoy also lost those cases at the district and appeals levels and also appeal to the supreme. Court. The court said, the house could subpoena the president but their requests had to meet a heightened standard. Then we go..

trump president Wilbur Ross trump vance Donald Trump William Convoy Manhattan vice president INVESCO China US Supreme Court United States court of Appeals Attorney Cyrus Vance Commerce Department vance Manhattan District Oval Office
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

08:25 min | 3 months ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"Interests, not the public interest. This past summer, our friends at New York magazine came to us and they asked if I wanted to help create a list of people sort of a, who's who of individuals who profited in some way from trump being in the White House? It's a stunning list and you can find it in the current issue of New York magazine. Any one of the entries from the list might have derailed a previous administration. As we were putting together the list something really came into focus for us. The story of corruption in the trump administration is interest about individual people or their actions. It's about how trump's way of doing business has pervaded our entire democracy. That's the story we're telling today. It's like a four year experiment in what happens when you don't refrigerate your leftovers in these conditions, a lot of mold can bloom. So today on the show, a TRIPTYCH, the cabinet secretary, who is business partners with China while negotiating a trade deal with the Chinese. The lawyer who's done more than any single person to keep the president's business records the key to understanding his conflicts out of. The third story is about the president himself and the way he's wielded his constitutional perogatives to pardon and commute criminal sentences. It's his most monarchic power to make problems disappear Intel allies, I can protect you. Trump reporter may Kramer starts us off. A. Act One tone at the top. There is a moment right before trump became president that we add trump bank talk about all the time to be here today at president-elect trump's request. It was when Sherry Dillon one of trump's lawyers walked out in front of a group of journalists and trump supporters to announce that president elect trump had a plan to separate himself from his business. He directed me and my colleagues at the law firm, Morgan Lewis and bacchus to design a structure for his business empire that would completely isolate him from the. Management of the company trump was not going to sell his assets or put them in a blind trust like past presidents Dylan. made it clear. He didn't have to his voluntarily taking this on the conflicts of interest laws simply do not apply to the president or the vice president, and they are not required to separate themselves from their financial assets. Instead, she said trump would hand over management of the business to his eldest sons, which meant trump would still have a financial stake and what happened to his company. Dave vesting. Sherry Dillon said would be unfair to trump president-elect trump should not be expected to destroy the company he built. This plan offers a suitable alternative to address the concerns of the American people. This plan is one that allows the president to funnel taxpayer money directly into his business whenever he visits his properties. Over the last four years, we have seen so many consequences flow from this moment when trump said, he would not disentangle himself from his financial interests. Inside Trump Inc, we sometimes refer to it as the original sin of the trump presidency. Is, going, to get my, you want me to hold up the recorder now. Yeah. That'd be great. Okay we're good. This is Dan Alexander. He's a reporter at Forbes I called him up because I have been thinking about one consequence of trump's decision not to divest, and that is the message it sends to the people who work in his administration. Dan has been reporting on one cabinet official in particular who has a lot of power and a lot of complicated financial interests who failed to separate those interests from his work for the government. Can you start by telling me who was Wilbur Ross before he joined the trump administration or what was his reputation? So Wilbur Ross the. Part of the account is known as a private equity billionaire, the population who wasn't afraid to go into complicated situations and to kind of rough and tumble industry's demands. Coal steal stuff that Scott dirt under the fingernails the millennials are not spending at the same rate says, one of his specialties was negotiating complex bankruptcies. This brought him into contact with trump in the early nineties when investors wanted to take over trump's struggling Atlantic city casinos, Ross helped convince them to keep trump involved and when trump then says that he's going to run for president. He starts making some declarations about why he believes that trump's trade policy is really really smart. He also hosts fundraisers for trump and sort of a big backer, and then after trump wins, you know he receives one of the first appointments to be Secretary of Commerce. The commerce secretary oversees everything from trade to the national weather, service to the census. It is not a flashy position. It is a powerful one. Like trump Ross had all of these business entanglements when he stepped into the role, what's supposed to happen in that process? When someone goes from working in private industry to being a cabinet official? What are the rules for separating yourself from Your Business Yeah? So the first thing you have to tell everyone what you own and that sort of gives people a sense of what it is that you have and. Where there might be potential conflicts, and then the next thing that you're supposed to do is you're supposed to divest everything. So trump does not legally have to do this because the criminal conflicts of interest statute doesn't apply to the president, but it does apply to the Secretary of Commerce. So Wilbur Ross then has to sell off everything in his portfolio that could overlap with his responsibilities as secretary of Commerce. And he doesn't have to do it right away. You've got you know a little bit of a grace period so you can do it over several months and you're making the promise that is. Going to stay away from anything that could be related to my own financial interests in that intervening period. Stick to that promise? No, he did not. Just give you one example. He didn't disclose one of his holdings in a railcar company called Greenbrier but then not only did he not disclose it but then he held a meeting with the CEO of Greenbrier in the basement of the White House when the Greenbrier CEO was in town to talk about government matters. and. There's some ethics officials who think that even if you just take the meeting that's already a crime but certainly, if you act upon any business things that you learn in the meeting, that's a crime. Wilbur Ross says that they didn't talk about business that was a purely social meeting. But that wasn't the only meeting. He met with. CEO of Chevron. When his wife still held a large interest in Chevron and for purposes of the law, his wife holds an interest in a company. It's the same thing as if he owns an interest in a company is just as vulnerable from a legal perspective and there are other meetings. You know he meets with the CEO Boeing and at that time again, his wife holds what looks like a multimillion dollar stake in Boeing, we can see the calendars we can see that they're talking business. I've been thinking a lot about this idea of the appearance of a conflict of interest men I think what some of your reporting on Wilbur Ross shows is that it is almost impossible to know based on publicly available records whether or not. He is truly conflicted because it involves knowing what his intent is I mean in many ways the appearance of a conflict of interest is the best indicator that we have. You can't get inside somebody's head. Wilbur Ross changes policy because I own millions of dollars with Chevron stock, but that's not going to happen you know and. The reason that the laws are set up sooner then you have to divest at the start. Is that then nobody has to wonder..

trump Wilbur Ross president Trump Inc Secretary of Commerce Chevron secretary New York magazine Sherry Dillon reporter president-elect White House official CEO Boeing Dan Alexander vice president CEO Greenbrier
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"Mobile's John Ledger. After. All of t mobile spending at the trump hotel was ferreted out by the Washington Post. Ledger tweeted he trusted regulators to make their decision based on the benefits it will bring to the US not based on hotel choices. On the regulators did make the decision. What he wanted to get is now official a federal judge approving the merger between T. Mobile and sprint. It rejects argument from a group of states that said the deal would violate in laws in raise prices you're looking at. Sprint stock now sixty percent..

John Ledger sprint T. Mobile Washington Post US official
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

03:01 min | 3 months ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"Listener supported W. nyc studios. I want to tell you about just one day of trump's Washington. April thirtieth two, thousand eighteen. Nine top executives from t mobile. Check into the trump international hotel in Washington DC with their names on a list of VIP arrivals. They arrive in Washington at a critical moment. Just the day before the company had shared some big news team mobile and sprint announcing yesterday they still the blockbuster. Deal agreement T mobile is set to by Sprint for a whopping twenty, six billion dollars to complete the deal. The company needs approval from the justice. Department one block away from the trump hotel. Hanging out in the lobby in his trademark hot pink and Black T. Mobile. Hoodie. CEO John Ledger is instantly recognizable to hotel guests he and the other exacts aren't just patronizing the president's hotel. They're advertising they're doing so. In. The original same evening check. Sam. In a closed-door sweet justice the hotel lobby. More lobbying is going on. A small group of political donors dining with the president of the United States. Method that you shut down. So every truck now. The guests include a steel magnate who complains to the president about roles limiting the number of hours truckers can be on the road. A property developer who is just holding the next summit with Kim? Jong. UN. And a site he built near Salt if you would. Consider. song-bo also in the mix. Too then obscure businessman either from in which report from you and left Parnasse. They'd security invite to the dinner after promising three hundred twenty five, thousand dollar donation to America first. Action Trump aligned super PAC. They also have something they want from the president or the purchasing A. Ukraine right now that should. The US ambassador in Kief Maria von beach stands in their way we guard your Basler is she still leftover from the Clinton administration where the investment where you great. Yeah. She's basically walk around telling everybody wait he's GonNa get impeached just wait like this is a fabrication. Trump's reaction is strong. Of. Oak. Take her out. It. Took a year. For trump. Did get rid of her. The other person's staying at the hotel that Night T..

trump trump hotel president Washington DC Basler T mobile Kim CEO John Ledger W. nyc Sprint United States UN Jong Sam Parnasse America developer Kief Maria A. Ukraine
"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

03:51 min | 3 months ago

"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Today's episode is a little different than our usual show. It's an interview I did with Tennis Star Maria Sharapova from our INC five. Thousand Vision Conference. Maria started a company when she was in the middle of her tennis career when she was just twenty six years old. Since her retirement in February, she's found a new sense of balance in life, and that involves not only running her company but investing in a lot of fascinating startups I spoke with her about starting a company while in the midst of an entirely different career finding balance in the pandemic and her passions for design and branding. Here's my interview with Maria. Sharapova. Maria..

Maria Sharapova tennis
"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Away. Has received a lots of media. Attention in in the past years in ink and elsewhere for their eye-catching rolling travel bags inspiring founding story and sharp marketing but last week investigation suggested that all was not as rosy as the lifestyle resonances seem to suggest there are a lot of layers to this one Luckily we have Christine Liborio. Check in on it. Yeah you know I. I got kind of acquainted with the company away this summer when I was working on a piece about Jen Rubio. WHO's one of the CO founders She's always sort of the key to creative director And is on the board you know she's She kind of introduced me to some of the struggles. The company had been through in the past at as grew to nearly three hundred employees. What we didn't talk about is kind of the current struggles struggles that That have been emerging amongst more lower level employees and former employees Kinda came forward last week to A site called the verge urge they spoke to about fourteen former employees who allege that they were paid fairly low wages for really grueling hours sort but at that breakneck startup pace and also were repeatedly subject to bullying over over slack. Their main communications MHM vehicle and doing the bullying. Well I- man-management mostly screen. Shots showed Steph Corey who who is the CEO and Co founder. Who is someone? I didn't get a chance to know. Unfortunately I I really sort of wish I had gotten to know her. Never spoken to a couple of former former employees myself since this piece came out and I've heard echoes of this. You know I'm I'm looking for stuff that's even a little bit a little bit more than this piece Alleged because there are sort of when you're when you're kind of harassed at work or bullied there are things that are you're kind of go with the territory of the fast growth or can just be symptoms and might not be patterns of a huger like larger behavior. You're that that that could you know say inflict your employees with PTSD or could actually harm people you know. I do think that it is fair to pay overtime. I'm with this company. Seems to have not been when when asking lower level employees to work super long hours But I mean there's this very this illuminates is very interesting area kind of inbetween. Like what's right and what's wrong right. And let's stipulate I mean Steph. Curry is out. She was out. Well See You know basically a bunch of a screen of her slack behavior messages to employees some at three. AM showed this pattern of sort of harassment and some some of it's subtle. Some are not and then there. There's allegation that she She let go. I think six employees who had formed a private and we're part of a private slack talk channel to discuss how they themselves felt like. They had been harassed or bullied We'll because they have a very unusual communications which probably talk about sure. So part of the company communications communication sort of mode the the protocol was to use slack for almost all communications and group group. Message Slack. What they wanted to You you know a response from stuff corey said later is they wanted to create a more open. Communications sort of style. They didn't want people to be call each other out one on one and they also didn't want people to be excluded if you're on a team you're on a team they didn't. They've seen they'd seen in their past work experience. Certain women people of Color just just just being left out and they didn't want that but what they seem to have created some of these former employees allege is this atmosphere of constant surveillance lends and of constant potential for harassment if not harassment and And people sort of being called out on small mistakes. They made In group settings things which is is kind of disturbing we'll talk about having an open environment and and companies that we interview are always talking about how important transparency is have you. You're her have either of you ever heard of something. This dramatic where you're not allowed to message people one. You're not allowed to stream and I do. Oh I do by the case that that is sort of in restricting people's communications. It takes away their outlet for venting I think it is. It shows US micromanaging. Tendencies NC by the upper management of a way And yet you know. One of our editors here Inc pointed out to me like what is it save their culture that employees are screen shotting their slacks right like and I was like yeah. Of course I mean. They felt so kind of trapped by this system that they knew it was it was wrong is is fascinating because it's such a subtle thing that can just go awry right what did you. What did you make of the report? I mean like did you. Did you have any sympathy for the The management because you know it is only a couple year old company and very passionate about doing. Yeah Yeah Right. I mean the fact that they're you know she's up in the middle of the night writing anything I mean it just. It was like one of those things like this note. That tone is wrong. You know now there are things in my life that I've put in emails that I would not want shot it on slack But I think we can. Broadly agree that like telling eighteen. That is working their hearts out at two in the morning or whenever it was that there's GonNa be no more paid time off until they get it together a little better What I keep coming back to his as we all know Stephanie? Core is a woman. This happened the story came out on Thursday. She was out on Monday. Do all the chew things are somehow related with this happen open to a guy. Well do you want to hear the conspiracy theories or no wonder talk. This is inconsistent. So there's the AH basically they had appointed a Lululemon executive Stuart Hazelton as as C. O.. Previously they were going to announce that very soon he was going to be working talking with Steph and Jan and then potentially step up to CEO sometime mid twenty twenty is the thought that reporting shows right now but that process process was obviously sped up a lot now who who orchestrated that and how and how quickly I think is interesting to ponder and You know whether stuff herself was ready to step down is is interesting to think about when you raise a really interesting point. Christine about how really a a lot of the story is trying to figure out and separate the differences between the kinds of challenges that all startups face and the kinds of transitions that always happen at startups as founders unders try to make the jump to operators and people who are good at one aren't always ready or fit for the next one and then what sounds like this really toxic doc sick and kind of was certainly unusual one might say insane The notes away specific problems. Yeah absolutely and I do think there's As I wrote in my piece on INC DOT com we're at this particular moment when especially direct consumer companies but really any startup needs to sort of sell a vision Asia to its employees and in a ways case they were selling this like luxury travel like beauty and appreciation of the world. And we'll make people's lives easier easier. And more seamless to these folks who were living. You know. An hour commute from their office making forty thousand dollars a year unable to take a beating just like our employees e. Yeah exactly I mean and then you know. They're basically they're just suitcases. It's just a suitcase. It's not that great. You know I mean I I. It's it's a hard it's a hard thing to sell sell folks on on but when you're you know one employee told me you know she everytime she would tell. Oh her friend she worked at away they were like. Wow that's so cool and it's it's hard to give that kind of thing even when you were in sort of an abusive Work Work Environment Very true I want to conclude this segment by saying that in a very strange bit of timing. It looks like The Wall Street Journal magazine is doing a day in the life of which is kind of thing where they follow an executive around today and it features away luggage. co-founder Jen Rubio Very Glam. Extraordinarily Ed. She's wearing that dress she's just great But at the bottom of it it says The by the numbers zero internal emails. The Away Staff Communicates Solely on Messaging Platform Slack. Acknowledge the they call nothing at all. I it's really astonishing Washington. Did this gentleman this. Just one live. Today we're taping this on Thursday the twelfth It's a fascinating story. I mean there are so many layers here of Gender of hey treat. Employees of keeping people motivated in. What are you know quite difficult jobs and arguably would you know Something that can happen with the best intentions transparency. I mean I just want to add that. If you have tech company valued at one point four billion dollars you should be thinking about you know scaling your employees so that they can work standard eight hour days and paying them. Well I think the allure of future stock. Your company only goes so far and I think that young employees are going to not happy tolerating that taking that risk as much in the future. We'll see Unfortunately looks like many of them did mobile changes tech integration..

Steph Corey harassment Jen Rubio Christine Liborio executive CEO and Co director US Curry Washington NC Asia Stephanie founder CEO Stuart Hazelton The Wall Street Journal co-founder
"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"And we're back so the October issue that we just talked about the founders one hundred has a fantastic cover of Audrey Gelman from the wing and Christine. This is the cover of the story that you wrote a profile of her and of of this very fast growing company. Tell us about it. Thank you is there. Is there something notable about the couple's. Yes that's right. Audrey is about eight months pregnant on the cover of the October issue. Has she actually had the baby she hasn't hasn't yet. She sent me a photo this morning. She is still we're. We're recording on the eighteenth so by the time you hear this. You may actually have given birth but we believe this is the first time that a visibly pregnant. CEO has been on the cover of a business magazine and and that's really she's proud about it. You know she is saying listen. I want this is difficult for me to do right right now. I am tired. I am over-worked. I am running this fast growing company but she made the time to be on our cover to do the interviews for this story because she says if you don't see it you can't be it and she wants to be there to be representing for Mama's at Work Mamas who are CEO is and show women listen you can can do this and she went on TV while massively practice because she did ammunition. She's been doing other stuff too. She told me basically she's stopped taking red eye flights. She stops them for international travel but she's just trying to do as much as she still can. Thankfully she has a co-founder Lauren Casson who also she has a a believe. Leave a one year old right now but lawrence through this before and you know is she and the rest of the all female executive team are ready to take the reins Welsh. It is out on maternity leave. Audrey herself is a great story but the wing is also an incredible story. Can I talk about the growth of this absolutely so listen. It is three years old this month the wing just it feels like it's just launched and all of a sudden you only three years old though because it feels so it's permeated a part of our culture so you cultural impact especially for those of us who cover women in business such yes it's grown from one location a small location the flat iron in New York City which launched three years ago this month to ten locations now by next year will have nineteen. It's international it. It is going super fast. It has ten thousand members right now by the just the end of the year. Just in a couple months expects that fifteen thousand members that's because London is opening up to new locations in New York are opening up and they're these members are mostly all women and like the story details. It's not just these fifteen fifteen thousand members of the wing create. Its sort of fan base. It has more than five hundred thousand followers across social media platforms and one of the lines in the store. He says well you know these are fans of an office in a city where they don't. LA- crazy right it really is amazing and I and I really can't imagine that anyone would have predicted that and so one of the things you talk about in the stories where they're gonna go and how they can leverage that incredible appeal and brand that we've built. Can you discuss that absolutely two of the things that this story exclusively details is that the wing is launching. Its own business conference starting early next next year. It's going to be called strictly business in New York and at that conference they will debut something brand new which is their internal APP which members I currently use will be made open to the public next year by the public. I mean paying members who are mostly going to be women again. and they'll pay an undetermined..

Audrey Gelman Audrey CEO Mama New York City Christine New York LA Lauren Casson Work Mamas London co-founder lawrence executive three years eight months one year
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"<SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <hes> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> move <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> over the next <Speech_Music_Female> fifteen <Advertisement> months <Speech_Music_Female> on trumping. <Speech_Music_Female> We're going to be paying <Advertisement> particular <Speech_Music_Female> attention <Speech_Music_Female> to the <Advertisement> money <Speech_Music_Female> machine surrounding <Speech_Music_Female> trump <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> in the last several <Speech_Music_Female> election <Advertisement> cycles <Speech_Music_Female> more and more <Speech_Music_Female> money <Advertisement> has <Speech_Music_Female> been flooding into <Speech_Music_Female> politics <Advertisement> since <Speech_Music_Female> the supreme. Court's <Speech_Music_Female> citizens is <Advertisement> united <Speech_Music_Female> decision that said <Speech_Music_Female> essentially <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> when it comes to political <Speech_Music_Female> speech <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> corporations <Speech_Music_Female> are people. <Advertisement> They can <Speech_Music_Female> give as much as they want <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on <Speech_Music_Female> top of that. <Speech_Music_Female> We just learn <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Female> Federal Election <Speech_Music_Female> Commission. <Advertisement> No longer <Speech_Music_Female> has a quorum <Speech_Music_Female> of commissioners <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> which means the agency <Speech_Music_Female> in charge of enforcing <Speech_Music_Female> campaign finance <Speech_Music_Female> law <Speech_Music_Female> cannot actually <Speech_Music_Female> enforce force <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> campaign finance <Speech_Music_Female> law <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> on top of that <Speech_Music_Female> we have a <Advertisement> transactional <Speech_Music_Female> president <Speech_Female> has made it perfectly <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> clear that he especially <Speech_Female> likes <Advertisement> people <Speech_Female> who pay <SpeakerChange> him <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> there are <Speech_Female> so many ways <Speech_Female> to do that. <Speech_Female> International <Speech_Female> Real Estate Deals <Speech_Female> Golf course memberships <Speech_Female> hotel stays <Speech_Female> throughout <Speech_Female> the campaign. We'll be <Speech_Female> looking at all of these <Speech_Female> money. Flows holistically <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> all <Speech_Female> of the ways money <Speech_Female> flows into <Advertisement> the campaign <Speech_Female> trump <Speech_Female> world <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> all of the ways <Speech_Music_Female> it flows <Advertisement> out. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> You might call <Advertisement> it. <Speech_Female> What trump's campaign is <Speech_Female> actually <Advertisement> called. <Speech_Female> Donald <Speech_Music_Female> J <Advertisement> trump for <Speech_Music_Female> president. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> We're going to need your <Speech_Music_Female> help. <Advertisement> TRUMP INC <Speech_Female> is an open investigation. <Speech_Music_Female> Shen <Advertisement> send <Speech_Music_Female> us your tips. Find <Speech_Music_Female> out how <Advertisement> at trump <Speech_Music_Female> INC PODCAST <Speech_Music_Female> DOT ORG <Advertisement> while <Speech_Music_Female> you're there <Speech_Music_Female> sign up <Advertisement> for our newsletter. <Speech_Music_Female>

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"Trump ink is supported by the showtime time documentary series the Circus John Heilmann Alex Wagner and Mark McKinnon. Give you an insight take on the wildest political show on earth. It's the real story of American politics in the age of trump as we race toward the twenty twenty presidential election. The circus goes where others can't bring you closer to the story minus the spin don't miss the Circus September twenty second second at eight pm with new episodes every Sunday only on showtime go to showtime Dot Com and enter the CODE TRUMP INC to receive a free one month trial of showtime new subscribers only only offer expires October thirteenth. I'm clemmie button. Hill and I'm here to tell you about the open as project the new podcast from WNYC studios in W CULEX saw in which people share stories about the classical music that gets them through their lives people like to send Mendez Musicians Gianbattista and Wynton Marsalis goyal friends and our very own Alec Baldwin. It's taught mix tape pot sonic love letter canonica daily musical journey into other human lives. Listen for free wherever you get your poke cost and sign up avenues project DOT org. We're back in a TV. The interview in the glow of victory per scale quoted his wife candace Blount. She said that I was thrown into the Super Bowl. Never played a game in one and Pascale took his super bowl ring and monetize it. He tried to really cash in on the success of the presidential campaign. He actually pitched his commercial work. As the per scale effect and the notion was Mr Commercial Businessman Company Higher Birth scale to do the magic for your company that he did for Donald Trump that was kind of a theme he starts working on a project for the Dallas Mavericks. He pitches a high dollar digital marketing campaign campaign for seaworld does paid speeches in Romania and Monaco. He spotted flying around the world walking down an airplane. I'll he's hard to miss but he's also continuing to do. Political work literally from the moment trump takes office after the whole issue with the fight and the ad commissions per scale reframe things for the twenty twenty election says he's only taking a three hundred thousand dollars regear salary from the campaign but he positions himself to be the beneficiary of much larger income streams for his campaign work while his collecting the salary from the campaign his company gets paid millions of dollars by the Republican National Committee to make and buy ads well. There's certainly nothing the wrong people in politics making money of course there are lots of high level operatives for both parties who have unapologetically cashed in. It's business as usual for the political political class. Pascale says he's doing this for the love of country and trump working for trump is clearly made brad millions and transformed his life. He now drives Ferrari A and B. M. W. He owns a gorgeous two point four million dollar waterfront home in Florida the money from the campaign and the RNC weren't the only way press gal was making money after the two thousand sixteen election. His company was also making money from a pro-trump dark money group called America first and and that's a group that's free from the normal restrictions on disclosing its donors on how much money can raise and how it spends money under the law. These groups are barred art from coordinating with a political campaign but per scale had actually co founded this group along with other trump campaign operatives and he was simultaneously only getting paid by both trump's reelection campaign and America. First Common Cause has filed complaints about this with both the Federal Election Commission and the Justice Department I meant the complaints are still pending after scales named campaign manager in February two thousand eighteen America first which has to publicly report. It's payments suddenly suddenly stopped paying Brad's company personnel strategy but then per scales crew didn't stop doing the work and he didn't stop making money from it. He incorporated rated a mysterious Delaware. LC that had no public connection to him. It's called Red State Data and digital it took over the work per scall- was doing for America the first Super Pac. It's payments as reported in Public Federal Election Commission filings were to a anonymous mail-drop at a Pennsylvania Avenue ups. PS Store and the secretive new company which had no other known clients is made more than nine hundred thousand dollars at first per scale all set his company's work for the RNC the Super Pac and the trump campaign were all legally vetted after PROPUBLICA and other news organizations began asking further questions for scale said he'd stopped doing advise for the RMC but all of that back and forth obscured something Peter you uncovered something else. It's not just that scale was getting streams of income from the campaign. Super PAC and the RNC. It's that the trump campaign has taken over the currency. NC An unprecedented ways under trump the currency has become practically a wholly owned subsidiary of the trump campaign. Now it's not unusual for president to direct their parties to play a critical role but as with so much else in this situation trimtabs way way further than any of his predecessors have one way this has happened. There's a metric down ballot candidates people running for governor or Congress look at called voter scores. It's information Russian on how voters in a particular district feel about trump which could affect campaign ads and messaging previously the RNC would allow these Republican Republican candidates to see this information not trump so candidates in Michigan or Ohio or Illinois who who were trying to figure out how best to run their campaigns how best to be victorious. Republican candidates are deprived of the information from the party on how L. voters in their district feel about trump. RNC officials say the data belongs to the trump campaign which is free to withhold it. If the president wants America I declined comment. It's kind of an enforced loyalty. They don't have the information that they need that might incline them to distance themselves therefore they're in this situation of of being afraid that if they don't hue very closely to the president and to his wishes that that they're going to jeopardize their own candidacies clearly president trump is not patient or tolerant of people that try try to run campaigns distance themselves from him and it's not just the fear factor the parties actually also depriving them of information that might be helpful in them winning reelection or winning office and in two thousand sixteen trump promise to drain the swamp to fund his own on campaign to reduce the influence of big donors. That's not what happened so here. We have what's projected to be America's first billion-dollar in dollar political campaign if so much money rocketing through the trump campaign and updates related accounts and the groups that are supporting trump and per scale is at the center of it all all he personifies a huge issue which is how big money has taken over American politics.

Donald Trump TRUMP INC Republican National Committee America Super Pac president Pascale RNC scale brad Public Federal Election Commis Federal Election Commission WNYC John Heilmann Mark McKinnon Wynton Marsalis
"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"About anything they hit the buttons of the fantastic people who write and edit for inc. My name is james ledbetter. I'm the editor of inc magazine and nick dot com and i'm very pleased to be joined by three of my esteemed colleagues. We have reporter cameron albert dyke research director erector marley gazeta and san francisco bureau chief matt haber everybody. We've got three topics to discuss today. I we're going to talk about the do's and don'ts of applying for the inc five thousand zain then we'll look at a startup trying to tackle the problem of mass shootings and finally will look at what just might be america's fun workplace plus. Stay tuned for our like buttons a quick hit on something. We saw this week that we liked. I don't want to give too much away but they will involve baseball versatility and not one but two bad things about google we have kind of completed the thank five thousand season for two thousand nineteen although the big conferences coming up in october marley as you and i were talking about the list and how people apply and what happens to their applications. It seemed like a good idea to maybe give some tips to our listeners who might be applying for twenty twenty. You know what should they they do. What should they not do. You are responsible among others for vetting the companies which you do a fantastic job of every year to to protect the integrity of the list. Tell tell us a little bit about that. Process so the vetting process in our offices or it's a two tiered process the marketing department fields the actual applications themselves and goes over the years people have have to pay to apply and they should be paying applying by the deadline so those basic housekeeping tasks as well as larger counting tasks are taken care of by the marketing department and on on the editorial side we do more qualitative vetting and the tips were going to give you aren't just for in five thousand. They're also potentially helpful for interacting with journalists. Were making your web presence especially more journalist friendly owning your story owning your story so one one point in particular that is helpful for anyone who wants to learn learn about your business but especially journalists is to be very clear about who is running it on the website. I know in some cases. It's deliberate for people to remove themselves that normally only ends up being not a red flag necessarily but it a discouraging factor and we go to learn about a company on its website so x._y._z. widgets dot com you go to the website eight and there's no mention of the c._e._o. There's no mention of the founders that that kind of thing. There's no contact information. There's no address. I know in terms of maximizing efficiency of your team name. Some startups may want to discourage people from reaching out to them through their website that i believe is probably harmful in the long run. Why would a company not wanna put the founder in the first place. That's exactly what we asked that tends to be a big question to seem in this day and age a little shady. Most people nowadays especially now with the easily accessible missile templates for websites not put on basic gallery of the executive suite of a start up a little bit about what they do a little bit about their background their names we wanna see that on just about any website we access and in addition to seeing the names there we also begin to read about people on their lincoln profiles and in the public domain an at large so another thing that is particularly helpful for us is to see continuity across platforms in terms of the story that you're telling right. I mean particularly with things things like the year that the company was founded. You want you want consist because we measure the inc five thousand by the growth of the company over three years and you can imagine if you fudged edged the founding date you could come up with of a figure that would be you know kind of astronomical growth because you you you claim your business in two thousand fourteen but actually it was really like december of two thousand fourteen or january of two thousand fifteen see revenue growth that first year was artificially love is therefore the growth rate artificially a high we encounter these things we come across these things and we don't just refer to linked in order to verify these points we have public databases and private data may says that we have subscriptions do not want to give away too much of the special sauce that we use to vet companies but at the very very least make sure that there's continuity across also so things like educational background professional experience don't oversell yourself. You don't need to we'll. We'll get to that in a sec. <hes> i want to ask you. I mean listeners your should know we're not in a position to rigorously vet all five thousand companies that is a task that would require thousands and thousands of of the person hours but we do that anything that appears in the magazine on the website anybody who's number one in their category. There's a lot of spot checking. If red flags are raised otherwise otherwise the the kind of thing that you're talking about marley where there seems to be some discrepancy or just kind of no record. How often would you say you encounter that in the course of a given season oh i would say it probably pops up at least one in fifty companies. I mean one of the things we love about. Entrepreneurs is that they believe in themselves selves when no one else does and they believe in their story when it's not there yet and that can be an asset but when you are talking to journalists that can also be a massive hindrance because if we we find out that there are holes in your story it makes us terms it bolt <hes> so i've been the editor of since two thousand fourteen in every year it comes up that there are there are companies that otherwise seem like they would qualify that we end up having to take off the list for for one reason or another and one that comes to mind from the two thousand nineteen list you reminded me of it when you were talking about consistency with a lincoln material l. and we had a situation where a company was extensively very very high on the list and therefore we check the top you know whatever twenty twenty twenty five companies anyway the founder had already received a an honor from another organization <hes> all of which seemed to lend credibility already bought when we went and looked at the company's website. What are we finds lynch. Look this founders website. There were not only discrepancies in educational personal and professional background that did not hold up upon further scrutiny with the alleged sources of employment or education. We also found that some of the work in the portfolio folio was not actually work that this person had done had not been commissioned to do had not worked on in a team setting and it was almost immediately a disqualifying factor in that particular instance. This founder was victim of our own goodwill for her company because the reason we even start to look at her as closely as we did is because we wanted to support her and the work that she was doing she was young young she you know she had what appeared to be an interesting story we wanted to support her and it was only upon doing due diligence to get ready to give her more attention mentioned that we realized that there were so many inconsistencies in her story we really do give businesses as much of the benefit of the doubt as we try <hes> we certainly try and and i think you know there are different categories of mistakes right. I mean i think i think there are genuinely. Some inadvertent mistakes and there are genuinely people who are trying to game the system system to get on the list in some ways. It's backhanded compliment that people want it that bad <hes> but but i think it's also really important for us to protect the integrity of the list. Give our listeners one more tip about something they should do or should not do if they want to pass through your gate the number one thing is don't lie yeah yeah. The number. Two thing is don't like the number three thing is don't lie but tell your story in a way that is is acceptable and don't try to give us what you think we want to read. Give us what's real. I think probably my favorite stories of the issue that we put together. Every in five thousand are the stories where we take what is a relatively dry company from a relatively dry industry and we're able to show show the human struggle behind what the person has been able to achieve in the construction of widgets. Tell that story brief. Be you know you don't have to. We're not asking for nine pages ages. We don't need your memoir on your website but tell that story. Even if you think you're doing something mundane. We want to know why why you got there. I have been fascinated by any number of mundane seeming companies from salt mining to ice skate sharpening. I mean it's just it just great panoply of of business well. I hope that's that's useful for our listeners. We're gonna take quick break and be right back. When i was in college. I had a professor who used to joke these spent half his life trying to lose ten pounds sounds and learned to speak german..

founder editor james ledbetter inc magazine zain baseball google america reporter san francisco matt haber cameron albert bureau chief marley research director executive professor lynch lincoln three years
"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Let's close out with our like buttons. A quick hit on on something. We saw this week that we liked cameron. What i've been on the record on this podcast is a proponent for communication. It drives me nuts. How many people are really weirdly bad at it and it's my favorite football team. The atlanta falcons are in the news this past week for really upping the ante on their own internal communication. I think it's interesting. I think it's worth noting for for business owners but they've basically done is an all of their preseason practices. They have miked up all of their defensive players so that everyone can hear each other and more importantly everyone can hear. You're in the post game post practice film sessions exactly what everyone else is saying in certain moments on could possibly go wrong possibly go wrong. It's it's never going to be published or so. We'll see if someone hacks in the players. Were really really really reticent and i should also say that i have been on the record on this podcast as being very anti making in your employees up in this particular case. It's really helpful because in a sport like football their assumptions that have to communicate a lot like middle linebacker. Thanks safety. There are some positions nations that are silenced. They basically play their match ups on an island cornerbacks or defensive ends and what the falcons figured out especially last year after a lot of their leaders got injured injured and we're not on the fields to be communicative was that the people who aren't usually communicative still have really important valuable insights to offer they can still help help their teammates and their teammates can still help them even if it comes down to just their one on one match ups and apparently although this season hasn't started yet coaches say that they have already noticed tangible improvements improvements in the the level of play just by virtue of everyone talking more because they're thinking. Is it kosher for one team to do this. It seems like it gives them an unfair advantage. I mean whatever you you want him practice. Oh it's not gonna happen to the real game. No no no just for practice. Oh i see okay well i did. You didn't communicate that. Oh i'm so sorry i'm a poor communicator and i'll make amends. <hes> emily early says starting this week. You guys have noticed a lot of tweets about chicken sandwiches. Yes so turns out that popeye's started making a new chicken in sandwich that i guess seems a lot like chick fillet chicken sandwich and so these fast food restaurants got into a bit of a chicken sandwich twitter war and then basically other companies started weighing in and now all i see your people eating these chicken sandwiches from different companies trying to determine which one's the best so you know we saw thought tweets from chick-fil-a pop is other chains wendy's got into it bojangles places yeah. It was just insane and it. It just seems like it's upping the business for all these chicken sandwich companies and chicken sandwich. Mania is happening all over the country right now. This whole episode is making me hungry. Yeah i was gonna say bill. Murphy wrote about about this for inc dot com and one of his questions was does this stuff actually sell chicken sandwiches and i have to say after about five minutes really i really wanted. Apparently there are lines down the block at popeye's god that multiple have sold out people have been coming back multiple times just to be told. We still don't have any in stock yeah. I think <hes> murphy wrote that the popeye's has like one hundred thousand thousand followers on twitter and one of these tweets got re tweeted four hundred thousand times. I mean it's really it's incredible. <hes> hats off to them. I suppose <hes> tom. I want to return to something we've been talking about the inc five hundred of course and also food companies the company that was number two on our two thousand fourteen inc five hundred list <hes> company called inquest nutrition and they were purchased yesterday for one billion dollars by another food company called simply good foods simply good foods is a publicly traded company that makes packaged goods under the atkins brand quest. The company that was purchased was early to the protein energy bars tower bar kind of ships based in el window california. They were launched in two thousand ten three friends who were sort of disaffected software engineers looking for something else to do. They were all really into fitness culture one of them <hes> his wife was making these energy bars at home in her kitchen because they were just really into it and everybody loved them and they turned it into a business and now they sold it for a billion dollars left. My wallet in el segundo my like button. This week involves the year nineteen sixty-nine i for one one and a little overdosed on fifty year anniversary observations about the moon landing and about woodstock and chappaquiddick is coming up i think and in the town of dairy new hampshire. They thought that this would be a good time to open the time capsule left in nineteen sixty nine in the public library was actually a safe that sat sat in the corner for fifty years with the combination written on the back and it's a really kind of old fashioned safe and they went and what's going to be in the time capsule from nineteen sixty nine like like moon landing stuff a space stick hit of ahsley acid. What's in there and they opened it. Nothing it was completely and now they don't. I don't know if somebody broke into the safe and stole it was there or if the whole thing was goofing. There was never anything there to begin with which lies is nine hundred sixty nine and in a nutshell along a fantastic bit of theater. That's all for this week. I want.

popeye football Murphy atlanta falcons cameron twitter falcons el segundo california chappaquiddick wendy one billion dollars billion dollars five minutes fifty years
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

06:14 min | 2 years ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"Yeah. I tell knocked her guy horror New York knocking car cupboard dolls Giuliani Korsakov in made 'em Tober Guiliani traveled to Yerevan the capital of Armenia to attend a conference. It was released first time in the former Soviet Republic high in the Caucasus mountains, which hosts Russian military base and has close trade ties to it's humongous nearby. Neighbor. Russia. Second-year salmon enough. I got Don pasta on them. You seven. Visited a memorial to the Armenian genocide got a briefing from the acting defense minister and gave a speech about cybersecurity. The whole world with even. So this was the Rudy. We have come to know American flag pin Yankees World Series. Ring a face seems to involuntarily grimace at irregular intervals. Sure. Where did you Leon was listed on the conference program is speaking at a featured panel on technological breakthrough the other panelists included to advisors to Russian President Vladimir Putin one of them was sanctioned by the US after the Russian invasion of Crimea. He still on the US sanctions list on one part of the trip Rudy was asked about US Armenia relations. But I'm not here in my capacity as private lawyer for President Trump here as a private citizen and the person who brought private citizen Rudy to Armenia. He's Armenian businessman who lives in Russia and who received an award from flat. Amir Putin at a ceremony last. That he's if he did. So here's Rudy Giuliani. International businessman, who also happens to be President Trump's unpaid part time attorney in Robert Muller's probe of possible Russia, collusion, you know, how sometimes the cover up is worse than the crime in this case. The investigation was much worse than the no crime the same Rudy Giuliani who is appearing at a conference with a sanction Russian in a state with close ties to Russia. Just now. We don't know if Rudy got paid on this trip. He didn't answer any of our questions about this or about anything else. Hello and welcome to Trump Inc. An open investigation from WNYC and propublica into the unresolved business conflicts surrounding the Trump administration. This fall we're looking at how the people around Trump, maybe profiting from the presidency. I'm Ilya marritz. And I'm Andrea Bernstein Rudy Giuliani has lived a life in parallel with Donald Trump. The two men were born in the outer boroughs of New York City two years apart Trump and Rudy Giuliani became famous in the nineteen eighties. Trump is a builder Rudy as a high profile US attorney. They both feel themselves to be outsiders there. Publicity-hungry showman who turn themselves into global brands Trump's brand gold, and marble Rudy's brand law and order. Style note here four calling Rudy Guiliani Rudy everyone does. Rudy Donald have known each other for decades, and they have chemistry. You're really beautiful woman that looks like that has to have her own special set. Thank you. Maybe this clip is from a celebrity roast in the year two thousand Donald looks like Donald Rudy isn't a blonde wig and an iridescent lavender dress. The camera pulls in for a close up as Donald lowers his face into Rudy's Dikla Taj Rudy returns a high camp slap. Oh, you dirty boy. Once these men could laugh at themselves today when defending the president on TV Rudy, sometimes strays into absurdity trout. Trout. I know it isn't true true. There's in truth. The president United States says I didn't truth is truth. Mr Mayor de realized what I for this story. I reached out to about a dozen people who knew Rudy Giuliani from his days before joining Trump, many of them say they're out of touch these days. Don't know what he's doing all of this adds to the mystery about Rudy's day job. What exactly he does where he doesn't? After he became Trump's lawyer in the spring Rudy left has big law firm, New Yorker journalist Jeffrey Toobin who recently profiled Rudy tells us he now prefers to do business from the grand Havana room. Slightly seedy cigar bar on top of six six six Fifth Avenue, which of course, is famously owned by the Kushner family, and I went there once and I got sort of got a kick out of it. And I said. It was a subsequent interview. I said where do you wanna meet he said, oh, let's go back. And then a third time. We said we went back. So I think he really uses the grand ballroom as kind of his office for meetings with outsiders. Does he have an office? I think his office for the most part is his cellphone. I mean, I think he really just sort of rocks and rolls as got a bodyguard. But I think he just kind of goes from meeting to meeting and television appearance to television appearance when he was doing that today on trumping we're going to lay out what we've learned about what Rudy's doing beyond appearing on TV and who he's working with. Here's one thing that surprised us Rudy has done a bunch of appearances in the former Soviet Union going back to two thousand four and since Trump was elected he stepped up his activity there because he didn't answer our questions, and because he doesn't have a government job. So he's not required to file disclose? Offers. Our information is limited. Now, we're going to piece together what we do know. And we'll start by going back to the moment when Rudy Giuliani became Rudy Giuliani. Yes.

Donald Rudy Rudy Giuliani President Trump Rudy Donald Andrea Bernstein Rudy Giuliani Rudy Trump Trump Inc president Giuliani Korsakov Russia Armenia New York City US Soviet Republic Amir Putin Yerevan Vladimir Putin WNYC
"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

Trump, Inc.

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"inc" Discussed on Trump, Inc.

"You can hear train in the background because. All right. Okay. Andrew, you're there fracture there. I'm here. We're here. We're in the western hotel courthouse square where Kasur and you can hear a train going by in the background. Hi, everyone. It's merits from WNYC with the Trump Inc podcast, extra Trump Inc from WNYC and propublica is an open investigation into the business ties behind the Trump administration. But let's call this conversation. Manafort pink. Paul Manafort was Donald Trump's campaign chairman for three critical months in two thousand sixteen, including the Republican convention for decade before that he did political work in Ukraine, including the successful presidential campaign of Victor Yuna kovic for that man was toppled from power, and it's the money Manafort made from that work that is now under the microscope in Virginia courtroom where Manafort is accused of tax fraud hiding cash offshore accounts, and also Bank fraud lying on loan applications. This trial is getting a lot of coverage there. Plenty of places you can go for minute by minute. Updates we're going to do now is look at the big picture. How did Manafort make himself so value. To the Ukrainians who was he Donald Trump and how does this trial add to our understanding of Robert Muller's Russia investigation. With me now, Andrea Bernstein, my co-host and my co reporter when we at WNYC started looking at manafort's perplexing New York, real estate deals all the way back in the spring of twenty seventeen. Hi, Andrea. Hey, Ilia and also Franklin four staff writer at the Atlantic. I'm a huge admirers of your reporting on Paul. Manafort welcome to Trump Inc. Thank you so much and people there is no better account of manafort's life and what it all means than this piece that Frank wrote in the Atlantic titled the plot against America. We're going to post that link on our website. So this trial opened ridiculously fast. There is jury selection, opening arguments and the first witness all in a day, Andrea, what's the story? Prosecutors are telling and what's the story that manafort's defense team is telling the prosecution stories known to us that Paul Manafort repeatedly lied to banks to the IRS in order to avoid paying taxes on his. Sixty million dollars in Ukrainian income and to maintain his lavish lifestyle. After his Ukrainian client was booted out of office and that that continued all the way up until twenty seventeen. So that's the case against Paul Manafort couple interesting details like he spent fifteen thousand dollars on an ostrich jacket, whatever that is. I was really interested to hear the defense argument because we haven't really heard it before and what they were saying essentially is that there's nothing wrong with being rich and successful and working abroad. And if anything untoward happened here, it was the fault of Rick gates who was Trump's deputy campaign manager who was manafort's business associate for at least a decade. They said Ricky's was embezzling and hiding it from Paul Manafort so their defenses. This wasn't Paul Manafort. Maybe he didn't check a box on his tax forms. It was the people who work for him who. Let him down and Frank. You've written extensively on manafort's long history in Ukraine, and Rick gates was there with him for most. If not, all of that history is an argument that makes some sense. No way, no. How I mean, Rick gates was like a son to Manafort manafort's operation shrunk over time as he became more isolated in Kiev as business became more concentrated. It essentially reduced to two people in addition to himself and Rick gates was one of them in Rick gates was the guy who was running a lot of his business operations, but the Email chain between the two of them is going to be so extensive. And I can't imagine that they're not clear instructions buried within that long Email chain that would disprove the defense's theory of the case, but it's what they got there not working with a whole lot of material. You know, it's it's plausible that gates was immediately in a lot of the payments that happened, but in order to get these sizable payments, it's not like you could have your flunky Goto the presidential palace in beg the old arcs for money. What would happen is that Manafort himself would have to go to the president's chief of staff and Bill him, and the reason that these fees are so high is that Manafort was a master of overcharging and asking for the audacious some. And so that's not a Rick gates saying as totally poem for thing. I mean, you say he's the master of over asking, which makes me think of sort of, I think if there was a headline that came out of the first day, it was the ostrich jacket, which I'm trying to imagine enough. It has plumes or just ostrich skin. What do you think is the significance of all of the expensive things that Manaf. Bought for himself and his family, whether it's Yankee tickets are expensive homes or hundred thousand dollar suits. I know it's good for headlines, but it doesn't matter in other ways. It does because his life was a Ponzi scheme. It's really hard to imagine how a guy who was who had sixty million dollars and his offshore Bank accounts would end up underwater, but Paul Manafort just engaged in the most conspicuous consumption. And so as money flowed in he was finding all sorts of new inventive ways to spend it, and he just became over leveraged and in order to fuel that type of lifestyle, his life was built around this rube Goldberg financial contraption where the money with sitting these offshore accounts, which weren't really easy to access and order to get money into the country. He needed to buy real estate because that's how you get around anti money laundering laws in order to have the cash to do the things that he wanted to do. He had to take out loans against those. Properties. And so it became this vicious cycle that led him to take risks that were ultimately as we're coming to see untenable. And this was it seem of the prosecution's open, opening opening arguments that Manafort believed no rules. No laws applied to him. I want to ask each of you. What do you think is the most significant interesting new information on the public record? So the thing that has really fascinated me from some of the pretrial documents. And also what we heard in opening arguments has been the direct line in payment from the oligarchs in Ukraine to Manafort. So just wanna unpack this a second in two thousand five when Manafort first starts having discussions with people in Ukraine, about going to work there on campaigns, there has been a big national discussion about denationalisation of the steel mill. So the steel mills have gone into private hands and people are making a lot of money and Ukrainians are upset about it. It's an issue in the election, and then the people who have made. Money from that. And in particular, we saw a memo from an oligarchy named Rinat Akhmetov. He reaches out to Manafort and Manafort sends a memo which is now in the court filings, and we expect it to be introduced into trial in which Manafort speaks directly to this gar about the obstacles facing be oligarchs, favored, political party, the party of regions. It's totally fascinating. He basically says, you guys lost this last election. This sort of sucks for you here. How to get your team back in if you want to be winning again. Right? So people made a lot of money from privatization. It was unpopular and they wanted to hire Paul metaphor to make sure they're guy would stay in power so they keep making money. It says, if that had of Exxon directly hired the political consultant, because the president of the United States was voting in. In tax situations that were unfavorable faucet, it's, it's, it's actually even worse than that because these guys were gangsters who actually blew up political opponents allegedly. And that's the way that they were able to privatize these industries that you had these vicious war for the resources of the post-soviet, an actual conflict. It was actually, it was actual gang. Warfare was the way in which these guys procured their nationalized properties. And so when there was a revolution in the revolutionaries came in and said, we want things to be done the right way they needed to defend themselves against arrest needed to protect their steel mills, and the way they did that was politically and they were kind of flailing until Paul Manafort came on the scene. In fact, when metaphor came on the scene, the the dark, you're talking about had to relocate to Vienna because it wasn't safe for him to be in Ukraine, and he was funding time between Monaco in Vienna. Manafort was advising him to take all of his. Operations into Austria in order to create a shadow operation in case this nationalization actually happened in a lot of the meetings that Manafort was conducting with these oligarchs head to take place in Moscow because it was unsafe. They felt like to conduct them in Kiev. This main oligarch you're talking about is renowned off Mathov who has a big industrial base in the east of Ukraine. That's right. That's correct. And one of the things that I found so interesting about that memo to comment off as well, it's from two thousand nine. And on one point in particular, Manafort really surprised me. He said you have to dump the head of the party victory. Eneco vich Ukrainians don't like him. He's too toxic. Akhmedov must have felt differently. He didn't take that advice because the following year Paul Manafort helps victory Makovich in fact to be elected president of Ukraine, and for the next four years until he's toppled from power, he is manafort's big client. And so. Thank I wanna put to you the same question that Andrea answered, which is, what do you think is the most significant piece of new evidence or information that's come

Manafort manafort Paul Manafort Rick gates Ukraine Andrea Bernstein Donald Trump Trump Inc WNYC president Kiev Manafort Frank Kasur Andrew rube Goldberg IRS Rinat Akhmetov Virginia
"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"inc" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Inc uncensored is brought to you by the national association of realtors whether you're abutting small business owner or a large company looking for a new space a realtor a member of the national association of realtors can help you find the right place to grow so get what your business needs get realtor inc uncensored is brought to you by i shares wembley retire or save for college for every when you need a how i shares understands how to build for tomorrow today i shares by black rock inspired to build the following podcast contains explicit language dowd turn bennett hello and welcome to inc uncensored our podcast about business entrepreneurship technology cool companies and just about anything that it's the light buttons of the fantastic people bright and headed for inc my name is james led better on the editor of inc magazine and inc dot com and i'm very pleased to be joined by three of my esteemed colleagues we have senior editor maria aspirin contagion reporter emily canal morning and staff writer zoe henry hey jim we've got three topics to discuss today first we will reveal inc's two thousand seventeen company of the year then we're gonna talk about what seems to be the end of net neutrality regulations and finally the sale of shas am the uh innovative but uh been around for awhile music app uh plus they tune for our like buttons a quick hit on something we saw this week that we liked i don't want to give too much away but they will involve tweet storms and weird scottish words.

business owner dowd james editor inc magazine reporter zoe henry bennett senior editor aspirin emily canal staff writer jim
"inc" Discussed on IoT inc

IoT inc

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"inc" Discussed on IoT inc

"Coming up on they say the side of the inc inc facing they say you see undergoing having saved a few hundred nord's in that case a private rob gender look betty in vietnam users issue for if you have saved thousands or millions of those then even the private rob jeanlaurent of this fact that are fool new projects that of uh descending the injection rich should don't use the auction as such but they use if they are a different kind of the idea he the super that your technology one is the i will tell project and others on the chin project okay are blocked chain discussion isn't quite over yet let me ask the question again is blocked chain ready to transact iot business the answer is still a resounding 'no let me caveat if i sang there are new technologies that address blockchain's bottlenecks and the plan weaknesses introducing alternative detailed tease distributed ledger technologies in this episode of the iot business show i speak with a sheesh meta about the options available for those who won incorporate block chain like functionality and iot today uh.

rob jeanlaurent inc inc vietnam