35 Burst results for "IDA"

Cuomo against plan to close New York schools amid COVID spike

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Cuomo against plan to close New York schools amid COVID spike

"Look at the school, not just the city rates. That is what Governor Cuomo is urging their de Blasio's city parents brace for a possible return to virtual learning. Governor says it is more than the 3% positivity benchmark. He says it's important to look at rates within schools, especially since they're lower than the Oblation, Adding school is not spreading the virus. Off this school was a much lower positivity rate than the surrounding area. Then the school is not part of the problem. And you could argue keeping the Children in this school is part of the solution. Yesterday, his honest of the positivity rate dropped slightly to 2.47, but warned that the city is a crucial point in fighting the virus. That some parents are strongly opposed to the idea of going back to virtual learning. They rallied to fully square yesterday, said Ida Greenberg can't replicate it home. What are teachers do in the classroom? Every day. Our teachers are heroes, and that's why we need our kids to be with them so they can raise their hand and ask the questions so that they're not just staring at a screen looking at a chat if they even have

Governor Cuomo De Blasio Ida Greenberg
"ida" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

04:57 min | 2 weeks ago

"ida" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"I mean i. I had an original plan after i retire that i would write to plays and the first one was going to be a light fund one so that i could really knock it out with my second one. She from the get-go made a tough one for her. First one impressive absolutely phenomenal. Well and not wanted was really her first one. I mean given that. She took over for elmer clifton after he had a heart attack before filming started. Yeah i mean it does film the filming hadn't even started and what. I love to be very honest. Not wanted is maybe even my favorite ida lupino ville not because of necessarily the writing or anything in particular about the camerawork. In fact i think the camera work from outrages superior particularly in the very norwich chase scene. But what i love about not wanted are the performances that she gets from the individual performers are so subtle from the sally kelton character. Who has these beautiful micro expressions that are very ida lupino ish in terms of exactly what she's able to convey and i very much get the sense. When i watched not wanted that ida lupino contribution there was not necessarily so much in terms of setting up for the cinematography itself or any of that but the articulation of how the actors were going to play certain parts of it. And i think she had the best cast in that particular film that she ever got to work with and that she had the strongest influence over them especially given that the film that more people know her for the hitchhiker she had men. Who deliberately did not want to take direction from a woman who were deliberately fighting tooth and nail. Am i correct about that. Yes when you think about not wanted item. Latino was in her mid thirties when she directed note wanted and she was dealing with many very young actors and she showed great sensitivity in dealing with young actors and she worked with young actress in a lot of her movies and she was young herself..

ida lupino elmer clifton sally kelton
"ida" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

04:17 min | 2 weeks ago

"ida" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"And idolo pino created and gwen john created and expensive lives creating and making art and what specific art is is not as important as making it. But i would argue that. Ideally pino who. This podcast is more about john. Sort no no no. No i mean it's wonderful. I love your play and everything that you have to say. i feel like i- lupino really does have a lot to say. And that it's more than just the creation in her in her particular instance when she's remembered today as an actress as a writer as a director as a producer. You know even this morning. I was talking to my mother about ida lupino just because i was going to be recording this post and she said oh. I remember every single time. I watched her films. I knew she was brilliant. And i said well how did you know that. And she said you could just see it on her face every nuance and every detail of what the character was thinking. Was there on her face and you could just tell how incredibly intelligent she was. Even if she herself hated the movie she was in. You could see that on her face. You could tell exactly what she was thinking in any moment and to my mother. That was everything. Because i think for her when she was reflecting on this it was more about the fact that very few actresses actually were allowed to portray themselves as having brains of any kind and ida lupino was as you definitely discuss in your play. She's the queen of the bees but she's also the queen of the brains absolutely even in fluffy things when she was younger. You could see her thinking you could see her and she was a hard work. I mean she put everything into every role she played and i think she was the rainiest of when you think of other actors from her erin i think it's only fair to compare actress of the same era I think about people. Like myrna loy and irene dunne and barbara stanwyck all also portrayed a great deal of intelligence in there acting but lupino had an intensity..

idolo pino ida lupino gwen john myrna loy barbara stanwyck irene dunne writer producer director
"ida" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

05:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"ida" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"Hello and welcome to ride the omnibus. I'm your host aerial baske- and we're kicking off new remember by talking about ida lupino the great actress director and producer. She was responsible for some great chills and thrills in front of and behind the camera. and today i'm joined by. Playwright david kessler as we discussed his memory and play an imaginary meeting between the artists when john and ida lupino as a meeting between two highly. Creative women recognizing each other's personal and historical presence..

ida lupino david kessler director producer john
Atlanta board of education delays renaming of Grady High School

Mornings on Maine Street

00:18 sec | 3 weeks ago

Atlanta board of education delays renaming of Grady High School

"Atlanta School board Delaying the renaming of Grady High School, a renaming committee had recommending recommended rather using the name of Ida B Wells, but a decision on that was postponed after an outcry from the community. A survey garnered more votes to call the high school

Atlanta School Board Grady High School Ida B Wells
Turkish rescuers pull girl from rubble 4 days after quake

On The Edge With Thayrone

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Turkish rescuers pull girl from rubble 4 days after quake

"After Turkey's deadliest earthquake in nine years. Another young survivor is found four days after an earthquake collapsed apartment buildings in Izmir, Turkey, rescuers shout God is greatest ahs! They pull a three year old girl from the rubble. Ida Gaskin had bean trapped for 91 hour's tucked in a tight space by dishwasher in the ambulance. She asks for meatballs and a yogurt, Fox says Simon Oh, in the quake Killed more than 100 people, injuring hundreds. AA group of

Earthquake Turkey Ida Gaskin Izmir Simon Oh FOX
Joe Biden pushes back at President Trump for downplaying masks, says wearing one is "patriotic"

Midday News

00:38 sec | Last month

Joe Biden pushes back at President Trump for downplaying masks, says wearing one is "patriotic"

"Wearing a mask should be seen as a patriotic thing. At a town hall on NBC. He blasted Mr Trump for the message he's sending to others are CBS News. Political correspondent Ed O'Keefe has more. The former vice president said he isn't worried about contracting the virus despite being in the same room is Mr Trump a week ago? I didn't know because look, I've been fastidious about The social distance. I've been fastidious about worrying a mask when I'm not social musicians, and even then many social existence and so we never got closer than you and Ida are right now. Earlier in the day, his wife, Jill, had to step in to remind him to keep a social distance from reporters.

Mr Trump Ed O'keefe Vice President NBC IDA Cbs News Jill
World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

UN News

07:08 min | 2 months ago

World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

"The number of plants and animals on the planet that are at risk today would be far higher without globally agreed safeguards in action to protect him but it still far from good enough UN by diversity exports sat on Tuesday in call for far greater commitment from only Chicago to safeguard human wellbeing in the planet's the body that oversees these work. The Convention on biodiversity urged those gathering for UN summit at the end of the. Month to broaden their ambition from the convention. Here's Executive Secretary Elizabeth Marina Deputy Executive Secretary David Cooper talking to UN uses Daniel Johnson just if you wouldn't mind Elizabeth Merima give me the classification of diversity and in particular why is it important in simple words by devastate is everything around us and when I say everything around us, it means everything we do as human activities affected by busy. Each could be what we do on the land what we're doing. What we do in the forest, what we do on species, animals, plants, I mean, what we do is we produce our food as we consume all by diversities. So our human actions in the nature of virus around us and what we're finding is that if fact but diversity is in massive trouble and your report from the conventional biological diversity, the UN Conventional Biological Diversity tells us that only six out of the world's twenty goals on biodiversity have. been achieved only partially achieved by the deadline, which is actually this year. So to be honest I wasn't aware that the governments of the world had agreed in Japan twenty ten to a series of biodiversity targets and you're saying that only six of twenty goals of being partially achieved by the two thousand twenty deadline. So what is the concern? Which of these? Obviously a very bad report card where have we gone wrong and please don't say everywhere. No because they some progress. But indeed unfortunately by diversity's declining it unprecedented level rate and precious deriving they decline unfortunately. So increasing just as underlying. So indeed this scorecard, his only identify six of the twenties so not even half in the seats. In the areas of deforestation, where at least deforestation is gone down by Fed or two percent fisheries. Management fisheries catches also improved clearly indicating where appropriate policies on fisheries management have been put in place. Then the fishery cage hazing and abundance is increased and improved education of alien species. Particularly from the islands Z. Qualley improved protected areas has increased from ten percent to fifteen percent in terrestrial in three to seven percents on marine areas we also learned my says extinction fishes extension at really threatened in the history of mankind still where conservation measures they've been put in place every improved and reduce extinction of species without which. We and be waste than what we are talking today I think joining us now we are very fortunate have Mr David Cooper. Deputy Executive Secretary of the UN. Conventional. Biological, diversity. Welcome to you Mr Cooper. Thank you very much. Daniel. Thank you ever so much for joining us. We were just talking there with Elizabeth, my executive secretary on the really mixed report card. I. Think that's the charitable worth putting it off. The biodiversity targets that was back in two, thousand ten. So a decade on. We've got six of twenty goals partially achieved although Elizabeth was saying that the has been some good work on eliminating foreign species from islands and in the fisheries to and other national programs that perhaps you could tell me a bit more about to give us maybe a little bit of positive news. What is a pretty Hesse mystic outlook for humankind and also forbade diversity moving forward? Yes. Thank you very much indeed even in those targets that haven't been pasta passages talks that haven't been achieved. Is. Some signs the progress as as in his methods as as mentioned in which Houston deforestation rates in fooding fisheries management in dealing with invasive alien species and in reducing. Rate. So numbers of bird mammal extinctions that occurred over the past ten years or indeed over the life of the Convention would bean at least to perhaps up to four times higher without the actions of being taken. So one clear message despite the disappointing results one clear message is policies do work if they are put in place and implemented, and so we need to learn from that we. Need to be encouraged by that, we need to step up those policies more widely in order to reduce the greater biodiversity loss. The report also shows that if he wants to actually not only we do survey to biodiversity loss that Ben that curve and put me on a path to recovery than more fundamental actions also needed looking at the way we produce and consume food in particular that. Sustainable production and consumption captains more broadly as well. I'm just going to dive in that because the report is pretty alarming and I'm very glad to hear about some of these national projects that have been successful in. Boosting bio-diversity, but the report says that the rate of biodiversity loss is unprecedented in human history I guess we did know that really and precious intensifying and living as a whole being compromised, and of course, we can't have this discussion without talking about covert and how the degradation of our natural environment has I suppose, but closer into contact with viruses in the natural world, is that the kind of thing that's really going to galvanize support for greater support for native greater protection for nature if we don't do so we're going to be huge trouble ourselves forms. Suddenly I I. Hope. So there's Very clear evidence as you say that the degradation of of ecosystems encroachment into international areas, unregulated wildlife trade, these things. Increase the risk of emergence of future. Disease increase the risk of future pandemics, and conversely, if we can invest in conservation an investigation regulating control wildlife trade, we will reduce those risks. So these are suddenly Lead important reasons on top of wanting to prevent six-man south extinction. These really positive reasons also for investing in IDA versity.

UN Un Conventional Biological Div Deputy Executive Secretary Executive Secretary Mr David Cooper Daniel Johnson Elizabeth Elizabeth Merima Elizabeth Marina David Cooper Chicago Ida Versity Japan FED Houston BEN
"ida" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

09:08 min | 3 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Guys. . In this first episode of your. . Marathon. . With my appearance films, , Meshes of the afternoon at land and ritual in transfigured time and IDA. . Lupino. . The hitchhiker I've been thinking about how to connect these two directors and these films if it is fair to connect them. . On the one hand Lupino and Darren have little in Common Darrin made experimental films bending cinemas form and it's character and narrative conventions and she worked holy outside the studio system. . She was this film theorist writer director actor where she funded promoted and screened her own work off and on living room walls. . Lupino on the other hand made more straightforward narrative films following character plot and structure conventions, , and she worked from inside the Studio System With Archaic Pictures for example, , ultimately distributing the hitchhiker. . But it is notable that Lupino was actually suspended from studio contracts and when she turned to directing, , she formed her own production company called the filmmakers and beyond production itself both women in their unique ways bucked the system and pioneered that own paths and I think I must say, , Latinos, , the hitchhiker is perhaps for me alternately as subversive as the wonderful woman figure in Darren's at land this figure who crawls and gropes her way along the long table at a formal dinner party exposing and disrupting their rituals and expectations of so-called polite society. . Take the ways both Darren's meshes of the afternoon and Lupinos the hitchhiker reference and disrupt the conventions of filled noir of their day. . If nor films broadly speaking are these thrillers featuring things like low key lighting and claustrophobic urban interiors kind of a somber mood a sense of cynicism inescapable fatalism, , an anti hero of course, , and FM fatal both films give us many of these things but new Lupino Duar in the hitchhiker rejects the classic cityscape and creates the same coster phobic intensity in a wide open desert landscape instead. . She also rejects a FEM fatal that figure of Man's demise, , and she focuses our attention on the brittle masculinity of her male characters, , exposing guns fetish wielded only by those who are weakest and most insecure. . And instead of a SAM spade type figure furiously asserting his independence, , I won't play the SAP for you. . Lupino suggests it's in vulnerability and Camaraderie where true strength lies. . And Darren's noir infuse meshes of the afternoon while offering her character, , a claustrophobic cycle of fate within the walls of a city home from which noir like death seems only escape. . She even more radically rejects cohesive ideas of anti heroine, , FEM, , fatale, , and makes her central figure a woman someone who she makes both anti hero amphay towel. . And instead of a thriller playing out over a three act structure, , she makes it a thriller wholly confined to one individual's mind where we see justice many twists and character trails as any new are. . So my question for both of you as you begin this new marathon and consider Lupino and Darren specifically is what do you see in these directors films that like the connections to Nuwara that we've noted the film's are products of the kind of cinematic conventions that every filmmaker is in debt to, , but also showcase evidence of trail-blazing in form and in content the you so much. . Melissa. . For that setup, , we hope that we'll. . Get a chance to hear from Melissa another time or two throughout this marathon. . But she certainly did an excellent job getting a started she also in her extended voicemail pointed out that look was the only woman director who is included in Andrew Sarah says the American cinema directors and directions from nineteen, , sixty eight, , which included his ranking of directors. . He kinda put him in different tiers of his Pantheon if you will and Lupino. . was there, , and of course Sarah the man who coined the term at least here in the United States, , the auteur theory that are marathon title references he had her in the back of the book called Oddities One shots and newcomers and also rightfully points out. . She wishes that says had just left Lupino out as his entry on her work basically dams her with Faint Praise Melissa gave us a question there to wrestle with. . As we consider both of these filmmakers how rooted in traditional filmmaking and even especially in Lupinos case Richard in genre their films are but also how trail-blazing, , how pioneering their work truly is what stood out to you in that regard with both of these filmmakers well, , let me start with Darren, and , first off just to say that I think meshes of the afternoon. . Her first film is a flat out masterpiece it just completely. . Knocked me over in a way that <hes> reminded me of a film that's in the tradition I think you could say Darren was working in and that's Louis Boone Wells whom Chen and Lu which we did as part of our boone. . Well, , Marathon Adam. . So it's a this is an experimental surrealist film in a Lotta ways meshes of the afternoon but what is distinct about it to me is the way dare intakes this dreamlike atmosphere this the sense of dreaming the intellectual surrealism at play and made it. . So intimate this movie just feels completely distinct from something like Shin and blue because it was an emotional experience for me whereas. . The other one I think you're kind of like a fun puzzle to think about and it's you know. . Under Lewis disturbing absolutely in it, , it strikes you on that level. . But here as we follow this woman played by Darren who walks into a house in the afternoon goes up some stairs notices. . Some items falls asleep in a chair and then the whole sequence kind of repeats and it repeats a number of times. . I just basically felt with each level even as it got increasingly surreal, , it was. . Another level of psychology we were really exploring of this particular person. . There are ideas at play here, , but there is also a person who's who's reality and whose very life we can say is at play. . So in addition to all of sort of the experimental touches techniques that we can probably talk about in this this short film, , it's sort of that the way the movie really captured psychological distress. . Dislocation for me that makes it stand out and stand alongside I would say something like in China Angelo. . Yeah, , I agree and I think maybe the best way for me to try to get an answer to Melissa's question is to talk about the fascinating intersection of these two directors. We . put them together pretty randomly there the first films in our series chronologically, , and it worked out that we would combine some films here because the three Darren films combined are about forty five minutes and Lupinos the hitchhiker is only about seventy minutes. . So that's a solid two hours there between these filmmakers but how perfect was it Josh watching? ? These films together and thinking about these two filmmakers together you have Lupino someone who I think is clearly interested in using cinema to reflect reality and you know this from watching the hitchhiker and especially that opening bit of text right that tells you that this is based on true events than you're going to see facts play out at uses that word and even implicating you as a viewer saying, , this could be you yes. . Experience could happen to you but also how focused she is on putting us as viewers through this experience with these characters so that sense of reality is omnipresent and I also know it because i. . Watched a video was I think on the Criterion Channel website? ? It's a very short video, , maybe a minute, , but just kind of puts lupinos career and Perspective Imaging Sarah Smith is the critic who talks about her work and she says explicitly, , Lupino wanted to make documentary style films about contemporary social problems like rape unplanned, , pregnancy, , disability bigamy, , and the corresponding clip examples there notably, , all feature women in these movies and women's stories. . That's not the case at all. . Of course, , with the hitchhiker. . Now, , you've got Latino on one end of this realism spectrum, , and then you've got Darren on the complete opposite using cinema not to express reality. . Or reflect reality to completely transform it and I think where they meet in a really interesting way is in Lupinos, , expressionistic flourishes and endurance psychological realism. . You said a perfect word there the intimacy of those three shorts that we watched. . That's where these two filmmakers crossover they seem so disparate and distinct, , and they are, , but they're also mining some of the territory.

Darren IDA Lupino Melissa Tamika Melissa Profess Lupino director Lupinos Lupino Duar Josh Andrew Sarah IDA Seattle Deren Bogart staff writer United States Frank Lovejoy William Tolman Sarah Smith China Angelo
Overlooked Auteurs: Ida Lupino and Maya Deren

Filmspotting

09:08 min | 3 months ago

Overlooked Auteurs: Ida Lupino and Maya Deren

"Guys. In this first episode of your. Marathon. With my appearance films, Meshes of the afternoon at land and ritual in transfigured time and IDA. Lupino. The hitchhiker I've been thinking about how to connect these two directors and these films if it is fair to connect them. On the one hand Lupino and Darren have little in Common Darrin made experimental films bending cinemas form and it's character and narrative conventions and she worked holy outside the studio system. She was this film theorist writer director actor where she funded promoted and screened her own work off and on living room walls. Lupino on the other hand made more straightforward narrative films following character plot and structure conventions, and she worked from inside the Studio System With Archaic Pictures for example, ultimately distributing the hitchhiker. But it is notable that Lupino was actually suspended from studio contracts and when she turned to directing, she formed her own production company called the filmmakers and beyond production itself both women in their unique ways bucked the system and pioneered that own paths and I think I must say, Latinos, the hitchhiker is perhaps for me alternately as subversive as the wonderful woman figure in Darren's at land this figure who crawls and gropes her way along the long table at a formal dinner party exposing and disrupting their rituals and expectations of so-called polite society. Take the ways both Darren's meshes of the afternoon and Lupinos the hitchhiker reference and disrupt the conventions of filled noir of their day. If nor films broadly speaking are these thrillers featuring things like low key lighting and claustrophobic urban interiors kind of a somber mood a sense of cynicism inescapable fatalism, an anti hero of course, and FM fatal both films give us many of these things but new Lupino Duar in the hitchhiker rejects the classic cityscape and creates the same coster phobic intensity in a wide open desert landscape instead. She also rejects a FEM fatal that figure of Man's demise, and she focuses our attention on the brittle masculinity of her male characters, exposing guns fetish wielded only by those who are weakest and most insecure. And instead of a SAM spade type figure furiously asserting his independence, I won't play the SAP for you. Lupino suggests it's in vulnerability and Camaraderie where true strength lies. And Darren's noir infuse meshes of the afternoon while offering her character, a claustrophobic cycle of fate within the walls of a city home from which noir like death seems only escape. She even more radically rejects cohesive ideas of anti heroine, FEM, fatale, and makes her central figure a woman someone who she makes both anti hero amphay towel. And instead of a thriller playing out over a three act structure, she makes it a thriller wholly confined to one individual's mind where we see justice many twists and character trails as any new are. So my question for both of you as you begin this new marathon and consider Lupino and Darren specifically is what do you see in these directors films that like the connections to Nuwara that we've noted the film's are products of the kind of cinematic conventions that every filmmaker is in debt to, but also showcase evidence of trail-blazing in form and in content the you so much. Melissa. For that setup, we hope that we'll. Get a chance to hear from Melissa another time or two throughout this marathon. But she certainly did an excellent job getting a started she also in her extended voicemail pointed out that look was the only woman director who is included in Andrew Sarah says the American cinema directors and directions from nineteen, sixty eight, which included his ranking of directors. He kinda put him in different tiers of his Pantheon if you will and Lupino. was there, and of course Sarah the man who coined the term at least here in the United States, the auteur theory that are marathon title references he had her in the back of the book called Oddities One shots and newcomers and also rightfully points out. She wishes that says had just left Lupino out as his entry on her work basically dams her with Faint Praise Melissa gave us a question there to wrestle with. As we consider both of these filmmakers how rooted in traditional filmmaking and even especially in Lupinos case Richard in genre their films are but also how trail-blazing, how pioneering their work truly is what stood out to you in that regard with both of these filmmakers well, let me start with Darren, and first off just to say that I think meshes of the afternoon. Her first film is a flat out masterpiece it just completely. Knocked me over in a way that reminded me of a film that's in the tradition I think you could say Darren was working in and that's Louis Boone Wells whom Chen and Lu which we did as part of our boone. Well, Marathon Adam. So it's a this is an experimental surrealist film in a Lotta ways meshes of the afternoon but what is distinct about it to me is the way dare intakes this dreamlike atmosphere this the sense of dreaming the intellectual surrealism at play and made it. So intimate this movie just feels completely distinct from something like Shin and blue because it was an emotional experience for me whereas. The other one I think you're kind of like a fun puzzle to think about and it's you know. Under Lewis disturbing absolutely in it, it strikes you on that level. But here as we follow this woman played by Darren who walks into a house in the afternoon goes up some stairs notices. Some items falls asleep in a chair and then the whole sequence kind of repeats and it repeats a number of times. I just basically felt with each level even as it got increasingly surreal, it was. Another level of psychology we were really exploring of this particular person. There are ideas at play here, but there is also a person who's who's reality and whose very life we can say is at play. So in addition to all of sort of the experimental touches techniques that we can probably talk about in this this short film, it's sort of that the way the movie really captured psychological distress. Dislocation for me that makes it stand out and stand alongside I would say something like in China Angelo. Yeah, I agree and I think maybe the best way for me to try to get an answer to Melissa's question is to talk about the fascinating intersection of these two directors. We put them together pretty randomly there the first films in our series chronologically, and it worked out that we would combine some films here because the three Darren films combined are about forty five minutes and Lupinos the hitchhiker is only about seventy minutes. So that's a solid two hours there between these filmmakers but how perfect was it Josh watching? These films together and thinking about these two filmmakers together you have Lupino someone who I think is clearly interested in using cinema to reflect reality and you know this from watching the hitchhiker and especially that opening bit of text right that tells you that this is based on true events than you're going to see facts play out at uses that word and even implicating you as a viewer saying, this could be you yes. Experience could happen to you but also how focused she is on putting us as viewers through this experience with these characters so that sense of reality is omnipresent and I also know it because i. Watched a video was I think on the Criterion Channel website? It's a very short video, maybe a minute, but just kind of puts lupinos career and Perspective Imaging Sarah Smith is the critic who talks about her work and she says explicitly, Lupino wanted to make documentary style films about contemporary social problems like rape unplanned, pregnancy, disability bigamy, and the corresponding clip examples there notably, all feature women in these movies and women's stories. That's not the case at all. Of course, with the hitchhiker. Now, you've got Latino on one end of this realism spectrum, and then you've got Darren on the complete opposite using cinema not to express reality. Or reflect reality to completely transform it and I think where they meet in a really interesting way is in Lupinos, expressionistic flourishes and endurance psychological realism. You said a perfect word there the intimacy of those three shorts that we watched. That's where these two filmmakers crossover they seem so disparate and distinct, and they are, but they're also mining some of the territory.

Darren Lupino Lupinos Melissa Lupino Duar IDA Director Andrew Sarah United States Sarah Smith China Angelo Coster Writer Shin Rape Richard Lewis Nuwara Josh Boone
Interview With Barbara Kopple

Filmspotting

04:11 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Barbara Kopple

"I, know I'm not alone this. I'm on record as naming Harlan, county USA, one of the best documentaries ever. Made I taught it and American dream once in a class on cinema verite. So Barbara Cop bullets genuinely thrilled to have you on film spotting. Thanks for coming on That's nice to hear. Thank you very much. Of course I was four when the events of desert one played out. So I guess I'll use that as my excuse but I, have to confess I really had no idea. Story was going to unfold when I started watching and the story I did get surprised me. So was that partly what drew you to this story that it's a mission that a lot of Americans may not be aware of or have forgotten about chosen to forget about Exactly, the history channel is GonNa do hundred feature found based on history that people really wouldn't know that much about And so does it one was one of them they ended up on these doing for five and so. We're rocky that we got to do this. and. I just love death because I just felt that desert one really is a story that needed to be if you know for me. Story of heroism, a reminder of the horrors of war and it also. It's so rennaissance today because it looks the roots of the conflict between the US and the Iranian government. And plus I just really wanted to do. Because the guys are so incredible, their their diet who'd never really got do and they went because they wanted to rescue fifty two hostages who had been you know taken by the Iranian students. So not knowing the story, I'll also confess I, assumed it was going to be a story of American triumph and in some ways it is you mentioned it is a tale of heroism. It's definitely a tale of great courage but it is a failed mission and the failed missions aren't the ones history typically remembers or wants to revisit. It sounds like that was also an angle that appealed to you. Yeah. from people have this motto had the guts to try. And From this. Ham. A lot of really incredible things like it's organization called the Special Operations, Warrior Foundation and also was really the first time that special forces wherever put together you know marine and navy and everybody in now special forces are together you know on different missions that they go and so it was the start of that. Thinking about desert one in relation to some of the other documentaries you've made the to mention. For example, you give a voice there to people who are often voiceless overlooked. I'm thinking of course of the of the miners and the meatpackers, and it's not the soldiers whose missions are unsuccessful as we touched on whose stories are typically told, but that's what you've done and so I'm curious if that was a conscious choice on your part or are you just naturally drawn to telling those kinds of stories and giving voice to those people? Yeah. That's what I love doing more than anything is. Really getting to know people that you narrowly. No are you have stereotypical feelings about and let them tell their story and let them think D- I've done two other films about the military one was. Found with the collective of people called winter soldier, which was about Vietnam veterans, telling stories about what happened in Vietnam, and then another one in two thousand and fifteen called shelter, which was about homeless veterans and a really wonderful friend of Mine Day of Marist. News did a lot of the singing and Harlan County USA was a homeless that and he was sorted the center of the film as we went to different places where they were homeless and he saying he told stories than it was quite

Vietnam Harlan County Harlan Barbara Cop United States Warrior Foundation
Chicago announces restricted access to downtown will continue at night through weekend

John Howell

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago announces restricted access to downtown will continue at night through weekend

"Announce. Sing that it again will restrict access to downtown tonight from nine o'clock until six o'clock and that those restrictions will continue every night through the weekend after the looting and civil unrest that we saw Earlier this week. Also, lakeshore drive after nine o'clock at night will be shut down between Fullerton on the north and I 55 on the South. All bridges will be up by nine o'clock. Except for LaSalle, Harrison, Ida B. Wells, Lakeshore Drive, Columbus, Kinsey and Grand. If you work or live downtown, you will have to show an I D to the police. Who will be cordoning off access to the downtown area, Starting at nine o'clock to night,

Ida B. Wells Fullerton Kinsey Lasalle Columbus Harrison
Bitcoin Booms - Where To From Here?

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:51 min | 4 months ago

Bitcoin Booms - Where To From Here?

"We did not only. Did we get up through ten thousand? We went through eleven. With currently sitting in the best position yet, the best position that we've been in a balloon a balloon AB- looming bloom long time. maxed out yesterday with a high of eleven thousand, four, hundred fifty to. If you recall what all saying yesterday on Zippo gassed always talking about getting through the of ten, thousand, four, fifty, six or ten five I also then went on to talk a little, ten, thousand, six, hundred and thirty. Well, of course we took both those levels outs, and we smash them most out. We've got a wonderful wonderful looking start to the weight here. Ladies and gentlemen we are about ten thousand. We auditing media. And we are looking very very good now. This is looking better of saint. Look for long time Let me talk through back. Let me, so the run loss time up to ten six. The weekly wasn't quite as fond as a trend. Guy It was just coming out of a downtrend the time before when we broke up and this is nineteen. Two Thousand Nineteen March up runoff when we when we hit, a paik of fourteen, was fourteen, thirteen, thousand, nine, hundred twenty. That was looking good through that because we did have NAS pullback, unaffiliated round, but the one that we've got here. The woman is high or low on that weekly Ken on. You heard me talk about it so many times NRA that is what we're after. K., really good shots structure. Hey, now it just looks better. It s much much more structured. The monthly looks better in the middle of the monthly hasn't got a good trend. They'd just yet. We're up twenty percent so far this month. The weekly that structure on that poppy is just fantastic. The daily looking gripe as well so right down low bitcoins pulled back away bits. We've pulled back to eleven thousand and four dollars right now. That is down point. Five of a percent big moves overnight now. Could this move going willy? See a pullback tonight. We closed yesterday above eleven. Thousand could certainly see a back, but in the same respect, we could say this. Just continue to carry on. Why well because this is the first big move in bitcoin very long time to And it's looking very very nice as I. Keep mentioning I'm sorry. Just so stoked on how this looks right now. Looking for cried looking for more entries. I know some members got little cradles from from back around that level. Background tend to. was at ten to. Oh was ten to, but the one actually was talking about was a little Kreil came back and let me just give you the risk ratio on this as it currently stands background nine seven now. Based on the entrance to a process is right now. You'd be looking at a forty two one. Yes, Forty Times your mind that means a thousand on Maine's forty thousand back sky at twenty, thousand, five hundred. Be Your Prophet right now as it stands now. The other thing to mention here as well is people have done this either got some very heavy pundits. Rotten crypto community with all we do is talk about the strategies finding tried twenty people in the right direction built upon the backbone are the three trading strategies in the coolest that is where it is a guy that he's worries so the Crypto community. We've got there. That slot group now. I'm not talking about anything else. I'm focused on crypto toting about fundamentals with trading. That is all the way doing, and if you're in there if Get in the videos at the moment. Did video today about how to take profit in parabolic? Get there and check that out too province on one. Anyway let me go back to the top ten. The bitcoin ten, thousand, twenty, one point three four to settled with a balance there we go theory, sitting at three hundred and twenty one dollars five cents. Down Point. Six five of closed up three point six percent, yes, of course bitcoin. Was the mightiest stab yesterday on at full point, three percent was sitting at twenty two dollars and. Twenty two point three cents dollars down point six percent bitcoin cash well I'm hopeful to see this puppy followed by why well with currently sitting in around a region where we are coming at the top end of that very long consolidation that's gone back to March of this year many months, and we are top end of that I've got a long tried on my one to WanNA locked. Locked in profit I'm happy. The Ida was where I took that tried oat soya modest got that wrong. I think it was. It was the four hour so I'm very hopeful to say this. Continue to kick on maximum mega. WHO's out of that so carrying on as we will bitcoin cash to seventy up two percent, the best performer in the top ten or top ten right now. Donna? Its up point three thirteen point nine cents pullback on that daily I did get taken out of that. My bitcoin holding so tastes say have not happy for simply because well. Stop got hit. That really is hilarious. Avocado thirteen point on as I said biggest. Point. Six six children non Dole's full sense. We did finally get up through that two hundred dollars did. Take some time and There is a lovely level around one darning on that. I'm looking for pullbacks in at the moment I've got one as of

Crypto Community NRA Forty Times Dole KEN Maine Donna
ETH - Yep I Am In

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:19 min | 4 months ago

ETH - Yep I Am In

"I also have been very vocal about moving some money into a theory in with that resistance level in the high low building. That's what I did I, actually pretty much, nailed to the to the timing perfectly yesterday, by quite some time as of close at other positions, rather than going back into Bitcoin, a moving some back to his theory, I think it's much more bullish looking shot. And for me. The reminder of the Ted that I had. Assad for trading pays are putting too serious, so yeah, it's been a bloody good day. Without actually having to take any particular tribes and warm Italian is on not telling you this as Brag now. You'RE GONNA. See I've already seen loss of brags. Away said this Tom Blah. Blah Blah That's wonderful good for them. Excellent on I think that's fantastic that the helping people make money, or they're making money and showing people's stuff. But under the Braga. Hated by one. I'm here to do from here to motivate you to take the plunge to get started. Because whether you're looking to manage any investment portfolio oil, you're looking to trade on low timeframes and everything in between what I do. We'll help you with that, and that's what I'm saying about. Link at some sighing about eighth sign about cod dominate the. Pain them. To know how what you're looking for well, it could certainly change your loss of. Where are we right now? About five minutes until the market closes for today do. Well thousand five hundred thirty dollars at one point, five percent on the BTS Yayha and guess what today has done. You heard me talking about the bright of that weekly candlelight back on the sixth of July broken the heart and we look at much more bullish now. BITCOIN is a move in and a very came very to see work always to next because well. Thing? Theorin I the big dog got to sixty four, forty six. To sixty four. Forty six cents wanted are fake. That will because as a theory. And a thirty to fifty beautiful, it's up seven point five five percent. And there was a wonderful little. Krylya Sally which she'd be a byte point five times. You'll risk if he took good Scifi. Yep there. It is I saw Pai. In exile pays moved up two point. One percents twenty point four cents. Yes, it has. It's actually broken through that twenty cent. Barry, that's really struggling with for a little while. She's up through a looking good. It'll move their necks. bitcoin cash that four hour cradle started up for out to our cradle was at ten P.. I. T.. n. p. m. a. pointed that out of my McAfee video. I didn't try anything I did like the look of Bitcoin cash guys a practice few to tall or not feeling well, you stay at and I just I just feeling. Thoughts Utah yesterday so I stayed up. Di Big would abate on that puppy up four percent to forty dollars at the moment. Ida Okada twelve point four percent. Up Point six five not too much, but it's obviously going to be big moose bigoted, pretty quick, musical, best one, eighty, four thirty. I'd up two point nine percent right now. Lot coins three percent up one foil candle. Wish Guy. Right up in the. Forty! Five Dollars and eleven cents Barn answer bit of an honest move there also two point two six percent up sitting right around that resistance region from yesterday, eighteen dollars and twelve cents per tools, sixty six out one point six percent renting the top ten. We've got leakage at seven dollars forty two point three nine percent of the standard as a theorem. There is absolutely no doubt about it. We broken the resistance. We've broken out on the pitch shot. We've broken up against bitcoin working up and through every single barrier level. You imagine we have go blue sky ahead. What will I be looking for I'll be looking for. Nazi boosters crypto cradles and big breakouts, while because that's all I have looked full. The three strategies that are built my career as a tried and I'll go all checkless for you. Should you wish to? Get stuck into them.

Tom Blah Assad TED Di Big Krylya Sally Ida Okada Utah Barry I. T.. N. P. M. A.
How workers are fighting for their rights in a dangerous gig economy

The Big Story

09:09 min | 6 months ago

How workers are fighting for their rights in a dangerous gig economy

"I was doing my grocery shopping at ten thirty last night and by doing my shopping. I mean I was picking things out on an APP that somebody else would get for me at the grocery store the next day and delivered to my front door and if for some reason I couldn't get a spot on that APP INSTA- cart and I guess we'd probably have ordered delivery for dinner using another APP that relies on another person to pick things up at the scary world and bring them to me. Yes I feel guilty about that but not enough to stop using these APPS and doubt that I'm alone in that right now we're relying on workers and the GIG economy more than ever and their job is far more dangerous than ever and most of them. Don't get hero pay or have job security or benefits. Some of them will have been fighting hard to change that and some of them have even one including a group here in Canada. The provinces Labor Board has ruled out food door couriers more closely resemble employees rather than independent contractors creating a groundbreaking precedent for others in the GIG economy. So today will tell you their story and we'll also tell you what happened right after that historic victory and we will do that as soon as. Clare. Who is just back from vacation gives us an update on covid. Nineteen this weekend Clare. Welcome back where did you go? Hey Yeah I took a few days off last week but didn't go anywhere. Obviously the furthest I went was to the park down the street. I am just glad that you came back. And before you update us. Can you explain to listeners? When will hear your updates now? Because we're changing that alphabet. Yeah will you know? I think we're kind of over the initial shock of Covid nineteen down the world and we've been hearing the phrase new normal lot so there will be fewer news updates at the top of the show from now on basically a couple times a week will update you on anything big happening with COVID. Nineteen in Canada. So yes you'll still get the news you need but maybe not every day and of course if God forbid a second wave hits and things do go downhill we will then be right here going down that hill with you every day and speaking of a second wave Clare. Let me guest as your report. Today involves some idiots in Toronto. Who were doing their best to make that happen this weekend. Yeah well that was what everyone was talking about this weekend. Because it was nice and warm out in Toronto and people wanted to go out so there were these huge crowds at Trinity Bell Woods Park on Saturday. Thousands of people were there with practically no physical distancing the city of Toronto. Call this dangerous behavior saying that. This threatened to undo all the work done over the past ten weeks so on Sunday. The World Law enforcement officers in the park and making sure that people were keeping that two meter distance. This is happening. As the number of cases of Covid nineteen is actually going up in Ontario and perhaps coincidentally two weeks after Mother's Day in Alberta the cities of Calgary and burks joining the rest of the province in allowing bars restaurants and hair salons to open today and there will be more restrictions lifted for those cities in particular on June first and in Quebec their concerns about an upcoming heat wave a minimum of thirty degrees Celsius for three days. Starting tomorrow the concern is people in long term care homes who don't have air conditioning. A long term care homes as we know have been hit the hardest throughout throughout this pandemic in Canada especially in Quebec so the Quebec Council for the protection of patients says. It's ready to go to court on this one as of Sunday evening. Eighty four thousand six hundred and ninety nine cases of covid nineteen in Canada with six thousand five hundred and fifteen deaths. I'm Jordan Youth Rawlings and this is the big story. Sarah much heads. Ida is the work and wealth reporter for the Toronto Star. She frequent guest on this podcast and now she has a podcast as well. Her new show is hustle. It's about the David versus Goliath battle. For Workers Rights in the GIG economy and episode two drops today Hazara high. You told us about this podcast when we had you on a couple of months ago and you've been putting the whole thing together. I guess well. The landscape has been shifting dramatically. So why don't you just kind of take us way back to the beginning and tell me about the GIG economy and food aura in particular When you first began this project which is a little over a year ago. Yeah that's right. It's sort of the May year anniversary of reporting on this story and there is really being so many twists and turns over over the course of the year. Some of which we sort of new would come a big battle at the Labor board an effort to try and unionize food aura careers. And then some that were just totally unanticipated. Obviously picked the pandemic being the major one there. So it's been a. It's been a really interesting. Year of following wet was really a unique kind of first attempt to change working conditions for workers in the GIG economy. Which I think is a word that we're all familiar with and we're so used to using APPs to get an uber left or order a meal to our doorstep but you know often. We don't interrogate what is happening behind the scenes. And so that was sort of the inspiration for taking a deeper dive into what the realities of this kind of work are like a new followed a group of food or careers for a year. Just tell me about them. I mean who are they? How did they meet? What are they like? Yeah so Fidora careers are really a diverse group of workers in the city. You know we've all probably seen them on their bikes with a big pink Fedora. Bag on the back or food or a jacket But they're not just cyclists. They're also drivers who go around the city delivering meals and I think a lot of people kind of assume that Workers doing this kind of job are often like young college students especially downtown a lot of the folks that you'll see on their bikes are are younger people but the reality is that the workforce when. I started meeting. Carriers was so much more diverse. You know a lot of drivers who are working in more suburban areas. Are you know New Acadians? Were supporting their families and haven't been able to find work in in their field. You know it's people who really do this as a full-time job is their career. Really They've been doing it for years And I think that the kind of overwhelming feeling that I sort of got from from talking to careers over. The course of the past year were just the fears and concerns around the protections on the job and a sense that this is a job that has really kind of fallen through the cracks that disentitlement workers from a lot of supports that many people take for granted. I think most fundamentally is a job where many express expressed just feeling like. There was a lack of respect and and one career Chris Williams who was involved in the Union drive. Kind of summed up why careers started organizing and trying to change that the broader issues around health and safety wages and dignity. And all those kind of stem from this other issue which is Fidora's misclassification of their couriers calling them. Independent contractors instead of employees or dependent contractors and that misclassification allowed them to avoid taking any responsibility for carriers. You talked about that kind of the goals of forming a union and one of them with dignity. Why is that so important? It's the hardest issue to define by in some ways. It's the most important careers have value. And I think it's the most important because that's personally by the way I think it's the most important because I think it's the one that justifies everything else like. That's why wages are important in many ways for me is because it's hard to live a dignified existence if your wages are two or uncertain if you don't know whether you'll make your daily quoted today or not and obviously health and safety connects to dignity because it's hard to be now when you're wearing constantly about your health you know it takes a toll it takes an effect. I want to explore that a little bit more but I I find the idea that we can talk about. These jobs is having fallen through the cracks kind of crazy. 'cause can you give me a sense of the scale of the GIG economy and Canada because it's everywhere right? Yeah anything I think

Canada Toronto Covid Provinces Labor Board Workers Rights Clare Trinity Bell Woods Park David Rawlings World Law Fidora Labor Board Sarah Calgary Quebec Council IDA Reporter BAG Quebec
French Fries: American as Apple Pie?

Doughboys

01:47 min | 6 months ago

French Fries: American as Apple Pie?

"As the nineteen seventeen. Us Entry into World War One whip citizens into a nationalistic fuhrer rebranded. Sauerkraut as liberty cabbage. An attempt to mute the culinary influence of the now hated Germans. This distinctly American act of combining performance jingoism with the absolute least amount of effort would repeat in their early outs as Francis. Opposition to the Iraq. War led the. Us's loudest wrong as citizens to rebrand French fries as freedom fries. But despite these temporary attempts at Euro erasure the continents influence on American cuisine is indelible and vice versa with French fries. Among the most notable examples in the sixteenth century Spanish Explorers Return from the Americas with a new ingredient the potato at first relegated as hogtied by Europeans but in time recognizes the first style kitchen staple French fries among the new dishes. That would come to exist as a result of the transcontinental tuber track though their disputed origin is credited by different sources to France Belgium or Spain brought back to the states in the seventeen. Hundreds French fries exploded in Popularity State side in the twentieth century alongside their common accompaniment. The hamburger and soon home cooks would desire way to approximate addition their kitchens without the Messi sputters of deep that frying in Nineteen Fifty. Two brothers formerly corn. Growers opened a company offering frozen French fried potatoes intended for oven. Reheating with facility. Straddling the border between Oregon and Idaho giving their company. Its name from abbreviating both states day. Sixty years later. The Briggs Brothers Brainchild is the dominant frozen fries brand in the US and the company also credits itself with the creation of variant beloved and cafeterias and Gastro pubs alike. The tater tot only time will tell which future war of opportunity will lead to originally specific foodstuff getting clumsy rename. But whatever you call them. French fries are now as American as Apple Pie. Which itself is European origin.

United States Briggs Brothers Brainchild Nineteen Fifty Iraq Apple Americas Messi Francis France Oregon Spain Idaho Belgium
"ida" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

The United States of Anxiety

07:43 min | 7 months ago

"ida" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

"Slave owners and oppressors where we can all be at peace. Now just pause and think about this. I is part of the first generation of black people to grow up free in the south and that freedom comes with a really big asterix because black people are considered less civilized than whites by nature like scientifically. This is a mainstream noncontroversial idea. So of course this generation really wants to prove it can be just as civilized as white people having so many of us we. We don't realize the black people were massacred during the Victorian era and that character in this in the sense characters like destiny in this period and that idea the rights of first class citizenship. People feel it needs to be earned. There's nothing inherent there and in the early days of IDA's journalism career. These are important ideas. Turn she fills the pages of our newspaper with messages about black achievement and independence and success in about looking to the future. Get Education accumulate wealth. You know become this kind of first class citizen as defined by the society be progressive. There's nobody more progressive than black people in the spirit of time because they really believe in in progress and they they're very hopeful for progress obviously And She's part and parcel of that idea. It's very familiar honestly absolutely still exists. It's one of the things we talked about in the first season of this. Podcast that when you look at at after Americans in immigrants you see people who were positive about the country. That's all of these. Trump people were so negative about a very similar devise a hundred years ago absolutely which is why history so it was a. I find so many answers to what's happening now in in in in history you do see these patterns because there's a certain character to the country and it repeats itself over and over again and there are certain values that endure the strivers ambitions of reconstruction era black people. There actually the root of what we now derisively call respectability politics. This idea that black people ought to be more like the OBAMAS and early in her career. Ida WELLS EMBRACED. These ideas heartily. She is after all quite a success herself. She's the first black woman ever to be editor in chief and publisher of a Major City newspaper. And she's become part of Memphis's black elite. I mean she goes to the Right Church. She dates the right kind of guys. But there's this one piece of it all that just really bothers her. Because you see if the black community is going to prove that it's just as civilized as white people by white people standards then that means something quite specific for black women. There's something called the cult of true womanhood in which women were supposed to be pious and pure and submissive. The true woman had those kinds of characteristics at least as defined by those times in the late eighteen hundreds but then wells which actually really bothers her. She beats herself up about not measuring up to this standard of womanhood. And she's trying so hard some of her people she looks up to women who are very feminine who very refined and who seemed to have a very even temperament she of course is completely up. She has McCurry temperament. She's gets enraged very easily. She hates about herself in her diary. She calls it her besetting sin. She's trying so hard to live up to a certain ideal. But then she will finally breakthrough it. When she has to follow the logic of lynching when she realizes white civilization is ally her weakening comes win. The violence of the era finally touches people in our own life. Three incredibly bright entrepreneurial. Smart Men Calvin McDowell William Henry Stuart and Thomas Moss that created a grocery store a very successful grocery store in an integrated neighborhood on the outskirts of Memphis and across the street from a much less successful white owned grocery store. The People's grocery is one of these entities that is so symbolic of the rise of black people in reconstruction is actually a co OP. With more than a dozen. Investors led by Thomas Moss who it turns out is a very good friend of IDA wells. It all starts in March of eighteen ninety two with a playground dispute a black boy white boy playing marbles they get to fight. They get into fisticuffs. The father of the white boy comes and starts beating on the Black Kid. This brings out the community. There's a huge neighborhood. Brawl whites against blacks in the middle of this Malloy. The Guy who runs the white grocery store gets beat up well. That is one indignity too many for him. He wants revenge so he leaves. The fight goes to the police goes to the sheriff and says in fact that black people are in a conspiracy to kill white people and he says the. People's Grocery is at the center of this conspiracy. So the cops freak out they deputize a bunch of white men and they form a mob and in the middle of the night they raided the grocery store but what they don't know is that the black community and particularly men of the People's grocery assume that this was going to happen and they lay in wait for these men come and there's a shootout three of the deputized men white men are gravely injured. Eventually the cops do successfully arrest the man of the People's Grocery Thomas Calvin McDowell and William Stewart and they throw them in the county jail now. Nobody's confused about the danger. These men face so at first an armed black paramilitary groups stands guard outside that jail but the injured white guys didn't die so it seemed like things were going to cool down the black group outside. The jail took their guns and would hold the very next night. Seventy five masked whites on horseback. Come to the jail. Take them to an abandoned railway yard. Torture and Lynch them is true eye for an eye vengeance. The torture is meant to mirror the deputies injuries. One man shot through the eye. Another through the Cheek Calvin McDowell fights back so shoot off his fingers one by one and so here we have this young man who is emblematic of the rise of the south. Who's a hard worker? Who is not even particularly political by the way but who's just standing ground the try to preserve what he had earned and he is lynched and this makes wells begin to see things differently. Have different ideas about what's really going on. And she's one of the first to really begin to put certain elements together coming up the truly revolutionary ideas of IDA wells and white. So many of us don't realize.

Ida WELLS Calvin McDowell Memphis IDA IDA wells Thomas Moss Thomas Calvin McDowell Trump Right Church OBAMAS McCurry Lynch Malloy editor in chief Major City publisher William Stewart William Henry Stuart
"ida" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

The United States of Anxiety

10:22 min | 7 months ago

"ida" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

"Introduce yourself who are you? I'm Paula. Giddings writer biographer of either. Be Wells I spoke with Paula. Back in two thousand eighteen during the midterm elections. Her spectacular biography of IDA wells is the definitive source. And it's as much coming coming of age story as anything else as I looked at her diary. She has fragments of a diary. That are available. You begin to see what's really inside of her. She wants to transform society. That isn't treating her well actually and she wants to transform herself was very interesting comes out in the diary is that she has allowed anger and she knows it will destroy her if she can't get a hold of it so she works very hard to transform that anger into something positive and this kind of urgent activism that she has. I think comes as the result of that. I was born enslaved but grew up free during the reconstruction era in those decades following the civil war when the United States rewrote its constitution to create a truly interracial democracy. And for a time those were more than words on a page. I came of age in a place where that promise that ideal of everybody getting a fair shot at making a life for themselves it was palpable and real memphis was called the Chicago south because There was lots of industry going on and lots of opportunity and black people had Opportunity as well and we're very optimistic in those early years. After reconstruction business was exponentially increasing. Black Business Schools Blacks actually had a higher attendance rate in the Memphis. Public School system than whites did and there were people. Making money and people were making money and there were restaurants. There was industrial businesses. There were small stores. The other thing that's going long guy is that Because of education I mean illiteracy is dropping precipitously in fact so much so that there's now a market for a black press with the first time in the eighteen eighties because there are black people who can read. You know I this minister Benjamin I'm said she said look we're in a Christian country with a Republican form of government. What can there be but progress for us and this is only one generation out of slavery but they thought that this kind of prejudice and hatred and certainly and slavery was something of the past. There are still remnants of it but this was old. Now that they're moving forward they would. Of course soon begin moving backwards again. I would witness the federal government's retreat from reconstruction. She would face the surge violence that southern whites used to regain absolute power over politics and Industry and by the time she was in her early twenties she would begin to lead her community's response to all of this her choices in her ideas mark a pivot point in the history of black politics which really is to say in the history of the United States. There is a before and after I had a wells fittingly. Her political career began in a fight over space. The literal space that she occupied as both a black person and as a woman in Public. Well she actually enters public life because of an incident on a train in Memphis Tennessee. Think about a railway car. That's a first class ladies car and the gender specific very important there. If you were going to be a high class woman you weren't really supposed to be running around in public at all but if you had to be out you can find yourself to respectable public space free of smokers. Free of bad language free of any drinking alcohol and women who wrote in them to be women of good character and there was a hacking order. You could only be a truly first-class lady. If you were white if you were in upper class black woman there was something called an accommodation car separate but equal and in fact materially. That car is exactly the same as the ladies car. The differences is no gender designation the differences at their smoking and drinking. And what happens but made people really angered is that whites would leave the ladies car and come and smoke and drink in the accommodation card and black car and then go back to the when they finish the latest car. Well in one thousand nine hundred eighty three either going to get on the train. She sees smoke in the accommodation car and to her mind. This means that this is no longer a first class car so she makes her way to the ladies car. She's paid her first class fare. She certainly considers herself first class caliber and so with the full certainty of her social station. She sits down in the white ladies car. Now it's eighteen. Eighty three less than a generation after the civil war. She's just twenty one years old but when the white conductor tells her to leave refuses firmly and repeatedly the third time he asks he actually tries to extricate out of the seat physically you know she grips the seat with their feet in front and fights the hold on and scratches the conductor and actually bites him. You know there's a court case later in the court case. He actually testifies she. Looks like the lady now but I bled freely. That court case turns into a local celebrity. She fights it for years and ultimately loses but in Black Memphis. That's not the point. It's not about IDA winning or losing. It's about the fact that she just refuses to cede one inch to the idea that she is a second class citizen and that is thrilling to watch as a result a local newspaper asks her to write about her experience. And that invitation changes the course of American history because IDA wells discovers her calling she says in Journalism. I found the real me. And this is a person who's really searching for herself but journalism. She finds her voice and so watch out everyone. Acid thousands of black people were lynched in the years that followed reconstruction. I is known today for investigating hundreds of these murder. That's why she got her Pulitzer Prize but she didn't just gather the facts. She used them to develop an entirely new set of political ideas about how black people could get truly free in this country. Ideas that differed sharply from those of the reconstruction era from the value. She once held dear herself. Hello it's great to be with you. My name is Brian Stevenson. I understand either evolution. I went down to Montgomery Alabama to visit the nation's first memorial to black people who were lynched take me Stevenson who runs the equal justice initiative. He created this memorial to flesh out the history of lynching with names and places in stories. He wants us to feel the terrorism that ended reconstruction that established the segregated society. We still live in while. Let's let's go absolutely. It's an open airspace. Balden but outdoors. You can hear the city just beyond the walls but suddenly it somehow really distant. There's open sky. There's a winding path. There's a big Grassy Hill and the monument itself sits at the top of this hill and almost Minnesota's us we climbed toward it as we reach the top. I can hear a waterfall running in the distance. And we enter. A forest of these weathered pillars. These are six foot monuments. They're made out of court ten steel and the elements. When it rains it causes them to oxidizing so you see Marx and streets and they become this really rich important variation of Brown and copper and they replicate in my mind the complexion of the African American community and because they're six they have a very human forum. It's honestly terrified. The floor slopes downward and the monuments hundreds of them begin to hang over our heads. Each one with the name of a county etched into its steel along with the names and dates of each person lynched in that county. You get a sense of these communities by the number of lynchings one in Monroe Montgomery County Kentucky Alcorn Mississippi has five Wilkinson County. Mississippi has eight. This is Emma County Mississippi. The first lynching documented Simon Jenkins in eighteen. Seventy seven the last one. Eugene Bells in Nineteen forty-five it's decades of the threat and menace of lynching hanging over African Americans in that community. Eventually we get to the monument for IDA's Home Shelby County which encompasses Memphis in which you immediately notice about Shelby County. It has dramatically more lynchings than any of the neighboring counties. There's a reason for that shelby. County had a huge black population. It had been a big player in the slave economy and when freedom came a lot of black people stayed and they were optimistic. You had formerly enslaved people who had skills who had trades who were used to hard work when they won their freedom. They didn't say let's get revenge. Let's retaliate. They said let's find a way to create a community with our former.

memphis IDA IDA wells Paula United States Shelby County Black Memphis Black Business Schools Blacks Brian Stevenson Public School Giddings writer Monroe Montgomery County Kentu Benjamin Pulitzer Prize Simon Jenkins County Emma County Mississippi
St. Louis City and County leaders to reduce COVID-19 public health restrictions starting May 18

Overnight America with Ryan Wrecker

00:26 sec | 7 months ago

St. Louis City and County leaders to reduce COVID-19 public health restrictions starting May 18

"Ball St Louis city and county will reduce public health restrictions starting on may eighteenth more detailed guidance by the end of the week which they I think hopes to ease some of the fears that people have had that this thing could be on going for go ida so when they say may eighteenth that's still pretty far away I mean that's like two weeks away so two Mondays from now so next Monday would be may eleventh following Monday would be may

Why Is Plankton Our Tiniest Unsung Hero?

BrainStuff

05:25 min | 7 months ago

Why Is Plankton Our Tiniest Unsung Hero?

"One of Earth's unsung heroes is also among its tiniest plankton. A single celled algae. It's barely visible to the eye. But it contributes to some of the world's most important resources it's essential to the food chain. It's a main supplier of oxygen and it's the fuel that keeps our cars running and our homes heated these organisms. No bigger than a human hair float. The sunny upper parts of the Ocean. The two main types of plankton phytoplankton and zooplankton support one another phytoplankton and organism so small. The millions can fit in one drop of water produces its own energy through photosynthesis accounts for nearly half of all photosynthesis on the planet zooplankton which are tiny animals in. Crustaceans like Copa Pods. Along with other small fish and marine creatures eat phytoplankton. Then become food for bigger fish and so on up the food chain from seals dolphins virtually every creature in the Ocean. Each either plankton or an organism. That depends on plancton in a David versus Goliath. Battle filter feeding baleen whales like the humpback rely on tiny organisms. Such as plankton and Krill. A filter these whales take huge gulfs of water than use their tongues to push out liquid. So foods like Krill. Plankton remain right. Whales also swim up and mouthed through plankton filled waters. They trapped the plankton and third tongue. That pushes the organisms down their throat but plankton role in the food doesn't stop in the ocean polar bears and seabirds rely on Plankton. Fueled meals like seals and fish. Even humans. Count on fish and therefore plankton to survive Americans loan eat around fifteen and a half pounds or about seven kilos of fish and shellfish per person per year. That's a whole lot of plankton. Plankton itself is making. Its way toward dinner tables. It's not common in restaurants yet. But on Angelina and Nuno Mendez. Both shafts of Michelin starred restaurants in Britain added Plankton to a special event menu in two thousand thirteen. This included delicacies. Like a plankton cocktail and plankton risotto. Leon told the UK newspaper Metro. It's velvety dry. Before mixing it with liquid silky ones mixed oily an elegant pungent on the nose yet subtle and leaves a long finish in the mouth while it's still wearing restaurants. Plankton is slowly catching on. According to fine. Dining lovers plankton producers Spanish agriculture company Phytoplankton Marino are growing microalgae for human consumption and one chef even tried his hand at Phytoplankton bread. Plantains earthly contributions go beyond the food chain. Marine plants like FIDO PLANKTON KELP and the plankton. Pretty seventy percent of Earth's oxygen in fact pro chloro- caucus type of phytoplankton produces the oxygen for one out of every five breaths a human takes and IDA plankton superpowers. Don't stop there. Not ONLY DO THEY HELP. Produce Oxygen through photosynthesis phytoplankton take carbon from the atmosphere during the process of living and store it in the ocean. They die which ultimately helps curb climate. Change this is similar to the process. Trees used to store carbon in leaves since photosynthesis consumes carbon dioxide. The carbon is basically stored in each plankton. A one group of scientists found that FIDO plankton incorporate up to forty five to fifty billion tons of inorganic carbon into their cells and that petroleum. We used to fuel our cars. It's made reprocess. The dates back to ancient seas and also involves that tiny superhero of an organism plankton when plankton die they sink to the bottom of the oceans. Here debris settles on top of them and chemical reactions transform the materials into waxy kerogen and Bittermann a black tar. That's one of the main ingredients of petroleum the carriage and also undergoes further changes as it heats and it becomes what's known as crude oil or if temperatures are even hotter natural gas plankton may be essential but the small organism is also a little bit trixie scientists too long struggle to accurately predict fido plank to numbers and growth rates. But that changed in two thousand five thanks to Nasr's satellite observations and thus reported that scientists can figure out phytoplankton numbers based on how green water is when phytoplankton get stressed by cold water. They become less green phytoplankton. Rich waters become greener as conditions and growth rates improve. Oh and by night. Plankton filled water conglo through the organisms bioluminescence electric blue green red or orange researchers estimate phytoplankton makes one percent of all of Earth's biomass. That's the total mass of organisms. But that number is dwindling study published in the journal Nature in July of twenty ten showed that gradually warming ocean waters have destroyed some forty percent of earth's phytoplankton since nineteen fifty whether we know it or not all. Humans rely on this micro algae. That's why a forty percent decrease or more is worrisome.

Ocean Phytoplankton Marino Copa Pods Fido David Michelin UK Leon Nasr Angelina Britain Nuno Mendez Bittermann
"ida" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

10 Things That Scare Me

06:14 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

"I'M GONNA go first person. That's scary number. One Lake scary bugs and fish biting So of that I think biting Is Scary literally. Everyone does biting scary as when swimming underwater. You never know when there's a biting second thing. I think dairy scared of the laundry room because of the types of scary. When you look at them they look really scary business. Suck you into the tube. Tell that to your kids. So they know not to look at the pipes. Third thing I think is scary the black door in the laundry room. The one and only thing is it's not axles black. It's a white door built on the side of it. It has cracks. That are black and it's really scary. That I think is scary. Getting burned example. Today I burned my two singers and now I have blisters on this thing. I think too scary number. What honeybees number? Two about these out or scary because you never know when there's peace in the flowers collecting pollen for example in your passing by your real loud. Bees can just stink. Thing is if the scary about the BE HIGHS. Because never know when you're gonNA bonk into it and these are just. GonNa get swimming out at stinging yet. Fifteen I think is scary. Scared of dogs. One only seen that scary about dogs is dogs on the trip because his dogs on leash on the trail. They come running up to you Eating your snacks he know. What's on your list? My hus- thing that scared me is a scary movie. Snack to rescue to underst at night. Going back in time. Lightning for Nice thing. I was scared to peace. An example is high gay and I came up to a of bees. My Dad passed it already and somehow we made them angry as well. My Dad was coming back. He got staring ones. And I got stung sleepytime Going to and then we had like hasn't the trail. All Dad gave us an. We finished the hike myself saying planning scared. Scared of is spider on New dog on the Law Gladys Spiderweb. Who Do we New Year? I'm reading today by by Saint Together Ida and know our sisters from Brooklyn Noah tasted her I now the summer and Ida past the purple swim tested camp so now she's allowed to swim all the way out to the dock a big. Thank you to. Ida. Noah's Dad Navy. It was a navy who came up with the idea for the girls to list out their fears and who recorded them and that was the audio that inspired the idea for our podcast so this is a final episode of season two. We also want to thank you guys for listening to the show and let you know that we'd love to hear from you so I'm going to give your email address it's ten things pod at WNYC dot org reach out anytime we're listening scares me. You're standing in line for groceries and there's like little marks on the sidewalk marking up six feet and you're standing on your mark but the guy behind you keeps creeping up off his mark and you know you should say something but you don't want to be that person and he just keeps creeping creeping closer closer..

Brooklyn Noah Law Gladys Spiderweb stinging Ida
Tips for looking great on Zoom

Talking Tech

05:30 min | 8 months ago

Tips for looking great on Zoom

"For All your money questions turned to the nerds at Nerdwallet DOT COM okay. So we're all taking a lot of zoom meetings right now and we're looking at the camera and we're looking ourselves and saying God. I really look awful. Don't I what's wrong with this picture. Well my good friend Larry Becker. Who's a photographer and bibliographer in Florida has just written a book? It's called Great on-camera. He's got a bunch of tips for how to make yourself look way better Larry. I'm going to toss it right to you. Where shall we start? Thank you appearance right. Yeah it it's all about how you look and how you sound so there are a couple of different things that That I push people toward but one of the problems is people. Don't realize that the camera that they're using whether it's a a Webcam or one that's built into their tablet or their phone or their computer is wide angle and so there are a lot of bad things that happen when you're really close to a wide angle lens and it starts with making you look extra around so what I tell. People is first of all. Let's get camera in the right place so for me. I always suggest go straight at I level so you make eye to eye contact. Another thing is back away from the camera a little bit so that you're more normal human proportions so one of the challenges people feel like they need to be really close to the camera and that's not always a good thing so definitely back up to. Let's talk about appearance. Yes so there are a lot of things that have to do with your appearance. And one of the things that affects your appearance is going to be lighting. I have a really bright outside light coming into my office all day long whenever I'm not on video but as soon as I'm getting ready to go on video I shut the blinds. Because that overpowering light just makes my appearance look really bad. I'm really really blown out white on the side that the sunshine comes in and hits me on the side of the face. So that's terrible. Another thing that affects my appearance is I have really smooth forehead skin and if you have any extra lights on at all I look shiny and if you look shiny you look sweaty and if you look sweaty that tells people you're not really somebody I can trust and so believe it or not just a little bit of powder will knock down the shine and you'll look a whole lot better and another thing is what are you wearing. A lot of people don't realize it but The cameras do this thing with the sensor the image sensor in the camera that causes more pattern interference in the way. I explained it to people a lot of times. Is it's like if you're looking through a screen door at another screen and in Florida here where I live. Everybody has a pool with a big screen cage over it and they all know if you have to screen. You're looking through both of them at the same time. You get these weird patterns of interference. Well that happens with digital cameras and small patterns on shirts so if you or any cloth so if you have a shirt with a really tight design or even a ribbed look on the fabric that that can cause pattern interference and your shirt then just looks all like it's electrical. It looks like bad. Interference Patterns clothing is forget about a plaids and patterns solid colors. But not white or black. Right I I like to stay away from black white and tight patterns. I don't mind stripes. If they're really big you can get away with that okay. What about backgrounds? A lot of people like to go in front of bookshelves That's fine if it's all just books but if you have a bookshelf and you have all kinds of different objects. But what's going to happen? Is People will start listening to you. And then they'll get distracted by the weird stuff that's in your background. And if you want people to pay attention to you make your background. Simple lighting webcams are very low resolution and We usually look pretty dark when we look at ourselves on the laptop. What can we do about that couple? Things the Webcam is trying to balance all the light throughout the whole scene. And if you're wearing dark stuff in your scene is dark and your backlit your face is going to be fully in the shadow so the best thing to do is have the brightest light near your Webcam but actually pointed at your face. So that'll light up your face. The other thing is the lighter shirt. You wear the lighter. Overall the exposure will be throughout the image and are probably end up looking better if you're wearing a a medium to a light colored shirt so bottom lining No no distractions on on on a bookshelf. Notice tractions on my clothing coma. Hair shave my face. Put on the makeup and Get a light in front of me and most importantly I di- contact. Don't have the Webcam looking up your chin. Yeah that's the worst is looking up your chin. It's a little bit better to have it looking down at Ya but I see beauty bloggers a lot saying do that. But I recommend Ida eye

Larry Becker Florida
The Wisdom of Solitude: Lessons from the Lives of the Prophets

The Friday Circle Podcast

10:38 min | 8 months ago

The Wisdom of Solitude: Lessons from the Lives of the Prophets

"We look at the lives of the prophets to see what we can learn from something. We're supposed to do all the time. Anyway I something that lesson hunting with the other. He wants us to do. That's why he sa- panel with the honor. His put their stories in on We have more detail about them in the highly. And so I wanted to begin by looking at the life of a Ubani Saddam when he says what are you ignore? The Obama who anemia sunny. A little while under Rohani And mentioned a you when he cool to his Lord Indeed. Adversity has touched me. And you are the most messy full Over the muscle said you by the Senate on this Great Prophet of Los Apparently Data. Who many of us have heard of many people love it? They love him so much that they named their children off to the U. Many many a UBIQUONOL massage school. It's families what was so great about this prophet. And what lessons can we take from his life now in in the Times that we're in this situation of where without tells us here in the NBA? He called on a loss of Hanoi Thailand and mentioned a you when he called his Lord. Indeed adversity has touched me. So you buddy. Saddam he says to us about Sapan Donna in Nima Sunny Doda. That has afflicted me something by this happened to me. Then also handle the data in the next Jeopardize the Hoof Akasha abby he indoor The Dallas so we responded to him and removed what afflicted him of adversity will add a now. Who who Miss American or Indiana where they could only live and we gave him back his family and the like there with them as mercy from us and a reminder for the worship of a law so you about this profitable east from the most beloved of creation to Those special human beings that were chosen by a lesson with due to the cleanliness of their hall due to day connection the commitment to a lesson and this great prophet. He's then tested. He's given test that. He can be Shaab that he can take because without a dozen tests. Us doesn't afflicts us with anything that we can't handle you live alone of sin in there was he had a wife. He had children. He added family. He had well he had looks. He had all these things he had a place in society and loss of handle what he tested Ubani Saga by afflicting him with a disease within a an ailment and this caused him to become repulsive to the people he's his skin was was covered in these In this disease and people when they saw him they were repulsed by his life. They didn't want to go near. And so for being this person who was wealthy family Mixed and went about his business went about society about with people as he as we do. He went from that to being somebody who no one wanted to be around. Nobody wants you to see. And he became almost completely cut off. He had His wife who remained him. And there's a evidence from That they were a couple of other people but apart from that you belie Salaam has lost that position that he had amongst you know. Just going about people mixing with them talking to them socializing with that He loses his family and he loses his wealth and of course he's lost his health. Now he doesn't in this area also says you will listen. He says to almost a Muslim. Hi Donna way you if neither a robot who anemic do. He says the. I've been afflicted with adversity. Are you ready? Salaam? Does it make donahue. He just states the fact that I've been afflicted And so powerful that sufficient that was sufficient for a loss of Hannibal at the IDA to know what he wants what he saying and a lust soprano Diana says Though that we answered he's He's plea what he wanted. Even though it's not expressly woods he wanted a lawsuit Hainan with either to alleviate his suffering to fix the situation that he was also colonel. Valla he does the Removes Fiction And obviously he spoke he cool to lessen hand with after say what he was going through with lots of. Hanno with allies names and characteristics that he was looking appeal to at that time. We chose Hamill rocking that you are the most musset full out of those who are masterful. And so this is something that you know the Alabama they often speak about the when you make and you're looking for something from a lesson planning with then use those names those attributes of the loss of Hanuman Island which which linked to the that you're asking for so if it's For example you know we want a lesson hundred dollar to help us We may talk about you. Know we And here you ballet. Salamis looking for balance you have messy upon him and alleviate suffering so he speaks about messy Hanno with either as made his Story reminded fos that no matter what where afflicted we've now specifically in these days they're also people have fallen ill and they're suffering from that. There are those people who've Suffered the loss of livelihood in the same way as Saddam did there are those people who Who are losing family members? They themselves might be fine. Themselves may have gotten better but they have lost family members. So this only things that we may be going through now that Similar to what you really. Saddam expires. a lot of the The impact the effects of the time that we're leaving in the things that we're going through Not even GONNA become a power for a while When things start to settle and the economy in companies et Cetera et CETERA. Start to get back up to speed report. What's going on? We may find a lot. More people are affected their livelihood affected more than we know now because right now he's still a time of uncertainty. So we see we will happens. What's to come but the time that we're in now And the time to come whatever time it may be cool for something which is central to the story of. Are You Ready Center? And that. His patients his sub. We'll talk about that a bit later. what does patients look like? Now in our time patients would be when we were afflicted when something's difficult Is facing us so I do know some brothers who have lost their jobs One of others. He called me yesterday and spoke to me about the fact that he's sees Joel So these people don't know that for a fact now and there's those that don't know that for sure at the moment when something like that happens. There is an inclination forms. You know in some of us for many reasons It may be because of our background. They may be because away from that when something bad happens when something difficult happens the first instinct is to turn to some of those bad things from our background so someone may tend to drugs. Someone may may tend to You know other things other things. I don't mention them in the fear that people think it's okay to time to these things Because it's not a loss without when he speaks about patients and that's why we're talking about. It's not what is patients. Look like that when these things happen when these hardships they strike then a less Hannah what the ISLA expects from us that we tend to him. that's what patients looks like. We turned to him in Dora. We to humidity bad. We tend to him in controlling our our souls and containing ourselves. No not saying not doing things which will be displeasing to handle data and some of us have and some of us. Have you know so The person that I was speaking to that was one of these big fees that my initial reaction was not a good one but not much to handle without food or she and and I reminded the Butler that we can always make you turn into a lesson on it and we should in the doer of told by his own.

Times Ubani Saddam Sapan Donna Barack Obama Senate Hanoi Thailand Dallas Indiana Nima Sunny Doda Salaam NBA Hannibal Shaab Hannah IDA Donahue Hainan Valla Hamill
"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

14:31 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Salary made her the highest paid lighthouse keeper in the United States and according to many articles she was also the first woman to get this kind of formal appointment. That's second distinction isn't completely clear though. Various women had had some kind of formal recognition as a lighthouse keeper before this as we mentioned earlier in the show hundreds of women. Did this work exactly. Who should be called? I not entirely clear on February fourth. Eighteen thousand one Lewis made yet another rescue of an abbreviated soldiers from Fort Adams. This time they had been on foot. They were trying to cross the frozen harbor as was the case with the boat that struck the rock earlier in the episode locals had a pretty good sense of which part of the frozen harbor were safe to walk on. And which were not. But these two men either didn't know didn't care or were just too intoxicated to realize that they had strayed into dangerous territory. This time I think it was her mother who saw them go through the ice but again without a coat on and while wearing a bustle gown Ida Lewis went after these men on the ice she tried to throw them a clothesline so she could pull them back to safety. She made several attempts. That didn't quite work where she would throw the line and they wouldn't be able to grab it. One of the men finally grabbed onto the line and yanked on it in his panic and in doing this he pulled Lewis herself through the ice but she managed to pull herself and her bustle gown. Back to safety before trying yet again. She managed to get one of the two men out of the water before her brother arrived on the scene and helped the other. I can't help but thinking if I were in her position at this point. I'd be like you're on your own out. I think if I were in her position at this point I might have drowned. I cannot imagine how heavy a wet bustle. Gown is. Yeah it depends on what kind of cage colonel. And she had at some point after this rescue someone asked Lewis what had given her the strength to do this. She answered quote. I don't know I ain't particularly strong. The Lord Almighty gives it to me when I need it. That's all this eighteen. Eighty one rescue sparked a second wave of fame for Ida Lewis although maybe not quite as dramatic as the earlier one on October eleventh of that year. She was awarded the. Us government's lifesaving medal of the first class. This metal had been established by an act of Congress in eighteen. Seventy four and Louis was the first woman to receive it. The lifesaving services eighteen eighty one annual report described her as having quote unquestionable nerve. Presence of mind and dashing courage on November fifth of eighteen eighty one. Lewis was also written up in Frank. Leslie's illustrated newspaper. Lewis continued on with her work at the lighthouse. Her brother Hosie died in eighteen. Eighty three and her sister. Hattie died the next year. They both had to Burke Yellow Sus. Ida's mother rarely left her bed after their deaths. Ida had always been Christian but after her siblings died she became truly devout joining the church. She had been married in and being baptized there. On June eighth eighteen eighty four. She also started attending services daily at the height of Lewis's earlier fame. The island had seen hundreds of visitors a month but by the eighteen eighties. Lime Rock was a solitary place again. Ida and her Mother did not get many visitors and after the Radia died in eighteen eighty seven IDA was mostly alone as she got older brother. Rudolph helped her tend to the light but either loved it on the island in her words. Quote there's a piece on this rock that you don't find onshore. There are hundreds of boats going in and out of this harbour. It's part of my happiness to know. They are depending on me to guide them to safety. 1896 lighthouse keepers in the US were classified as civil servants as part of ongoing civil service reform. Ten years later Louis carried out her last documented rescue. A friend came to visit her and capsized or boat. Just shy of the island stock. Lewis's friend Cornelia. Chadwick tried to use this rescue to get Lewis a pension through Andrew Carnegie Hero Fund the Fund that recognized acts of heroism happened after the fund was established in one thousand nine hundred four for her part. Luis didn't think pulling her friend. Out of the water right by the lighthouse really counted as a rescue but it seemed that Carnegie was moved by all of Lewis's earlier acts of heroism in nineteen. O Six. He decided to give her a thirty dollar a month pension out of his own pocket which IDA put into a bank account for her brother to leave to him after her death also in one thousand nine hundred six an act of Congress established the American corrosive honor Lewis became the first person to receive it in one thousand nine hundred seven over. Lewis was still being recognized for her work. The job of lighthouse keeper was dramatically changing. It had been a job that was mostly about keeping and maintaining a lighthouse and sometimes rescuing people but it started to involve more and more administrative work. There were more forms and were procedures. Were records to be kept basically just a lot more bureaucracy and none of those things were really Lewis's strengths. There was also an increasing focus on automation and efficiency and Lewis became concerned that this trend was going to put her out of a job and separate her from a light that she described almost as her own child. In one thousand nine eleven IDA Lewis Age sixty nine was still tending. The light on lime rock with her brother. Rudolph's help in late October of that year he arrived when morning and he found her on the floor of her bedroom where she had probably had a stroke. She never regained consciousness and she died on October. Twenty Fifth Nineteen Eleven. Some of her friends and relatives attributed her sudden death to stress brought on by all the changes to the lighthouse administration and her fears about her own future in it during her life she had saved at least eighteen people from drowning. The actual number may have been more than twenty five flags were flown at half staff and bells were told all over Newport in Lewis's honor on ever funeral. Six soldiers from Fort Adams served as pallbearers. A new lighthouse keeper ever Jensen was chosen as Lewis's successor. He moved into the keeper's residence with his wife and not long after they had a daughter who they named Ida Lewis Johnson after her death. Lewis's friend Cornelia Chadwick circulated a letter that she had gotten from Andrew Carnegie that read in part quote. Your kind note gives me one source of satisfaction. A happy in favored man. Am I to be enabled to help such heroines as Ida Lewis who has passed away? She had no future to fear. Having made the best of this life fortunate. She was having you as a friend. Let us try to emulate her in the service of our fellows in one thousand nine hundred eighty four lime rock was renamed Ida Lewis Rock in nineteen twenty five. The Lighthouse Service changed the name of the lighthouse to Ida Lewis Lighthouse. Even though the policy was to name lighthouses only after geographical features the lighthouse. That Lewis had tended was deactivated in July of nineteen twenty seven and replaced with an automated late on a steel tower and then its function as a lighthouse ended in nineteen sixty three. I don't know if that lighthouse renaming Was Technically Okay. Because the rock had been renamed after her or if they were just like you know what? Forget that whole standard. We're going to do it this way. By the time. The lighthouse stopped operating. The Island itself had been sold many years earlier. The IDA Lewis Yacht Club bought it in one thousand nine hundred twenty eight and built a boardwalk between it and the mainland as we said earlier. It wasn't that far to the nearest point. The Yacht Club formally opened on the island on July Fourth Nineteen Twenty nine sixty years after Newport had celebrated Idol Louis Day in nineteen ninety seven. The coastguard unveiled new keeper class of Buoy tenders with the first of fourteen ships of that class named the IDA Lewis. The IDA Lewis was commissioned on April Twelfth Nineteen Ninety seven and a station from Newport. The crew of the IDA Lewis also paid for the restoration of Lewis's headstone at the common burial ground in Newport. Today her boat. The rescue is in the collection of the Yachting Museum at Fort Adams. I tried to look into whether this museum is still a place that can be visited. That's a little hard to determine giving the fact that everything's closed right now definitely cannot visit right now when we recorded sure can't on February twenty seven. Th of twenty seven teen idol. Louis was honored with a Google doodle for her seventy fifth birthday and in two thousand. Eighteen or road was named in her honor at Arlington National Cemetery. Making her the first woman to be so honoured. I also thought that we would end on a quote from her which I particularly love which I also feel like is appropriate. Given the time that we're living in right now. She said quote if there were some people out there who needed my help. I would get into my boat and go to them even if I knew. I couldn't get back. Wouldn't you and also like if you would like to know more about her. You can read a book called. Lighthouse keepers daughter the remarkable true story of heroin IDA Lewis S- one of the sources for this episode. You also have some listener mail for us. Do by just a totally delightful coincidence. Tiffany left this note on our facebook wall yesterday. Tiffany says so. I just recently listens to the Flan and aisles lighthouse podcast. I'm that person that has to listen from the beginning and CANNOT SKIP ahead anyways. Tracy mentioned that she would like the lighthouse job. Does working from home make you feel like you're working at the lighthouse and secondly are you enjoying it as much as you thought you would anyways stay healthy and I'll continue to listen? Maybe I'll catch up in a year or two. Thank you so much. Tiffany for this. Fortuitously coincidentally very well timed question. So we talked the. I think the only other episode that we've done this really about a lighthouse. Because when I landed on this idea for an episode I was just making sure we had not done something super-duper similar and I remember saying in that episode that I felt like I would really like being a lighthouse keeper. I think when that episode came out. I don't think I was married yet. I'm not even sure I must have been at least dating my husband by that point But I have actually been working from home on this podcast since two thousand fourteen and I also have always been a pretty introverted person and so long before the current pandemic I would sort of reached a point and a week where I would kind of think to myself. When is the last time I went outside? Perhaps I should go outside today. Vitamin D.'s. Good free so in a very strange way the the current. I don't think we have escalated to a shelter in place here in Massachusetts yet but the governor did a stay at home directive and it weirdly does not feel that much different from my typical day to day life except my husband is with me. That's not like it was before. So yeah it's it's a very strange thing where I know a lot of folks who are a lot more social and a lot more extroverted than I am who have really been struggling with the staying at home where I have been sort of like. Yeah this is. This feels In terms of my day today workplace functioning. It feels a lot like normal. So thanks Tiffany for this question. It just it delights me so much that it happens to be asked right before we were going to record an episode about a lighthouse keeper For reference that episode originally came out in August of two thousand thirteen. Okay Patrick and I were dating. Yeah I had not moved no in with them. No so you were still living alone and had been for awhile so yeah I am. I'm telling you I thought I was GonNa go bananas having to stay home and a.

Ida Lewis Ida Lewis Lighthouse Ida Lewis Johnson Ida Lewis Rock IDA Lewis Yacht Club IDA Lewis Ida Louis Day Lewis Lighthouse Service Fort Adams IDA United States Tiffany Newport Congress Andrew Carnegie Rudolph Cornelia Chadwick
"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:45 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The Lighthouse Service changed the name of the lighthouse to Ida Lewis Lighthouse, even though the policy was to name lighthouses only after geographical features. The lighthouse that Lewis had tended was deactivated in July of Nineteen, twenty, seven and replaced with an automated late on a steel tower, and then its function as a lighthouse ended in nineteen, sixty three. I don't know if that lighthouse renaming. was technically okay, because the rock had been renamed after her, or if they were just like you know what forget that whole standard. We're going to do it this way. By the time the lighthouse stopped operating the island itself had been sold many years earlier. The IDA Lewis Club bought it in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty eight, and built a boardwalk between it and the mainland as we said earlier, it wasn't that far to the nearest point. The Yacht Club formally opened on the island on July Fourth Nineteen Twenty nine sixty years after Newport had celebrated. Idol Louis Day in nineteen. Ninety seven the coast guard on a new keeper class of. Of Buoy tenders with the first of fourteen ships of that class named the IDA Lewis the IDA Lewis was commissioned on April Twelfth Nineteen Ninety seven and a station from Newport. The crew of the idol Lewis also paid for the restoration of Lewis's headstone at the common burial ground in Newport today her boat. The rescue is in the collection of the yachting. Museum at Fort. Adams I tried to look into whether this museum is still a place that can be visited. That's a little hard to determine giving the fact that everything's closed right now. Definitely cannot visit right now when we recorded sure can't. On February twenty seventh of Twenty Seventeen Idol Louis was honored with a Google doodle for her hundred and seventy fifth birthday, and in two thousand, eighteen or road, was named in her honor at Arlington, National Cemetery, making her the first woman to be so honored I, also thought that we would end on a quote from her, which I particularly love which I also feel like is appropriate. Given the time that we're living in right now. She said quote if there were some people out there who needed my help? I would get into my boat and go to them even if I knew I couldn't get back, wouldn't you? And also like if you would like to know more about her, you can read a book. Called Lighthouse keeper's daughter, the remarkable true story of heroin IDA Lewis S- one of the sources. For this episode. You also have some listener mail for us. Do by just a totally delightful coincidence. Tiffany left this note on our facebook wall yesterday tiffany says..

Ida Lewis Lighthouse IDA Lewis IDA Lewis Club Lighthouse Service Newport Nineteen Ninety Louis Day Adams Tiffany Yacht Club Fort heroin Google National Cemetery Arlington
"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:24 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Are you end to thirty thirty thirty right now and I'll send you your own free membership. We know very little about idol Lewis's marriage to William Wilson we can speculate. I can think of a few reasons, but we don't really know anything about their feelings for one another, or what motivated Lewis to get married and leave Lime Rock, but within about two years they had separated. They never formally divorced, though probably because Lewis thought that divorce was sinful, she continued to use her married name, and at least some context for the rest of her life. We also don't know exactly what prompted Louis to go back to lime rock around eighteen seventy two, although her father died on November seventh of that year. Her mother technically, though not officially took over his keeper, although wants. Ida was back on the island. She was the one who was doing most of that work. After a while of basically keeping the lighthouse herself IDA started to become frustrated with her lack of formal appointment as a lighthouse keeper. With the exception of her time in Connecticut, she'd been doing most of the work involved with keeping the lighthouse and maintaining the light as well as a lot of the domestic work. She'd been doing that for well over a decade in November, eighteen, seventy seven. Lewis made another dramatic rescue when she went after three inebriated soldiers from Fort Adams. This was during another snowstorm, and it was difficult, cold and Wet, enough that she and others around her blamed it for contributing to a serious illness afterward something that may have really been diptheria by this point Lewis. As many rescues, especially rescues of soldiers were well known within the Federal Government in eighteen seventy eight general ambrose burnside, he was former governor of Rhode Island, and the time a US senator started investigating why she had never been given a formal appointment finally on January. Twenty, first eighteen, seventy, nine IDA Lewis was formally appointed as A. A lighthouse keeper she received a letter from John Sherman Secretary of the Treasury which read quote. You are hereby appointed keeper of the Lighthouse. Rock Rhode Island at a salary of seven hundred fifty dollars per annum. Vice Missouri a Lewis resigned. This appointment is conferred upon you as a mark of appreciation for your noble and heroic efforts, saving human lives..

IDA Lewis Lime Rock Ida Rock Rhode Island IDA ambrose burnside Rhode Island US Fort Adams William Wilson Federal Government Louis Missouri John Sherman Treasury Connecticut senator Secretary
"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

05:53 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Lewis ran out of the house without stopping to put her coat or boots on, and her younger brother Isaiah went with her, she rode out to the men, and she managed to pull them into the skiff before rowing them back to the lighthouse to warm up and wait out the storm this time, Ida. Herself had to recover from both hypothermia and frostbitten feet. This rescue really made IDA. Lewis famous people called her. The Grace Darling of America grace. Darling was the daughter of William Darling. Keeper of Long Stone Lighthouse off the coast of Northumberland grace had helped her father rescued nine survivors of a shipwreck on September seventh of eighteen, thirty eight. Grace. Darling became really famous for this. She was depicted in artwork and sheet music printed of musical compositions that were written in her honor Queen Victoria Australia her a personal letter along the same lines. People wrote and printed sheet music for IDA. Lewis and they depicted her rescue in artwork, some of which visibly resembled the depictions of Grace Darling in another similarity. President Ulysses s grant and Vice President Schuyler Colfax each visited Lewis in eighteen, sixty nine. There's a story about this visit with grant. Grant road out to the lighthouse and then got his feet wet while he was trying to get out of his boat, but said quote. I've come to see idol Louis and to see her I'd get wet up to my armpits if necessary. That is a charming story, but in reality it seems like she met the president while he was in Newport and she was the one who went into Newport to meet him. The city of Newport renamed the Fourth of July eighteen sixty-nine. Item, Lewis Day girls were scarves with his name on them tied in the way she often were her own money was raised by subscription to build her a very fancy and completely impractical rowboat, which was called the rescue. It was made of Mahogany with Velvet Cushions Gilt edges and wrought copper fastenings, The New York Times described it as a quote, beautiful and costly boat, and it was paraded around the streets of Newport before it was presented to her since Lewis also needed a place to. To store this very impractical boat financier, James. Fisk built her a boat house for it. He also gave her a set of gold plated or locks the people of Newport, also gave her various banners and flags and other adornments for the rescue, meanwhile, Louis kept her own much more practical skiff, which was the courageous child of Columbia for her everyday use on July, thirty, first eighteen, sixty nine Louis was on the cover of Harper's weekly with the publication, calling her the heroine of Newport. She was written up in other publications as well, and she was frequently photographed both in studios and around Lime Rock, also in eighteen, sixty nine, the psoriasis society, a professional women's organization made her an honorary member. The lifesaving Benevolent Association also awarded her Silver Medal in recognition for the rescue of the two soldiers apart from Ali's honors and awards. There was kind of a media frenzy and for a while Louis XV. Xv Fame intruded upon her regular life at the lighthouse visitors and well-wishers road out to lime rock to try to meet her by her father's couch. She got as many as nine thousand visitors to the island in the summer of eighteen, sixty-nine alone. This included Susan B.. Anthony and Elizabeth Katie Stanton when they were in Newport for a convention at Newport's Academy of Music..

Lewis Newport William Darling IDA Louis XV Long Stone Lighthouse Vice President Schuyler Colfax President Ulysses s Lime Rock Isaiah Queen Victoria Australia Fisk president psoriasis Ali Susan B lifesaving Benevolent Associat Northumberland Elizabeth Katie Stanton James
"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:39 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"When Ida Lewis was living a light housekeepers, primary duty was to keep the lighthouse going light housekeepers could also be called on to rescue people who are in danger in the water nearby, and that was something that Ida Lewis did a lot. Her first documented rescue was on September fourth, eighteen, Fifty, eight, a little more than a year after she and her family moved to the lighthouse keepers residence on the island. That day, four teenage boys were traveling around the bay by sailboat. They had gone past the lighthouse for a picnic on an island farther out in the bay. On the way back, the four of them were horsing around when one decided, it would be a good idea to climb the boat mast. This caused them to capsize something that Ida witnessed from the island Ida immediately got into her skiff road out to them, pulled each of them into the skiff with her, and then took them all back to the lighthouse. One of the four boys had lost consciousness and all this and had to be revived, but all of them. Survived This ordeal. No horse play on the sailboat is the moral of that story like we shouldn't have to tell you this. We can go back in time with chastise those boys when we build our time, machine many of Lewis's other rescues. Were soldiers stationed at Fort Adams for atoms had started as a basic fortification at the end of the eighteenth century it grew, and evolved with ongoing construction of a fort, happening between eighteen, twenty, four and eighteen, Fifty, seven Newport of course was a popular place for soldiers at Fort Adams to go for recreation and entertainment. While.

Ida Lewis Fort Adams Newport
"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:12 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The light that idol Lewis capped is on what was then called Lime Rock off the coast of Newport, Rhode Island Newport had been a major port during the transatlantic slave trade. It was one of the North American ports where the slave ships departed, and it was also home to more than twenty distilleries that made rump from sugar and molasses that were grown and processed by enslaved people in the Caribbean. When the war of eighteen twelve disrupted, all of this newport reinvented itself mainly as a vacation destination idolizer radio. Lewis was born in Newport on February twenty, fifth, eighteen, forty two. Her Father Captain Jose. Luis was a cutter pilot although he had to retire because of his health, but then in eighteen fifty three congress ordered the construction of lime rock lighthouse in Narragansett Bay this was shortly after the US had established a new lighthouse board to oversee and manage all of the nation's laid houses. The lime rock lighthouse was an oil burning lantern. Lantern with the Fray Nell Lens which can be pronounced about ten different ways, including Fresno and free now French physicist Augustin. fornell developed this lands in Eighteen, twenty two, and soon they were standard in lighthouses. Fornell, Lynn's looks kind of like a beehive made of bull's is that surrounds the light source, and it focuses the light that the source emits into A. A very narrow beam, the first keeper of Lime Rock Lighthouse was Joseph Lewis who was captain Lewis's son from a prior marriage. He only stayed in that role for a few months, though and Captain Lewis was appointed as his successor Lime Rock, itself was only about two hundred twenty yards from the shore closest point, but it was about a mile and a half. Half away from Newport, and at first the lighthouse was the only structure on this little island. The keeper was expected to roll back and forth to the shore every day. It really quickly became clear that this was not always possible because of bad weather or nautical conditions, so a shack was built to serve as a temporary shelter if the keeper needed it. A permanent dwelling was completed on Lime Rock in eighteen, fifty seven. When the permanent dwelling was finished, the captain moved his family out from Newport to the island. They arrived there on June twenty, ninth, eighteen, fifty seven. This included his wife Radia and four surviving children. There were two sons, Hosea, notice hosie and Thomas Rudolph who went by Rudolph or rude and two daughters Eva and Hattie Ida was fifteen years old, and the oldest surviving four, only about four months after the family moved to lime rock captain Lewis a severe stroke and he was disabled for the rest of his life. Ida Ends Radio.

Lime Rock Lighthouse Captain Lewis Lime Rock Newport Rhode Island Newport Captain Jose Augustin. fornell Hattie Ida Caribbean Thomas Rudolph Narragansett Bay Hosea Radia Fresno Luis congress US physicist Eva
"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the PODCAST TRACY BE. Wilson and I'm holly FRY since so many of us are doing some kind of social distancing or sheltering in place. And even if you're still needing to go into work once you're off work. Probably living in more isolated life than you might normally do I thought it might be nice to do an episode on somebody whose life was relatively solitary, and a kind of winding path on that theme led me to today's topic of Lighthouse Ida Lewis and she lived most of her life on a tiny island off the coast. Coast of Rhode Island. There was one phase in her life. When this wasn't particularly solitary. Which of course we will be talking more about, but this is the life that she deeply loved in her words, she said quote. I could not be contented elsewhere. The first lighthouse in what would become the United States was Boston lighthouse that was built in seventeen, sixteen and supplemented with a foghorn three years later. Other, lighthouses followed each built and managed by one of the colony's. Then after the revolutionary war, the US tried to organize itself into a nation with a functioning government, ultimately ratifying the US constitution and seventeen eighty eight. And this lay the groundwork for the first US Congress, which met starting in seventeen, eighty, nine, the first public works act that was passed by this congress included the establishment of a Bureau of lighthouses under the Department of the Treasury. This act brought all of the lighthouses in the US under the control of the federal government. The federal government also decided where to build new lighthouses and appointed keepers to manage and. And maintain those lighthouses. The officially appointed light housekeepers were generally men. Most lighthouses at the time were oil burning lamps with lenses or reflectors to focus the light. They were critical parts of the maritime navigation system, and keeping them going could be an all night job. The keeper needed to light the lamp keep the wick properly trimmed and ensure that it stayed burning throughout the night before extinguishing it in the morning. The lenses or reflectors also had to be frequently cleaned and polished to remove soot and other residue to keep the.

United States Bureau of lighthouses federal government Lighthouse Ida Lewis Boston lighthouse Rhode Island congress holly FRY Wilson Department of the Treasury
Ryan Forsythe of Trevor Sorbie: Being a Happy Successful Hairdresser

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

07:22 min | 8 months ago

Ryan Forsythe of Trevor Sorbie: Being a Happy Successful Hairdresser

"Before we go any more into that. Let's just learn about you. Ron And you'll Rosa I. He just gives a little bit more of a heads up about you'll row at Trevor Syllabi and undertakes so our senior director in the card. Salam which is our flagship store. And I've been since two thousand four and basically started as a stylist there and worked on the way up to to this position and I look to all of the education happens in the cotton solemn and I work under Tiziana prematurely. She's the international head of education. So you know together. I work very closely with her. And we way Lacoste with in house education which is for the system Sir Training and there is also Zach by and Nathan who lacoste at the technical side of the shining and yeah we look after the assistance. We also look after people that are applying for jobs like He pulled up from the outside so we take trae tests we retry them and we'll say China teaches to become teachers. So you know. That's quite busy rolling itself as well as you know. We're all working on the floor as well. Five days a week doing clients fully but is and stuff like that stuff as well as the head of the ship sound on. What led you to that role so I mean I can't trump sorby and I you know I came in from the from the outside odd had previous experience so I kind air and I started as a stylist and ostrow couple years of working trying to kind of make my my kind of inroads. They're around all these amazing addresses who I really wanted to aspire to be like no you at Angelo Seminar. A time and trevor was cutting additives carrying and those all these headdresses around you that you just aspired to be like so. I just really wanted to kind of eventually get to that level and Pi Ata of all those names futures should of delight site uproar many of them onto the podcast but for the most respected names in the world. Trestle be really is in the same levels. Vidal's essay in Mile. They probably the the world of hairdresser in the Angelo with former guest. Tom Connell very first interview previous. You have this certain style of hairdresser. Enemy galleys at that point of what Trevor Soobee is all about. And it's look it's tastes level in the head that it produces in its collections. I think first of all so continuing education things like the good foundation in Cotonou coloring styling having that foundation and then then kind of developing missiles personality the individual in the of the Hesse themselves. You know we're not trying to kind of create robots. We won't people'd Sir to flourish on. We really try to encourage creativity and yeah. I mean you know this. I guess we kind of work as a family. I'm necessity collaboration in terms of trying to kind of and that's why you see that consistency in terms of taste level. Think Yeah Salinas well before you were Trevor Sloppy. You mentioned that you was a hairdresser pronto. So you didn't start out. Trevor Soobee now. What was that before you got today and say I mean I I was? I come from a town outside. London called Stevenage in Harper Cheer. And it's also I think as thirteen IDA starts getting interesting to do hair. I didn't have any family. History of hairdressing. But you know I just. I loved anything creative. I loved music. I loved making start up fashion just I loved people but also was was London as a place and I saw was brought to London quite a lot bomb and my grandparents and you know as a place in really excited. And that's that's where I wanted to end up. I think it's a definite reason why I want to come into hair. I think just I always loved in my head coach as a as a kid. He wants governor here and I love the process before and after and fascinating. Our pain together. I loved the environment. I think it was how I fell off the haircut. That really made an impact on me me and my haircut and then we recently with James Bond the run around in the streets pretending to be twenty five. That's the Roger Moore James Bond. Put Away those. Yeah so that was. Then so yeah. You have an idea that I wanted to do and some tickets job in London. When I was fourteen so I was going to school class. Job In this great Ceylon in Maryland public image and Simona walk through the door. Just for this is this is broad belong so this is Ronnie to. I was in London as in hairdressing and this is a this is it now and I met my my my then boxes now at the Senate dear friend of mine who Barry Chriswell and he was to become a teacher and I would call mental as well because he taught me to Kuttab. He taught me really good work ethic he said Iran. We would like to pie to go out and party but just please come to work. You know that. Stay that stage that stay with me to this day so often I is kind of. I thought last album by role yourself them run as in your position that you have been not mental and how important is for your team. I don't yeah I feel like I'm in a position now where I can offer my experience for education and just infer. Two Years of working in hairdressing solve worked with great hairdressers levels and and obviously we client different manages. The norm that say so. I would consider a wealth of experience and of offering. I feel like the me. It's my duty to be able to help people whether it's with education whether it straight simply or whether it's just how to progress in the salon style saw in a hairdresser in general. I think the other thing. My my mushroom buried taught me was kindness and being a good person. You know. That was something that really stuck with me. From the

London Trevor Soobee Trevor Trevor Sloppy Angelo Angelo Seminar Tom Connell Senior Director Cotonou RON Roger Moore James Bond Ostrow Sir Training Vidal China James Bond IDA Salinas Maryland Ronnie
"ida" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:44 min | 9 months ago

"ida" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Today's episode born into slavery. Today's warrior became a journalist. Educator civil workers rights activists in suffer. Just she is best known as the leader of the Anti Lynching Movement her reporting on the violent injustices faced by African Americans and the work to make United States or more equitable place significantly impacted American society. Let's talk about ib well IDA. Bell Wells was born in Holly Springs Mississippi on July Sixteenth. Eighteen sixty two six months. Before the emancipation proclamation. She was the eldest of six children. When I was sixteen. Her parents died in a yellow fever. Outbreak Ida was determined that she and her siblings would not be split up so she got jobs a teacher at a rural country school in eighteen. Eighty two item move with her family to Memphis Tennessee. Two years later I was riding on a train from work when she was asked to move. She was instructed to move to the colored car which also served as a smoking area. Furious either refuse when the conductor forcibly removed from the train ida bit how she sued the Railroad Company and ultimately lost the case according to a story in me obey the injustice inspired beginning of her activism in journalism career while working as a journalist Ida wrote about ride subjects she was an outspoken reporter and weighed in on issues such as disenfranchisement and segregation rapidly. Ida became one of the most prominent black journalists have her time and was called the princess of the press in eighteen ninety two. I disclose friend and two other African Americans were murdered by Lynch mob. The killings motivated IDA to expose the reality of becoming one the first reporter city so I don't wrote articles condemning the attack and the wrongful deaths of African Americans and one article titled Lynch Law. In America I wrote the nineteenth century lynching mob cut off. Ears toes and fingers strips of flesh and distributes sugars person at the body as souvenirs among the crowd. Her Writing Ida documented the dangers that black southerner face after one particularly controversial article. That either wrote a mob stormed the office of her newspaper and destroyed the press. Fortunately I wasn't in the office when the incident occurred still the attack understandably Friday nighter and she left town. She moved to New York where she worked at the New York Age and African American newspaper. There she continued her work exposing lynching and wrote a report on the subject for the publication. Ooh In eighteen. Ninety eight IDA brought her campaign to the White House. She discuss lynchings with President. Mckinley Alami Congress for a National Anti Lynching Law in one thousand nine hundred five item to Chicago and married for an Ed Barnett with whom she had four children in Chicago. Idaho for many prominent civil rights organizations including the National Association of Color Women That Alpha suffrage club and the end ablaze c. p. she actively fought for the women's suffrage movement during one suffers parade organizers told IDA and the other black women incidents to march in the back the organizers feared that women of color would offend southern delegates but either refused standing her ground despite the enormous backlash she received. Ida's fight for. Social Justice was relentless. She continued her activism and to her death in one thousand nine hundred eighty one at the age of Sixteen Ida is best remembered for her invaluable role as a social pioneer Ida a risks her life repeatedly to fight against the score of lynching and to protect African Americans all over the country. Join US TOMORROW TO LEARN ABOUT OUR FINAL WARRIOR. A LEGENDARY PRINCESS A BURKINA-FASSO. Talk to you tomorrow before you go. I want to tell you about a campaign that we're really excited about studies. Show that women and men are labeled differently in the workplace for the same behavior due to unconscious gender bias and because bias is Are So ingrained in society even the most progressive among us are guilty of perpetuating the issue become a catalyst for change this.

Ida reporter Sixteen Ida Lynch Law United States New York Age Memphis Bell Wells Tennessee New York Chicago America African American newspaper Ed Barnett Holly Springs Mississippi National Association of Color Mckinley Alami Congress
Ida B Wells: The Unsung Heroine of the Civil Rights Movement

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:03 min | 9 months ago

Ida B Wells: The Unsung Heroine of the Civil Rights Movement

"Born into slavery. Today's warrior became a journalist. Educator civil workers rights activists in suffer. Just she is best known as the leader of the Anti Lynching Movement her reporting on the violent injustices faced by African Americans and the work to make United States or more equitable place significantly impacted American society. Let's talk about ib well IDA. Bell Wells was born in Holly Springs Mississippi on July Sixteenth. Eighteen sixty two six months. Before the emancipation proclamation. She was the eldest of six children. When I was sixteen. Her parents died in a yellow fever. Outbreak Ida was determined that she and her siblings would not be split up so she got jobs a teacher at a rural country school in eighteen. Eighty two item move with her family to Memphis Tennessee. Two years later I was riding on a train from work when she was asked to move. She was instructed to move to the colored car which also served as a smoking area. Furious either refuse when the conductor forcibly removed from the train ida bit how she sued the Railroad Company and ultimately lost the case according to a story in me obey the injustice inspired beginning of her activism in journalism career while working as a journalist Ida wrote about ride subjects she was an outspoken reporter and weighed in on issues such as disenfranchisement and segregation rapidly. Ida became one of the most prominent black journalists have her time and was called the princess of the press in eighteen ninety two. I disclose friend and two other African Americans were murdered by Lynch mob. The killings motivated IDA to expose the reality of becoming one the first reporter city so I don't wrote articles condemning the attack and the wrongful deaths of African Americans and one article titled Lynch Law. In America I wrote the nineteenth century lynching mob cut off. Ears toes and fingers strips of flesh and distributes sugars person at the body as souvenirs among the crowd. Her Writing Ida documented the dangers that black southerner face after one particularly controversial article. That either wrote a mob stormed the office of her newspaper and destroyed the press. Fortunately I wasn't in the office when the incident occurred still the attack understandably Friday nighter and she left town. She moved to New York where she worked at the New York Age and African American newspaper. There she continued her work exposing lynching and wrote a report on the subject for the publication. Ooh In eighteen. Ninety eight IDA brought her campaign to the White House. She discuss lynchings with President. Mckinley Alami Congress for a National Anti Lynching Law in one thousand nine hundred five item to Chicago and married for an Ed Barnett with whom she had four children in Chicago. Idaho for many prominent civil rights organizations including the National Association of Color Women That Alpha suffrage club and the end ablaze c. p. she actively fought for the women's suffrage movement during one suffers parade organizers told IDA and the other black women incidents to march in the back the organizers feared that women of color would offend southern delegates but either refused standing her ground despite the enormous backlash she received. Ida's fight for. Social Justice was relentless. She continued her activism and to her death in one thousand nine hundred eighty one at the age of Sixteen Ida is best remembered for her invaluable role as a social pioneer Ida a risks her life repeatedly to fight against the score of lynching and to protect African Americans all over the country.

IDA Reporter Sixteen Ida Lynch Law New York Age United States Memphis Ed Barnett Mckinley Alami Congress Bell Wells National Association Of Color Tennessee Idaho African American Newspaper New York Chicago America
"ida" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"ida" Discussed on Curious City

"Journalists and Professor Northwestern University in eighteen ninety three legendary activists in journalist IDA B wells came to Chicago on a mission. The world's fair was happening that summer millions of people were expected to visit in anybody with the product to sail a constituency to celebrate or a message to promote wanted to be there. Prominent African American leaders apply for space to celebrate their achievements since the end of slavery but the fair planners denied them so well traveled here to speak Gal she was breaking with well established black leaders like Frederick Douglass back then pamphlets were a key tool in political protests and campaigns wells. This was the lead author of a pamphlet arguing. Their Black Americans work be recognized in her words they contributed a large share to American prosperity and civilization. The Labor of one half of this country has always been and still being done by them but there was a problem. They didn't have the money to print the pamphlet. Frederick Douglass had said he was going to get the funding and he was trying the more traditional way of getting some newspapers to sponsor and all that kind of stuff and he was having a lot a lot of problems with it. This is Michelle Duster. She's the great granddaughter of IDA B Wells. I just think it's funny. She's like step aside. Let me show you how to do. This wells went directly to Chicago's black community from Church to Church asking for money from their women's groups and she got the money anti Lynching Crusader Seder truth teller. If you know about IDA b wells you likely know about her work in the South and the eighteen ninety S. She risked her life exposing exposing lynchings and publishing reports throughout the US and abroad. You might also know her as a CO founder of the Indaba Lacey Pe- but well spent spent most of her adult life here in Chicago. It's where she got married raise a family and also it's where she developed new strategies to advance the costs awesome black equality and black power and learning about her work. Here laid one Chicago high schooler to send in a question curious city. She wanted to know what was I to be whales legacy in Chicago. There's a lot we could talk about. She opened the first kindergarten here for black students. She fought against formalized segregation Gatien in Chicago schools and one of the first issues. She worked on with helping support. New arrivals from the South and the Ymca the young. Men's men's Christian Association did not welcome Black men Michelle dessler again her great granddaughter. So there were all all of these men that were coming up here who couldn't find a place to stay so she decided to do something about it. She started the Negro Fellowship League. It began as a boarding boarding house but it became so much more it place people in jobs and hosted political meetings and social gatherings wells was hoping that middle and upper class black chicagoans huggins would fund the Fellowship League but she never got enough to keep it running so she paid for it herself. She got a job as a probation officer during the day and ran the Fellowship League night but arguably her biggest legacy in Chicago is how she built political power among black people particularly Julie Black Women in nineteen thirteen wells. Founded Chicago's first suffrage Organization for Black Women The the Alpha suffrage club soon after women black and white did get the rights of only Illinois but it was limited. They could vote in presidential elections in some some local elections but there were some offices including US senators and representatives that they couldn't vote for and while the universal suffrage movement was gaining momentum. Not everyone was welcome at the table. There were white women who were very upset. That black men had the right to vote but white women didn't any logos president of the League of Women Voters Chicago. She says black women also got resistance from black men. There were some black back men who thought that if black women could vote that would dilute their power that would make them weaker I to be well. She made the point that if if black women could vote that would strengthen the power of the black electorate so she started organizing and educating black women in in the nineteen fifteen election. Those women had the opportunity to vote for black candidate for Otterman Oscar de Priest. There had never been a black Alderman. She you did an enormous amount of work to get Chicago's first black. Aldermen elected through basic civic education explaining to people why this local who government position was so important and also just doing the basic nuts and bolts campaigning knocking on doors telling people why it mattered bird and really motivating the electorate and the work paid off. Ask Her to priest won and became the city's first Black Alderman and according to wells autobiography. It's because a third of the votes he received were from women and so when universal suffrage was finally ratified in in one thousand. Nine hundred twenty wells had already show that black women were a powerful voting bloc. That's true to this day for the rest of her life. Wells put her time time money and energy into city politics because she believes Chicago was the place. Black people could make real gains as she once wrote on. Only one spot on this broad United States have colored citizens demanded anything like adequate political recognition and that one spot is Chicago also today a century later the work that wells began continues Black Chicago when steel suffer from inequitable housing economic opportunities entities and education. But many victories have been realized for one black women. Now hold the most powerful seats of Local Government Cook County State's dates attorney Kim Fox we take for granted particularly right now in twenty nineteen where you have an African American woman mayor and African American Woman County Board where President African American Lieutenant Governor African American woman state's attorney This is the natural order of things but it has taken a while to get here. Fox's Fox's the first black woman to serve Cook County State's attorney she points out the for wells. It was always important that political movements include everybody. She was way ahead of her time. It's a lot of conversation about diversity and inclusion right now. A lot of conversation about intersection. -ality right now I was at the forefront of that at at the absolute forefront of that so an answer to our question about wells legacy in Chicago there are many perhaps most notably though she empowered Gordon mobilized black people and especially black women to claim political power but for decades a now demolished Brownsville. Housing project was the only major city landmarks bear her name. This year that changed Congress Parkway was renamed IDA B Wells Dr Making King Wells the first black woman to have a downtown Chicago Street named in her honor. The sign unveiling ceremony was emotional. I was there in the room. Started to seem the black national anthem. Lift every voice and sing. I could feel the weight of this monumental moment it now to Fox and many others. I'd be wells. Finally has the kind of commemoration she deserves in all of the legacy that she has laid around representation. Invoice intrusive tally. There is something tremendously powerful about driving into the central business district and seen her name Curious city is supported by the Conan Family Foundation. Joel Hopkins was the voice of Ida b wells. I'm Arianna nettles.

Black Women Chicago wells IDA B Wells Black Chicago Julie Black Frederick Douglass League of Women Voters Chicago United States Kim Fox IDA B president Professor Northwestern Univers Michelle Duster Negro Fellowship League Joel Hopkins African American Woman County Fellowship League Arianna nettles
"ida" Discussed on the memory palace

the memory palace

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"ida" Discussed on the memory palace

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