38 Burst results for "ICU"

Fresh update on "icu" discussed on John and Ken on Demand

John and Ken on Demand

00:35 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "icu" discussed on John and Ken on Demand

"So it says only a quarter of those participants who were reinfected high viral load. That's a score. below thirty. Two thirds had a high viral load from their first test but overall the value was pretty loud. So it makes sense. Yeah i you know. I don't know wh- rather than everybody constantly arguing about this nonsense if get the vaccine. You're in a free zone you know for sure you're not going to end up the hospital. You're not gonna end this any serious symptoms. I don't know why you wouldn't want to live like that. And and i was reading the the other three and a couple of stories is like well. You know what they're asking what the government's asking is for the vaccinated to help protect the unvaccinated. I saw the today in one of the stories in the left. You some job in life is to prick you because your unvaccinated at your problem. So good vaccinated. Don't bug me. you know. I'm supposed to wear the mask. Because you know maybe briefly. I might have a little bit of the virus in my nose before the antibodies. Kill it not living my life for you you know you. You've you've got the rescue plan. It's free it's flay it's easily available. Take a few minutes. Don't ask me for help. I can save your ass now. The thing that's sweeping the country right now is government's requiring their employees to get the vaccination that's the case with the state city of. La's moving in that direction. If you dumped you're going to have to be tested. The new york times did a look at the story. They started with a man by the name of gabriel montoya who works at kaiser permanente the downey medical center in southeast los angeles county and he said that he was one of those people. Emergency med technician who watched patients couldn't breathe overwhelmed at the icu with cova late last year. But he says even with all that with the amount of people who died the amount of people we saw intimated he can't believe how many of his fellow workers and union leaders. They can't even get half of the three hundred rank and file members to be vaccinated union leaders. That's that is the brightest species walking on two legs Need well he says. Union leaders are actually trying to get the members vaccinate. But half of them do it. Yeah and they're watching. They were watching people die every day right there on tv first of all they were heroes ever is banged pots and pans. Eight o'clock at night and they were watching all the death and they were all traumatized. They're crying on the news and and then a few months later you find out they're not getting vaccinated.

Gabriel Montoya Downey Medical Center Kaiser Permanente Government Cova Los Angeles County The New York Times ICU LA
CDC Says New Science Caused Change in Mask Guidance

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:59 min | 15 hrs ago

CDC Says New Science Caused Change in Mask Guidance

"Their mask guidance as we hear from a B C's Eva Pilgrim, the CDC advising the fully vaccinated people return to wearing masks indoors in areas of high transmission as cases climb around the country. This was not something that we took lightly, and something that I know weighs heavily with me and with all of America director Molinski, citing New science that shows even some vaccinated people can transmit the delta vary it the data showing, though, that the vaccine reduces the risk of getting the virus, seven fold and the risk of being hospitalized. 20 fold. The CDC also recommending kids and teachers returned to school in the fall with everyone masked even if they're vaccinated, a reverse from guidance given just two weeks ago. The new guidance coming his parents across the country protest mask mandates in schools, but the head of one the largest teachers unions in the country standing by the new guidance. Obviously we're going to embrace the science, but you know it's it's with great reluctance that we have to put our mass back on the variant now responsible for an estimated eight in 10 cases as we learn who is in those hard hit hospitals. ABC calling 50 hospitals in 17 states of the 271 Covid patients in the ICU 255 were not vaccinated. I see you doctors telling ABC News the vast majority of vaccinated patients in their ICUs had underlying conditions or weakened immune systems with more than 156 million Americans fully vaccinated nationwide. Approximately 153,000 symptomatic breakthrough cases have occurred representing less than 1% of those fully vaccinated, according to an unpublished internal CDC document obtained by ABC News overnight. Pfizer's CEO Albert Bourla, making the case for booster shots. Saying Some studies suggest the delta variant challenges the vaccine's protection after six months talking to former White

Eva Pilgrim Molinski CDC America Abc News ICU ABC Albert Bourla Pfizer
Fresh update on "icu" discussed on John Howell

John Howell

01:05 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "icu" discussed on John Howell

"The past month. There are currently 857 hospitalized with the virus 184 in the ICU in 74 on ventilators, the state positivity rate has ticked up to 4.4%. Governor, Pritzker says Every school district in Illinois has the right to make its own decision when it comes to the latest CDC guidelines, suggesting anyone inside the school this fall should wear a mass regardless of vaccination status. But he says, there's a caveat school districts need to decide. Are they going to at this moment? Are they going to potentially be subject to liability for not following those recommendations? The recommendation comes as the Delta Varian continues to surge across the country and Children under the age of 12 are not eligible to be vaccinated. Secretary of State Jesse White's offices reinstituting reinstituting a math policy beginning Monday at all Illinois driver services facilities here, spokesperson Henry Hopped. We are doing this to ensure the health and safety and well being. Of our employees and also our customers, and we're also doing this because it is imperative that we keep our drivers services facilities open to continue serving the public. The same policy will be in place at the state Capitol and Secretary of State offices. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have mixed reactions on new masking recommendations from the CDC in the Senate. Masking has recommended Illinois Senator Dick Durbin. Responding to comments made by Senator Ted Cruz. He accused Democrats of prolonging pandemic mandates and shutdowns because it's better for them politically sickening to think of that. I think.

Henry Hopped 74 Democrats Illinois Monday Jesse White Capitol Hill Senate CDC Pritzker Delta Varian Senator Dick Durbin Past Month Governor 4.4% Ted Cruz 857 Hospitalized Age Of 12 Secretary
"icu" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

04:01 min | 4 d ago

"icu" Discussed on All In The Mind

"I ended up collapsing at work. And they took me to emergency and from there. I was placed in icu. And that's what. I figured out that the whole time i'd never had. It was a cardiomyopathy That was caused by the virus that i quoted in bali and i didn't really understand when they said to me that i have heart failure What that meant to me in my mind. I thought it was a death sentence to be honest. I thought that i was not going to live for very much longer and My heart was going to give out but they assured me that a lot of people live with heart failure every day and just managed with medications. And i should be okay to continue a quality of life on medications but that medication stop working and much quicker than doctors were. Expecting beck was told. She'd need a heart transplant. She had to endure allot of other complications. Nine months later she got the call. A donor match had been found after a twelve hour. Operation beck was taken to intensive care with her new heart. I didn't get any sleep. I was yelling. I wasn't very nice to some people without realizing the nurses have to. Do you know hourly checks On you so most of the time you'd wake up from that so you barely getting any sleep. I mean the lots still on most of the time. It's not dark at all and you. You have a lot of weird thoughts going on in your mind. The first is you stay. I had didn't have too many bad thoughts. It was more like just weird things like those one time. I asked my mom to ken candidates and she was like. Why do you want me to ken. Candidates and i was like you're wearing a really pretty dress and my mom was like i'm not wearing a dress so i would be seeing things a lot of the time. I was hallucinating and i said there was a puppy in the sky. Wants and a dolphin tried to eat my arm and like all these funny funny things. They went scary at this stage. But the next icu. Stay so the one. After my transplant was probably the worst. That i've ever experienced. I pretty much had not as like every night i would even hallucinate with my eyes. Open i would hear voices. I would think people up beside me when my eyes and they're not there but i could still hear them the brought lots would constantly be like on. Even though i've got my eyes closed it's like it would just be embedded. That lights are on I the noise of people who again. Icu is for critical patients. So not everybody is awake a lot of the time for me. I was awake..

beck bali heart failure ken Icu
Fresh update on "icu" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:31 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "icu" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

"Their mask guidance as we hear from a B C's Eva Pilgrim, the CDC advising the fully vaccinated people return to wearing masks indoors in areas of high transmission as cases climb around the country. This was not something that we took lightly, and something that I know weighs heavily with me and with all of America director Molinski, citing New science that shows even some vaccinated people can transmit the delta vary it the data showing, though, that the vaccine reduces the risk of getting the virus, seven fold and the risk of being hospitalized. 20 fold. The CDC also recommending kids and teachers returned to school in the fall with everyone masked even if they're vaccinated, a reverse from guidance given just two weeks ago. The new guidance coming his parents across the country protest mask mandates in schools, but the head of one the largest teachers unions in the country standing by the new guidance. Obviously we're going to embrace the science, but you know it's it's with great reluctance that we have to put our mass back on the variant now responsible for an estimated eight in 10 cases as we learn who is in those hard hit hospitals. ABC calling 50 hospitals in 17 states of the 271 Covid patients in the ICU 255 were not vaccinated. I see you doctors telling ABC News the vast majority of vaccinated patients in their ICUs had underlying conditions or weakened immune systems with more than 156 million Americans fully vaccinated nationwide. Approximately 153,000 symptomatic breakthrough cases have occurred representing less than 1% of those fully vaccinated, according to an unpublished internal CDC document obtained by ABC News overnight. Pfizer's CEO Albert Bourla, making the case for booster shots. Saying Some studies suggest the delta variant challenges the vaccine's protection after six months talking to former White

Eva Pilgrim 50 Hospitals 17 States CDC ABC Republican Rob Portman Two Weeks Ago 20 Fold Molinski 10 Cases Democratic Senator Seven Fold 255 271 Covid Patients America Eight B C ONE
"icu" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

01:52 min | 4 d ago

"icu" Discussed on All In The Mind

"They're very sick loved ones but for patients themselves. There were multiple times at night time. Especially when i wake up screaming because i just couldn't deal with it anymore. It was like this evil who they didn't even have a face it's surprisingly common. Icu patients to experience. An acute confusion state called delirium which can involve terrifying hallucinations and there seems to be something about icu's in particular that leave patients prone to delirium. You're listening to all in the mind. I'm donna qatar today. Delirium in the icu. Producer jennifer leak. Has this week's episode. I was hallucinating at sutton. Us as we're going to kill me. What's it like a it's like being in jail at one stage. I thought i had. Osama bin laden operating these testimonials from real patients voiced by actors the describing what it was like to have delirium in intensive care drew bad. I dreamt that they had captured me and costatini bass data on not safe. He was so frustrated. That i said get me a gun on a cumulus of the patients. Experiences with gathered by the critical care research team at the prince. Charles hospital in brisbane. They're on a mission to transform the.

delirium icu donna qatar jennifer leak confusion sutton Osama bin laden Charles hospital brisbane
"icu" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

10:05 min | 5 d ago

"icu" Discussed on Reveal

"Health news brings us the rest of paloma story. It's december fifteenth twenty twenty. When paloma gets that email asking her to go back into the icu. She's in her apartment staring at her computer screen. Trying to decide should she go back into the breach. I took approximately forty five seconds before replying to this email saying that i was happy to go back to help at this point. It's been four months. Since paloma was last in the icu. She still trying to process all the death she saw there. It's a big risk to go back. Emotionally and physically and paloma could be weeks away from a vaccine going back into the riskiest place in the hospital is scary. But it's exactly where she wants to be. When i am a faculty member hopefully one day in a medical school and my students asked me. What did you do in the twenty twenty pandemic. I wanted to be able to have an answer that i felt proud about that. E mail that my program director said was my answer december twenty first four days before christmas. It's palomas first day. Back in the icu. And it's a long one. She crawls into her car at the end of a thirteen hour shift. Oh my god finally take off the mask the. Icu was busy the last time she was here in august. But it's so much worse now. When i came into the. Icu got an even remember. How long ago that was there. Were only two teams and now there's like five. It is absolutely bursting at the seams. It is it is so busy. These are not good conditions for doctors or patients. One study found that when. Icu's were at their most crowded during the pandemic. Kobe patients were twice as likely to die. But there's not much doctors and nurses can do. They're just scrambling trying to provide the best care. They can to the most patients. Today's christmas eve december twenty four twenty twenty in home now. Today was rough. I was probably done at around five pm today. I stayed an extra two almost three hours. Paloma gets her first dose of the vaccine that day and she stays late in the icu. There's a patient there who palomas been taking care of who's already lost her family member to cova now. She's sick to all the patient wanted was to go home and spend christmas with her dog instead. She's dying in the hospital followed. This patient's wishes the night did not allow them to die alone. I was there and the patient's bedside nurse was also there and she was so sweet she was you know kind of brushing her hair and lightly touching her head as if she was comforting her I got very emotional and i cried. I allowed myself to cry at the moment because it was overwhelming. And i think it was kind of a culmination of a very long week. It might not sound like much. But i'm starting to notice a change in paloma in the past. She's given herself really hard time for crying but this time she doesn't beat herself up. Paloma seems like she's figuring out how to protect her own mental health even as the pandemic rages around her. I've had to be very strategic about my own self preservation. You know if. I run into a burning building and burn myself and then i become another casualty. That's not helping anybody on our next call. I asked her if things feel different. This time. In the icu. I felt like this power where i could advocate for. My patients verse. Says before this rotation i was like. I'm just an intern. I'm really scared. Like you know. And i was just like no. I'm going to handle it. I'm the doctor now Hearing you talk about this just feels completely different than the last time you were in the icu. You have confidence. You are confident as a doctor. Yeah yes the wound closed. I do think that i have some skills. I remember a lot of things that i learned in my first rotation on how to take care of patients with cove. It like i usually would ask my attending Do you want an x ray for every day for a patient so that can track the progress over time. I didn't do that anymore. I asked myself that question. I said do you. Dr paloma marin navarrese. Do you need the x. Ray to figure out what's going on with the patient you know and like pushing myself to do those things on january third twenty twenty one. The us hits three hundred and fifty thousand deaths from covert a few days later. Paloma wraps up her time in the icu. And she's able to get her second dose of the vaccine. The left side. Your daily cova cases in california are still at an all time. High your fifteen minutes on your timer over there on the terrorist perfect. Thank you so much awesome. Thank you very much. I've been talking to paloma for the past eight months. I witnessed firsthand the challenges. She's faced and the risks she's taken throughout the pandemic. The vaccine is a glimmer of hope thinking about all the people. Like paloma who've risked so much it made me think again about something. Paloma told me back in august about her discomfort with being called a hero. I wondered if she sees it any differently. Now i wanted to play you some tape of yourself from earlier on and have you reflect on it and it'll ask you a question shirt. I don't feel like a hero. That's not me. I'm not doing the impossible. I'm not a superhero. I'm not bringing people back. i am know. Of course paloma following. You as you've been on the frontlines you've done a lot of heroic things not the least of which has been talking a lot of families through end of life issues. I wonder how you think about this idea of heroism now I don't want this was a catastrophic failure psych oba's four hundred thousand people were dead in this country because because we expect that the job of taking care of others might only those who get paid to do so by calling other people heroes. We're separating ourselves from that job like what is every single person said had seen themselves as a hero and not said no to travel during the holidays or had said no to throwing a wedding during a pandemic or had said no to having a party or to have a get together to give something up. What if everyone had thought of themselves that way and that said it is also my job to take care of others and we're all doing what we can as physicians nurses social workers as custodians as everyone who works in a hospital. But what the fuck is everyone else doing. Paloma tells me that by calling healthcare workers heroes. It's like the rest of us get to let ourselves off the hook. We get to absolve ourselves of all the things we could have done differently to protect one. Another more than six hundred thousand americans have died from cova nineteen more people than any other nation in the world at the height of the pandemic paloma was one of twelve first year emergency medicine residents at community regional medical center in fresno when that email went out asking for volunteers to go back into the icu. All of them signed up since we first aired this story paloma has finished first year of residency. She's thinking about adding an extra fellowship in.

icu paloma Paloma palomas Dr paloma marin navarrese cova Icu Kobe Ray oba california us community regional medical cen fresno
"icu" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:29 min | 5 d ago

"icu" Discussed on Reveal

"I grew up in like a mexican household with a lot of like soap operas and like that was kind of the measure of a woman successes finding a man having children and i guess only thing i've done in my life has get a doctorate and i have no partner no children so according to mexican soap operas that would be a failure but that's okay when she gets back to the hospital. She stops by the icu to check in on her former patients. She has a list of people she's been wondering about. I went back to look at the ones that i had taken care of. And go down the list and see deceased deceased disease deceased deceased all of them except one had died on september twenty second twenty twenty another milestone two hundred thousand americans have died of covert but the second wave of infections has finally flattened and things seemed to be turning around around the same time. Paloma gets a little space from the virus. She begins rotating through departments. Where code is less prevalent. And she sends me audio dispatches. Along the way i i. She heads to the trauma ward where. She works the overnight shift. I've been running around responding to a bunch of pages. It is just a matter of time before get another page i'm currently. There's the page i knew. It was just a matter of seconds in october. She moved to anesthesiology where she learns how to intubate a patient the breadth sphere. We wanna feel your oxygen with a wanna fill your lungs with oxygen. Okay go do the tube in november. She works with kids at a pediatric clinic. Are riley see what the heck were haircut by my gonna go with dinosaurs. orwell's today let's go with wales mammal monday gathering one new skill after the next is exhilarating. My brain is just swelling with knowledge. And it's really amazing to see the growth. I mean i've only been a doctor for a few months and so just to think that. I'm gonna continue to have this. Incredibly steep curve of learning is pretty exciting but by november cova cases started to climb again on november eighteenth..

icu Paloma orwell riley wales cova
"icu" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:44 min | 5 d ago

"icu" Discussed on Reveal

"Everyone. I've talked to. Who knows paloga tells me she's an extrovert. Which makes this time. Feel even more isolating. She doesn't know anyone in fresno she's trying to make friends but it's hard when she can't even hang out in person with her fellow residents. It's not like they can just grab a drink or go out for brunch. I feel pretty disconnected from people right now. Honestly um and i had to like you know. Call my therapist and call my old friends. Just because i don't really feel very connected to people right now and it's nobody's fault it's just the pandemic well. I hope you're getting some quality time with the kitty least. You're actually. My mom ended up taking him for a bit a really. I was not home at all to take care of him. I was feeding him and cleaning his litterbox. What he was getting really anxious and he was not playing so my mom took him now. That chuck the cat is gone. Paloma is all alone. When she gets home i can tell she's worn out and lonely so many healthcare workers are struggling right now. All over the world people are trying to cheer them on calling them. Heroes back in the spring of twenty twenty when the first wave of cova cases hit new york there was a nightly ritual for people clapped for healthcare workers being pots pans every day. When paloma heads into the hospital she walks past these signs. A superman silhouette wearing a mask and the words heroes work here. It bothers her. I don't feel like a hero. That's not me. I'm not doing the impossible not bringing people back you know. Of course we're doing the best that we can't but at the end of the day people are still dying there so much that i wish i could give to my family's like their ability to visit their loved ones their ability to have those moments that i have taken with me of seeing their loved ones last words last interactions with the world last two opening up there is on their own. I wish that i could give that to them. I wished that was my superpower by september. Paloma finishes her. Icu rotation she gets much needed vacation and drives down to la to see her family for her birthday. She stays an airbnb to keep them safe. It's kind of nice in some ways in my mom had already recovered from cova and so it didn't feel as socially irresponsible to go see her. They got me a really nice lettuce. Cake my mom people solely it was awesome. It was a big one. She turned thirty..

paloga Paloma fresno chuck paloma new york cova la
Despite Rise in COVID-19 Cases, Masks Are Not Mandated in New Jersey

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

01:14 min | Last week

Despite Rise in COVID-19 Cases, Masks Are Not Mandated in New Jersey

"There has been no spike in hospitalizations due to covid infections. But the state is seeing a sharp increase in the rate of transmission now at its highest level in months at 1.37. New Jersey is also seeing a rise in the number of so called breakthrough infections. The state has documented nearly 3500 infections among those considered fully vaccinated and 31 deaths. Despite the spike in new cases, hospitalizations have remained low at around 300 statewide. In California. The delta variant has been pushing covid cases higher and the indoor mask mandate has been reinstated. Is covid infection. Rates in hospitalizations rise in New Jersey A return to face coverings is not being ordered here. Jersey Health Commissioner Judy Purse, Achille says. While Covid cases are up in Jersey hospitalizations remain relatively low, as do the number of patients in the ICU and on ventilators. So severe disease seems to be under control. But we look at this every day. As you can imagine, Governor, Murphy says. Right now, state officials are comfortable with where the Covid metrics are, and hopefully, things will stay that way. I don't want to go back. But if we think that's the right public health thing to do that, that's what the the experts will suggest.

New Jersey Judy Purse Covid Jersey Achille California Murphy
The Pandemic Is Taking Its Toll on Health Care Workers

Short Wave

01:56 min | 3 months ago

The Pandemic Is Taking Its Toll on Health Care Workers

"A year ago when the pandemic hit the united states took to argue even solid was working. As a researcher stanford university solace is a surgeon but wasn't practicing medicine at the time but seeing the need for doctors in new york city flew there in april of last year to volunteer her time at hospital. Working in the icu. Now remember spring of two thousand twenty. It was still the early days of the pandemic and new york was the first city in the united states to be hit so hard all my feelings and thoughts were by far by the people. Dying wasn't much in terms of treatment for covid. Nineteen at the time and the number of people getting hospitalized and dying was climbing fast almost every day for almost every patient. I'm calling saying there is no improvement and maybe things are worse right from the start of the pandemic healthcare workers have stepped up beyond what many of them were trained to do so to say that this past year has been stressful for them is an understatement for me. I think it's mostly been anxiety. I think that i've had Definitely tendencies toward depression. And i have seen a therapist in the last six months or so. A recent poll by the kaiser family foundation and the washington post found that about six in ten healthcare workers a struggling with mental health issues as a result of the stress of the pandemic more than half say they're burnt out which is a response to chronic stress at work. One of the things that has come out of my time in the icu has been a need for more connection with people. I think when we see people dying every day We need some reassurance that that there is

United States Stanford University ICU New York City New York Kaiser Family Foundation The Washington Post Depression
FDA, CDC Lift Pause on J&J Covid Vaccinations

WBZ Programming

01:28 min | 3 months ago

FDA, CDC Lift Pause on J&J Covid Vaccinations

"Following the FDA and CDC decision to lift the pause and resume use of the Johnson and Johnson Corona virus vaccine. Health officials in the state say all providers are being notified. They may resume administration of the single shot vaccine effective immediately. Here's WBC TVs Christina Rex, that pause did not have a major impact on Massachusetts vaccination efforts. Out of 2.23 million people fully vaccinated here on Lee 204,000 have gotten Johnson and Johnson Jersey still out there. Still, people out in about aren't sure they trust the single dose vaccine doesn't apply to me because I already got fries, all right. But like emotionally speaking, if I didn't get it, and I was supposed to get it at me, opt out and try to get something else. But local doctors say the investigation should increase confidence in the system and emphasize the J and J shot greatly benefits vulnerable communities with limited access to vaccines. These people that most benefit from a single dose vaccine from a van that could drive around from an outreach group that can get to places the other places aren't going to get it to those groups of people we really need to get to, and I think the Johnson Johnson vaccine doesn't matter. Simply facilitate vaccinating those kinds of populations. Latest figures from the state Department of Public Health Show more than 1400 newly confirmed coronavirus cases 13 new deaths 644 people hospitalized 156 in the ICU and a seven day average positivity rate of just over 2%.

Johnson Corona Christina Rex Johnson Jersey Johnson CDC FDA Massachusetts LEE Johnson Johnson Department Of Public Health ICU
India Sees World's Highest Daily Cases Amid Oxygen Shortage

NPR News Now

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

India Sees World's Highest Daily Cases Amid Oxygen Shortage

"Continue to surge to new highs in several parts of the world. India said a world record for daily cases for a second day in a row. Npr's jason bobi and reports the graph of new daily cova cases in india. This month looks like a skyscraper and it continues to point sharply up in the is now reporting more than three hundred and thirty thousand cases per day. The country is facing shortages of icu. Beds bottled oxygen and other supplies. Eight other countries are also reporting record levels of infections. These include turkey iran argentina. Well the number of

Jason Bobi India NPR Turkey Iran Argentina
Alarming Number of Babies, Children Dying of COVID-19 in Brazil

BBC Newshour

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Alarming Number of Babies, Children Dying of COVID-19 in Brazil

"More than a year into the pandemic. The number of covert related deaths in Brazil is now as high as it's ever. Bean nearly 3000 people every day at the moment. But even more shocking is the number of babies who have died since the start of the outbreak. 1300 babies under the age of one Being recorded is dying from Cove in 19. BBC. Brazil's Natalia Pasadena is being given access to one pediatric intensive care unit in the northeast of the country. And then Dr Syn, Attica, NATO gently lays her hands on the defense head. Cradles her tiny frame, rubs her belly and tickles her toes. With no visits allowed due to the fear of infection. It's the doctors and nurses who offer comfort to these critically ill Children. All of whom are fighting covert 19. There's civil Mason is off you, Pamela. It's been an immense challenge working in the ICU without any parents being able to visit. It's just words exchanged over the phone. It's so hard for them to understand how their child's case could have become critical. And in some cases, unfortunately, the child might die. Doctors in Attica NATO is a pediatrician at Albert Saving Hospital in the northeast of Brazil. Together with her colleagues, she was determined to help families maintain some form of contact with their Children. The explosive you project been able to connect these families by a video the staff got together. Brought tablets and phones. Then we started to make video calls from inside of the ICU so as to allow at least some contact with the Children. Lucas was just one when he contracted the virus. After showing signs of a fever and breathing difficulties. Jessica his mom took him to the

Natalia Pasadena Brazil Dr Syn Attica Nato Bean Albert Saving Hospital BBC Pamela Mason ICU Lucas Fever Jessica
Brazil's ICUs have more young patients than old

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:11 sec | 3 months ago

Brazil's ICUs have more young patients than old

"Experts say most of the Brazilians in intensive care for covert are under 40. They believe this may be owing to greater exposure to the virus Aunt to lower rates of

India Reports More Than 145,000 New COVID-19 Cases in One Day

NEWS 88.7 Programming

01:05 min | 3 months ago

India Reports More Than 145,000 New COVID-19 Cases in One Day

"Among those countries seeing a surge confirming a record number of new Corona virus infections more than 145,000 new cases in one day. Mumbai has been put under lockdown as NPR's Lauren Frayer reports here in Mumbai where cases are among the highest. A curfew is in place and you're only allowed to go out for essentials, food and medicine. But factories are still open and Busses and trains are still running. In other parts of India state elections are underway and voters are crowding into polling stations. India is now where the corona virus is spreading. Fastest hospital ICUs are filling up. But authorities are trying to avoid the economic pain and even starvation. That happened under total lockdown last spring, India's the world's biggest vaccine producer, But even it has shortages now, and some vaccination centers have closed. India has administered nearly 100 million shots so far. But that's still a tiny fraction of the country's 1.4 billion people. Lauren Frayer NPR news Mumbai The

Lauren Frayer Mumbai India NPR
COVID-19 patient receives lung transplant from living donors

WBZ Afternoon News

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

COVID-19 patient receives lung transplant from living donors

"Tonight, doctors there say they have successfully transplanted lung tissue from living donors. People suffering from the virus. First patient here is a woman from the nation's western region who so far has been on life support for months. They did the procedure, her lungs of the time. We're essentially not functioning, her husband and son donating the tissue from their lungs to this woman who tonight is in the ICU. The donors are in stable condition. Doctors hope everybody can leave the hospital in the next couple of months. All

Lung Tissue
The Brazilian Coronavirus Crisis

The World: Latest Edition

02:05 min | 4 months ago

The Brazilian Coronavirus Crisis

"Week. I spoke with marcy. Castro about the brazilian coronavirus crisis and more castro is the envelope professor of demography and chair of the department of global health and population at harvard. School of public health mercy. Brazil is now in the midst of current surge that has pushed the national death toll past three hundred thousand last week. Brazil recorded more than three thousand deaths in a single day. it's more than any other country in the world. It's the highest mortality. The country has seen since the pandemic began and hospitals are said to be on the brink of collapse with or ninety percent of covid. Icu beds already full. And almost every state. This is just hard to believe but also the united states has experienced searches as well. So i wanted to start by asking. What exactly is going on in brazil right so what. We're seeing in brazil. Now is a much worst second wave so we had a major surge last year In this second major surges It it's growing at a much faster rates than the first one. We have at least two states in brazil that recorded in two thousand twenty one more cova deaths than all two thousand twenty That's how my zone is in from dona in the state was capital is manaus. That was all over the new where we didn't even just run out of hospital beds. It run out of oxygen. And that's the situation that manage states in brazil are facing now. It's the trach to run out of oxygen but also the necessary drugs to perform into beijing so A few states have already issued guidelines of who should be prioritized to go to a nice you bed so it's that situation. You never wanna face where you basically decide who gets to leave. Who gets to die so some states in brazil. His face are facing

Brazil Department Of Global Health School Of Public Health Mercy Marcy Castro Harvard Manaus United States Beijing
Over 1,800 new COVID-19 cases, 29 additional deaths reported in Massachusetts

Mac and Gu

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Over 1,800 new COVID-19 cases, 29 additional deaths reported in Massachusetts

"With the virus. 141 of those patients are in ICUs. The seven day average positivity rate is now at 2.28%. Nationwide, some conflicting signals on the battle against the coronavirus. While more than 30 states are relaxing restrictions and widening vaccine eligibility infections are increasing in a majority of states. CBS News Senior National correspondent Mark Strassmann describes a blurring of the lines between immunity and invulnerability, covert immunity to these California

Mark Strassmann Cbs News California
Interview With Dr. Megan Hosey On Finding Peace Of Mind IN The ICU

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

01:51 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Dr. Megan Hosey On Finding Peace Of Mind IN The ICU

"Welcome megan it's nice to have you here. It's great to be here. thanks so much making. Do you mind if we get attack some of the unique situations that covert has brought us. Because i'd be interested in some of the new challenges that covert has brought your work. Yeah sure so. Just to give you a framework for what i usually get to do. I usually get to work in our medical intensive care unit where are patients are mechanically. Ventilated may be on medications. Keeping them alive things like visa oppressors. And of course they need life support. That might help other and organ function league kidneys etcetera. I get called into work with the team when we have patients who are coping with anxiety delirium hospital demoralization. Any of these things that might get in the way of their participation with the medical team or with their rehab engagements and in the wake of covid. Things have been different in a few ways. So of course we have everyone taking on and off this p. and that can be quite scary for patients. I know in some of your previous podcasts. You might have been talking with my colleagues about icu delirium just as a refresher. This is these changes in attention increases in hallucinations and delusions. That patients might have as a result of infection medications just being in a bizarre hospital environment so anytime we're walking in for these patients in this bizarre p. p. e. We've been finding that a really important tweak is to remind people what it is along with the general reorientation that were doing so for example. We'll tell people where they are there and we'll say i'm wearing these masks. And that's to protect us from infection for example because patients having collusive nations and delusions Really understand what that is

Megan
Will the State of Emergency in Miami Affect the Rest of the US?

Nightline

03:00 min | 4 months ago

Will the State of Emergency in Miami Affect the Rest of the US?

"More on the state of emergency in miami and how it may impact you earlier this evening i spoke with. Abc news contributor. Dr john brownstein dr brownstein. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so miami. Beach is imposing a apm curfew through the weekend. We've seen alarming crowd sizes as the us make steady progress with vaccinations. Should we be worried about another surge when all those travelers head back home on one and you can understand. People have been locked down for year lead to get out and we're beyond the point of pandemic fatigue on the other hand. We're seeing many parts of this country including miami with high test positivity rates so you have large gatherings with masking and social distancing that can be really necessary in terms of surge that we might see and so this fast reopening. That's a place really lead to increases in cases but most importantly hospitalizations and deaths mean we have about thirty two percent of adults that have at least one victim now but that still leaves a lot of adults and vulnerable populations that could potentially deal with the worst of this This fires and so you know now's the moment not to let our guard down truly. It's being referred to at the highest levels as a fork in the road. Miami as we know has the highest positivity rate of any metro area. And there's a new strain that we learned about this weekend the brazilian variant which was found a new york. One we know about the effectiveness of vaccines against the new variants right. This p. one very actually caused a major surge in brazil and in fact as many health systems many one hundred percent. Icu capacity in the us. We've seen more than a dozen states already identified p one it's highly transmissible and there have been some reports of reinfection now. It may not be concerning some other various but it still concern as we're still trying to roll out this vaccine the data so far shows that these vaccines work well especially where it counts the most in terms of hospitalizations and deaths but it still puts the pressure on to get this vaccine to as many people as possible right now. How dangerous is it to be in the middle of that kind of crowd even if you have been vaccinated and and we know that this fourth vaccine is coming online from astrazeneca. When can we be assured that most of us are safe and when is our duty to start shipping overseas to happen right. So we're in the homestretch. We think that they'll be enough vaccine by may to start really unionizing the entire adult population and so now we have this fourth thaksin which looks to be just as good as the other three now. Likely the supply that will come in may about fifty million. Vaccines probably won't make a big difference to our population because we just had so much of the other three and so that puts a bit of pressure to think about how we get this vaccine to other countries clearly. This pandemic is a global phenomenon of course and so. We have an urgency. Not just to vaccinate americans but the globe if we really want to bring back this economy bring back travel and really bring back a sense of normalcy again.

Miami Dr John Brownstein Dr Brownste Abc News United States ICU Brazil New York Astrazeneca Thaksin
Rollins Promises To Vacate More Convictions Because Of Massachusetts Drug Lab Scandal

WBZ Afternoon News

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Rollins Promises To Vacate More Convictions Because Of Massachusetts Drug Lab Scandal

"In ICU, Suffolk County, D a. Rachel Rollins announcing a plan to drop charges in thousands of cases connected to the victorious state run Hinton Laboratory. The Hinton lab is the largest drug lab scandal in the country. Two chemists were convicted of tampering with evidence and the lab itself had issues with mismanagement and subpar standards. 10,000 charges have already been dismissed. Know Rollins is unveiling the Hinton Lab initiative, which she says will work with attorneys to examine convictions extending from work down at the lab. Rollin says almost 75,000 cases are in question, and that is just Suffolk County. Erin Regal

Rachel Rollins Hinton Laboratory Suffolk County ICU D Rollins Rollin Erin Regal
US sees lower death rates among children

Inside Outside Guys

01:27 min | 4 months ago

US sees lower death rates among children

"Rates for Children are down for about everything and for Corona virus, Except for the rare obese adolescents seem to be the patient that would pump the Children's hospital Michigan or another pediatric facility and have a bad outcome now bad outcome, meaning that they would need to go to the ICU and that they might need to be on a breathing machine. We're not usually talking about somebody passing away that that's a rare rare exception in pediatric doctor Rudy Valentini, chief medical Officer of Children's Hospital of Michigan, says the near disappearance of the flu corresponds with the small number of coronavirus cases and deaths among Children were being so few cases of viral infections in general, because I believe distancing and mask and sanitation of your hands. Nobody behaves like they used to call the small numbers of kids who have gotten Corona virus. Ah, higher percentage of cases are among minorities spread with people who live in close proximity. That's why we talk so much about distancing while we talk about masking, they think about if you have a household With four people in it for household is more densely populated in that tends to be less affluent communities to this could still spread the virus. So any one of us you, me or any child could have covert infection today not realized it we call it pre symptomatic and actually be infectious for one or two days before we become symptomatic. And if you're very infectious, early on, and so, yes, that's definitely been shown that Children can do that. But in a year marked by pandemic catastrophe, the lower childhood deaths from all causes is a welcome. Change. I'm decay thinner for WJR Health

Rudy Valentini Children's Hospital Of Michiga Viral Infections Michigan FLU
Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

07:18 min | 4 months ago

Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

"When you hear the name mark morris. I want you to high cashflow. Portfolios mark is an expert at building developer relationships and helping house builders achieve discrete volume sales at speed alongside in. It freelance career. He has been a property investor for the past twenty years building a portfolio of biden alette apartments and houses across greater manchester. He is also built a solid income generating portfolio in the mid west of the us. Including ohio. where. I grew up outside of cleveland. So mark take a minute in philly for tidbits about your life. Sanju sheddings absorption. So yes she switched on. I was was in icu. Freelance i was employed full sudafed mid twenties and then when we came to the what would what you may remember the Units thousand mobile. Everybody believed that when the clocks when the diet changed nine thousand nine hundred ninety two thousand. Who's going to be magadan. None of the computers worse on in those sort of times. You know companies. I work for finance initials. Just paying ridiculous amounts only for contracts is just to get bums on tested and as we all know now it was a complete dump squib in the wall a really lights the freelance world. All the who wants to two thousand dollars over loss of come shots. As if finished the assignments finish they could find new signings and allow people became employed or went back to just the danger. I was really really adamant levels. Gonna do the fumes out an illness you know it. Nearly money was tight. And i was struggling on a realized needed some way of raising faceting to government with these to kuwait for these breaks in between science. And that's really started looking at property. I was really keen on. I started building very small. Folio parents were involved in property. And i really realized that was chain to enable mix to continue a freelance career. And that's really where stars interesting and you said your parents what experience today they were places or yeah they were they were actually renting holiday homes and a cold the lake district which is about an hour an hour and a half wave on. When i was very young i used to go. There needs to clean and they used to take book in. So i could see how the property the property business. Words open cell becoming a freelancer. Never at any sort of money at the anger means so i needed started actually finding the walls. A cash should the under the move on a bit of fox together. That's all yeah let's start invested in bronson. It's an interesting story because sometimes what we learned in our youth comes back later to help us so well. Now it's time share your worst investment ever since no one ever goes into their worst investment thinking we'll be tell us a bit about the circumstance leading up to tell us your story. She'll so probably around the year. Two thousand five prophecy prices about point very boyens. No you went down to the pulp. Everybody was talking about. Everybody was getting surprise. You not taxi. Drivers rids tropic is getting closer with you know with all the height how to threaten to was an estate agent and he said look you know i two or three approaches but i got gotta cashcall together wanted to try and create more cash to give me this sort of space for when i was out the contracts so he suggested. Why don't we go. This loss of new build new built developments in a place called wales. Which is you know in the uk on marinas. And let's go and have a look. And i was quite impressed by him because he owns his own business. Not saying yeah yeah. Let's show enough with when which sold round the few places. In wales armed with came on warm marina development was being sold off clump so all the walls literally we went to the agents. All the world's a big model booth this arena development was going to sell useful the ashtray by the marina. The guy that wo- he was selling like a dream was these properties are selling. Those should off planet two hundred k. You know within his twelve pro build within eighty. They'll give you two fifty six day boy. Was i just call in the height within ten minutes of full a deposit down you know never really saw that was it. You know how solta. I was gonna make quick this quick book. Wow brilliant advocacy was gonna to go so well how was i. Think he's probably hounds with all developments with side gets in delays so twelve months into eighteen months eighteen months tune into years. All this time it was thinking. She's great of a to k reservation. Fee doubt on this property is increasing crease in talk about gray leverage on a suitcase investment and then after about two years start completing development lit chalet within me completing in two thousand seven with about two months. The crash happened know would so can big time. Us england every you know suddenly. Wow a suddenly realize on this fifty sixty k though is gonna make was gonna become essentially a fifty sixty k loss because very quickly. Nobody was buying. These apartments wasn't gonna turn. I wasn't going to turn over the thing. So many i mean it was. It was a castle varis. Now only because i felt was though a wasn't to be keeping old at the time used finance put a small deposit down and offensively but not finished. I couldn't i couldn't remortgage because i was in negative atwood said just couldn't evaluation would have been sixty k. Down i would have thought another eight just to get another

Sanju Mark Morris Boyens Biden Manchester Cleveland Folio Kuwait Ohio Bronson Wales FOX United States UK England Atwood
Samantha Yap - YAP Global - Blockchain PR

Bitcoin Radio

06:17 min | 4 months ago

Samantha Yap - YAP Global - Blockchain PR

"You started in two thousand. Seventeen with an icu. Boom and. I'm sure that the media's all over that at the now Especially with this latest bull run I'm sure that the everyone wants to hear about it. Know about it. Your stories us as a very exciting time. But i feel like with a two thousand seventeen. Ico boom it was a lot of excitement. And then everyone was interested was on the front page mainstream media then like the bubble burst and all the mainstream all right this is just a fad and they forgot about it and then now we're seeing with this latest bull. Run this excitement again so on one is there any hesitancy on the on the part of the mainstream media their little. Wary that okay. Is this just another bubble. Are they kind of scared to lean into it of a skeptical or are they excited about it like like we are. I am so that there was talk last week. Sorry i'm not sure his co. out but there was talk of how it's not as knowing it's not as noisy and bitcoin eighteen k and even just as we speak right now. Nineteen a It's been quieter like quieter than than before Perhaps the all time high had Had already been nineteen case. It's not like new news so probably a waiting until like we're all waiting until it hits twenty k. And then anything else. The twenty k. Will be like the old time high right. Because that's we're at the way media works in you know. In general journalism is like image not new. It's like just you know it's it's not like a gonna make headlines yet I think this time round. I think from from the lot like from two thousand seventeen in early twenty eighteen it's the regulators that kind of Yeah they were kind of clamping down on ice ios. The in the us sc was like kind of clamping down on on on activity in this space. And i think that that added contributed to the negative stigma. That ice us in crypto had But i think like the company's the innovation in this space like the fact that they're still companies being built with the technology on the technology Shows that like it's a real industry is not just a bubble like it's that they're they're still companies that are building today So i think this time around. It's more of like. I think when we hit twenty k. That's when people will start paying more attention and Yeah i end this time round. It's because within the industry. We kind of know what this means but to the outsiders still they're kind of yet has hit twenty k. As i think they just let's hope let's hope that they don't realize a little longer so i could afford to buy bitcoin event. Let everyone on the party. But it's kinda crazy because you know like you mentioned to. Someone was teaching you all about it and i know when i first got into the industry. It's a lot to learn. And i wonder you know as someone who's trying to pr for a specific project company. I it has to know what laura blockchain and then they have to know what. Bitcoin is and then because before even trying to sell your product. Your product is predicated on the success and instability of this underlining new technology new concert new currency so when you're actually do pr for for a project. Or how important is it to know tied in attach. Bitcoin to in or any crypto. Like how hard is it to explain the technology or know you. Just tell cool story how this is going to make it like that. Yeah that's a really good question. And i think the knowledge gap because the nausea is wives with like newcomers encrypted but the knowledge gap is getting wider. The industry gets so like bitcoin is what like twelve years old now and i think yeah like going. It's very important to enter. The space right. Now is still early to still understand the basic so to actually still go back and read the bitcoin white paper any new a team member. That joins my team. I make them read the bitcoin whitepaper. There's also this other university called the university of recosia maybe University has a program to but they had this like introduction to digital currencies. Course like. I always encourage my team to do that too. I think it's very important when you're communicating What your company does like. Especially even this year with defy exploding. There's a whole other level of complexity to even talk about decentralization. You need to go back to the basics But then there's the other argument where like soon. We want these applications to be easy like these web three point applications to be as easy as web two ones but at and just like how. Today we don't need to know what goes on behind google and internet like we don't need to know the basics. I think with crypto. They're still Like fundamental points like the fact that it is decentralized the fact that when you own your on a cold storage while like what that means how you store that like there is more responsibility for the holder of cryptocurrency. 'cause it's not like you know it's not like he can like i know this coin base where you know they have your password and everything off my possible but you know people still need to know that if you have like a cold storage wallet your or bitcoin it and you forget your password or you. Forget your pin. There is no bank. there is no one that can help retrieve that for you. Like new are responsible for that. I think we need to still remind people that like. That's how you interact with crypto today.

Bitcoin Laura Blockchain University Of Recosia Maybe Un Nausea United States Google
COVID-19 rips through Europe amid slow vaccination rollout

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:29 min | 4 months ago

COVID-19 rips through Europe amid slow vaccination rollout

"Poor italy. It was the first country to lock down a year ago today. It's doing it again from this morning. Half the country faces curfews. All italy will shut down over. Easter france is closing too region by region with icu. Occupancy at its highest level since november. Germany says it's facing a third wave and weighing lockdowns the eu simply isn't rolling out the vaccines fast enough in the us. Over twenty percent of the population has received at least one dose in italy france and germany vaccination rates are less than eight percent the twenty seven nation e. You didn't buy enough supply on spec when the vaccines were still being researched. The european union took of you at the beginning that it would procure jointly but of course it takes time to get agreement with everybody distribution of what they have has been painfully slow. Today it got even slower. Germany france italy and spain all pause distribution of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine after reports of blood. Clotting six other. European countries have recently hit pause to the. Who said today the vaccine is safe. This is europe's biggest modern test of its ability to act collectively and it's failing. European governments are blaming vaccine. Hoarding side effects manufacturing delays but opinion polls suggest most europeans believe the e. u. is doing

Poor Italy Italy France Germany EU Astrazeneca United States Oxford Spain Europe
"icu" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"icu" Discussed on Reveal

"December twenty first four days before christmas. It's palomas first day. Back in the icu. And it's a long one. She crawls into her car at the end of a thirteen hour shift. Oh my god finally take off the mask the. Icu was busy the last time she was here in august. But it's so much worse now. When i came into the. Icu got an even remember. How long ago that was there. Were only two teams and now there's like five. It is absolutely bursting at the seams. It is so full it is so busy. These are not good conditions for doctors or patients a recent study found that when. Icu's were at their most crowded during the pandemic. Kobe patients were twice as likely to die. But there's not much doctors and nurses can do. They're just scrambling trying to provide the best care. They can to the most patients. Today's christmas eve december twenty four twenty twenty coming home now. Today was rough i. I was probably done at around five pm today. And i stayed an extra two almost three hours. Paloma gets her first dose of the vaccine that day and she stays late in the icu. There's a patient there who palomas been taking care of who's already lost her family member to cove it now. She's sick to all. The patient wanted was to go home and spend christmas with her dog. Instead she's dying in the hospital. Follow this patient's wishes tonight did not allow them to die alone. I was there and the patient's bedside nurse was also there and she was so sweet she was you know kind of brushing her hair and lightly touching her on her head as if she was comforting. Her I got very emotional and i cried and i allowed myself to cry at the moment because it was overwhelming and i think it was kind of a culmination of a very long week. It might not sound like much. But i'm starting to notice a change in paloma in the past. She's given herself a really hard time for crying but this time she doesn't beat herself. Up paloma seems like she's figuring out how to protect her own mental health even as the pandemic rages around her have had to be very strategic about my own self preservation. You know if a run into a burning building. And i burn myself and then i become another casualty. That's not helping anybody on our next call. I asked her if things feel different. This time. In the icu. I felt like this power where i could advocate for my patients versus before this rotation. I was like well. I'm just an intern. I'm really scared like you know. I was just like no. I'm gonna handle it. I'm the doctor now. Got paloma hearing you talk about. This just feels completely different than the last time you were in the icu. Yeah you have confidence. You are confident as a doctor. Yes what do you think. I do think i have some skills. I remember a lot of things that i learned in my first rotation on how to take care of patients with kobe like usually would ask my attending Do you want an x ray for every day for a patient so that you can track the progress over time. I didn't do that anymore. I asked myself that question. I said do you. Dr paloma marin navarrese. Do you need the x. Ray to figure out what's going on with the patient you know in like pushing myself to do those things on january third two thousand twenty one. The us hits three hundred and fifty thousand deaths from covid a few days. Later paloma wraps up her time in the icu and able to get her second dose of the vaccine. The left side of your daily cova cases in california are still at an all time high peaks. Your good fifteen minutes on your timer over there on the chairs perfect. Thank you so much awesome. Thank you very much. I've been talking to paloma for the past eight months. I've witnessed firsthand the challenges. She's faced and the risks she's taken on throughout the pandemic. The vaccine is a glimmer of hope thinking about all the people. Like paloma who've risked so much it made me think again about something. Paloma told me back in august about her discomfort with being called a hero. I wondered if she sees it any differently. Now i wanted to play some tape of yourself from earlier on and have you reflect on it. And then i'll ask you a question. Sure i don't feel like a hero that's not me. I'm not doing the impossible..

august california january third paloma marin navarrese two teams Paloma tonight December twenty five Today second dose first day two thousand first dose fifteen minutes thirteen hour first rotation two twice first
"icu" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:57 min | 5 months ago

"icu" Discussed on Reveal

"This is the beginning of the third wave. And it's the one that hits california the hardest daily cases in the state double then quadruple. It's hard to describe just how much worse the situation is. By december compared to july when paloma was in the icu looking at the graph of the surges. The summer wave. Looks like a tiny mole hill. Compared to the mount everest of the winter wave and once again fresno is a hotspot covert is wiping the floor with the united states of america. Right now the emergency department the entire what we call the red zone where they take. The absolute. Six patients has been turned into a mini. Icu and so patients are spilling out. The hospital is bursting at the seams. By mid december the us hits three hundred thousand deaths in fresno a handful of icu. Beds available in the entire county. That's one paloma. Gets the email one of the emails that i got. Today was from my program director letting us know that they need. Backup in the icu. And some of the residents have started to get symptoms. The hospital is looking for residents to go back into the icu. Justice cases are at their worst. When we come back. Aloma makes a very big decision. that's next on reveal. You want to know more about how do what we do well. Our weekly newsletter takes you behind the scenes are investigations chains laws minds and show. We like to say it. The world.

Today california fresno Six patients july three hundred thousand deaths december mid december united states of america third wave red zone double quadruple paloma icu one Aloma
"icu" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:35 min | 5 months ago

"icu" Discussed on Reveal

"It has disproportionately hit communities. Color has exposed the vast inequalities that have long defined this country many of palomas patients in the icu. Like dennis's dad are latino for me. It's really hard to witness. My people just getting absolutely destroyed by covid knowing that dan where the ones at the front lines. More than half of latino workers in california are in jobs that have been deemed essential during the pandemic. So it's hard to see us working so hard and then paying the price for it. In the icu. Paloma is on the front lines of dealing with these inequalities and she's the one who has to talk to patients and their families when it becomes clear that the patient isn't going to get better. It's palomas job to walk. Families through really difficult decisions about when the medical interventions used to prolong a patient's life have started to cause more harm than good and whether it's time to shift away from aggressive treatments to focus instead on giving the patient comfort as they die. She sometimes rehearses with her team ahead of time about what she's going to tell a family called her to ask what do you say. There's a very tricky shift that needs occur. We want them to understand that at this point their health of their loved one and their prognosis is so poor that us continuing to invasive things like ventilating them through a machine like injecting them with medicines is not doing good anymore and is causing harm and so it's a lot of parsing. It's a lot of listening. It's a lot of giving the family the space to cry. It's my job. And i come in and i do this multiple times a day but for them. It's an incredibly significant event in their life. Did you learn this in school. Do they teach you this or is stuff. You've just figured out on the job. No no they. Don't teach you this. Medical school paloma remembers a one hour seminar. But that's about it. I spoke to palomas mentor at stanford and he agreed that medical schools spent a lot of time on topics like molecular biology. But not enough talking about the end of life. I think that we need to improve our fluency in discussing emotions. We need to improve our skill and sitting in a room with someone in silence and just letting them cry and letting them grieve. Medical residents like paloma almost always have to confront the death of a patient at a point in their training but because of cove it. The number of deaths is just overwhelming. Paloma often finds herself witnessing patients last words or their final breaths. I hold in my memory. One of the last interactions that this person had with someone on earth. One day she helps interpret conversation for a spanish speaking patient who then dies just hours later. Paloma was the last person to speak to them in their native language. It is a gift but it's also a gift that. I wish that i hadn't received really. I wish that i would have been able to provide those last moments to.

california earth One stanford More than half spanish one hour seminar latino Paloma hours later times a day icu dennis
"icu" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"icu" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Had you been in hospital before ever? I had testicular cancer when he was forty years ago and fellow for mid twenties sue. Interestingly The Times of being an Oscar being every twenty years. I'm going to watch. This has definitely been the worst by far the testicular cancer. Chemotherapy and it never crossed my mind. That wouldn't just be a process that would go through and come straight out with the side. Which is what happened but this this one. I was aware that people were dying. This you've got two grown up daughters from a previous relationship. Who are both living abroad? They've seen you three cancer before this when they were teenagers. This must have been incredibly hard for them. I think a lot of the emotion flooded out of me coming out of. Icu was exactly down to that point. I was aware I'd already put them through cancer and I was aware that they were having indicate through it again though he was fantastic with them She kept them up to date all the time so they knew exactly what was going on and she was very reassuring and so actually once. I was able to to them and see them smile and reissue them. It certainly brought the family closer together. Once he'd moved onto the walt. We starting to feel better. I hadn't been able to move my head left or right because when they took the Kenya from my heart out of my neck. The muscles in my neck seized out. I couldn't literally move my neck and so I couldn't sleep and I was getting more and more sleep deprived as as time went on when I first came out with the new. I couldn't actually hold my hand. Still couldn't test for example and literally my hands which is shaking uncontrollably Again the ratio. That would get better quite quickly and it did. Once I had all the troops taken out and I was able to walk around the ward. I noticed that I'd lost a lot my legs in terms of muscle mass and they were like Jelly and the consultant had told me that you can lose your quad strength in about four days. And I've been on my back way over a couple of weeks by then. Do you remember the first time he looked in the mirror? I do actually wrong mentioned in the ward the first time I went to have a shower and that was in there. I just thought to myself thinking good. You have aged remember the first time I looked at my hands and I thought my dad's hands they were they were shaking and they looked really very very old. How did you manage to get strong enough to eventually leave hospital literally? Just walk around around the ward as often as I could and then on that last morning it was sort of preparing myself to be able to convince the consultant that maybe he could let me out and I would be sensible and I wouldn't overdo it. I really really had to go home. And he very kindly let me go ahead and Micoud Savvy. She came to pick me up. Trade me home and I got into bed and slept twelve minutes..

testicular cancer cancer consultant Jelly Oscar Micoud Savvy Kenya Icu
"icu" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"icu" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Do you remember the name and I opened your eyes and realized you're in I do. I managed to open my eyes enough to be able to see that I was on a bed in our could seek a blanket but I was also aware I was listening because I couldn't focus and the blanket looked like it was coming alive. I was aware that I couldn't move so I was scrapped down. If you like I remember. It was deafeningly loud. All the vents were full. There was any one bed that was non cova twenty jeopardy wrapped himself out tree in his new car. He was lying a few beds away from me. Everybody else was lying on ventilators On CPAP machines you can hear people coughing. There's a very specific coded cough. Forget and of course you bring up this very solid mucus which they the nurses appear as if by magic with suction and goodness knows what when I did. Try SWALLOW WAY since it hit my stomach. I was immediately project vomiting and you are on a ventilator what did I actually feel like then ventilator itself I really have no awareness of being in a ventilator except to say that my breathing was much easier after I came off the ventilator and put onto the C-PAP the personal ventilation mosque. I found that quite an unpleasant experience mainly because a still coughing up a loss of hard meakers and of course. You're wearing a very big and very tight mosque we you aware of the NHS staff working around to me. They were coming to me every probably twenty minutes to come gentler pressure my oxygen levels an take blood from my heart. I had to Kenya in my neck so they could take blood directly from my heart. Everyone's running around doing their jobs. I mean the ICU. Staff would absolutely phenomenal. Every time I would cough which was probably every five minutes also they would appear literally in seconds with dissection machine and then when they when they had to change my sheets which had to do several times because I have no probably functioned until they had to clean me out basically it must have been really difficult to realize that they have to look after every single thing exactly and at that stage. It is very scary. Must have been scary and incredibly confusing very confusing exactly and Whilst visually I was delirious I was very aware will people were talking about. I was aware of people being told that they may not make it through the night for example person. The bed next to me. I heard that you had that exactly that. And did you hear any conversations about yea I remember? They came with torches and they were checking my eyes dilation to doctors and nurses force in my eyes open and shining the light into my eyes and they were sort of shaking their heads and saying well. They're they're fixed and dilated and might people's were fully dilated and then when the light shone on them they weren't reacting to and I had record. That's never a good sign so I had that going on in my head Zoe while all this was happening you weren't even allowed into the hospital. What we doing basically? I was in isolation myself because I was recovering from having creative iris so I had it the first week. Save so I was basically sedation just waiting for the phone to ring to check in with Dave. Did they tell you how about his places was? I spoke to a Doctor. And she said he was going to get worse before he got better and that he had a good chance of recovery but he might not pull through which was turtle shock. Because I just didn't expect him to a being such a serious condition. I just thought he would go into hospital. Have been there for a couple of days and come back out so yeah it was. It was a total shock. You couldn't speak to his away. When did that change? I spoke to the first time the day after I came off the ventilator. Cu I think it was about one o'clock in the afternoon I call cool from the nurse and she said that someone wants to speak to you under. She came to me and she had my arm and said I've got Zoe on the phone view seriously and she held the phone by my ear. What Chad's zooming totally outfit still? He was sedated. You could tell that with his voice but he was it was so it was just. It was so lovely it was just the most amazing thing. That was really lovely. I mean it's probably any woman that phone call but it was definitely the most significant financial into while I'm by then. Did you know you pass the west of it? I was aware by then I was off the ventilator and improving and then the consultant came around and examined me and he said that they were going to try and get on high dependency unit. Would I find amazing? Is that how he was able to be mentally strong as well? Because he's musical he made up beats with all the sounds the different equipment just to keep his brain active. We aware of time passing. No I wasn't aware of how long anything was taking when I was told it was likely I was GonNa go to award. It seemed like I've been on the ventilator for at least a week and then off the ventilator for at least another week but actually it was a total six days and then Sunday morning the physiology came around and they helped me stand up and move around. How did she fail as you came out of the? Icu must have been emotional. It was extremely emotion. I can talk about it now but I couldn't talk about it for days. The ones the senior nurses they lizzy. She just hold my hand. When she just saw at burst into tears she just me and explained. It was a very common experience to to feel.

Icu Zoe Kenya NHS Dave consultant Chad
"icu" Discussed on Medicine ReMixed

Medicine ReMixed

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"icu" Discussed on Medicine ReMixed

"And I think that model has allowed for extending ICU. Level care beyond the issue wolves. Yeah I mean I. I think you painted a really good picture there just with that that last anecdote of just how crazy things are right now so with that being said. How do you guys handle this? I mean I don't know that anybody's really ever seen anything like this so like you know. What is the morale like power? You guys like supporting each other through this and you know I. Obviously you know. We're all on social media. Were connected that way. We're hearing stories of our fellow providers you know being affected by this or worse case scenarios. People dying from this. How are you handling everything and you know? Do you have any stories like you know to to share to really shed light on what you guys are going through while I haven't cried today. So that's a start. I think the first two weeks for the pinnacle of stress in my career and I did a residency for position assistance in surgery. So that was insane but this is stress. Like I've never imagined I myself Within a few days of having her. Icu's blow up. You know received a call from my fragility clinic and they told me. They've canceled my cycle. That was started within a day. I cried for few minutes. A fellow walked by and stood six feet away. Offered her condolences And it's just this sort of beautiful bittersweet organized chaos I cried. I told her what happened about five minutes later. We both got fold to respective patient rooms and then that was up. People are stressed out with.

Icu
"icu" Discussed on Medicine ReMixed

Medicine ReMixed

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"icu" Discussed on Medicine ReMixed

"Thing is that there's nothing consistent at put it that way so you you get there usually around six forty five in the morning. Start getting sign now. If a new unit has been you should expect to get slammed with seven to ten admissions. I'd say ninety percent of those are going to get intimated on arrival So you're sort of mentally preparing getting prepped for rounds managing the acute patients with your care physician. And if you happen to have a fellow as well. So you're getting all your data together. You're presenting very efficiently on realms so that you can get through your seventeen to eighteen. Icu local patients to then essentially execute. The plans start managing ventilators throughout the day. Because you're attending might be pulled to do something else and help another attending out with that are happening. Throughout that timeframe you are putting in central lines putting announces his catheters for people that have no unfortunately gone until like multi organ failure and start dialysis So it's a lot of just flint wind up all in and out of the rooms following up with the nurses getting used to all these new ventilators that we've been using from the. Or and is a lot like learning and executing at the same time to literally get to the end of your shift to now give sign out for the nineteen. It just seems like a rollercoaster. First of all what kind of a patient requires admission to the ICU? And then kind of what is their hospital. Course look like sure. That's a great question. So essentially what.

Icu
"icu" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"icu" Discussed on What A Day

"And never some ads..

"icu" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"icu" Discussed on What A Day

"New York remains the epicenter of the corona virus in the US with over ninety thousand confirmed cases and more than half of those are in New York City where the viruses also taking a toll on the health care workers needed to combat it. One of them is Dr Sally Chowdhry. She's a resident in her final. At Columbia Medical Center in the Washington Heights neighborhood in Upper Manhattan. She was working in the ICU until she got sick with a fever and cough last week and was sent home for a seven day quarantine. Although she wasn't tested she suspects. She had covert nineteen. I spoke with her earlier this week. To hear more about her experience started off by asking her how she thinks she may have gotten sick. Note Dr Chowdhary speaking on behalf of herself and not as a representative of Colombia Med Probably because it is rampant both in my community and in every hospital in New York. Now I. I was fortunate in that. I I never went into a room without protective gear but at the same time although I was working mainly in the ICU. Last week I also part of my job was walking back and forth throughout the hospital and emergency room which is not as protected. And as you can imagine a lot of people come into the emergency room they may or may not have initial symptoms of covert and so may not be on the proper isolation and so there is certainly a point. Maybe like halfway through my rotation where I walked into the emergency room and I had a feeling that any of us could be exposed to coveted any time right and in terms of the actual work. That was happening in the ICU. we've seen obviously lots of different kinds of stories. Coming out of New York. Obviously Harrowing Ones Can you talk a little bit about what you saw there of the last couple of weeks? Sure I think harrowing is the right word for it. I honestly in talking to my colleagues and reflecting on it myself. This is probably the worst thing I've ever seen as a doctor and I hope it is the worst thing I ever see. But in the span of a week to week and a half we went from a couple of Cova patients in the hospital to the hospital being inundated with with very sick Cohen positive patients. We've had to double our capacity and ICU's throughout the hospital as you've seen we are redeploying retired. Healthcare workers or healthcare workers who do not necessarily work in internal medicine and critical care in terms Supplies personnel. You're kind of getting it this. Does it feel overwhelming where you're working? Are there enough people and Supplies? And then broadly. Where you're at is is that sort of a reflection of the larger medical community in New York with whom you may have spoken. Or how does it kind of stack up? Yeah I think so I. I am at a private hospital and we. We do just have more resources than other people do. And so I've been fortunate but I have friends all over New York and especially the ones who don't have as many resources i. I hear like scary stories. I hear about people running to code situations which are like very high risk for a covert exposure. Not Having Masks Or not having proper fitting masks. I hear about Running out of bounds having to use the same mask many many times And then we're running out of equipment like we use these things called high flow nasal Kenya's Which provide more oxygen than irregular nasal. Kanye and people are running out of those so we're worried about that and then I think staffing is also a big issue. Because although I think we've been good about getting enough Physicians and physician assistants. We we all across the city really need nurses and Mike critically critical care trained nurses. Who can help take care of these sick patients right and in terms of the patients that you were seeing typically young or older and what is the level of severity of conditions is it ranging depending on who? You're seeing for me. One of the most shocking things was seeing. How young many of our patients were we see the statistics like out of Italy? That are showing a much older demographic dying and becoming critically ill in unfortunately that's not really what I have been saying or what my colleagues have been. Seeing we on a daily basis are seeing patients in their twenties and thirties who are being into baited. I also like I live in the same community that I work in And I take care of a lot of US patients both in clinic and in the hospital and it has been hard and sad to see this community being so affected and sometimes it feels like being slowly obliterated by this epidemic. Like at this point. There's probably not a patient that I talked to. Who doesn't have someone affected by? This doesn't have a loved one in the ICU Idea is just spoke to a patient. Yesterday I was just doing a routine like telemedicine visit and it happened that I had taken care of her husband in the ICU. And He subsequently passed away and she herself on quarantine and was handling it like very gracefully. But it made me so sad. Because she's on quarantine she's isolated and she can't really agree with anybody right. There's so many elements of this. That are so overlapping and in terms of sadness Is there anything though that you have or seen from the start of this crisis to now that has given you hope about Either the socialization process what people are learning scientifically anything along those lines. Yeah I mean I think both socially and from scientific perspective there there are encouraging aspects. I think as a community. We have all really come together. And I've seen my colleagues and friends rise to the occasion no one complains with the doubled or tripled workload they just take it in their stride Which I really appreciate and then our community. We've had so many donations of personal protective gear of food there. It's kind of cute. There's this member of our community who comes out in front of the hospital with his dog and holds up a sign. That says like thank you to your staff or everything. You're doing So I think that gives me hope. That was Dr Sally Chowdhry in New York City. She also mentioned that if you want to donate protective equipment you can head over to get us. P P dot org that's get us p P. E. Dot Org.

New York ICU New York City Dr Sally Chowdhry US Columbia Medical Center Washington Heights P. E. Dot Org Dr Chowdhary fever Kenya Cohen Kanye Upper Manhattan ICU. representative Mike Colombia Italy
"icu" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"icu" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"The number of ICU patients spike from two hundred to four hundred ten according to governor Gavin Newsom chucks Iverson ABC news so now the latest traffic and weather together interstates are looking good tonight no major delays there is an accident on the west side Beekman at Westwood northern Boulevard now the latest forecast from the advanced dentistry weather center during this challenging time advanced dentistry would like to say thank you to all the health care workers and folks on the front lines out there you are appreciated another round of showers headed towards the tri state for the overnight hours looking for some of those to possibly be on the severe side will keep you updated on that and then for tonight expecting a low of fifty nine Sunday look for a high of sixty seven degrees and windy from your severe weather station on my first morning forecaster raven Richard news radio seven hundred WLW no rain in the tri state area of any significant amount but we are watching an entire track the storms that is moving to the east northeast across Indiana and it extends from about Evansville on to the north region spur up through Bloomington and into Indianapolis and a tornado watch has already been posted for the Louisville area and so we're gonna watch the storms there Lee heading right here to the tri state no severe thunderstorm warnings or tornado watches have been posted for later tonight in the Cincinnati area although we did have a severe thunderstorm watch expires at eight o'clock for the tri state we'll keep you posted on that those seventy one degrees right now in Cincinnati do not go to church tomorrow that's the message from governor Mike DeWine tonight those of you who are still doing services we would ask you not to do that again we're not going to tell you not to do it a lot it really is not a a wise thing governor to one during a news conference this afternoon that you heard live here on news radio seven hundred WLW there are now more than fourteen hundred cases of coronavirus with twenty five deaths in Ohio Cincinnati and Columbus police departments both reporting an officer in each department diagnosed with the virus the former police chief of Cincinnati James Craig testing positive for it he is currently the chief of police and Troy it's the biggest one day jump in Kentucky the governor there reporting ninety two new coronavirus cases northern Kentucky now has its first death a sixty six year old woman from Kenton county and a Louisville city councilwoman has tested positive Paula McCraney had self quarantine for the past two weeks for more on the corona virus goes to the I heart radio app and tap the podcast tab for the latest news and information our next update coming up at ten thirty hi Matt Rees newsradio seven hundred W. outside counsel for those fortunate enough to care for the person who has always been their hero A. A. R. P. is here to help find the care guides you need to help complete with tips and resources at AARP dot org.

ICU
"icu" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"icu" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"Minutes by breakdown crying that's life it's it's it's our show enter show is about our lives so i it we took her in and she was fighting going to the staying overnight and the emergency room that they actually icu came down and they said you know she doesn't need to go in icu yet at go nice of you but you know we were will put her in regular room will monitor and and she was there firm and i'll get some of the time line rahm but she was indy a regular room for a maybe a day and then they they rushed her to icu and she was that icu for a couple of days and then on saturday at friday they moved back to a regular room and i'd saturday in the afternoon done the 30th the doctor came in and she had were this masked by the way this mask that covered her entire face it basically was pushing aaron or lungs because she just wasn't you know uh if my mom was a smoker and i've never really talked about bite fight family a you know my my rule is that i don't deal they didn't sign up for this and uh you know but my you know my mom was a smoker for a lot of years and um her lungs were in horrible shape and then she got sick so she got the flu and she her lungs you know as we all do when we get the flu the you have trouble breathing and so but if your lungs are so damaged that there's nowhere for that inflammation to go well now the inflammations blocking off any sort of air path so she wasn't breathing and then so they had a foot this mascot which was just.

rahm icu aaron flu
"icu" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"icu" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"They don't have a traumatic experience in the way that a combat veteran or rape survivor would so they're not referred to a mental health professional they really fall through the cracks with all of these gaps they're just as a lack of awareness how do you feel dr west easily has studied this phenomenon for almost twenty years he says the risk factors are clear powerful sedatives and prolonged use of ventilators which can trigger delirium some icu patients need those interventions but not all of them do we had to thai people down so they would pull lines and tubes out we also chemically restrained than with these deep sedatives so we got comfortable pummeling people's brains with gargantuan amounts of bins that as a pains popa fall other types of of sedation he put them in this cocoon but it wasn't a safe one and win in when we started measuring delirium and then started measuring physical immobility it unveiled this issue of picks thirty can you help on your eyes a substantial number of patients leave the icu with newlyacquired problems ranging from dementia to depression to muscle in nerve disease dr alias been following some of them for six years and will soon release a study preliminary data show one third of patients improve and get back to normal cognitive and functioning levels one third remain the same as the day they left the hospital and one third decline even further we should talk about whether we should move a tube to the neck okay because that will allow us to decrease the amount of sedation that you're on so leaders in acute care developed a different icu treatment when possible they keep patients out of the cocoon by reducing the use of drugs and ventilators and by getting patients moving.

immobility depression rape icu twenty years six years