22 Burst results for "ICM"

Interview With Sharon Williams

Photography Radio

04:36 min | Last month

Interview With Sharon Williams

"Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the frames podcast. My name is Scott Olsen. And today I am Overjoyed to be talking with Sharon Williams Sharon is a member of the frames Community. She lives in one of God's gifts to photographers Ireland and his doing work that when it goes by on my screen is immediately arresting immediately compelling and someone that I've wanted to meet and talk to about her work for some time now Sharon, how are you today? I'm really good Scott. How are you? I am wonderful. I have to ask because I'm just completely jealous. How is Ireland? What does Ireland look like today? Well, Ireland Spain Four Seasons in one day. I suppose as it is most often. It's a very wet and windy but lots of sunshine in between. Oh man. I've Had The Good Fortune to be there a couple of times and every single bit of it from you know the song Inner City to the the countryside is from a photographer's point of view. I think really compelling you are doing work that is not like the work a lot of people on the commission are doing and work that when it goes by as I said really does cost me to stop and look and you're calling it fine art floral photography. That's not all you do. You do landscaping do portraits that this is all on your website for those of you that are that enjoy looking at websites during these conversations. Her website is s Williams images.com s w i l l i a m s i m a g e s. Tell me how you got started in photography. Did you remember your first camera? Do you remember when you first start thinking of yourself as a photographer? Yes. Well, that's not that long ago and my husband bought me a Camera DSLR nickel and for Christmas one year. It's probably dead. 2014 and and then a couple of months later. I'm thrilled cuz I had an idea that I would like to take photographs and a few months later wage. I work in the local hospice and we were looking at maybe doing a calendar for the first year as a fundraiser, cuz I had me brand new camera. I was nominated as a photographer. So there's no pressure. So it was the best thing ready cuz it really focused my attention on what I was doing and I said about we change the the Hospice and and dairy here boy hospice is set an amazing Grimes. We it's it's on the banks of the river Foyle and it has sneezing Gardens that I've been a script and maintained by volunteers over thirty years. And so that's where I immediately Drew my inspiration from the calendar and the calendar worked out really well. So I was inspired to sort of keep going. And did you have any training at all or was it just you know work yourself off of automatic as as gradually as you could chuck. Yeah. Well, my dad does spend to stay away from automatic and go straight into Nigel. So that's what I've always done. I never use automatic. In fact, if I do I get confused. I like the absolute control over what I'm doing but in the September of the following year, I did take a short course in the local College here and the city and Guilds of course and which really introduced me to page, you know, hire a camera works and and introduced me to a new community of people as well which and it was amazing. And then after that I took another course and it was at that point. I had started really experimenting with this and came across this sort of like pad photography, but I have to say I was always fairly experimental because off The rules were a bit too fast and maybe a bit too rigid for me. So I had always sort of my first delved into like an intentional camera moves. I see em work. Yep. And I love that. I just love the movement you could get from that. And from there. I started working in Photoshop bringing like the Box focused into the ICM work and blend on the two together so very abstract and but seemed to go down well with you know, some people that aren't really appreciated it so long I kept going.

Ireland Sharon Williams Sharon Scott Olsen River Foyle Spain Scott Williams Drew Nigel
Sahara migration route: Many would die without us, migration agency warns

UN News

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Sahara migration route: Many would die without us, migration agency warns

"They cod move with you and us every month, the UN rescues, Ron one thousand in two hundred people from divest Sahara, desert near Niger, many after they've been abandoned by traffickers, who promised to take them to Libya, Nigeria or Morocco, in an interview with Daniel Johnson from you and us jewel millman from the UN migration agency, ICM says it without its help virtually all of them would perish what we follow the SARS what we found since the beginning of time. Is that they're extremely lethal temperatures are high conditions are very rough hard sometimes to find water very hard to find fuel trucks, get abandoned migrants, get abandoned. There are accidents. There are people who died hydration or even murder. So if finding it's an extremely lethal environment. It's also an enormous expanse of territory to try to cover. We do our best we've done one hundred and eighty nine mission. Since April twenty sixteen approximately twelve hundred people month are taken out of the desert this way. It's an average of forty a day. Of course, we're not finding people every day. And you think you. Saved twenty thousand lives. You think since two thousand sixteen we think it's safe to say that the entire population that we brought out, which is almost twenty thousand people virtually all of them would have perished if we had not been able to find them. So the migrants themselves must know that the journey is paralleled, that they're going to be in the hands of traffickers, that there was a high risk of them dying. Why do they continue to do this? Well, certainly, they know that, and certainly another risks involved, we hear a lot of people say that it's God's decision when I die, or I would have died, if I stayed at home, I mean, there is a kind of fatalism that comes along with this, that desperate, they're desperate or they're hopeful there Embiid who can't always know, but we do know is ninety eight percent of the people that we brought out, do choose voluntary return to their homes. So it makes it very strong impression to escape death this way and they'd rather go with the known misery at home than continue on how many change their mind again. We just don't know. So we're talking about nesia here. But in neighboring Mali, you don't really have access, but you would like to. Yeah, we're at a lot of countries across the region. We want to make clear that the twenty thousand rescued isn't simply one country and there are other countries we'd like to do more and like Molly. But this is something that we've been active in across the region, including in southern Libya said, what happens next you're going to continue to rescue these people. You have these refuge centres, Fulton as a big win in ECE macaroni, think you were saying, so we're just going to carry on listening to, you telling us about these people crossing the Sahara, and dying being picked up, what's Iowa? I'm going to do about this. We plan to add resources to an ongoing project called the missing migrants project. We use it all over the world. It's very key. Indentifying routes and particularly hotspots violence are dangerous lurk. We've had a lot of success with this around the world pointing out places where there's an alarming concentration of homicides or behavior deaths this very helpful to thirties, and help to our own planning and trying to rescue people and know where the act of spots are across the world and we plan to add those resources in this region. So we can do a little better job of identifying danger before it takes another life. Finally, maybe you could just. Explain the kinds of how chips that people men, women and children are facing once they decide to get in a truck crossed the Sahara hardships, obviously, mistreatment by smugglers is a key trucks are overloaded trucks are poorly supplied trucks have to be pushed out of revenge or holes that they get stuck in the often, the migrants are not only neglected in their welfare, they're often used as part of the machinery, to move others along when someone gets hurt or falls off a truck, they will often be abandoned.

Sahara Libya UN Murder Daniel Johnson ICM Mali Niger Morocco RON Embiid Molly Nigeria Fulton Iowa Ninety Eight Percent
The Hatchery Chicago Cooking Up Food and Jobs on the West Side

The Opening Bell

03:43 min | 1 year ago

The Hatchery Chicago Cooking Up Food and Jobs on the West Side

"We begin this morning front and center with our CEO spotlight here on the opening bell, Chicago's newest business incubator is cooking up some innovation in the food and beverage industry. The hatcheries Natalie Shmulik is in our spotlight this morning, Natalie. Good morning. Welcome to the opening bell. Good morning. Thank you for having me. I've been excited to have our conversation today because the idea of hatchery is one that I think Chicago has been asking for we've how we have all kinds of incubators, but not one focused on food and restaurants. Yeah, we're very excited about what we're doing. We know that Chicago is a staple for food and beverage whether it be amazing restaurants throughout the city amazing resources agriculture the foundation for somebody. Big CPG companies, and we're excited to share alongside great incubators accelerators like good food business accelerator, and so many others here in Chicago that are doing great work for the food and beverage industry as the CEO you are overseeing all of this. What have been the challenges and some of the things that you've had to get over to get to this point. I think some of the biggest challenges have just been ensuring that what we're doing is in fact meeting in need, and that was very important to us from the beginning. We wanted to be able to learn learn alongside the entrepreneurs that we serve. And so we have this great concept, which was really the brainchild of ICM see industrial counts of near west Chicago, which is one of the oldest and largest business incubators in the country right here in Chicago in Fulton market district and axiom, the nonprofit microlender, and they knew there was a need just based off of what I was seeing in their manufacturing space. They were. Seeing an influx of food and beverage entrepreneurs that just couldn't find food grade production space, and that was a big challenge here. We know there's so many brilliant minds. So we needed to give them space to be able to have an outlet to develop their concepts and launch their products. So I think just ensuring that the building we were building was in fact, what was needed. So really understanding the design understanding all the elements of the architecture. The Bill doubt, I do not have a background in building. So I think for me that was a huge challenge. But a great learning opportunity. I've learnt so much about far more about 'electricity and measurements than I ever wanted to. But I think it was really important because these are all elements that go into making an efficient space for food and beverage producer walkers through the space, if you will for virtually give our listeners a tour of what it looks like, and we'll kinds of resources are there. So we have a sixty seven thousand square foot facility it. Houses fifty five private food grade production spaces and a large shared kitchen. So most food and beverage entrepreneurs get their start in a shared kitchen and allows you to rent by the hour. So you don't have as much overhead early on. It gets you in a kitchen you can test your concept, and you can legally produce and sell your product. In addition, we have private kitchen spaces, those are really valuable those are the areas that we found there was just a huge gap in the industry is giving somebody a space that they have access to twenty four seven where they could grow their business. In addition. We also have a culinary training center run by chef Rick Bayless, big well-known shetler, Chicago. He's done so much for the city and for the food industry as a whole he was very passionate about this project because for him. He saw there were challenges in the food service world where there's a big turnover right now with employment finding talent finding finding skilled labors and chefs that can come into the kitchen and stick around and and help build the business, and he also.

Chicago Rick Bayless CEO Natalie Shmulik ICM Bill Producer Fulton
"icm" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"icm" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"Just like just a brutal insult year after year. Yeah. So I'll be Passover my birthday's on Christmas day as a Jew. I think about that. I have another friend of that too. I mean, I guess as a Jew it's not super bad because you weren't gonna get Christmas anyway, but you couldn't have birthday party with friends from. But there was no cake on Halloween and smell. It was fun kinda fun. Also to everyone wants to trick or treat rather than right? Yeah. Then celebrate him the fem-. His birthday is blood. Right. Well, anyway, that's my so don't eat mozza. That's my basic, you might delicious treat John delicious, generally, delicious, continuing Eddyville office, not only expert. Board member. So we'll start today by talking about some stuff because that's what we basically do stuff happens cap it, but we cap it sort of on a Saturday, then everything changes by. You'll see how completely obsolete information. Let's see what happened this week. So on Wednesday, the Doubleday filed a lawsuit seeking to stab that talented packaging fees are illegal under both California and federal law. So the defendants in the lawsuit are w me CA UTA ICM the big four town agencies which represent eighty percent of the patching fees. Paid by how was today as networks the plaintiffs in the suit in the east and west include paddock are actually Gable? Barbara hauled their accused Hanson digit Magon David Simon and Meredith steam, enter we know take a moment to really honor that group of incredibly brave people because they it's not even so much that they specifically I don't wanna speak to individuals, but we needed plaintiffs who simply have been on shows that were packaged for whom we could fight on all of our behalves. And the fact that that group stepped up and put their names on the lawsuit is really brave and people don't typically stick their necks out like that for for others. I really want to commend them. And thank them. I got C three of them yesterday pulled aside. Thanks so much for what they're doing. Because it is just putting yourself in the spotlight now way, David Simon think kind of privatised via to the lawsuit had already extended his neck torso limbs, and he's been pretty pretty outspoken. Okay. So steam is from the show cold case spoke about sort of how the who's making ninety four cents on the dollar everything she made in the back end and do dramatic again. I didn't know before. But she did Madam secretary on the big hit show. And so these are great plaintiffs, and as sort of said in the speech is in the lead of all this stuff this lawsuit. We said we're going to file it. We all said it's gonna take a really long time. He started. Now what the ups and downs are but the lawsuit now filed and we'll check in with it. And it will take years we can check in on this conversation for years and years and years, my mother just had settled this week that took ten years ten years able time high thought that I had a pretty good case against her. And I was willing. I was ready to take it the whole way if you guys were on the board if other people on the board, and we were hearing about this information than I would say certain kind of thing. And so I think it should just keep saying that certain kind of thing because I would and you don't have to react any of this. But my general analysis and its search situation like this is that the lawsuit is part of a strategy to try and get a deal. I believe my fear is that in fact, this lawsuit will not last years. It will not go to court. It won't do any of that might migrate hope..

Gable David Simon Barbara UTA ICM Eddyville California John secretary Meredith steam Hanson ten years eighty percent
"icm" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"icm" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Award-winning faculty like those were featuring today. You can learn more at DMC dot W. V._U.. Dot E._D._U.. Go there and find out more <music>. Let's pick it back up with our last couple of minutes talking about P._R.. And other sorts of topics yes sounds good. Thank you Paul and again. We're talking to Harney Micevski President of ninety degree communications communications and a leading expert in P._R.. Executive Communications Corporate Affairs and a whole lot more <hes> we're talking about. I paused you there. We were talking about R._O._I.. Just wanted to ask again. You know how can communications educations professionals demonstrate again that that R._O._I.. On the activities that they are <hes> you know that they are executing on Roy well that the short answer is to go to Barcelona and see if you could just suck it up the Eh prof- profession gathered there twice <hes> in <hes> most recently at Twenty fifteen in Barcelona to develop. It's a great city to develop the Barcelona principles which were or an attempt to to answer this fundamental question which is how do you measure R._O._I.. For for communications P._R.. What what sort of resources do you need to do that? What metrics do you need to do that and the the thing I think that came out of that the single most important thing that came out of that was to stop using advertising equivalents <hes> and it's still used quite frankly in the profession but it's because it's it's it is a real serious? It's a serious number but so A._B._C.'s and and online impressions are still two numbers that are used in the profession but the the message out of boss out of Barcelona is stop using issues and ah I think the communications profession still having a difficult time <hes> with that <hes> and I don't I don't have a silver bullet answer for that one <hes> but I I will because a lot of what communications and P._R.. Professionals do is the value of it is qualitative not quantitative <hes> it is and I'll heart you know reference again the the <hes> The C._E._o.. Profile. File a major business publication or <hes> a company profile in either trade magazine or a <hes> <hes> local regional publication. I did some work <hes> recently a for a consumer Tech Company <hes> probably not a maiden not not apple Microsoft not at that level but probably a company that people would recognize a company that has reimagined itself a few times and changed its <hes> <hes> AH products at a company that had a C._e._o.. Crisis of financial management crisis a couple of years ago and really restructured the organization brought in some new leadership and the story that that we were able to place was a story about that that process and how the company has emerged and <hes> and the new product lines it was involved in and that sort of thing and that was extremely valuable. The people that it was extremely valuable for in this case was the board of directors and some of the institutional shareholders right right. It was a very important that now that's a very well defined audience and it is a very limited audience <hes> so <hes> you know I'm not sure how you apply a metric to that another client <hes> and I'm trying to bring these real world experiences to to what I do and I teach the course I told the students and of course I come here as a practitioner not as a little. I have some academic training on not an academic right. We actually I did want to ask you. We have just under a minute here and I just wanted to ask you that one that one final question <hes> that I teased coming coming out of the break <hes> who looking forward in your crystal ball who's going to prevail in that C. Suite the CEO's The C._M._O.'s. That's a that's a good question. I I did a recent survey on Lincoln. There are roughly sixty thousand people on leaked and who have C._M._o.. In current or past title and our about five thousand only five thousand who have C._O.. In their current or pass title so that tells you who's winning that yeah sure but I think we would have looked five years ago than that. Five thousand would have been even smaller <hes> so I think that but the more important point is Rather C._e._o.. Or C._M._O.. The things they do you are going to look and feel the same that same set of responsibilities. <hes> is going to fall under that title. Excuse me and it's going to be important for that person to live in the C. Suite <hes> and to and to who report to the C._E._o.. and to be an equal with C._F._O.. And The C._E._O.. And all the other C._F._O.'s that that companies have so whichever title prevails the skill set the skill set that Communications A._p._R.. Professionals bring and learn and deliver is going to be a key component of what that person does great advice great insights. Thank you Marty and thank you for spending time with us today and thank you for listening listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today from West Virginia University. I hope you found today's episode as informative as I have. Thanks again. You've been listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today Karachi live from West Virginia University for Biweekly Program that sits at the intersection of data.

Barcelona Marketing Communications Executive Communications Corpo Eh prof- profession West Virginia University Harney Micevski Paul trade magazine Marty President Roy A._B._C. CEO apple Lincoln Karachi Microsoft C._M._O. ninety degree
"icm" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"icm" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"From this book what was the value to the organization is C._E._O.. Of A small aw Tech Company <hes> not a brain that anyone who's listening would probably recognize but a small tech company that's growing <hes> in the cybersecurity space obviously a space that's exploding more generally and the students in their in their discussion and I haven't <hes> haven't read the writing assignments for the week yet that was just submitted last night but were were torn between to kind of models of value one was there's the traditional are more and more traditional our ally model value than a marketing might bring to this sort of discussion <hes> leads generated sales generated <hes> <hes> that sort of thing can you you measure clicks from an online review of the book people who Click through to the link to the company's website and how they did they navigate through the website to to perhaps a marketing or sales information collection page or something. Something like that <hes> and there's other people in the in the class said Hey. Let's take the C._E._O.. At his word because I was able to do a Q. and A. With the C._E._o.. For the purposes of the class as to why he wrote the book while he hope to gain out out of the book <hes> <hes> what value he signed the book and let's measure it against what the C._E._O.. Said <hes> and if you measure it against that that his definition of value which was some visibility link which was <hes> something he could use for a talk track and conferences he appears that when he talks to media when he talks potential <hes> prospects he even said he used it as a business card <hes> when he would meet somebody nobody he'd give him a copy of his book <hes> cereal but he has business cards anymore. It's a pretty good substitute so <hes> so from that perspective the add value perspective the definition of value has to be <hes> <hes> not the practitioners definition of value I think but the definition of value assigned by the by the owner by the client <hes> if you will so it's a it's a it's an interesting challenge <hes> how oh you Dornam value in a world where you're sort of looking more more like a marketer more and more like an advertiser <hes> but the but the value of P._r.. <hes> the value of a book the value of they cover story for a C._E._o.. In Forbes magazine Fortune Magazine <hes> is you know. How do you put a dollar value but the C._E._O.'s love it? They love it. <hes> so it's it's it's deliver value but understand that the definition of value is not your definition. It should client or your your C._e._O.'s definition. That's that's an important point. I'm GonNa Pause you right there. We're GONNA take a quick break now. We're GONNA come back and talk more about <hes>. We'll talk doc more about measurement some of those necessary tools and who will win out the C._M._o.. Or The C._E._O.. In this new world so stay tuned we'll be right back just a quick break to remind the West Virginia University's online find data marketing communications program is the first graduate program of its kind in the country focusing on strategic thinking critical problem solving an informed decision making the Data Marketing Communications Program at West Virginia University prepares you for your career by learning innovative tactics from award-winning faculty like those were featuring today. You can learn more at DMC dot W. V._U.. Dot E._D._U.. Go there and find out more <music>. Let's pick it back up with our last couple minutes talking about P._R.. And other sorts of topics yes sounds good. Thank you Paul and again. We're talking to Farney Micevski President of ninety degree communications and a leading expert in P._R.. Executive Communications Corporate Affairs and a whole lot more <hes> we're talking about. I paused you there. We were talking about R._O._I.. Just wanted to ask again. You know how can communications medications professionals demonstrate again that that R._O._I.. On the activities that they are <hes> you know that they are executing on Roy well that the short answer is to go to Barcelona and see if you could just suck it up the prof- profession gathered there twice <hes> in <hes> most recently in two thousand fifteen in Barcelona to develop. It's a great city to develop the Barcelona principles which were or an attempt to to answer this fundamental question which is how do you measure R._O._I.. For for communications P._R.. What what sort of resources do you need to do that? What metrics do you need to do that and the the thing I think that came out of that at the single most important thing that came out of that was to stop using advertising equivalents? <hes> and it's still used quite frankly the prevent but it's because it's it's it is a real serious. It's a serious number but. So A._B._C.'s and and online impressions are still two numbers that are used in the profession but the the message out of the out of Barcelona is stop using issues and with. I think the communications profession still having a difficult time <hes> with that <hes> and I don't I don't have a silver bullet answer for that one <hes> but I I will because a lot of what communications and P._R.. Professionals do is the value of it is qualitative not quantitative <hes> it is and how hard you know a reference again the the <hes> The C._E._o.. Profile missile and a major business publication or <hes> a company profile in either a trade magazine or a <hes> <hes> local regional publication. I did some work <hes> recently away for a consumer Tech Company <hes> probably not a maiden not not apple Microsoft not at that level but probably a company that people would recognize a company that has reimagined itself a few times and changed its <hes> <hes> UH products at a company that had a C._e._o.. Crisis of financial management crisis a couple of years ago and really restructured the organization brought in some new leadership and the story that that that we're able to place was a story about that that process and how the company has emerged and <hes> and the new product lines it was involved in and that sort of thing and that was extremely valuable the people that it was extremely valuable for in in this case where the board of directors and some of the institutional shareholders right right it was very important that now that's a very well defined audience and it is a very limited audience <hes> so <hes> you know I'm not sure how you apply a metric to that another client <hes> and I'm trying to bring these real world experiences to to what I do and then when I teach the course I told the students and of course I come here as a practitioner not as a although I have some academic training. I'm not an academic right. We actually I I did want to ask you. We have just under a minute here and I just wanted to ask you that one that one final question <hes> that I teased coming out of the break who looking forward in your crystal wall who's going to prevail in that C. Suite the CEO's The C._M._O.'s. That's a that's a good question I did a recent survey on linked in there are roughly sixty thousand and people on weekdays who have C._M._o.. In current or past title and our about five thousand only five thousand who have C._O.. In their current or past title so that tells you who's winning now sure but I think if he would've looked five years ago that five thousand would have been even smaller yeah <hes> so. I think that but the more important point is whether it's C._E._O.. Or C._M._O.. The things they do are going to look and feel the same that same set of responsibilities. <hes> is going to fall under that title. Excuse me and it's going to be important for that person to live in the C. Suite <hes> and to and to report to the C._E._o.. and to be an equal with C._F._O.. C._O._O. and all the other C._F._O.'s that that companies have so whichever title prevails the skill set the skill set that Communications N._p._R.. Professionals bring and learn and deliver is going to be a key component of what that person does great advice great insights. Thank you Marty and thank you for spending time with us today and thank you for listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today from West Virginia University. I hope you've found today's episode as informative as I have. Thanks again. You've been listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today..

Marketing Communications Barcelona West Virginia University Executive Communications Corpo Fortune Magazine Farney Micevski President C._E._O. Marty Paul Roy A._B._C. CEO apple Microsoft C._M._O. ninety degree five years
"icm" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

17:36 min | 1 year ago

"icm" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Welcome back for another episode of W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today live from West Virginia University a syndicated show that sits at the the intersection of data driven decision making and modern marketing practice with our house this week Matt Coming Say Matt May Paul. How are you oh feeling frustrated here? Just as we're getting ready to go live I had a little technical glitch but <hes> Sarah minutes too late. I apologize to all those tuning in better laid the never that's right well. It's good to be back with another informative episode of Marketing Communications Today from all of us here at West Virginia Ginny University so not long ago communications was a subcategory N._p._R.. In the eighties and nineties P._R.. Professionals spent their working hours on crisis communication employee communications shareholder communications marketing communication's etcetera these were very targeted and specialized forms of P._R.. But today the profession has really evolved to the point that Communications N._p._R.. is now part of integrated marketing communications or is it really integrated communications marketing. We're going to explore all of that. During today's podcasts our guest for it all is Mardi Micevski one of my faculty colleagues and delivers I._M._C. Program and Communications Communications and Marketing Professional. It's no coincidence that he lists communications their first with expertise and technology healthcare corporate affairs financial services and Crisis Communications Marty has supported boarded a broad range of clients including major brands such as G._e.. Logitech Microsoft Pfizer A._T.. And T. Samsung Verizon S._N._p.. Bluecross blueshield and a number of startups he has handled the range of corporate. I thought leadership marketing and public policy issues and he's worked extensively with CEOS marketing and communications teams investor relations groups government relations offices and corporate counsels. Mardi is currently president of ninety need degree communications with that introduction. It's time to thank Marty for joining us today. Marnie thank you well. Thanks thanks for having me on. I appreciate the opportunity glad to have you in the intro in our conversations conversations as well leading up to today's show one one common theme that was mentioned often is change and we just sorta described that change going back looking at the eighties nineties and how how things have changed since then. How do you defined this change Marty and what's changing and what does this change really mean for communications in P._R.? Professionals well. That's a that's a good question to kick off with. You know the one thing about change in our profession is that it is constant went <hes>. I've been doing this for a long time and I remember the days when people and I worked mostly on the agency side of the P._R.. Profession and I remember the days when people would hire your P._R.. Agencies to put out press releases for them. <hes> literally put out press releases and contracts would would specify the number of press releases that went out every month <hes> the amount of time that would be spent writing those press releases says and that was what P._R.. Firms did and that's how they made a lot of money today I am as I was preparing for this. <hes> I was thumbing through the February issue of strategies and tactics. That's the publication. Version of the Public Relations Society of America and if if anyone's listening who's in this space and doesn't subscribe to that they certainly should it's a great way to learn what your colleagues are doing and what what are the trends in the in the profession yeah but yeah and the class on teaching this semester we did a lesson on storytelling the rise of storytelling how storytelling differentiates from stories not really the same thing. It's a more robust immersive experience etcetera and I was thumbing through through the issue of strategies and tactics and I stumbled opponents story the headline of which standing out with story living <hes> is it is all about how the advent of augmented and virtual reality technologies are going to create even more immersive experiences and we are no longer be hearing stories and imagining stories and following starts. We'll be living in stories. We will be immersed in in story so it's that's obviously a couple years down the road and everybody owns augmented reality glasses and those kinds of things that is just an an indication of the constant change some of that is creative growth of the of the profession itself as people come up with new ideas and new ways to address all challenges but it's also <hes> you know it's a function of how technology has changed how expectations have changed and also so how how as the as the professions of marketing and communications out even throw in advertising have converged over the last decade or so you know monitor you mentioned their advertising so how is the relationship now between advertising and P._R.. Our change to <hes> well you know a couple of years. I guess ten years ago there was a book <hes> written <hes> <hes> by recent reese called the fall of advertising and the rise of P._R.. And I I remember when that book came out and it was it was it was a striking wave of cheers coming up from the P._R.. Profession and a striking way wave of groans coming up from the advertising profession because it really really hit at <hes> how people are spending resources. <hes> advertising is still <hes> if you look at a company budgets if you look at agency budgets far greater than than P._R.. Spend even today but the Russian that P._R.. Would would become an equal with or go toe to toe with advertising as an only as a as a profession but also as how people were spending resource was really quite dramatic and P._r.. Agencies issues were quick to sort of jump on that and <hes> and try to differentiate <hes> using the the old the arguments that public relations is more authentic public relations has a trusted filter her at at that time it was still largely the media that was filtering <hes> stories at the public read <hes> public relation was more genuine and advertising was simply <hes> you know messages from a corporate brand or from an organizational brand at rice believable so that it always been that sort of it's it's. It's you know their friends their competitors in many places they were housed in the same agency. We saw on the business side of the equation how big advertising agencies bought up P._R.. Firms to be able to do offer both of those services <hes> but what's happening is that advertising and P._R.. are becoming coming much more intertwined <hes>. It's rare today that I'm involved in a client account where part of what the P._R.. Team extensively the P._R.. Team is doing looks and smells. Just it's like advertising. It is whether an and that has emerged in the social space on facebook on twitter on other kinds of capability but it's rare that you do a program that does not involve again a very traditional advertising feel purchased space purchased eyeballs right <hes> for a message on a long time ago in the newspaper days you remember there. Are Things called advert oriels where. <hes> <hes> accompany our organization would purchase space on a newspaper's op Ed page and have a piece there that was essentially a an advertisement that looked like an op Ed story so that there has always been the opportunity to purchase eyeballs <hes> in <hes> in the advertising space and then even that was even the P._r.. Space but now today those those professions those tactics and strategies have sort of really melded so they're beginning to look a very differently and you see it in some of the changes that are happening. I hit to sort of keep referencing back to strategies and tactics but there's a wonderful <hes> their January edition was a wonderful <hes> <hes> set of articles on convergence and how things are <hes> converging <hes> between particularly between advertising and communications model so that's really where the industry is going. The convergence model grew up <hes> started in the advertising world but the digital world has really created up <hes> a platform for those things to occur together so let's stay on convergence of for a little bit here so what is the ars relationship now. We talked about P._R.. And advertising how they're different how they're the same but what has p._R.'s relationship now to marketing in this new world again I think it's I think it's a a lot of it is the same <hes> <hes> <hes> the the marketing message. <hes> is a is a much more straightforward message than the than the P._R.. Message that place in the traditional marketing sales funnel that we've all seen in various various iterations <hes> p._r.. Tends to be at the top it's about recognition and awareness and interest and brand identity and the things that swirl at the top of the funnel and somewhere in the middle marketing takes over and begins to introduce the potential for transaction for sale for a <hes> in the context of public affairs for the it's the it's the the opportunity for take action to become an advocate advocate <hes> on an issue and then sales is obviously you know. The closing of the dealer and interestingly sales has always managed to sort of be its own separate sort of world over there where people play different people are compensated differently people. Who are you know they they sit at the bottom of the funnel rating for things to fall through and and you know have to so to seal the deal as it were but between P._R.? And marketing the again the strategies and tactics are beginning to look very much alike now and again facilitated by the emergence of Digital <hes> even in the traditional sense of P._r.. And newspapers and magazines and television and radio <hes> those those are the delivery of that content has moved online <hes> so that the newspaper story is doesn't sit out there by itself but it becomes something that's online the newspaper taper storage generates clicks and it generates shares and it generates all the things that we traditionally associate with digital marketing but the things that are generated <hes> by P._R.. It's interesting that <hes> <hes> ah I was talking to a reporter recently at the Washington Post and we were we were starting talking to him about the value of exclusive stories. Whether it's you know if I give you a story in three seconds later it's on another outlet. That is the exclusive value anymore in the old days you give somebody an exclusive. They had it for hours. Perhaps even a day or the next outlet could report the story now. It's literally seconds is that exclusive <hes> of value anymore and he said you know it's not as valuable from a news perspective but it is valuable from for bragging rights and that's important still in that spader but what's really valuable about is that it generates. It's clicks and shares the first story generates collection shares and reporters today certainly at Heil of publications perhaps even more regional publications are measured by the kind of digital activity they generate for the business of the newspaper so when I clicked through a story or I share a story there's eyeballs on the paid. There's an opportunity to click through for ADS. <hes> it's the reporters being judged on those metrics these days yeah and that wasn't the case before and <hes> you didn't know when you had a story in the newspaper how many people read it or <hes>. <hes> you know perhaps there was the the very rough measure of letters to the editor or calls to the editor complaining about the story or commenting on story in a but today reporters are living in that world of clicks and shares ears and eyeballs and so even their world is changing very much becoming very much like a marketing world and that has an impact on what they need how communications professionals we have to understand that and sort of help them take what information we'd like to share and molded in such a way that generates the kind of feedback in return that works for them as well so it engagement is important not only for the reporter but also for the brand as well absolutely absolutely. It's really important for that as communications P._R.. Professionals what do we need to do to flourish in this new environment that you describe well. That's that's a tough. That's a tough question. There's a lot of metric answers insist that but I think at at the end of the day we still have to deliver value and the thing that we have to understand is that value is not defined by us. It's defined by hype <hes> <hes> If you're working for an agency it's defined by your client. If you work <hes> inside the corporate division it defined by any number of people. Perhaps your colleagues in the C. Suite the marketing guy in the I'll give you an interesting example in the course on teaching this semester. We did a lesson on C._E._O.'s as authors and I had the opportunity to bring into that lesson a real world example of a C._E._o.. That I worked with two years ago who authored a book and and <hes> I asked the class as part of this what was the R._O._I.. From this book what was the value to the organization is C._E._O.. Of A small all tech company <hes> not a brand that anyone who's listening would probably recognize but a small company that's growing <hes> in the cybersecurity space obviously a space that's exploding more generally and and the students in their in their discussion and I haven't <hes> haven't read the writing assignment for the week yet that was just submitted last night but we're we're torn between to kind of models of value one was the traditional are more a more traditional our ally model of value than a Martin might bring to this <hes> sort of discussion <hes> leads generated sales generated <hes> <hes> that sort of thing can you to measure clicks from an online review of the book people who Click through the link to the company's website and how they did they navigate through the website to to perhaps a marketing or sales information collection page or something getting like that <hes> and there's other people in the in the class said Hey. Let's take the C._E._O.. At his word because I was able to do a Q. and A. With the C._E._o.. For the purposes of the class as to why he wrote the book why do you hope to gain out of the book <hes> <hes> what value he signed the book and let's measure it against what the C._E._O.. Said <hes> and if you measure it against that that his definition of value which was some visibility and which was <hes> something he could use for talk track and conferences he appears that when he talks to media when he talks in a potential <hes> prospects he even said he used it as a business card <hes> when he would meet somebody. Buddy he gives them a copy of his book. <hes> nobody has business cards anymore. It's a pretty good substitute so <hes> so from that perspective the add value perspective the definition of value has to be <hes>. I'm not the practitioners definition of value I think but the definition of value assigned by the by the owner by the client <hes> if you will so it's a it's a it's an interesting challenge <hes> how you taught him value in a world where you're sort of looking more and more like a marketer more and more like an advertiser <hes> but the but the value of P._R...

P._R Communications Communications Marty Public Relations Society of Am reporter Bluecross blueshield West Virginia Ginny University Sarah West Virginia University Mardi Micevski Matt Coming Logitech Samsung Marnie Digital Washington Post facebook
"icm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"icm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pastor would be ministering to. So they would flip. Quaint about which village they actually went in worked in. And then we use the other one as the comparison. So we had four different treatment arms to the study. We had one treatment arm that received the full package the full package, meaning the standard transform curriculum. Equal parts religious values health and nutrition and economic livelihood for another quarter of the villages. Just the pastor wet not the ICM employees. So those participants got only the values or religious instruction for another quarter of this of the villages. Just the ICM employees went in the pastor never showed up. And so in those villages, people were receiving Justice, secular curriculum and did not receive a Christian curriculum in these cases, the program was not held in a church just to make sure the religious component was totally removed and then a quarter of the villages. There's nothing left as the control group. Okay. So those were the four conditions from a set of villages that had been chosen randomly with each condition including hundreds. Of households. It's pretty impressive for real world are CT six months later. The economists went back to measure the results now, how do you do that? Yeah. So we wanted to study to be about the effect of religiosity on economic outcomes we ended up working with six thousand households. So in order to identify the fact of religiosity, we were comparing those values health livelihoods against just health and livelihoods, and then we also compared those you got just values against those. You've got nothing this would allow them to isolate the economic and other effects of the religious instruction. But first they need to know, whether the religious instruction, actually increased religiosity are style. You would kind of go nowhere. If the religious curriculum didn't actually change the religiosity of the individuals attending, these classes, they surveyed people to see if the program made them more likely to read the bible, pray or attend religious services. And we found that it did. So we found big increases in religious behavior. So then we can go to the second stage, which is given that the religious programs increased religiosity, what does the effect downstream on other economic outcome seem to be they looked at everything from food security to life satisfaction to of course, income because the whole purpose of this project. The whole purpose of the ICM charity was to alleviate poverty. So what was the biggest downstream effect as they call? It of just the religious instruction. What we found was that just being exposed.

ICM six months
The Evolution of Television

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

05:07 min | 1 year ago

The Evolution of Television

Environmentalists fear Bolsonaro policies could speed Amazon deforestation

FT News

10:55 min | 2 years ago

Environmentalists fear Bolsonaro policies could speed Amazon deforestation

"Today we're looking at Brazil's rainforests sometimes referred to as the earth's lungs because of the carbon dioxide it absorbs and the oxygen it brings out Leslie hook environment. Correspondent spoke to Jerry Lee. Our Brazil bureau chief about fears that both in our presidency will undermine environmentalist efforts to preserve the forest and its wealth of by diversity. So Joe what's the situation at the moment. When it comes to deforestation in Brazil, the situation at the moment on deforestation is it hit a peak around two thousand eight of around twenty seven thousand square limited a year and its since come down sharply over the past ten years or so so it's much lower than it used to be. But still there's a severe persistent amount of deforestation. It's still going on mostly by illegal miners, loggers and unethical ranches, a minority we should say of agricultural produces a small minority, but still very persistent, and there's a lot of land conflict going on on the edge of Amazon. That's feeding this deforestation. Now, I understand that the Amazon rainforest contains about one hundred billion tons of carbon which is ten times global fossil fuel emissions. Can you just explain in a nutshell why the Amazon is so important to the environment? The. John. Ironically enough is the main source of emissions in Brazil because it contains much carbon. If you deforested you're unleashing that carbon into the atmosphere. So the zones a huge carbon Bank, and it serves as a major system for controlling the atmosphere, not just in South America. But also globally and one of the key points in Brazil, and one of the reasons why Brazil has tried to control deforestation from its own interest. Is that they believed that the Amazon is a source of much of the rain that feeds the tropical agricultural power of Brazil, dire Bolsonaro has said he wants to curb excessive policing by the country's environmental agency. And he's gained a lot of support from the farmers lobby. When exactly does he mean when he says that well, he talks about an industry find. So he talks about the main environmental agency Bama and the national parks agency, which is called ICM bio, he talks about these having a kind of industry funds, but I just. Oh out and find farmers for the sake of it to try to produce revenue for the federal government. And this is very popular among farmers farmers in Brazil held to account according to a forest code, which limits how much they're allowed to deforest and these limits can be quite severe up in the Amazon region. You're on the allowed to deforest twenty percent of your land in some areas in the south. It's much more relaxed in south of Brazil where widespread agriculture's being present for much longer. So he's appealing to the farmers on that account. There is a point to ease complaints. Brazil is a very bureaucratic country and environmental regulations are no different. But the danger of what he is talking about here is to try to pull Obama back from doing its job, and that could be very risky for not only the Amazon, but the other Brazilian biomass such as the Atlantic forest, which is in the southeast of Brazil, and the Suharto which is where a lot of the soy farming happens in Brazil. So in addition to reigning in Alabama's you've just described. What other measures has he talked about that would have big impacts on the environment. The regulations only embalmer these are the main ones the supervision of Obama and easy. And by these are, the major ones, but one of the other key things that he's talked about is combining the ministry of agriculture with the ministry of the environment and putting in charge of that super ministry, a farmer or an agricultural presentative in doing such a thing who'd be observing a long tradition in Brazil, which is putting the FOX in charge of the hen coop. So it would be tantamount to basically subordinating the environment to agricultural interests. And this is something that's got people very very concerned in environmental circles, if you had to sort of summarize farmers attitude toward deforestation preserving the rainforest, what our farmers views in general on these deforestation policies traumas in general in Brazil, most of them will tell you they're against further deforestation illegal deforestation. So the have the forest code, which I mentioned earlier. Which requires them to protect the streams on their properties in not deforest a minimum of vegetation. And most of them say that they respect that low. They just want to see it implemented. But the backside of that law is that it does allow deforestation. So for instance, if you are in the south of Brazil, and the limit is, for instance, twenty percent v Lyon has to be protected if you have forty percent that's forest. You can do farce out of the twenty percent. So farmers in Brazil champion, this low that they have to protect the environment. But the other side of that is that the law does actually allow a little bit of deforestation, and there's a lot of ways of sort of bending it. And if you don't have very strict supervision. Yes, very hard to sort of catch them. So I'm the boss, and our farmers are hoping that they'll get an easing of these restrictions, and they believe that if Bolsonaro can get these regulatory agencies off their backs they'll be able to do that easier with fewer fines, also if the environmental ministry is subordinated to the agriculture ministry. They believe they'll be able to get other things such as Ben sector science and other things approved more easily the danger of. Course is that if you remove the supervision, the less, ethical, farmers and other sectors of the rural community illegal loggers illegal minors. They will also take their cue, and we could see a massive increase in deforestation of the Amazon outside of Brazil. Is there a risk of consumer backlash? If Boston our eases environmental standards had one of the big risks for Brazilian agriculture. And this is why when we talk about busy Negra Celtic went up talking about a uniform group of people. So the ones who are very excited about a chance of illegally deforesting, probably smaller pharma's or less ethical operators on the frontiers of farmlands of Brazil, but the larger operators larger farmers the trading company's value these environmental protections because this allows them to sell Brazilian soya bean and Brassinne vif with some level of stamp of approval in terms of the environment. If they lose that that could be very damaging for Brazilian sales in developed countries, especially of beef. It's already big problem to trace. Products coming out of Brazil, especially mates, but also soy. And if you suddenly start to have a lot of deforestation that's gonna really cloud the Brazilian brand. The other thing that's bad for Brazil in general is I've a recent years it's actually developed a very good image in terms of its efforts to protect the environment. If it suddenly a gets the image of deforestation and the things that come with deforestation which include land conflict murder confiscation of lands from Indians genocide of Indian tribes. This is not a good thing for the Brazilian image. And it's not really good for busy and businesses. Well, that's a rather grim picture. But on a more hopeful note, Joe you've written about project to map the DNA sequences of species that are in the Amazon river basin. What are the aims of this project who are its backers? Yeah. This is a project that's being coordinated by the World Economic Forum and a Peruvian entrepreneur Fuan Carlos Castillo, Hugo and the I'm of it is to map all the biological assets of the Amazon and Cody. Defy rights of usage for industry and research is in blockchain to dual of this by twenty twenty and the idea is to try to capture it the intellectual property that's imbedded in the Amazon and try to use that commercially. But the key thing here is that the proceeds of this use should go back to the communities that live in the Amazon, the traditional communities conservation funds, and the governments that are actually in the Amazon and the way that they want to do that is that using blockchain and special contracts that will be able to trace the usage of this information around the world, and those who use it once I have proceeds once they make profit from this information will have to pay it back in some form. So it's an extremely ambitious project. A lot of scientists around the world, and it's a feel like an extension of the human genome project in the sense, it's extending that to the rest of the species on the planet. So it's a Ray of hope to them as on if it can be implemented. Wow. So how much will it cost, and is it likely to make a lot of? Money in the long term. I mean when you talk about using the block chain to return profits to local communities is this potentially a profitable enterprise in the long run. Yes. Well, let's see to go. If the costs the human genome project apparently costs four point eight billion dollars and generated sixty five dollars for the US economy for every public all of that was invested and this project the entire project that includes Amazon, which call the earth by genome project is expected to cost four point seven be into complete. And if we go by past products that have been developed out of Amazon organic material we can see that they are huge profits to be made especially in pharmaceuticals. But there are also other ways of using intellectual property that's embedded in the Amazon. If you like, for instance, there's interests to studying the traffic patterns of soldier ants to try to develop autonomous vehicles, and there are other processes in the zone that are being studied that can be used for the people think can be developed as technology. So the backers of the project cited. Proceeds could be billions of dollars in the long run. But it's just a matter of actually implementing it and seeing if it works. It's all very new that sounds like a really fascinating initiative, but all this is happening quite late in the day for the world's rainforests. Do you think there's enough time to see results and could something like this set of precedent for efforts to save forests? Elsewhere hit I think this time there's still time. Brazil has deforested twenty percent of them online for us, which is you know, when you think about the other bombs in Brazil such as the Atlantic forest. It's not much Atlantic us as almost being wiped out. So the Amazon is still there to be protected. I think it depends a lot of global pressure on Brazil as well as pressure from within Brazil. There's a lot of support within Brazil to save Amazon. So it depends a lot on people mobilizing to make sure that those unethical sectors of agriculture mining and logging and not

Brazil Amazon Amazon River Basin JOE Atlantic Forest South America Jerry Lee Bureau Chief Barack Obama Boston Alabama Negra Celtic John Agriculture Ministry Bama Suharto Bolsonaro
"icm" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"icm" Discussed on Small Doses

"I see. I see him where where is ICM's EMC. I see in a blast over there. We're really having a good time whenever you hear us talking about an agency that really, let's. Guys, we'll up. Yes. Okay. Good. Good. Yeah, they'll be happy to hear this. They will. I'm definitely going to like. The black woman. I've had that to me before when me and Quinta was somewhere like smiley. I love it who's also thriving excelling live for her. A lot of thrive celery is happening. And it's also kind of bizarre because you're just like, I don't know about you, but I feel like I was not not that I was like on the outside looking in, but I mean for a long time you're just like I'm working towards a goal and then you're like, oh, we're, we're here. This is what it is. Yeah, this this, it's like a college class. Honestly, it is. You realize that like, oh, it's weird because you realize like along with my peers, but then you also remember they were. We were always always, we were always peers. You just chose to put yourself on another level or to say that you didn't have the success that you thought it took to be with said people yet, but we were always working together. We were always, you know, rising up together and it's and it's really, it's just a really nice time in all of our lives and careers, but it has a lot to do with self worth and acceptance and all those other things. But. Grew talk about self worth for market value. You know yourself worth like on the shit. I'm just as good as them, but market value. I don't have the credit. Yes. I don't have the credit. Yeah, also water credit. I mean, there's it's just like what is race where it's like it's fake but has real consequences. So yeah, it's like credits are basically a calling card that says, like I have worked before. You can hire me to also the problem with credits. I think kind of differentiates it from raise is that it's completely subjective. Lies race not comes subjective per people. Tell me I'm not black all the time. Yeah, but, but like you are though, so that's not, that's that's I see what you're saying. But I just feel like there's also like a fact we can like do blood like, you know what I mean? Like we can say, I am an African, there's no, I can't just be like, yeah, I'm, I've always you're saying, whereas like with with credits, people can be like that credit doesn't count, and someone else going to be absolutely valid or or. Next is completely subjective. You could be the best, whatever in the world and someone could still choose to hire you for whatever reason. Well, that's what makes it a bitch, and that's Hollywood. The fact that it's not a meritocracy by any means. Yeah. I mean, if that were the case, then I mean, I wouldn't have been..

ICM Hollywood
"icm" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"icm" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Inside of a car and you don't wear them yep that's correct i enjoy baba again back to freedom of choice icm messes legislative watchdog in our biggest thing is to maintain freedom of choice for all motorcycles throughout the state idaho would motorcyclists have have an issue if it would be okay for if my seatbelt wasn't required by law would i i'm just i i wonder because i don't want anybody get hurt and i get it no but i understand the wind through the hair i get the get the whole feeling i have a windshield you know i get it i i completely i'm not judging you man i'm not judging you at all and i don't want anybody to tell me what to do the now the only reason i don't put my seatbelt on because there's a law out there i put my seatbelt on because i don't the damn car keep stinging drive me nuts so that's why i i'm always curious that's all because it's always part of the of the new story somewhere where something bad happens they weren't wearing helmets so forth we get that a lot and a lot of the reason for that is because on the farm report the fatal accident scene report there there's a check box was there a helmet or not okay that's it that's where a lot of that that's where a lot of that information comes from gra phone to knocked every motorist out there give us i mean other other than look twice i mean what what else what else do we need to be looking for is the the thing about motorcyclists and i've seen the psa there was one psa that was out there when you look once if a motorcyclist is a quarter mile mile down the road it might actually look like somebody walking motorcyclist you appear a lot slower than than a vehicle traveling toward you so alana time people will miss judge their distance they go oh well that that bike is way back there he's actually much closer than he appears that's why we're that's why we're really pushing on look twice because another thing is blind spots always check your blind spots you can hide a motorcycle easy in every blind.

idaho icm
"icm" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Front i'll islamism fall of interest rates boy that's pretty good for josh right he's our chief economist when it comes to icm said he can be followed on twitter ajay right stuff all right jay writes stuff you've got a chance to look at those fomc minutes what are you take away from them well think the word for me is conviction the we actually you have an interview with neil cash card to the president of the minneapolis federally your today he said they choose each word very carefully you know that's the case but he made a point of being explicit and saying when we added that word further to the fomc statement further gradual increases in interest rates they really meant it and what i view this as is kind of like a in theory light the way of cheating the way they see risks didn't want to go so far as to change that very sense of language and the fomc statement of the balance of risks they wanted to say that they have got more conviction in their view about how the economy is evolving and how they're going to respond to it so what earnings coming in better than everybody expected better than everybody expected in bed lie better i mean improving stronger and higher and better than perhaps is wise is what they say actually here they talked about how growth is above the longterm potential that they see in the economy so the implication there is it a it's going to have to fall back and that's really where we are now in the stage of the economic cycle were looking towards at some point we don't see recession risk right now but at some point is going to appear on the horizon and how's the fed going to respond we know that they're trying to get ahead of that here that's why they've got that word further and why they're talking about their increase conviction because it's all about trying to get rates and financial conditions back to something more like normal and that's why we find ourselves in.

chief economist icm jay president minneapolis josh twitter neil fomc
"icm" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on KOMO

"President's predecessor ahead to do often as wells' abc news senior white house correspondent cecilia vega seventeen times our president obama by our account that for president trump there's been ethene and many of his remarks after that church shooting in texas president trump said it would be a little too soon to talk about gun laws after the massacre in las vegas he said quote we will talk about gun laws as time goes on there has not been a very serious public policy conversation about gun control here at this administration in this white house the president tweeted no child teacher or anyone else should ever feel unsafe it in american school we will see if this is the one the forces that policy conversation it was moving in day for a young family tacoma day that almost didn't happen after scammers swiped several thousand dollars from them but after our story about the crime aired comas keith eldridge reports doors started to open to help them for something missing from the front yard of us tacoma hallway it's the for sale side it was taken out as the icm's moved in her so we have a little baby toddler van haeren stephanie serenity icm's little boy dad's baby eta's parrots are moving into their new home we just by a kingsize bed it's a day that almost didn't happen after scammers swipe twelve thousand dollars that serenity thought she was sending in for the closing costs it's a story were first told you about the date have it i don't i don't know what to do any more at this point i'm just off its believe this cameras either hacked into the icm's email or the email of the lenders because they knew the closing dates all the deems of the people involved and the amount needed and we're finally going on our home and then we just felt kingpins she says local attorney can gordon sars story and offered to take on their case for free and negotiated lower fees and commissions putting.

President wells cecilia vega obama trump icm attorney white house correspondent texas las vegas tacoma keith eldridge gordon twelve thousand dollars thousand dollars
"icm" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on KOMO

"President's predecessor ahead to do often as wells' abc news senior white house correspondent cecilia vega seventeen times our president obama by our account that for president trump there's been ethene and many of his remarks after that church shooting in texas president trump said it would be a little too soon to talk about gun laws after the massacre in las vegas he said quote we will talk about gun laws as time goes on there has not been a very serious public policy conversation about gun control here at this administration in this white house the president tweeted no child teacher or anyone else should ever feel unsafe in an american school we will see if this is the one the forces that policy conversation it was moving in day for a young family tacoma of day that almost didn't happen after scammers swiped several thousand dollars from them but after our story about the crime aired comas keith eldridge reports doors started to open to help them there's something missing from their front yard of this tacoma home it's the for sale side it was taken out as the icm's moved in other fans are following out a little baby toddler van heeren stephanie serenity icm's little boy eta's tariffs are moving into their new home we just by a kingsize bed it's a day that almost didn't happen after scammers swipe twelve thousand dollars that serenity thought she was sending in for the closing costs it's a story refers told you about the date have it i don't i don't know what to do any more at this point i'm just off its believe this cameras either hacked into the icm's email or the email of the lenders because they knew the closing dates all the deems of the people involved and the amount needed and we're finally going on our home and then we just felt because she says local attorney can gordon sars story at offered to take on their case for free and negotiated lower fees.

President wells cecilia vega obama trump tacoma icm attorney white house correspondent texas las vegas keith eldridge gordon twelve thousand dollars thousand dollars
"icm" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Something a slightly different way from which was that that one of the things that that seems to get lost in a again the serve incurred samonte by the social media and so on is is there's this huge emphasis on serve down the the quote unquote the hacked right the busy do this at the up 10x what you're doing today and and to me the thing that the jit quoted with pete pete carroll was the ruined folks is how we get one percent better today because i can i can focus you on one percent better today and we can do that day after day after day after day while we're gonna we're gonna hit that 10x at some point but you know we do it this in a very you know chief alone realistic way and i think this is one things that that i seem an icm workforce's there's a surf you have people coming in and you eluded to it earlier as you know people come in at the lower rung and then you know they want to go to rungs above the necks as opposed to saying look let's how to get better every day and we'll get to those two rungs but may not be in one big jump absolutely and i think that you know the other the other reality is the worst button on a game console so whether it was in in an atari nintendo playstation or even you know even angry birds on your phone if you're playing on your song the worst the worst button that we've created a reliance he on is the restart button gm we have again we have we have people in the workforce who have grown accustomed to if the performances in the way they wanted to be taking just restart the game i actually start i can.

pete pete carroll icm gm one percent
"icm" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Uh zamboni icm born here and i i run the whole place snapped let a complex it's a it's an indoor skating rink cut indoor basketball courts indoor track waiting room centres it like a for scores in a club for its for private school yeah private school private boarding school yourself selfimposed around here of south of boston okay yeah uh was ice how'd you get the gigs sounds like a good gig uh i i i i worked beer in the 80s when i was going as boston and get my degree and i i got the job because i i used to play a lot of ice hockey ha ha uh and uh you know there was actually an ad patriot ledgers is pre internet and i went down for the center you and i was like eighteen and they're like jared riders him bonian with absolutely no problem had no idea what i was doing i got the job and you know i figured out you know i figured it out for alley turned zamboni ceesay rights for the most part it is put fear is you know there may be some some lesser is out here there is actually like uh this is the science grooming the the ice absolutely um you know you got a this this this is a way to do it properly um i mean you'd kinda drive around circled but you've got a use you know right while the temperature you're going to make sure you have a travel blade on the bottom two shaved the ice there's a big giant razor blade on the bottom of the machine a lotta people don't know about like if you haven't dropped it on your wrist your fingers eulogise lawsuit was really sabah's razor blades or just absolutely bradley yep it would if you ever dropped it on your wrist it would cut it right i'll just try to cut it off with tear it right open light up but yeah so you have to sharpen that uh we send it out to uh police in need of um that sharpens blades and so you have to i'm bolton that's when you can hurt yourself god you're smart guy absolutely yep yep any change that anywhere for me.

hockey ice bolton boston internet basketball sabah skating ad south people
"icm" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"He jack man he's doing good i had i hadn't seen them since we finish the movie access on once who we are always screen the movie uh but he looked really good uh now i did ask him if you know you get into good shape maybe you're not is funny and i'm like we like will little fatter so were concerned about this mark i understand the concerns thankfully we're not shooting another movie for a while so i think oh it will be back to his regular form one icm underwear and all an israeli nudity in this movie uh we've got will in his underwear and he was wearing a woman a woman towels coat which is a very small one woman i like dress draft lash robes look i got an it have you tried tom brady's a workout regimen all the things he eats no no would you no well you know let me tom com needs to do for tom and i need to do what i need to do for me you know i think uh tom you know he's tall slender man you know i'm usually trying to build some monk puts output aunt's muscle or you know depending on what i have to do to prepare for roles but uh no i think uh cosmetic secrets maybe i would follow the summer tom's tips is such a good looking gentleman but as far as now now working out i've got to do my own thing would you take a role where you added thirty like you let yourself go a little bit.

icm tom brady
"icm" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"That's amazing i do think the slightly less attractive will pick tied we did the blue on blue the one that you wear a lot roach so so that all contested ties i think for me to win a raj with your agreement has to be scott pain with his thai i have no idea what these those are even on his tied i don't know whether it's foodstuff barbecue equipment or cartoon characters ended up from the spent his poise under the barbecue food or swastikas it could find it hard to tell from sangal i also see swastikas in everthing there but the best part about it is it is tied around the neck of icm scott pains own crap cat if he had to borrow a cat do that by the way he's even more the winner because if you borrow a cat any any time that you borrow a cat fur visual comedy the i think that's like for your when you are winning in life when away a few been watching h key yet we should do in h k now everyone's going to be doing each q in my opinion planet every night like a maniac yet but we should do is scottie rogowski used to work on out embassy rose crowd goes wild host that roads we should do crap q it should be english premier league and many blazes trivia the only slight snag and thing to this approach davor if we ask questions like where did courage originally source it's use of sowing of from the we both bela we have no idea how we got momories of a goldfish yeah so i think better by english premier league trivia yeah i think that's what we do we do english premier league trivia when with the goal at crap q when was we have an obsolescent billable exactly well maybe the most translucent player in the history of the pros aaa stephen a smith the will hughes we'll see some one so invisible we at you.

roach premier league smith scott scottie rogowski hughes
"icm" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"The ad was vernon is is uncle was vest her and one of the what are the recipes was squirrels do or something and we did actually have a a squirrel prepared squirrel i we i need it no but it was it was robert it was either i held it up in it was who was addressed squirrel allow mean undressed in then it was just naked but icm man you too uh they were hunting squirrel shooter failed to identify target shooters shot at what he thought was a squirrel hitting victim in the back uh monkeys might want to get a you know a tick um another thing at a scope on it or not but uh dwell looked like us if he did he have like a ponytail or something the it's five thirty and here in chicago powell woah coming up a year in chicago we have trump on tax overhaul and of ellis park man is must have been a gun and drug selling staying news next but first the weather channel forecast dusty winds out of the west of the northwest behind a game changing cold front which is march through chicago our temperatures tonight down into the mid20s at the lake shore wind advisory through the early evening we've already had our high temperature for the day today sunshine tomorrow high of thirty five degrees teens and 20s tomorrow night thursday night friday night and into the weekend for the weather channel i'm scott lawrimore wlsam 890 with another update 30minute it's thirty two degrees in chicago president trump is predicting a congress will come together quickly to reconcile differences in a sweeping tax overhaul passed by the house and the senate he says a meeting with a half dozen republican senators at the white house that it calls the joint housesenate conference committees the mixer the president says quote everyone gets together and they pick all the good things and get rid of the things they like sir or a mixture in reality the conference will involve tough negotiations over differences in the two versions of the tax bill that can be approved by both chambers president trump says about the end result choice we directly for a vote let's put it in through the conference that looks come out with something where everything is perfect and that's what we're going to do trump and the lawmakers were also discussing trade including ongoing talks over nafta and melrose park man is found himself on.

vernon chicago trump congress the house senate white house president robert ellis park scott lawrimore melrose park thirty five degrees thirty two degrees 30minute
"icm" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Icm member like walking at at this movie and being like she's done i think that things over sure but she was young with things he was johanna lara tyree added out ghetto she's terrible miss moving she's really diets she's she's like that easily the weakest part of his no cash is the rest of the cassis great everyone else's good yes piper is it pera bore parabola isikara baraboo yeah she even she's pretty good she actress i think is really underrate i knew she always seem like she should have been famous ms never quite like broker has it he is because she gorgeous she hit really hard at first six yet at summer where it was like she was the lead of like three movies and then all them didn't do that well was i just i just couldn't remember clarity i would also says rucking boys the lead of russian blair movie is a catastrophe tester i think maybe maybe those are the two but they came out within like a month of each right and then she made that lake sort of like cheesecake ye lesbians at boardings with amish martin right and jessica pera right which called loss and dealears which is like the most anonymous movie loss in delirious which is i think became leg now the because there's not a lot alike lesbian coming of age dramas searches sort of became slightly canonical any way it also had people who went on to become more famous has very surreal thing when you look back in your laying on this and then there's that movie where she plays like a french girl with a beret is kalic slap her she's fresh which was a on the shelf for like fiveyear i was one of those weird movies a kept coming retitled editor for doing pipe repairable and then she private dozen you know i was ahead i don't know what to say lynch's goes nowhere ended up on one of those usa share their fire that was aged want if you yeah that we were we are gallagher rent.

editor lynch Icm johanna lara tyree rucking blair jessica pera fiveyear
"icm" Discussed on Android Central Podcast

Android Central Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"icm" Discussed on Android Central Podcast

"Icm in europe as well we'll have a google search widget on that home screen and if not let me know i could be wrong about this but every phone that i have in my foot in in my house has one so my question is is this more about getting google to stop bundling the the access you know the the cts apps the ones that only m's needs easy to install in order to get access to the playstore urge this merely about lowering googles dominance in consumer search it's stories i think it's all of the same feeling for them the it's the tyranny of the default for them and as we saw all the way from from the microsoft case yep i agree that he's a fault great way to put a that's that's the part the bugs me is they don't understand that it's two very simple things uh if you were to say okay google you need phone you need all this stuff to to operate that's cool good put it on their but don't make the default launcher have a search bar the top that's very different than saying you can't bundle search in the phone and force users to have it installed very different things and it's illegal number eight and like you can't you're you realize you're trying to tell google not to bundle google search on a google run operating system i mean meals biggest yet like it's it's kind of weird because google gives the solloway way for free like they their argument here is going to be that google is not forcing anybody to do this when they.

Icm consumer search google operating system europe microsoft