38 Burst results for "ICE"

Fresh "ICE" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:41 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "ICE" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"Of $75 dealer fee is the only dealer for you'll pay. That's the major world promise. Visit major world dot com or call 1 800. Major auto. I'm Kelly Dylan. Our next reported 10 21 on 10 10 wins. Was used time. 10 12. Now, the AccuWeather forecast. Here's meteorologist John Feerick's partly to mostly cloudy overnight will get back to 46 closer to 40 and a few suburbs, turning out mostly sunny Saturday and ice afternoon it to 56. And they're mostly clear Saturday night Low 40 Sunday mostly sunny, high 54 Monday will turn windy Mylar periods of rain. Even a thunderstorm. Rain could be have enough to cause some flooding winds could gust 40 to 50 MPH. I'm Monday, 63 than blustery chili or Tuesday. Leftover showers. I 52 dry for Wednesday and Thursday, American weather meteorologist John Spherical New York's weather station, 10 10 wins. And right now we have 53 degrees in midtown, going down to 46 under clear skies. Wins news time. 10 13 Today, there was celebration in the Catholic Church or to Bishop Wilton Gregory of Washington,.

Bishop Wilton Gregory Accuweather John Feerick Kelly Dylan John Spherical Catholic Church New York Washington
German coronavirus cases now above 1 million

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 18 hrs ago

German coronavirus cases now above 1 million

"Germany has hits another grim milestone in the crown of ice pandemic taking above one million confirmed cases of cove in nineteen the countries that disease control center says that Germany's sixteen states reported at nearly twenty three thousand cases overnight for total since the start of the outbreak of over a million cases despite the high number of infections Germany has seen fewer deaths than many other European countries with nearly sixteen thousand compared with more than fifty thousand in Britain Italy and France for example a rapid response to the national outbreak massive testing and a robust hospital system have been credited with helping keep the fatalities down I'm sorry I. Shockley

Germany Britain Italy France I. Shockley
Fresh update on "ice" discussed on Lars Larson

Lars Larson

00:37 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ice" discussed on Lars Larson

"This is Housecall for Health. Pat Quinn, co creator of the Ice Bucket Challenge created to fight me, a traffic lateral disease known as a less or Lou Gehrig's disease, died This past weekend, Quinn was diagnosed at age 30 with the degenerative disease affecting nerves in the spinal cord. In 2014, he helped create the ice bucket Challenge, which quickly became an Internet sensation. Well known public figures, celebrities, athletes and everyday people would dump ice water on their heads and post the video online, then challenge others to do the same. And donate. I'm nominating Stephanie Mondo Amanda, Both Lee and Veronica Shaw movement.

Pat Quinn Degenerative Disease Stephanie Mondo Amanda Lou Gehrig Veronica Shaw Both Lee
How Tall Is Mount Everest REALLY?

Short Wave

09:51 min | 20 hrs ago

How Tall Is Mount Everest REALLY?

"Okay lauren fire. Today we are talking about mount everest. Which is the highest mountain on earth when you measure from sea level and today we're focusing on how that measurement is made weird we start. How about some old timey newsreel resort evidenced bothering his survey of eighteen hundred and forty one estimated his height pinton nine thousand feet back in the nineteenth century. When george everest brit was the surveyor general of india the used trigonometry to measure the height of the mountain like what we learned in middle school points angles and triangles totally. Yeah and incidentally the mountain got its english name from sir george everest but it was actually an indian mathematician. Radin seek dr. Who did most of the work and actually figured out that. This mountain is the highest point on earth. That sounds right for colonialism. Totally yeah okay. So how accurate was this trigonometry. Approach will i put that question to be nagaraj on. He's a geoscientist. One of george everest's successors at the survey of india office which still exists about is now staffed by indians. In fact i was sitting in the same chair. Our team location. Where you're sitting. Because i didn't want to change the room. So he says the trigonometry that his predecessors use throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was surprisingly accurate. I mean the standard height. Everyone now uses for everest that twenty nine thousand twenty nine feet. It dates back to nineteen fifty five. Wow that's pretty impressive. Okay so how did they actually calculate that measurement for mountain like. Walk me through it. It was not easy. They measured it from eight different points throughout langdon distance and everything and computer and took the mean. It was a very difficult matter very heavy machines. Heavy machines called theod delights instruments used to measure angles between visit points on the horizon and vertical planes like a cross between a telescope and compass. You might have seen municipal surveyors using them sort of on a tripod. Oh ya know. I've seen those folks reflective vests and their little tripods them. Yes yeah okay. So but for measuring mountains. They are these big heavy versions. I don't know how many hundreds of kilograms they carried forward to make this measurement it has slowed colored most of the time we didn't know work so the foot that was put on. Who's very difficult nowadays. Nothing much what the chinese are doing. Our a nepalese are doing their hypic instrumentation with the chinese and the nepalese are doing now involves satellites so instead of measuring everest from afar on the horizon with these theod delight contraptions these send a team up to the top of the mountain with a hand held. Gps receiver hey. That sounds like a little easier to me. Maybe but maybe not. Here is d nash mandar. He's gps expert from nepal. Who teaches now at the university of tokyo. It's a very harsh environment. There that very windy and you have all these battery or power problems and like the people who climbed everest. They come steadier probably more than half an hour. I think that's limit for them because they already exhausted. So they've got thirty minutes to connect to multiple satellites because they are solar flares and interference. at altitude. You can't rely on just one reading and they have to measure the thickness of ice and snow underfoot because you wanna reading from the actual rocky mountain right and not the ice and so for that you need a ground penetrating radar so another piece of equipment to haul up the mountain. Yes oh fumbling. With all of that on top of everest. You've got wind. you've got your oxygen depleting. The clock is ticking and that is still the easy. Part monitor. Says because all of that data from the top of everest. It's only half the story. Yeah so you need to know from his point. And that's the biggest problem then need a reference somewhere but we don't have a seat difference in nepal because nepalis a landlocked country. It's land everywhere. The nearest sea level is in india. Sitting knew how high this mountain is you. I need to know how low sea levels and you need a reference point sea level which it turns out varies depending on where you are. Yeah i mean sea levels tricky right. It's not necessarily constant and climate change is really messing with sea level these days. Yeah and has monitor says there isn't even a cenex to so here's how they do it. They measure sea level in india at the bay of bengal at china's yellow sea at many other points hundreds of them to calculate the mean sea level. And then they figure out where sea level would be. if there were a ac- right next to everest o- okay and then you measure from there up to the peak. Oh no no. No you have to account for the shape of the earth bishop of the art okay. It's a live swyto very much. Swyto right the earth is elipsoid. Soil like a oval-shaped watermelon because of the earth rotation makes it kind of bulge slightly at the equator. Plus you have to account for how gravity effect sea level in different places around the world and mountains themselves affect gravity so the earth at sea level this invisible line along the earth's surface. It's actually like kind of lumpy. So you're telling me that we are standing on a lumpy elipsoid. That's exactly what i'm telling you. So sea level is actually not level at all and the next step. You got map. Those lumps essentially variations in the earth's gravitational force. And then you get the gop lead a. I'm sorry a joy d- yeah so the geo is the shape of the earth at sea level taking into account gravity and the planet's rotation. And now you follow that joy to appoint directly under everest. And that's what you use as a reference point for the mountains height okay so after all that sea levels gravity you finally get a reference point you take that you compare it to your. Gps measurement from the top of the mountain and you get everest height. Well not so fast. Because there's also these pesky plate tectonics oh my lord. This is harder than actually climbing everest. I'll say i'll say right now. Yeah yeah so. The mountains peak is variable to like and i'm not just talking ice and snow like the rock is actually moving. Sri daddy jaw is an engineer and expert on himalayan plate. Tectonics i have been field kinney. My philosophist been between behaviors and then ever asked is on the edge of two plates. The eurasian plate and the indian plate and j has measured how the indian plate is slipping underneath the eurasian plate and how that is pushing everest skyward measurements for last you. One point four million yearning threes in high. Like a few hundred years. We can only do bring Comes johnny has concluded that everest is gaining roughly a centimeter every ten years. So that's about a foot every three hundred years other scientists say that's far too conservative that the growth could be three times even four times that much but i mean however fast everest is rising. Things can happen very quickly to change that like earthquakes hung or at least they have in the past. So professor john day studied a nineteen thirty four quake that calculated took about sixty centimeters off the mountains height. So that's at least six hundred years of growth a raced in an instant and there's been another quake since in two thousand fifteen and we're not sure how that affected the height because there haven't been any definitive measurements since then so i'm guessing you're about to tell me it's time to remeasure mount everest. It is indeed so last year nepal sent up a team of scientists to do just that and this year with the climbing. Season cancelled for kelvin. China did the same and both countries have been analyzing their findings and their due to release the measurements pretty much any day. Now this is very exciting yes especially because most of the surveys of everest has been done by foreigners british colonial rulers. There was an american survey was an italian one and professor monitor. The gps expert from nepal says yes. He's motivated by science and the search for truth and all of this but you know also in part by the previous. Why don't we measure our own mountain and so nepal dead and we are waiting for those findings now. It may turn out to be taller shorter. Whatever the point though is that it's changing and that's what scientists say matters to them. Here's garage on the former survey of india guy again. I feel the joint will here. Shedding the knowledge will use the society beget understanding. What is there a big deal if you come and see okay. I'm announcing mall. Dividends did this much healthy that who cares you know because she missed the learning that teaching how people understand how do people perceive almost put in what model you used. Then be be happy if he's happy about what this tells us about. The earth overall the technology. They're fine tuning on. Everest has all these practical applications from agriculture to defense and scientists say if their research gets more eyeballs because it involves the tallest mountain in the world. Hey that's a great

George Everest George Everest Brit Nagaraj India Nash Mandar Nepal Mount Everest Langdon University Of Tokyo Lauren Yellow Sea Himalayan Plate Bengal Professor John Day
Fresh "ICE" from John Landecker

John Landecker

00:30 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "ICE" from John Landecker

"News is sponsored by builder supply outlet. More updates on the coronavirus. We'll have that story and more after WGN traffic right now we're still seeing delays on the C T. A red line now on the north bound side. From Cermak Chinatown Station of Fullerton is because of earlier incident on the Red Line trains have started to move again. 95th bound trains have resumed their normal wrote. Eyes and our disabled vehicle blocking several lanes. Right now, This is inbound at Mannheim Road. Got an accident on the right shoulder on the ice and our out found at home and avenue and we got police activity is shooting right now in Chicago Jackson Boulevard at Pulaski Road, So emergency vehicles have Gathered at that location. Many of the roads are starting to be blocked off. CDC panel meeting Tuesday to vote on Covert 19 vaccine Priority panel established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will meet Tuesday to vote on how initial supplies of the cove in 19 vaccine will be distributed. The advisory committee on Immunization Practices will meet to recommend who should be first to be vaccinated. Once there is approval for a vaccine. The panel's recommendations are almost always.

Cermak Chinatown Station Of Fu CDC Mannheim Road WGN Chicago
Holiday trends to watch: Adult Play-Doh; stores that ship

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 d ago

Holiday trends to watch: Adult Play-Doh; stores that ship

"Black Friday shopping this year looks a lot different because of the pandemic and retailers know they're about to lose a fraction of their sales because people are avoiding the stores about one quarter of holiday purchases are impulse buys the items that you see in the store and tossed into your cart like bath oils toys or holiday housewares according to an adviser for the NPD group marketing research company this year impulse buying will drop down to about ten percent as shoppers move they're buying online even those going into stores probably won't linger they'll go in for a specific item and get out fast trying to avoid exposure to the virus but that impulse shopping is considered the icing on the holiday cake the difference between a successful profitable season and a whole home holiday I'm Jackie Quinn

Npd Group Jackie Quinn
European countries prepare for Covid vaccine arrival

Rush Limbaugh

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

European countries prepare for Covid vaccine arrival

"To spread more and more hope is focusing on a vaccine. That means a lot of work on distribution even before any vaccines when approval boxes Simon Owen is live in London. At least a European countries are making plans for vaccines in Germany's capital, Berlin, officials say they'll convert a concert arena to airport terminals on an ice rink into giant vaccination centers. Each able to handle up to 4000 people a day. Friends says vaccinations could begin next month, but in the meantime, Europe is still trying to combat a second wave of infections. Germany and Greece are among the latest countries to extend lockdown restrictions. Lisa meantime, Simon, the CEO of AstraZeneca, just telling Bloomberg news they'll probably run another vaccine trial to test an accidental lower does that left lingering questions? About some of their results. President elect Joe

Simon Owen Germany Berlin Lisa Meantime London Greece Europe Astrazeneca Simon Bloomberg JOE
Hawaii Wants to Lure Visitors---but Keep Out Covid-19

TIME's Top Stories

07:22 min | 1 d ago

Hawaii Wants to Lure Visitors---but Keep Out Covid-19

"Hawaii is riding out the covid. Nineteen storm but geographic isolation isn't the blessing it may seem by a. hundred algata when hawaii's corona virus infections were rising in late august. Honolulu mayor kirk caldwell visited doctors in the covid. Nineteen ward of the queen's medical center the state's largest hospital. I could see it in their faces and in their eyes caldwell says the concern and fear. They had that by the following week. If things didn't change they were not going to be able to care for people that they were going to have to put them intense outside. It was a crisis that leaders in the fiftieth state hoped they would never face between march and may when a stay at home order was in place. Hawaii was averaging only a couple of new cases every day but as some restrictions were lifted in june resulting in a patchwork of state and local rules. The numbers soon began inching up by late. July hawaii was metaphorically ablaze with the bulk of cases centered on oahu. Home to two thirds of the state's population. The island lost one hundred and nineteen. New cases underlie thirtieth by mid august. It was averaging over two hundred today four days after his hospital. Visit with more than three hundred and fifty people hospitalized for covid nineteen symptoms on his island issued a second lockdown order with the blessing of hawaii governor. David ige our hospital administrators had informed us. If we didn't do something that they would become overwhelmed says he gay three months later. It seems hawaii's response may have worked as a new deadly wave of coronavirus infections sweeps across the us. Hawaii is one of the only states in the country experiencing relative reprieve. It reported one hundred and thirteen new cases on november twenty third according to data from johns hopkins university slightly more than its weekly average of one hundred six daily new cases. Only vermont reported fewer cases that day hawaii the fortieth most populous state has a low case. Count even when adjusted for population as of november twenty third. It has a weekly average of seven cases per one hundred thousand residents the lowest in the country by comparison. The highest per capita figure is belong to north dakota at one sixty and wyoming at one fifty four infection levels in hawaii have stayed relatively steady since mid-september while nearly every other state has experienced an increase it remains to be seen whether a slight uptick in recent days could be the start of a new upward trend however how has a wii so far avoided another major covid nineteen surge. The clearest reason is apparent on any world map geography. It's so obvious yet. It plays such a big role says thomas lee. An assistant professor of epidemiology at the university of hawaii at manoa and co chair of the hawaii pandemic applied modeling workgroup. He also served as the lead outbreak. Modular and forecaster for the hawaii emergency management agency this spring for hawaii. The pacific ocean has helped serve as the world's biggest moat travelers arriving there by plane. Essentially the only means of reaching the state with cruise lines. Shuttered have since march required to self quarantine for two weeks though since mid-october visitors can avoid isolation if they test negative within seventy two hours of arrival while the rules may have kept visitors from seating new infection clusters. They have also devastated. Hawaii's tourism sector which accounts for nearly a quarter of its economic activity. Some hawaiian leaders. Still don't think they're doing enough to prevent infections part of a broader split among hawaiians over whether and how to welcome visitors back during a pandemic derek kawakami mayor of quite county says new infections on his islands are related to the reopening of travel from the continental us. He's proposed a requirement that travelers get tested a second time after arriving. This virus requires layer upon layer of intervention and mitigating measures. Kawakami says we have to be able to respond quickly and boldly because it can spread like wildfire kawais. Recent uptick is tiny in relative terms on november twentieth. It reported six cases. Its second highest one day count so far but kawakami has good reason to be worried koci home to around. Seventy two thousand people has just nine. Icu beds and fourteen ventilators. Isolated and with limited healthcare capacity and uncontrolled. Outbreak could quickly spell disaster. The holy grail is prevention. So that is what we put our blood sweat and tears into here on kobe. Kawakami says we're almost always on the red line. A similar imperative applies across the entire state of one point. Four million people with nowhere to turn of hawaii's healthcare system is overwhelmed leaders. There have little choice but to be proactive. In preventing covid nineteen outbreaks. We are geographically remote and so our healthcare system is really vulnerable says catherine purple an associate professor of health policy and management at the university of hawaii minoa there really is a strong motivating factor to try to keep those numbers under control. Hawaii's isolation then is a double edged sword. Thousands of miles of ocean are a good tool to stop travelers from seating new corona virus clusters but if infection spin out of control anyway. Assistance could be a long time coming. We have been from the very beginning focused on the science and public health recommendations because we are twenty five hundred miles away from any help. Says the governor. We learned a long time ago. That we have to be self reliant and that we have to act as a community epidemiologists say it's difficult to attribute hawaii's relative covid nineteen success to any one factor isolation included for one thing cold weather which is forcing many americans indoors where the virus can spread. More easily is unheard of in most of hawaii. Honolulu's thanksgiving day forecast is eighty two and sunny. Other government measures may also have played a part unused hotel rooms and a wa who have been repurpose to isolate nineteen patients and restrictions on inter island. Travel have prevented. Local spread mask wearing has helped as well on kauai and a who mask. Mandates were instituted in april while an august survey found that ninety. Six percent of hawaiians are masking up. Unlike for many americans. Wearing masks to prevent illness isn't an entirely foreign concept for hawaiians public health experts. Say that's likely due to the states relative proximity to asia where facial coverings tend to be more prevalent. Many hawaii residents. Who commented for this article also cited the state's heritage and cultural values as a reason for high adherence to public health mandates. We have a culture here that comes from the first people's the native hawaiians called ball says the term juliana means responsibility and it does the people here in hawaii still leaders in hawaii have come under pressure over cove nineteen restrictions caldwell says people sometimes drive down his street to yell outside his house either at him or his wife and daughter. Some people certainly have reason to be upset. Travel restrictions have ravaged the state's tourism dependent economy hawaii's overall unemployment rate was more than fourteen percent in october according to the us department of labor the worst in the country for the second month in a row called bo says he understands people's frustrations but needs to prioritize. Public health. people are impacted. Their businesses are impacted. their life dreams are impacted. He says. I get why they're upset. But i also believe that in order to protect health and safety which is always the most important thing that comes first. And i think it's tied directly to the economy to after months of travel restrictions. Guy says the state's pretrial testing program finally bringing in visitors and helping hawaiians get back to work while keeping cova level stable still. Despite hawaii's current low case counts it remains to be seen if the state's leaders can revive tourism based economy while at the same time staving off a devastating rise in cases which would likely put the tourism business back on ice anyway depend on travel. Uk says but everyday day. I get comments from members in our community that continuing to bring visitors into hawaii during this time is really putting our community at risk. It's something that weighs very heavily on myself. And the mayor's every day as we see the virus counts increasing on the mainland.

Hawaii Kirk Caldwell Queen's Medical Center David Ige Hawaii Emergency Management Ag Kawakami Honolulu Derek Kawakami Caldwell Koci Thomas Lee Oahu Catherine Purple University Of Hawaii Minoa Johns Hopkins University Manoa University Of Hawaii
Space Week Night I Spy

Chompers

02:58 min | 3 d ago

Space Week Night I Spy

"Back it's time for chompers your morning and night tooth brushing show start brushing on the top of your mouth on one side and make sure to get the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth to it. Space week on chompers and today we are playing. I spy all describe an object that i spy and you have to shout out what it is. We flew away from the sun and found a bright red planet with the dusty surface with a robot on it. What do i spy shouted out. I see mars. Our neighbor in the solar system switzer rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth brushing in tiny circles around each tooth. That robot that we spied on the surface of mars came from earth cleanest curiosity and now sent it from earth to mars to find out if there ever was or could be life on mars. Curiosity is the size of a car. That has six wheels and a long robotic arm curiosity even as a camera for taking selfies on mars. Someday nasa hopes to send humans to mars to. Maybe someday you'll be able to take a selfie with curiosity so what you're brushing to the bottom of your mouth but don't brush too hard ready for your next is by floating through space. I see a bright light shooting pass. It looks like a ball of dust but behind it. I feel long tail. Streaking into the sky. What do i spy shouted out a comet. Scientists sometimes call comets dirty snowball because all the muck that they're made out of is frozen in the cold of space switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. Don't forget those frontier. Here's your last ice by. I'm looking up at the sky. And i see what looks like a giant soup spoon. The earth three bright stars the makeup the handle and four stars in a rectangle that look like a bowl. What do i spy shouted out. The big dipper is what we call a constellation a group of stars in the night sky. That look like a picture when you use your imagination. I imagine you're done brushing now so come back tomorrow for more out of this world. Facts and to

Switzer Nasa
Blue Jackets close team facilities after 'several' players test positive for COVID-19

Rush Limbaugh

00:23 sec | 3 d ago

Blue Jackets close team facilities after 'several' players test positive for COVID-19

"The Blue Jackets are now reporting that several players have recently tested positive for the virus. In a statement, the team says they had several players test positive and they immediately began to quarantine and the club is also closed. It's off ice facilities at nationwide arena. The team did not provide any more details than that or what players may be involved.

Blue Jackets
When Critters Bleed ... On Purpose!

Short Wave

08:36 min | 3 d ago

When Critters Bleed ... On Purpose!

"Okay now so why did you get interested in this whole reflex bleeding thing well. I just saw this report by that guy. Sebastian hofer and i called him up and he told me that not too long ago he got a job at an island ecosystem research institute in the and so i was looking into what's around. What kind of animals are just scanning through the literature just to see what of questions could answer any read about. These local snakes called thunder snakes. That sounds very dramatic. Thunder thunder thunder snakes. Really it's just that they come out when it rains a lot. And i remember reading this from nineteen fifty five describing this behavior this auto hemorrhaging behavior in these snakes. And i just thought to myself. That's insane so there weren't any photos or any kind of detailed description. It just said. The snakes bled from their heads when handled so he did what most good scientists would do. I assume he went out on an expedition to fight snakes. Absolutely you know it. He absolutely did. He had a couple of colleagues went out looking under rocks flipped a ton of rocks until they finally found one and the snake made some defensive behaviors kinda rolled into this tight ball and it started defecating. And asking you know emitting this pretty bad smelling liquid and then sebastian applied a little pressure to its nose like just gently pinched. Its nose to see if they could trigger any bleeding from handling all right. Now you set me this video. And i'm watching a. It's like a little nose pinch. Maybe you know you pinch at like good. And but then boom the snakes is fill up with blood like immediately there are just too big drops of blood where the is used to be and then suddenly the is kind of clear up and then a drop of blood comes out of its mouth yes. Sebastian told me it was wild. Just because i've never seen anything like that. And just the fact of how quickly that i or the is fully flood with blood and then the blood exudes from the mouth and then the ice fully clear up again in just a couple of seconds. I was stunned. I was like this is mad. I mean that is pretty dramatic and you said other critters. Do this to right right some other snakes. You know the one that's been studied. The most is the horned lizard. That's a lizard that lives in the us in the southern us and what it does is pretty nutso. It shoots blood out of its is and the blood can fly several feet several feet. Yeah it doesn't happen that often but when it does it's so dramatic that it really gets people's attention. Indigenous people have known about these lizards for a long time. European scientists wrote about them centuries ago and for forty years. These lizards have been studied by wage. Sherbrooke director emeritus of the southwestern research station of the american museum of natural history in arizona and he told me at the beginning. He was just wondering if this is supposed to be a defensive response. Why would blood be a turnoff. For what is after all a bloodthirsty predator. Good question when you try to say well. Maybe a predator wouldn't like it depends on is going to eat these things you know. That doesn't make sense so That's that's where i started. So he began watching the lizards in doing experiments. And what he found that. The horned lizard wouldn't always squirt blood from its eyes when threatened by an animal. And what i found was with roadrunners with grasshopper mice with Leopard lizards with rattlesnakes with other snakes. They never squirt blood. They don't do it then so when do they do it. Do they squirt blood. He told me it's when the lizard is about to be eaten by something like a coyote. Or a bob cat and the reason is the blood has a distasteful quality to mammalian predators and it has to be. It has to arrive in the mouth. Okay so these lizards are not really trying to like hit. A predator from several feet away by sending streams of blood. Flying out of there is apparently not disappointing. It's more like a coyotes mouth clamps down on the lizard the lizard squirts out foul tasting blood. Way told me that when he goes out and handles horned lizards only a couple times. Out of one hundred. Will it actually squirt blood from its. Is you know he said. Humans aren't typical predator. So he thinks lizard is just kind of confused. It doesn't really know what to do and he told me he's actually tasted the blood no for a long time. I thought it basically tastes like my blood. I wish i was surprised that this took a turn to a scientist tasting blood. But i'm not look. This is science magazine science. So then you know after a while. Though he started thinking actually there is this kind of you know aftertaste. Kind of acid aftertaste that lasted for maybe twenty minutes. Or so he said it was really minor. But if he squirts the blood into the mouth of a coyote or a bobcat they have a really strong reaction disgusting immediately. They begin to celebrate quite a bit. They shake their head to all kinds of things like that to to they. They have different taste. Buds than i do okay. Okay so all of this kind of suggests that for these horned lizards. This is really a strategic specific defense that it's not just a random stress response. I mean you could imagine that if an animal gets like it's blood pressure goes up lead might just shoot out of a leaky capillary. Somehow i guess but this seems to be pretty specific defense move aimed at particular predators right and like i mentioned before. The horned lizards auto hemorrhage has more studied than any other creatures. Okay salikh what beyond reptiles you said. Some insects do this to ladybugs. Yeah actually quite a lot of insects do this. And if you're poking at a lady bug and some liquid comes out it might just seem to you like it was urine or feces or something you know in ladybugs it comes out of the legs underneath so it's hard to see where it's coming out. It's yellow you know so unless you know what it is. You'd have no reason to think. This thing is just bled on me. You know spontaneously was happened. And now i'm looking back and i'm like oh that was blood cool so i talked to michael nop. He studies ladybugs at the czech university of life sciences and he told me that reflex bleeding is a highly effective way for ladybugs to deter predators because their blood is full of substances that smell and probably taste awful two birds or small mammals and he told me that actually if a lady but gets attacked by ants the coagulating blood can act like a kind of glue that glues aunts mouth parts together during the attack. I mean that's pretty amazing now. But here's the thing. I don't understand about this doesn't a lady bug need. It's blood i mean like it seems like critters would be at a disadvantage of some sort if they went around anytime they got threatened. So like how much blood are we talking about. So for ladybugs. He told me it can be a lot like up to fifteen or twenty percent of all. Its blood wild. Why i mean for you that would be like if you lost a liter of blood like a couple pint blood so it is significant. And that's why he's been looking into the consequences of this. I mean you know he said bleeding could save a lady life but there are also some costs and we re better searching for physiological costs in our research he just published one set of experiments he and his colleagues forced young lady bugs to reflex bleed repeatedly like every day and then they studied them and what they saw is that the bugs immune system seemed a little weekend but the number of eggs they produced was the same their reproductive success was almost unaffected. You know maybe just some slight delays in the age at first reproduction but nothing major. So what i'm taking from this. Is that these insects kind of know what they're doing like evolutionary speaking. I mean do they filter the blood in any way to try to preserve the good stuff and week only just like the nasty compounds in it. His is actually looked at this and he told me that the blood that spontaneously comes out of ladybugs is exactly the same as the blood inside. And when i asked him you know exactly like what is going on. You're like is there an opening in the leg. He said no. Like somehow the insect is able to kind of injure itself to somehow create an opening in its skin or cuticle. But it's not like all the mechanical details of reflects bleeding have been well studied. It's still pretty obscure all right now. Well thank you for this mini tour of the world of auto hemorrhage

Sebastian Hofer Island Ecosystem Research Inst Sherbrooke American Museum Of Natural His Sebastian Salikh Michael Nop Czech University Of Life Scien United States Arizona
Working With The Open Voice Network With Julie Daniel Davis

Alexa in Canada

01:49 min | 3 d ago

Working With The Open Voice Network With Julie Daniel Davis

"I think the thing i'm most excited about when it comes to boys right now is working with open voice network. We are currently. There is an educational steering committee that john stein has put together and this group of people. We've been meeting together for goodness every two weeks or what seems like forever. Don't even sure how long have been doing it. But we're right now in the process of creating lesson plans for teachers to understand what is conversational design. Help can voice assistant helped me with matt learning that type of thing so our goal is to do the new. What when where. Why create lesson plans around that so that we can start really young in helping student see this paradigm of voice and how it can impact as learners so is that geared toward or geared towards elementary school or is it all ages or what are you focusing on. Get good questions good questions. You're you're great year. actually true. Get geared for every level so we you know there are some ideas some concepts that naturally are bent toward certain age roots just a very basic of. Hey you're not talking to a real person when you're talking to a voice assistant that's stopping a kindergartener needs to know you know. They need to know the difference for ethical reasons. Her say but there were also talking about what is conversational design. That's a little maybe. Were you know middle school. And then later on really talking about how to create with and so that i would see more of the ice low mazing

John Stein Matt
Space Week Morning I Spy

Chompers

02:42 min | 3 d ago

Space Week Morning I Spy

"Welcome to choppers your morning and night tooth rushing show start on the top of your mouth on one side and make sure to brush the front back at chewing side of each team very grass. It space week on chompers and today we're going to do a little is spy that means all describe an object to you and you have to guess what i'm talking about. Okay here we go. I'm an astronaut floating in space. I can see a big white ball with lots of holes on it called craters but this white ball is entirely covered by shadow on one side on the other side. The sun is hitting it making it look like he glows before you shout out what i spy switzer brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and make sure to brush in little circles around each tooth okay. What is this giant white orb floating in space next to earth. What do i spy shouted out another right the mood. If we zoomed in on the moon we'd also be able to spy the footprints of neil armstrong the first astronaut to ever walk on the moon. Here's what he said when he landed at one. Small step for man biathlete prevent switch. You're brushing to the bottom of your mouth and don't forget about those frontier. Here's your next ice by here. In space there is so much to see swirling clouds of dust twinkling stars far off planets. But there's one kind of thing that stands out. They're made of metal and they look like machines so many of them circling the earth. Some of them have wings or antenna. What do i spy shouted out. A satellite switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth but don't brush to heart. Futurelast is by if i fly past the moon. Travelling further away from the sun. I can see a bright red planet. The surface dusty dry looking through my telescope. i can even see a robot on this planet. What do i spy. Wait until tonight to find out. Come back to chompers tonight for

Switzer Neil Armstrong
Oxford's Vaccine

Kottke Ride Home

05:02 min | 4 d ago

Oxford's Vaccine

"Good vaccine news just keeps on coming on the backs of really promising news. From the pfizer. Biontech and madonna now oxford astrazeneca have announced the preliminary results from their phase three trials which showed overall seventy percent efficacy as reminder madonna and visor biotechs. Vaccines both currently show around ninety. Five percent efficacy but seventy percent is still very solid. That's about where dr fauci had been saying. He'd be very pleased to see. But i overall seventy percent. Because there's a weird quirk of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. That i as someone who is not an immunologist. Don't quite understand but hopefully we'll get more information on it in the coming days. Here's what i can tell you for now. The vaccine like the pfizer biontech one would need to be distributed in two doses however the first dose just needs to be half a dose for some reason. Doing a half dose on the first injection makes the whole vaccine overall more effective than if you got to hold doses quoting stat news. The preliminary results on the astrazeneca vaccine were based on a total one hundred. Thirty one covid nineteen cases in a study involving eleven thousand three hundred sixty three participants. The findings were perplexing to full doses of the vaccine appeared to be only sixty two percent effective at preventing disease while a half dose followed by a full dose was about ninety percent effective. That ladder analysis was conducted on a small subset of the study participants. Only two thousand seven hundred forty one a us based trial being supported by operation. Warp speed is testing the two full dose regimen. That may soon change. Astrazeneca plans to explore adding the half dose full dose regimen to its ongoing clinical trials in discussions with regulatory agencies spokesman told stat in an email and quotes and quoting from the new york times. The oxford scientists said they were still trying to understand why the vaccine was more effective at a smaller first dose. The first is supposed to prime the immune system while the second is supposed to boost its response while it seemed counter intuitive for a smaller i dose to be more effective. They said that strategy. More closely mimic. What happens with a real infection. End quotes peter openshaw professor of experimental medicine at imperial college. London explained to the associated. Press that vaccines. don't work. Like normal drugs where a higher dose produces more effects. The immune system is more complicated. Openshaw also notes that if indeed people do only need half a dose for one of the injections that's great news because it will be even cheaper to produce for more people. This was the vaccine candidate. That i was most excited about early on because it seemed like they kind of had a head start quoting the new york. Times astrazeneca's macos vaccine is designed to genetically altered in a dinner virus found in chimps. So that it harmlessly mimics the corona virus and provoke an immune response vaccine deploying. That technology has never won approval but the approach has been studied before notably in a small two thousand eighteen study of an experimental vaccine against the virus that causes middle east respiratory syndrome or mergers that viruses related to sars cov two the novel corona virus that causes covid nineteen so when covid nineteen emerged the team of scientists at oxford's jenner institute that had been leading the work on similar corona viruses. Had a head start once. The genetic code of sars cov two was published in early january. The oxford team sped to adapt their platform to the new corona virus and begin animal testing and quotes the other win in oxford. Astrazeneca's corner is unlike the pfizer. Biontech vaccine this latest one does not require any special refrigeration just standard storage and transportation temperatures of two eight degrees celsius or thirty six to forty six degrees fahrenheit and it can be stored for up to six months. The moderna vaccine requires cooler temperatures of negative four degrees fahrenheit but then can be stored at normal refrigeration temperatures after thawing in can be stored as such for a month. The pfizer biontech vaccine. Meanwhile requires dry. Ice to store at negative seventy degrees celsius or negative ninety four degrees fahrenheit s- that makes the oxford astrazeneca vaccine much more appealing for areas without the infrastructure or funding to sustain the pfizer. Biotech cold chain. And with that in mind. Astrazeneca is applying for early approval wherever it can as well as an emergency useless stained from the world health organization so that it can be made available in low income countries they plan to produce three billion doses next year and are committed to providing it at cost around the world through july. Twenty twenty one. The vaccine costs around three or four. Us dollars significantly less than the others late stage. Trials are continuing in the us. Japan russia south africa kenya and latin america and further trials are planned for other european and asian countries. So definitely more good news but watch this space for more

Astrazeneca Oxford Pfizer Biontech Dr Fauci Madonna Peter Openshaw Openshaw The New York Respiratory Syndrome Jenner Institute Imperial College The New York Times
Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

Charlie Parker

00:30 sec | 4 d ago

Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

"The A L S Ice Bucket Challenge. Has died. Pat Quinn died at the age of 37 yesterday after seven years with the disease. Quinn and the late Pete Frates started the challenge after being diagnosed with a L S, which is known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The ice bucket challenge raised over $250 million Since it took social media by storm in 2014. Those of you do not know

Pete Frates Pat Quinn Quinn Lou Gehrig
Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier on the value of ice and snow

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 4 d ago

Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier on the value of ice and snow

"Anyone activist sheila watt coochie grew up in the northern canadian territory of nunavut. Until she was ten she travelled only by dog sled and so we were very much connected to the ice. The snow on the cold in her book. The right to be cold watt cloutier explains how global warming threatens this traditional lifestyle. She says hunting and fishing are important. Parts of inuit culture but as arctic sea ice weakens hunting for seals and other animals is becoming more dangerous. We have loss of lives. In fact and loss of sleds and snowmobiles through that thinning ice says people who've traveled the same routes across the ice for many years to reach good hunting spots. But they now have to find new paths which cost time and money. She says hunting and fishing on the ice is more than a way to get food. It teaches life lessons developing the patients. The courage how not to be impulsive. How to develop your sound judgement and ultimately how to become wise people. You learn that when you're out there in nature that she says her community and the world are losing a vital source of wisdom as the arctic melts.

Sheila Watt Coochie Watt Cloutier Nunavut Arctic
Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

Short Wave

04:18 min | 4 d ago

Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

"Or at quang. I am ready to go back to school with you. Which honestly dreer great. We would be good lab competitive. Yeah we will be competitive but we be great together. I think and so the science concepts. We're going to unpack. Today is states of matter. You know some of those other states of matter. You didn't learn about in science class rights so the physicist i called up to explain this is martin's veer line at mit. and what. i find hilarious. How martin is he said when it comes to his own kid. He actually prefers to keep this particular science lesson. Pretty simple to assam like. Oh yeah you the gas liquid solid bam. Leave it at that you know. He's seven and states of matter is really just a way to describe how a group of particles think atoms or molecules etc move which is sort of beautiful and collective and different from what you would gifts by looking just at a single particle and changes in temperature and pressure can cause those particles to move differently and change their behavior right. We see the super easily with water. That's right in the liquid phase water molecules slip and slide past each other but we humans quickly learned that if you lower the temperature the particles slowdown bam. We see is appear and we fridges. And we're very excited about. That actually was a huge deal hundred years ago to make ice and if we go in the opposite direction heat water. The particles move faster and farther apart and eventually the h. two o. Molecules breakaway and dissipate into the air as water vapor humidity. That's right it is already a miracle in itself. Water exists in these three different states that we can see those states at temperatures that we can reach as a humans in the kitchen. But here's the thing we can only do so much in our kitchen. Speak right speakers though there. But there's a limited range of temperature and pressure that even you can achieve in your kitchen mattie and there are states of matter beyond this okay like do you remember plasma who ya. Sometimes it's called the fourth state of matter and it can happen when matter gets heated to a super high temperature like electrons rips from atoms which actually allows plasma to conduct. Electricity super cool. Lightning is plasma. Plasma is wild. It is wild. Yeah and if we were to go in the other direction to an extreme if martin son were to ask dad what can happen at a temperature much cooler than ice. Is there something else. I might start telling him about these superfluid states of matter which is exactly what martin's studies at mit these superfluids states of matter that we're long predicted but not easily observed in nature. So how many states of matter are out there. Well we don't actually know martin want to even commit to a number. When i asked him this question he actually said ouch. The is apparently no end to the series of interesting new. Twist that nature gives us to to find your states of matter. We just are digging as we speak. We're digging into this all the time and that's because in theoretical physics. You can use math to predict things that experimental physicists haven't observed yet and i say yet because in the last few decades scientists have successfully coaxed atoms under extreme laboratory conditions to enter other states of matter states that could have useful applications for future technologies awesome. Okay let's get this. Emily like how do they do. This kind of lab can had to exist for these other states of matter to emerge. I'm so glad you asked. They had to get cold. Ultra cold we work in the neno. Kelvin regime for breakfast ano- kelvin. So you might ask what so. That's actually very called. It's a billion times cold interstellar

Martin Quang MIT Emily Kelvin
The Michelle Carter Case

Not Guilty

05:10 min | 4 d ago

The Michelle Carter Case

"In westport massachusetts with his mother and sisters that day. Conrad's mother lynne. Never suspected he was considering suicide. She knew he'd seemed presley but as they walked along the shore she and conrad joked about the bathing suits they saw. They discussed his scholarship to fitchburg state university. Conrad took his sister's out for ice cream. Lynn leader said. I thought he was doing great before. I continue with conrad psychology. Please note that. I am not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but i have done a lot of research for the show. According to the american foundation for suicide prevention one of the warning signs of suicide is a sudden improvement in mood. medical news. Today has reported that this mood shift may occur because the afflicted individual feels relieve that they've come to a decision conrad perhaps seemed calmer and more relaxed to his family because he felt glad in the moment that he was nearing the end the looming decision hadn't been made even as conrad spent the day with his family. He continued text. Michelle for most of that afternoon. Conrad shell that. He felt worried and stressed but he was still committed to going through with his plan around six o'clock pm. Conrad told his mother. He was going out to visit his arianna. She asked if he'd be home for dinner. He told her that he didn't think so. He also texted michelle to tell her that he was leaving. Conrad drove to a k. Mart parking lot and fairhaven massachusetts. He sat in his truck as it slowly filled with carbon monoxide. Just before six thirty he called michelle and they spoke for forty three minutes before disconnecting at seven twelve pm. Michelle called him back. She was on the phone with him for another forty seven minutes until conrad cell phone ran out of batteries. There are no recordings of these phone calls and it's not clear what they talked about but later michelle would confess to a friend that at one point conrad got scared and left the truck to get some fresh air. Michelle told him to get back inside. Conrad listened to her. He got back in the truck then remained there until he died when they hung up at around eight pm. Michelle immediately texted to friends and told them she was afraid. Conrad had killed himself. She neglected to mention that she'd been in on his plan or that she had encouraged him to do it afterward. Michelle tried calling conrad again. The call went straight to voicemail. She continued to call him more than twenty times and received no response. She texted him asking if he was okay after months of conrad suicidal talk. She seemed unconvinced that he might actually be dead eventually. Michelle tried texting. Conrad sister camden asking if she knew where. Conrad was camden. Assume that conrad was at their father's house and michelle apparently believed her. She immediately texted. Conrad i thought you actually did it. She also told him that since he hadn't gone through with suicide. Maybe it was time for him to finally get help. of course. conrad didn't respond the next morning july thirteenth. When conrad didn't return home his mother reported him missing to the police and his family went out looking for him that afternoon. Police discovered conrad's truck parked in the k. Mart with his body inside they also found his phone sitting next to him. Although conrad's death was not at that time considered suspicious. Police decided to confiscate his phone. They thought it might give them answers as to why conrad had taken his own life. In the meantime conrad's family grieved loss on july nineteenth. They held his funeral. Which michelle attended. Some of the family members recalled that she acted oddly. Asking conrad sisters for some of his belongings and even requesting to keep some of his ashes. Conrad's friend arianna said. She sat close to where the family area was. I always described her. Seen as the grieving widow. She was constantly sobbing. She made a scene that evening after the funeral. Michelle texted conrad's phone and made her feel better to text him even though

Conrad Michelle Fitchburg State University Conrad Shell Massachusetts American Foundation For Suicid Westport Lynne Presley Arianna Fairhaven Lynn Mart Camden
Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:26 sec | 5 d ago

Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

"Pat quinn. The co founder of the viral ice bucket challenge died on sunday at the age of thirty seven quinn and the late pete. Freights were both diagnosed with a rare and fatal disease and started the ice bucket challenge to raise money and awareness about the condition. The disease has no hope at the moment but the ice bucket challenge revamped that outlook the ice bucket challenge helped raise more than two hundred million dollars to fund research and treatments for the disease.

Pat Quinn Quinn
Is Snow Good For Plants?

Plantrama

05:13 min | Last week

Is Snow Good For Plants?

"Let's talk about snow for the plant new and discuss whether or not it's bad or good for plants. Yeah i was thinking about this. Because i had a question ellen from a listener who said. She didn't know whether she should plant this new plant because the snow and the winter cold might be hard on it and that got me to thinking that those are two different things the winter cold and snow. And maybe we should talk about whether snow just by itself is hard on plants. So that's what brought me to this topic. I think it's a really good topic because the answer might be counter intuitive to some people because the fact is that yes winter cold can be very hard on plants and sometimes snow can be depending on what kind of snow it is but snow actually is a great insulator for many plants and can help protect them against winter cold so i don't think that's something that most people understand. Yes you're absolutely right. I've had people say to me. What's the best protective mulch. I can put on the garden. And i usually respond a twelve inch snowfall because it keeps the temperature of the soil. Constant it it protects the rupaul's from heaving. Oh and this was interesting to me. Maybe you knew this. But i did not i read and hopefully this is true that as snow falls through the atmosphere it actually collects nitrogen and sulfur from the air and then kind of like delivers that to the ground. I'm going to say that only partially correct. Come because you're right. It does collect that as it falls through the air. And if that is one of the spring snowfalls or maybe. I don't know maybe you have. These snows more in the santa fe area. Then we do here. But in order for that nitrogen to be delivered into the soil. The snow has to melt fairly quickly after it falls. That is so interesting. Because in santa fe we get six inches in it melts twelve inches. And it's gone. It accepts in melting snows and melt so for you. That's no fall is what they call. Poor person's fertilizer for us here in the northeast where the snow typically stays. You know through the winter on the ground or at least say's first several days or a week or two Then all of that nitrogen that those flakes have picked up falling through. The air actually goes back into the air as the snow sits and so we only get the poor person's fertilizer when we have that you know freak two inches of snow in april and it melts right away. Well since our soil is much crappier out here than yours is. I would say that we need it. Well snow does contain. It's got nitrogen or not. It does contain a lot of airspaces snowfall. Which is why. Snow makes good insulator. I've never had as many beautiful fox gloves. As i had the year after we had a good two feet or more on the ground all winter long so it can be a great insulator for plants and of course the one way that snow might be detrimental to plants is when it's really really wet and heavy and either mashes plant down or break slim's off of shrubs or trees or that kind of thing or occasionally if it falls very wet and then it gets really cold and freezes into ice and again can break things. Yeah and that's more likely to happen in. If you've got like an early fall when the leaves are still on the trees in those leaves hold a lot of snow or if you have evergreens that are going to get way down and sometimes you see ann arbor vitae that gets covered with snow intellectually like split. And that's very sad. So what i do usually if i get a very heavy wet snow and i can see. The branches of trees are bending over. As i'll go up out there and knock some of it off actually discovered one other way in which snow is beneficial to plant. And i haven't thought about this but it makes sense when you think about it in a winter warm spell if you got a little bit of melting and there was no snow cover some plants actually say oh yeah it's time to start growing they'll sprout and then it gets cold again in that greenery dies off but if you have a nice snow blanket down and it warms up some of. It's going to melt but a lot of it's going to stay on the ground and protect that plant from sprouting too soon. Which i thought was kind of cool. Yeah snowfall moderates the possible heaving and thawing and freezing and and all of that back and forth temperature swings that seemed to be happening more and more in many areas. A snowfall

Ellen Santa Fe
Living Sober FAQs

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

05:00 min | Last week

Living Sober FAQs

"We're going to do a little compilation. A little collection of frequently asked questions so get questions. obviously all my social media platforms people. Message me. ask questions questions in the facebook group email. Everybody's got a lot of questions about sobriety and getting sober quitting drinking all of those things. One of my favorite things to do is answer questions in live videos so i'll go live usually facebook and youtube. I'll go live in. Just do maybe a five or ten minute video answering whatever questions have come in. Or what's popular at that time. So what i did. Is i took a few of those videos. Only a few not nothing crazy. I took a few of those videos. And i took the audio from them. And we're gonna do a compilation episode of frequently asked questions and these are three questions. Literally that i get over and over again. I'm forever most popular things that come up all the time in recovery and we're going to start with a big struggle in the twelve step world sponsorship. Most people get a really weird feeling about sponsorship self included. I was the same way. When i got sober and i started going a. It didn't make sense to me. You know by nature the majority of ice with addiction or very rebellious obstinate. And we don't like authority. Usually in any form and i think there's this sense of like sponsors. Are your boss right. They're gonna tell you what to do and like a good super immature alcoholic. Like i was when i quit drinking. Super emotionally immature. That was my thought process around sponsorship. In i was like i don't need somebody telling me what to do. I don't need somebody to call. And ask what i need to buy at the store how i need to act in this situation. You know i was just such a. I was such an immature self-centered little brat right. I didn't understand at all. The dynamic of sponsorship in what is really meant to do and that this is a person being of service to me for free giving me their time and energy and knowledge that i just didn't even have the capacity to understand it from that point of view because of course i was completely selfish and self absorbed and only thinking about how it would affect me. How's this gonna work for me. How do i feel about it. I'm so glad. I have grown out of that really really grateful that my sponsor taught me how to have a more mature grown-up humanistic approach to life. Right in that service a sponsor is not your boss. A sponsor is just someone who has walked this walk before you has gotten farther than you and they're going to help you figure it out to get farther also so here is the audio from facebook live. I did about sponsorship in honor of full transparency. Like i was super weird about sponsorship when i got sober it was not a concept that i was like down for immediately right out the gate It was a struggle for me. So i get where you're coming from also in my sober living houses. I see this a lot too. I feel like we have a tendency to kind of overthinking and remember. You're not marrying this person right. This is no different than if you hire a coach or something like you can fire us as you are sponsor and as your sponsor. Arkansas are you too. So don't feel like you're getting into this major commitment and there's no way out of eight and it's so serious and like this person is going to be your boss or something like that's not what it's about at all. The other thing. I want to talk about is remember that we are just people as sponsors like literally. We are just people just like you. We have our own issues. Every single sponsor kind of has their own way of doing things. You know many years ago when i really sponsored a lot of people i did ask them to call me every day and i had good reason for that because my time is fairly limited right in. If i'm going to work with somebody. I will give you of energy and time that i have that i need to know that you're really in it in the you're willing and that you're in a place that you're ready to work for your sobriety because it's not always easy and it doesn't always feel good so if you can't do something as simple as calling

Facebook Youtube Arkansas
"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

33:11 min | 1 year ago

"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

"But I will say I love getting my phone calls out of the way at like six thirty this morning and then being like ten am being like everyone on the East Coast at lunch I can chill flying is a backup and he's really worked out well for so that's how we go about it and we're not going to change to definitely get you know I'm sure I think he can get something more to it is there something is there something to the formula that we don't understand that allows the Bruins to be that good defensively year in and you're out who all I mean it started with cloud right that was his culture and and you know I was coaching in Providence we played similar styles so right away you're coming up you don't have to change a lot you know we we made some adjustments in the neutral zone to try to defend the new the Blue Line a little better because our de Corps got more mobile over the years but I think it's just inherent with with the the Z. and Burgi and to there are constant and you know so it's just part of the said the fabric of how we play here and I think that's a credit to the older guys they continue to buy in they understand but it takes to win I've always been a believer in good team defense we probably opened it up a little more here in the last few years offensively but we've tried not to lose that defense subside and I think for us it's all about our layers I think that's the big debate that I hear `bout defensive zone coverage anyway as layers versus man to man is a better style we've always been about layers and support and help and it works for us so I think dad probably why that consistently every year and and you know what we've been able to coach it over time so that the players coming up no it so it's not foreign to guys that maybe commodities you know come come from providence they're playing the same way so I think that's helped us a lot and that would be my take on it and like I said I think Bergonzi put a lot of value on playing with the puck so that they're not spreads down through the lineup last one from me last year's playoffs is a huge story with your team the injuries that Donald Charles sustained with broken jaw and at the time you know you have to be a little bit tight lipped about it I really did take off all the taste but you didn't want to get too much out there and you know for competitive advantage but now look back just what was it like behind the scenes of in everything he went through being able to come back and details you can share about you know just seeing him and how he persevered through it well he went in for Sir through the morning before the game and and we didn't see him that whole day and then you know we're we're assuming he's not gonNA play I mean we saw the damage it did to them like like everyone else I mean he's he's got to you know I don't know if that was revealed at the time that I know we talked about fractured teeth but two fractures in his jaw and I can't remember how I think we tried to you know obviously downplay that part of it that he's got metal plates in there and there's there's wiring in there so you know here's a guy that's first of all had surgery or major surgery he hasn't eaten and he walks in the restroom the next morning ready to go so I mean we're just first of all oh you know you're the guy that you know he's playing such a high level and with you know fitness level is so high already now he comes in with with that type of injury and wants to get out there and plays well so I I mean other than you know like I said simply you know just just odd to me that his his pain tolerance is obviously through the roof and then I honestly once the game starts forget about it 'cause you're you're you're in the moment right you're you're you're playing for the Stanley Cup so he's just another player there that you expect to do the job which is the great hockey mentality with most players have that are able to play that one and last one bruce and thanks for the time today man I was reading a story of our old friend Joe McDonald that year ticket collection concerts and this really cool story but one thing that caught my eye in it that you didn't really get into you said you have five to seven thousand hockey and baseball cards and your and this is as a guy who used to collect this fascinates me first of all do you still collect if not when did you did you stop and is there. one card in your collection either hockey baseball is like your your pride enjoy the one that you you say oh I can't believe this in the collection I'll work backwards Bobby Orr card I'm gonNA guess from boy like seventy two or three or somewhere in there because he's he's it's purple backdrop and he's he's he's got his White Jersey on I used to tape it in my room and he had all this trophies there that he'd won the you know the Norris the MVP The playoffs to heart you know And that was my the one I had for the longest and unfortunately now I know it's in my attic somewhere but I haven't come across it for jaws trying to find doc for that because he had asked me that is probably stop collecting around I'm guessing now twelve years old I was I had a paper so I started collecting around eight nine years old maybe fifteen you know something like that and it was years of full sets in there and my brother did it too he's a year and a half alert me so we kind of did it together so trading partner I think a lot of kids did we used to play that game it's like I don't know if you've ever even at school bring your your extras in you wrote a real good piece in your column on Monday about the changing equipment in the NHL you know so much of the game right now is being.

East Coast eight nine years twelve years
"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

"Completely understandable and also not the fastest starter when it comes to his seasons either but gasket can ask for a little bit more about other Carlson is that so bad he's a minus nine right now through seven games and he coughed up the puck on kyle postal for check for sabres goal a really big sabers goal in that loss on Saturday I this is not Eric Carlson is cooked not air Carl's is not worth the money that's not anything about that it is can I get a little bit more at this point from Air Carlson yeah for me the biggest concern the sharks it's their back end and look the thing about Carlson is about the that they had to give up to get him and losing donskoy and Pavlovsky who really were big parts of that for a group and that was the depth that you were speaking on but defensively they're getting challenge and we know Martin Jones had struggle than he might not be the guy that you really wanNA trust but allowing three and a half goals per game you know you mentioned Carl's not playing great they've been without defense men who are more physical and I think they are back which is great but you've got like a guy like Tim he'd you just can't trust he's playing like six minutes the other night was benched that's not inspiring and I wonder if there's move because this used to be one of the best blinds in the lead to Finally the Saint Louis Blues now keep in mind about the blues the Cup champion took three two or three there's not really a point of concern at this point with the Saint Louis Blues except that their results have been middling and there are some games like their game against Montreal that are a little bit concerning when we do this podcast for doing it ahead of their gaming Colorado night which if they win I mean owns even it'd be tough point of concern but you know a little bit of a stumble out of the gate a little bit lacklustre in some areas Crepe Ruby just been inconsistent I think they've seen some really good performances and you've seen some not so good performances and this is a team that played its best last year when there was absolutely Oh expectations and they need to learn how to play with expectations and early in the year last year they didn't do that well and that's why we saw them plummet and this year again we're seeing them just look a little out of funk's but I'm not worried because y you know I never heard the phrase out of Funk's before one I'm here in California and I'm feeling Funky as bill and don't give complete funk's okay I liked it I'm keeping it I stand by my folks funkhouser right that's a California thing that's totally California thing I agree I think it's more of a consistency thing and fleet of much hockey as they have it's fine also again like the blues remind me of when the Kings made won the cup out of the eight seed and then like for the several seasons they're like we literally don't care about anything right now because we gave every ounce of everything we had for that no no it's more like we Kentucky in in the last playoff seed and won the cup so I'm not really concerned about this loss in October and I feel like if you're the blue it's like hey Bourbon we were the most unstoppable team on the planet from like January on Lake. We know that we can do that. I'M NOT GOING TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT middling results and plus gotten some points to it's not like they've outright law some of these games like other teams have but yeah it's just us some funk's all right this guy's not in a funk neither is this team Boston Bruins and coach Bruce Cassidy and he was kind enough to join us on the podcast and now joining is coach of the Boston Bruins Bruce Cassidy and coach we're about four weeks into the season I'm GonNa ask you a nice and light question how do you feel about your teammates now you know standings wise we're in good shape our game probably like most teams at this time of the year has lots of work to be done on it but you know we have a competitive groups who are in every game and so far we've we've got some good results I saw the Boston Globe recently had apiece calling for Dave pastern actively dropped from the top line to spread the wealth in the lineup and I've always wondered about you would you have a line that good how do you deal with I don't know the temptation to break it up verses knowing that it could carry you through a game that how do you how do you balance that with decision like that wall typically I'm not going to break it up until I'm comfortable with us the line he a we're we're pastas GONNA go to right now I'm David Krejci is out injured so he and he has good chemistry with him so it it you know I'm not gonNA draw them now simply because they don't often makes us better right I think you never know what you'll find l. but that's sort of the the first thing is it is it GonNa make you a better team by doing that automatically now not always convinced that is and just like the chemistry between those those three so how's it gonNA affect them who can go up there and sustain it and that's the next part of it they haven't found a guy to be able to go up there like Danton Heinen has gone up in spurts and done well but we've seen drop off eventually maybe he's a year older you're better you're stronger you're more amateur and he could handle it but until crunchy gets back that's probably not even in the cards right now and then we'll go from there so last year's playoff run too that one of the things that helped him he thought stealing a little fresher he didn't play as much last year and it really seems like you are giving the loaded between him and lock what is your philosophy towards L. Golly workload management you think this is the new trend in the NHL where you really do need to depend on two guys to have a winning club I don't know if it's if you have to we we do it that way because you know the data's told us that too there's a certain workload where you know over the years he's performed her and it's you know a lot closer to fifty games than it is sixty five or sixty two right so and the second part of it is we have a we have a really good back-up I mean we you trust them it started with who who is good for us and then Hawaii so you know part of it is that I mean it's it's great to have that in theory but if you don't you know you don't have confidence or your team doesn't have confidence and the guy going in you know thirty five times a year or whatever divided up to be then then that's a problem whereas we're lucky that way down he did a real good job identity at least sixty percent of the the starts but it's not going to be like like a typical seventy five or eighty twenty split that that some teams may do what they're number one and whether trends that way or not like I said I think it it could I think the Games it's harder on goalies I think that's why it's faster it's more physical around the net so I think their workload is is harder than maybe it wasn't passed as well I think for emily when I say that we both really enjoyed covering year clubs run through the Stanley Cup playoffs last year in particular because when you would speak it'd be very insightful you were a very interesting guy to hear opine and bring some some insight so what was happening with the during that run and I was wondering after it's over and after you get a chance to reflect on it are there any lessons that you've personally taken from that run insofar as becoming a better coach well thanks Greg I listen I've tried to be honest with the guys here the media I think it's just easier you know there's certain things that stay in house I mean that's that's tip with every team but you know we've tried to be open with what we're trying to do here I think our fans appreciated as well so most of all the players But what I learned I think was was you know the ups and downs of the play offs and how you have to stay consistent because I'm an emotional guy so typically during the year we lose a game you know there's a learning curve to it and you gotTa Kinda get better from it and I think in the playoffs almost got shut the door and just move on a lot quicker and I learned I haven't had a lot of places fronts and the National Hockey League so that was the biggest thing for me is to put the previous game you know behind you get ready for the next one get the players back to a good place and a lot of that's more positive energy sometimes than necessarily details video or structural stuff you know it's just you know what we need to be better in this area yeah but now let's feel good about our games so that that's what I learned personally whether you know the players took tonight or not I don't know but that's the one thing I did find out that they'd be ready for them next one so it is earlier in the NHL season but you've had a couple games I'm curious are there any trends you've noticed either the way teams are playing the way games are going that skills different the new I don't know if it's new but I find they're a little more wide open this time of year I think that's typical his most players are healthy lots of energy feeling good about themselves so you know they're skating well so the Games are fast Oh and now I would think in the next two three weeks guys will get a little bit banged up you see listen we're playing Toronto they're already down to virus right we're down crunchy so you start to see the the the players drop a little bit so then you gotta you know coach start getting a better feel for their team so they tighten up you know typically as what happened so but that's that's what I've noticed this year so far and then the top players are playing a little more early on I think coaches typically will run with them because they are healthy you wanna get points on the board so maybe that balances Selfo to as year goes on where you get minutes or a little bit more equitable amongst your you know your players but and I don't know if that's different than last year or not but that's what I've noticed so far this year and you know I gotTa tell you haven't paid attention a ton of the has to the league because we have some new players here in a few injuries so we're gonNA take care of our own business but in the short term that's that's what I've seen you're busy dude you get a pass on that one listen I love hockey so I watch games but I also got two young kids so I'm in a hockey rink and I'm on my way to one let's let's you know so that's Nice get away from the NHL and eight and ten year old sometimes there you go exactly what are the trends within these days there's one kid that's usually really good every team and you gotTa stop them that's what I noticed that is my daughter plays the youth soccer same same prince people always somebody who thinks Palay out there they ruin it for everybody well unless you've got the kid on your team right you've been in this bruins culture now for so long as looking at the stats so last two years bruins our third in the NHL and goals against average as the team you go back five years their second overall goals against average that's an amazing consistency given the ends in this league and the way that offense has exploded in the last few years and I think we all know the personnel Chara version on goaltending it's pretty easy to see why you guys keep the puck out of the net but.

Boston Bruins Bruce Cassidy Carlson two three weeks sixty percent six minutes five years four weeks two years ten year
"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

"I'm Greg wishes keeping your NHL writer Emily Kaplan National Reporter and Honorary Californian for the next three days that's exactly right I hope that you get one of the many October fests here in California which I experienced one on Sunday and came to find out pretty quickly that ocober fest in California means it's the farmer's market with less farms and more sausage is pretty much what this means here in California noted actually I was I was just talking to somebody about that the other day that's on my bucket list of places that I haven't gone yet is to actually go to Germany for October fest that would be great have not gone to New Orleans yet believe it or not despite my shocking to me predilection relations but October fest the slumber yes have you ever been to Germany I have my sister and I and her husband went to Berlin last summer Oh all right time stumbled upon some beer festival that was like eighteen kilometers long and eighteen hundred vendors and I think it was just called like Saturday in Berlin the experience the one thing that disappointed me the most is I had this great fantasies about going to Germany in eating Sauerkraut like I thought that would be thing apparently that is not a delicacy Berlin and everyone could tell I was stupid American visiting like some Sauerkraut for that Pretzel Oh my God so you did the I went to China in order also experience in Germany you know what yeah that's exactly what happened so much clunky or in more embarrassing when you put it like that yeah well you know that stuff but I think in your case though like you'd expect it's such an intrinsic part of all German cuisine that we get the figure it's a thing but I guess it is in parts of Germany does not the region that Berlin is in I will say like the best Turkish food I ever ate the donor was great Schwartz kebabs like that food was unbelievable all right now we're talking one time here on the West Coast we should get going not so unbelievable some of the starts for our precious Stanley Cup contending teams or at least in the minds of people potentially let's start off with bay lightning the lightning are an odd doc right now as you do the show for eight games in their four three and one two hundred nine goals for twenty seven goals against there have been times in the opening have looked very good so seven to three wind at the Toronto Maple leafs at a time when everybody was wondering if the lease we're GONNA have to win every game eight two seven urban times when the lightning have not looked good such as a four two loss to the Ottawa senators in Ottawa and then also getting the doors blown off them by the Colorado Avalanche in their last game as we do this podcast where are you right now in the lightning is the reason for concern and should we take it as maybe bizarrely positive sign the the aren't steamrolling everybody maybe understand they have some things to work on yeah that's kind of what I'm thinking I think back to that first game against the savers and believe and it was the first time that we thought the sabers could be for real and Steven Stamkos we're just so disappointed and it's team and he's saying they played picture and we didn't know this is not acceptable we need to change our ways and I wonder if these growing pains are important for them that you're right that they're not writing off as they're usually dominant self I do worry though I mentioned the sabers there are other teams in the Atlantic that looked pretty good and could spoil their party and not saying that they are in any danger the playoffs I just wonder if they are going to run away without top seed especially with the sluggish start positives for the lightning Kevin Kirk seven points in the first eight games I looked great signing yeah I mean it's it looks like one of those great little bargain-basement buyout signings that usually workout for these teams less less exciting though the goaltending Andrei Vasilevskiy defending the trophy with a foreign to start and a save percentage under nine hundred point nothing to really be all that panicked about giving given how the offense gets going for these teams pretty early and goaltenders usually have to catch up what an interesting point of concern wasn't I think they're going to be fine I am fascinated to figure out what exactly is going to happen with this team when comes to the really important games whether they have learned their lessons and this definitely those teams that I think is going to be fine it's going to make the playoffs but I'd like to see where they are in December to kind of figure out what the DNA is GonNa look like going forward for them all I have to say this is how unmemorable their start has been totally misspoken it wasn't a loss to the Sabers I was speaking of at loss to the Carolina Hurricanes L. Preface it by singles are two teams wrote about early so I just got the mixed up but yeah it was hurricanes throughout structuring the Tampa Bay lightning not those plucky Atlantic division leading stabers teams that are up to grade stores. It's an easy mistake other team that's not off to the best start in the eastern conference so they'll maybe inching potentially towards turning the corner is the Florida Panthers authors made a little bit of news this week I thought was interesting which was bring on our old friend Brian Boyle to the next thing that I love it I think honestly you can say he's going to bring on the ice he's a big net presence he could help on the power play perhaps but just from a leadership perspective I know they brought in a lot of guys but it almost feels like a team you know Berkow is there captain and by the way amazing that they avoided major injury there it appears that he's going to plan your day and not miss time that is why I'm not as worried about them but I wonder if his your answer especially as experienced in the playoffs could help this team because you know this is a team that's always been on the cost but has never been able to get over the hump and I do think that they could use a centralized voice and I wonder if he can help chemistry there lot's been said about their start which was bad they've won two of three now bob to to to to across the board right now a four seven goals against average in an eight seventy two save percentage not the great wbob as we say on this show madmen gift vote no minimal time forever and this one is actually appropriate but I do think there's to be said for all the contributing factors too I'm getting off to a bad start new coach new team you defense new environment new weight of ten million dollars a season on his shoulders hopefully that's not a weight that continues to weigh him down there's a lot of sort of learning curve and then going on right now and it's it's not to say that this is going to be way it's GonNa be for him I think we've seen him play well I thought he ended up playing pretty well in a couple of their losses even a little bit of concern I think when you've you know bought on what you believe is going to be a franchise goaltender then see him be about roughly six and a half goal saved below average at this point in the season she rather sharks You know I was at the sharks game against the Buffalo Sabres on Saturday night got a chance to hang with the sabers a little bit for story with this week which means that you know I turn my recorder on and look at Ralph Krueger and said go and then my story was written the sabers first of all as a sidebar just a really team right now I think that the major miscalculation that we made with them to our is twofold one that Krueger could have transformed effect on that roster and to that you can afford to break up Jack Eichel Jeff Skinner Marcus Johansson's GonNa play as well as he does as a second line player for them and their big finding this offseason huge so understated and we get into with the with the Bruins and they're definitely with Bruce Cassidy in a moment but like you know removing him from the Bruins equation I think was an interesting thing that may have actually directly affected the way recoils play this year putting them on that that Sabres team you know the one thing about Johansen and I'm I'm not a big fan of his insofar as I think that there's a there's consists the issues dude knows how to play top talent I mean he cut his teeth in Washington playing with Nick Backstrom and Alex Baskin and to see the way he's played with skinner so far this season there's been one of the more impressive things for the Sabres and and you know obviously like we said good news for Jason Botterill because that's a guy that could use a couple of wins in the transactions category and bring it on Johannesson was a pretty smart idea unless they're fast they're so very a quick fast and you can see that there is a lot of pressure they put on other teams too it's it's it was impressive to see them live I feel like maybe I hesitate I hesitate to say this if I want to say I believe any buffalo team but the sharks okay so they're in trouble I'll be honest with you there's a nice little uptick when Marlowe came on as of right now they are three and five a season they have the same record as Los Angeles kings at this point in the season which is not what you ever WanNa see if you're sharks fan I'm I'm really learned about the depth on this team and when they made the marlow signing I think we both agreed that it's like a little bit of a Hail Mary a smart helmet very like a good percentage as Hail Mary but at least one one and it adds that guy out of the room it was a smart decision to add marlow at the end of the day like when he is one of your top right wings and the guy didn't even play right wing it's kind of a problem and the more you see the sharks team the more you understand that like outs you get past those top two lines and it's just you you're not even worried it's you don't even care like when you have a team like the buffalo resist role for at this point in the season and you look at the sharks and it's like well we're catarrhal he's off the ice well let's wait until it's back on you know it's like it's that kind of thing there replay lethal they're five on five play I think is a real real point of concern right now and I understand our Carlson's got a lot going on away from the Ice and and that is.

NHL Greg Florida Panthers Emily Kaplan Brian Boyle writer Reporter Honorary Californian eighteen kilometers ten million dollars three days
"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"ice" Discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

"Hey Emily Greg I should actually say good morning emily because you the west coast and seeing how the other half of this podcast lives in a weird three hours behind the rest of the hockey world existence I'm not ready to say West Coast Best Coast I don't know if we've talked about this on the show before but like the existence of the West Coast sports fan for someone who lived on the east coast or in your cases lived in Chicago for a long time as well is an interesting experience like Ruby my wife and I are still having debates about whether it's cool NFL Sunday too out of bed and watch games or if the experience of having a morning and mingling and getting drunk Brunch at one o'clock to then watch nfl James is the better experience and I haven't quite figured that out yet it's still kind of throws my day off to have football star at that early June I think is cool like having a family dinner and going to sleep at a reasonable hour that's pretty cool through morning yeah I mean there are definitely some sort of like mental health benefits to not having a stay up till two thirty in the morning to cover every west coast games this is true but but it's an experience so what are you doing Kelly I'm here at the ESPN W summit in Newport Beach California I am incredibly excited my first time here I heard it's an awesome event and I'm just here to soak it in cover it I heard there's going to be a little bit of news and yeah just be a part of a great ESPN thing its tenth anniversary they've been doing this ears ten years that's incredible Hulk Wayne will be here so there's a hockey tie-in here you go and she's all over the place using Chicago recently just doing the shark stuff too the busiest working woman in hockey these days make sure you give her a big Pierre McGuire level hello when you see her now I am the opposite of that go to funny today we've got a great chat with Boston Bruins head coach Bruce Cassidy about many things from breaking up the top line to goal usage to his extensive hockey card collection plus a look at some silica contenders that are off to eh starts and then also a look at a player in glee equipment and an interesting thing that emily wrote this week as well plus Phil Kessel hotdogs buck headlines with the love and the show show proper shelley to your.

hockey Phil Kessel Boston Bruins Pierre McGuire ESPN Newport Beach California football West Coast Emily Greg shelley Bruce Cassidy Kelly James NFL Chicago three hours ten years
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"Raising questions it's been great to follow the conversations we've been overwhelmed by the response we wanted to try answer a few of those questions and share some of the themes quite a few viewer asking whether these women pregnant or whether she ever had children whether that was ever known we know from the autopsy report that this was a woman who had never given birth yeah and that also showed that she wasn't pregnant at the time she died and then a lot of you have mentioned the story of the summit on man to somerton case this is an unsolved case in australia about unidentified body found with the labels cutoff it's close but from all we've seen the two cases are not connected at all but yeah they're similar artists people are asking whether we check missing persons reports in belgium and other european countries that she may have come from and yes the police asked interpol to check this with the member countries on their databases and didn't get any positive results many of you are suggesting that this could be a woman mentally ill in some way or another that are things by her behavior that suggests that's she was quite paranoid fleeing from something maybe she had some kind of mental illness yeah i'm not a psychiatrist but to me it's too much with her behavior showing that this was a person having controlled she was pretty organized i mean the way she traveled on so she was highly organized that's true but you just don't know if she was being pursued at that point whether it was fear or stress or depression or loneliness it's hard to say but professor stephen dorrell has looked mental health in connection with the lives of spies and he has some thoughts on this it isn't tally possible that somebody maybe somebody's been to for some time to becomes totally depressed by what they're doing where does it go is this the end of the road i'm a freudian always think that these kinds of things come out in the end in different forms that you can't keep this stuff secret it will leak out that might be internally that you end up because of the pressures of keeping up all these multiple identities of the travel of basically lying to people over a longtime may be just can't live with and you end.

belgium stephen dorrell australia professor
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"In the massacre he wasn't they killed the wrong person and then they got caught before they managed to leave the country so they were imprisoned in lillehammer and was a big big story about that so most had did have a history in norway flexible timber was one of a number of radical groups which emerged in the early nineteen seventies and kicked off filing campaigns in europe many of these groups disillusioned with the response to student movement demands in nineteen sixty eight and the often violent reactions of the state so they moved from methods of direct action to armed struggle which included acts of terrorism they saw their struggle supporting similar groups which had developed in the post colonial world as part of an eruption of nationalism and anti imperialism many supported the palestinians and the palestinian liberation organization the plo there was the red brigade in italy the red army faction and the bother meinhof group in germany and the ira in island their aims and methods varied across europe but at their heart was a belief rightly or wrongly that democracy was something of sham and that states were perfectly willing to use violence to support it terrorism was seen as the means to expose this this is something we haven't considered either with being thinking about hawaiian for a state intelligence agency in some way could the style woman if be mixed up with these groups working some kind of operative or courier the red army faction bottom line of start post nine hundred sixty eight and they were looking for weapons were looking for support but they didn't really get sophisticated organized again until the early nineteen seventies when they do have some contact with the soviets but more particularly with these germans but these in connection comes in into bit later the were connections with the plo and the middle east attempts to get homes through and they did require identities did require passports kind of things but again i think this particular is just too early for that the other terrorist groups throughout europe and the ira but i can't think of an instance where they've done anything like this and there were other groups in europe but again i think this is nine hundred seventeen it's just a bit too early for speculation that these groups had some involvement with her or she was part of.

lillehammer ira plo norway europe italy red army germany middle east
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"Expert in the field of western counterintelligence you have been following our series what's your puzzle theory on the case begins up over two pieces of information my first thought was that this was masa which is these rayleigh intelligence agency they were rating in the late sixties seventies infiltrating far right groups infiltrating the plo excetera and they used agents who did have different identities this particular woman pure speculation but she came from germany i believe that you was maybe part of the postwar refugee problem or could have been a maybe i don't know maybe she was jewish that was my first thought the one agency that is capable of doing this kind of operation of running somebody with multiple attentive because they did was mustered it's a shame we don't know the passports because masa to degrade deal about passports they stole passports forged passports us passports from different countries and they used agents who did use deny densities and they did recruit more females than i think most intelligence agencies and can you speculate as to a mustard agent might have been doing in no way at that time that's the difficult bird supporters of the palestinians were across europe so that's a possibility they had agents in different places they were tracking former nazis war criminals were still doing that they were also out to get opponents of israel they engaged in the sesame of people from different organizations so the number of possibilities so no one's mentioned mossad before actually the worst big scandal involving mossad in no way in nine hundred seventy three a year before a palestinian group called black september took eleven members of the israel team hostage at the munich olympics in germany and killed him automatic gunfire and been a great deal of police and military traffic in and out soon after the helicopter ride from unique a convoy of police car drove into the field and without station dogs came out and started patrolling the barbed wire perimeter within minutes it had been reported with the gunman escaped mussa agents then came to the wheaton town of lillehammer and assassinated a man called a pa cheeky a moroccan waiter who they suspected of being involved.

israel mossad olympics lillehammer germany europe munich wheaton
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"So local police officers didn't have a good feeling about the case in the way it was closed but they obviously took the case very seriously and and showed a lot of respect to these women mean they were the only people who attended have funeral in february nineteen seventyone yes there's a photograph of them at the graveside they really looked like they care about the woman being buried goodness listen variance most famous crime writer took us to the spot where this photo speaking as you know it on market wait this is typical bag in bush it's rodin run and grow very fast and very high so it's an unmarked burial grave i don't think anybody really borders about this and she was put on house of course in nineteen seventyone she was buried today still had hope oh finding family in a near food you're so that she could eventually brought home original concrete and barrett again and that was the reason for that puffing so she's still i hope a real mystery to the end even to resting place you can't even see it it's only because this old photo that we could identify it an poster people in bergen known all the time that it was here that is my father to slum again policemen stunning etiquette yeah this is the barrio very serious soda it's a very somber mood yes so we're gravesites the coffin is being lowered into the grave it's a white beautiful white ornate coffin with hundreds on the side honestly design around the edge with flowers on tongue and you got the priest on one end of truck under about oud about fifteen mostly men around the gray effectives to remember this was the chief of police in bergen what are unique funeral and burial con imagine through many like that this is very unusual picture another so a picture like this the reason was that she had no relatives sometimes the only relative worked on the guest.

writer barrett bergen
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"After episode nine the facebook group has done some amazing research and that's without even seeing the photos of thin grabbing with just posted on the website we must give special mention to mike alexander who found out that this symbol with the sec hp within a heart was the trademark of a steel company in vienna the capital of austria it was called shoots and patrie and they must produce cutlery so it's unlikely that this boon had any special sentimental values after all a bit like the matchbooks in the earlier episode it was an intriguing clue but in the end it doesn't tell us anything special about these woman it was worth a try title found into safe number one and number two case number four thousand nine hundred sixty eight nine hundred seventy a means criminal case this case is now gained a lot of international interest one of the places that feels the effect of this is the state's archives in bergen this investigations and if you win this one we can see this is the correspondence with the international police it's director is inga negative who's in the city in nineteen seventy asian now the states are in bergen has a pop star pop star case on this is the case yes of course when we have people coming from halfway around the world to see that means the case has brought on interest not much of the things that we keep do have the most parenting is of course no one has been able to find solutions so that's going so why wouldn't they be able to find more information about because obviously she stayed for quite some time she had a lot of people probably she met someone is not telling everything and so the feeling was that the police hadn't done to jump and as i have been in your car since the early nineteen seventies there have been so many people coming here and everyone was very optimistic and everyone said that i will find the solution and until you came we might have got closer but we're not there yet this feeling he talks about that the police didn't do their investigation well it's an interesting one do you think it's fair well the wet teams of officers working on that and they did a thorough investigation we know because of all the.

austria bergen director inga facebook mike alexander vienna
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"We are now two hours drive north of flow outside a museum and coley ovan tell what brought us here the hits brought us here to this museum it's actually forest museum within the forests in the land of norway and they have something that might be similar looking for my which is in election he it's belong to all in that area numbers this is museum curator buren becky lynn this bit rusty does it say something just should be driven manufacturer it's made in all sorts sorry sorry this seems to be some kind of like veteran i've normal normal i lead in nineteen seventy and i think many people had such folks in life at that time do we see any inscription on this knife and fork and we turn them you don't there's something quite small my old is gone three it's so you know it's roast stall german for stainless steel in the middle we have this inscription we are looking for it's a small heart with the s c h and the underscore and the p that's right but and there's a but there is no the this inscription is not made afterward to me it says that this is something made by the fabric factored definitely known the knife yes you're the same hot and the same litters we have brought with us the documentation from the police about the contents in the suitcases of this woman it says suitcase number one object g in english it would it says via steel soup spoon smooth with an inscription ross thrashed out and s c h p within the hot it's the same thing definitely seems to be the same manufacturer and so we're not getting any closer here now but we know then for sure that this must have been made in austria we have been sold in norway i see or brought here by somebody yes traveling austria for instance okay married now i know we got quite excited about the spoon but i i've gotta feel in it's not going to be the case cracking clue we were looking for after all maybe not but after we went to the museum and.

coley ovan forest museum norway becky lynn austria two hours
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"This is the last episode in series who still got some important leads to follow up in this podcast but to think back to where we began to where i began on that bleak hillsides outside bergen at the scene where the woman was found nineteen seventy so difficult to find that spot it's memory the rain falling answer to lonely lonely place i've been there several times and every time we had slight problems finding exact spot where she was but i've heard that now there is a path leading to the place pasta mate by people going there after we started this podcast series the word really has out but also you've been living with the stub woman story long that i have i mean how how far she got under your skin this has been so intense this work trying to get closer to the truth in this story so of course it has done something to me i find myself thinking about her and asking questions all the time it was the situation yesterday actually i'm staying in hotel rooms all the time every time i come here to london and this time i stay in rather old hotel in soho and doom is a very nice room but with all handmade furniture and i have a big desk in there and it just struck me as today that it might be like her hotel rooms back then it was one of those frozen in time rooms you could have been in the neptune or the whole time yeah the desk you tempted put the desk against the door for any reason no i know i had no reason to do that but my boss has just to sit down on the desk and write some poetry in code so we've come a long way from the cold hillsides and those many hotel rooms we're not finished yet less time we got worried about the spoon that was found in the style woman suitcase on closer inspection of the police report this thing all the items inside we saw some detail about an inscription on the spoon that we'd missed we've done some research and had a few hits on the in graving which was an essiet underlying and.

bergen soho london graving
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"This story is typical of young child on the kindertransport quickly evacuated not knowing what happened to that parents separated for the duration of the war or permanently as many Jewish adults were murdered in Nazi concentration camps. Germany divide that after the war into capitalist west and communist east. If these style woman was reported missing in the east, which was under communist party rule, it's unlikely that the Norwegian police oriental with ever have known about that. How they interact. How discuss the next day? What are we gonna do now with come to what we believe to be the parts of the world she grew up in, we wanted to reach into people's homes with story German, TV, and radio crew has been following us around whilst we make our inquiries filming and recording us helping get the word out to somebody who might remember the story about that woman. Nobody knows who she was, and it's very interesting for our viewers to hear that she was German. Apparently she had maybe German sisters, brothers and parents or nephew who remembers her who remembers back in the days. There was this on my father that never came back or something like that. I think people love these stories and yet maybe someone remembers something cloudy. Funke is a TV reporter from Sylvester trouble. Funk w. SWR one of Germany's biggest broadcasters. I think. For the people. It's almost emotional, a little. I mean, if she was really German, she if she was one of us, it's really like, yeah, you want to know who was she and how did she end up there from very interesting time in German history, the decades leading up to nineteen seventy a divided country. People were lost on either side, so each other's families and some reunited someone's this is part of why I've been thinking, did she? She sort of lost touch with relatives or was caught on the wrong side of the border at one point, this all speculation, but in the course of history, it's quite possible. Absolutely. Yes, because there was so many people without roots and without families as you said and maybe some difficulties in between political discussions in the families. You know, you have all these divided people back then. So you probably she said, go to hell, dad, I leave you because we had the wrong political view or whatever. So everything could be possible. But yeah, a lot of. Families has been divided back then what's good for the cutting edge of science has brought us here, but now it's over to human memory. It's always going to be the two things that will help solve this mystery. We came on quite a long road trip from Uram bag. And with following the isotope mop, really, we've been through forests and hills and pine trees and Silva batch. And we've come quite high up into the Faust region Meyer. It's in the south west of Germany, and you're right. The isotope map showed us the possibility that are woman is a woman actually moved here to disregard. It could at least be one of some possibilities in this area. And so where we are quite high up surrounded by open farmland being through vineyards, very old church to my right and old sandstone, Chet, and tells a little bit more about where we are is Mr. Delhi, a lay preacher here. Maria Rosenberg wasn't. Of or holy mother. Maria the first part of the Chippewas build in eleven fifty and synthesis time. People are coming here to pray to enjoy the silence and as well as being a church. It's also a place where children have lived, especially in the twentieth century, haven't they. If your home for children who don't have parents, it was built in nineteen twenty eight. The lift of in the former times only women, young women and goals who don't have parents who came out from. Difficult families? Yes. So like a foster home for children. So we're interested because it's the period where looking at during the war second World War it shows on the ice Tope map that the style woman as a teenager might have been in this area pup. She was in a foster home pup. She was somewhere like this. So I understand you have an archive. So we'd like to see it please. I showed you go known the stiffer house on this was the first for the young girls because the other house was built in ninety eight and it's called the Shifter house. So the girls would have lived above us down. So we go left. Zoe. Little Archie? Yes. Yeah. His the archive.

Germany Funke Maria Rosenberg Shifter house Uram Zoe Archie reporter Silva ice Tope Meyer Sylvester Chet Mr. Delhi
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

07:04 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"This is death in ice valley. An original put cost series from the BBC World Service and an arcane. Even footy seven years on many witnesses have vivid recollection of these style women and how old she looked, but looks committee saving. Your age is written in your teeth. I'm Neil McCarthy, and I'm Marty, this is a piece owed. Eight case closed. Time full McKay GB officer. Alexander Vasiliev gave us his courier theory, which sounds like it could fit these style. Women didn't hung around in one place for long, try to blend in like a spy. She came and went between European cities and she had meetings with different men including a naval officer. She could have been a messenger, I spy organization, it's plausible. There's no evidence for her being part of our new eaten espionage ring. But it's an interesting speculation from somebody with first-hand knowledge of the secret world of spice. Let's return to the science for awhile to help us with this case to keep things in Scandinavia. It's a cold nights in stucco with in the Swedish capital, and we're in the company of huddled. Who's joined us from knowing, could you introduce improperly? Yes. Transferral from cripples is with us. He is now the leader of the identity unit at campus, and he's here bringing three teeth of the woman. That's correct. I have three with me to get to the scientists -tarian Karolinska Institute to try to find out how old was the. I still women when she died in the way in nineteen seventy. Very, very exciting thing. And the reason for us to be here is that disci- Syrian Caroline, Scott said Hello themselves and said, we have a method, we believe we can define the eight of the woman excited. By looking at her tease with carbon fourteen method where they look at the level of carbon porting. In her teas, and then they can say something about eight or exact birth. You used carbon analysis effectively in any other missing persons cases? No, we haven't done that before. So this is new for us. And how you deal with missing persons cases all the time. What what do you make of the ice style woman's case. Well, I am police officers. I have to stick to the objective facts. So I very interesting case. It's very special because there is no many people who are found in the forest burned in Norway, and if it's a suicide is very special way to do it, I don't think we have and they similar case. So it's for sure. This is a very special case. Let's take you might sleep and let see tomorrow what the scientists can do. Got the teeth in a very safe place. Yes, I tell, you know, under your pillow. Not very far from it. Since fuel has brought to east women's teeth to the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm where professors cannot across and Henrik greet toil away in a lab fool of scientific cutting instruments. The wolves are covered in marvel. It used to be the hospital mortuary. Classic here, I would show you the left. I hope you have the teeth of you with me. So we have here to the left side. I was show you how we going to prepare the teeth and. Hopefully we can help you with this case. And here I have my click handed. Terrific. Handed. Terrific. Collision SCA. Hello. Nice to meet you and thank you for this case for us. Very important. I have the my bag. It's in the low. So here it is. Thank you. And do you have those three three s four years. We'll take this. This is the wisdom tooth which is very important. And we have even here another tooth. And here is three. Thank you very much. So what are you exactly going to do not? We can see the your age is written on your tooth. So by analyzing this teeth, we hope we can help the police in Norway by telling the age of the woman, the age of death. One of the method that is so powerful is allies. ING carbon fourteen, which is nice. Tohp of carbon carbon. Fourteen is known to be radioactive and has been used in archaeological studies all over the world, and we're doing the same kind of analysis, but we are taking advantage of the increased levels of carbon fourteen that started to Kerr night and fifty five due to extensive test bomb detonations of. Nuclear weapons. From nine hundred fifty five through nine. This sixty three. And that was just a side effect that increased cover. Fourteen has been incorporated in our bodies ever since and the teeth they're formed at a certain time after the person is born. Then by looking at the carbon fourteen levels in particular tooth, we can match that with the particular levels in the atmosphere at that time. I'm

Karolinska Institute officer Norway BBC World Service footy Alexander Vasiliev Neil McCarthy Marty Scandinavia huddled Kerr Scott Stockholm Henrik seven years four years
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"Seven will be released next Monday. Fest episode, we told you, we're gonna see how much could find out with the help of modern science which have been talking about again in this episode. We also said we were going to try and crack the case. Using the power of podcasts can tell you that we are now busy investigating leads that have come to us from you. Podcast listeners will let you know if they lead us anywhere. Reminder Email address for any leads. It's death in ice. Finally, at BBC dot com and Facebook group, Facebook dot com. Slash groups slash death in ice folly. Many, thanks Beth right there and unavoidable in our team for the hard work posting documents, videos, and background information. In is valley original podcast series made by the BBC World Service and k, it's presented by Neil McAfee and me Martigues sound design. An original music is by feel channel. Additional investigation by stola Hudson and even Beijing from an okay, the serious editor Philip sellers. The BBC World Service podcast editor is John Mel, the put coast studio mixed by Donald McDonald. The producer of death in ice valley is Neil McCarthy. Thing before we go. When we can, we like to recommend other podcasts which we think you might like. And as you've been listening to our investigation, I want to tell you about the award winning investigative series in the dock from BBC World Service partners in the United States American public media. It's now in its second season, and it's exploring new story with real life or death consequences. It's the case of full people killed in a small town, Mississippi. And why called Curtis flowers has been tried six times for the meta you can find in the doc, whatever you find your podcasts. Thanks for listening.

BBC BBC World Service Facebook ice valley Neil McAfee Curtis flowers editor stola Hudson Neil McCarthy Mississippi Donald McDonald Beijing Beth Philip sellers United States John Mel producer
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"Time. rut story sounds entirely plausible to Hove. Remember he had better police context and any other journalists that the time that's right now let's get back on the road. There's a key interviewee coming up demand who called the spy in Hove expand only get ready to hear from a real Spycatcher. This is unlike a lot of the other interviews we've been doing. You've been trying to long time to get this interview. I've been trying to years to interview this person, this man, and it is not easy because he, he doesn't give interviews anymore foot. We are now on our way we got permission to come to his own. So from what you've told me, something of a of a living legend from the Cold War period, who is he? He's name is tough time is the most famous Norwegian spy hunter, and he's the man behind chasing down the most famous. By the way, I'm was he in Bergen in nineteen seventy on this case on the case of the ice element. Oh yes. We know he was when we read the files and the documents at the secret police about the case. We found documents with his name on, so it was no doubt. It was the. We're in a little community as bungalows. It's a pension as residents. Hottie. From door to the bungalow opens a very tall man and his nineties down holding his cane. It's no exaggeration to say that he has piercing blue eyes. I've been win. There's always top Spycatcher. I can only imagine what it have been like to have those eyes boring into during a long interrogation in a small room, especially once he knew he had something on you earn tufted had being called to ice volume nineteen seventy to the scene of death along with the head of the dischord Ralph how yardman to give their opinions on whether she was a spy, whether she had been murdered, you'll have to listen closely to this Spycatcher's theory or people who have been connected river women in Bergen all about. She has in her profession. Can over hairspray big ever event every with civils hotel room and also the street will account his head. That can hedge never from woman from about fifty two from the lake. Close to track close to the for. Then. Yardman I have talks over are the worst of it wasn't a murder? Is. Accident. And the accident could easily happened in that she had system fire. Fire had her hairspray decide and that. Hairspray following them in the fire, and she should try to pick it up and then it blows interface. That's also repaying. Because are nothing about the hairspray in the police documents in the witness interogations more. Technician toll seekers police people. Who is to find out what the fuel was that started. This fire has praised incredibly flammable and co fire. She didn't have a kind of spray would make sense. And if that exploded, it's a possibility, isn't it? Yes, but I assume the should be some remnants of this bottle of has bright than and there were actually no remnants of pot like this was a big can of has break, could vanish totally or looped of four about your heart activities are confined, hasn't. She has no notes comparing. Most. His whole sheen could have been, but she knows turn. Hairsprayed into fired, and then it's blow interface and that shield can I heard many cases, intelligence forces killing people what is in knife, they're using guns. They were using throws, they will use in points. I have never heard any on the shores or using burning as they taking people. So your assessment at the scene of death is that she hadn't been mad. Vichy for pollution, Bergen. He didn't arrive a report this hold him over opinion. It's almost no trace of murder. It's most no connection with as much as far as I could see. So tough pretty convinced that scene, whether it's woman was founded in any of the hallmarks of spy med. Yes. And his pretty convinced about his theory would has spray and and he thought about this woman not being important for the police because she wasn't the case for the police, something about the whole thing that makes me think that he knows more than he says. So

Bergen Spycatcher Hove murder civils Technician Hairsprayed Ralph
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"This is death in ice valley. An original put cost series from the BBC World Service and an arcane. I am mighty off from an k. and the long. Wait my BBC colleague Neil Mukasey. We trying to get to the bottom of the case of the Easter woman episode, six Spycatcher. Our last stop was in Tonga, a small fishing village in the south of no wait. This was the place where fishermen called Beckham earth. Soda is the woman talking to a naval officer whilst to penguin missile tests what's in place. That's right. You he recognized from the police during in the newspaper, and then he responded to the request to the public to pass on any relevant information to the police. He did that, but he wasn't prepared for what came after he informed the police. His son smart was with him as the family were boarding, a train at Stavanger railway station. They were on their way to London for their Christmas holidays in nineteen seventy. Whilst waiting for the train. His father was approached by two policemen sweater has never gone on the record with the story before. We were all four. The family was gathered there and should go into trait, and he left our group and went with these policemen for about fifteen twenty minutes, obviously, talking with him and he didn't say much to us. He said, it will some policemen, and then we were wondering about this to hold trait. We were in London. Did he say why they came to the train station? What would you do want to speak with him over my father was a man of few words when things should be kept secret. You know, when we came back, I was informed that he had had this knife and this handgun that he received from them that gave him that in the race station. And you had that all the time we were in London for protection is. Say something, why? Why did they give him this? Obviously, he was told by some people to keep his mouth shut obviously because he normally didn't like to speak so much about it. But on the other hand, he was angry sometime. It was rather upset about that. Why he was not properly informed. So himself, he lacked knowledge about the whole situation. So you can imagine there you are about to get on a train with your family. The police take you away, give you a gun and a knife and tell you to protect yourself just as you're about to go on holiday. Not that they're going to look out for you and protect you, but you have to look after yourself and he had no idea. We was supposed to protect himself from quite a scary prospect, but whatever you had reported at put him in danger. That's that's clear. What different time they lived in as well. The fuck the police, just give him a gun and a knife, send them on a family holiday tone to protect himself, and nobody even checked customs or on the or whether he had got as far as London and brought it back. Well, that's hard to imagine. But obviously it was not those strict security spy traveling those times. Maybe there's also the reason why the east the woman could move across borders with different passports. And so the checks went so strictly enforced back then at least in western Europe, I'm sure maybe in eastern Europe, it was a different matter maybe. And how long was your father told he would need this gun on this knife? Did he keep it permanently? He had it for many years, but in many ways it was the story we didn't speak so much about. So it's impossible for me to say how many years he kept it, but many, many years he kept it. Sometimes I feel he looked behind his shoulder sometimes that was just a feeling you know how this whole thing executive father using you said he, he looked over his shoulder. Was he anxious about something he was. It was very much stressed about this case. All the air, c- he, he would. I wanted that the truth came forward, you know, he would. I want to that. It was like cover. It was like a layer of protection around this whole question about this lady. The

London BBC World Service Tonga BBC Stavanger railway station Spycatcher Europe Neil Mukasey officer executive fifteen twenty minutes
"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

Death In Ice Valley

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"ice" Discussed on Death In Ice Valley

"Number. We'll take these with us. Dargis funks catch it day. He is a big cat tissue samples and the job own full of gold teeth. It was an incredible an unexpected, find its high-value in terms of DNA. We need to take this new physical evidence to scientific specialists, and we also need the cooperation of the police and their labradors. Let's see what it can tell us today about her identity that it couldn't in nineteen seventy an identity. She was very good at covering with many different names so pops. The science could reveal who she really was, but it's hard not to think that the east I'll woman was on a secret mission when she was here in Norway. Yes, I agree on that. But what kind of mission. Next week on death in ice valley shady goings on. Today, believe that she was murdered because she had not swallowed all the pills. The pills in their mouth. And I think the Petersberg forced into. Episode, four of death in ice fairly will be released. Next Monday. If you are affected by anything you've heard in our podcast, you can find details of organizations which offer advice and support at BBC World Service dot com slash death. Nice. Finally. Many of you are now in our Facebook group topics being discussed include the watch why the labels were removed from her clothes and the smell, which was talked about an episode to if you haven't joined yet you can at Facebook dot com. Slash groups slash death in ice valley. If you think you have information which might help our investigation, please email us a death in ice finally, at BBC dot com. That's death in ice. Finally, at BBC dot com. And thanks to all of you who are leaving ratings and comments where you're able to and who are talking about on social media. Please continue to help us spread the word. Thanks for listening. While is an original series made by the BBC World Service and an I k- it's presented by Neil McCarthy and me morte some the signed an original music is by feel channel, additional investigation by stola Hansson and even be alert from K the series editor is Philip sellers, the BBC World Service editor John. Now. Put cost is studio mixed by Donald McDonald. Producer of tests in ice valley is Neil McCarthy.

ice valley BBC Neil McCarthy BBC World Service Facebook editor Donald McDonald Philip sellers stola Hansson Norway Producer