37 Burst results for "IBM"

Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

01:20 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

"Edition collection of non fungible tokens or NFTs to raise funds for Ukraine. The collection titled Putin's ashes will be available for purchase today, Friday on tezos based NFT marketplace object. Spelled OBJ KT. All of the proceedings from the collection will be donated to Ukrainian soldiers who have been battling the Russian invasion since February 2022. The open addition will start minting on Friday at 10 a.m. Pacific time and end on February 3rd. Each NFT will be priced at ten tezos or about $11 at current prices. Pussy riot plans to open the collection with the protest and performance Friday in Los Angeles at the Jeffrey deitch gallery. Generally, Ukraine has embraced cryptocurrency and NFTs as alternative crowdfunding methods in May, the country had received about $135 million in cryptocurrency donations since the start of the war. Coin desks camp Thompson reports on that. And shifting to traditional markets, equity markets continued their uneven climb upward this year with a tech heavy NASDAQ and the S&P 500, which also has a hefty technology component and the Dow Jones Industrial Average all ticking up just around half of a percent. Even his fourth quarter earnings continued to tilt negative and a rising number of firms announced layoffs in anticipation of an economic contraction. Since the start of the year, Amazon Microsoft Salesforce and more recently IBM have announced job cuts. The 2.5% rise in GDP and an unexpected decline in jobless claims on Thursday had little impact on the current investment environment, which turned cautiously hopeful that inflation will continue waning without the economy falling into deep recession. The combination would likely enable the U.S. Central Bank to ratchet back the size of its next interest rate hike next week. Now taking a look at Europe, it's a bit of a different story. Major indices inched lower with the regional stock 600 in London's footsie 100 dropping two tenths of a percent. Germany's Dax meanwhile traded flat. In Asia, Mainland China's Shanghai composite index remained closed for the lunar new year, Hong Kong's hang sang index, meanwhile, gained half of a percent while Japan's nikkei two two 5 traded relatively flat. In commodities markets Brent crude, the global benchmark for oil gained just over a tenth of a percent, trading at $88 per barrel. Gold meanwhile is down two thirds of a percent trading at $1924 per Troy ounce. Today's traditional market coverage draws from The Wall Street Journal and market watch. Stay tuned for after the break, and we'll take a look at the year ahead, regulatory style. Back in a minute. Join coin desks can census 2023.

Jeffrey Deitch Gallery Ukraine Putin U.S. Central Bank Thompson Los Angeles IBM Amazon S Microsoft Mainland Shanghai Europe Germany Asia
Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on Bloomberg Markets

Bloomberg Markets

00:30 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ibm" discussed on Bloomberg Markets

"Got to fire thousands of people or an IBM says we got to fire a thousands of people. People say, oh. What's the deal with your demand? Exactly right. So we'll see if we're going to get more of that. We got a lot of tech earnings next week. And we'll stay on top of that and we'll see what they want to do with their headcount. This is Bloomberg. Now, your company news headlines. From Bloomberg world headquarters, I'm Steve rappaport. Shares of Intel open lower after the chip maker predicted a gross margin of 37% for this quarter, one of the worst forecasts in the company's history. It follows a fourth quarter that fell short of expectations, CEO pat gelsinger sought to mitigate the impact reassuring investors. I want to remind everyone that we are on a multiyear journey. We remain focused on the things that are within our control as we navigate short term headwinds while executing to our long-term strategy. Gelsinger adding he thinks momentum will stabilize this year. Oil giant Chevron posts a record profit, adjusted earnings for 2022 more than doubled to 36 and a half $1 billion from a year earlier. Chevron stock rose the most in four months yesterday in response to a surprise announcement of a $75 billion share buyback program. The Biden administration argues

Steve Rappaport Bloomberg Pat Gelsinger IBM Gelsinger Intel Chevron Biden Administration
Dr. Keith Rose's Initial Takeaways From the 2022 Midterms

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:42 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Keith Rose's Initial Takeaways From the 2022 Midterms

"Is your initial take from the midterms? Well, Charlie, I think that the liberals, the Democrats, were very strategic. And the elections that they targeted. I think a lot of us expected something more, but if we really go to a 100,000 feet and look at it, we didn't have control of the media. We didn't have control of the overall narrative. I think more people showed up to vote in these midterms. That's been shown than anything else. But we're not seeing the results of those folks showing up. And I think we need to ask ourselves why. I think there's a ways to explain it. Looking at the different amounts of money that went into the races, but there's also some things that defy any rational explanation, and that's kind of why I sent you that paper. If you were planning it out, it makes a lot more sense to see it written out on down on paper. How you would structure something to make people not or believe their line on it. Yeah, so let's talk about it silent weapons for quiet wars. What is this? It's a paper that was found in 1986 by a defense contractor from General Dynamics. I'm doing some more research on it. And I'm not finished with the yikes. I'm talking to a lot of folks I know on the east coast. But my understanding is it was found in one of those big IBM copiers. You remember the ones that are half the size of your garage that a lot of people had, the really big ones, like 6 feet long, four or 5 feet high. And the guy had bought it. I believe like a government surplus cell for parts. And when he started taking it apart, he found this document inside. And the document is purported to be made back in 1979. I've looked at it. I've read through it. And back in 1986, if you would look at it back then or back during cold wartimes, you might think, well, this could be Russian disinformation. It'd be easy to just blow it off. But looking at it now with the events that have happened and this is talking about the second industrial revolution and now we're into the fourth industrial and the way they outline everything that's going on in this paper will make your blood run cold and because it talks about what they want to do. It talks about how they're doing it, who they're using to do in it. And then you add in big data capture in the Internet and it's put this project on steroids and it's exactly what we're seeing. I mean, you can say it was misinformation, but it's not misinformation when I'm basically, it's like I was given the advanced copy of what they were going to do in 2022.

Charlie General Dynamics East Coast IBM
"ibm" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

03:52 min | 3 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on AI in Business

"Opportunities and help to steer a successful AI strategy. And you found yourself in the right place. That's exactly what we do here on the show. And today we're talking about a topic that could be thrown under the category of buzzword, but will soon be much more. When you think buzz words today probably you think blockchain or Ethereum or deep learning or something along those lines. But today, we're actually talking about 5G and our guest this week is Marissa vivaro. She is the VP of strategy for IBM global telecommunications, and in this episode she unpacks two topics that should be of interest to all of our listeners regardless of what industry you're in. Number one, what do business leaders need to understand about 5G? What does it mean in simple terms and what does it actually allow for in terms of new capabilities on the telecommunications grid. So what is 5G and simple business terms? Going to affect every industry worth understanding. Number two, combining 5G with AI, what new kinds of capabilities might be possible. What will tell co companies be able to learn about their users? How will telco companies be able to better route and serve their users the kind of content that they're likely to digest and what else might open up at that intersection of 5G and AI? It'd be hard to find a better guess for this particular topic than Marissa without further ado. Let's fly right in. This is Marissa vivaro with IBM. Here on the AI and business podcast. So Marissa, I'm glad to have you with us. And we're talking today about the very new idea of 5G plus AI and before we dive into that and I'm excited to talk about the combination. I want to kind of explain and break down 5G for our listeners because we mostly talk about AI here. When you explain 5G as a paradigm shift to technology, two business folks, how do you like to explain it to people? Because first of all, Daniel, thanks for having me here and a pleasure for me to be with you. And I really enjoyed your podcast. So I hope everybody will listen. They enjoyed as much as I do. So let's just start with 5G so 5G is the next innovation mobile or wireless technology.

Marissa vivaro IBM Marissa Daniel
 Biden: IBM investment to help in tech competition with China

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Biden: IBM investment to help in tech competition with China

"President Biden is said to celebrate a new investment in New York's Hudson River valley where two House Democrats are in tough reelection races The president will be at an IBM facility in Poughkeepsie where the companies announcing a $20 billion investment aimed at boosting semiconductor manufacturing and other high-tech advances It comes days after chip maker micron revealed plans to invest up to $100 billion to build a plant in upstate New York The White House says it's all part of a manufacturing boom It hopes will help democratic prospects in next month's elections While many Democrats in tough races have avoided appearing with the president whose own approval ratings are underwater he will be joined today by two incumbents in competitive races Sean Patrick maloney and pat Ryan Sagar Meghani Washington

President Biden House Democrats Hudson River Valley Poughkeepsie New York IBM Micron White House Sean Patrick Maloney Pat Ryan Sagar Meghani Washington
"ibm" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:17 min | 4 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Leading data protection and data privacy policies even when deploying in the public cloud. So then you really have optionality. You can have cloud on premises or you can have it safely in public cloud as well. Hey, you know, in your role as chief technology officer at IBM. I do wonder Hillary too, though. I kind of going back to where we started a little bit of macro. What kind of environment are you guys getting ready for that? I know we talked a little bit about what you're seeing from your customers. But it is kind of a tricky time and we see inflation continuing to be persistent, supply chains have gotten better, but we still hear about component problems in various industries worried about a global economic slowdown. How would you best describe kind of our environment? Yeah, you know, I think it's an environment with a lot of opportunity, like we were talking about at the beginning. Cloud and technology, everything from AI technology is to business process automation to the elasticity of cloud, you know, if you don't want to run a business anymore, scale down the consumption of the IT, you didn't invest in it on your promises. You can scale it down in the cloud. As well as continuing also on premises to adopt faster more efficient technologies, all these things are key parts of addressing where enterprises need to be thinking these days. And I think we're just continuing to invest in those core technologies that are going to help folks go through this period that we have coming up successfully. I'll also comment you mentioned supply chain. The topic of risk in the supply chain also from a cybersecurity perspective is one that definitely came up in this index that we just released. And I think there's a lot of really important work going on in that area as well. Hey Hillary, before we let you go, I mean, you know, we hear from a lot of different companies about the cloud about the hybrid cloud. When a company is considering who to go with an IBM is one of those choices, what are the competitive advantages that you offer? Like why choose you rather than another service provider? Yeah, you know, this index that we just released of over 3000 global leaders cited skills, cited security and cited compliance as three of the top areas for consideration. And at IBM that's really what we're trying to address. It's a journey. It's a journey to get to the cloud. You need to partner with someone who like IBM consulting has in-house skills to both look at transformation

Hillary IBM
Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:55 min | 4 months ago

Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

"I'm continuing my discussion of the misdoings and malfeasance of various social media platforms. And now I want to talk about Google. Now what I'm saying about Google to some degree also applies to IBM. Apparently, Google and IBM and I talked about this on the podcast, think about a week or so week or two ago. Established race based scholarship programs. And established them in coordination with many elite universities. The Google program alone was called the Google fellowship. And Google was carrying out this program with Harvard, Princeton, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, duke, NYU, UNC Chapel Hill, Johns Hopkins, I'm Carnegie Mellon. So this is a Google fellowship, and basically under the Google fellowship, if the selection process produced more than two nominees for this for this fellowship, Google required that the next two nominees quote self identify as a woman black African descent, you know, the whole, the whole gamut, trans, LatinX, or person with a disability. But it was essentially a kind of mandatory quota. You have to do this. So these colleges entered into contracts with Google as a requirement. Now, this as it turns out, flatly violates not only the well, gladly vibrate violates a civil rights law that goes all the way back to 1866, which completely bans racial discrimination and contracting. And let's notice that these are contracts between Google and these universities. And then there's also title 6 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bans racial discrimination at federally funded schools, and all these schools, some of them, of course, private, some of them, public, but nevertheless, they all have massive contracts with the federal government and so they fall under the federally funded clause. Now, the free Beacon, the Washington free Beacon, publicized, did an article, which I talked about here on the podcast about this policy on the part of Google. And they also mentioned that IBM has a similar policy IBM had a fellowship program, and it required a mandated that half the nominees of this PhD fellowship program B quote diversity candidates. Now, Google talked, I'm sorry, the Washington free Beacon talked to a bunch of civil rights lawyers when they go, well, these programs are illegal.

Google IBM Unc Chapel Hill Carnegie Mellon NYU University Of Pennsylvania Johns Hopkins MIT Princeton Harvard Duke Federal Government Washington
"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"And we carved out three values that he believed expressed the ethos of the company and his culture. Every client's success, an innovation that matters for the company in the world, and then trust and personal responsibility in all of our relationships. So he gave me that middle one. He gave me that innovation that matters for the company in the world. And I then proceeded for the rest of my IBM career. To bang that out. And I kept saying to everybody, look, you know, just because we're the number one inventor in the world, and IBM still is by Patton's file in the U.S. patent and trademark office doesn't mean that we're the innovator. We got to get that. We have to earn that and that's not something that we can say about ourselves. We have to get other people to say it about us. So we set out to do a whole myriad of very innovative things to convince people that we were creating value where there was no value. Project after project, we did an innovation jam, we get we did this in this famous road travel system in Stockholm, Sweden that saved them the ability of not building another bridge into city center. And we came up with innovative ideas by building a formula around a simple pretense, which says everyone matters. We're going to enable everyone to participate and we're going to focus on the problem, and then we're going to do it open, collaboratively, multi disciplined, and we're going to do it with a global perspective. So I help build that environment before I left. And then IBM started to be listed as one of the top ten innovators. Innovators, not just inventors or technologists, but innovators in the country, if not the world. Well, Nick, I do appreciate you being on the show, especially for number 700 is certainly brings back my roots. I had a great career for 9 years at IBM. It was the first person that a company that took a chance on me, a liberal arts graduate, coming out of brandeis university. So I have nothing but good memories. The title of the book is called, if nothing changes, nothing changes. Where can people learn about the work you're doing now? They can certainly go to that book. They can ping me. My email address, I'll give it to you. You can give it to them. If there's so motivated, they can contact you. You can send them to me. I got a long list of mentees to your point, Barry. I don't really care how many more I get. I mean, if I have something that's a value to someone, I want to give it to you before I can't give it to anybody anymore. So as long as I'm here on this earth, I'll continue to do what I can to enable people to be their best. And to you, Barry. I'm so glad IBM chose you. I'm so glad you chose to do what you're doing right now. God bless you. Thank you, Nick. This is AMA 20 CPT in Chicago right back.

IBM U.S. patent and trademark offi Patton Stockholm Sweden brandeis university Nick Barry AMA Chicago
"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

04:34 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"Value though in those services is if you can tie them to assets that can produce repeatedly for people. Not just not just occasionally. And IBM, we worked very hard at integrating the services business into the entire technical community. I spent the last ten years of my life at IBM integrating the technical community. You know, I thought the world of the services people, every bit as much as I thought the world of our technologists or hardware people are software people. And eventually we got everybody in IBM to think that way, that there's as much technical content in the services side of things as there is in the hardware or software side of things. And so, you know, your really legendary for having mentored a lot of people and small business owners say that the single most important thing that they can have is a mentor. I mean, for me, one of my mentors at IBM was my branch manager named Jim cordial, and I remember I didn't know that. I know I'm very well. I'm entertained. So Jim brings me into his office one day and he's got his business card that says, Jim cordial branch manager. And I was a marketing manager at the time, and he scratches his name out, and he writes my name in Barry moltz branch manager, and he gives it to me, and he says, Barry, you can be a branch manager someday. And I thought, and I still tell that story today because I thought it was incredible. Well, tell me about your relationship with Jim cordial and tell me about why you thought being matters to me were so important. Well, number one, that is vintage, Jim cordial, what he did for you. I mean, that is exactly who I know Jim to be. I mean, but we work together. And he came back east, as you know, spent the last part of his career in the headquarters scene. We worked through the transition on the mainframe. He was the supportive guy, as well as the work that I did in Austin on the RS 6000. And he lives close by. So, I mean, we stayed friends and colleagues. But, you know, he is exactly the quintessential kind of branch manager. I mean, that ranch manager structure, you know, did things for people like you. That's who developed people with developed talent, you can't deny the fact that it had a lot of pluses, but it also had a few minuses. And when IBM decided to change, we changed that structure. We lost some of that value in the branch management structure. So I tried to pick up the slack. I mean, I spent a lot of time in the field. But a lot of time with clients, I'm a technical guy.

Jim cordial IBM Barry moltz Jim Barry Austin
"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

04:17 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"That's close. My head. So at that point, some people were calling for IBM to be broken up, right? But what were you saying at that point? So look, I was on, you know, IBM put me on the team, Barry, that actually had to go fix the system 360. I had just finished up a tour of duty in Austin, Texas, where we brought out the RS 6000 and that's our advanced workstation. We entered the Unix market in a very big way, spent three years of my life there. And then I come back, you know, they call me back to armonk, as you know. And then they dispatched me to Poughkeepsie and say, now go fix this. And this was viewed as the problem. The system 360 was the troubled IBM company got that name because of 360. And they were pretty much getting ready to let it go. To be honest with you, we were going to, we were going to be spun out, was the original plan at that time. So how did IBM really change? You know, you have this new book is called, if nothing changes, nothing changes. I just wrote a book on change. It's very hard to do. How does this behemoth like IBM, which is this multi-billion dollar company actually change in evolve after so many years? So it bury the truth of the matter is IBM changed because it had in your deaf experience. So you either survive those near death experiences by changing or you don't change and you don't survive. It's that simple. But when you're looking into the abyss, as we did in the early 90s, everything had to change. So we changed the system 360. We made it more viable. We made it more relevant. We made it more pertinent. We made it more desirable. We switched this technology. We did everything but break the covenant that Watson junior made that said, you don't have to change your data. You don't have to change your applications to your clients.

IBM armonk Poughkeepsie Barry Austin Texas Watson
"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

04:46 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"Workshops, Joe manager of large scale computing division, executive vice president innovation technology. He's got a new book out it's called if nothing changes, nothing changes. Nick, welcome to the show. Hey, Barry. It's good to be with you. And congratulations to you. That's amazing to act record. I appreciate that. So as I was telling you before we got in the air, my first job out of college in 1981 was with IBM, they recruited me at a brandeis university, movement in Chicago. And it was a great 9 years where they really taught me a lot about being in business and it was one of the heyday years of IBM. Tell us how you found yourself there. Well, it's a really interesting story, Barry, and it's simple. I was born and raised in the mid Hudson valley. Being in New York to be exact. And as you would know, that's right in the middle of what was then an IBM country. Poughkeepsie to the north of us and east fishkill to the east of us. Big IBM facilities. But I am not sure I wanted to go to work for IBM, so I went to RPI, got my electrical engineering degree. I knew IBM because they actually co opt with them and they're one of the reasons that I was actually able to be afford going to RPI. It comes from a very modest Italian family by my grandparents poor immigrants. And I was one of four children. So I knew IBM right from the get go in 1964. Everybody knew IBM from that part of the world, right? That's who we were. I mean, you lived and breathed the IBM. But when I finally graduated from RPI, I actually wanted to go to work out in California for one of the federal systems integrators. They had a great program. But the punchline Barry is my mother made me go to work for IBM. She told me this isn't a good idea.

IBM Joe manager large scale computing division Barry brandeis university east fishkill Nick Hudson valley Poughkeepsie Chicago New York RPI California
"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

04:28 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"When you think about your career and what you ended up doing, do you think that you, in some ways, were born with leadership skills, or do you think that you learned how to become a leader? Well, that's a question I get regularly when I teach with these leadership, forms, I think that 99% of management is acquired. And management is a very large percentage of leadership. There's a maybe a ten or 20% of leadership that is emotional. It's intuitive. It's just attitude. I mean, great leaders, imbue organization with an emotional commitment. They create passion, they create a sense of belonging, a sense of achievement, a sense of challenge, and you have to learn how to communicate. You have to learn how to manage your time. You have to learn how to do performance appraisals. You have to learn about how to do good competitive analysis. And those are those are skills that I think you have to work on for as in a lifetime. As you know, Lou, there is a lot of conversation about the responsibility of corporations towards the public and towards their workers. And, you know, you've been really outspoken about it. And you've said that corporations have a responsibility beyond just making money. That's correct. And somehow a whole bunch of people seem to have discovered that corporations should have a responsibility beyond their shareholders. And I find this a somewhat amusing discussion because I don't know why we haven't learned or recognized that there is no successful corporation that doesn't worry about its employees, doesn't worry about the communities in which it works. I mean, you can't have a successful company in an unsuccessful community. You can't expect to have good workers, good staff members, if you don't have an education system in the country producing people who can learn and know something, can communicate. And can live in a 20th century world. So to think that corporations can simply only worry about their shareholders, is a myopic view that I've never felt at any value. Here's my point. I don't view this as some additional challenge, additional responsibility imposed on a corporation. I view this as an absolute necessary and important part of being a corporation of being successful. That's the former CEO of IBM, Lou gerstner. Lou is now retired and spends much of his time working with his foundation. And he's probably not going to be rushing back to head another company anytime soon. When asked what he misses about being a CEO, he answered, quote, knocked that much. Hey, thanks for listening to the show this week. The music for this episode was composed and performed by drop electric. I'm guy rose and you've been listening to wisdom from the top, the blue, built in productions, and NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor, base camp, your business is growing, but so are the number of files, emails, and meetings, base camp is an all in one solution for organizing and collaborating. Keep it together, put it in base camp, more at base camp dot com slash NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor, American Express business, with features and benefits like membership rewards points and flexible payments, AmEx business cards are built for business. Don't do business without it. Terms apply. Learn more at American Express dot com slash business cards.

Lou Lou gerstner NPR IBM American Express AmEx
"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:12 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"In a company, and so that's why this process change. Was so important because we could not have become an integrated company. We could not have become hardware software and services. Without integrating inside the company and changing the way we paid people. I'm guy raz, and you're listening to wisdom from the top. We'll be right back. This message comes from NPR sponsor, LegalZoom, got a head full of business ideas, it's time to turn those business ideas into a business, business with LegalZoom. From content creators with podcasts to monetize, chefs with dreams of opening an Italian Peruvian fusion restaurant, anyone can get their business started with LegalZoom with the press of a button. LegalZoom, now you're in business. LegalZoom is not a law firm or a substitute for an attorney or law firm. This message comes from our sponsor Wix. Every day, billions of Google searches lead potential customers to billions of websites with Wix, your site can be one of them. Wix gives you the tools to capitalize on organic traffic and drive people straight from Google search to your website. Whether you're an SEO pro or a business owner, you get out of the box, search engine optimization settings, and the ability to customize them. So you can bring new audiences and new revenue to your site. Find out more at Wix dot com slash SEO. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Zoom used by half a million businesses, a platform for phone, chat, workspaces, events, apps, and video, enabling real-time collaboration for teams around the globe. Zoom, how the world connects. This is wisdom from the top. I'm guy Roz. How were you able to hold people accountable? I mean, there are huge challenges or multiple challenges. There are dozens of potential solutions, and then other initiatives and then other problems that are coming to you. So how are you able to sort of figure out how to compartmentalize and focus on very specific things? Because it's practically impossible for a single human to juggle 50 different things at the same time, or even ten different things at the same time. I want you to know a guy that, you know, I went home every weekend with four briefcases. I rarely got home at night before 8 or 9 o'clock at night, was left for the office at 6 30 or 7 in the morning, traveled all over the world. And probably two months after I was at IBM, I said to my wife, I made a mistake. Wow. I can't do it. I mean, I felt like I was walking in quicksand. Overwhelming, you know? I take one step forward and two steps down, but eventually there were things that we could do quickly to stabilize the company. So we quickly found some ways to cut losses. I had, when I got the IBM, we had four businesses that were losing a $1 billion each. Wow. And I said to myself, well, I don't know, Lou, this is, this is easy loop. All you got to do is get two of those to zero. And you've made $2 billion. Well, it wasn't so easy, but we did find ways to very rapidly improve the stability of the company, the financial stability, and then I was able to say to the organization, now we are stable, financially, now we're going to go grow and because we were able to do that, we actually turned a profit. 56 quarter after I was there. That gave me some time. To sort out the 50 things. When did you start to see a turnaround? When did you start to sort of see the light? Because when you got there, it was a crisis, right? Billions of dollars being lost. And how long did it take before you started to see? Well, I told you earlier that we turned a profit and about the 5th or 6th quarter. And I really was unhappy about that. I didn't want that because I knew that was going to lead a whole bunch of IBM to say, oh, good. Now we can go back to the way we were before. Right. And I was still trying to drive this sense of urgency, the sense of crisis, which is absolutely tantamount to any organization to really transform itself. I would say it was about three years in, maybe four when we had stabilized the company and then we came up with the E business campaign and that put IBM in a leadership position in the industry. We now were leading something. Because the industry went from mainframe to PC to E business or network business, and we were in front of that. And it gave the company a sense that we were not only fighting a defensive game, but we were now out in front. And that's when I felt that the wind had turned from directly in our face to our back and I just got to tell you guy that there is a dramatic difference. You can feel it. In an organization when the wind moves from in your face to your back and that's occurred about three years in and then I knew we were we were on our way.

LegalZoom IBM Google NPR Roz Lou
"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:53 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"And so when I got there, I had to unlock this huge talent pool that was there. And get them energized and focused and working in a different way. But when you, when you were recruited to go to IBM and you are initial response was I'm not a technology person. This is not my area of expertise in someone said, look, the problem at IBM is a leadership problem. What was the leadership problem? What were the things that you actually had to change? Well, the first thing that I had to change was repositioning the mainframe, which meant that we had to drastically cut its prices because it was getting attacked by two Japanese companies that had basically cloned IBM system and so we had a cut prices by almost 50% in a period of a few months, which again was something that was fought bitterly inside the company because that's where if there were any profits, that's where they were coming from. So now the losses were going to be worse. The second thing I had to do is I had to decide whether we were going to keep the company together or to continue to break it up into pieces. And I made the decision as a former customer of IBM that we were going to keep it together. That there was a unique value that IBM brought to the industry, and that was its ability to deliver solutions that encompassed hardware software and services. So that was the second thing we had to do. And then thirdly, we just had to unlock the talent and get people working differently than work before. But I would think that the third would, in some ways, be the most challenging, because how do you do that? How do you unlock that? Well, you're right. The certainly that means the first two decisions were relatively easy for me. The third one of how do you get the company working together is took a whole series of steps, communication, I mean, I spent hundreds and hundreds of hours talking to people all over the world and IBM and saying to them, look, there's nothing wrong with IBM, the problem is that we're just not paying attention to customers. We have the technology. We have the resources. Now let's go out and get reconnected with our customers and listen to them and deliver what they want. So I got the company focus externally on winning again. And not frozen in thinking about internal things. Then we had the guy we had to go and change every single process in the company. And I'm telling you that was a 5 year challenge. One of my associates at the time described process transformation as setting your hair on fire and putting it out with a hammer. Yeah. I mean, we had to, for example, change the organization, which almost destroyed me, IBM was a train wreck of decentralization. My good friends at McKinsey, when I was there, you know, made tons of money going around the world and convincing people that decentralization was the way to run global companies. And in many respects, at the time it was, but by the time you got to IBM in 1993, it was astonishingly over decentralized. I mean, we had many IBMs and almost every country in the world. I remember when I got there asking, well, how are we doing with the one 800 IBM marketing activity? And I was told, oh no, no, no, corporate doesn't own one 800 IBM number. It's owned by the Alabama branch. And they won't give it to us. We had data centers all over the world. We had everybody who wanted an advertising agency hired their local advertising agency. So this train wreck of decentralization had created massive amounts of cost in each organization and it had created a rigor mortis in terms of people working together. So I had to change the organization. I had to change the compensation system. I had to change the measurement system and what we measured and what we looked at, how those are all processes that we had to go through to get people focused on a new strategy, the strategy that I had outlined of being the company that delivers solutions, and that's why I had to drive a culture that valued teamwork above anything else. But how did you do that when you came in as an outsider? I mean, presumably you had to bring in a new team. You had to get rid of some people. But those aren't enough. I mean, you have to, you still need to buy in. I mean, there's still a hundreds of thousands of employees who have to believe in that, right? So the best thing that happened to me at IBM was, and I knew it was there when it was probably the reason I eventually decided to go, was I knew it was full of talented people. I mean, I had competed with IBM over the years when I was at other companies trying to hire people and they almost always won. And so my job was to convince them that we needed to do something different. We really. And there wasn't too hard given this situation. We were in. I didn't bring in many outsiders guy. I mean, there was no, there was no HR head when I got there and there was no finance head when I got there, so I had to bring in people from the outside. But I had to make some choices among the people who were in the senior group. IBM had this general view, which again, I think, is in successful organizations that as you grow up in an organization as you become a leader, your job is to preside, you preside, and I don't believe that. I believe is you move up in an organization. You dig in and you stay close to the facts, you stay close to the marketplace to stay close to customers and yours knowledgeable as the people who work in your department of not more. We had something I called operation bear hug. Where I said to the top 50 to a hundred people in the company over the next two months are going to go out and visit 5 customers. And tell them that we care about them and listen to them and find out what we can do for them. Everybody, the lawyers said to me, well, I can't do that. I said yes, you are going to do that. They had to communication similar I can't do that. I said yes, you are. And I said, I'm going to I want you to send me a four page letter or memo about each of your visits, and I'm going to read every one of them. You know, changing a culture is about changing processes. You don't manage a culture directly. You can't just jump on culture and say, change. You have to change what people do and what they value. And what you reward,

IBM McKinsey Alabama
"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:09 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"So I know that at the time when you went to RGR nabisco, there was a lot of, I mean, certainly. A lot of Wall Street analysts were saying, well, what does Luger know about food and tobacco? When you got there, what did you, you know, what did you sort of face? What was the landscape that you were now kind of overseeing? Well, guy, there's a very famous book written about this called Barbarians at the gate. And our jar and nabisco was the 8th most valuable or admired, 8th most admired company in the world, according to, I think, business week at that point. And I was enamored with the idea of now running up very large and successful company, but what happened is that financial markets were going through very difficult times so that I was faced. I had a piece of debt guy that carried a 21% interest rate. Wow. I had another one which was 19 and a half and it was so called pick paper, which means you didn't pay interest. You just paid more debt. And it kept getting reset every year to keep going up and up and up. So what happened at our jar nabisco is I spent most of my time selling assets to pay off the debt that had been created for the LBO. You were selling off companies businesses that were owned by yes, yes. And of course, when you are up against the wall and your balance sheet is about to explode and you're about to lose control of a company, you have to sell the best asset not the worst assets. And you have to take the first price and not the last price. And so we wound up selling some very, very successful companies that had been put together. I mean, our jar nabisco had been assembled over the last decade from a whole bunch of individual companies. And so the food company included lifesavers as well as Oreos, as well as other snack planters, peanuts, and so we sold off everything we could to pay down the debt. And some of those products like, I think, Oreos, for example, are owned by Mondelez today completely different. Company. Right. So you were there, I think, for four years. And I guess while you were even while you were at RJR nabisco, IBM had come knocking a few times interested in sort of gauge measuring your interest in whether you would come there or not, and you would sort of turn them down a couple of times before you agreed to go there. Yes, I left to go to IBM on April 1st, 1993. Appropriately, April Fool's day, and I think that the IBM search started at prior September, they did approach me in they broke a lot of people. It's well documented. And I said immediately, I said, no, I can't run a technology company. I mean, I know I know how to use technology, but I'd certainly can't run a technology company, so no thank you. They came back a few weeks later and said, come on, keep your hat in the ring and I said, I don't have a hat in this ring. And they were, I think, running out of candidates. Well, I don't think anybody wanted that job. And then eventually, they convinced me that there was a leadership challenge not a technology challenge. And then I got a little more interested in it and I went through a series of processes that go look at some of the numbers and then one day I took a walk on the beach and I said, should I do this or should I not do this? I came home and I said to my wife and children well, I'm going to take it. I mean, this was a, I think, incorrectly if I'm wrong, but I think the year that you joined IBM lost a post an $8 billion loss shares of IBM were down to like $12. I mean, the company was just hemorrhaging money. It was a really bad and really bad shape. Presumably, it had to do with the PC clones, right? IBM really didn't positioned. It hadn't positioned itself to compete in that market in a way that it should have. That's correct. And the loss, I believe, that they announced that spring for the prior year was the largest loss that ever recorded up until that point by an American corporation. And yes, let's go back to our success syndrome that we talked about with crowdless checks. IBM had a remarkable business built around mainframes which had really created information technology for the most part. In large institutions around the world. And for reasons that we don't have time to go in and its discussion, people decided they wanted more distributed computing individuals in a corporation wanted access to a terminal where they could do some computing on their own as opposed to running to the IT guy and begging for time. And so the customers started to want distributed computing as it's called, and IBM basically knew that and started really the creation of the PC industry, but then it didn't get behind it. Again, it was so wedded to the mainframe that it really didn't get fully behind in any way. A distributed environment for computing. This is a company that two years before that had shown the biggest profits I think in ever ended by any company. It was always ranked year after year as the number one company in the world. And within a period of three years, it was losing billions of dollars and as I was arriving, the board of directors had decided to break it up into pieces and sell it off. And the company was frozen. People couldn't believe what had happened. They had grown up and IBM was for the most part, were lifers. They had grown up believing they were part of this extraordinary and they were correct. They were part of an extraordinary successful company. But things changed, the world changed, and they didn't change.

nabisco IBM RGR nabisco RJR nabisco Luger LBO Oreos
"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

05:34 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Judgments,

"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:23 min | 6 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Legendary CEOs of the 1990s were people like Jack Welch of GE, or John chambers of Cisco, who was on our show last season. But another name that dominated the Pantheon of great CEOs at the end of last century was Lou gerstner of IBM. Not only was he the first IBM CEO to be recruited from outside the company, but when he was asked to take the job in 1993, Lou gerstner had never really worked for a technology company. And as you'll hear, he arrived to the company in the middle of a huge crisis. Big blue as IBM is known, was one of the biggest players in technology in the world. But as the personal computer revolution started to take off in the 1980s, smaller upstarts like Dell and compaq were leaving IBM in the dust. In addition, Microsoft's window system was crushing IBM's OS two system. An IBM had a decentralized structure that created a whole series of redundancies and inefficiencies. The day Luger arrived at IBM, he famously said quote, the last thing IBM needs right now is a vision. And instead, he focused on things like breaking through IBM's internal bureaucracy and making tough decisions. That approach would pay off because between the time gerstner arrived IBM in 1993, and the time he left 9 years later, the company's market cap went from 29 billion to a 168 billion. But even though Lou gerstner is remembered as a legendary CEO, he says he never intended to lead a company. In fact, he never really considered becoming a businessman at all when he was a kid growing up on Long Island. I grew up in the village of mineola, back then we had some villages in the western part of the island in Nassau county and for the most part the rest of the island was farms. No Long Island expressway, no parkways. And what did your parents do? What do they do for work? My father was the traffic manager for the F and M schaefer brewing company. My mother did something about everything. She was a secretary. She sold real estate. She was an officer in a college working on admission. So whatever she could do, sometimes it was two jobs. My father worked nights. My mother worked days. And pretty religious family. What did you guys go to church every weekend? And we went to church every weekend and on holy days and went to Sunday school and we had crucifixes in most of the rooms in our House. Or were you pretty good student? Yeah, I mean, I worked hard as a student. I don't think much in life comes easy. Maybe there are natural athletes and maybe they're a natural geniuses, but no, I'm a firm believer and I've said to people for many, many years that I believe in that whole prescription that success is 90% perspiration and 10% inspiration. So I did my homework. I worked hard, my parents pushed me. And I enjoyed my work. I enjoyed school, yes. When you went after college, you went to Dartmouth, and then you would go on to Harvard to do a business degree. This isn't necessarily the early to mid 60s. And at that time, I mean, what did you think you should do with your. I mean, did you have a sense of what you wanted to do with your life or what you should do with your life? I had absolutely no idea. One of the reasons that I went to Dartmouth is that it offered a bachelor's degree in a BA while I could study science, which was my interest. And while I was in the engineering program at Dartmouth, my favorite subjects were philosophy and French and subjects like that, which sort of steered me away from engineering school and I'm not quite sure guy that it was terribly insightful, but the alternative was business school at that point. And so the idea was, well, I'll go there and probably get some kind of job. It's some kind of stable job that was probably it was probably a little more confident than that. You know, I had worked almost every summer. During college, I had worked for New York telephone company. I worked for the Scott paper company. I worked for General Motors. All doing summer jobs and got a glimpse into the business world. So I don't think I fell into business, but I don't think I was propelled from my youth. To be a CEO, no. So in your mind, the idea of becoming a corporate executive. This was not a part of the plan. There was no, there's no vision in your mind when you were a younger man that this is what you would do. Absolutely not. I never met a CEO until I was pretty much at a business school. So when you finished, when you finished business school, I mean, today a lot of people who attend business school, particularly Harvard Business school, have dreams of becoming entrepreneurs, as you know, right? This is a really popular area of study, even though a lot of them go on to finance and consulting, there is more of a sort of an entrepreneurial kind of push. When you graduated in 1965, was that was at the case or zero. There was done none. I mean, it might have been a couple of people who thought about it, but I can't remember a classmate of mine. Back when I graduated, the big avenues of attention for MBAs, at least at Harvard, were consulting and consumer products goods. So being a product manager at Colgate or Procter & Gamble, in fact, my choice came down to Procter & Gamble and McKinsey the consulting firm. As to my first job, my first full-time job. And quite frankly, one of the reasons I chose to go to McKinsey is I figured it would be an extension of my education. And that I would learn a lot in a hurry. And Mackenzie had a great reputation at that time as it does now. And I found it extremely helpful in developing skills. And what was the kind of projects that they had you work on? Well, I'll never forget the first project I was asked to work on was a compensation study for an oil company and I said to the senior partner, well, I don't know anything about executive compensation. I don't know anything about oil industry. He said, don't worry, you're just going to do the charts. And so I did the grunt work of analysis and I learned a lot about what it means to take apart a business problem. How to look at the economics of a company, how to understand its competitive analysis, McKinsey was maniacal on making sure that before you made any

IBM Lou gerstner Dartmouth schaefer brewing Long Island John chambers Jack Welch gerstner Luger mineola GE compaq Nassau county Cisco Scott paper company Dell Harvard Microsoft
Ginsburg's art, fur coat, awards in auction to benefit opera

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 10 months ago

Ginsburg's art, fur coat, awards in auction to benefit opera

"IBM's IBM's IBM's IBM's from from from from Ruth Ruth Ruth Ruth Bader Bader Bader Bader Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg office office office office and and and and home home home home are are are are hitting hitting hitting hitting the the the the auction auction auction auction block block block block to to to to benefit benefit benefit benefit one one one one of of of of the the the the late late late late justices justices justices justices passions passions passions passions Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg love love love love the the the the Washington Washington Washington Washington national national national national opera opera opera opera taking taking taking taking part part part part at at at at least least least least three three three three productions productions productions productions over over over over the the the the years years years years now now now now some some some some one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred fifty fifty fifty fifty items items items items she she she she owned owned owned owned will will will will be be be be auctioned auctioned auctioned auctioned online online online online to to to to raise raise raise raise money money money money for for for for the the the the opera opera opera opera there's there's there's there's everything everything everything everything from from from from Picasso Picasso Picasso Picasso to to to to a a a a piece piece piece piece done done done done by by by by her her her her grandson grandson grandson grandson of of of of the the the the justice justice justice justice says says says says the the the the statue statue statue statue of of of of liberty liberty liberty liberty and and and and it it it it says says says says Baba Baba Baba Baba buddy buddy buddy buddy of of of of liberty liberty liberty liberty Potomac Potomac Potomac Potomac company company company company auctions auctions auctions auctions owner owner owner owner Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Haney Haney Haney Haney Wayne Wayne Wayne Wayne Steen Steen Steen Steen we we we we have have have have her her her her make make make make hope hope hope hope that that that that she she she she used used used used to to to to wear wear wear wear to to to to the the the the opera opera opera opera and and and and inside inside inside inside the the the the pocket pocket pocket pocket is is is is her her her her is is is is her her her her name name name name beating beating beating beating on on on on that that that that starts starts starts starts at at at at two two two two hundred hundred hundred hundred fifty fifty fifty fifty dollars dollars dollars dollars some some some some pieces pieces pieces pieces are are are are as as as as low low low low as as as as twenty twenty twenty twenty five five five five dollars dollars dollars dollars about about about about Casal Casal Casal Casal played played played played to to to to that that that that hundred hundred hundred hundred Ginsburg's Ginsburg's Ginsburg's Ginsburg's Watergate Watergate Watergate Watergate dining dining dining dining room room room room will will will will open open open open at at at at four four four four thousand thousand thousand thousand Sager Sager Sager Sager made made made made Donnie Donnie Donnie Donnie Washington Washington Washington Washington

IBM Ruth Ruth Ruth Ruth Bader Bade Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg Gin Washington Washington Washingt Wayne Wayne Steen Steen Picasso Picasso Picasso Picass Justice Justice Justice Justic Liberty Liberty Liberty Libert Baba Baba Baba Baba Buddy Budd Liberty Liberty Liberty Libert Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Ginsburg Casal Casal Casal Casal Sager Sager Sager Sager Donnie Donnie Donnie Donnie Washington
"ibm" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

04:34 min | 10 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"And you worked your way through yours too. Well, mine was, okay, we should just tell very quickly. A lot of people know this. I was a bill collector for IBM through graduate school. And as long as I got a B or an a and a course that's B is a boy, not D is a dog. So as I got an a or B, I would be reimbursed. I had to lay out the tuition and then IBM would reimburse it. And what a deal. And I had always been a pretty indifferent student..

IBM
WSJ: Russians Warn Western Companies of Arrests, Asset Seizures

Mark Levin

01:38 min | 11 months ago

WSJ: Russians Warn Western Companies of Arrests, Asset Seizures

"Russian prosecutors over at right scoops threatened to arrest company leaders seize assets of western companies boycotting Russia over the war Wall Street Journal Russian prosecutors have issued warnings to western companies in Russia Threatening to arrest corporate leaders there who criticized the government or to seize assets of companies that would draw from the country according to people familiar with the matter See this is an economy that's going to implode Prosecutors delivered the warnings in the past week to companies including Coca-Cola See that Coca-Cola the Republican legislature in Georgia looks pretty good about now doesn't it McDonald's Procter & Gamble IBM KFC so forth the call letters and visits included threats to sue the companies and seize assets including trademarks that people said Gee I want to do business in Russia Don't you The warnings have prompted at least one of the targeted companies to limit communications between its Russian business and the rest of the company You got to love these corporatists How they cower Now these are the same companies that are doing enormous amount of business with communist China This is why communist China has to figure out what it wants to do And I think they're going to help Russian no matter what You want to know why Because most of our corporatists are unpatriotic

War Wall Street Journal Russia Coca Republican Legislature Cola Procter & Gamble KFC Mcdonald Georgia IBM China
Omicron was in Netherlands days earlier than first thought

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Omicron was in Netherlands days earlier than first thought

"That's that's helpful helpful for for to to say say the the over over corn corn variant variant was was already already in in the the Netherlands Netherlands when when South South Africa Africa alerted alerted the the World World Health Health Organization Organization about about it it last last week week the the news news adds adds the the fear fear and and confusion confusion over over the the new new version version of of the the corona corona virus virus in in a a weary weary world world hoping hoping it it left left the the worst worst of of the the pandemic pandemic behind behind the the Netherlands Netherlands is is all all IBM IBM health health institute institute has has found found only only calm calm in in some some polls polls dating dating from from November November the the nineteenth nineteenth to to the the twenty twenty third third the the WHO's WHO's says says South South Africa Africa first first reported reported the the variant variant on on November November twenty twenty fourth fourth it it remains remains unclear unclear whether whether that that will will win win the the variant variant first first emerged emerged but but that that hasn't hasn't stopped stopped wary wary nations nations from from rushing rushing to to impose impose travel travel restrictions restrictions especially especially on on visitors visitors coming coming from from southern southern Africa Africa I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

Netherlands Netherlands South South Africa World World Health Health Orga Confusion Africa IBM Charles Charles De De Ledesma
 Pope: Don't send migrants back to Libya and 'inhumane' camps

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Pope: Don't send migrants back to Libya and 'inhumane' camps

"Pope Francis has made a plea to the international community to stop the practice of returning migrants rescued at seats in Libya and other unsafe countries or don't know what the police told his truck I would use it to scrap that human race in the microwave yes and his backline Francis went on to ask the international community find a common concrete and lasting solutions to manage the flow of migrants and IBM across the Mediterranean the pope said those was sent back to Libya are exposed to inhumane violence in detention facility similar to concentration camps the U. N. human rights organizations have condemned the detention centers citing practices of beatings rape and other forms of torture and insufficient food hi

Pope Francis Libya Francis Mediterranean IBM Pope U.
Is America About to Go Through a National Divorce?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Is America About to Go Through a National Divorce?

"A new poll shows that forty one percent of biden voters and fifty two percent of trump voters at least somewhat agree that the time has come the split the country into red and blue states. What is your take on this. What is that paul. Can you send that to me. Connor we have been warning about this for quite some time that the country is about to go to a national divorce and you see a lot of conservative podcasters following our lead on that we've been. We've been on top of that honestly because of you the amazing listeners. You guys have been emailing us. Freedom at charlie kirk dot com and we tens of thousands of emails in every week or two and so we really get a good idea of. What are you thinking. What's going on here. Are you happy with your current government. And so i just wanna thank those of you that amazingly support us. Business insider majority of trump voters believe. It's time to split the country into to. This is where we are headed quickly. I said this in a meeting recently and it just got totally silent people. Decide what do you mean. And by the way let me just be very clear because lot of journalists watch this. I think this is terrible. I don't support it and it is tragic but it's true. This is what's happening university of virginia center for politics poll. Uva surveyed two thousand voters. Half of whom voted for trump hafer biden late july in order to get a better understanding the growing split between the democrat party. So i asked. I asked people to question. What do i have in common with. Ibm inc supporting transgender activists. In san francisco they want peace of people forcibly vaccinated. I don't they think america's racist i don't they think our history goes the gutter. I don't they want our borders open. I want our borders closed. They love the tech companies. I don't they don't revere the constitution. I do go through the list. Besides us both using dollar bills to transact our business relationships. What do i have in common with that person. They're starting to say. I don't wanna live in the same country as them and guess what that's what our side is saying to.

Charlie Kirk Biden Connor University Of Virginia Center Hafer Biden Ibm Inc Paul UVA Democrat Party San Francisco America
Actor Antonio Sabato Jr. On His New Film 'God's Not Dead: We the People'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Actor Antonio Sabato Jr. On His New Film 'God's Not Dead: We the People'

"Guest is antonio salvato junior. I have to lead with something stupid. Tony forgive me man. Thank you very very much for having me on your show. That's fun people magazine. Always wrong so that they were wrong about it. They were should've put. I know they were gonna put me in. But you know what i wasn't willing to grease the palms you know what i'm saying otherwise. Ibm there. i'd be in there. Come on all right so seriously. You know have a background. I mean you've got an amazing story. You grew up in rome and immigrated to the united states of america became an american citizen. You've had a successful career as an actor as a model and now you're in a film which is why you're here today that i'm really excited about. Tell us about this film. Because i actually was going to say that. We need to be inspired. We're going through tough times in america and people need to know what i do. What am i. What is my job today. As an american things are going to hell in handbasket. our liberties being challenged. What do i do. I want to say to people. If you don't have time to read my books about heroes you can watch film and this is what we're this is why you're here. Yeah well god is not dead people. It's it's a. It's a movie than it needs to be seen by everyone by the world. Especially the american people go. God's not dead dot com purchase tickets because these this is only going to be out for a few days. The beginning of october the fourth or fifth and sixth so go to god's dot net dot com and then gave tickets because there's certain times in entertainment world where you have a movie that is gonna impact a lot of lives and right now. Our freedom is being taken away slowly but surely in this country's turning out to be a socialist country and that's a very dangerous place to be because first of all you give too much power to government make decisions for you and all of a sudden they take advantage of you. It take your money and they do absolutely nothing in return. That's that's communism and the socialist attack more. It's worse than doing nothing in return they take your money and use it against you which is really horrifying.

Antonio Salvato United States Of America Tony IBM Rome
Speechly Origin - Hannes Heikenheimo Co-founder and CTO at Speechly - Voicebot Podcast Ep 228 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Speechly Origin - Hannes Heikenheimo Co-founder and CTO at Speechly - Voicebot Podcast Ep 228 - burst 07

"I had hobie project with a colleague in a a student friend of mine who who was a u u x experts and at that time fitbit was very popular job and it was a big thing so we had our fitbit's and and we were excited about that than we're following our calories or all of that and so then then we had this idea. Wouldn't it be cool. That in addition to the burn calories could somehow really nicely calculate the calories that we consume to be able to get a balance of of input and output and was a functionality in and fitbit to to do a meal diary but it was very cumbersome so so we had this idea that we need to make it easier for us to to follow that and we had this idea of of using voice there so so just like if you have a meal it would just list out the items that you eight and the system would compute the calories and so that was sort of a aside project that then i think was really the origin of of speech. Of course like speech we way of thinking because we had a very specific. You you ex you. I in our minds and so we studied the api's at that time and turned out. There was no api that could do the type of experience that we wanted to achieve and and so so that that was sort of the origin and then of course i was working at apple. So i i. I was in the sort of the The epicenter of voice working on on syria and then there was all these very interesting things happening like alexa came out around that time and also advanced like advances in speech recognition so there was a paper in two thousand sixteen from ibm where they got this. First results of human baratheon transcription accuracy. That all of these things sort of somehow brewed in in in my head. And and and so so that i would say those were the things that that then sort of originated the idea behind speech by but a big portion of it was the hobie project we started out with with my

Syria Apple LEE Alexa Siri IBM Hobie
Expand - 2022-03-09 - S14E29  Penultimate Episode Recorded - burst 2

Ubuntu Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Expand - 2022-03-09 - S14E29 Penultimate Episode Recorded - burst 2

"And point to it? And point out the ports to the listeners that join us because I feel like they're missing out on that visual face that you've just given to mark and I you may mark. Yes, we might. I'll allow it. In the retro computing community, this really popular, like for people who use Commodore amiga, they put them in those. People who use IBM PCs, they put them in those, like people like 8 bit guy and knows Richard Abbott, they use these go tech things, because then you don't have a mechanical disc to deal with and you don't have to worry about the motor wearing out all going out heads going out of alignment or the rubber band around the motor perishing. It's all digital. It's no longer mechanical. Actually, another place I've seen these used is appliances that take floppy disks rather than PCs. So things like electric keyboards and embroidery and sewing machines that take programs. A lot of these have been around for a long time and took floppy disks to program them. That's exactly what it's designed for. If you go to the manufacturer's website, it doesn't mention PCs at all. It mentions sewing machines and meaty devices and keyboards and stuff that legacy devices should we say that need access to floppy disk drives for storage that people still want to use. I look forward to the Ubuntu podcast jumper that you're working on for Mark and I for our Christmas present. And with that, let's go on with the rest of the show. And now it's time for the community news and events. And first up in the community news this week, Alan

Alan Pope Mark Johnson Martin Youtube Apple Spotify UK Mark Twitter Alan Google Richard Abbott IBM
The Difference Between Pro-Life and Pro-Choice

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:02 min | 1 year ago

The Difference Between Pro-Life and Pro-Choice

"The rape and incest exception. How many times have you heard somebody say. How many times have you heard. Politician say well. i'm pro-life an ibm. As far as i'm concerned let's outlaw all abortion except for rape and incest. Okay that is not a pro-life politician. You are not a prolife person if you say that. Here's where the heavy lifting begins. It's it is not an easy thing. It is a sobering thing. It is a is a thing of great gravity to address. Shall we say the community of people who have been victims of rape and incest and say guess what his immoral for you to terminate that pregnancy. It just is. But i've been raped. They'll say i understand. And i never walk in those shoes. Obviously the shoes of a rape victim of the shoes of pregnant person. I get that but like what jen psaki might tell you. On a given day men get to weigh in on this too because it is in fact a human life issue and not just a women's issue and here's the bottom line that newly created life no at circumstance is either sacred or it's not the basis of all pro-life ness is that the unborn. Human life is sacred. But just the thing that's kind of some value in a thing we'd like to preserve if you there's inconveniences or no bad circumstance sacred sacred mean sacred you to believe that or you don't if you believe that abortion becomes okay if there's rape and incest than you don't believe in the sacredness of you of that unborn human life and you are thus ready pro choice. You may not be as radically pro-choice somebody. You says that abortion was okay if you just one kid or or whatever but you are nonetheless. Pro-choice the definition of prolife requires the definition of that unborn. Human life is sacred

Jen Psaki IBM
Seth Dobrin Talks About Trustworthy AI

Eye On A.I.

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Seth Dobrin Talks About Trustworthy AI

"We're gonna talk about trustworthy a i. It's something that is increasingly in the news and concerns a lot of people. Ibm has a product called fact sheets. Three sixty that i understand is going to be integrated into products. Can you tell us what fact sheets three sixty is. And then we'll get into the science behind. Yes so let me start by laying out what we see is the critical components Trustworthy a at a high level Three things there's a ethics there's govern dated ai and then there's an open and diverse ecosystem an ai ethics is fully aligned with with our ethical principles that we've published with arbin dr ceo co leading the initiative out of the world economic forum. And i'm adviser for essentially open sourcing our perspective on a ethics from a govern data in ai perspective. It falls into five buckets. So i is. Transparency second is explain ability third is robustness. Fourth is privacy and fifth is fairness and so the goal of fact sheets is to span multiple of these components and to provide a level of explain ability. That is needed to drive adoption and ultimately for regulatory compliance. And you think of it as a nutritional label for ai where nutritional labels are designed to help us as consumers of prepackaged foods to understand what are the nutritional components of him. What's healthy for us. What's not healthy for us. Factually is designed to provide a similar level capability for a.

Arbin Dr Ceo Co IBM
Sebastian Has Made Only One Mistake: Backing Bill Barr

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Sebastian Has Made Only One Mistake: Backing Bill Barr

"Have made one mistake which i have publicly accepted on this show. I have made at least two or three mea culpas and that has to do with a certain member of the administration. I served with a cabinet member. I was just a lowly strategist deputy to the president and that individual was our attorney general. Bill baugh and i have a story to tell you about bilbao from us nine on this show on social media and elsewhere i made statements about bill baugh being a good guy getting to the bottom of things rooting out corruption in the department of justice. Not making an excuse. Because i you know those words when mine but i made those statements based upon things that had been told to me by very good friends. Who'd worked for bill baugh when he had been the attorney general previously in the bush administration. So it's going on socio deemed to be very reliable. And i repeated that affirmation but i was wrong. I was as wrong as wrong. Could be this man is come. He is swamp. Just look into how richie is in where he got his money from. But you don't need to know that stuff. The inside baseball. You need to know what he did or didn't do for the trump administration how he had one job one job to clean out the stygian origin. Stables that were the department of justice just clean it out of corruption of the likes of stroke mccabe at the fbi komai people who weaponize law enforcement and he didn't nothing zip one. One junior loy gets a slap on the wrist for forging cia document. If i'd forced the cia document ibm jail now and be there for a long

Bill Baugh Bilbao Department Of Justice Cabinet Bush Administration Richie Baseball Mccabe FBI LOY CIA IBM
Ethics Panels Reject and Delay Biometrics, AI Projects for Google, IBM, Microsoft

Daily Tech Headlines

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Ethics Panels Reject and Delay Biometrics, AI Projects for Google, IBM, Microsoft

"With ai. Ethics chiefs at google microsoft and ibm published by reuters looks at what. Ai projects these companies reject in september. Twenty twenty google's cloud unit rejected a financial firm looking to us to determine credit worthiness and earlier this year. Google blocked features from analyzing emotions. Ibm turned down a client request for a more advanced facial recognition system microsoft place limits on software mimicking voices. All three companies said they welcomed clear regulation for

Google IBM AI Reuters Microsoft
A Powerful Intersection of AI and Robotic Process Automation With Merve Unuvar

AI in Business

01:54 min | 1 year ago

A Powerful Intersection of AI and Robotic Process Automation With Merve Unuvar

"So marvan. I'm glad to have you here with us on the show and i know we're diving into the topic of rpa intersection with a i. I think given the coverted era is a lot of thinking about gaining efficiencies about finding opportunities for automation when you're working with big enterprises obviously. Ibm works as many of the largest firms in the world. How do you walk people through finding those pockets where automation could make a difference. What does it look like spot opportunities in workflows yet. Thank you that. This is a very interesting area. Especially as he emphasized during this pandemic a company has realized that some of the workflows could be rethought through given most of their workforce with two remote working right so before we discussed this topic further. I'd like to open up the definitions of key concepts here for the audience. So what is it business workflow. It's basically an execution of business processes that contain tasks information and paperwork related to all of these right and then they're passed from one person to another to achieve a business school better. It could be alone operable for a bank or could be a claim submissions furnishings company. So this usually moms one or more people and a hub can best leverage automation in these workflows needs to be thought through in a few dimensions so the first one is from overall process and the workflow performance point of view so in order to analyze the performance. Right manner i. We need to understand the end goal of workflow if he thinks through the same mortgage scenario is the goal to sell more loans or is it to process loans faster or it can be combination of these metrics but we need to really define the key performance indicator or the goal of these workflows and then start monitoring the performance towards these goals and one of the very obvious waste of flying. The pockets of automation is then to find the bottleneck tasks in these workflows that will impact the

Marvan IBM
The Alexa Prize Story - Professor Jan Sedivy on Winning the Alexa Prize SocialBot Challenge and 40 Years in Voice Tech - Voicebot Podcast Ep 225 - burst 05

The Voicebot Podcast

04:28 min | 1 year ago

The Alexa Prize Story - Professor Jan Sedivy on Winning the Alexa Prize SocialBot Challenge and 40 Years in Voice Tech - Voicebot Podcast Ep 225 - burst 05

"I start date group and there were many students who got through Applause am giving the who worked with me. Owner fees asuncion Step by step We have been following the progress in the industry and i was You know get inca people who are more and more interested than who are willing to cooperate and in some i would say like plenty fourteen. He decided to do question answering. So he did the Different knowledge database as son view slowly but surely giving questions like typing questions Did voice until Land the very basics of or the students learn the very basic so unhappy like do data extraction duties on the And then sunday in twenty sixteen. All's own came up with this competition and the competition or the main task of the competition was to create a social boat. Which would engaging louis and also entertainingly talking to users so and the target or the goal of those to talk as long as possible to survey difficult to convert into functional end to any a system function so it was something which is a entertainment as well as mathematics and many many different algorithms in it and a deadline We once of the road is meant a muslim put on there but they just resold so we should try and the weaver very pessimistically plus weaver. starting beautiful He can do these universities. We are admiring from here that they have a much better team. Sunday would be those who would lead. But the thought okay. Let's give it a try so we put together a proposal and the we mainly based on our work in the question onset. Inca believe me or not. We made between the top twelfth. Who was elected as these semi-finalists that time and is brought us like two fifty For students and This money this was something fantastic because this monday helped me to keep the key people on board and no students receive money therefore four day fully concentrated on the problems. We were interested in which was the social. We stopped the to put it together. In a very practical by firestone stopped with trying cody allies debts time grew and neural networks and after a few attempts we thought. Okay that is. This does not work. It's very difficult. And we opt for very simple based system and started to grow a simple system and it worked it did something is and people were able to talk to it so we went on indie competition. The uber very surprised that we were doing very out. We saw on the leaderboard by Even two or the competing sites and we've had been we have been leading so we continued. We ended up in the final on the second sports which was unbelievable. Fantastic success v about twice in seattle Received the mind price in In las vegas so unbelievably nobody for a while. I was in las vegas but none of the students was ever in las vegas. Which is again something you cannot note. See anywhere else. Except in las dos.

Amazon Alexa Prize NLP BOT Conversation Finalist Semi-Finalist IBM Socialbot Cybernetics Robotics Firestone Cody Las Vegas Seattle Las Dos
Is the AI Market Saturated?

Eye On A.I.

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Is the AI Market Saturated?

"My first question is is the market saturated and without picking winners. What products us rising to the top. Good that you're asking this question right now in general timing of the world because here we are for those who are listening to podcast. August the twenty twenty. One people might be listening to this year from now. So this'll all seem really quaint. To those in the future but the markets actually in the midst of consolidation. Saying we're actually starting to see a lot of acquisition activity and we do track over one hundred vendors and machine learning platform space about seventy two of which meet the minimum threshold of viability. There's lots of startups in the space. We love startups. We have an affinity for companies of all sizes but when we're looking at companies who are buying products and services we tend to look at those companies that have either at least ten customers or have at least ten million in revenue or at least ten million dollars in venture capital they if they have like to customers and no venture funding raised in a little bit of revenue than. We're like just grow little bit more a little bit more. So this is about seventy two companies. At least that are in that that john rao of course all the cloud vendors are in that space. The major cloud vendors microsoft. Ibm google amazon And a few others. So those were recalled the cloud sas machine learning as a service vendors basically and then there's a whole other category of pure play machine learning platform vendor so you may be familiar data robot or did i do in that space a bunch of others that are kind of trying to pull together all the components of what's required to put machine learning and advanced analytics solutions into play and increasingly. What they're doing is they're growing through Both building out their product suites and through acquisitions so she did robots but on a tear lately did i. Two as well as been been really growing raise very significant round recently but the answer is that this market is actually starting to

John Rao IBM Amazon Microsoft Google
"ibm" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"ibm" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

"We're going to be walking through the ibm customer data breach This is a annual report from. Ibm security in the analysis of five hundred plus real will die breaches going to be joined by. Chris hawking's chief technology officer advice. They're up there in queensland. And i'm hearing a cd end the birthday of strata airing Lockdown so interesting times nonetheless But this was on from the twenty twenty report where we eating view. Ibm on this looking forward to some of the findings and quite troubling some of these awnings also without further. I'll bring on. Chris hawking's the chase technology officer with. Ibm security chris. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me chris men. Thank you chris So we'll just keep going as well I haven't interviewed chris for a long time I think the last one was the astronaut Crisslow think that. I'm chris in queensland interesting times to say the least at the moment It may be introduced as to role that was one. Obviously people will be tuning in for the database report and some of the findings. But i think things say ti With ibm security in the region. I think it gives a context to to what your observations are in the latest into. The report will thanks. chris and Seventy guests that. I knew as well as part of your sessions Yeah i guess my role of in. Ibm since two thousand. When company that i worked full at the university was acquired by vm. We're the first acquisition audion mike in the modern security era and i. I am still in queensland. We have an hour. Nathe exports software To the global region actually the people would say his initial products that we that. We've so i in the region solve nah working in. Ibm insecurity for all of us through all of the challenges and being able to stein ussery. Obviously i've had different roles Subic but if he is came back here as part of the business helping to define and defined a strategy gotta market Focus and People like yourself and reflecting guess l..

Ibm Chris hawking chris queensland chris men Crisslow stein ussery Subic
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ibm a podcast. From pushkin industries high heart media and ibm about what it means to look at today's most challenging problems in a new way. I'm malcolm god well in this episode. I'm speaking with jim. Whitehurst senior adviser at ibm in his time with ibm as both an advisor and former president. Jim was responsible for the ibm cloud and cognitive software organization and corporate strategy. Jim is an expert in open innovation during his time as president of ibm. Jim embedded his philosophy into the company helping clients and partners on their own digital transformation journeys. Today we'll be talking about the ways open. Culture accompanies can change the way we lead and work together realize. Hey this isn't insanity your chaos..

ibm pushkin industries high heart Jim Whitehurst malcolm jim
"ibm" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"ibm" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Not make. It seem like a human being because there is this relationship design that timing here right in. If you break the trust early on you'll never get us about. S- offense wins. Even insoles is always being cleared about how Has been news is also about privacy and so many so it's about safeguarding custer on consumer privacy and rights in you know it's ensuring security of models and data and all of that but at the end of the day we need to be transferred to our users that the is therefore they're good. It's being driven from data. Says those trustable is giving them insights and data points that they could actually act on to make their job better so going back to expandability right. Chance for instance. There are also interlinked before we finish up. Won't question me like taffy blonde. This podcast is someone in the industry to you. Sort of aspire to or your inspired by our our whose work you love and kind of recommend listeners. Who are interested in learning more about this kind of go checkout unfunny for that question. My answer might be a little shape but i truly believe in from a crack standpoint and quality of design. I am a big fan of johnny. Johnny is apple's yeah yes Not just for the products but at the designing for the details right. That's amazing on a design as a practice user. Expediency is usability. The of building products did the regular six. But that i look don norman and he is probably one of the reasons. Lie in this field has been read. His book design of. Everybody thinks it just opened up my mind a lot so those will be two people think go. Some tasks are to to designers. Sometimes out of my daft on a design discussion but to designers don unfamiliar. With even i have heard of. Lastly before we finish up where kerner listeners goes kind of kibo but you and your twitter at our bombing lincoln have a medium publication were Stories as all. But i'd also say that is not just me Present is some of the goodness in the great for. Ibm dead so interested in knowing a little bit more about some of the things. I've talked about ibm dot com slash design slash thinking. It has a lot more information about how you can start thinking about designing for a is. So there's the i essential still can so. Yeah you can try. That is fantastic. Thank you so much on them. I definitely having checking at those resources in preparation for this. Ibm dot com. And i thought they were great. So thank you very much for being here with us today on. Can't wait to see the direction does you in. Ibm in this area. Thank you so much if you enjoyed our chat with our make. Sure you don't miss any upcoming episodes by following us on i tunes overcast spotify or your usual podcast platform. This is inside intercom..

don unfamiliar don norman johnny Johnny kerner Ibm apple lincoln twitter ibm
"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"This tube for modern times a person can quickly master sex jobs as accounting or word processing even used the ibm personal computer de forecast group all helping the business person at home to wear many hats. That's an ad for the one. The only ibm personal computer released. In august of nineteen eighty-one. The pc was a watershed moment. For computing look no further than your own desk or even the closest internet connection most computers in twenty twenty one are still based off. Ibm's original design that ranges from the cheapest laptops up to the bulky servers. Keep the internet running the newer one devices. That apple started manufacturing. Wouldn't be interesting or new if they weren't trying to break from long established convention in that sense very much still seeing ripples of nineteen eighty-one in the modern day but was the pc really a tool for modern times. Was it really even modern in the time it was produced by today's standards. Definitely not the heart of the pc intel's eighty eighty eight microprocessor was already starting to show its age. When ibm's new computer hit the scene but chip came complete with nearly a decade's worth of legacy and baggage the pc would be marketed as a sixteen bit computer but it came loaded out with a smattering of eight. Bit parts despite all that this one system became the blueprint for computing for decades to come. The pc broke from ibm's tradition. It opened the doors to outside developers and by doing so it changed computing forever but looking at the bill of parts. It's hard to see how that change was even possible somehow. Ibm was able to make magic happen. Break all their own rules and build a future out of the most unexpected components back to advent of computing. I'm your host sean. Has and this is episode fifty one the ibm pc. This is going to be a companion to last episode which covered the development and release of the intel eighty six processor. All episode fifty isn't required to enjoy today's episode. I'd recommend giving it a listen. The eighty six and the pc are kind of two sides of the same coin. It's hard to talk about one without addressing the other this will also be a bit of an epilogue to my series on intel's processors so it wouldn't hurt to be up to date the series so far has covered the four zero four eight zero eight. The eighty ibm's first brush with intel and then finally arrived at the eighty eighty six. That's a lot of eight thousand zeros and a lot of silicon. But we've made it to the payoff to where intels processors into the mainstream in a massive way now. If were to make a list of the most important computers of all time the ibm pc would have to be pretty high up there. It wasn't just a personal computer. It was the personal computer. From which modern systems draw their basic design the development overall architecture and administrative choices surrounding the computer lead to runaway success after ibm blew up in the market. Third party started producing compatible. Pc clones and from there a kind of unintended standard formed. The pc became the defacto in home. Computing up into the current day at the core of the ibm pc was intel's eighty eighty eight microprocessor. That's a modified version of the eighty. Six this is important because ibm's decision and the ensuing pc explosion solidified x eighty six processors as a core part of the p. c. standard. That meant that. Hold a bag around intel. Stopgap chip became part of. Ibm's new baggage but outside of the weird legacy stuff when we get down to it. The ibm pc was a really weird computer especially by ibm standards. The intel chip that made the computer tick was just one aspect of that strangeness. So let's dive into my long overdue coverage of the original. Pc how did ibm's earlier love affair with small computers. Come to a head. What made the pc so different than other ibm systems. That came before it. How did intel get wrapped up in all of this and to round everything out. What would have happened if ibm an intel had never met what were those other options. That didn't come to pass. Honestly it's not hold it easy to find a good starting point for the story of the. Ibm pc in the early. Seventies is probably the best place at least in my opinion this is where the actual product designation numbers start to matter. Officially the ibm pc was called the ibm fifty one fifty which puts it squarely in part of an earlier product. Line the story of that product. Line the fifty. One hundred series is a little convoluted. I covered it back in the archives. An episode called ibm gets personal to quickly. Summarize the key points engineers inside ibm started to realize that they could build a small computer to sell to small businesses. This led to a computer known as the fifty one hundred. An all in-house system developed designed and manufactured by ibm at the time. That was just how ibm did things. Control was a key part of the company's outlook so the fifty one hundred had no third party parts in it. Save for crt tube and a tape. Drive the fifty. One hundred. didn't well mainly because it was insanely expensive. Ibm still very much in the mindset of selling multimillion dollar mainframes over the next few years the computer was revised the fifty one hundred. Turn the fifty one ten and then the fifty one twenty.

august sixteen bit eight apple intel eighty eighty eight one system today nineteen eighty-one one devices ibm a decade twenty twenty one decades -one nineteen eighty