35 Burst results for "IBM"

Biden Administration Will Not Require COVID-19 Vaccine Passports, White House Says

Fox News

01:44 min | 3 d ago

Biden Administration Will Not Require COVID-19 Vaccine Passports, White House Says

"Proof will be required for entry. But while schools and businesses may want some documentation, the idea of a vaccine passport is not going to be mandated by the federal government, at least, according to White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki. The government is not Now, nor will we be supporting system that requires Americans to carry a credential. There will be no federal vaccinations database and no federal mandate requiring everyone to obtain a single vaccination. Credential. She did say their concern was with protecting Americans. Privacy colleges like Rutgers, Duke Brown Cornell are requiring students to get vaccinated. Cruise lines like Norwegian and American Queen Steamboat will require all guests and staff to be vaccinated. The MBA announced last week, a partnership with a comedy called Clear, which has developed a health pass AP Clear says it offers covert symptoms surveys but also a way to store test and vaccine data. The Miami Heat has started allowing fully vaccinated people who can prove it. Sit in two sections closer to the court. They still have to wear masks. Last week, the Mets announced they'd also be using clears health passed to confirm a fan's negative covert tests before game attendance. MGM Resorts is also partnering with clear, as is Las Vegas Sands Corporation. And, of course, as you might imagine, the airlines are considering all of this to their trade group. The IA Thia says they've been working on a travel pass. Different countries have different covert restrictions before entering. And while New York was the first state to create a so called vaccine passport with the Excelsior past other states are interested. Hawaii is partnering with clear and the Commons Project Foundation on digital vaccine authentication. IBM is also working on a digital health past using Blockchain technology. So is all of this A good idea. Is it legal? Should we be calling this

Jen Psaki Duke Brown Cornell American Queen Steamboat Mgm Resorts Federal Government White House Rutgers Las Vegas Sands Corporation MBA Mets Miami Thia Commons Project Foundation On Excelsior New York Hawaii IBM
Digital papers, please? New York rolls out COVID-19 vaccine passport

News, Traffic and Weather

00:54 sec | Last week

Digital papers, please? New York rolls out COVID-19 vaccine passport

"Passports are being touted as an easy way to verify a person has received one of the corona virus vaccines or tested negative for the virus. Jason Kelly is the general manager of global strategic alliances at IBM, which helped develop New York's Excelsior Pass, You see an app that includes a Q R code. They took a test and when the negative test they then had that You are code pushed to their home. When someone scans the QR code, they can access the state's health data. Some critics were skeptical of carrying around personal health data on a smartphone. But Kelly says the APP doesn't collect any information on individuals that Q R code is really The past. So there's no data on your phone. It's just a Q R code with Tech trends. Chuck's Iverson ABC News Before I was adopted, I felt like nobody wanted me. I felt like my life

Jason Kelly IBM New York Kelly Abc News Chuck
The Art of Business Wars: Positioning

Business Wars Daily

02:43 min | 2 weeks ago

The Art of Business Wars: Positioning

"Second. Happy friday everyone all week. We've been bringing you stories based on the lessons in our new book. The art of business wars which comes out on april thirteenth. If you haven't heard the episodes we earlier this week you may want to check those out. I today's lesson from the art of business. Wars is positioning. The skillful fighter puts himself into a position which makes defeat impossible. That's pro tip. From chinese general sons in his text the art of war and in war as in business if a company can find advantageous position in the market and stake. It's claim their success will likely follow someone who knew a thing or two about successful market positioning the late apple. Founder steve jobs in nineteen ninety two after jobs had been pushed out of his own company. Apple rolled out the newton message pad sort of virtual calendar and address book. Remember that the newton gained a devoted following but when jobs returned to the helm of apple in nineteen ninety seven. He promptly cancelled the product. Why well during the years jobs was away from the company apple had lost. Its distinct position. Apple had initially succeeded because it positioned itself as a maker of personal computers not business machines like then dominant brand ibm but with jobs away. Apple put out product after product until it wasn't entirely obvious what the company actually stood for when he returned jobs knew he had to make sacrifices to clarify apple's position as a maker of personal computers so he slashed several products until only four computers remained suddenly apple had regained its focus accompanies position must evolve with the market however jobs knew that by two thousand one apple was ready to take more risks. So jobs introduced the ipod and then six years later. I bet you know where this is going. The iphone came on the scene and it became a cultural phenomenon. Now the success of the iphone wasn't a given especially because research in motion already had pocket-sized communication device in the market. Remember the blackberry. Or i am had successfully positioned that device not as one that would be wildly popular with everyday consumers but as a necessary product for business people the only one secure

Apple Jobs Steve Jobs IBM
Ok, Will Digital Vaccine Passports Work?

Techmeme Ride Home

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Ok, Will Digital Vaccine Passports Work?

"Digital testing tracing apps on smartphones did not exactly pan out as some of us thought though. I have heard that these kind of apps are used more extensively in some countries than you might think. Ok though now what sort of odds would you give me that digital vaccine passports will take off. New york state has launched the first. Us vaccine passport app. Excelsior pass built on ibm's blockchain based health pass platform quoting usa today. The first in the nation certification called the excelsior pass will be useful. I at large scale venues like madison square garden. But next week we'll be accepted at dozens of events arts and entertainment venues statewide. It already enables people to increase the size of a wedding party or other catered event. The app championed by governor andrew cuomo to support the recovery of industries most affected by the pandemic is funded by the state and available for free to businesses and anyone with vaccine records or test results in new york like an airline boarding pass. People will be able to prove their health status with a digital. Qr code or quick response machine readable label. They'll need to download the accelerator pass. App enter their name date of birth zip code and answer a series of personal questions to confirm their identity. The data will come from the states vaccine registry and also will be linked to testing data from a number of pre-approved testing companies. The new york system built on ibm's digital health past platform is provided via blockchain technology. So neither ibm nor any business will have access to private medical information and entertainment. Venue will simply scan the qr code and get a green check or a red x. and quote.

Governor Andrew Cuomo IBM Madison Square Garden Usa Today New York United States
State of New York Launches 'Excelsior Pass' That Shows Vaccine Status

the NewsWorthy

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

State of New York Launches 'Excelsior Pass' That Shows Vaccine Status

"It's the first state to launch a sort of covid nineteen vaccine passport as in a digital pass that can be used as proof. You've been vaccinated against covid. Nineteen or gotten a recent negative test is not actually called passport. Though the state of new york launched what it calls the excelsior pass and starting this week. Madison square garden in new york city plans to use it with other smaller event. Venues and businesses expected to start using this tech soon. New york has partnered with ibm for this. And the governor's office describes it like an airline boarding pass so people can either store it and show their pass on their smartphone or print out the pass then venues or businesses can scan the qr code to see green check or red x. It's all paid for by the state and it's free for individuals and businesses there to use supporters. Say this is just another tool to help safely. Get the economy going again. And to save local businesses. State officials are also stressing. It's all voluntary private and secure for everyone involved. The tech is go on blockchain technology. Either ibm nor any of the businesses will be able to see any additional medical info. Still critics argue. People should not have to share any type of health data just to go to certain events businesses either way expect to hear more about these types of passes or certifications in the months ahead and not just from states some cruise lines sports teams and other companies have said they may also require proof of vaccination before their doors once again.

New York Madison Square Garden IBM New York City
New York Launches Vaccine Status Mobile Phone App

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

New York Launches Vaccine Status Mobile Phone App

"Status. Officials say the Excelsior past will give people quicker access to gatherings, including sports arenas and large weddings where the state's public health Ruth rules are still in effect, NPR's Brian Mann reports. When Governor Andrew Cuomo gave a briefing this week, He talked a lot about re opening businesses and venues getting the economy going again. But he also gave a warning. We have made tremendous progress, but anyone who says it's over They're wrong. 71 people passed away. There are still thousands of new coronavirus cases confirmed in New York every day and dozens of deaths. The challenge, says Mark Door with the New York State Hospitality and Tourism Association is reopening more places like sports arenas and Broadway theaters when the Corona virus is still lurking. I think confidence is the biggest dilemma I guess to overcome as we head into the busy season confidence and getting people out to travel, so New York State partnered with IBM to create Smart device app that includes a scannable barcode similar to the one used in airline boarding passes. They say it's voluntary. It's free. The download keeps most of your personal information, private. Horses. Business venues can check customers barcodes to find out if they've been vaccinated or tested negative for the Corona virus. Within the last three days, the business will be able to really quickly recognize. At the proper protocols have been followed in order to have a safe entry into the business from the start of the pandemic. Smart devices have been used for contact tracing and public health alerts. Disappears to be the first app in the US that shows this kind of personal corona virus status, though officials in Hawaii or working on a similar vaccine passport, Melissa Fly Shoot, who heads the New York State Restaurant Association. Doesn't think smaller venues like

Brian Mann Governor Andrew Cuomo Mark Door New York State Hospitality And NPR Ruth New York IBM Melissa Fly Hawaii New York State Restaurant Asso United States
New York Launches Digital 'Excelsior Pass' To Prove COVID Vaccinations

Financial Quarterback With Josh Jalinski

00:26 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York Launches Digital 'Excelsior Pass' To Prove COVID Vaccinations

"The Excelsior Pass, which aims to fast track the reopening process. Post pandemic. It's a free digital pass access through your smartphone that lets people share covert vaccination information or negative test status. Governor Cuomo calls this proven and secure technology, developed in partnership with IBM. Excelsior past can be used in arenas like Madison Square Garden, wedding venues, participating theaters and other large gatherings. The

Governor Cuomo IBM Madison Square Garden
Environmental Consultant Stacey Isaac Berahzer Is All About Water

Breaking Green Ceilings

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Environmental Consultant Stacey Isaac Berahzer Is All About Water

"My name is stacey isaac raza. I run a stall environmental. Consulting firm called ibm environmental. We only like released added in september two thousand and two but it's been a funding so far i got into the field of voice against the movie was in my undergraduate degree where i had an internship during the semester and ended up doing what follows the stuff i did. Different things that boost. But or woulda i ended up on everything from yeah into of indexing different streams or what bodies within the us different shopping segments into of the solid With anything different refinements ec had put a designated saddam will not and so that's probably rare relieve loyal insufficiently symptoms. And you also have an interesting background. You're from trinidad. And most people probably don't know much about tim's of its water issues to my kind of giving us a bit of an overview of the water situation there absolutely. I didn't grow up. Include noninvasive tobacco. Which is an island. Republican the caribbean to in small islands in the tropics through a good bit of rainfall but in terms of the island environment awards the russia's off the land pretty quickly storing capturing and storing it for human is is enforced sunday challenge also the high volumes of reform that we have signed in an island environment trindad coupled with developments and develop lines construction on even navas mountain range the the non arranging and of course issues flooding on the last couple of decades

Stacey Isaac Raza IBM EC Saddam Trinidad TIM Caribbean United States Russia Navas Mountain
Pride Leadership with Dr. Steve Yacovelli

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

06:48 min | Last month

Pride Leadership with Dr. Steve Yacovelli

"Is the secret of great leadership engagement as part of that or not but will it and it's a great question. it's funny. I've had a gentleman asked me when i launched my latest book. Pride leadership last summer. Not this past one. But the one pre code i i'd say and the germans said what's the secret leadership i said. There is one really like yes. There is as an if you if you take my three hundred sixty five page book. Boil it down to one page with one word. The key secret to is trust. So if i'm a good leader. And i can foster trust within my team and team doesn't have to be direct reports. It can be those around me. My bosses my clients. Whoever that is if you foster trust your gold. So i said know one word on one page. That's the secret to leadership but police buy my book. Anyway i'm sure there's lots more golden. Well actually since you brought it up. Why don't we. Why don't we go there and tell me a little bit more about the book. Yeah so like. I said technically my third book i with a real publisher which has been exciting different process. But i've been in love in the leadership and diversity inclusion space pretty much my whole career. You said i did. It was it disney. Ibm for a while as internal people who kind of went out on my own in two thousand eight as a full-time gig and worked with some awesome clients but you start to see leaders and leadership pattern for those who are just like rock and roll and be an awesome leaders and the ones who are crashing and burning and not doing so well the little qualitative research nerd in me was kind of just observing and all this stuff gathering that data if you will and then. I'm at a conference a couple years ago and sorting business cards go before session. This woman's next we actually doing the same thing and she's like what do you do. And i said well you diversity change management will. I said how about you. She's like. I'm a publisher mike. You know what. There's a book in my head that needs to come out. She's like let's get that book out. And so jen became was your and it really just got me starting to think about you. Putting these observations that had over the course of my career down in into play. Since i started. Kind of mapping that and then you know not not long after that. I started looking at some of the leaders around me i do a lot of work advocacy work of volunteer work especially for the lgbtq community as well as others just kind of helping foster equity and justice for the quote unquote others in the world. I through the lens because leadership is top of mind. I'm started watching these leaders. Do what it is they do especially the successful ones. And then if you remember that. Tv show from from back when sex in the city always computer. She's like. I couldn't help but wonder and i actually kind of popped in my head. I couldn't have put wonder if as an lgbtq blue person you have an opportunity to exercise leadership differently or in an in a unique way then our street brothers and sisters for example out of the story some competencies i wanted to play with. I would've down to six in this holding up my mouse pad which just happens it here. It's branded with license competencies. So they're authentic authenticity. Courage empathy communication relationships and culture. And so let's talk about empathy for a second. If i'm out gay man in the workplace when we could work that's leading very authentically in a different way. That may be my straight brothers and sisters are doing so. I'm not saying that. Gay leaders are better than others. But i write it. Probably lucia that. There's an opportunity for people to Maybe exercised those those leadership comedies. That everybody really should be focusing. Their energy on the basis of leadership allies. Love it to trust me. I have had that feedback along So it's not just for gays anymore. But it's really went through the looking at these six competencies through that specific. Yeah i think that's great and it really just makes sense because because yeah you have people who are Who fall fall in one of those communities. They really have had challenges. I think in particular i mean. Just you know personally. I mean it's i mean we've seen it earlier this year with the black lives matter movement and and so when you've got sort of you know couple strikes against you you've got to learn how to be able to maneuver in the business world or or your personal life and be able to find ways to have common ground which is something that we need so much of him so many aspects of her life frankly not just not just the business world as well but Well and which. I guess maybe maybe you can speak on. This is then how do i. I would thinking of people who've gone through unique challenges. Whatever it is and this can even be people who have Physical disabilities as well right that. How does one become. How do you kind of come up with fostering resilience especially when you're having to deal with maybe people who don't see either you or who just have a different way of you know just how how the world should work and your different and it's it's such a great question especially now one of the things that i also say is a key to leadership that and it's one of the skills that i don't feel that people leverage it enough is the concept of listening but it's not just you know it's stephen covey great leadership guru. It's listen to understand versus listen to respond and to far too often especially in western society in. Us society we tend to just listen to give our two sets and instead let let's. Let's do that active listening. Actually i talked about that in my my communication chapter is how can you. You could pull the fright of being empathetic through the action of being an effective and active listener. And so i think that's one of the ways that we can start to really see from different perspective. Especially if we're not really in in that frame of mind and i also i also acknowledged that one of the things that i really try to is my my soapbox if you will is is fostering leaders to be more consciously inclusive and so it really does mean getting in into my own head. I tried to reduce some of those those unconscious biases. And maybe maybe over by susanna might have. They're really work on myself. I and i kind of talk about that as i think. In methodology work on me first. And then i can start to what i call. Speak up on behalf of those around me and then really act out meeting look at the broader organization. We're talking we're plays or society. In general what are ways we can foster inclusivity and belonging for everyone and so it. Oh it's only the ultimately does start within my own

IBM Disney JEN Mike Lucia Stephen Covey Susanna United States
Mavericks pull away late to beat Spurs 115-104

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Mavericks pull away late to beat Spurs 115-104

"Look at dodges had a triple double and the Mavericks closed on a seventeen four run to beat the spurs one fifteen one oh four Dodge each finished with twenty two points twelve rebounds and twelve assists for his thirty third career triple double Kristaps porzingis chipped in twenty eight points and fourteen boards for Dallas early on was really getting well some some looks that but I would like to go to a store credit and IBM's my teammates found me certain that plays basketball and that just gives energy on defense the martyr Roseanne had thirty points eleven assists and four steals in the spurs first game since announcing that lamarcus Aldridge would no longer be with the team by mutual agreement I'm the ferry

Kristaps Porzingis Dodges Spurs Mavericks Dodge Dallas IBM Roseanne Basketball Lamarcus Aldridge
"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

05:28 min | Last month

"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"Ibm have to fully give up control over their new computer would have to take a page from the playbook of these smaller manufacturers. Or you know just go out and buy a small manufacturer to use either way. Taking a totally different angle of attack would save development time and hopefully lead to a successful new personal computer. Ibm was already tinkering with this line of thinking. The data master still in development at this point was using intel chips inside it. The software and overall design was still ibm third parties were creeping into the picture. Low proposed a total completion of this process. Quote the key decisions were to go with an open architecture. Non ibm technology not ibm software. Non ibm sales and non ibm service. And we probably spent a full half of the presentation carrying the corporate management committee into this concept because this was a new concept for ibm at this point in quote it took some convincing but nineteen eighty saw the birth of a new project. That was unlike anything. Ibm had done before lobes proposing an ibm computer that wasn't made with ibm technology. And this brings us to something totally unexpected. At least something that. I didn't expect at all in my head. I always just assumed the story of the pac would be pretty cut and dry aid to be to see with nice sources stacked up in a neat little pile but dude listener. That is not entirely the case. Primary sources on the pc's development are scarce. Ran into much more scantily documented stories. But there aren't as many as i assumed making all the more frustrating. There are actually a lot of rumors and very poorly. Substantiated claims around the pc's early development history. One of those rumors is the billow tried to get atari to manufacture a personal computer for ibm. Now i've also seen the phrase online as ibm tried to outright by atari to form some new home computing division. This is a bit hard for me to address because like i mentioned the story of the. Pac isn't paved with excruciatingly detailed primary.

atari One intel nineteen eighty playbook ibm
"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

06:23 min | Last month

"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"This tube for modern times a person can quickly master sex jobs as accounting or word processing even used the ibm personal computer de forecast group all helping the business person at home to wear many hats. That's an ad for the one. The only ibm personal computer released. In august of nineteen eighty-one. The pc was a watershed moment. For computing look no further than your own desk or even the closest internet connection most computers in twenty twenty one are still based off. Ibm's original design that ranges from the cheapest laptops up to the bulky servers. Keep the internet running the newer one devices. That apple started manufacturing. Wouldn't be interesting or new if they weren't trying to break from long established convention in that sense very much still seeing ripples of nineteen eighty-one in the modern day but was the pc really a tool for modern times. Was it really even modern in the time it was produced by today's standards. Definitely not the heart of the pc intel's eighty eighty eight microprocessor was already starting to show its age. When ibm's new computer hit the scene but chip came complete with nearly a decade's worth of legacy and baggage the pc would be marketed as a sixteen bit computer but it came loaded out with a smattering of eight. Bit parts despite all that this one system became the blueprint for computing for decades to come. The pc broke from ibm's tradition. It opened the doors to outside developers and by doing so it changed computing forever but looking at the bill of parts. It's hard to see how that change was even possible somehow. Ibm was able to make magic happen. Break all their own rules and build a future out of the most unexpected components back to advent of computing. I'm your host sean. Has and this is episode fifty one the ibm pc. This is going to be a companion to last episode which covered the development and release of the intel eighty six processor. All episode fifty isn't required to enjoy today's episode. I'd recommend giving it a listen. The eighty six and the pc are kind of two sides of the same coin. It's hard to talk about one without addressing the other this will also be a bit of an epilogue to my series on intel's processors so it wouldn't hurt to be up to date the series so far has covered the four zero four eight zero eight. The eighty ibm's first brush with intel and then finally arrived at the eighty eighty six. That's a lot of eight thousand zeros and a lot of silicon. But we've made it to the payoff to where intels processors into the mainstream in a massive way now. If were to make a list of the most important computers of all time the ibm pc would have to be pretty high up there. It wasn't just a personal computer. It was the personal computer. From which modern systems draw their basic design the development overall architecture and administrative choices surrounding the computer lead to runaway success after ibm blew up in the market. Third party started producing compatible. Pc clones and from there a kind of unintended standard formed. The pc became the defacto in home. Computing up into the current day at the core of the ibm pc was intel's eighty eighty eight microprocessor. That's a modified version of the eighty. Six this is important because ibm's decision and the ensuing pc explosion solidified x eighty six processors as a core part of the p. c. standard. That meant that. Hold a bag around intel. Stopgap chip became part of. Ibm's new baggage but outside of the weird legacy stuff when we get down to it. The ibm pc was a really weird computer especially by ibm standards. The intel chip that made the computer tick was just one aspect of that strangeness. So let's dive into my long overdue coverage of the original. Pc how did ibm's earlier love affair with small computers. Come to a head. What made the pc so different than other ibm systems. That came before it. How did intel get wrapped up in all of this and to round everything out. What would have happened if ibm an intel had never met what were those other options. That didn't come to pass. Honestly it's not hold it easy to find a good starting point for the story of the. Ibm pc in the early. Seventies is probably the best place at least in my opinion this is where the actual product designation numbers start to matter. Officially the ibm pc was called the ibm fifty one fifty which puts it squarely in part of an earlier product. Line the story of that product. Line the fifty. One hundred series is a little convoluted. I covered it back in the archives. An episode called ibm gets personal to quickly. Summarize the key points engineers inside ibm started to realize that they could build a small computer to sell to small businesses. This led to a computer known as the fifty one hundred. An all in-house system developed designed and manufactured by ibm at the time. That was just how ibm did things. Control was a key part of the company's outlook so the fifty one hundred had no third party parts in it. Save for crt tube and a tape. Drive the fifty. One hundred. didn't well mainly because it was insanely expensive. Ibm still very much in the mindset of selling multimillion dollar mainframes over the next few years the computer was revised the fifty one hundred. Turn the fifty one ten and then the fifty one twenty.

august sixteen bit eight apple intel eighty eighty eight one system today nineteen eighty-one one devices ibm a decade twenty twenty one decades -one nineteen eighty
The Evolution Of The IBM PC

Advent of Computing

06:23 min | Last month

The Evolution Of The IBM PC

"This tube for modern times a person can quickly master sex jobs as accounting or word processing even used the ibm personal computer de forecast group all helping the business person at home to wear many hats. That's an ad for the one. The only ibm personal computer released. In august of nineteen eighty-one. The pc was a watershed moment. For computing look no further than your own desk or even the closest internet connection most computers in twenty twenty one are still based off. Ibm's original design that ranges from the cheapest laptops up to the bulky servers. Keep the internet running the newer one devices. That apple started manufacturing. Wouldn't be interesting or new if they weren't trying to break from long established convention in that sense very much still seeing ripples of nineteen eighty-one in the modern day but was the pc really a tool for modern times. Was it really even modern in the time it was produced by today's standards. Definitely not the heart of the pc intel's eighty eighty eight microprocessor was already starting to show its age. When ibm's new computer hit the scene but chip came complete with nearly a decade's worth of legacy and baggage the pc would be marketed as a sixteen bit computer but it came loaded out with a smattering of eight. Bit parts despite all that this one system became the blueprint for computing for decades to come. The pc broke from ibm's tradition. It opened the doors to outside developers and by doing so it changed computing forever but looking at the bill of parts. It's hard to see how that change was even possible somehow. Ibm was able to make magic happen. Break all their own rules and build a future out of the most unexpected components back to advent of computing. I'm your host sean. Has and this is episode fifty one the ibm pc. This is going to be a companion to last episode which covered the development and release of the intel eighty six processor. All episode fifty isn't required to enjoy today's episode. I'd recommend giving it a listen. The eighty six and the pc are kind of two sides of the same coin. It's hard to talk about one without addressing the other this will also be a bit of an epilogue to my series on intel's processors so it wouldn't hurt to be up to date the series so far has covered the four zero four eight zero eight. The eighty ibm's first brush with intel and then finally arrived at the eighty eighty six. That's a lot of eight thousand zeros and a lot of silicon. But we've made it to the payoff to where intels processors into the mainstream in a massive way now. If were to make a list of the most important computers of all time the ibm pc would have to be pretty high up there. It wasn't just a personal computer. It was the personal computer. From which modern systems draw their basic design the development overall architecture and administrative choices surrounding the computer lead to runaway success after ibm blew up in the market. Third party started producing compatible. Pc clones and from there a kind of unintended standard formed. The pc became the defacto in home. Computing up into the current day at the core of the ibm pc was intel's eighty eighty eight microprocessor. That's a modified version of the eighty. Six this is important because ibm's decision and the ensuing pc explosion solidified x eighty six processors as a core part of the p. c. standard. That meant that. Hold a bag around intel. Stopgap chip became part of. Ibm's new baggage but outside of the weird legacy stuff when we get down to it. The ibm pc was a really weird computer especially by ibm standards. The intel chip that made the computer tick was just one aspect of that strangeness. So let's dive into my long overdue coverage of the original. Pc how did ibm's earlier love affair with small computers. Come to a head. What made the pc so different than other ibm systems. That came before it. How did intel get wrapped up in all of this and to round everything out. What would have happened if ibm an intel had never met what were those other options. That didn't come to pass. Honestly it's not hold it easy to find a good starting point for the story of the. Ibm pc in the early. Seventies is probably the best place at least in my opinion this is where the actual product designation numbers start to matter. Officially the ibm pc was called the ibm fifty one fifty which puts it squarely in part of an earlier product. Line the story of that product. Line the fifty. One hundred series is a little convoluted. I covered it back in the archives. An episode called ibm gets personal to quickly. Summarize the key points engineers inside ibm started to realize that they could build a small computer to sell to small businesses. This led to a computer known as the fifty one hundred. An all in-house system developed designed and manufactured by ibm at the time. That was just how ibm did things. Control was a key part of the company's outlook so the fifty one hundred had no third party parts in it. Save for crt tube and a tape. Drive the fifty. One hundred. didn't well mainly because it was insanely expensive. Ibm still very much in the mindset of selling multimillion dollar mainframes over the next few years the computer was revised the fifty one hundred. Turn the fifty one ten and then the fifty one twenty.

IBM Intel Apple Sean Third Party
Quantum technology and implications for security in todays computer infrastructure

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

04:41 min | Last month

Quantum technology and implications for security in todays computer infrastructure

"Welcome to the cybersecurity weekly podcast. I'm jay lewis podcasting from singapore today joining us today. We have a very special guests from switzerland who is based in zurich. And he's a doctor khumalo. Got the donnie. Who is the security researcher. We've could ask security so thank you very much for joining us today jane. I'm very happy to be here with you today. To be honest to it's quite difficult. Also for ricardian super announced. So don't worry about that. So so the first question. I think many of our listeners will be quite keen to know is is quantum computing a high. Because when you read the news and media nowadays we see a lot of investments that have been announced by governments for example the us national science foundation and the department of energy announced. I think with more than one billion over. The next five years in quantum information systems and russia and germany also not far behind announced close to seven to eight hundred million investment china as well spending time billion on the effort. In the private sector's google and ibm are also spending in excess of one hundred million and even bangs like j. p. Morgan is also looking at developing quantum lonzo banking but on data hen. Also some in saying that quantum states are not reliable stable or quite understood well enough to replace the traditional classical computers and some believe that they will never be able to do so. So my question to you is is quantum computing a hype well All these people you mentioned are very smart so if they spend all this money it must be true right now. Kidding apart we have seen tremendous tremendous advancements in this technology in the in the latest ears. So just put it into perspective. So people started discussing about quantum computing. Already more than fifty years ago but it became interesting. I would say nineteen ninety-four with the discovery your applications for cyber security now. At the beginning people were thinking. Okay this is something very interesting from a theoretical point of view. It will never be real. You know it's it's kind of Would be something like Science fiction like however then after that we have seen continues continues progress on the on the research and development and we especially in the last few years we have weakness a situation from you know we can be really controlled. One beat of quantum information to prototypes. That are actually working. So they are still prototype so they are still not powerful enough to tackle Real world problems. But i wouldn't call it to hype this point so from my personal point of view. The trend is quite clear. So you mentioned the difficulties. In controlling information and the related technology so from from a theoretical perspective the technologies well-understood now. There is engineering challenges into building. Something that is working but this is the case we any brand new technology. I mean justice I transistors. They were big bulky. They were barring city You remember the famous quotes like sixty four. Kilobytes of memory should be enough for an anyone. That's right so like every new technology. There is challenges. So what i see is that from a technological point of view the the tuition is progressing much more rapidly than many expected to ten years ago. Now the question. Everybody's asking his okay. But when are we going to have computers. That are not prototypes anymore. That are something that can solve real world problems My impression is that we are very close to the point but there is a difference in what you consider useful because a lot of people say like okay when we'll quantum computers break cryptography. Well i i think that's not a good measure of progress for quantum computer because quantum computers can do much more than that.

Jay Lewis Khumalo Us National Science Foundation Zurich Department Of Energy Switzerland Singapore Jane IBM Russia Morgan Germany China Google
Bringing innovation into the Polish Financial Sector with the Blockchain Sandbox

Insureblocks

05:32 min | Last month

Bringing innovation into the Polish Financial Sector with the Blockchain Sandbox

"Low. Hello hello hello. Welcome to insure blocks. Your dedicated podcast to blockchain in industries and institutions. All around the world. i'm will lead all scores. Your host for this week's podcast. We'll be discussing bringing innovation into the polish financial sector with the blockchain sandbox. And i'm very pleased to welcome dorota. Do blanca president of the foundation siberian and head of human resources at keer and mass yak genetics blockchain technical leader at ibm dorota messianic many. Thanks for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. Quick introduction on yourself. hello there are free. I'm so happy to jong these recording. And to talk with marci and to talk about the the blockchain. And i'm going to to present my point of view from the not technician and someone from hr who is really really fond of the new technology. Excellent excellent how about yourself months yet. Hi thanks for having me on your show. So on a daily basis. I am responsible for a blockchain practice at ibm For the central and eastern european region and in the context of blockchain sandbox. I was acting as lead architect of the project on the solution. So i'll be more than happy to provide an overview and share information about launching sandbox with the audience. Great grayness is perfect to have you both on this show. So the first question i've got for the both of you is as it is customer. Here intra blocks. Could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain. And how does it work. Okay so much and maybe i will start before we go to the technology so for me. The book chains just stopped records. He also some kind of the database. It it's at least records called blocks and these blocks are started computers. So it might be stored in mind computer in your computer at everybody's computer and i'm always Monetize what talking to to to to the children to other not. It professionals about the blockchain comparing that to the lego blocks so we have a big basket of blocks and we are trying to build at tower so we are starting to compare the blocks at the same color and we would like to be sure that each blocks which are in our phone dominates our construction. They are the special types of the bronx and nawab. There is no the black desert staking white blog and exchanging for the blog which has a different structure different information so because we are building the stars together and we all are verifying this blocks. That's why we are sure that we may create a really really nice tower. The next one is we are building a very beak building. We need to have a very strong from demands. And when it now that everything's settled caller correctly. That's why it's very important that we all the time. Between this blogs our compradors we are exchanging direct records. And we know what is going on so we know which block assemble. We are checking. If we a- something one block that the other was not changed to change so no one can lie. There's no wanna can take the weezer taking wind block and exchange with a different the different. So the blockchain is. The bench is in a bunch of computation network. And the more we use the stronger. It became great. Thank you for that definition message. You have a go. At providing the definition to blockchain. This is a great question on always a tricky one. Because you never know who will. What is exactly the a person who is asking. Ask always trying to focus on the technology aspect of of blockchain. And when someone is asking me this question. I try to define it in as few words as possible. So by taking this very purist approach a my own definition of blockchain is as follows it database of course has a very specific data structure Whereby transactions are put together Inc so a block representing an interval of time between The recording all the previous tight and The states the one that is going to go through the approval process. Each block is crypto graphically leaked to previous ducks for presenting previous types of of that same of these data structures that have been recorded and the governance over the way data is saved on chain is determined by the network and the network decides with the type of policies that saw did are established between them that they agree a palm whether certain transactions are going to be included in a block. Were not

Dorota IBM Marci Blanca Jong Put Together Inc
test

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | Last month

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:27 min | Last month

IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

"About a decade ago. Ibm rolled out watson. One of the earliest artificial intelligence systems out. There watson was a big deal for ibm. You might remember that even went on and absolutely crushed the human competition it was a milestone in how we think about our relationship to computers and ibm wanted to take that technology and apply it to helping doctors diagnosed and cure cancer. But things didn't exactly happen that way and last week we reported that ibm was exploring a sale of its watson health unit. So what happened. And what does this tell us about the challenges of applying ai to healthcare for answers we turn to our digital science editor daniella hernandez hate mail. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So whereas watson now and what happened well i mean the struggles at ibm with watson. Been around for a little while. We reported in two thousand eighteen that the technology was really not getting the market share and adoption that it needed to make good on all the investments in all the acquisitions that ibm made in order to make watson a leader in the ai in healthcare field and so three years or so later it signals that you know the technology maybe wasn't working as well as they would have hoped. I think more. Broadly points to the fact that you know just having data or collaborations with leading scientists around the country. That just isn't enough and the reason is you know. Healthcare is complicated. So there's a lot of human issues at stake here. You know people do things differently. Like depending on which hospital you're at louisville depending on which doctor you're you're you're seeing but also the data in healthcare is messy for some of those same reasons you know you might input into a medical chart differently than me and for an i i might as well be two completely different things and so just that standardization of the information is really critical but also really hard and so when ibm started making these huge investments in watson they started buying up all these companies that had a lot of seemingly great data and the data might have been perfect but those data were basically styles from each other. They couldn't talk to each other and they never quite figured out how to meld them together. So they were cohesive data set of product. That really could make good on the promise that they that they saw. Fortunately has never materialized. And of course we should note here. That ibm says that watson has had some successes and that they're still believers in that technology we've been talking about. Ibm's new ceo. Arvind krishna on the show and following. He's been trying to of revitalize this legacy company how the sale of watson health fit into his efforts. Well i think one huge thing that has changed since the birth of watson. If you will is that you've had these other huge not legacy players come into the field. You've got google facebook amazon even microsoft right which you might consider a legacy company but they really rebranded themselves to. They weren't as big when watson. I came on the scene. And so now you've got this against storied legacy company competing with these new players. Who when they started making investments in. Ai were a lot more nimble and so they made investments in what at the time seemed like really experimental ai technology and now looking back like deep mind. Google investing hundreds of millions of dollars in that that technology just basically took over the world and ibm didn't really invest in that technology at the time and now is behind because all the talent is has been sucked into google facebook amazon apple And so they're they're behind.

IBM Watson Cure Cancer Daniella Hernandez Arvind Krishna Louisville Google Amazon Facebook Microsoft Apple
Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

03:36 min | Last month

Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

"I want to come back to this idea social audio analytics and maybe the social audio management system this is going to be near and dear to the heart to a lot of the people who listen to this podcast because their space is accustomed to taking raw audio content transforming taxed analyzing it Actually putting it against other services and potentially returning information. So i wanted to explore that with you. A little bit we. We haven't seen that publicly yet and any of these social audio spaces you expect. People are actually doing it today. How do you think that that's going to play out. Do you expect this to be predominantly the platforms are going to try to control it and use this as a feature and trying to block other people or do you think it's mostly going to be third parties coming in and somehow getting the feed whether through direct. Api or from a rogue angle and then being able to provide that data to people who are interested in it. Yes so. I think there's maybe four constituent groups to think about here. Let's try to break this down. And i don't have all the answers here. I'm speculating so there are the platforms themselves twitter spaces and clubhouse and facebook. I think they are so twitter. Spaces already has real time voice to text translation into english which is on the lower third for some speakers. It's a three second delay about ninety percent accuracy. Ucla right yes okay. The second group would be the Government agencies and spies They're probably already doing it. But we'll never know. Group will be the traditional social media Analytics companies like salesforce and adobe salesforce acquired radian six In two thousand eleven ten years ago For three hundred million and their job was to grab all of the text based social media content. That was being produced at a rapid pace and make insights out of it and sell to brands for seven. Figure deals annually on what is being set in their market and give them analysis on share voice sentiment byproduct by region by country by network by individual by they produce. I was involved heavily with that industry now. The fourth group the fourth group i think is the one that will deploy so i. I don't think salesforce. And adobe wanna risk breaking the terms of service against twitter and risk that access that they already have in their. Api I don't think they wanna be scraping that content and also risk privacy concerns especially when a democratic administration is very concerned about privacy when it comes to social media as well as on the right hand side of the government as well they're even more concerned about suppression of so i don't think those big giant tech companies Adobe salesforce and oracle to do an ibm want to do that. So i think it's gonna be the fourth category which will be roguish punkish startups that are going to rip the content off with botts at a recording. The information then conduct voice to text analysis. And then do the other things that i already mentioned with sentiment in mining and influence analysis network. So i think it's going to be done under the covers of darkness fair enough and do you believe that the botts will be listed as users and basically some sort of fake user or are they going to be attached to a real users use. The system could be both. I mean there are. People are reporting data out of social audio by using. You know i rig systems and connecting to their ipod to other systems as well and just you know exporting that data. That's already happening.

Salesforce Twitter Adobe Radian Ucla Facebook Government Botts Oracle IBM
Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:10 min | Last month

Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

"Luisa the welcome to come see us fan Saddest On people well-meant went guantanamo's kenneth lisa. What's your heritage come from who kansas louisa. Well kidneys louisa is trying to figure it out. But i i tell you what i am and what i've been doing what doing so i am not enough from venezuela in i grew up in venezuelan with my grandparents with i adore magnum weather. I grew up in small town in venezuela though what the super super state and they have the opportunity to come to the united states. And then some i came here to study. I went to the university to four business when i came here. Didn't know how to speak english at all in a hear about that. You didn't either an idea exactly what you may show one of your blood. 'cause i wanted to learn so bad so i wanted to surround myself with people that only speak english because i wanted to ask so. It wasn't very hard challenged. Because when i went to college didn't know how to speak english at all i so i knew in. Ibm it goes. I guess he'll was in noise Yes so but i didn't give up. I finished my education which was So so so happy and telling you a little bit about me from venezuela combing In had done so many other. Great things that you're going to be asking reward about it but you want me to answer the specific questions seven steps news. Okay good question. i can't him. I got married my first mary. I and my sick of marriage. Now when i met my hus- every though so i will have because my husband used to work for the american embassy in meeting in my country when i was ecstatic in one of the university concert that that was administered. Minnesota was beautiful lone That you here panda venezuela unfortunately very very sad contouring. Now people that really hungry that is not venezuela i grow up the minnesota eyebrow was a beautiful country has beautiful memories of my country. Anees very sad to see the country. The people desperate this matter saying is not the same by that is not when you are hungry on the is doing nothing for you. You know people lose the dignity people whose fact people lose who they are is like you said different things is that the footing is likely john gordon. My concert right now on his breaks my heart by amid my husband there in move here in continue with my education so that was the freeze tonight. Came him so you met him there and then he was like it's time to move back home anthems banana. Who does yes. We got married in my country and then via allows magnon. No noise is so funny but cook when the when i met my husband ex husband you know. He wasn't typical american told Blue is very hansel. I guess he has the most beautiful blue eyes is like. I was saying lowest. Lou is by didn't know how to speak spanish in. I didn't know how to speak english so when we met. He says ola senior double nita us like okay. So we went out a few timelines for launch. He used to pick me out for launch in. We launched and we'll look each other and we couldn't speak with assist mile. It was so cute in. We need that like a couple. Moore's acrimony guests at the ultra takeover. Nicotiana kimmy get it. I see it knows or he does he hope one day i said to hindu nowak. Don't call me don't call me anymore. I need to speak to you. I need to talk to you. Glad continual and so he was very sad in three months. He called me back. He was speaking spanish separately. Sap cohe layer is finding by himself. She in the newspaper bowl. So classes i Three mosey call me and louisa. Komo is task unit seat on more. Saudi yo who is there who is this. So yeah and how our love story star mary. Yeah

Venezuela Kenneth Lisa Luisa Louisa Guantanamo Kansas American Embassy IBM John Gordon United States Minnesota Nicotiana Kimmy OLA LOU Nowak Moore SAP Komo Saudi
"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

02:11 min | 5 months ago

"ibm" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"That our tail today is brought to a close. There are many approaches to creating a personal computer off and like a lot of Longshot goals. They were many attempts going on in total isolation. IBM would eventually crack the code with the PC but it wasn't a bolt from the blue devel. And Company had been working towards the personal computer for the better part of a decade and then they only struck a big when they were able to give up all control. The PC was a very unhappy I am computer. It used third-party hardware and it shipped with a whole slate of third-party software, but that was just the Terminus of work that had been brewing since the early 1970s wage. If we actually want to look towards IBM's first personal computer, then we shouldn't be talking about the 5150. We should be looking at scam the 5100 the data master and all the trials and factors that led to the PC we know today and while that story makes things more complicated. I think it's a better one. IBM didn't get their act together all at once instead. They slowly learned they slowly adapted and they were slowly able to let go of a little bit of control if it wasn't for this long evolutionary. We wouldn't have the same computers we have today off. And was over this long Evolution, but Friday was scammed would turn into everyone's PC. Thanks for listening to admin of computing. I'll be back in two weeks time with another piece of the story of the computer. And hey, if you like the show, there are now a few ways you can support it. If you know anyone else who likes Computer History, then why not share the show with them. You can also rate and review on Apple podcasts. And if you want to be a Super Fan, you can now support the show through admin of computing merch or signing up as a patron on patreon agents get access to early episodes olds for the direction of the show and bonus content. You can find links to everything on my website at the end of computing, if you have any comments or suggestions for future episode and then go ahead and shoot me a tweet. I'm at Advent of, on Twitter and as always have a great rest of your day..

IBM Twitter Apple
In House vs. Consultancy

The Design Intent

05:19 min | 10 months ago

In House vs. Consultancy

"Well all right alex. Hey great talking to you again really appreciate your time. we're back for some more design intent. Myself tony orlando. Daniel phipps aaron hernandez and of course the creator founder. Alex you'll have to pronounce your last name for us. Alex this niece okay. Well let's go. The ad is okay so similar site so happy to talk to you guys Maybe we can you introduce yourself of where you guys worked So the the reason why we gather today is because. I won't do this interview because i often have. This kris jenner of You should be working in their constituency our in house because Differences that can happen at the end of doing years of working. In hostile working inconsistency you will have a very different skaters. So that's why. I think it's it's good to have both side here on in this interview. we antonio who Will introducing serve but is basically designed neither at delta and we have a daniel simpson everyone who are like with fund design. Now at so we really to weld one with the in house we've constituency so that's Good interview to learn on the. What are the pros and cons of each side. Yeah i think that's good. That's a good topic. I know i have people asking me that all the time. I'll let you go first daniel since you're okay you've kind of been around in both worlds. Sure i have the i. I don't know fifteen years of my career. Kinda bounced back and forth a little So right now. I'm with access design actually started the company in two thousand and five so i guess Two thousand and twenty. That would be fifteen years prior to that. I worked for a couple of different Companies delving one of them. I worked for ibm and then another one and in between there i worked at a short stint at it consulting company up in the chicago area as well so for the first part of my career bounced back and forth a little bit and then i kinda finally may finally made the decision of okay thank the consulting thing is is a good place for me to rest for a while and so. That's what i've been doing since. Two thousand and five fifteen years running running your own small business correct consulting for various companies all over the country to some more for international companies as well So yeah and for the record. I've actually hired dan quite a bit to do work for me. Working adele so I'll i'll give a quick introduction of myself. I'll give a bit of a history later. I'll let aaron kinda talk about his his role. But i'm antonio designed enter for latitude no dell and i've been with dell thirteen years now but i've been in the industry for quite a long time erin so my name is aaron and i work here with daniel. I had access. I've been here for a little bit over two years two and a half years and a half years and this is all the experience or real real world. experience have had And i know it's a. It's a huge question whenever you're graduating or you're about to graduate or you're in school it's like what wh- what what she do. She go the consultant route or the more corporate route so i hope People get to learn how many years of experience you have in the field. Two and a half advocate. So that's that's you can give us the formula have i did. I have twenty years of experience. In most of it is inconsistency so we we have like like a goo- good of people different spectrum invasions on the same on this. I if one thing i would say that anybody getting out and design new in the design world or even established the design where i think the most single most important thing he can do is make sure that the the mentor that you work for or with is the right mentor for you. I i think that's you know my career was was the last with with really fantastic. Mentors when i would start at. Ibm right out of graduate school. And if it wasn't for those guys in al i'll name them John swansea was probably the first designer that i worked for for a long time who retired from ibm lenovo a few years ago. He worked there for over twenty five years. I

Daniel Phipps Daniel Simpson Alex Tony Orlando Aaron Hernandez Kris Jenner Antonio Aaron Kinda Daniel Dell IBM Adele Chicago DAN Erin Aaron John Swansea Lenovo
"ibm" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"ibm" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Work with a I've been trained by experts in twenty different the IBM the cloud it's free talk live the new year's eve edition we're here live you can take control of the airwaves you can bring up anything that you want ends want to remind you that fork fest twenty twenty the fourth fork fast is going to be happening in the summer time it'll be actually about the second week in the summer starting June twenty ninth until July fifth that means it will include independence day for the very first time ever because in twenty twenty four fest will follow the porcupine freedom festival previously it had come before the porcupine freedom vessel which is it's gonna be a good change I think in a lot of ways one it's going to be a little later in this it's gonna be actually in the summer instead of the last week of spring I can be your marketing is gonna include fourth for the fourth actually you should lashing should rename it to just for this year rename it forth fest you got to go I got I got I have good work animals and I got animals to feed yeah yeah yeah yeah you can hire people to do annal feedings hype you know what a like middle men hello is it been since you've been up there Conan hello two thousand I'll note for five years okay really for five years about I guess not I but I've never been the forecast I've only been right porcupine freedom fest I don't understand why people like you and bother having kids is not what they're for their for work in the well his moved out yes I know I'm you bring back in temporary state season you're speaking about Bernie she's in Verne Val of Vermont she doing lots I don't know all I know is that we don't talk as much days and I think it has to do with politics no work fast dot party if you wanna get together with people that actually share a lot of your beliefs not all of them you never know who you're gonna meet their libertarians Valadares anarchists they're gonna hang out from June twenty ninth till July fifth at Rogers campground it's in the beautiful White Mountains of New Hampshire maybe just wanna chill out relax campus mother freedom lovers or maybe you want to create a thing for those people to do because fork fest is decentralized there's no organizer so Johnson you're talking about marketing I mean yeah I market for fast but it's not on behalf of anybody right not for anybody that there are other people that market for trust as well right I think Chris Wade our Friday night host is actually promoting for fast on a Lennix meant website or the Lennix meant website yeah so I need a great I hope we get more crypto people to shop it was really like almost like a crypto camping festival this year because all of the vendors were taking crypto currency which is awesome you could eat all day long so I'm sure if Chris gets his way they'll be a large free and open source software contingent wonderful they could have like speeches or hackathon or something like that you can put whatever you want together merge with what's that the the I don't even know where you're gonna Jack Jack should Max thing alt exponents expo the lord thanks bro and have some sort of thank you and I'm gonna happen or they could do it separately you never know right like people can do whatever kind of merging or creating of they things they want to it's up to you the experience that you have there there's no organizer's there's no tickets the only thing you got to do is just book a campsite at Rogers are gonna for close to a party that is an unofficial website at the link you to chat room and forum in such a let's go back to Serie she's on the line with us here in California sure your government school teacher out in California and cut and you to ask the question right before we went to break the the the big what we hear what we pleads here quite often is that teachers do not make enough in this country and I am just curious and I know you've got some years under your belt so you probably make a lot more than the guys just entering into the position but what what is your opinion on the how teachers are paid I think overall it's not too bad any aspect I mean you still spend money on your classroom because you don't get and a lot of money you know you get so much you only get a little bit of money for your classroom but you end up spending a lot of your money but I don't I'm not you bad I mean my husband makes an income to so you're not uncomfortable after however many decades of teaching you feel like you're all right and you also get some benefits in there as well that I imagine aren't too bad yeah I mean I don't think I make that by the late now when I worked for the private school that was really difficult because then you're not making anything I mean you're making anywhere from forty thousand at the most and actually that high so usually it's around the twenty and right now I'm making in the seventies and I'm not gonna get any higher in the park openness my master but yeah yeah I mean that seems like a little bit like a decent you're you're not in San Francisco right no okay and it's not bad I mean it most seven thousand dollars of the national that's almost rich territory people out I've gotten to where he can out now you do spend you know more than you don't work twelve hours I mean you spend you know you work you get work and then you work when you get home yeah but what about ten o'clock at night sometimes but one day I and just working the one day is off I think one day off a week what do you do from July to September July two so I start planning for the next year I take pride but a month completely off why don't do any school stuff what did you do take a lot of I know some schools as well prep courses for teachers for the upcoming year during the summer morning yeah you have classes that you'll go to you might take classes little short ones you know on the line you might find something new to try out with the new with that young net new year they spend a lot a lot I think that's what people don't realize is that you spend so so much time sure I was a thanks for calling in joining us here tonight definitely appreciate hearing from you and thanks for sharing your experience she sounds like somebody who you know got into it for the right reasons she did say when asked you know what she would like to see changed as having more choice more educational choice from the teacher's perspective a she did indicate that she was given some choice meaning that she had to teach to certain standards that are you know cram down from on high but ultimately that she could sort of support supplement that I guess with some and has taught in private schools yeah but probably decided not to continue that route because they make so much less the money's better also money isn't the bunnies better when they the government the facility so which is which it you know like like I said this which is probably why that charter school what we talked about earlier failed because it could not compete with the too big to fail education system and while it might be a salary of seventy thousand dollars if you're taking a month off it's more like seventy six thousand that's a lot of by the way I'm sorry because very that's a lot of their money for for what a teacher has to do I'm I know that you're providing a good service but that's my it's a paid vacation for a month and you said your husband back into so I mean that's a land line yeah and that's not including the Bennies right so seventy thousand plus the bachelor's degree I should going to teach you go for that but that kind of money I mean like why not I should be doing something better than you know go go you know you're you has two other battles right you know teaching English in some other country let's get one these companies they have benefits they have packages no need to Greece for that I heard they're just looking vehicle could see so much a lot of the ones I've looked at or the good ones required agrees start starting a bachelor's in up in in yeah you can drag and I'll be I mean the best of all time types teachers because I have a degree in art so you know I could go teach art at the school there you go make that money will never get rid of me they Love Me the toll free number is nice you know the liberal backpage should a fifty five four fifty free we're going to talk about to the shooting we need to because I have a sneaking suspicion that a little a large segment of our population probably hasn't heard about this okay because it doesn't fit the agenda the gun grabbing take the guns away from the desk jockeys from the button pushes because we don't want them with the ability to defend themselves if they don't like how we're doing things because that's what it's all about it's not about hunting it's not about you know what's you know the second man is not in not even about defending yourself from burglars because when the when the framers were coming up with this idea and the guys before them as well I don't think any of them they could ever conceive a time when no one would not have guns it course you're gonna use are going to go hunting that's not what it's that's not what it's about it's about when the first amendment fails and you can no longer get the yahoos that are taking charge of your life to listen and reason the second amendment is there to protect and to take it back so in this case IT help when attending Christmann was drafted you know you private civilians had must get some cannons and you know the government had muskets and cannon was coming up here a fifty five traders we've all bought books we've all surgeon that we're all looking for that magic formula well.

IBM
"ibm" Discussed on Z104

Z104

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"ibm" Discussed on Z104

"Yeah thank you do IBM second that'll see you you'll be surprised that happens it sounds nothing new so is on thank god you can they without even question you can I was training over the.

IBM
"ibm" Discussed on FT News

FT News

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on FT News

"Technology and services, and I b m success many decades has been to stay relevant that companies look to it as a cool supply and that went through the mainframe air, and then later into modern technologies now the risk IBM is that it's becoming less relevant that people aren't looking to IBM's technology anymore because the cloud has come a long, cloud computing, and we will know that Amazon web services, Google, Microsoft. These are the companies that are running the big new cloud platforms that are starting to soak up more and more. Of the world's IT an IBM is kind of running behind in this game. And so although there have still a very big and important supplier of technology to companies owned data centers. They're not really anywhere in the cloud yet. And so what they really need to do is make themselves more relevant and adding this open source of this complex subject. But essentially that betters the they can reengineer quite a lot of those products and services, and the all of their customers will suddenly CIT IBM is more core to our budgets than we thought. And this is actually therefore gonna lift them into the next generation of computing. There's a really big bet it's really important, then right? And Jimmy has been talking a lot about what she calls the hybrid cloud. Can you tell me a little bit about what the hybrid cloud is? Well, there's a lot of jargon in IT. We all know that. But essentially the way to think about it is that what I am isn't did very well and has now been fully by some of these other internet companies is. Is it said to a lot of big corporate uses of IT. Look, you didn't have to build more data centers and put more technology in your data centers. Just give us your computing world. Let's move around them in IT too centers because we're Amazon we go these massive intimate data centers we can use. And they've just taken all that work laid off companies relieved them of it and just charge them and service fee. That's cool. The public cloud for some reason because it's not public data doesn't go out to the public. But anyway, anyways called the public cloud. Now IBM is betting that for most companies. They've got a massive sunk cost in their existing infrastructure. I'm for decades, they're going to carry on using their own data centers, even if they put some of their work in this public cloud. IBM's bet is look we can engineer it. So that some of you will computing happens in the public cloud. Some of it happens in your data center. This is a hybrid cloud. And the if we have the technology that help these two things glued together. Better that move your what leads? Computing toss efficiently between the two this is a much better world you to be in then just trying to handle Amazon web services, which is something alien and out there and takes a lot of integration. But we can do it for you. Right. And is that where red hat comes in in helping the transition for companies between their own private servers and the public cloud. Well, it is. But it's this is not a slam dunk pry B M, these two companies do not fit together. Answer the cloud question. Say IBM itself has been playing defensively for the last few years trying to protect its business in data centers. And obviously that ground is eroding. So is falling behind is revenues have been falling for years red hat, basically, a lot of his business is putting Lennox Lennox rating system this open source operating system, which is used by clouds and in data centers. But that business isn't the future. The future is all the other technologies that said on top of that that help. People manage what leads and so this is much new business for red hat. They haven't been doing that much of it for very long. But what they are trying to do is find ways to make it easier to shift those work leads from a corporate data center into the cloud back again and create this common framework that spans both the technology analyst..

IBM Amazon CIT IBM Lennox Lennox Google Jimmy Microsoft analyst engineer
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ibm did not own the operating system it meant that ibm had managed to create its own competitors in the marketplace this was great for the end consumer if you were someone who is shopping around for a computer it was great because there were a lot of different opportunities out there that had a really affordable machines that could run similar programs to ibm's but it was not so great for them if they had maintained ownership of the operating system it would have been an entirely different story ibm what did not just set the tone they would be the dominant factor in personal computers because they'd be the only game in town that could actually use that operating system someone else would have had to have come up with a different operating system that was at least as good if not superior to ms dos in order to have made that a more competitive space but ibm didn't have that microsoft had it and of course for microsoft it made way more sense to license out ms dos to any company that was capable of running it because that you just make money from multiple customers so microsoft was making out like a bandit compared to ibm ibm would end up staying in the pc market for several years but their choices meant that it was tough to create products that had good profit margins and good enough sales to justify that that industry and in two thousand five ibm ultimately decided that it had had enough and it sold off its pc businesses to lenovo for a cool one point seven five billion dollars and at that point ibm said i'm out but the architecture they had created the ms dos and then later on windows operating system platforms had defined what pc's were and to this day most computers you find out there follow that modular architecture that ibm set up where you can make.

Ibm microsoft lenovo seven five billion dollars
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ah forward facing side to them where they would have contact with customers but ibm didn't their customers were other companies ibm grew larger and more powerful and became a leading name and business machines and it all started with mechanical devices but eventually transition to electron eq and then microchip technologies in the nineteen forties ibm would partner with harvard university to build the company's first computer although most people refer to it as harvard's first computer known as the mark one or the automated sequence controlled calculator this was an enormous electro mechanical computer so in other words it had electric parts electric parts rather and the chemical parts and it played a very important role with several war related calculations in the nineteen forties including some designed by john von neumann as part of the manhattan project that's the project that developed the atomic bomb it had seven hundred sixty five thousand components and more than one hundred miles of wire and cable so obviously this was not a home computer although i guess if you were desperate you could maybe cut a hole in it and make it a home but still not quite the same thing as what we mean when we say home computer in nineteen fifty two thomas j watson junior would become the president of ibm and thus began the golden age of the company the engineers ibm did groundbreaking work including creating the first commercial hard disk drive by the nineteen sixties ibm was a leader in producing massive computers for businesses to help them manage their data and at this point no one would dream of owning their own home computer even after the invention of the transistor these machines were still pretty darn massive and they would take up an entire room of your house in the early nineteen seventies as the first computer hobbyists were experimenting with building their own basic computing machines.

harvard university john von neumann president ibm partner manhattan
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yeah i just would like to add a different perspective about ibm it's a large company and whereas maybe divisions where this is occurring but i can tell you from my experience i am sixty one i'm currently at ibm i'm on a product that the announced end of life so the product is going away they told people that you have two years to find something else at idea now i did not start the process of trying to find something else they came to me with the new product and said would you like to be on this new product and i'm getting training on this new product the mid just about everybody that was on the product that's into life that has gone over to this new product the all over the age of fifty so whereas what they're saying may be true i don't think you can say it is idea i think you have to say it is divisions within ibm bob i really appreciate you putting that perspective on the table ariana a speak to that issue i mean is this something that you guys have found is across ibm or is bob right as this sort of division by division issue perhaps and well first of all bob i'm happy to hear that that is your experience you'll if you look at the peace you will notice that we tried to be very exhaustively chirp peter is over there laughing exhaustively careful with the way that we phrased to this because of course it is impossible for us to make any kind of end of day sweeping final statement about what is or isn't happening.

bob peter ibm two years
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Movement toward unionizing at ibm and all of these people in these places where they were getting angry about changes at their employer would come together and try to compare notes to figure out what was happening to see if there was some kind of larger plan or strategy or unfair targeting of certain kinds of workers and up until two thousand fourteen ibm was providing the kind of information required by law that you just mentioned the which is a list of ages and positions within the company so before two thousand fourteen in those communities they had that information and could make decisions about things like pension plans where if they made a change to they made a change the way that retirement benefits had worked is this something that we as workers should push back on if there are huge group of employees being laid off at the same time would there be reason for us to come together and file some kind of class action lawsuit after two twenty fourteen when they stopped handing out those lists people at ibm got angry and a couple of years later they came to us and they said we used to have this information we could make decisions now we can't really interesting peter gaza wanna come back to you there were other sort of systematic approaches that you guys describe in your piece for weeding out older employees i'd like to talk with both of you about a couple of these ideas here's one of the ideas encouraging employees targeted for layoffs to apply for other ibm positions while quietly advising managers not to hire them.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hi i'm mindy thomas and together we bring you well in the world npr's podcast for family every week we explore wild a new scientific discovery also write a bird we also write a bird find wow in the world on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts this is on point i'm anthony brooks were discussing alleged age discrimination at tech giant ibm you can join the conversation techies ageism a particular problem in your profession did anyone think forty would be considered an older worker speaking with peter goslin and arianna tobin reporters at propublica who along with mother jones looked into age discrimination at ibm and arianna before the break you're talking about one of your findings and that is that when ibm lays someone off they deny workers information about others who were laid off and that's information that according to the law if i have that correct i learned from your piece they have to provide so first what's the purpose of that law and second why would ibm want to withhold that information so part of the story about ibm as you have already discussed is that they have this huge an engaged workforce so at one point that i b m invalid probably more than four hundred thousand people mostly within the us and that's the size of a huge substantial city link that's really a huge mass of people and the people who worked at this company care quite a bit about what happens to them they care about what happens to the company so when i started they hadn't had a layoff until the nineteen ninety s when layoffs started to become part of their business model when they started to become part of the an option for workers who had joined this company people would talk about it they would join together on facebook groups they would join together on email list serves they talk i know that we mentioned that there is no ibm union will right around two thousand the there actually was a pretty substantial.

mindy thomas npr anthony brooks peter goslin jones ibm us apple arianna tobin facebook
"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yes and no i mean obviously i had been around a long enough since things started to change but for for decades if not generations the culture was well here's a quote that i lifted from someone else in the discussions on facebook the more loyalty pride and dedication and ibm employee has the greater the sense of betrayal and deceit at the inevitable layoff and that is that's i'm that's it in a nutshell we were the generation that had still been around when ibm had their three basic beliefs respect for the individual outstanding customer service and trust in personal responsibility in all relationships and the first and last ones especially i mean that was how you conducted yourself at ibm that is why for decades there was never eve even a whisper of a union at ibm is because it was it was a family of employees but it was more than that we knew that we could trust our employer and to make that culture shift is very very difficult even though we knew it was coming laurel am i want to ask you this and i want to preface what i what i ask you by saying i'm i'm very sorry that you were essentially forced to retire because i can hear from your story that this was a huge disappointment to you but i want to ask you this you know in a fast moving konami employers are certainly going to be tempted to replace older workers for younger ones with for for a lot of reasons.

facebook ibm konami
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"As opposed to perhaps years or decades or centuries depending upon the complexity of the computational problem now again that's only for a specific set of computational problems for that set quantum computers will be amazing but if you wanted to play a game on a quantum computer it wouldn't necessarily run any better in fact it would probably run worse than on the classical computer because you have to have enough cubits to at least equal what the classical computer could do cubits also are very tricky keeping bits and superposition keeping anything in a quantum state is tricky because the slightest thing can cause to deco here too for the whole system sort of fall apart and then just become a classical computer and since most quantum computers have a relatively small number of cubits they end up becoming very dumb computers if you were to disturb your typical quantum computer and reverted to classical computer satis owed probably be less powerful than your average smartwatch but there's going to be a lot of discussion here at ibm think about quantum computing and how it will start to become a practical thing and not just something that's been worked on in laboratories and research facilities there are a lot of interesting speakers here as well obviously ibm has a lot of their experts here on things like cognitive machine learning artificial intelligence virtual reality augmented reality that both of those subjects are also represented here at the conference they're going to be doing breakout sessions all week long and i hope to talk to some of them this week but they're also representatives from other companies that are taking on sessions folks from like american airlines or invidia or even companies like ticketmaster there's also some.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"And there's also quantum computing that's another discussion that's going on here at ibm think there's talk about quantum computing emerging from labs and going into practical use quantum computers are interesting things they make use of cubits cubits are quantum bits a bit obviously for those who've been listening you know all about this bits are the basic units of information they can either be a zero or a one and that is you can think of as a no or a yes or an off an an on and using bits and chaining bits together you can represent all sorts of different types of information ultimately computers are processing information and bits a cubit a quantum bit can be in superposition which means it can inhabit all possible states which means it can be both a zero and a one and everything ten weekly in between simultaneously now that does not necessarily mean anything for every single type of application but for certain types of computational work that would make it much easier to process information rapidly specifically and he's anything that was using parallel processing cubits would be pretty good for that not all computational problems would benefit from quantum computing but the ones that would the processing would take a fraction of the amount of time i mean a fraction of a fraction of the amount of time that classical computer would take one of the big things that that cubans could do is make decryption really easy which is kind of terrifying because encryption is how we keep a lot of data safe basically the way your your your base level encryption works.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on TechStuff

"Those images perhaps on your smartphone but they also exist on other computers that's cloud storage and it's very useful if you want to be able to store more stuff that what your device can hold that's fantastic it's great to be able to turn to that but it's also somewhat limited because i mean someone else has your your your file your work your images and that means that if they change their policies you may no longer have access to it or you may not have full control over you may have surrendered control over the things that you generated to the entity that is now storing it you might be compromising your own privacy is a tricky situation it's it's got a lot of factors to it and it's a big big deal here at ibm think recently there was a big news story and i'm going to do a full episode about this later but there was a big news story about a company called cambridge analytica which used an enormous amount of data that it mind from primarily facebook in order to influence elections to get information about voters of potential voters and to help push them in a specific direction when it came to elections it is an enormous story and at developing scandal really and because of that story i feel like that's going to end up generating some questions here at the conference as well not just about about the viability of cloud services and data mining but the ethics of it what is ethical what is not and how should we codify that how should we define those ethics and how how do we hold ourselves accountable to ethical standards to make sure that the technologies that we have at our disposal are used in a responsible manner because some would argue that so far that has not happened that we have had multiple instances of violations of privacy security another example of of that sort of thing is all the different data breaches we have seen over the years where companies have not done a good job at protecting customer data and since that data is very much important to us as individuals this is a big concern in fact that's another area at ibm think it's all about data security how do we keep that day.

ibm cambridge analytica facebook
"ibm" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"Tens of thousands of decisions like that being made a every day across the different policies in the company like ibm as the chief teed off certain ibm you were central to your efforts as a company to chun yourself into a kind of enterprise i would love to hear some lessons that you learned along the way and get some insights into the advice that you have free executives who are about to embark on this journey themselves yes soul and right now i mean what i would submit to you is that organizations are working that through wikileak rewrote the leading edge of all this all in little very good position at ibm because in a sense data is the prerequisite to being able to use the are systems if you don't have good data you know you're you're going to be still pretty much subject to the garbage in garbage out phenomenon yeah i systems can be formed quite easily by feeding them all wrong types of data and so they reach the wrong decisions and so the data is kind of the prerequisite you you you have to get the data out of state of readiness so that these ai systems and consumers so i was that's why said i was fortunate in the sense that i could be in in some sense the very first cog in the wheel so then i could i could provide the leadership to move will move things forward a won't be done though beyond that is we have published a blueprint to prise blueprint so how do you make and enterprise like ibm cognitive one of the main considerations to being able to do that and we laid all that out in this new print and then our clients who worked in you know very uh very closely monitoring our own progress because we're producing these showcases that they can but replicate they've they've asked us to go further on say well okay what are some of the foundation.

ibm
"ibm" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ibm" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"In a one of the challenges of being a cop provider as you have to do everything while the buses moving a while everything is up without disruption and so as we would bring in something significant like hebron at ease yeah will do that side by side for a period of time as we transition over to some new architecture that we're going to run you mentioned the adoption of sre style and operations talk about the operations model of the ibm cloud like what's the division of labour look like are these 'sorry people sitting in the data center itself or are they a veto teams that are remote from the data center gaga's talk about just the operations framework in the management structure sure so generally speaking you know that the way we describe it as you build a you rise meaning you know he think about o'clock platform i got him caught his comprise of a collection services of each of the services is owned by a team in that team moans the life cycle of that service and the end inning they build it and they run it they operated and so are s are ease are generally speaking aligned with each of the services and they said conceptually with the service not in the data center but in the development team you know s r e is a model where you're applying software engineering practices and principles to the domain of operations and so watch agree those sa reserve aligned with the development organisations and and sit in this part of those teams and their job is to romance service and to design it further elibility an to continuously improve how we deploy and operate an update on recover that service through automation you know in through software technology you we of course have some centralized you know functionality around socket knock and you know central hurting and other things to help can of wire the cloud together but on the whole we kind of running each service has its own and an life cycle and that's really powerful and it's actually a model.

data center gaga development team ibm