35 Burst results for "I._B._M"

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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 1 d ago

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"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:27 min | 2 d ago

IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

"About a decade ago. Ibm rolled out watson. One of the earliest artificial intelligence systems out. There watson was a big deal for ibm. You might remember that even went on and absolutely crushed the human competition it was a milestone in how we think about our relationship to computers and ibm wanted to take that technology and apply it to helping doctors diagnosed and cure cancer. But things didn't exactly happen that way and last week we reported that ibm was exploring a sale of its watson health unit. So what happened. And what does this tell us about the challenges of applying ai to healthcare for answers we turn to our digital science editor daniella hernandez hate mail. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So whereas watson now and what happened well i mean the struggles at ibm with watson. Been around for a little while. We reported in two thousand eighteen that the technology was really not getting the market share and adoption that it needed to make good on all the investments in all the acquisitions that ibm made in order to make watson a leader in the ai in healthcare field and so three years or so later it signals that you know the technology maybe wasn't working as well as they would have hoped. I think more. Broadly points to the fact that you know just having data or collaborations with leading scientists around the country. That just isn't enough and the reason is you know. Healthcare is complicated. So there's a lot of human issues at stake here. You know people do things differently. Like depending on which hospital you're at louisville depending on which doctor you're you're you're seeing but also the data in healthcare is messy for some of those same reasons you know you might input into a medical chart differently than me and for an i i might as well be two completely different things and so just that standardization of the information is really critical but also really hard and so when ibm started making these huge investments in watson they started buying up all these companies that had a lot of seemingly great data and the data might have been perfect but those data were basically styles from each other. They couldn't talk to each other and they never quite figured out how to meld them together. So they were cohesive data set of product. That really could make good on the promise that they that they saw. Fortunately has never materialized. And of course we should note here. That ibm says that watson has had some successes and that they're still believers in that technology we've been talking about. Ibm's new ceo. Arvind krishna on the show and following. He's been trying to of revitalize this legacy company how the sale of watson health fit into his efforts. Well i think one huge thing that has changed since the birth of watson. If you will is that you've had these other huge not legacy players come into the field. You've got google facebook amazon even microsoft right which you might consider a legacy company but they really rebranded themselves to. They weren't as big when watson. I came on the scene. And so now you've got this against storied legacy company competing with these new players. Who when they started making investments in. Ai were a lot more nimble and so they made investments in what at the time seemed like really experimental ai technology and now looking back like deep mind. Google investing hundreds of millions of dollars in that that technology just basically took over the world and ibm didn't really invest in that technology at the time and now is behind because all the talent is has been sucked into google facebook amazon apple And so they're they're behind.

IBM Watson Cure Cancer Daniella Hernandez Arvind Krishna Louisville Google Amazon Facebook Microsoft Apple
Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

03:36 min | 3 d ago

Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

"I want to come back to this idea social audio analytics and maybe the social audio management system this is going to be near and dear to the heart to a lot of the people who listen to this podcast because their space is accustomed to taking raw audio content transforming taxed analyzing it Actually putting it against other services and potentially returning information. So i wanted to explore that with you. A little bit we. We haven't seen that publicly yet and any of these social audio spaces you expect. People are actually doing it today. How do you think that that's going to play out. Do you expect this to be predominantly the platforms are going to try to control it and use this as a feature and trying to block other people or do you think it's mostly going to be third parties coming in and somehow getting the feed whether through direct. Api or from a rogue angle and then being able to provide that data to people who are interested in it. Yes so. I think there's maybe four constituent groups to think about here. Let's try to break this down. And i don't have all the answers here. I'm speculating so there are the platforms themselves twitter spaces and clubhouse and facebook. I think they are so twitter. Spaces already has real time voice to text translation into english which is on the lower third for some speakers. It's a three second delay about ninety percent accuracy. Ucla right yes okay. The second group would be the Government agencies and spies They're probably already doing it. But we'll never know. Group will be the traditional social media Analytics companies like salesforce and adobe salesforce acquired radian six In two thousand eleven ten years ago For three hundred million and their job was to grab all of the text based social media content. That was being produced at a rapid pace and make insights out of it and sell to brands for seven. Figure deals annually on what is being set in their market and give them analysis on share voice sentiment byproduct by region by country by network by individual by they produce. I was involved heavily with that industry now. The fourth group the fourth group i think is the one that will deploy so i. I don't think salesforce. And adobe wanna risk breaking the terms of service against twitter and risk that access that they already have in their. Api I don't think they wanna be scraping that content and also risk privacy concerns especially when a democratic administration is very concerned about privacy when it comes to social media as well as on the right hand side of the government as well they're even more concerned about suppression of so i don't think those big giant tech companies Adobe salesforce and oracle to do an ibm want to do that. So i think it's gonna be the fourth category which will be roguish punkish startups that are going to rip the content off with botts at a recording. The information then conduct voice to text analysis. And then do the other things that i already mentioned with sentiment in mining and influence analysis network. So i think it's going to be done under the covers of darkness fair enough and do you believe that the botts will be listed as users and basically some sort of fake user or are they going to be attached to a real users use. The system could be both. I mean there are. People are reporting data out of social audio by using. You know i rig systems and connecting to their ipod to other systems as well and just you know exporting that data. That's already happening.

Salesforce Twitter Adobe Radian Ucla Facebook Government Botts Oracle IBM
Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:10 min | 3 d ago

Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

"Luisa the welcome to come see us fan Saddest On people well-meant went guantanamo's kenneth lisa. What's your heritage come from who kansas louisa. Well kidneys louisa is trying to figure it out. But i i tell you what i am and what i've been doing what doing so i am not enough from venezuela in i grew up in venezuelan with my grandparents with i adore magnum weather. I grew up in small town in venezuela though what the super super state and they have the opportunity to come to the united states. And then some i came here to study. I went to the university to four business when i came here. Didn't know how to speak english at all in a hear about that. You didn't either an idea exactly what you may show one of your blood. 'cause i wanted to learn so bad so i wanted to surround myself with people that only speak english because i wanted to ask so. It wasn't very hard challenged. Because when i went to college didn't know how to speak english at all i so i knew in. Ibm it goes. I guess he'll was in noise Yes so but i didn't give up. I finished my education which was So so so happy and telling you a little bit about me from venezuela combing In had done so many other. Great things that you're going to be asking reward about it but you want me to answer the specific questions seven steps news. Okay good question. i can't him. I got married my first mary. I and my sick of marriage. Now when i met my hus- every though so i will have because my husband used to work for the american embassy in meeting in my country when i was ecstatic in one of the university concert that that was administered. Minnesota was beautiful lone That you here panda venezuela unfortunately very very sad contouring. Now people that really hungry that is not venezuela i grow up the minnesota eyebrow was a beautiful country has beautiful memories of my country. Anees very sad to see the country. The people desperate this matter saying is not the same by that is not when you are hungry on the is doing nothing for you. You know people lose the dignity people whose fact people lose who they are is like you said different things is that the footing is likely john gordon. My concert right now on his breaks my heart by amid my husband there in move here in continue with my education so that was the freeze tonight. Came him so you met him there and then he was like it's time to move back home anthems banana. Who does yes. We got married in my country and then via allows magnon. No noise is so funny but cook when the when i met my husband ex husband you know. He wasn't typical american told Blue is very hansel. I guess he has the most beautiful blue eyes is like. I was saying lowest. Lou is by didn't know how to speak spanish in. I didn't know how to speak english so when we met. He says ola senior double nita us like okay. So we went out a few timelines for launch. He used to pick me out for launch in. We launched and we'll look each other and we couldn't speak with assist mile. It was so cute in. We need that like a couple. Moore's acrimony guests at the ultra takeover. Nicotiana kimmy get it. I see it knows or he does he hope one day i said to hindu nowak. Don't call me don't call me anymore. I need to speak to you. I need to talk to you. Glad continual and so he was very sad in three months. He called me back. He was speaking spanish separately. Sap cohe layer is finding by himself. She in the newspaper bowl. So classes i Three mosey call me and louisa. Komo is task unit seat on more. Saudi yo who is there who is this. So yeah and how our love story star mary. Yeah

Venezuela Kenneth Lisa Luisa Louisa Guantanamo Kansas American Embassy IBM John Gordon United States Minnesota Nicotiana Kimmy OLA LOU Nowak Moore SAP Komo Saudi
Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

Short Wave

09:33 min | Last week

Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

"All right emily kwong so. We're talking about this announcement from a string of tech companies that they are going gonna put limits on their facial recognition technology especially when it comes to law enforcement amazon microsoft and ibm yes on june eighth. Ibm said it would discontinue general purpose facial recognition or analysis software altogether. Get out of the business completely and it made an impression after. Ibm's big letter. Amazon announced a one year moratorium on sales of they're very popular software recognition spelled with a k. To law enforcement to give congress time to implement appropriate rules so a one year ban. Yes microsoft took it a step further saying it wouldn't sell products to law enforcement at all until a federal law is in place. Here's microsoft president. Brad smith speaking to the washington post we need to use this moment to pursue a strong national law to govern facial recognition that is grounded in the protection of human rights and for matali in conde who has been pushing for regulation changes in tech for years. This was a big deal when these words were coming out of silicon valley. She felt all of the feelings. My initial was thank god. Thank god i was. I was happy. I was pleased. I was optimistic. I was short of breath. I was exhausted. Tally is the ceo of ai. For the people a fellow at both harvard and stanford universities for her. These announcements shifted the conversation. But that's about it. So i'm pleased. It's got us incredibly far but we're by no means the woods not out of the woods because for all of the advancement and facial recognition systems. Still get it wrong. They'll incorrectly match folks what's called a false positive or fail to associate the same person to two different images of false negative. Yeah and what's vaccine. Is these errors are happening. More often. when the machines are analyzing dark-skinned faces and that can disproportionally affect already marginalized communities prone to unconscious bias at the hands of law enforcement leading to false accusations arrests and much worse so until there's action on this metallic said words just aren't enough gotcha. So let's unpack this a little bit. Let's talk about how biased gets into facial recognition systems in the first place. I'd love that okay. So it starts right with how the systems learn to do their jobs. A process known as machine learning so to make facial recognition systems engineers feed algorithms large amounts of what's called training data in this case. That would be pictures of human faces. Yes the way machines learn is that they repeat task again and again and again and again and again developing a statistical model for what a face is supposed to look like so if you wanted to teach the algorithm to recognize a man you'd put in like millions of pictures of men you got it. The machine will then measure the distance between the eyes on each picture the circumference of the nose for example the ear to measurement and over time the machine starts to be able to predict whether the next image it seeing is quote a man which sounds okay right here comes the but but the machine is only a smart as its training data so remember joy ghulam weenie who i mentioned at the top of the episode. Yeah the the mit yes. So she and her colleague timid gabe developed a way to skin color in these training sets and the two they looked at were overwhelmingly composed of lighter skinned subjects. Seventy nine percent for ibi dash a and eighty six percent. For etienne's these are two common data sets that were largely as joy. Put it pale and male. So basically the training data used to create these algorithms is not diverse. And that's how that bias gets in The diversity of human beings is not always being represented in these training sets and so faces outside the systems norm. sometimes don't get recognized. Here's matala explaining what the research meant to her. That goes back to this other issue of not just hiring but a bigger issue of those no one in the team to say that you haven't put all the faces you haven't put all the digital images of all human beings could look like in the way that they sharpen society in order to recognize these faces. And it's so. After realizing how unbalanced these training sets were joy intimidate decided to create their own with equality in race and gender to get a general idea of how facial ai systems performed with a more diverse population so basically they fed it more diverse pictures to to look at. Yeah it was kind of interesting. They used images from the top ten national parliaments in the world with women in power specific yes specifically picking african and european nations and they tested this new data against three different commercially available systems for classifying gender one made by ibm the second microsoft and the third by face plus plus an running these tests joint him knit found clear discrepancies gender and racial lines with darker skinned faces getting mis classified the most. Here's mut-ali again. So one of the things that joy blue armies amazing work looks. That is the coloration between short hair and gender so many many many black women with afros where mislabeled as men mis gendered because the system had trained itself to recognize short hair as a male trait and this research project mattie produced a massive ripple effect further studies legislation in december the national institute of standards and technology or nist published a big paper of its own testing one hundred eighty nine facial recognition algorithms from around the world and they found biases to looking at one global data set some algorithms in their study produced one hundred times more false positives with african and asian faces compared to eastern european ones and when tested using another data set of mug shots from the us. The highest false positives were found among american indians with higher rates in african american and asian populations again depending on the algorithm. Wow yeah that is not what you want from your data. And i'm guessing white. Men benefited from the highest accuracy rates. Yes they did now. The knicks study did conclude that the most accurate algorithms demonstrated far less demographic bias but for multi. This evidence of bias raises a bigger question about the ethics of relying on. Ai systems to classify and police at all the problem with ai. Systems machine learning is that they're really really really good at standard routine tasks and the issue with humans is that we are not standard. We're not routine. Were actually massively messy right. We're not the same but when a police officer searches face in the system. They're not making arrests based on just spat match alone are they. Oh absolutely not. Yeah it's a tool for identifying potential suspects but if you think about how there's already implicit bias in policing critics. A facial recognition are basically saying. It doesn't make sense to embrace technologies riddled with bias to right if all this research has shown. These tools are capable of misidentifying black people. We cannot use biometric tools that discriminate against a group of people who are ready discriminated against within the criminal justice system but policing most specifically mattie. When i first spoke to mut-ali in march she was open to moratoriums on facial. Recognition like amazon is doing buying time for these systems to improve regulations to be put in place but the protests have her views. Because why why am i being moderate with completely reimagined how we interact with technology so now she wants to see facial recognition banned from law enforcement use which some cities in the us have done. Moutallos has tried to push for legislation to outlaw discrimination in technology before but it seems like now people are paying attention and have a language for talking about structural racism that they just didn't have before whether why america listened to me or not. I was gonna continue with this work. I believe that technology should be an empowering force for all people and that's my work but now having old and new ala not just allies but co-conspirators bright. I'm so happy. Because i didn't think would happen in my lifetime and it's an it's

IBM Microsoft Emily Kwong Matali Amazon Ghulam Weenie Brad Smith Matala The Washington Post Stanford National Institute Of Standard Harvard Etienne Congress Gabe Mattie ALI Knicks
Challenges and opportunities of blockchain in the insurance industry

Insureblocks

05:08 min | Last week

Challenges and opportunities of blockchain in the insurance industry

"For this podcast. We will be discussing challenges of blockchain in the insurance industry with special insights from ibm. And i'm very pleased to have mark mclauglin. Ibm's head of insurance strategy solution sales and partnerships worldwide mark. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself sure thanks lead and thanks for having me on as you said our head of strategy for the insurance vertical for ibm a teams pulled together. Ibm's hardware software services cloud and our business partners to deploy value for the insurance industry. I've been doing that myself For twenty twenty five years now. The first solution i built for the industry was artificial intelligence back in their early nineties for a large insurer here in the us and that solution is still running today which Either tells you something about our industry or something about my coding one or the other. so let's go was your coating absolutely exceptional. Not sure that's really really. No thank you for that introduction so as you know and hearing two blocks and we always ask. Our guest is first question which is what is blockchain. And how does it work the way i. Obviously i think most of your listeners. Are well aware that there is a difference between the blockchain enabled currencies like bitcoin and ripple and the actual blockchain functionality itself. The way i think of it is. It's a shared ledger. The trusted leisure. It's an ability for multiple entities. Who don't necessarily have a one hundred percent trusted relationship. They are business entities with different interests. Different goals but you can establish a common ground wear a set of documents they said of processes a set of data is maintained by a group across a business network and that is maintained in a way that is immutable Where everybody can see the changes that are going on and everybody has a record of what's going on you know whether it be you know data around contract or execution of a business process and being able to do that in a way that is trusted by all participants That can bake in features like smart contracts to help you automate some of those processes right. There's a lot of different things you can do. With the blockchain right currencies one of them but running a lot of shared business processes and other one of them and. i suspect. We'll be talking about that today right now. Thank you thank you for that. So as you are aware we've had a number of your colleagues on the inch. Blocks podcast from bos- expert within the blockchain in the insurance space. Now i'm curious to know from your personal standpoint. how would you characterize. The insurance industry's embrace of blockchain technology. Well i think high interest right. Insurers for a number of reasons are feeling the heat on innovation. Right whether you look at the you know. The forty six percent kager on tech investment. The last three years or the entry of of large-scale players like like paying on like amazon into more kind of online distributed type insurance ventures. Right whether you look at insurance being baked into other industries right when you go by airlines at the united states your offer travel insurance now as part of that process right. It's it's very different than the kiosks in the airport of old right. I think the industry knows that they have to figure out ways to connect to broader ecosystems. Knows they have to innovate and blockchain's one way to do that. There's there's definitely some great opportunities there's definitely some pitfalls but ensures you know high level of interest having a little trouble getting started in some cases and i think we'll dig into that as we go. Yeah exactly because you know we know we started our podcast mainly focus on the insurance industry in two thousand eighteen inch thousand nineteen. We spread out to cover other industries. Which is very fascinating to see the challenges and opportunities each industry have with regards to adopting mom blockchain but this is sticking for insurance for now. You know as you mentioned you had twenty to twenty five years experience in building solutions and partnerships ensures. Would you say that insurers are more or less open to embracing blockchain comparison to other previous or existing modern technologies such as cloud in ai to name a few. As you mentioned. You know you did this project in quite some time ago. How does blockchain compared to these kinds of technology. I think blockchain has great potential and as technology. I think insurers are are more than willing to embrace it. I think the challenges are the business model. Right i can take a And it and it's very easy to visualize. Hey here's here's a case. Where i could see how i might help me process a claim better. You know underwrite risk better advise in indentured. Better now actually getting it to do that is a little bit more challenging but visualize it. it's eas- right blockchain. It's a little tougher for the challenge. Isn't the tech. I think it's the use case behind the technology

IBM Mark Mclauglin Blockchain United States Amazon
Interview With Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

Technically 200

04:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

"This is the first of a series of technically two hundred talks or roundtable conversations. Where it's not just a one on one. But one onto plus. And i am very excited about this one because we have miss jessica odor yemi once again from ibm technical product manager. And we've got Ms katy call technical program manager at facebook. Such a pleasure to have you both here to night so i just wanna start with one question for each of you in. Why don't we start with katie. Katie what's your first memory of being excited about tech my first memory of being excited about tack. It has to be. I think in my freshman year computer science course. It's like an introduction a computer science. I just remember. I had started at princeton as a chemical engineer and i was just like i was in my first chemistry class. I was like this is like watching paint dry like this is not like the chemistry. I know from high school and i was just really excited about this idea. Setting chemical engineering. But when i took my first computer science course everyone had worn me before the course that was going to be so challenging difficult and i just remember just like enjoying every assignment and every assignment just felt like it felt like a puzzle. Felt fun and i. I felt like i was spinning. Just an inordinate amount of time. Just focus on by computer science work over my chemistry homework and i hadn't even got into sort of like the chemical engineering courses yet and i was like this'll make sense. Why by studying. Something that i am like. Great like begrudgingly. Getting through versus has studying something that i love so i just remember just being super excited about the next assignment and computer science like always wanted the next one wanted to do like the extra credit. I love that and jess unless you that same question. Yeah so let's see. I got into the tech industry per se a little bit later in life. But i remember the first time i was excited about anything. Simulated was an elementary school. When i found out I don't know if you've ever heard of them ike rube goldberg projects Like i don't know if you've ever seen a movie pee wee's big adventure. But at the very beginning he has all these contractions that connect to each other to do different things. But i kind of find out found out an elementary school. There was. We were introduced to the the concept of a rube goldberg project. In thought it was so cool. So i did something similar for science fair project and i thought it was the coolest thing ever As far as you know the tech industry goes. I think that happened much later in life for me. So that probably didn't happen for me until i was working and i think we've chatted about this a little bit before but i was working in the oil industry and it just occurred to me that i was out on the rate drilling wells and that was great but there was this whole other world behind what we were doing. You know software insistence. That was kinda powering. Everything that we were doing out in the field. So i think that's when i first got into Tech per se jessica. I did the rube. Goldberg is file. When i was younger. i've loved it. I went to the. I went to the national competitions. Like and since. I'm so close to purdue growing up so i would go to indiana. Just go see what the students The cooking up so had logged. Rube goldberg did that. When i was like what is the most extravagant way to crack in a like the prices so so member game mouse trap. I love that like that.

Jessica Odor Yemi Ms Katy IBM Katie Princeton Rube Goldberg Facebook Jess Goldberg Jessica Indiana
Modern Oracles and Astrology

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Modern Oracles and Astrology

"Welcome to kids myths and mystery signer host. Kit chrome with this podcast. I begin a month long examination of modern oracle's and their methods of divination last friday. I mentioned how not all forms of designation demand a psychic or even a sensitive one. Such form of discrimination astrology as common popular astrology is today is complex but as mentioned does not rely on the reader having psychic abilities instead relies heavily on planets and stars. Initially you might scoff at the idea of pulling any kind of prophecy from the heavenly bodies. But let's take a look at the history of astrology. Mayan astrology is a variation of mesoamerican astrology. One of the most forward thinking kinds of astrology of times. Mayan calendar's comprised of twenty day signs and thirteen galactic numbers. Making two hundred sixty day. Calendar year the mayan study of the moon planets milky way son was some of the most accurate pre telescope astronomy in the world. Mayan astrology goes back to around the fifth century bc. Then we have england stonehenge. Gerald hawkins work on stonehenge was first published in nature magazine in nineteen sixty three following analysis. He had carried out using a harvard. Smithsonian ibm computer. Hawkins found. Not one or two alignments but dozens. He had studied one hundred. Sixty five significant features at the monument and use the computer to check every alignment between them against every rising and setting point for the sun moon planets and bright stars the position say would have been in in fifteen hundred bc so has astrology around for a while no doubt but let's go back to present to find out how astrology works. Here's a simple answer. Astrology works on many levels at the simplest level. It is not unlike a complex clock the uses the motions of the planets in a similar way to the movement to the hands on the face of a clock. Now let's dig a little deeper. Astrology is the belief that the alignment of stars and planets affects every individual mu personality and environment depending on when he or she was born. Astrologers print horoscopes and newspapers that are personalized by birthday. These horoscopes make predictions in people's personal. Lives describe their personalities and give them advice. All according to the position of astronomical bodies a survey conducted by the national science foundation found that forty one percent of respondents to their poll. Believe that astrology is very scientific. This begs the question astronomical bodies affect our lives. Solar flares cost electro magnetic disturbances on earth. That can disrupt satellites and even caused blackouts. The position of the moon costs us ocean tides. If you're a fisherman that position of the moon can have a significant effect on your livelihood. The solar wind causes beautiful aurora and sunlight itself is the main source of energy for our planet. Still the question. How is strategy as a tool of divination astrology uses a set of rules about the relative positions and movements of heavenly bodies to generate predictions and explanations for events on earth and human personality traits. Some used astrology to generate very specific expectations. It could be verified against outcomes. What does science have to say about astrology. Simply that it's not scientific yet. Hundreds of thousands of people have been influenced by designation nation provided by astrologers millions across america. No there astra logical sign and read their horoscope in the newspaper. Daily get this j pierpoint morgan. One of the world's greatest fight answers was suspicious of accepting planetary advice but ended up applying astrology to all of his personal affairs. John adams famous second president of the united states refused to sign the declaration of independence until the exact moment planetary indications were most auspicious. And this will really get ya jay. Jacob stout jeff pierpoint morgan and seymour cromwell comprised a bracket of three successive presidents of the new york stock exchange who utilized astronaut. Advice implanted their operations. They scoffed at this. However upon the arrival of the wall street crash these men had been warned by their astrologers and thus averted disaster disci- support astrology is a form of give nation. No has astrology affected millions of individuals over the centuries the answer is a resounding yes

Gerald Hawkins Oracle Hawkins Harvard IBM England National Science Foundation Pierpoint Morgan Astra Jacob Stout Jeff Pierpoint Mor United States Seymour Cromwell John Adams JAY New York
Automatic Summarization

Data Skeptic

05:53 min | 3 weeks ago

Automatic Summarization

"My name is martin luther before and i'm a vc student at the university from saddam. Main research is focused on natural language processing and information retrieval. And i'm especially interested in how we can learn from humans and human cognition to improve our ai models before that. I did my master's degree in artificial intelligence at my bachelor's degree in mystic so liked to take the knowledge i also have from the back roads and the light microbes research everything. I've done related to natural language processing carries with it a sort of computer science bias towards it. I don't have your background in linguistics. What advantages does that give you in your approaches to natural language processing. It's quite interesting. We've seen the developments. From the early days. I would say wehrley Quite prominence when we wanted to model language greedy looks into specific linguistic structures. And at least things then we went into an era. Our people throw that away basically no linguistics of war Data only we only want to learn patterns from data and always see a bit of shift back again so people try to incorporate knowledge from linguistics into models with the idea that they come maybe learn everything from data per se or if we have named with knowledge that might gives an advantage if we decide like these are models that could work well for this task for example is a pretty exciting thing to see that we go back in the knowledge of marie slogan definitely there have been a couple of people who have taken a pretty provocative ver- extreme point of view on this and is ibm. Has this famous quote. Yes i believe Frederick djelic said every time i fire a linguist the performance of the speech recognizer goes up so i imagine that was a deliberately provocative statement to make in your experience. How have these communities actually overlapped in the community or p. community specifically we want to model language and that's basically what you also want to do linguistics. You want to model language and you want to understand language. You may not want to light produce than which so much linguists rather observe whereas from nlp perspective you might as well to produce but also understand that right. So i think as linguist. You have certain intuitions about language with everyone might have. That seem very obvious to you as linguists that other people might not find so obvious such as negation can be a hard province so for me seems very obvious because this is a trend See gwyn stakes but like from computer science perspective. Never thought about this. You might wonder like why does my mom before well these types of includes or questions or whatever you might not realize that it was about negation or something. That is yet wasn't really that long ago when people still seriously considered that we could solve negation with just a couple of handcrafted rules Exactly like there's more to that right. I think in order to understand what would work well or licensing doesn't work well yet. List acknowledged really comes in handy. Will your paper the caught. My attention is titled what makes a good summary reconsidering the focus of automatic. Summer ization now automatic. Summer is kind of interesting that by hearing it. Even if you've never heard of this fuel before. You kind of intuitively know what it's all about yet. There's still some open questions practically speaking you know. What does it mean to do some reservation. Could you perhaps give us a survey or overview of the various techniques is a great question. Maybe not so clear which is one of the reasons why we started to write this paper. But that said i can give an overview first of what is often perceived as the way to do it in the community. so i'm talking about texts. Summarize -ation right because Of video summer ization for example with for decoration. You often do. thank you. Take any input documents. Texts article for example news article or a bunch of news articles media articles. And you want to kind of get the gist out of this input and right leg few sentence summary about it. That is the majority of work that is done now. How is this done with anything. We've seen a little progress. They're so it started off with a unsupervised Graph based model such as text. Frank relax wrangler. Basically people make a graph of the input documents and then kind of see. What are the most important sentences Extract those now with the rise of neuro models. We see that there is much To sequence approaches. That people used first night with our anez. We see transformers. And bird and bird dyke auto spoken up in a community. And then you also asked about the evaluation. So how often do it is served few forms of evaluation so you have flake the firm and often people use a roche with basically check for lexical. So have your label. Summary like the one you know. It should be any kind of check out. Many words are in common with summary. I produced there. How many acronyms to make it more precise and then there's also some new metrics such as like bird scores in one that doesn't measure lexical similarity with router semantics clarity right because in this lexical similarity approach. If you have a word is kind of the same word as in the summary. That was the label. But it's not the same word out and you don't want that so you run our to measure semantic similarity so that's another type of scoring functions people use and then another way is with human evaluation though you would ask. People questions like which of these summaries is more fluent or which one more informative or which one has the best coverage these questions

University From Saddam Marie Slogan Frederick Djelic Martin Luther Gwyn IBM Frank
Abbianca Makoni, independent producer, on documenting UK women gangs

Journalism.co.uk podcast

07:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Abbianca Makoni, independent producer, on documenting UK women gangs

"You've got the documentary gun. Goals coming out on the first of february corrects. Why don't you stop by just telling us a little bit more about that documentary. And as of what's to come there so this solution-focused documentary samson i essentially spark to those on the front line of this issue so from the grocery charities. Those who training police teaches on also the victim survivors as well. Who go to them are now trying to give back to youth and trying to draw. Young girls On boys out of crime and criminal activity so it just looking at okay. This is the issue this is about is but what is being done and what can be done essentially on dogs we hit Solutions and ideas means by about how we can do. Better essentially lows of questions come to mind of course but it's a constant an easy time to explore this with with what's happening in the world. How did how did covert kind of affect the documentary coming together. It definitely did affect it. Of course with the restrictions are times where we Some point will. I can be able to go and film this We have to via zoom. How we're gonna get you to be able to do the interview by. Luckily we actually started filming a documentary at the start of last year so we started around february and then some of the film was around march so other covid with here in the uk. It wasn't as bad as as it is now and the restrictions one as well as i guess so over the fact that you're a multimedia journalists with the evening standard. The documentary has nothing to do with the evening standard. You chosen to independently while working with sampson followed zone of course as executive producer and editor. Why did you choose to pursue this story in such small numbers. I've always loved broadcast. I guess telling stories visually and particularly on this issue in this area. This is something i. i'm very passionate about reports. Crime in knife crime in the post. But i guess i really wanted to work with someone who i was very familiar with. I've known some simple years now. And i know that this is something he also wanted to explore and again a subject matter a. He's the media with as well. Gt know where he grew up in how he grew up. And i think that's how they came to light before you know what we are too young creatives who have a passion for this issue on something that you know although affects everyone it also affects our community will. Let's do it. let's get up. Let's see what we can do together and bring the topic back into the limelight. Could you have explored this with the evening standard. Like with your day job if you wanted to. I definitely think so. I mean the evening star. They have an amazing video team. That i'm sure would have been able to do an amazing job With this project. But i think again with everything happening nineteen and then with politics brexit the us. They just so much attention going in different areas. Where i think. That's another thing. Which i guess i thought about and i thought you know what the news extremely busy right now. I'll with so many different things. This is something that i can. I guess also do on my own. I think i've mentioned. I am a self usa so with some of the videos i did self she on my own which meant that. It did allow me to do not depend on too many people so that the project could actually happen and we didn't have the delays columbine easy doing this in what must be limited spare time you you mentioned. Start to get the star of last year. Journalists are obviously well known for boehner. The candle at both ends taught me about is a honestly. I was always tired. Because of course idea what i was using my weekends saw straight off to my shift then like sailed all night. It's absolutely crazy but again when you are passionate about something when attacking very sensitive sore you're gonna give it your all and i think janice ala's walled anyway so staying up too late. It wasn't anything new to me. But again because i knew that a lot of these victims of i was saying like look. You know we've been trying to get this more in alignment they so many things you want to talk about the also about how cova has exacerbated a few of the issue so the fact that you're doing this really grateful and just hearing those things as well it does make you wanna keep pushing And using your free time to ensure that the project does get done so but it was definitely odd. It was a Walking basically seven days a week basically. But yeah i can see your passion warrants this story so close to home. While few years. I did leave the frightened to knife crime and i guess you know the issue of knife crime itself. It's something that is definitely a meeting the a whole just london but i think some people until it gets close to home. That's when you really realize how bad it is. I guess Lost my friends. I thought he just meant wearing a few young people in getting involved. more youth committees workshops. Basically trying to help Those that might be out of education all at high risk of gang life. And i guess when your communicates me about some of these children. You're hearing that going through in your hearing what they see on a day to day basis and it is one young man who was fifteen at the time who told me that he seen people get stopped in the face. And you're thinking so young and you've just experienced the west thing. So i think that is what has i guess. Giving me this passion and this is to ensure that we all highlighting some of the issues around crime as a whole and how. It's affecting young people in particular more condolences. Ibm i'm sorry to hear about fine. Listen this is a topic clearly. With a lot of sensitivities and considerations going in in a broader sense we've seen this trend of journalists going independent albeit on their own publications. And that's not specifically what you're doing here. But when i've spoken to them they've said that you know i wouldn't want to do something to in depth investigative because i don't have the the gut check that comes with perhaps a full editorial tame. Did you think about that going in that having such small numbers when you are going to be exploring something so sensitive and and ethically challenging of course i think a lot of my friends at his friends are very supportive throughout this whole I guess process while i was continuously checking in on them. And if i ever had any question it was like okay. You know what. I'm doing this documentary and know how to go about this and how to go about that and i think With some of the country the documentary. I'd watch them previously anyway. Whether it was like a youth event so there was a lot of trust that had been built. Because again added john honest. I try to be well connected with a guest different communities us that when you saw stopped topics they know they can trust you if they ever have a question or a query. They're very quick to tell you. Well how are you going to do this in high do that. Don't shy away from also challenging you and ask you how you're going to go outside and

Samson Janice Ala Sampson Boehner Cova United States UK London IBM John
Global stocks sink after China coronavirus resurgence

News, Traffic and Weather

00:31 sec | Last month

Global stocks sink after China coronavirus resurgence

"Stocks slipped as a worldwide rally takes a pause. The Dow fell 179 points. The S and P 500 gave up 12 points, but the NASDAQ closed up 12 points. Losses started early in Asia than carried westward on worries about resurgent coronavirus cases in China and weak economic data from Europe. Here in the U. S disappointed earnings reports from IBM and some other companies put investors in the mood to sell. IBM dropped 10.5% for one of the market sharpest losses. Big Blue's revenue has been mostly shrinking for years.

Big Blue Asia U. China Europe
Stocks drift to mixed close

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:33 sec | Last month

Stocks drift to mixed close

"Narrowly mixed today, the S and P 500 edged up one point and the NASDAQ composite Rose 73 both indexes again, notching fresh closing highs. But the Dow industrials slipped 12 points. After the closing bell. IBM reported mixed fourth quarter results. The tech giant's per share earnings of $2.7 topped expectations, but revenue of $20.37 billion was weaker than expected revenue that IBM is cloud and cognitive software segment fell 5% from a year earlier in after hours trading. IBM shares are down more than 6%. That's your money. Now we

IBM
VIPER Rover Gets Powerful New Headlights

Innovation Now

01:01 min | Last month

VIPER Rover Gets Powerful New Headlights

"The extreme light and dark found on the moon makes contours in the landscape invisible. In the darkness viper drivers will rely on a system of mounted lights and cameras to help them steer clear of boulders craters and other obstacles that might be hiding in the shadows instead of the single. Led's found on mars rovers. Vipers lights will be a raise of. Led's that provide the same flexibility. As your car's ibm or parking lights one pair of arrays will be mounted on the rover's mast to cast a narrow long distance. Beam around the base of the rover as many as six lights will illuminate a broad area less intensely teams at nasa's ames research center are not only looking for the best prototype but how best to position the lights. The powdery dust on the moon reflects light. Which could blind vipers cameras so researchers are always looking for ways to limit back gallery

Ames Research Center IBM Nasa
Netflix surpasses 200M subscribers as quarantines continue

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:18 sec | Last month

Netflix surpasses 200M subscribers as quarantines continue

"Netflix. Kick off the tech. Earning season yesterday reporting that at a record thirty seven million subscribers in twenty twenty and that it had topped two hundred million total subscribers for the first time the milestone with powered of course by consumers demand for at home entertainment options. During the pandemic we'll get reports from intel. Ibm and others in the coming weeks.

Netflix Intel IBM
Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

Good Life Project

05:56 min | Last month

Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

"We have this conversation. I'm hanging out in boulder colorado. You are in vancouver and You grew up in british columbia. It sounds like in a small town. Did which is known it. Tell me if. I have this right as the second largest stampede. In canada behind calgary is that right. We're gonna go that right. Yes yes. I've lived my entire life telling people that factoid and for non canadian listeners. The stampede is certainly it biggest rodeo on the planet candidate you've I grew up by Surrounded by cowboys and gold. Rush prospectors bright williams. Like the. it's the town. It's pretty small town though isn't it yet. Is sub between fifteen and twenty five thousand depending on over the course of years. So it's it's pretty small it's largely in the interior of b. c. so it's a lot of mountains nearby and a lot of outdoors and that sort of thing. The caribous right. That's right. yeah it's in the cariboo. Yeah so were you. Were you ever participant in the rhodesia side of things. Actually my father was the the head of the rodeo. When year. But i was really small. I was never a participant. We had sort of friends that had ranches in for a while. We had cattle and horses forces scared me in the sense that they they had their own minds. I wasn't entirely sure when i was on a dirt bike. I knew how to control that but horses had to actually be a lot smarter than i was to know how to get on with horses so my sister wrote a lot got. That's kind of really interesting foreshadowing in a weird way though right because you sort of like as a as a kid you see these animals and realize that they have their own mind than their own will. And you're not entirely sure how it works. How to relate to them or had a surly interact way where you develop a mutual understanding and then you look pretty far far forward actually like a couple of years down. The road and your life has been devoted to similar process but with human beings absolutely. Yeah it's it's really interesting too because you see come full circle and not for me personally. But now acquaint therapy you have these people that are really being able to understand. The phenomenon of the brain is the brain is the brain right. So it's it's fascinating to see it across not just humans but across all animals. Yeah a much. A curious is so you do all this work on Measuring what happens in the brain and detecting what happens in the brain then translating that. Because i i've also seen sort of this really fascinating emergence of therapy and known people who both Lead therapy and have been through it. You have been inclined slash patients and shared how they feel like a horse's or these deeply wise animals who are fiercely intuitive and consents. Everything about you so that there there is this sort of connection really unusual connection that tends to happen with human beings as a neuroscientist. Does that land trudy. Yes it does. It's actually where. I'm i'm right now. I'm really interested in tobacco up a bit when ibm i built watson and challenged Jeopardy champions i got called in the neuroscientist to compete Sort of debate with computer scientists about the brain and a and all that stuff. And i got fixated on this interesting thing. I stumbled across my research where somebody proposed that there could be more functional connections in the human brain than there were atoms in the observable universe and over the years. I've really found that interesting. Because i've i've tried to work the numbers and that sort of thing and what i realized it. You know if you reduce that down to a simple circuit of neurons it is possible that that circuit can have more connections than it actually has atoms that compose it and when i really realized it was kind of cool is when if you think we'll wait a minute that's the neurons are not just within our own. Skulls are neurons. Interact with each other all the time right so minor runs right now. Are changing your functional connections in yours are changing mind so so i thought wow. Isn't that cool. Because that's like a really heavy kinda insight into ways. We could tap brain potential brain power to do good things in life. And so yeah. I'm always thinking about those things. Yeah and it's and it's really interesting to right because the fundamental assumption there. Is that the things that go on in our brain can in a very real way affect what's happening in the brain of being whether human or animal in proximity to us in some way shape or form. Yeah yeah we just had one of our Cyber narrow factoid and one of the facts that was really interesting as when musicians are playing music their brainwaves synchronized and doing all these things now. I don't personally do it but through in the field. There's all these meta scanning where they can show the neuro relationship between mom and baby and different people far away as just fascinating. Yeah that's amazing because then if you can show that the brainwave sink. Then if that sentence than has almost like this trickle down effect on the physiology and the rest of the nervous system then maybe that also part of the basis for people who were new you have these phenomenon where it seems like physiological cycles. start to sink Yeah yeah. And i think it's interesting because the more that we become mindful of that the more we can actually use it for positive impacts right and i think in the world today you can maybe start to ask the question if some of that is there and has just out of control and so how could we actually harness that. I think that's just such interesting ways to think about how you know we never really think about our brains right. It's just what moves our body and our personality and all that but if you could actually think about it in different ways i've i've always loved creativity in that. Yeah

Bright Williams Cariboo Rhodesia Boulder British Columbia Cowboys Calgary Vancouver Colorado Canada Trudy Watson IBM
Addressing the Digital Gap During the Pandemic

CompTIA Sharkbytes

06:47 min | Last month

Addressing the Digital Gap During the Pandemic

"Either this is alan shark and welcome to another episode of shark bites. This is the first episode in the year. Twenty twenty one so hopefully you had a happy new year and looking forward to a much better year than perhaps we had last year. As you know the podcast delves into europe. Cio's and other tech leaders throughout local government to some extent state government and today. We are very fortunate. Have john walton. John is a chief information officer of the county of san mateo california. I've known him for over a decade and he is getting all these awards and whatnot and it seemed like this is an appropriate time to really have a chat into sheer the discussion with you. John brings over twenty five years of experience in the fields of information. Technology has a diverse background in both public and private sectors sending innovative technology standards providing visionary leadership for numerous organizations each receive tons of awards and most recently state tech recognized him as one of the thirty people to watch in the year. Twenty twenty twenty-eight came out towards the year so hopefully it'll make the list again in twenty twenty one but he sent a lot of things that hopefully we'll get into that for example. I believe he'd been on school board. You have been a race car driver so you have a lot of interest so john. Welcome thank you on. It's great to be here. I really enjoy having the opportunity to talk with you. Ve enjoyed our friendship and partnership over the years and really excited for twenty twenty one. Yeah it's got to be better than last year. Such such an anomaly. Such a different year. It can only get better so john. I always ask when we begin these discussions. I always believe that. Very few of us wake up in high school or even college and say when i grow up and when i go into the adult workforce i want to be a chief information officer so i'm always curious to know. How did you get to where you are. You've had a really great career and is far from over so if you would you've had an interesting journey so let's spend a couple of minutes talking about. How did you get to the county san mateo allen. Yeah that's That's a great question and probably the most complex question. You're going to ask me today. So i will. I will try to keep it to a couple of minutes. It was a long winding road to end up. Were ended up i. I grew up in. A family of there was a military family. My dad was missile defense and so we moved a lot as you can imagine and my dad used to like to say we lived in places where people didn't care where he blew things up so those rather rural and isolated and i wasn't into computers at all matter of fact i'm of an age where computers were still a relatively new thing so my exposure to computers were really through. My dad was a bit of what we call order now. Every time they would demo out a test site he He felt terrible about all the expensive computer equipment that was getting thrown away. Pdp lebanon's and things like that so he would haul them home in his pickup truck. And i grew up with garage. Full of old mainframe computers wang's ibm's and so those were my toys. My friends growing up but to be honest they didn't really interest me I really love nature and so When i teach classes at san francisco state and things like that mba students. I always tell them to become a cio. The first thing you do is you go to humboldt state university and get a degree in natural resource science. because that's where every good cio starts with a degree in natural resources. And and that's really how i got started i. I really wanted to be a researcher. A scientist i wanted to study nature and the environment and at that time The college was implementing backs computer systems. That was a new thing and it turned out that i wasn't really great at school. I i guess you would probably call it. Add now. but i don't do well sitting in classes listening but turns out a really good at setting up. Faxes for all the computer. Labs all the professors would give me extra credit to make up for my poor test scores by going in and configuring all the computers in the labs and so that would really help. My career started i. I did get a bachelor's degree in science. I enjoyed that but immediately after college. I started setting up. Computer systems. for counties and cities and private industry and it just went from there and in those days. It was really what you did. You just sort of went from project to project and it was word of mouth and if you knew anything about computers that kind of puts you a leg up on the competition so while up here i am now i must cio the great county here in california You know appreciative of all the recognition. Our county gets think it's really a reflection to the hard work. The staff here does and the leadership of the county the supervisors in the city manager. I think i am probably the best easiest. Cio job in california. They they make things very easy for me. I met one of your deputies at a recent meeting in there. You do have a very talented staff so tell us. I did read somewhere about this racing car thing so tell me a little bit about that. Well yes so. That's like. I said the the technology thing wasn't really a passion of mind when i was young and my dad is a hobby was an amateur stockcar razor so i grew up around tracks and engineers. It turns out you know. He was an engineer. Engineers love to build things and so he looked to build cars and fix cars so i grew up working on cars and building cars and race cars and have always been around those. And so that's always been my hobby. As a matter of fact the mechanic paid my way through college. Because i had an aptitude for that. And it's really just built from there. I think from my childhood you know as a as an executive technology really. I spend most of my time. Unfortunately you know in meetings in office buildings working on spreadsheets. Power plants you know. It's not as glamorous as probably some people think it is to be a cio for me at least and kind of tactile this rule I built my own race cars. I tune them my drive them on the track. It's really release for me. And all the things i do probably things. It helps me too many of us in this world. Nowadays we all try to multitask too much when meetings and checking email and texting. And i will say if you ever need to focus. There's nothing like being racetrack. One hundred thirty miles an hour going into a turn to cause you to focus and not worry about. Who's texting you calling you on the phone. So i still love it. I've sold most of my cars now. I have to left. And i still do it when i have the time. But it's it's less and less these days. Covert has kept us very busy. And i have two young sons that i try to spend as much time with is like can so until they get interested in racing than i probably won't spend as much time at the track is i have in the past

Alan Shark San Mateo Allen John Walton John CIO San Mateo California Humboldt State University Europe Wang Lebanon MBA IBM San Francisco
Gary Cohn joins IBM as vice chairman

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

00:18 sec | Last month

Gary Cohn joins IBM as vice chairman

"Gary cohn president trump's first director of the national economic council announced today he is joining. Ibm as vice-chairman cola. The white house after the trump tax cuts fashion might remember that has since been critical of the president. I do have one question though. What is the vice chairman of ibm. Actually do

Gary Cohn National Economic Council Donald Trump Cola IBM White House
In House vs. Consultancy

The Design Intent

05:19 min | 8 months ago

In House vs. Consultancy

"Well all right alex. Hey great talking to you again really appreciate your time. we're back for some more design intent. Myself tony orlando. Daniel phipps aaron hernandez and of course the creator founder. Alex you'll have to pronounce your last name for us. Alex this niece okay. Well let's go. The ad is okay so similar site so happy to talk to you guys Maybe we can you introduce yourself of where you guys worked So the the reason why we gather today is because. I won't do this interview because i often have. This kris jenner of You should be working in their constituency our in house because Differences that can happen at the end of doing years of working. In hostile working inconsistency you will have a very different skaters. So that's why. I think it's it's good to have both side here on in this interview. we antonio who Will introducing serve but is basically designed neither at delta and we have a daniel simpson everyone who are like with fund design. Now at so we really to weld one with the in house we've constituency so that's Good interview to learn on the. What are the pros and cons of each side. Yeah i think that's good. That's a good topic. I know i have people asking me that all the time. I'll let you go first daniel since you're okay you've kind of been around in both worlds. Sure i have the i. I don't know fifteen years of my career. Kinda bounced back and forth a little So right now. I'm with access design actually started the company in two thousand and five so i guess Two thousand and twenty. That would be fifteen years prior to that. I worked for a couple of different Companies delving one of them. I worked for ibm and then another one and in between there i worked at a short stint at it consulting company up in the chicago area as well so for the first part of my career bounced back and forth a little bit and then i kinda finally may finally made the decision of okay thank the consulting thing is is a good place for me to rest for a while and so. That's what i've been doing since. Two thousand and five fifteen years running running your own small business correct consulting for various companies all over the country to some more for international companies as well So yeah and for the record. I've actually hired dan quite a bit to do work for me. Working adele so I'll i'll give a quick introduction of myself. I'll give a bit of a history later. I'll let aaron kinda talk about his his role. But i'm antonio designed enter for latitude no dell and i've been with dell thirteen years now but i've been in the industry for quite a long time erin so my name is aaron and i work here with daniel. I had access. I've been here for a little bit over two years two and a half years and a half years and this is all the experience or real real world. experience have had And i know it's a. It's a huge question whenever you're graduating or you're about to graduate or you're in school it's like what wh- what what she do. She go the consultant route or the more corporate route so i hope People get to learn how many years of experience you have in the field. Two and a half advocate. So that's that's you can give us the formula have i did. I have twenty years of experience. In most of it is inconsistency so we we have like like a goo- good of people different spectrum invasions on the same on this. I if one thing i would say that anybody getting out and design new in the design world or even established the design where i think the most single most important thing he can do is make sure that the the mentor that you work for or with is the right mentor for you. I i think that's you know my career was was the last with with really fantastic. Mentors when i would start at. Ibm right out of graduate school. And if it wasn't for those guys in al i'll name them John swansea was probably the first designer that i worked for for a long time who retired from ibm lenovo a few years ago. He worked there for over twenty five years. I

Daniel Phipps Daniel Simpson Alex Tony Orlando Aaron Hernandez Kris Jenner Antonio Aaron Kinda Daniel Dell IBM Adele Chicago DAN Erin Aaron John Swansea Lenovo
"i._b._m" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

"X. Number of characters and they all have a certain of movement and all well defined but it's not the same same as teaching a computer kloden defy a tap dog because there are different cats and dogs and for example they could even be boxer dobermann <music> now station it could have a college could have it could be a puppy could be a could have as your script kinda stuff. You know so no just by that. He's he's not the problem. Domain becomes extremely complex. <hes> at opposed to an dust this sort of problem where you need <hes> deep learning and and <hes> and and and the beauty about of course is becoming more and more interesting in terms of <hes> the capacities of course come in the mobile edible congress had a demonstration with the deep learning foam <hes> where where they can find things looking at two to a form on <hes> ran <hes> so i think these are becoming more and more pervasive <hes> again data uglier than spiel so if you look could a company like nvidia for example this media historically was making games <hes> so exactly yeah and now their stock the price has gone like high because they have a brand new did this domain which depending chips and <hes> that's that's that's a huge huge domain and that's where i think you need specialized hardware to do these calculations and that's expand on coins so that's how i that's how i guess yeah yeah so okay so deep learning. I mean obviously there's still a bit of work to be done as we've seen by <hes> google trying to identify guerrillas but in general it's it's it's it's it's moving forward but other question i have though is can you describe machine learning. It sounds a lot like predictive analytics. What's the difference or are they the same yes. I think that were those two phrases. I just i've been used interchangeably <hes> and they should be used interchangeably. I mean it. It depends on how much you how how widely would define <hes> machine learning what i mean by saying that then are you sick. Predictive analytics or predictive analytics is used to make a prediction of some kind so if you have a machine learning system <hes> you make the diction of some kind but it is in general a system which is learning from expedience so if you think about <hes> if you think about nest nest any s._t. The google <hes> owned by google. Yes <hes> so if you think about nest nest next is has machine learning component because it is constantly learning from exceeded but it does not making a prediction every time so it's just a it's just it's the federal difference but that's what i mean but okay because yeah predictive analytics obviously by definition. They're gonna be learning from experience. You know history as well but what you're saying is with machine learning your same. Predictive analytics is machine learning but machine learning is not predictive analytics because it could maybe be using the learning running for a different purpose. Perhaps making the model my that's my just my gone off the cuff reaction to the question <hes> and that that's how yeah okay well. I mean we're on a roll here. So i'm gonna ask you another one. <hes> i mean i'm asking all these different i guess buzz buzz terms buzzwords but cognitive computing according again cognitive computing versus machine learning versus versus what is cognitive computing the cognitive computing idea is very closely tied to the deep learning as i just mentioned so i think that the word cognitive computing uh-huh is very much in that <hes> in in that domain deep learning or or things like that offensive computing is popularized is by i._b._m. <hes> in quite quite the bigly so in each perhaps is it is perhaps word news like like school thinking taking over internet of everything <hes> or something like that <hes> but <hes> the when people talk of cognitive computing i in my mind i i think what i._b._m.'s.

google nvidia i._b._m.
"i._b._m" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Here & Now

"I._b._m. Did i think the big finding here is that when you start trying to figure out how many people are affected you got to look closely at was that retirement really voluntary voluntary and knowing what the law requires retirements to be or was it forced on them be forced. Tell us how we couldn't be <hes> involuntary. It's pretty simple i._b._m. Told people who are <hes> fifty five and older many of their older workers who they decided to <hes> to lay off that they were retiring and many of these people many of the people we talked to said no. I'm not retiring. You're laying me off and ibm said no. You're retiring hiring now. That counts for something because another things if you're retiring you don't get unemployment benefits so <hes> people fought this but not successfully well. We'll get to more of the cases as you say it. You just sits on the important. We're not talking about the elderly here. We're talking about people over forty over fifty that's right. I think one of the reasons is important is that people over forty and fifty but younger than for example. My age of late sixties ineffective stranded. We don't have a lot of social safety nets for people who get laid off when they're fifty years old and many of these people end up being out of work for extremely long times and many of them eat through a lot of the retirement tyrant savings the very things that were expected to have for when we do get to be sixty five so that they're they're kind of stranded in the middle. It makes a mess of people's financial lives and under personal lives but also if you're thirty. Let's say or forty and you're listening to this and thinking well. That's not me will it sort of is in ten years so we want to lay the the groundwork here and go to the case in austin. What are the allegations in that case against i._b._m. <hes> the allegations this is a case in the federal district court in austin austin of top level sales person for one of i._b._m.'s products was told <hes> he was resigning prepatory to retirement and he has said <hes> nothing of the sort of that <hes> he was laid off and the hearing tomorrow is about whether or not <hes> i._b._m. C. go johnny remedy can be deposed on this subject. He you cite in your political reporting many of i._b._m.'s own words from confidential documents and and one for instance talks about the company having a strategy to correct seniority mix meaning. They wanted more millennials than active campaign to get millennials just taking taking i._b._m.'s position for a moment if a company feels that we are a technology company and this is a time of changing technology analogy. We want younger people in who are more comfortable with new technology. What is wrong with that well. Let's let's try to things one. One is this issue of being comfortable technology. There are lots of images that the young are better at technology and they may be about certain kinds of technology and they're not about others so there is the we have to watch assumptions about technological capabilities. One of the things that i showed in we showed in this story is that people who i._b._m. Rated as very competent technologically and in doing their jobs were not protected at all from layoff the fact of their competence and i._b._m.'s.

austin ibm i._b._m. prepatory fifty years ten years
"i._b._m" Discussed on Paging The Simpsons

Paging The Simpsons

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Paging The Simpsons

"And then he walks down the steps swith two officer with his two officer that has gone out and the cop is standing there barking orders saying put your hands by any back like what are you doing here like it essentially questioning the guy is an assuming it's the middle of the night noses jeremy day interesting so he's just like out like what's he doing boxes the monday hello if i live by myself if i live by myself and i'm just freaky put it doesn't have to be that though because i think there's a video that's going around these church the whole house yeah i'm so no one else was there but i'm not going out today. Actually that's the thing is you would assume that that's the person person who broke in dog in the house with my boxers on. That's why i'm saying why would they assume that's the person that i mean. I guess it's a safety precaution caution. You could say you can't trust anybody as he's walking down the steps he sitting there telling the officer like this is my house like an in the cobblestones here saying put your hands by back face away from me and the guy he's he's following with officers saying and he's he's also telling him like you know he's. I just got off the phone with its alarm company. He tells them over and over that he's the homeowner like he's like. What can i do to prove like doug. This is i._b._m.'s because it's another case of living while black i get it. It's a safety thing and all but man can. I like bring out like my wallet. Can you take my wallet. We can go confirm this real quick great so it took it took this guy to call his supervisor for this guy supervisor to to not believe his case to that guy's dolf supervisor calling his supervisor and the supervisor being like oh yeah this guy we know him like he owns a business here in town. Like what are you doing also did they bring him outside and coughs at that part. I article 'cause i'm like come on. There's a video online. There's the dude was happening raleigh north carolina so you could probably find the video for you if you look it up. I am looking at oracle on vice but <hes> <hes>. I just want to talk about this because i just thought it was wild and another reason why i'm like i feel like i can't just show my house like when i have these days off whether it's like you have to worry about some random person knocking on your door whether you'd be like heaven away we call it law enforcement or someone. That's trying to say yo come to my church. Companies guide with me like a house and not have to worry with you. Knocking on the door has been my bosses or whatever i always worry worry about people breaking in at night when i sleep naked. Thank you for sharing that with the world. You're welcome hey in the summer. It's hot. I got no shame but it's real because you think about that and like we lock our doors and all you do. We have to but like you think about that. Ah i would be another reason why it's like e but that's why i wear pajamas in the winter especially ashley well to that but both so so you won't catch me out here nikiel the winters. What if the house that's on fire and we have to run outside. It's like thirty degrees. I need at least something on so. I don't die from frostbite fight. What if the house that's on fire and it's like eighty degrees and it's the summertime. What are you gonna do. I mean at least if i go outside. I won't die. Hello hello. You need clothes on when it's cold outside so you're going to run out the house naked. No i mean i'll probably toss him my robe but you know what i'm saying so you can't do the same thing with the robe when you go outside what okay never mind. That's what.

officer supervisor raleigh jeremy north carolina doug i._b._m. ashley eighty degrees thirty degrees
"i._b._m" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Com. It's a free site full of great travel information leo laporte the guy they ought to take. I i have many eighty eight eighty eight. Ask leo let's see we talked to don in dana point so i think it's time for joe in brea california. Hello joe oh i <hes> i have a bizarre problem. Oh i love the bizarre ones well first of all. I'm not a newbie. I got my first computer shooter in one thousand nine hundred eighty one the apple e and i started teaching high school computer lab in nineteen eighty-five so ice. You've been around the block. You've been at this for a while ring chicken here my friends. It's hard to keep up man. It is hard to keep up. Here's what happened and this is fairly simple. I had a folder on my windows seven desktop with some photographs in it but i scanned and put in this desktop folder still called new folder by the way i hadn't even renamed it yeah and i was just going to drag that folder and drop it into another other folder where i kept family photo one does yes and using the right. Click saying move in <hes> okay. When you're moving around stuff on the mac and you right click you get some other choices. You can make an alias alias. You can move it. You can copy it so that's good okay mac. That's apple isn't it. Oh you're on a windows machine. Yes same thing because i gave up a copy. Copies mentioned the apple two so foolishly assume well our lab. Scuttled are my my you. You know my apple machines after a couple years with i._b._m.'s in nineteen eighty eight so that's like the rest of the world. What an take they may but all right. I'm not gonna business computer lab and so well yeah then you have because you're learning wordperfect. You have to well not quite wordperfect at that point but anyway anyway <hes> so i dragged and dropped his older and not into the other folder as an icon. I had that other folders window window open. I can see all the photos that i use often and when i drop the folder into an empty spot on that window disappeared what and in its place there appeared a file all cabinet folder what the heck called v._c. Underlying rea- r. e. d. dot c. a. b. I understand dan is the tab. It's a cab file c. Plus plus <hes> a lotta things can use cab files. It's like a zip file. It's a compressed file now. As i say this folder i use all the time that that icon was not there before you know i. It's not like i'm looking at this. It was for the first time my first thought was gee. I dropped it in the wrong place. You know it's it's gone somewhere curious what you want what i would do. Have you opened the cab folder to see what's in it. Yes i have photos there or your files. They're no not in. There is a bunch of <hes> system compiles that <hes> i understand. Are you related to c. Plus plus as a matter of fact <hes> you know the like ninety eight files in there and they're all dated two thousand seven all their old now. I do have the same file cabinet in other places on my computer but those c._a._d. Files else read v._c. Read files are all dated from two thousand ten now i this is a dell desktop. We're talking about here which i bought in twenty twenty thirteen and his run for me. Let me tell you what <hes> bought crawl dot. Com says <hes> v. c. r. e. d. defile is a harmless and vital file..

apple leo laporte joe brea california don dan dell i._b._m.
"i._b._m" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Radiolab

"I'm robert krulwich radio. Lab is supported by capital one with the capital one saver card you could earn four percent percent cashback on dying and entertainment that means four percent on checking out that new french restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends you also in two percent cashback a grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases now when you go out you cash in capital one. What's in your wallet terms apply. Hey this is jad. Radio lab is supported by ibm. What kind of tech company does the world need today. One that applies smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise not just for some but for all with a._i. Blockchain and quantum technology i._b._m.'s developing smart scalable technologies that help businesses work better her together. Let's expect more from technology. Let's put smart to work visit i._b._m. Dot com slash smart to learn more. I'm jaboomer rods is i found out was that it is a huge conversation but not a lot of people are openly talking about it and all of these kind of quiet conversation seemed to be happening now because of something. That's like bubbling up in europe. What's bubbling up in europe. Well so basically okay. What happened was in spain and this guy mario in one thousand nine hundred eight he had basically gone into bankruptcy <music> at which point the local newspaper published an announcement about it and then ten years go by mario cleaned up got his money back got his life back on course and so he reaches out to the newspaper and he was like hey. I've cleaned up my life. Can you take this bulletin down so it doesn't show up on the internet and the newspaper apor says no. Do you know why they said no. I think the usual reasons yeah we publish this. This is local news public record highs for public done okay and many go to google and he says hey can you deliver this from your search engines and they say no and so long story short he actually takes google to court gets all the way up to the european union court which is like the supreme court of the european union and in two thousand fourteen. The judges in this european case make a decision fat. If something is out of date irrelevant or not accurate a person can request a search engine to take it down <music> in europe. You can petition to have things taken off the internet yeah it. It is this moment where like a new right is established. This is when when you start to hear the phrase right to be forgotten the unfortunate element of human remembering as that because our brain forgets automatically kelly. We never had to deal with deliberate forgetting. This is victor victim schlumberger professor of internet governance oxford university. I called him up when i was trying to figure out what was happening in europe. We can't deliberate forget. If i tell you please forget that my name is michael you will remember that it's the exact opposite and so the problem is we don't know how to disregard memories of our past. We don't know how to forgive we have if we remember and so as we become a remembering society we become an unforgiving society so he is a strong proponent of policies sees that help us forget even just a little bit and that's the point that i wanted to make. I'm not in favor of an kneeling memories. I'm in favor of putting them into shoebox and stashing them in the attic. So if you really wanna make the effort to go up there you can take them down you. You can read them for yourself. Glass of wine go through them but you don't stumble over them every day and at some level i think i think that's part of the thinking behind the european union policy like can we just take take some of our stuff and put it back in the attic and pretty much which everyone i spoke to here said a mario type of cases coming. I mean basically the consensus is this has gotta start going to court in the states really hili when the european union went with a right to be forgotten you know we i started to look at that thinking is that we shouldn't have a law like that ad here because of the first amendment but is that something as an industry we should we should consider and chris. We gotta do something but we don't wanted to be a law because of the first amendment we still want editorial independence so why don't we just figure it out on our own and this is like every newsroom figuring it out for themselves yourselves. That seems to be the moment that we're in right now. You do really get the sense that it's like on the fly. They're figuring it out as they go but then you you think at what point do rules come into play do everything on a case by case basis by its very nature. It is subjective. This is a good one. <hes> it's college kid who you so one of the cases that chris and the other editors talked about while i was there was this college student who got involved in a drug operation. We're not gonna say which drug and he was doing it with. Some friends and we're not gonna say how many and this is one of the kids asking us <hes> again. It's it's going back. It's twenty. It is college kid doing something very very stupid by you. Know what are you is going to dog him for the rest of his life if it stays on our site everybody knows about it yeah but this is this is a college kid. Doing something really dumb yeah. I mean it's bad even he was enabling people to do. Drugs is later is trying to get on with his life so the first night you here in the room is just oh my god. We were all idiots in college. We should take these articles down. I didn't have an issue with this one but if somebody does because but then on the other side is so to me that's different between and <hes> you know selling pot on the site when you're in college or something getting called port <hes> or or even selling drugs other drugs so it seemed to me like ears long enough for me to thank played. Let's take this down stupid fun from college well. I did but i did not now. Look i mean i'm i'm the former rockford a great so so i'm like given to give this guy break but seems to me judging from some of the other cases. We've looked at this fairly serious. It wasn't one of the ones that said they had they were getting cleaned right like he wasn't saying. I was under the influence of drugs at the time and i mean that's not an excuse but <hes> and the conversation turns to okay who is he does he deserve to be forgotten and to figure that out there are ton of different questions you could ask you know is is he sober is he reformed. Was he sober then. How much time has passed. How much time was he doing. It are the other people in here having a difficult time getting jobs. I mean there's a lot of unknowns ear. You know i mean all these other people. Their lives might be fine. Maybe there's another reason. This guy isn't getting jobs. You know we know oh that he hasn't done anything since then he is making it expunged. He's saying it's coming up in every job interview yes right right. <unk> doesn't employer have a right to know this does an employer and he's getting it expunged another thing we could do say when you're expunged benjamin complete. Let us know and we'll take it down. <hes> years later he was in college twenty five. He wasn't like was eighteen. The so remove the fact that this is a clean cut kid fu with going to a private college and move this scenario to the same major the same race but not in college and in some rural community and at this point questions of race and class come into the room. All the editors are white most went college. Themselves is advising them in some way. I mean what our willingness to forgive. This kid be different if the social economic issue. This isn't about forgiveness. It's it's about the idea you that on our site because we're so big when you search for somebody. This is the first thing you find and we haven't set any kind of economic strata for this. We haven't set a geographic strata. We're considering each case as it comes in. It's this case. Does this kid deserve to have his name. Removed is is you know is it is enough time passed is it's not a crime of violence and corruption. I mean that's really the central question as you heard. Chris reacted pretty abruptly to the word forgiveness being brought into the room i don't. I don't think we are in a position to forgive so. I asked tim about it after meeting ended. I think it's almost presumptuous for me to think that i can forgive people but you but i i agree see that is that is it but in a sense you've taken on if we if we acknowledge these people and offer them respect right will help the rest of the world do that too that that to me sounds like forgiveness. Okay.

europe european union Chris robert krulwich ibm google mario i._b._m. spain european union court professor kelly rockford michael tim oxford university
"i._b._m" Discussed on Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory

Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory

"It's in meatballs where they leave camp and they stop and get like burgers and fries and you see the best looking never be that never ever. It's never <hes> let's dive into this. Okay big cat good for you for changing the toast world because you know a lot of you know that world needs to be changed and huge change it. I i i. I like tearing it out but this is very simple to me yeah. Let's hear it. I love simple reach out to this guy so hey bo. We've been friends for a long time. I hope i hope hope everything's going well. I just need to know. Are you going through anything. Is there any stuff in your life that kind of preventing you from kind of come into some of the things i invited you to and if that person comes back to you and says no okay you take care. You don't need to have fight you. Just let that ship sail out to sea done with this person so dan. You're talking 'bout his a level one to level your basic afte- just to check in i._b._m. Everything good to see. I that it is a f- to everything good with do but like okay all right. Well you take care. If for any reason you are going through something you don't feel comfortable in you ever want to talk to me about it always be here otherwise let that ship sail out to sea and start walking back through the woods with dance. Talking is middle road. He's not talking high road. He's talking middle road. Just keep going. This person doesn't want to be your friend. Here's here's the deal. I don't have to prove it. Here's the deal. Dan makes a great point. Reach out to see if there's something deeper going on because how is someone that close with you and they don't say man. I'm so sorry i didn't make the bachelor lie. I'm so sorry not reach out yes so so here's what i come to one of two conclusions them. Dan are not professional concludes me right now. We are only professional entertainers who have really big hearts and even then we feel like we've tricked a lot of people even then then i still feel i'm not a great person. I was driving upset at christmas. We can be like his any of this funny any of it but it's not it's not too. I know you because you have to sit with for so long. I know it's funny. Were professional at work constantly being like maybe not sometimes we don't show up to our own weddings. Slash shows right. Here's here's <hes> here's what i think doesn't show up to the wedding doesn't say anything one going through some deep shit and maybe check in is worth it or doesn't give a fuck about you. Sorry sorry sorry yeah so maybe check in his worth it because there could be something deep going on mhm and this person did not reach out this person's going through changes right. They got two kids. Lord knows you change after one. I can't even fuck imagine what happens after two <hes> but but but i do want to say and and then the other option is doesn't give a fuck about you or just being an asshole or has changed in a in a in a in an awful way to me. If you're that close in college yes all the people drift apart. It does happen you live in a time frame with a lot of your relationships and sometimes you're lucky enough to have lifelong lifelong relationships the very few people pull that off but at best and you do this sometimes people have these sort of lifelong but annual relationships you see your buddies. You do a weekend if you do a physical. Hey we all love each other. Let's check in. Let's hang out. We obviously can't do it all the time. We're all in our own thing well. Let's not forget to come back and remember the roots. Remember where we came from. Blah blah blah right. I wish i had more stuff like that. But in this particular case i would say it's got to be one analyst thanks. I don't think there's a middle ground. I think the dude is either going through some and you need to check because it could be serious and maybe he needs that and that you could be a ah shining light or he's a fucking asshole..

Dan i._b._m analyst Lord
"i._b._m" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

Tha Boxing Voice

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

"Take your clubs while these people chasing dirty thirty. That's the way yeah i'm gonna punish. Somebody and i'm gonna stop pot yeah. I'm gonna i'm gonna kill somebody in a row <music>. I'm i wanna make sure is one thirty. Please any gotta be somebody with a name. That's what i was thinking in the name i got you. I got he coming off a loss and four a declaration amazon under the under the hood akon footage bridge of them. You know the dude beat you wanna mayweather promotions tournament. He flew all the way from canada. They fall and kevin as jim. Cunningham was the referee and he hasn't been back since boorda was three in florida. You know okay but you know. He wants to go again a check me out before get off. I just wanna say this museum. You have it talks and i'm always into making big fights in i._b._m. Scouting cowan i'll be scouting jimmy definitely is the biggest night being undefeated in different weight classes fighting. May you know jimmy supposed supposed to be the underdog. I chose to win this fight and i believe in believing so most of him. I'm the one that challenge. Joseph rodriguez us a bit. Joseph rigas didn't wanna do that was me. I have faith in jimmy so you've gotta be somebody with a big name. The mexican ain't like mayweather. I wanna fight a mexican heavy's but what happens. Jimmy's in a bigger way than you won't see my way. We talked about it. This is a super fight can never versus mayweather. This is the super fight out of what we are talking about well. We've been talking talking about this way because we go fight me. Jimmy gonna fight in. That's the biggest fight is he. The one forty one walk forty at a cat. Wait whoa forty. Four at a cash. Wait is going to be the biggest fight in the history of border wars mexican fighter. This is the biggest fight i'm telling you i'm but what happens of native as you go fight matt. If jimmy loses i'll fight. We don't lose. That's the only way he's going to lose fights me so this is the fight main event. H money and i got people ooh. I want to keep that same energy. If mccain he mexican eight fanbase nice like what you're saying..

jimmy mayweather Cunningham Joseph rigas Joseph rodriguez canada amazon mccain kevin i._b._m florida boorda
"i._b._m" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"It. In good day internet right after the show yeah they mehta data they made a bit of a splash with that announcement <hes> they haven't been super well a little forthcoming about what their plans are basically a battle pass and i thought this would be a an interesting way to at least put out there this idea that or at least my theory that more and more developers publishers regardless of how much they're games make currently rely on luke boxes as their monetization method. I think you're going to move away from chance based <hes> item getting and move to something like a battle uh-huh past that you see in almost every single <hes> battle royale game <hes> most notably fortnight those are i think a fairer more sort laid out option for consumers. They see they know exactly what they're gonna. Get you pay ten fifteen bucks. Whatever it is and you know for this amount of time that i'm going to lock visit amount of items and if i play a lot i'm gonna do this much faster than anybody else but you know what you're gonna get when you're gonna get and they take that kind of role of the dice out of their taking games out of game mean well. They're taking the game. The game not spend some chance of you're giving a mini mini game within the game. If you want to call it that is absolutely i think going to go away so in some ways all this discussion about releasing numbers for chances of winning and all that sort of stuff i think is going to become moot at some point because i really do believe there are better options and some that haven't been explored yet for consumers to pay that are more fair. The don't have all the scrutiny that don't have all these problems problems and it will end up being a problem. Kinda kills itself kills itself ourselves. It solves itself. Sorry it's bad you used the term there. I would say i would say say that this is. This is a good thing that everybody's focused on. The people are worried about it. I actually think this is really healthy. Keeps things in line and makes us sort of go all all right well. Let's discuss what's good. What's not in the meantime. Other innovations are happening and as of happened. I think they're ready to pick right up a game like overwatch for example which relies entirely on blue boxes as their monetization method post game sale could just turn around tomorrow and do a battle pass something like that and have players glum onto it in a heartbeat. I would see goes. Let's talk about worshipping you might say what's worshiping well security researchers at i._b._m.'s x force. It's red say that worshiping can be very effective way for an attacker to gain access to a targets network just by packing up a device and then shipping it through the mail bill. Maybe they would even use fedex. The researchers developed a proof of concept device the size of a small phone equipped with the three g modem that could be remote controlled do cell service so the device would periodically scan for nearby networks when it reached its destinations front door or maybe a mail room or maybe a loading dock then the researchers could run and tools to either passively or actively attack targets wireless access the device also known as a worship <hes> would listen for some kind of a handshake <hes> somebody you getting wifi access say and then sends the scramble data back to the attacker servers which are gonna be a lot faster than the three g modem small device to try to crack the hash into a readable eatable wifi password and this is all done before anybody even opens up the package and there's sort of the genius part of this yeah the idea being you you do this fast right. It's done internet speed and once yeah you could you could do it by walking up to a target but maybe you don't live in the same country or something <hes> share via the other weakness the second season. This is if somebody does open up the package. They're going to see that..

i._b._m. three g
"i._b._m" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Small Doses

"Ask how you should because vegan certify sugar-free ninety m gluten allergy free all of that united be listening all that like like that's when you go to the club and it'd be like it's all ages is free. Free liquor is ladies. Night is going to have a stripper there. There's going to be like that's like what ritual is but for vitamins and it's meals goo weird. It feels good and here's the big one. It has a no nausea design on the kipps so they dance on an empty stomach now. I don't know oh by job. One time i almost feel over in the middle of mine because i take a vitamin on the empty something and that she came for for me like out drinking in i._b._m. Your fill out and they said this vitamin well rituals not trying to head that they're not trying to kill you. They're gonna make you better not ask them into the ritual and she was like yes. Of course i take rituals asi i take ritual because i really do on the go in a real way and since i don't eat as healthily as i would like to i need to at the very least take a multivitamin. It's been at least get me some of the supplements that i don't get in my food plus which will actually like smells good which is very odd. The house like a peppermint nice smell so it's like i'm somebody who loves candy and so like ritual low key smells like candy and remember when you were a kid usa love taking flintstone vitamins like it definitely try o._d. Dumping zone vitamins at certain point but ritual is like the adult version of that where you're just like. This is nice but i was like okay okay okay. I'm a gay my ritual. I'm gay marriage will <hes>.

i._b._m ninety m
"i._b._m" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Get debt from a bank you know. Y- <unk>. It's ridiculous the Medicare icy A._m. l. e. now have go through you know unless you're working with on the digital banks in the U._K. That would be like Monzo or revelead <hes> then. It's very very hard to do business. In most places Western Europe now is very is can becoming harder and harder to set up companies <hes> so what turned out to be quite an effective. the system for capitalist growth is decreasing as an effective system. That's why the the the the banks are going to struggle to keep up with with with <hes> the digital tentatives Sousse. Wow love it. Also I guess as we as we wrap up we want to just get some of your <hes> your opinions you've been in the space for a long time and you know we want to know if if this is the first podcast that one of our audience members is listening to <hes> what would be like your one word of advice to that. Maybe you know people Oh come on the show and they say you know. Protect your private keys or you know. Don't keep your coins on exchanges. At what would you say. Innovate would be the one thing you know I think it's very good for everyone. Sit Damascene how they can use crypto are they. GonNa Trade Crypto <hes> how they gonNA make you know that to the moon jump but the real thing. That's really really needed right now. The thing that's needed most right now is that people actually work out how they can use what's happening to better everyone in the <music> out because if there isn't a use case for this the trading is a waste of time in so besides your company what is one company in the space that you believe is having the greatest impact I think have what is the you know the Crypto blockchain company. That's <hes> to probably but the one that really opened the talks about is you know that's making the biggest impact even if they never allowed to ever stop at business even if the Fed and the regulated organizations. Oh closed down down even if they persuaded to change the business models. How much is it not recognizable the impact the Lebron's had this market cannot in any way be underestimated. It's phenomenon phenomenon and the way that people are just suddenly realized that two point two billion users might suddenly appear nowhere using digital currency but the fact that that's having which is thrilling across the whole the whole piece <hes> and it's the other the other prize probably goes to another megalithic from the <hes> from the old age is probably I._B._M. And I._B._M.'s effects on supply chain the supply chains never going to be the same again so it said that those things for a huge huge but I I think the the impact was not even begun yet but just the fact that there's a bunch of guys who are in businesses that have a household names on the world aggregate. <unk> get bigger marketing spend than any nation on the planet and have a more people sony ups them on a daily basis than any nation on the planet as not just GonNa Impact act cryptocurrency mccown see-saw they seem pixel impacts on a nation is among countries are and we don't really know what that means yet so being seen see how that plays that's how that that last little bit actually gave me goosebumps because we're we are redefining what a nation and what borders are absolutely in every sense and in a maybe it's the worst thing I've ever done this giving updates on the concept as a new oligarchy but then it was kind of bear anyway the west before. and but maybe there's just this little sliver of hope this little small line of possibility exists between the two things where we might scrape how the decentralized. Bob amazing. Thank you so much for your time today and for all your insight that you shared with us as always this is crippled. WanNa one we very much enjoyed having you thank you in really join it Ooh.

Medicare Monzo Western Europe cryptocurrency mccown Fed Bob Damascene sony Lebron I._B._M.
"i._b._m" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"Wars to the browser wars thanks to open standards and mutual l. discernment rule for software patents among browser vendors it's very hard to use the law to punish tool smith's who make ad blocking technology's not that that stop people from attempting it adversarial interoperability is often away for scrapping new upstarts to challenge the established players like the company that got sued by i._b._m.'s printer division for making its own toner cartridges and grew so big that it now owns that printer division that adversarial interoperability is also way for the public to assert its rights it's and push back against unfair practices take it or leave it deals are one thing when the market is competitive and you can shop around for some with better terms of service but in highly highly concentrated markets where everyone has the same rotten deal on offer adversarial interoperability lets users make a counter offer how about nay but for how long concentration in the tech industry including the vertical integration of browsers advertising networks and video content content under one corporate umbrella has compromised the internet's openness in twenty seventeen the world wide web consortium published it's first ever standard that could not be fully implemented lamented without permission from the giant tech and media companies who have sinced refused that permission to anyone who rocks the boat in publishing that standard the w three c explicitly licitly rejected a proposal to protect adversarial interoperability by extracting legally-binding non-aggression promises from the companies that made up the consortium the standard standard the w._3._c..

smith i._b._m.
"i._b._m" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

Conversations with Dez

14:44 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

"Registry out there well. There's just get immersed in the new technology. I'll go ahead and tell you right now. It's the bail would give you the tool set so that I can instantly increase your skill set in other words. If you're able to go out there and take tomography pictures I want you to be able to use our tools so that she can take tomography pictures using a T._i.. Camera and actually be able to deploy that technology and not feel like you have to go off and go to some expensive schooling to be able to do that. You can start today. That's what we want nothing to reading about <hes> whether it's thermal imaging or or just you know I guess vibrational heat-sensing. was that a lot of the things you'll building now fit into the natural transition to I guess Internet of things in that is that there are you know if you've got old infrastructure that's been sitting there and and people as you said to be running around with stub pencils and peds whether it's a permanent fixture that you're implementing a whether it's a temporary thing where people just want to get some insights. I was reading about what you're doing with some of the news IOT stall sensors where you're putting it in place for as long as required to get some insights and then potentially relocating elsewhere to gain the data versus having to roll out full infrastructure that sits area and sit shoot and never moves because I really liked designed to you that if you've got a large plot to a lodge equipment environment and you want to monitor all the time make it smart. That's one thing but often I think people and certainly. Only reading this article in some research around it that you published people might just want to get inside into something as running that they don't necessarily want to monitor all the time but I wanNA make sure it's okay and healthy with its vibrational heat or whatever might be these little senses were being deployed for a period the time maybe it's a monthly to monitor get look at it and then shoot them somewhere else in the factory of the warehouse and I thought that was pretty neat as well because I imagine a lot of companies are big sunk infrastructure. The last thing they want to do is another expensive roll up but they can do it in small bite sized chunks in manageable chunks and the whole adopt versus adapt is an easy journey for them as well absolutely so what you're what you just keep on there is called connected reliability and so getting them to understand that you can deploy oh way connected reliability to that and you can start making it work for you. That is how we're leveraging the Internet of things industrial Internet of things industry four point. Oh what whatever buzzword keyword phrasing you WanNa McCall that is what's happening so let's get involved. Horizontally inlet start some connected reliability capacity assurance mindset the must be the conversation that happens with you regularly where blunting to have the existing thing infrastructure and and and you know there's a whole planet of that out there which you're working with currently but I imagine there's also an interesting conversation to be had about people come in with Greenfield's and I'm always thinking about things like smart city infrastructure and resilient city infrastructure where we've got power plants. We got sides of roads. We got all kinds of big plants and equipment in place. There's a lot of activity around the world now building new towns new cities. We're trying to make them smarter. I imagine you having some interesting conversations with people who are studying from Greenfield as well and saying well. Where do we put in from day one? What's the best way to deploy and integrate and not just adopted but you know how do we go through this adaption face from day one well? I can tell you when you start talking Greenfield and we start talking about putting a new asset infrastructure all right now now you're actually talking about something that is to the left and the Steph Curry Vine and implementation stages so that's precision maintenance real so we can forgot to go out there and design. WE'RE GONNA design fit for purpose and we're going to install all fit for purpose correctly and so what we want to do is we want to put inherent reliability in place so that we can minimally manage it. You know that that's your true R._O._I.. That's where that's where you're low maintenance dollars coming into play so when you got a greenfield environment like that absolutely you're going to want to design out faults and you WANNA design in rely ability inherent reliability and so if you're putting in new censored assets you're putting into where they actually can start giving you actionable data great. That's where you wanna be to begin with. Yes a dream too and I'm saying it's happening. It's going to happen more and more I mean yes. It is aging infrastructure. It's going to be replaced with new infrastructure but we gotta make sure that we embrace that side of inherent reliability and understand that and so we want to make sure that the precision maintenance this is happening before we even start maintaining the asset. There's a lot of parallels to be drawn with another group that I spend a lot of time working within the telecoms and that is that they've monitoring their infrastructure all the time the monitoring real time and they've gone through philly similar transition position where they've essentially cloud infrastructure so it's all software defined the collecting data in real time and it seems to me that what you doing around <hes> I guess with accelerates and the framework around that and the whole transition to digital systems is now now that not only can you help people do smarter and better things with their existing infrastructure but people are going to look at what's new. I you know I can see things like airplanes and ships and transplant logistics building this capability into it so that it's not even just the big implant I can imagine a scenario where the flu judicial system's solution is going to be monitoring my car and it drives around and it's just going to be built into it so that at some point in time someone who's doing the maintenance and warranty and insurance on my car. We'll be out of collectible that in real time and even tell tell me that I should be pulling out and putting more oil in it so the Utopia there that you're talking about. This is what we call a prescriptive maintenance. Prescriptive maintenance has been around since the sixties by the way. I mean it's been around it says old as ours G._M.. So so prescriptive maintenance has been in the old school days is okay so we know from tribal knowledge what to do and what not to do and we know that <hes> the asset is actually telling us this and telling is that basically what the old school prescriptive maintenance the difference though is between new school prescriptive maintenance on the dawn of <hes> analytics and that's where we're at today is the difference was as we were telling the assets when we're going to be maintaining them. We were telling the assets what frequency were in what period city in win this is GonNa Happen so what we want is. We want the assets now to tell us that's where we crossover and that's what we want. So you gotTa Greenfield New Plan Your Plan. That's exactly what I mean by designing in reliability designing in their reliability and so <hes> if we can give these assets voice out there if we give them away to communicate their health to us the next evolution and and the next Ashkelon John we're GONNA want to design ourselves into is so that we can leverage that prescriptive analytics type of maintenance to where the acid is telling us when and I'll be honest with you. I don't know in advertise druthers but I can tell you super bowl actually had during the last super bowl here in the states and we're famous for commercials during the Super Bowl right and so one of the commercials was was actually <hes> i._B._M.. Watson accent and basically what it was was you had this guy showing up a maintenance guy showing up at the security desk down in this big high rise building and he's checking in and he's like okay so what are you here for. I'm here here to fit your elevator <hes> so they go back to their pat and looking to go well. I don't where we scheduled any maintenance with you today so I don't know why you're here. Who contact is you to come and fix the elevator into Repairman? Standpoint at the elevator and said he did it. The doors are open and inside there. You see IBM watching like that. Well it's interesting you say that because obviously the accelerate framework and all the tools you have around that one part of the puzzle but also you know when we think about sunk cost and sunk infrastructure from a plot and equipment and environment point of view that's also the case and business systems with the smart c._r._N.'s or business intelligence platforms analytics platforms and so in many ways I guess you've got to integrate into other tools and systems since there with I._B._M.'s Watson or any other tool around the place you know this date is going to move in and out of different systems and provide different insights whether it's asset management in an enterprise resource planning platform or the existing existing. I guess predictive work that they're doing business intelligence that they're not gonNA move it out. I mentioned the the journey goes the other way as well as if you're putting new infrastructure in place in it's inside your enterprise resource planning that will feed into the accelerate platform to be able to help the system. Tell you when it needs some love absolutely so you talked about your love for your car to build a tell you when these main as well. That's your today. I'm not that is the capabilities of here today and that's another good example for trying to explain <hes> Internet of things now all that comes together and what has that Kiam with maintenance well imagine you get an email about a schedule for you to go and take your car to get your oil changed in other words is telling you okay Thursday at two o'clock scheduled for you. Drop the car off over at this dealership and you're looking at it going okay. That's cool. How do they know that I was available? We've already checked your schedule. We know you're available but we've already scheduled this appointment for you to get the whole change in the car. I like that yeah so the the the cars telling you win the do what to do. That's the prescriptive side from the analytics point of view. That's Utopia. That's where you WANNA go. That's called actionable data at at its fullest example that gets people excited when you start going with that. Is that a reality. It's only a reality if I work if we work our way towards that run so what is it a dream a dream but as soon as you actually have a goal and put some plans in place it's no longer dream and I imagine there's an upside that a lot of people haven't thought about it you know when I was reading through this I've done a lot of work around power and utilities and and certainly lodge federal government infrastructure and transport logistics. One of the key things we worry about is number day since incident and whether it's an incident someone's lost a hand or leg will unfortunately not lost a live and in many companies that have a great big chalkboard that were at the front of the desk and they have a sign saying X. number of days since loss incident and so I see this thing where you know on one side with thinking about lower costs and saving time and increasing productivity and better r. why the other side of things is I guess some of this equipment when it's running better and it's running safer and it's running on the right temperature at the right frequency. This is a safe place that people to live and work and be if the car is maintained properly..

Greenfield Watson Steph Curry Vine Ashkelon John IBM telecoms Kiam philly I._B._M.
"i._b._m" Discussed on Five Rounds with Brett Okamoto

Five Rounds with Brett Okamoto

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Five Rounds with Brett Okamoto

"I'm thinking great knowledge on that and what a performance I thought it was five rounds to none. Maybe you can make a case for the last time at any point. Did you feel in danger at any point. Did he hurt you at any point. Was He doing something that you didn't expect. I'm not really I I knew ever GONNA throw a new one down what what is going to do. I actually read a book into as though I was not surprised <hes> anything he of off from that that's that's about. It was <hes> I I. I am I here is a game. I am the one that was something that really stood out to me watching the fight. It did seem like you knew his move before he was going to do like if you were one step ahead of him which was supreme impressive considering how tough R._D._A. is and all of a sudden. Now you hear people say like Oh. He's old and stuff. He just be Kevin Lee two months ago. It's era in the next day Vince deluca knocking out in I._B._M.. Knocking again then go to Nelson Become <hes> common skis. He's GonNa Nelson that cowboys Kabul was that audience not audience in all of that though I think it might start I enjoy <hes> I went in the faulk winning. Thank you winning and all about this is one of the more interesting eight fight winning streaks in the history of the sport because you do have to try to get people behind you. Puff your chest out. Why do you think it is taking people so long to get on your bandwagon? <hes> I don't know what it is. I don't know what it is. I do like the folks on my off and I I duNno I duNno publicly hyphen social media or whatever it is. I do not know like I control a lot of I go. I did the best of the world I win the nominee for much longer. How did they treat you? In Texas. In San Antonio will move ooh. I loved we're not I'm a week early Arkansas by saying it was beautiful. It was nice didn't on People's Nice. The fans are not nice but nice by I don't enough you know this Leon but I took a lot of heat last week because I compared you to the great n._B._A.. Player Tim Duncan. I said you're the Tim Duncan of the U._F._C. and everyone got so mad at me. How dare you compare them and then I see you met Tim Duncan afterwards? What was that L._A.? Honestly now did you know who he was Eros on your show on your show amended. You wasn't googling the legend of the <hes> of the <hes> I didn't have a clue before that one of the <hes> very nice and humble man on the Congress <hes> enjoy the fight and good you you see here's the big dude oh he's. He's seven foot three. This is the thing that people are missing with my analogy. They say oh Lee Leeann Edwards Never WanNa title and Tim Duncan is a multiple time champion but here's the difference in his sport..

Tim Duncan faulk Lee Leeann Edwards Vince deluca Kevin Lee Nelson Kabul Congress Arkansas Texas San Antonio Leon I._B._M seven foot two months
"i._b._m" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Science Friday

"You can call us eight four four seven two four eight two five five can also go to vox pop yeah. Our Vox pop is Sifi Vox hawks pop. If you want to send this continued to send us your all your own vocal questions and comments also social media. We're taking our tweets at Scifi eight four four seven two four eight two five five back with lots more with our degrees of chain series after the break stay with us science Friday supported by IBM technology is becoming more open data more accessible and the world more innovative I._B._M.. is combining their industry expertise with the open source leadership of Red Hat to bring you more freedom more security security more flexibility. Let's lock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at I._B._M.. Dot Com slash red hat. This is science Friday I am I replied Oh continuing our degrees of change series about the challenges of a changing climate then how we as a planet and people will are adapting and focus is what's on your fork. Our Guide is Amanda Little author of the fate of food what will eat any bigger hotter smarter world and we've been taking your questions all week long with these Sifi Vox pop APP. It's a new way for you to contribute to your VO- your voice to our program. You can search for Scifi Vox pop wherever you get your APPs that Seifi Vox pop V..

Red Hat IBM I._B._M..
"i._b._m" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I think that's going to create a lot healthier. <hes> <hes> work <hes> environment for everyone. Thank thank you very much from Wisconsin. I appreciate it good points there Bryan in Albuquerque New Mexico. You're next welcome to the show Hi Jane thanks for taking my call. Hey I just had a comment about he. Basically I don't I don't think the workforce is incentivized to <hes> hires field workers anymore more favorite generalists though if it's the case that particular fister industry wants to have less workers or is it sort of forces the workers they have to be more generalists and it also forced the for it also allows the business the industry to spend less money because instead of hiring people who have specialized degrees specialized skills that that's they're forcing their new employees or current employees to do these things but they don't happen fairly the qualifications or credentials that would bring a higher pay or hire you know now three year John. I don't know oh I think I think I think it's definitely the case that the workforce is moving towards generalization and I think that if only benefits the employer not the employee Brian Thank you Erica. Would you agree with that you you know I don't agree <hes> and and it's partly because of where we are in the economy right now in the U._S.. I mean the latest Jolt Report tells us we have less than one unemployed person per job opening. This is a worker's market and what organizations I need to understand and this is this has been the topic of our two thousand nineteen. <hes> human capital trends report is at organizations have to invest in providing workers meaning in what they're doing because that's what's going to not only make them loyal to the organization Shen but it actually ties directly to productivity and so organizations can't just pay people less <hes> ask them to do more because one workers have more options to be able to go to other jobs given the job market right now <hes> <hes> to it will impact how they feel about their job <hes> and ultimately the productivity that they bring to their job which will impact the bottom line and so the wake-up call that we're trying to deliver to organizations is that the ability to to bring meaning into work which means giving workers a true sense of belonging <hes> valuing and showing them how you value what they bring to the table and then investing in their future potential that is what we believe the organizational mandate of our time on the organizations that do that well are going to show better returns to their shareholders <hes> in in the long term and it may seem like not every organization is understanding that. Right now but we really do believe have seen a trend underfoot of organizations embracing this concept and bringing it to the table. <hes> I WANNA play this clip <hes> i._B._M.. C._E._O.. Ginny Remedy <hes> saying that one of the most pressing issues to this point <hes> facing society is a skills gap <hes> that is leaving a lot of workers behind. She explained it a fortune media conference last month at a particular kind of candidate I._B._M.. is currently pursuing <hes> to boost its productivity. We <unk> hire lots of P._H._D.'s university graduates but I need more workforce and we had coined this idea and I keep using the words. I'd like to try it on you called new collar the idea was if you would could believe in a different paradigm not white collar not blue collar collar so negative about this but that you could make a really good living a career you did not have to have a four year degree so I would value your skills over your degree. I would value your skills. I would also believe leave that there could be new models of education that could get you there in different pathways. That's so interesting Jerry. You seem a valuing your skills over your degree a new collar not a white collar or a blue collar. Did you see that in your research <hes> yes I._B._M.'s been really out in front on this kind of thing and they have a whole system now. There's there's this career counseling. A An employee couldn't talk to basically Chat Bot called Mica and say Hey Mike..

Bryan Wisconsin Albuquerque New Mexico Erica Jane Shen John I._B._M. Jerry P._H._D. three year four year
"i._b._m" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

Conversations with Dez

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

"Details. Confirm my account I think five or six minutes I was out with a new cod and it was like wow they made on the spot. I I've been thanks for ten and years in my in my mind mental image of going in and lining up and getting a form and filling it in with a little pain attached to a chain that stolen and lining up at a glass counter that was designed to not be rubbed with a gun none of that existed anymore like holy couldn't caboose but underpinning we'll let you you mentioned something interesting around sentiment analysis and particularly I guess that intelligence and those insights we can get now. I'm interested to get your take on where you see the market with things like automation particularly artificial intelligence and leveraging urging that you had a comment in your notes back to me with regard to are we seeing the rise of a new overlord Skynet savior or is it really just part of the the instep pay stuff was down now that people have with I find that can talk to a smart agent. It doesn't necessarily have a conversation back with him yet but it will do but and I know that when I'm talking to people on twitter occasionally there is a little bit of a smart chat but feature there until it qualifies what I need to do with human where are using this car in the marketing where we currently as far as you're concerned where we come from what what's the current state love to get your insights and kind of that whole automation challenge because it's obviously putty agreement and specifically the artificial intelligence component of it because we're not really talking about <hes> sentient see we're talking about machine intelligence. What's your general sense of where rat and how far we've come so far as far as what you're dealing with your wilder broadcom so at least to me right when we're talking artificial intelligence where we're trying to get to is that some machine make some decision somewhere and and then tries to drive some execution on that bright and that's pretty far from where we are in a lot other places? There's some room entry systems that do that right and I correlate that then to customer conversations that I have which is look. I just WanNa better dashboard right. There are two ends of the dichotomy. which is I want the thing to do it for me and then there's I just wanted to be? I have all the data. I just wanted to be pretty and so a lot of this I I quite back to a conversation. I had a few years ago which is wide around when big data was coming up and they're like you know we have the dollars and budgets flowing into two big data but what people really are looking for is just you know cleansing the stuff. They already have in a way that they can actually make sense of it run and so I think there's there's there's a lot of draw to beat the bigger things you know whether it says hey you're an implement chat bots and go back and forth where people honestly want are taking the next steps are are really simple sort of A._b._C._d.. Increments right the the analogy that we can use out of at least my presentations here broadcom as we talk about the self driving car you know we walk in and we say okay how many people here have heard about the self driving car and every raising their hands how many people actually step into one and maybe one person raise their hand. There's not a lot of trust there in terms of letting the car sort of take over but we talk about the building up to that even the car companies are saying that that twenty twenty-five kind of thing unless what's your Tesla in their marketing hey we can do right now sort of if you WANNA get a car crap we see other day about it's the progression you know it's it's going from you know stick shift to to an automated automatic transmission right you know people didn't necessarily trust the automatic transmission when it first came out but now it's sort of the thing that everybody's used to and I might I I might not even teach my daughter how to use stickshift and unless you really wants to but we talk about battle these sort of new fangled technologies coming on such as you know that that blind spot assist I just bought a new car the other day and it has that little flashing light where if you're going to be into the other lane that you know it starts to Plash <hes> there's annoying side affects that which is for I've noticed that you know it beeps any time that I started over the line. I've noticed beeping alive and I'm trying to figure out that might driving or is that just the road so <hes> there's all kinds of steps that we go through and you go. Through these sort of driver assist kind of things where the machinist here that really help you make a decision where I hear a lot around from our customers is the first step is really where they're stuck which is just gathering all the different things together we have all these disparate the data sets and all these disparate data sources and I spent a bunch of my time just sort of getting a the the query on aid to see the Detroit connected before even really start to ask questions understand <hes> so we you know we we walked through things like ah what's the equivalent of a parking assist. You know we we go through the thing was Ford had the car ad which said Hey look you know it will parallel park itself the these kind of automation assistance in these small sort of tasks that I think that's what the people are really looking for now is there's a things that I do every day and I do it five or six times a day. How can I have something you make my life better by taking some of this drudge work off my plate <hes> to go back to like what I mentioned a while ago which is how do I get that thinking time? How do I get time to figure out what I should be working on how to figure out when you design next you know I I think where we are with a I is right around that level which is is there in terms of augmenting augmenting the things that you do every day and trying to make what you do either better <hes> faster cheaper more productive when you're talking about enterprise I._T.? Or when you're talking about the consumer space you know I it's really some some of those simplistic simplistic sort of actions right it. I you know I have a question. I just want to get an answer right. P people acquaint google or something like that the I in the cloud. It's amazing that it can come back with the answer that you're looking for based on the Gobbledygook that you just put into that search bar right so I I think we're sort of far away from that Skynet Lord and Savior sort of thing right <hes> no one's really taking over. I think a lot of trust has to be built in the system and you and you'll the-the analyzing the conversations whether that's Google talking about their A._i.. Ethics board or like new regulations coming out around you being able to drive permissions on what these things are allowed to do or not. I I don't think we're anywhere near there. Technology wise yet in a majority of cases but people are starting to get worried and the technologies are starting to come up with ways to make people feel better about what may be coming five six seven ten years in the future right. I mean that's looks like is ultimately. We want the things to drive decisions for us but we have to get really comfortable before we get there and so we're taking these small steps on. I don't WanNa even crane my neck to the left to see if someone's in my blind by one a little light company that kind of stuff I think we're looking at right now. Yeah I once made a joke can Akina didn't wear <hes> someone in the queue and ice section said you know what's The dumbest version of I could relate to and I said well. It's not really artificial intelligence but like when was the last time you blinked when spill spelling and auto correction would processes happened and they're like Oh okay. I said we just assume that spill correct order crater spilling areas erzen grandma era happens in would purchase it also happens when I'm talking to my phone wherever I am an even when I'm typing something on social media my browser says that spelt wrong and highlights I just assumed that happens now and yet there was a time when I was a teenager that I tried to teach my mom how to <hes> do some word processing and save it to follow and then get out of the word processor and get into a spellcheck document and have it look in dictionary and I thought that was pretty cool and nowadays I just assume that things are going to correct my spelling. I'm typing quickly so yeah. I think you're absolutely bang on the money there with regard to the fact that we're going to get to the point where we're just assuming that intelligence is built in and I think we're now seeing that as you indicated in the consumer space but in many ways I'm seeing it at the other end and I'm sure you're seeing this as well. I'm keen to get your thoughts on this and that is that it's it's one thing to assume that things like spellcheck happen but or you know intelligent devices like Causa telling us out of the lane. I had a funny moment where and I've seen this in an article somewhere. I wasn't going to be wide magazine. I went to a demo. I went say who because the it's a bit of an India thing but a window of with one of those self parking things before it came out and they're like this is a great thing. It can't be beaten and I'd I'd prepared for the side. I've actually taken one of those spray cans of paint and I drew a circle round the car and the car didn't move you know because I had a move and a half a block up the street to do the demo again but I just wanted to highlight that a great system but if it thinks the roads all around it it's going to do the right thing in stay still so I think there's a lot those caveats but I think in you talked about dashboards and big data. I mean people announced to the point where big data's part of the vocabularies want bitter data. They want those dashboards to work. I I like the idea that spreadsheets are going to go away and we're going to move to dashboards because we can just point at data and we'd have to spreadsheet. It'll know what do it but I'm also seeing the back end when we look at what people are doing with a mainframe environments doing the database environments what they're doing with their monitoring and so forth that a lot of that is getting automated that you know the machine heals itself and we're seeing a lot of this transformation down the back end where not only manufacturers making the machine smarter the I._B._M.'s making things like switch fabric the compute fabric inside that began a smarter and it can self heal the tools we deploy the modern. We're certainly seeing this networks. We've certainly seen it with the Internet with Border Gateway Protocol can route around <hes> well. I guess the Internet was designed to route round atomic war but you must the.

broadcom google twitter Detroit Ford Akina I._B._M. India Causa five six seven ten years six minutes
"i._b._m" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"i._b._m" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Right tools to adventure company because this is the human power issue forget that dirty data. We're back to humans here and Google's unexpected discovery about humans so actually we use data for the data to analyze humans here. It's a great book on tribal leadership something. We're hearing a lot about so. If you want to understand how to take your company the next level with confidence pick up a copy of confident R. I Dot Com all right back to that. So what did we figured out the real hardball question to throw Adam here. I got a couple of mind here. Go ahead fall all right. We'll just that you know what we were talking about before. Are you using bad data tomake future predictions here and how do you know that you're looking at the right stuff and not the wrong stuff here technical term out at least in my aunt just define it in analytics in predictive analytics. There's a technique that uses what's called a confusion Matrix. I'll be confused already and so when you said so we charge the clients more are co confusion. Me Coefficient is optimize your rates go up. It's actually it's actually really simple so because because you said you know maybe we're using bad data but it's telling us some things that we should be doing right so essentially the confusion Matrix gives you four scenarios. It tells you one you know. It's giving you a false positive at saying you know guess what it's telling you to do. Something thing. That's going to lead to the wrong answer. Yeah right you could have something in which it's telling you to do something and it's leading into the correct answer right and then the data might lead you conversely. There's two other scenarios that data is showing you. There's a negative implication and and it's showing you that really if you follow that it's actually GonNa show you what to do and then the fourth scenarios what <hes> you know the negative the negative implications is basically driving <hes> that you shouldn't do something. which is the correct do? Oh that's so there's positive data telling you to do something correctly. That's what you WanNa follow and then when the data and the good data drives you to do something that you know you shouldn't do and that's correct as well but there are two. That's correct as well so the good data is giving you the wrong result that that's an those are those two scenarios where the good data's giving you the right answer the wrong answer and then the wrong gate is giving you the right and the wrong answer as well and so essentially <hes> you know yeah you're bad data could lead you into a positive outcome but you don't WanNa follow that because those are Aberdeen and so that's what leads a lot of people in to poor decisions as well meaning that it's it's really not a predictor the future it's just a one off bad data and you use it and something turns out well for your company organization that secret thing again. It's an illusion and so but you're thinking that you're bad data is driving a good decision when it's kind of like a superstition kind of superstition exactly anyway so you think so you need some people to understand the difference and understand what a confusion refused to let me give you another example that I'll shut up here. We had somebody in a while ago. Who is the chief? I think he's the chief data officer for the city of Los Angeles and if I remember this correctly there's only four five major cities. Doing this San Diego's another one where they've hired a chief data officer and he said the first thing is we gotta realize we have millions of potential points of collection and one example he gave was parking meters. Parking meters are all connected to the Internet now because they got a church your credit card so what could we be doing. We should be monitoring that usage and but he said but we're smart enough to know we don't know what to do with data so maybe in their example they made it available to the public in fact they had to meetings. Come on and we'll show you the kind of crazy data. We're collecting figure out what to do with and some young guy developed an APP from it. You can download your in busy downtown. Los Angeles you looking for that open parking meter. You can go on his APP. 'cause they're measuring it in real time they didn't mean to be but they're online we might as well add some little thing that measures which ones open which ones not and then he collects the data and turns it into an apps you can instantly reserve it and go grab it and do it and they said they thought that was bringing idea of using data to make city function better. It wasn't something they came up with a just came up with the idea of collect data and throw it out. Is that as data ever going to be open from companies like that. Are they going to say. Let's see what you can do with our toaster data. We can't figure out what to do with it or refrigerator data or whatever else were collecting in the Internet. Now that's a great question and the answer's. Yes I mean they're they're lots of opportunities for an organization that all of a sudden realizes wow you know we build toasters but we have an amazing asset here. It's called our data. They're probably not an in position to really understand how to monetize it right but there are companies out there. We've got we're collecting all this usage from our toasters. We don't know what to do with it. We've already got what we think is valuable but we'll throw it out and see if somebody else heard that I._B._M.. was putting out big data data sets on get up and also tools to analyze it and they're encouraging people. Go see what you can find these data sets line it see if you can find some gold we we missed her and then you there's a whole other dimension to <hes> outside of organization is Social Media Moore social proof if you will the APP ways is reliant on just drivers driving down the road saying Oh there's an accident here. I think I'll input that into my ways. APSO other people can realize that there's an accident four point two minutes from where they are so crowdfunding data. The crowd is a presenting data into the system here. I have a a slide up here that I brought up. I WANNA share with your audience. Kinda brings to bear air how massive how quickly data can amass so if you can imagine just twelve dimensions of data. Let's just say you've got an organization with a product okay and your product that so easy I can't remember to dimension twelve well while you're playing twelve dimensional a lot of dementia you got a product and you want to track it sales and where it sells and etc who buys it right companies have tens of thousands of of dimensions right and so just looking at twelve right just giving your your audience here a little quick math primer if you look at paired combinations of those twelve distinct. How many pairs can you make with twelve set sedate exactly? Isn't it sixty six okay. I think excel can handle all that pretty well <hes> if you look at combinations right you come up with about four thousand ninety five hundred combination different appear combinations more than two more than two right <hes> individual but yet distinct combinations of the twelve but if you look at all permutations in which order is also important right and every type of permutation by count an order order order meaning so one Plus Two plus twelve but maybe it's two plus one plus twelve yeah exactly in that conclude you know analogously weights because unlike math it matters what order you put him. If I had to in one and twelve or one and two in twelve I still get the same result but if I put the date in different order correct from the different results so again you know pair combination sixty six all combinations four thousand five all permutations over one point three billion dollars too so you can't do that with Excel K.. You need to have high powered software to turn through that data and that's the only way you're gonNA understand that this specific permutation of your product or your service or these outside you know indicators are the key metrics you should be looking and that's where bringing back to the example motorcycle auction. You're looking at okay. What permutations are relevant to pricing this motorcycle before it goes on auction? That's exactly right like a C C. The year built the model the make you they were over the time of the year might matter that's right that place that it gets auctioned so in this case going back to that word dimensions there was over a hundred different variables or dimensions that you get the human half to decide how many dimensions and you're GonNa look at and you said you went to some -partment thing and they wanted to look at employment. They thought that was important dimension when you analyze that important anymore okay. Let's let's talk about this. In two ways one let the computer do all that work but that said the politics politics right and the art in the art and science of analytics. You need to take that into account why because you have a C._e._o.. That's absolutely convinced and doesn't care about computers or analytics that the library rate is absolutely something that he's been looking after thirty five years. He knows it drives his business. Whatever it's like a dog with a bone and he's not gonNA release that bone so you can't tell them he thinks tire size is important in a in a motorcycle making decisions so he's always going to look tire size and so you can't just tell them he's wrong or she's wrong? So Alex does every week so I learned the hard way. You know you have to present your analytics in a way that it sometimes gently evolves thinking in the company now that said it's okay to look at tire size and continue to keep that in your dashboard analytics where day after day week after week month month after month they look at it and realize and make their own decision. Oh yeah this is really not but you but you incorporated in there and let them come to the conclusion that you already know. You're talking about the politics politics but now the science of innovating models models and using analytics is that nobody really knows though what's going to be the corporative highly indicator that that really drives the company saying the next twelve years because you only GonNa know that twelve years or twelve months later so that's that's where a little bit of the art comes in say look you know what we stopped using unemployment bowler entering a new cycle and unemployment may become once again a highly correlated driver so let's start looking at it because our intuition Shen right our experience matters and so analytics does not replace the cease we experience intuition. I think we just got a lightning or maybe I think it's the big fellows way of saying we should wrap uh-huh so so David <hes> covered a lot of great stuff. Today people are interested talk competitive analytics. How can they do that? Well you can go to our website competitive analytics dot com just like I always say just like you spell the two words competitive Tiv- analytics dot com or you can email us at Info at competitive analytics dot com.

Los Angeles officer Google Adam Aberdeen Tiv Shen Alex San Diego David I._B._M.. twelve years three billion dollars thirty five years twelve months two minutes