22 Burst results for "I. Emiko"

WFH From Barbados

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:44 min | 5 months ago

WFH From Barbados

"Global tourism as you might expect, has been way down this year the number of people going overseas on vacation declined by a massive sixty, five percent in the first half of the air. But this hit was especially bad for Barbados the Caribbean island nation has built its economy around tourism, and normally this is a really great business more than a million tourists typically visit. Barbados. And they're all these businesses that depend on these tourist hotels and restaurants and local farms that supply the restaurants and all of these people count on the tourism sector. It makes about a third of Barbados's GDP as people started to halt their plans for trips to places like Barbados those jobs and businesses, they took a huge hit. So the country's Prime Minister Mia Motley. She had an idea and I spoke to UC skeet about this. He's the US director at the organization that promotes tourism to Barbados Prime Minister Recognize that we have an opportunity to welcome these individuals who are working. Remotely to come to Barbados enjoy all that the Allen has to offer and stole be able to work. So what it did is it allowed us to look beyond short-term visitor and create lungs. The visitor is on the island and the government developed a special new visa twelve months long, and they're just a few conditions you have to work for your employer back home ending at least fifty thousand dollars a year that is, you know you're not getting a job in Barbados also, you pay two thousand dollars application fee and you need your own health insurance which travel insurance can typically cover. Application is approved Bam. You can sit up let up in a hammock overlooking the Caribbean on horseback. Emiko horseback take your pick and you know probably not very surprisingly daring after having seen this ad over two thousand people like, Sean. Have applied for the welcome stamp visa and it doesn't sound like a ton but using explained why this is actually a really important economic boost, they have to find a place to live. They have to eat this hurtling going to participate in a lot of the attractions and activities in addition to that. Then no become because I can guarantee you want to come into the welcome stamping Barbados they're not gonNA WANNA leave. So they're also become a part of the voice that tells their friends and families at that. You must visit Barbados and I think that then has even longer term benefits and I. Think that's certainly a win win. But of course, this question comes up in my head, right like, could it really be this easy I? mean if it is maybe the entire population of the world is going to end up in the Caribbean. But to check this out, we went to talk to Tim Burgess. He's the CO founder of an international workforce company called Shield Jimbo he's working internationally is not always so simple. There's there's a whole lot of compliance and I guess I. Sort of administrative issues that people don't think about in this context. Tim says, there are two main obstacles to international working from home. So first of all, if you're going for a long length of time like at least six months, you have to start thinking about taxes. If you're for example going to Mexico you might become tax resident in Mexico, your employment say hold on now where liable for having employees Mexico, and of course, this is not just income tax right? Example, Hanshin State health insurance. Yeah. All the different components of social security a few moved from the US. To Franz the employees accost goes from about fifteen percent on top of the salary to forty seven to fifty percent on top of the summer. So it's not as easy as just going to a we work in Paris. It's a very gray area. Barbados got around this particular snag. They said, you do not need to pay taxes in Barbados with this particular visa just keep paying your taxes and social security to home country but Tim. Raises a second issue, which is if you'll say working for an American company but want to work overseas the company you work for start to need to comply with your new countries, regulations and labor laws like say, maybe you'll be forced to take the minimum twenty four vacation days required by Jim. Laurie. If you relate to Berlin, which would be sad. Yeah. I mean that would be a struggle, but I would be up for tackling that. So Barbados, really turned this gray area into a very simple and clear invitation to remote worker. They saw this. And so Darian you know we started talking about this and we were wondering like, is this the wave of the future? I really hope and my hope is that people take it up. It would be a really wonderful initiative and a great model that people could follow and a lot of other countries have realize there is a huge opportunity here Estonia has launched its own visa. So has Bermuda and so Shaun the business intelligence analyst from Charlotte she's a tastes case company said, yes, and to visa was approved and the horses in hammocks wait exactly excited I I couldn't believe it. I was like Oh my God he's actually going to happen. I'm excited to Sean paid her two thousand dollars visa fee, and she now has her flights booked for just a couple of weeks from now what are you looking forward to most about? Barbados the food. The food tasting. Some new flavors there flying fish is like their. Go to national dish it's something called flying fish, which I have no idea

Barbados Caribbean Tim Burgess Caribbean Island United States Sean Prime Minister BAM Mexico Mia Motley Co Founder Hanshin State Allen Franz Darian Paris Laurie Director
"i. emiko" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:33 min | 5 months ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Goa'uld. It with invigorate and keep on going, Emiko, ultimate with invigorate a BP and Amoco station. I'm mad Bear with traffic on the fives. Follow us on Twitter at W. II be sea traffic. Randy Hollis. Which TV meteorologist What's going on? Yeah, Tony getting upto warmer. Start this morning after a We're down to 30 this morning with a 40 year. So sunny, breezy. A warmer afternoon we're gonna call for are very nice. I 73 degrees clear tonight Down 56. Mostly sunny, warmer tomorrow. Unseasonably warm 80 degrees for high during the day on Wednesday, call from comes through tomorrow night on Thursday. Sonny Cooler high temperature in the mid seventies Upper seventies on Friday, and as we head to the weekend, there may be a few showers around either Saturday or Sunday. The models were kind of conflicting here, but a few showers possible and temperatures remaining in the seventies. During the upcoming weekend. That right there is Randy Alice. Of which TV Randy. Thank you. 44 degrees in the American Standard Cooling Weather Center. The time right now is seven of six thiss hour on 93. WNBC is powered by the home loan expert dot com. You know, you got to make sure you're catching the top of the hour. Bottom of the hour News with John Harris, Kirke darling and the rest of the gang. Otherwise, you would have missed this story about a West Lafayette City councilor,.

Randy Hollis Randy Alice Amoco station Twitter BP Kirke darling West Lafayette City Tony John Harris
"i. emiko" Discussed on Charlas sobre TDAH

Charlas sobre TDAH

05:17 min | 5 months ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on Charlas sobre TDAH

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Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

FT News

09:07 min | 1 year ago

Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

"For the first time will also be recording this for video on our Youtube Channel so today we're here to talk about Crowell food an extreme file is a microbe that can survive in extreme conditions one star up in Chicago has found a way of turning these microbes rapa creatures into an edible protein part of a growing trend towards a microbial revolution in Food and agriculture could microbes hold the key to feeding a growing relation here with me in the studio to discuss this is Emiko Tarazona commodities correspondent and Clive Cookson science editor thanks for joining today Emiko to start with tell us a bit about this company and what it is trying to do so sustainable biproduct is a start up in the US yes and it's turning and micro that discovered in yellowstone national park into protein so they are going to use precision fermentation and they again A to turn this protein into alternative dairy and meat products like burgers and microbial base cheese wow has it garnered much first from investor's overall the search for alternative proteins is such a hot topic in Food and agriculture these days and comes as increasing income uh-huh in developing countries and when populations become more rich they moved from carbohydrates to prestige products I meet but people can't continue easing me because of the environmental is also health concerns as well so we've had the plant based meat products impossible Burger and beyond meat and the search is on for alternative sources of protein among entrepreneurs and scientists and so yes investors are we interested sustainable by products is raised she three million early this year from companies including France's Danone and Archer Daniels Midland which is an agricultural trade we've got some really serious money behind them what to these products actually tastes like have you tried any yourself when you talk about protein means you'll have a protein which is a source of the product by the vehicle for the taste so I think the idea there is to reduce the taste of the channel whatever you using it sauce itself like pre protein which is used in beyond meat you don't want it tastes like peas yeah so you want the protein to be pures possible with Mike I have not tasted was actually not on the market so I have not tasted volcanic microbial burgers but the other uses with proteins is as food ingredient to enhance the taste of a certain product or change the way the product tastes for instance impossible foods I uses a protein called him which is made from soy and that is made from precision fermentation and it adds the meaty taste gene. The bugah wow so how optimistic are you I mean is this pine sky or do you think this is genuinely changing the way that we wing to source proteins in our food well I didn't think it's Pine Sky Tool because you already have corn for instance that is more not not C. O. R. A. But exactly due to you O. R. N. and that is made from a micro protein which is a sort of fungus and that's been around forever clive you know better than me in Qu'une dates back to the nineteen eighties and it's a good thing to think of anyone has headcorn it is as you said a vehicle for taste quarter is growing out of single celled fungus which you can define `as Microbe F- Initiative Mike Grove is somewhat stretchy incubators any organism that you can't see with the naked eye as the individual cells and you have to onto microscope to identify them that's so interesting I mean microbe seem to be having a bit of a moment recently why have they come into the spotlight now I guess spotlight might be the wrong where maybe under the telescope from yes what's the wider scientific picture here well when it comes to food one of the most important changes as of the twenty first century in in nutrition and even I would say in medicine is understanding that the billions of microbes the bacteria that live in our what's play a gigantic role in our health not just how we digest food that's the most important thing but even welby being psychologically the microbes within our body of vital and therefore there's a big and growing industry you're trying to produce microbes not say much as food but to populate guts with friendly bacteria so that's a very big growth area Another is that might cribs used to ferment foods of being extended a lot everything from Kim Chae to sauerkraut route to the molds are cheeses to bear in wine they depend on microbes one sort or another and so using microbes to produce protein I mean could this be scaled up used worldwide I mean are there inhibiting factors will I think we have to remember uh-huh like all new foods microbial food stamp grow on thin air they will need a lot of input of water nutrients at that try so from the environmental point of view that are not going to be completely benign now they're probably going to be more sustainable and growing card which spends a lot of its energy wondering around fields and belching and burping and emitting methane which is a very powerful greenhouse gas but I think those environmental questions need to be answered and they haven't yet been answered by the new foods companies that are making not only microbial foods CACO's talking about earlier but also sell based meat and fish products web rather than growing a cow will catching a fish you'll grow the proteins and the muscle the fibers hopefully trying to capture the texture and taste in the lab and where does this fit into other types of new food technologies I think they're going to be seen alongside these other cell taste foods a lot of progress is being made in taking for example stem cells from cowes Castle and getting them to develop essentially and to meet and if you combine that with Three D. Printing you can get something that's good texture I mean that's one possibility abass meat but I guess this whole microbial fungus bacterial activity I mean how will consume is really react to it is the uh-huh because it's cruel to animals and I didn't think cruelty to microbes is going to enter the picture remains to be seen sustainable but biproduct CEO has told me that he wants is to get a product out into the market either on a trial basis or onto the shelves at least in about eighteen months in the US so it'll be interesting to see what sort of marketing strategy he takes a certified next Winter Christmas twenty twenty we could be having microbial something on the shelf test smoke it I think probably not in London yeah yeah as a final question I wanted to ask you both do you think there's an argument that time and money would be better spent encouraging food and agricultural offices that are more sustainable rather than creating new products that sort of enable everyone to keep consuming in the same way I think that's a really interesting question but I suspect that the horses kind of left the stable that consumers want convenient food that they crave and also the newly rid sh developing country population they also want that as well they expect that and on the other hand you'd companies and fast food companies won't all that so can we continue killing life is to have diversity I think from a sustainability and health point of view giving consumers as rich and diverse mixture of foods as

Emiko Tarazona Youtube Archer Daniels Midland Emiko Clive Cookson United States Chicago Yellowstone National Park Crowell France Editor Mike Eighteen Months
"i. emiko" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

The Flop House Podcast

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

"Hey everyone welcome to the flop house. I'm dan emiko roy. I'm stuart wellington and i'm elliot kaylynn and we are yup. We don't normally do it that way but that's fine now. We're doing this from a special location. That might be a little bit of surprise to anyone who didn't listen to the opening go on on we're at college in richmond indiana where dan and stewart i met as we leads to tiny. Little guys was two two years less tiny now. I believe the story. Is that dan you were the president of the nerd frat and stewart. You're the president of the party frat and i wasn't the president so much as like the guy that kept chained in the basement and pulled out only for special events. There are no greek houses on this campus but <hes> uh there's no there were definitely some freak houses. That was cool yeah so we'll we'll stop doing early specific civic chatter and we'll get into a we actually on this podcast which is all business when he's alone he wants to look professional in front of his former college student student colleagues and i have to the audience assumed crusty dean that was always mad at you feel like i feel like dan's wardrobe has been auditioning reasoning for like a college professor job long yet judging by your wardrobe dan. I think you work here yeah. Every every time you look in the mirror like a wonderboy or the listener at home i have a cardigan and a high of cardigan and a tie so dan what we do on this podcast other than make fun of you know that's it we watch a bad movie and then we talk about it. In in this case we watched as we said in the intro jurassic world fallen kingdom sequel to jurassic world the kingdom's doing okay and of course there was the prequel jurassic wrestling world building a kingdom we just dive into this and we might not even seen the first one though right well neither either view. Neither of us are the original draft which i know as a dinosaur boy. That's an issue and i wish i had seen it. Is that how you identify dinosaur wisit dinosaur boy tarzan boy. I mean i don't i don't like labels on the spectrum. I guess that's where i fall. I have dinosaur boy tendencies. Okay now dress world dressing park of course as regular listeners know was a very important movie to me. It's how i date. All human history is that nineteen ninety three for me is the year one j._p. And every year before that is dated as b._j._p. Regressive part and every year after that is a._j. After drastic arc so you'd think i would have gone to c. jurassic world but for some reason it just didn't seem to have the same magic. Let's roll fallen. Kingdom recaptures that that magic being a questionable grasp of how dna works we begin at the site of the doomed jurassic park and then also doomed. I'm dressing world theme parks. That's why we're all the first one is was so dumb to me that they were like. Hey remember that theme park that never opened because everyone got eaten leads open avenue and we'll put it in the same place so run is lavar guys. Regular joes were inside a submersible bathysphere. The arizona what you're thinking as stewart's that were watching it. James cameron is involved that loves undersea exploration and they are looking at an underwater site where they find the skeleton of dominance ominous wrecks the super dinosaur from the last movie and they take its tooth in a scene that involves a c._g._i. Saw cutting into a c._g._i. To it really bothered thirties yeah i think i think it was all c._g._i. And it's like saws and teeth both exists later on in the movie we learned that the tooth collection part of the film is not for d._n._a..

dan emiko roy stewart president c. jurassic dan stuart wellington elliot kaylynn arizona richmond indiana James cameron dean professor two two years one j
Farming and climate change

FT News

09:28 min | 1 year ago

Farming and climate change

"Growing focus on environmentally friendly farming methods with Leslie hook an Emiko terrorism. I'm a co can you tell us a bit about into goes initiative to pay farmers to store, carbon, so I'm plots absorb carbon dioxide from the Ariza grow, and then they release it back to the air and soil as they decompose? What indigo is saying is bomb as we want you to restore so health and increase its ability to store, carbon, and we'll pay for it so farming practices, like, minimal tilling of the soil planting cover crops in between main crops and crop rotation. Having livestock Rome in the fields that can all help the soil capturing carbon is this different than what farmers normally do? Well, traditionally these were what bombers have been doing, but one day intensive bombing practices, like using chemical pesticides, and fertilizers have a rare disloyal health and scientists estimate the across cropland soils as carbon concentration about one percent in this compared to about three percent for naturally. Consistence like forests, I guess, when I'm struggling understand, is how much carbon this is going to save in how they're going to measure it. Leslie. What do you think it is very hard to measure, how long the carbon stays in the soil and to measure each individual plot? And that's always been one of the challenges with this approach. We know that globally. There is a lot of carbon stored in the soil. The top two meters of soil around the earth, contain about three times as much carbon as the atmosphere. So there is a huge store of carbon, they're already and as Emiko says a lot of it has been lost. Scientists I've spoken to have often pointed this figure of four hundred and fifty billion tons of CO, two essentially lost from the soil because of modern farming practices. So that's about a decade's worth of global emissions, and that's going into the atmosphere. So it has had a huge impact, and there's a huge sort of opportunity. Here, but one it is quite difficult to quantify, and I think indigo correct me if I'm wrong, they are planning to use satellite, imagery, and a very novel approach to sort of measure, what the farmers are doing. So indigo says that it will use remote sensing technology from satellites, and satellites, these days, come measure, everything from radiation to see a two levels, so that's what they're going to rely on. And the companies also part of a study with tens of thousands of farms looking at how carbon is stored in soil. But they've also launched a competition calling on innovators and entrepreneurs to come up with scaling up measurement for carbon, so it's a bit of a moving target. It's a cool to arms. But it's you know, I think it's opened a little people's eyes into the potential there. Can you explain a little bit more about the business model and how exactly this is going to be financed? So indigo is going to use its own money to pay them as initially and then settled on the. The so-called common credits to feed companies and other cultural companies what's in it for indigo? I know they've invested in authors of environmental initiatives. And that's kind of their main thing, but how are they going to benefit from this? So one of indigo businesses is selling my Kirby -als to form. So coating seeds with microbials, which is essentially what Sinaga as well, but using those microbials to help bombs reduce chemicals, Passat specializes, so that hoping is farmers turn to traditional soil-friendly methods that they can increase sales. The but also, if arm as have more organic and less pass tied less fertilizer used crops that increases the premium the famous can get and indigo also of his like an EBay for grains. But they offer this marketplace, where palm is combined sell that premium get grains to buzz so they hoping. It will kind of ties together. But I don't think we've said immediately in this scheme, how much to farmers stand to make because they're effectively being subsidised paid to do this. We'll exactly so indigo in two thousand nineteen says the pharmacies lineup this year. They'll pay fifteen dollars for every tonne of carbon. They've managed to store in the soil and this year, the hoping to sign up more than three thousand growers covering more than one million acres, and then eventually going to take these carbon credits and sell them onto company. Exactly Leslie, what do you think about that idea? Is it something that's just a novel need idea? Does it actually have the potential for a bigger impact? Why I think it's interesting because it's one of many efforts that we're starting to see to store more carbon as global emissions hit a record high last year. The gap between what the world should be doing to limit. The worst impacts of global warming and the reality of what's going up in the atmosphere is just growing, and so more people are thinking about what's called negative emissions acknowledges, and these are just ways to. Store carbon in the soil. Underground in the ocean in trees. It kind of covers any way that you're pulling CO two out of the air, and storing it or sequestering it in a place where it won't be released and soil has really been one of the most interesting areas for this sort of negative emissions technology because that's nature's own way of storing a lot of carbon. So in a way it's sort of a low hanging fruit. There's not some technological mystery about how this works so have been a lot of really interesting efforts to try and replenish, the carbon that stored in soil, which can be good for the fertility of the soil and for the crops, as well as good for the atmosphere and from agricultural point of view, the debate about how much bombing and agriculture contribute to emissions is also been growing, and I think policymakers, quite aware. Of the debate around that. And I think they're more actively wanting to find ways to help reduce negate emissions out of agricultural, farming and this is potentially one of the ways have you seen that, as well as yeah, there's a lot of emissions from the cultural sector a lot of greenhouse gas emissions. There's methane emissions from cows. There's emissions from easel trucks, there is a Monja emissions that arise when you fertilize the fields. There's a lot of different types of environmental impacts from farming that are coming under more of a focus. I mean here in the UK there's a lot of discussion over payments to farmers that would reflect sustainable farming practices and reflect the positive environmental impact of what farmers are doing mostly it'd be great to understand just how much of an impact farming has on greenhouse gas emissions as maybe compared to other sources. Well, most people don't instantly think of the farm, as a huge source think of sort of the coal power play. Belching black smoke. But in many countries agriculture is the second largest source of emissions after the power sector globally. It accounts around thirteen percent of greenhouse, gas, emissions now, different farms have different types of environmental impact so cattle farms dairy farms, have a larger impact on greenhouse gas emissions because of the methane that's emitted by cows and farming practices can also have a big impact on emissions and previously. This was overlooked, a lot of the efforts on decarbonisation have really focused on getting rid of coal and cleaning up the power sector, more renewable energy and farming is a very difficult sector to introduce change into because you have so many farmers so many different types of crops, but it's an area where a lot more companies and policymakers are increasingly focusing and how optimistic are people in the sector that initiatives like the indigo one, maybe two? Taken in aggregate are actually going to make a difference. I think there's going to be a lot more research and a lot more funding going into programs like this, we've seen researchers looking at what type of plants can help store more carbon in the soil. We've seen companies like indigo starting to pay farmers. So I think this is an area that's going to see a lot of growth. That was Lauren Fito took into Leslie hook environment correspondent, and Emiko tear is owner or commodities. Correspondent, thanks for listening. Don't forget, if you missed out on a recent episodes of the sale of suburbs auction house caring for dementia, sufferers or Kamala Harris in the race. For the democratic nomination, you can find them all on the usual podcast by booms. He is a few words from Dame. Helen Mirren telling us what she's a fan of. I'm a fan of platform heels on a fan of Fellini and Antonioni. I'm a fan of animation Yanni for me the greatest actors of all. I'm a fan of being a bad ass. I'm a fan of dressing up and glamorous outfits. I'm a fan of luxury. I'm a fan of Mandarin. Oriental.

Leslie Emiko Helen Mirren Ariza Kamala Harris UK Sinaga Palm Passat Fellini Lauren Fito Antonioni Fifty Billion Tons One Million Acres Thirteen Percent Fifteen Dollars
Freedom Party, Europe And Austria discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:01 min | 1 year ago

Freedom Party, Europe And Austria discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Just a few weeks ago. Things were looking rosy for Austrian politician, Heinz, Christian stock. Mr. struck has hard, right. Freedom Party had been ruling in a governing coalition and he was the country's vice chancellor and heads. The his- at a campaign event for the upcoming European elections. He spoke from a beer tent about some of his favorite themes must see fit into human, and I'm. With a beer glass in front of him. He railed against immigration saying it causes massive development failures. He said, natives or ancestral, people becoming a minority in Austria, that the country, did not want is limitation. Now his career has taken a nosedive. He was seen in video. It was a sting was filmed covertly in twenty seventeen and it's all happening beef or so. It's become known as the beef scandal. He's discussing the possibility of illegal donations from woman who claims to be the niece of a Russian oligarch Emiko Voy is a senior editor of the economist, and was recently reporting in Austria. And there was also some of the rubber dunk stuff about controlling the media in this being part of a deal in return, the state contracts in the wake of the scandal. The Austrian chancellor Sebastian coots dissolved the coalition government by calling for elections in September. The government has fallen apart effectively. It has. Collapsed because the Freedom Party was the minority party propping up the conservative party in government in Austria. So the Israeli government that is now having to go forward to hold new elections. And we'll see what happens then. So this, right. Wing party. That was propping up. The coalition government has now got itself into some very visible trouble what happens now. The interesting thing about story is that you had is very charismatic young leaders best in courts, taking over one of those traditional parties Austrian conservatives, typically, these are the kind of policies having difficulty at the moment and having these populist challenges across Europe. Would he did reach out to the Freedom Party, which is pretty hard core is much better to bring these guys into government? We can sort out things to the satisfaction of the broad centre-right and further. Right. The problem now is that has been up Salih torn asunder to presumably in the forthcoming. Elections than the Freedom Party this far right? Party will do extremely poorly, and perhaps, the, the conservative party will get an outright majority. I think it's quite difficult for conservatives to get that, right. Majority struggled for years, but was needed coalition partners, the Freedom Party. We simply don't know you would say, wouldn't you, this is one of the great pratfalls of political drama, in Europe, but let's not forget, they do have a very strong base very strong in certain parts of Austria, and also Australia, bit defiant, and often when they find that they've got a leader, whatever their political taste, the basal leader under pressure as often stood very firm. It's not absolutely clear that being hugely embarrassed once figure is gone destroys your vote Sebastian could However, I think, will not want to go back into a coalition with these guys really has had his fingers bird. And what about beyond Austria as we head into the European parliamentary elections, will this story have resonance for all of those people thinking? About other populist right-wing hard line parties. I think the kind of nuanced populism that's to in courts represents still has a lotta vote here across Europe. And don't think it's on the way, the European elections of probably getting to suggest that what does it mean it means coming up with solutions of possible solutions to immigration and asylum crises, which you, usually about keeping the people who want to come quite a long way from Europe's borders, and particularly the borders of its inner state. So it can mean trying to do deals to keep them just at the edge of the broader e you. But I think that way of taking some of the language of hatred and stripping away, leaving that to the fall reut was same time, you preach pragmatism, but you really try to clamp down on the numbers coming in. I do think that is the politics. The is gaining in salience across Europe. That election to the European parliament begins tomorrow with all twenty eight European countries. Voting over three days. In the five years since the last elections, nationalist parties like Austria's, Freedom, Party have seen their fortunes rise. But one feature of the last few years in Europe has been the growth of extreme parties on the right. And, and on the left particularly on the right. I suppose Chris Lockwood is economists Europe editor you see in Italy, the Northern League Lega becoming a much more powerful force in politics, you see in Spain, the rise of this small new, vox party in Poland shift to the conservative party of law, and Justice, and so on, and so forth. So it's to be expected in these elections that you will see a bit of a tilt in the European parliament towards the far. Right. Does that mean that the sort of overall tilt of the parliament itself will we'll be to the right? Do you think I think this has been rather exaggerated? If you take the combined forces of what you could call the nationalist right if you define those parties as being one. That are outside of the mainstream existing parties. I wouldn't expect them to gain more than forty or fifty or maybe sixty seats which is a sizable number. But remember that the European parliament is seven hundred fifty one strong. You say this rise in the sort of extreme parties, isn't quite so worrisome as, as some might think. But I mean, do you think it's election kind of takes the temperature of the, the you as a whole? Well, that's a very interesting question. I don't want to underestimate what's going on here, you are seeing forces that previously were not in mainstream politics, taking bigger rose in national parliaments, and bigger roles in the European parliament. So that does matter because it also requires the parties, particularly on the center right shifting a bit to the right in order to fend off that challenge. So, so there is an impact, and it's a response to a number of things one, the continued depression of wages and the hangover from the European Europe. Crisis of two thousand and ten to eleven and before that the worldwide credit crunch of two thousand eight hundred words the fact that Europe did receive an enormous number of migrants coming out of the Middle East, and that's led to a tremendous backlash in quite a number of countries. So these are genuine things that are genuinely happening in their, they're shifting politics to certain extent in a right with direction. So does it seem to you, then that people are kind of losing faith in the EU as an institution? No. It didn't think so actually, if you look at all the polling, it suggests that support for the EU is rather high levels. Of course, it went down during the economic crises pass those not the economies are in a fantastic state, but economic growth is returned unemployment has come down. And of course, you have the experiment of Britain Britain vertically leave the EU and has got himself into a tremendous mess ever since not able to decide quite what the mechanism for leaving would be. Be not being able to form a consensus on when and how to do it. And as a result every other country where there have been. Exit type movements of old hundred around. Maybe it isn't such a great idea. So the fascinating thing is that despite all of the problems that Europe's been through maybe even because of them because it was seemed to have just about survived them. People have come back to thinking, well, maybe this organization isn't so bad after Chris, thank you very much for your

Freedom Party Europe Austria European Parliament Coalition Government Wing Party Chancellor Sebastian Coots EU Chris Lockwood European Europe Israeli Government Salih Emiko Voy Senior Editor Middle East Britain Spain
"i. emiko" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Emiko on the Westwood One NCWA radio network that would do it as LSU win sixty-nine sixty seven over the turps to advance to the Sweet Sixteen and so the Tigers despite their head coach will way being suspended indefinitely. Amidst in FBI investigation into college hoops corruption able to advance to the round of sixteen number seven Wofford falling short to seed Kentucky, sixty to fifty six to seek Michigan handling kency Florida, sixty four forty nine Florida state routes Murray state ninety sixty two top seed, Gonzaga facing number nine Baylor right now. And it's all zags thus far. They're a big over the bears. Meanwhile, it is Michigan state up big on ten seed Minnesota thirty three sixteen they are late in the first half. And it's number three. Perdue of thirteen eight number six Villanova just a few minutes into the first half in Hartford last game of the evening. Coming up. We'll be number five Auburn and number four, Kansas highlanders. Double up the flyers for Philly. Josh bailey. The go ahead goal with just under four minutes to go. And he ended up with two goals for the game. Rangers and Maple Leafs are at the end of two periods. They are scoreless in Toronto Yankees fell to the Blue Jays. Seven three GIO Gonzalez struggling in his debut though for the Yanks allowing five runs on four hits over to and the Mets. Jacob degrom with three scoreless frames as they route the bridge twelve to inlay lake Avista sports at fifteen and forty five around the clock. Jacob wilkins. Tension win sports wins. News time, eight forty seven. One.

Michigan Rangers Florida LSU GIO Gonzalez Jacob wilkins Josh bailey FBI Jacob degrom Tigers Wofford Avista Perdue Kentucky Kansas highlanders Philly Mets Auburn Yankees Hartford
"i. emiko" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on WTVN

"Kodhbane Emiko quick update and recap of the latest headlines, you'll get it all in minutes at the bottom of the hour on NewsRadio six ten WTVN. If you saw the presidential press conference moments ago, you saw exactly why they have got to get rid of the guy. You saw why they hate this guy. You saw how they understand. They cannot do what he does in terms of public. Speaking reaching out connecting with an audience making his case, what a performance from the president, greetings, my friends. It's Friday keep. Friday. And the number is eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two the Email address elrushbo eibnet dot US. All right. We just have the press conference in the rose garden after the president signed the. The budget deal and then declared a national emergency. We're still working on some of the some soundbites from this. That I want to share with you. But I I wanna I wanna set the.

president Kodhbane Emiko
For Bud Light, A War Between Taste and Calories

Business Wars Daily

04:43 min | 2 years ago

For Bud Light, A War Between Taste and Calories

"Business wars daily is brought to you by Pitney Bowes, and send pro online shipping can be complex with the uncertainty over costs and deciding which carrier to use plus tracking your packages things can get confusing. Stay tuned to the end of the show to find out how Pitney Bowes and send pro online can save you time and money and to get a special offer just for listeners of the show. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Friday February first happy Super Bowl weekend. Everyone the Super Bowl is of course, a celebration of spiking smashing and snacking. But this Sunday as you Nahshon, nachos and toast. Your team Anheuser Busch hopes you'll take a moment to consider the calories in your beer. Yes. You heard that? Right. The makers of Bud Light are voluntarily adding nutrition labels to their brews in an effort to flaunt the one advantage. They think they have over craft beers low calories and the label will show off something else. The company's proud of a short list of what it claims her high quality ingredients for far too long people have been less to wonder what ingredients are in their view as your leader. That handsome leader. I put an ingredients label on every case of Bud Light this way. The people will be sure that the kingdom's favorite light lager is brewed with the finest ingredients. It was really great. Did you get that supposed to be writing that? Now, it wasn't until twenty sixteen that brewers began putting ingredient labels on beer, and even then the voluntary lists weren't comprehensive. Now. Anheuser Busch is posting a more thorough label on Bud Light more like the USDA required. Labels on packaged foods in hopes that you'll trade in say a bottle of bell breweries to hearted craft beer at two hundred twelve calories for a one hundred ten calorie, Bud Light. Will it make any difference to its sales though, it could there's growing evidence that drinkers just like eaters are getting more health conscious Michelob ultra low calorie beer also from Anheuser Busch. Druids sales by sixteen percent. Twenty eighteen one of only two major beers to do. So the other was Maddelo Mexican beer. Now also owned by Anheuser Busch. Craft beers have been taking more and more of the market, but the health trans even applies to drinkers who prefer that beer which typically runs between two hundred and three hundred calories per bottle and craft brewers are paying attention dogfish head craft brewery, the twelfth largest craft brewer in the nation is releasing a ninety five calorie beer called slightly mighty. I ta made with monk fruit to give it body. So what do you say? Would you cheer on your team with a monk fruit based beer and say celery sticks? Well on Sunday. We'll find out which will win the patriots or the Rams or perhaps a robust frapp beer versus low calorie brew. From wondering this is business wars daily. This week's episodes were written edited and produced by Elaine Appleton grant, they're edited by Emiko Lynn, Jenny lower bagman. Our editor and producer our executive producers marshal Louis created by non Lopez for wondering, I'm David Brown. CNN? This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by central online from Pitney Bowes central online makes it easy to save time and money. No matter what you ship or mail, printing shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk with a semi pro software. You can compare shipping rates between carriers plus say forty percent off USPS priority, mail shipping and get five cents off. Every letter. You send our listeners can try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale. But only by visiting PB dot com slash b w daily. That's PB dot com slash BW daily.

Anheuser Busch Bud Light Pitney Bowes Brewers David Brown CNN Usda Rams Elaine Appleton Emiko Lynn Patriots Marshal Louis Editor Jenny Lopez Executive Producer Two Hundred Twelve Calories
"i. emiko" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Organization. We're bringing free market solutions to environmental issues across the country. We do policy work legislative work, and we work on campuses with college students spread the word. So this was a study that looked at a variety of grocery store chains and chemicals it uses and it found that whole foods when it comes to there to go bar uses products that contain potentially cancer, causing chemicals. Yeah. And it's actually kind of ironic because often is often hailed as every health high-standard company for. For health and environmental issues, but they use these chemicals which can cause liver damage and cancer. And they're not biodegradable when they go to the landfill emanating water and soil as well in the hot food bar so in response to this. They've said, oh, we didn't know that. And now they're looking for new packaging. Yeah. And I think they did have some degree of knowledge on what it was harming Emiko. It was used in the forty s or resistant in manufacturing and used today and like fire retardant dating, but they did respond. They're saying they're looking for better eco friendly packaging, the biodegradable. I think this just goes to show that not everything that we think is environmentally friendly. Is as always you gotta do your homework this chemical if I'm not mistaken is flooring. And I know this is tough to quantify by the last few this. Anyway, I mean, how dangerous is this stuff, especially in the quantities that people at whole foods may be getting where their their food sitting in and four. For a short time in patches to food. And then when consumed it can your body for a long time getting hot food blot can build up in tensely be very dangerous, and then the other part of it in the water contamination, and it ends up in our water. I think sample of bad where it looks like better for the environment. They switched to the paper product hooted in this Laurie of it'd be better for the environment. But it actually ended up being worse. The other concern with some of the paper that you know, you might be a pick up a product. What to put it inside? Something actually touching the food. Right. Yeah. It's coated all over it. And it actually the other interesting thing is it was called bio, even though coding on the product isn't biodegradable. There is some good that came out of this. You know, the backlash does show the humor care about the environment or than ever particularly millennial. It's been shown we've done with the yen. Energy network shows that fifty six percent of conservative millennials, did it'd be less likely to vote for candidates opposed clean energy. I think that shows you kind of shit. In consumer opinion on the environment in the company is working to correct the issue. How do you guys have you guys differ from like, the left-leaning environmental groups? I think what we like to do we focus more on policies that produce outcomes rather than look good on paper. And we also want to make sure that we're producing Hollis T and pollution that go along with our capitalist principle rather than against them in. There's there's many ways to do that. I think it's important that we remember that policy..

liver damage tensely Hollis T Laurie fifty six percent
"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"And there's his main seat piece it's molded into a curvy l shape and then there are very answer can have arms or no arms it can have different legs different styles of bases all that kind of stuff yeah isn't that modulator d was a big selling point buyers could pick a base for the home or pick one for the office you know something more minimalist or something more stylish but the chairs weren't just designed to look nice they were also meant to be affordable and functional so they were low cost easy to mass produce easy to move around easy to keep clean and actually the first prototype was built for an international competition for low cost furniture design which was hosted by the museum of modern art in new york city and so did it actually win this competition actually know the chair took second place but it's pretty good so yeah to be fair there were you know three thousand that are entries are so and the jury reportedly liked that modular approach but they may have taken off points because the prototype was made a stamped steel and that's a tricky and expense material to work with takes these high pressures at high temperatures so for mass production they actually switched to fiber reinforced plastic and because the chairs are made up of just a few pieces they were easy to assemble and it sounds a lot different from the seventy seven step process great the aluminum navy emiko chair it really has and that simplicity is by design but these different tiers do actually have something in common knockoff companies love to make copies of and according to one source i found one of these molded eames chair variants this one that has what's called the eiffel tower base which is a set of four legs with these crisscrossing metal connectors is actually one of the most copied chairs in the world today but if they were designed to be affordable what is the incentive to make copies of them even shares that are officially licensed by vitro actually self over five hundred dollars which is you know the same ballpark has these emiko navy chairs and obviously it seemed a little odd to me given this eames quote.

new york city museum of modern art eiffel tower eames five hundred dollars
"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"We have very good luck if it's an exact copy i can get those in them heartbeat when companies don't comply with their requests to take down the lookalike emiko can take the company to court this is what happened in two thousand twelve when restoration hardware started selling the naval chair they even knocked off a name so when someone is a a counterfeiter that's typically the kind of things they do in order to give their product fake authenticity restoration hardware settled with emiko before the case went to court greg's also gotten other big box companies like target and kia to knock it off with the knockoffs he can do this because he has trade dress protection trade dress protection is designed to protect consumers from the lookalike imitations of name brand products is not practicing the function or use of the product it's just the dress how it looks and for emiko that means the chairs shape that shape belongs to emiko nobody can reproduce that shape so so having that kind of protection allows us to be very aggressive when when we need to be but i met a lawyer christopher sprig men who doesn't think amoco deserves this protection so consumers in the marketplace when they look at this chair in less they are real french or aficionados they don't think oh this is amoco they think oh that's a chair writer that's a pretty chair that chair would look good in my living room i don't think that the shape of this chair is distinctive it's a it's an office chair design that's been around i have pictures of it from the twenty and department stores and offices if this had gone to litigation i think that would have become clear.

restoration hardware greg writer christopher sprig
"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"After five sold baths in a night in three hundred twenty degree oven this aluminum chair is three times stronger than steel it's the ultimate is sustainability and kind of the opposite of planned obsolescence many of the designers who work with emiko wanna see this elaborate process and make the trip out to pennsylvania to meet the workers like the famous industrial designer philippe starck whose visit was filmed by greg i was obliged to meet you because like artist you make a sculpture and the and you re you reproduce this could show every day by android and by zander and that it's it's a beauty that's why you're when you see you chair you see love according to greg when designers visit the factory they come away with a deeper appreciation of the workers and the value of the chair beyond its shape when i take an architect through emiko the one thing that they always say is you should charge more for this chair a lot of architects must have a pretty big chair budget because emiko chairs are not an expensive a new teno six navy chair we'll set you back about five hundred fifty dollars but you can get an amoco alike chair for a lot less there are several websites that have listings from vendors of fakes counterfeit chairs that's madsen bookbinder greg's wife she does press for the company but she also has this ritual where she wakes up every morning and scours the number of e commerce sites for fakes and those sites are house and ebay amazon and ali baba.

philippe starck zander amazon ali baba pennsylvania greg i three hundred twenty degree five hundred fifty dollars
"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"Shape in the seat that's j bookbinder she was named for her grandfather greg's father and she recently started working at macdill nfl man we're off to welding i didn't see much automation at the emiko factory just a number of very skilled craftspeople walled and right now he's routing old incher the aluminum extruded to in order to accept crossbar said go into the two in this case the famous three vertical slats the back of the co chairs curved like an upside down u and the three vertical slats come down from the top of this you and meet a curved crossbar the three sluts don't go all the way to the sea they intersect with the crossbar three quarters of the way down it's one of the most distinctive design elements of the miko shane okay so now we're going over into department three which is grinding all the wells have to be ground down except three the original chair they made for the navy had a lump of welding and each join but when the fancy designer sort of working with them ago they found all the welds to be a little crude so emiko ground them down except for the three welds where the vertical slats meet the arch on the back of the chair these three wells on the back as our signature after the chairs have gone through all this heavy work they go through a series of water bath there's a total of five bass one two three four five in order to perfect this this process.

greg shane navy macdill nfl three quarters
"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"She had no idea who that was and i started to look through the file cabinets of who we were shipping chairs to they were shipping chairs to designers like giorgio armani and terence conran and hip entrepreneurs like ian schrager wealthy tastes makers had discovered the beauty of these indestructible navy surplus chairs greg suddenly realized that emiko could sell to what was mostly an untapped market i just felt right at that time if we can shift our focus from government sales to focus on architects and designers that would be an opportunity for us to take this thing and turn it around greg bookbinder definitely turned things around today emiko makes new chairs with architects and designers like norman foster frank gehry and philippe starck and the original ten oh six navy chair has become one of the most iconic chairs in the world you've definitely seen it before it's an all kinds of movies and tv shows it can be seen in the matrix and avatar an upholstered version shows up in the dark night when batman interrogates the joker it's the chair uc and seen set in prisons and police stations it's also a goto chair for fancy restaurants and art galleries and co working spaces it's everywhere but not all of these chairs are emiko chairs a lot of them are knockoffs fakes how can you tell the real oh easily you can see the slot at the bottom at curves see the bottom slat last month benjamin walk me around new york city showing me both real in fake and moco chairs like the fancy diner filled with real emiko chairs near his apartment in the east village it has nice chairs and would and it's full of people they look wealthy.

giorgio armani ian schrager frank gehry batman terence conran greg norman philippe starck new york
"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"It hit the sidewalk and bounced several times i am retroactively terrified but this whole story someone ran the cheer backup and it was it was completely perfect on damaged the navy was impressed and they gave wilton dangerous a huge contract in order to fill this contract he opened a huge factory and he called his business the electrical machine equipment company or emiko that's my fellow radio topi and benjamin walker host of the theory of everything podcast benjamin reported this story over the next few decades emiko shipped hundreds of thousands of these ten of six navy chairs to the us government from its factory in hanover pennsylvania it became standard issue for all worships battleships aircraft carriers submarines it's aluminum silver modern and minimal not too many flourishes it doesn't even have arms just three slats coming down from the back the top is arched would it squared off a bit on the sides it's a utilitarian looking design except it has one slightly unexpected enhancement there's a divot on the seat for your butt in the nineteen seventies amoco was purchased by a california businessman named jay bookbinder that's greg's father but by the nineteen nineties the company was losing a lot of money so greg took a trip to the factory to check on things when he got there things looked really bleak for emiko it was a skeleton crew and the guys were were just waiting for the company to close the government contracts had long dried up greg started to think perhaps this place should be shut down but then he overheard a phone call between the office manager paulina and a mystery customer she was on the phone is just know we will not chip your chairs you ship you send us the money i and slammed the phone down and paulina who said she always some guy giorgio money and.

wilton us jay bookbinder greg paulina benjamin walker hanover pennsylvania california office manager
"i. emiko" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on WEEI

"They where the celtics don't do not where the celtics don't do or they they have done recently we talking i mean star they have it on reality that warfare word i know who they start he ever seen hayward yet but you saw in cairo has a side that max deal yet so we'll see what happens but he looks like he's worth it it is a difference in that you've got a a structured salary cap so everybody knows you're gonna have to if you're going to be contender you've got to have two or three maximum contract guys this polish different and it's treated the players are treated differently here than the other team in this likeability factor emiko down at look at it who has a better chance of the four teams of becoming the next champion i'm not just looking at the calendar and when they are going to play their their playoff series the red sox red sox still in nobody's but they're not likeable it's almost as if i'm getting the feeling right now they've gone from being unlikeable i get some of that david price opening up his trap last year and saying stupid things and the stuff he did with eckersley pisses people off because the sitting there going to be a good human being first of all okay and they and they get pissed that but they usually you forget about that and you move or how would they so unlikeable win i'm telling you they have a better chance than these other teams of winning you get the bruins right now and they've been great and they're really likeable in the should be likeable they have good young kids they have a future they of veterans marchant is taking his game to the next level he's a superstar patrice bergeron his nice fair all around plural gandhi hr is playing like nobody started about sharp playing the you know like brady at advanced age to a rat i took rescue they hated earlier in the season last year they they were disappointed up now suddenly serving a phenomenal year they have a coach she was taken over that is really turned the steam around and yet you look at it and say i don't know what look at a doing a it in the.

celtics hayward cairo david price bruins marchant brady sox eckersley patrice bergeron
"i. emiko" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"An elderly woman emiko county live and local details now from wwl tv's wrongdoing jackie the victim was a ninety six year old roseville woman discovered out the door to elementary school playground around seven thirty that morning that's in the area of grass should have frazier roads are police say she was wearing only a nightgown robe and slippers is single digits aperture 's according to the family the woman was recently diagnosed with early onset dementia and sometime during the day police say she became confused and decided to leave her home and succumb to the cold her death ruled accidental by the county medical examiner's office due to exposure live and local rendezvous w w j newsradio nine fifty all right thank you ron also knew this midday and eighteen year old is sentenced to ten to fifteen years behind bars and the stabbing death of a manning here on township stacy wayne rose jr of taylor was guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the fatal stabbing of robert briscoe briscoe was stabbed outside of his home while trying to protect his teenage son police say rose took off from the scene but was later arrested after tips during a traffic stop he broke down in court as the sentence was read by the judge today and the way county prosecutor's office has now received a warrant request in the case of a double murder under toits east side the gunmen was found monday night at a relative's home and redford a few hours after two victims his wife and a friend were found in home i'm a kinney street near i 94 in harper investigators say the suspect and thirty six year old woman were getting divorced prosecutor's office says that they are now reviewing that case w wjr news time eleven thirty three a strong close to a strong here for car and truck sales wtmj ought to be reporter jeff gilbert joins us live with more jeff while jackie ford and gm had better than expected december's to indy of the will all be off only a little bit from 2016 now all of the drop will be on the passenger car side now listen to these numbers car is made up fifty three percent of the market back in two thousand nine they with thirty four percent last year a chinks at ford sales chief markland a abc's as permanent we believe a structural but it's not related to you know god directly related to fuel commie prices in part.

abc ford sales gm reporter harper redford stacy wayne rose jr ron frazier roseville wwl tv jackie ford jeff gilbert murder prosecutor robert briscoe briscoe involuntary manslaughter taylor manning medical examiner fifty three percent thirty four percent ninety six year thirty six year eighteen year fifteen years
"i. emiko" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Overall push for legal and social equality freedom you has won paid employee emiko solstice basically at the provost and the janitor of freedom you sosas has a phd in human rights and social movements and a history of being what she calls a troublemaker she was arrested for standing up for the rights of cafeteria workers when she was a grad student at emory university freedom you was founded in 2011 in response to georgia's policies that put up roadblocks for kids like arturo soul to speak him executive director in 2014 the spanish now been in place for seven years um and we have an entire generation of young people in georgia who since they were in middle school now grade school soon thought college was not a possibility and they gave up last year there were just four hundred twenty eight undocumented students enrolled in the university system of georgia that's one seventh of 1 percent celta's tries to convince her students not to lose hope and to explore opportunities and other states to drive the van of the east coast so they can meet freedom you alumni now going to ivy league schools the tour campuses around the country that welcome students like them and they even asked them to give talks sometimes back home in georgia salt introduced them to an earlier generation of atlanta's student leaders who faced obstacles and fought back people like charles black who is a board member freedom you those loan coverage emerged every good i could have jim because murray's but grew up in florida in 1958 he came to atlanta to attend morehouse a historically black college was an early leader of the atlanta student movement which challenged segregation boobs illegal for brexit words suitability are opposed to portugal some you couldn't use the same texaco's the hospital that separate ambulances the black some words i mean all these limbs were the law you know uh jeff like this is the long now the rewriting a gas for arturo martinez charles black and the civil rights leaders of his generation arnn inspiration black teaches them what it took to dismantle segregation from lunch counter to dime store to city hall he was first arrested mateen's 60 while trying to desegregate the whitesonly waiting room at the train station where he first arrived in town mortgage ridley.

provost human rights georgia atlanta jim murray florida emory university executive director charles black portugal arturo martinez civil rights mateen seven years 1 percent
"i. emiko" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Push for legal and social equality freedom you has won paid employee emiko solstice basically at the provost and the janitor of freedom you celta's has a ph d in human rights and social movements and a history of being what she calls a troublemaker she was arrested for standing up for the rights of cafeteria workers when she was a grad student at emory university freedom you was founded in 2011 in response to georgia's policies that put up roadblocks for kids like arturo salt us became executive director in 2014 this ban has now been in place for seven years com and we have an entire generation of young people in georgia who sense they were in middle school now grade school soon thought college was not a possibility and they gave up last year there were just four hundred twenty eight undocumented students enrolled in the university system of georgia that's one seventh of 1 percent celta's tries to convince her students not to lose hope and to explore opportunities and other states she drives a ban of the east coast so they can meet freedom you alumni now going to ivy league schools they tore campuses around the country that welcome students like them and they even asked him to give talks sometimes back home in georgia salt us introduced them to an earlier generation of atlanta's student leaders who faced obstacles and fought back people like charles black who is a board member of freedom you those low college in miami that i could have them because my race mud blacker up in florida in 1958 he came to atlanta to attend morehouse historically black college he was an early leader of the atlanta student movement which challenged segregation bibs illegal for blacks obliged to sit together a replace before because some you can use the same texaco's the hospital that separate ambulances the like some words i mean all these limbs were the law you know uh jeff like this is the law now the rewriting a for our turrel martinez charles black and the civil rights leaders of his generation arnn inspiration black teaches them what it.

provost human rights georgia executive director atlanta miami florida emory university charles black morehouse civil rights seven years 1 percent
"i. emiko" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"i. emiko" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"An eightyear six mumps she got relief and then when she came out like the way chagall release was so unorthodox like with like a miracle because she should have been deployed about trimming took jamming the fatherland wherever you at least and she was struggling because she was living if modest vo and i remembered of like pretty soon off the she clough she proposition most is boyfriend tickets fish some stuff mostly flattened the taken the pace just been away for his time when he doing when thinking nor barbault blah and and again through that but yes i slide sending drugs among us to to tone to it below barbara emiko to prison first day in their portsmouth i mean red in medicine because that was their local nick for what young offenders as in their hamma backs moslem in his office in a way yes i am the door a spot crime and this fucking guy like god bless him on the mv again like a by crime and he will possibly sweeping the land and look to me is that may come in comey may coming commonwealth that may look only be honest if you win don't ever crying on the wing because just imagine that everyone on this wing alliance and when you cry outside your so you become food year teams i don't dearest wannacry doing in your so close the door bravobrava remain on the bucks caveats shows crushed up quick 'cause not fundamental german dreaming of a macrofinancial was as muslim it's not a call was complete out macbeth i was quite brave obviously this new territory the william prison now drumming but where his lie that thing and it's not worry sara will at school as the caucus goals the erez without then you may be got through difference go on somebody who's always yangyang exactly and now you with the air and what unom and i've been reading an article in this prison from southampton from portsmouth but from.

barbara emiko nick comey southampton portsmouth chagall sara unom