20 Episode results for "I Left College"

How to invest in overlooked ideas

Product Hunt Radio

45:12 min | 1 year ago

How to invest in overlooked ideas

"Hey everyone it's advocacy your host of product on radio where I'm joined by the founders investors and makers that are shaping the future of tech in this episode. I speak to John Henry of Harlem capital about how to invest in overlooked ideas. His Fund has raised more than forty million dollars to invest in talented founders with a focus on the underrepresented wall still in his twenties easily. Cheap a number of accolades from selling a company. He started in his teens to boasting a global media career as presenter an influencer in addition to all this he also invested in real estate here. He shares advise on building a multi-dimensional career and investing in underserved markets. John thanks so much for being on product on radio today for those who aren't super familiar with who you are and what you do progress up to speed yet. My Name's John and I am. I guess primarily the son of immigrants proud son of immigrants who just grew up in uptown Manhattan and deal with the good to get by didn't have careers more so worked on odd dead end jobs and yeah these days. I I'd build companies that passionate about I guess it take a step back. Also I didn't get into entrepreneurship because I read about it on an article and read about venture capital and like all the buzz that surrounded today I got started because I just wanted to help my family out and I felt like my job at that. Time wasn't enough to help out as quickly as I wanted to help my family. So you know and I offer that context because I think the world of business and entrepreneurship can seem pretty scary these days. There's so much there's so much at stake you gotta get it right you. GotTa raise money. You got to go public in like man. I gotta be honest if I were starting now versus a decade ago when I started I might feel like the weight of the expectation maybe woulda crushed the seed of enthusiasm that I had to start At least it can feel that way and so anyway. Yeah when I reflect on my own experiences. Also tell folks about entrepreneurship by try to kind of keep it to his most basic elements which is really. Just you know doing something grave doing something that you find fun and seeing if you can sell to folks and not in some like overly transactional way but just like. Hey I'm putting this together you know amp silent for such and such you know like would you like to buy from me just like you know and it's so simple And I think it can be made to seem very daunting so anyway. Yes Oh these days have started a number of things on next started up. What at that time. My first business was on demand kind of laundry service which is really for us to go to people's homes and pick up their laundry. I'm more or less laundry. Delivery Service incubator most recently started a venture fund but have never stopped doing other things as well Investing in real estate being one of them and also pretty active in media so amazing. Yeah you have filled a lot of your life so far with so many adventures in so many projects which is incredible. It just makes me think what else are you gonNA do? I mean do you sleep. Yeah yeah I mean th I've found myself at the turn of the year and also decade was an interesting reflection for me because I realized that place so much and I feel like a lot of us. Maybe we place so much emphasis on what we're GONNA do in the next year. But then when I zoomed out and I was getting ahead about. Did I do what I wanted to do in a year? And you know certainly. There's something to be said about being goal oriented but it's funny because when. I zoomed out and looked at how I'd trended for the decade. You know all of a sudden like in a way just by framing that way you feel some sense of relief for you know you just realize like hey just chip at it slowly in overtime over a long period of time you get to where you're building towards And so that lenses been particularly refreshing for me and also. That's what I think about when I think of like my own journey because I did get started when I was eighteen. Yeah I think it's Pretty Cool how building blocks add up and then sometimes the foundation is not sturdy enough. Like that's happened to me like I built really fast and then slipped and digging several steps back and do the same thing number of times and now now I just feel good about what I've learned like. I know that my experience in my knowledge can't be taken to restart a kid. I wanted to kind of go back to something that you mentioned at the start of this interview about how you start your entrepreneurship journey because you were working and you realize to help your family at the level you wanted to. It wasn't enough to just work job. You needed to own a company and create wealth. In that way I just wonder like how would you describe either the revelation that led you to realize? Wait a minute I can put my time into a job where I can put my time into building a company. How did you handle dealing with the risk? That comes with that because I think a lot of folks have probably maybe stumbled upon that realization. But there's so much more risk that comes with building a company versus just signing a contract and starting job so I'd love to hear more about that yeah I think it's a great question. I mean let me put myself in those shoes for for a lot for myself and maybe a lot of folks listening and certainly a lot of Americans across the country you know folks do work at paycheck to paycheck and is fun. We grew up particularly broke so I thought even middle class affluent. But now as I've risen in socioeconomic means I see that you know even middle-class like it's all relative like sure maybe folks down the street from me had a house at I used to think that was a benchmark for wealth. But then when you come around folks like that you see that they're you know trying to meet their mortgage to their car insurance and so forth and so I guess across the spectrum when you look at it that way what is the risk really in giving giving it a shot. Try something different. I think the risk is true in the short term. Like yes certainly short term. You can get a job that takes up your full time for a decade. Let's say when you're in your twenties but I don't know as I don't know what folks make of the news that they see but You know lot of rounds of layoffs. That happened at anytime you know. There's a lot of macroeconomic changes Not only are older corporations like macy's and so forth cutting jobs but also see new companies by ser fire. Twenty nine buzzfeed We were mujber. I mean at any given moment. There's jobs you know. Ebbing and flowing professions are changing. And so for when I look at it that way that to me fell riskier because your own income was not in your own hands So when I do the risk analysis that you asked me about for me it's okay. Do I spend you know five to seven years. Will I think more realistically I think it takes? Like two solid years of trying something really hard to build a decent skill said that you can then generate income off of and then it takes a number of years after that to really be able to build Clientele people coming to you to buy what you're selling and so forth but then once you once you kind of have it builds It's not that can't go away because anything can go away but to me. I felt more in control. I felt better equipped to handle big changes if I had my own way to make income rather than just being at the mercy of the job market so I don't know and also by the way you know. There's also like a lot of stigma against jobs but I don't even think that's accurate either. Because I wasn't working like a career job. I was just working as a doorman but when I look at you know. The modern workforce and I have a lot of friends participating in the modern economy so to speak man dozens dozens not hundreds in certainly through social thousands of Ood that I'm connected to that know. Earn incomes you know being designers or hot cat. Podcast produces content strategists gaming. Like there's so many new types of careers you can have and the good thing about these new jobs is they're pretty well paying If you can resist temptation to to spend your cash on lifestyle Which is not to condone lifestyle. But he's a my own experience. I didn't find fulfilling ago to all the branches and events keep up with the foam owed type of thing and I was realized in and maybe some listen it might realize like to Kinda just wasting your cash you know so you can all that to say a job is a wonderful means to get ahead to the next stage and that next stage could be you know rising levels of influence at your job or could be using that job stashes cash and giving yourself a little cushion to try something that you've always been passionate about if it's not your job. Yes that's amazing. I was going to bring this up. I feel like you did. And so it's like a wonderful segue. I just returned from your hometown of New York and Kind of like you said. There's a lot of temptation especially in the big cities to spend your money on things which are quite a femoral. You know they're not gonNA last like a lovely brunch. A great match allow whatever the case might be and I started reflecting on the macro trend of millennials investing in experiences and I started to think what part of the narrative is driven truly by our desires and what part of that narrative comes from those who benefit from it. You know what I mean because if I keep hearing that Oh invest in my experiences unlike previous generations. Because that's what matters to me that night feel more inclined to spend more and more limited budget on experiences when I could be as you say saving them so putting off the gratification for something more concrete like an asset like housing investment etc very philosophical question. Ray leg how much beholder ado think is true that like we're generally as millennials as a segment of population like generally less price sensitive because we have found ourselves like our base case when we come came out of school. Was you know having a job whereas in two thousand eight? So the generation. That's older than us like. They were in the midst of a macro economic recession. And so you know when you adjust for the economy like we came out of school wind to our backs. Like there's plenty of jobs they pay really well We're less price sensitive as a result you know. We're all about the experiences and I think probably I do feel that And I also feel that I'm sure marketers like leaning on it because you're seeing a bunch of older brands like adopt that messaging. But you know it's interesting because to me raises the philosophical point of like okay. I find it interesting. That you know corporate entities if you hire a savvy millennial you know to lead your marketing strategy then all of a sudden your corporate voice is that of millennials and so anyway. I do feel like there's a bunch of influences at play all the time and I feel like the distraught as combatant. Maybe combat's not the right word but for me the greatest sense of independence that I feel is when I'm building a robust economic engine for 's okay. So here's what I would say. I would say that there are a lot of forces at play to your question Abou- millennials. How much is self induced? How much is it? Marketing Marketing Works. And you know as I reflect on it like I've been you know so I hope the TV show and you know it's international extreme than eight degrees and you know brain ambassador for big automobile company. I guess overall this time like I have been fortunate to sit in boardrooms where people are devising. You know campaigns that they know based on data will influence hundreds of thousands. Ideally millions of people. So like I'm just like more and more sensitive to the fact that like marketing is devised and it doesn't necessarily like it's tied to financial incentive for these entities because they're publicly traded companies and their value goes up. Every every day is a stock cleanser falls. So I don't know I feel like I've got to take a peek behind the curtains and I'm realizing you know for me. I feel like the best thing I can do is build something for myself and for my family that I know can't be taken away. Yes and do you feel that finding that balance between participating in consumerism as a consumer but also building wealth or generational wealth like? We like to call that often. You know things that will remain even after we go was striking that balance. Something that came naturally to you or did you find that you were taking the time to improve your financial literacy and taking time to speak to folks who were investing in property because you wanted to get a property. Because I think that we don't really talk enough about that and we don't necessarily learn about it at school and so you know when I do speak to. People who are building portfolio is investing in Property Building Funds. Investing their companies. I just like to know about how they got more knowledgeable about that because I think it's available to everyone. Yeah it's a good point. Mike Ernie into this was certainly not like came easy to me kind of thing. You're not left school my first semester. I Left College. And don't come from an affluent family and so didn't have resources or people close to you that you could just ask but I think what would that does afford you when you come for very different life experiences. Maybe you don't take a lot of those things for granted and you know not. Every person that comes from. My background is prompted to be interested in this. But you know people have different influences and passions and so forth so for me. It was just like the rice seed and then exposed in the Navarre. That is New York where you have. You know. The the scale in New York from of people in diversity of income background the city. I mean it's all right there in your face so if you're curious and you ask questions you start thinking about things like an like for me was very personal. You know having grown up in the hood in wash heights and I spent a little bit of time around some athletes as when I was in high school and you start asking like man. How come we don't have it as easy. 'cause I just. I didn't see their parents. Were as stressed. I'm sure they have their own dresses and stuff but at that point in time I was just realizing that our you know we grew below the poverty line and is just like very dire situation all the time. We were happy but managed media. Ask questions like Manhattan Among you realize like well okay. The first thing I discovered was like okay. You know. Net Worth is primarily tied to your primary residence and then you discovered was appointed time in which you know there was actual policy. That prevented folks of color from partaking in something called the fha program which allows you to three percent down to buy home so it quite dramatically lowers of aired entry to buy a home because you could buy hundred home for three thousand and then so anyways you start being you know you just ask more and more questions than you realize like man so much of what you experience on the dailies actually systemic. And it's actually you know like the flow of capital goes but to certain hands whom I do not believe are acting on ill-intention but people just do what they know so they say no and you know and so on and so forth like wealth and all kinds of things. End Up being propagated to what it's familiar with so anyway taken that cycle all the way around you know. I just realized like okay. Let me start taking a crack at this. Let me start get bit And for me I was already in business in our realized that at that time like being in business felt more powerful to me than ever before trying to employ my family when I could and realizing that those dollars at you. Circulate you know you keep keep those dollars circulation. You don't hoard it. I think people think that saving up caches like you know hoarding it. You circulate it you know and and as you circulate more and more the the the what you command grows and so you're able to circulate more and more humilate more more And now that she's grown for me over the years like now I'm really focusing on buying assets because I've really got interested in ownership in for instance when you own a lie in an area you pay a lot of tax and then all of a sudden you care about what's going on your local government and like all like you know white folks like being you know folks like wow they're always petitioning like yoga cheesy stuff. It's funny because there are a lot of things that when you don't own as a community you're you Arab out because you're under exposed to it right now that yeah. I appreciate that insight. I think that makes a ton of sense one of the things I wanted to ask you so you know. In addition to your Congressman as an entrepreneur and now as someone Managing Fund Forty Dollar Fund with Harlem capital which. I definitely want to dive into more in a bit. I also noticed that you are incredible at capitalizing on opportunities to amplify your your brand you mentioned your TV. Show some commercial partnerships. Many folks will know you probably because Love the content that you've created. They've loved stories that you've shared on the angles. You've taken certain stories. What advice can you give individuals out there about commercializing capitalizing on opportunities that are presented to them opportunities which aren't always directly related to the company that running but which will of course amplify the work they're doing at the company running? How do you make decisions about what you say yes to and how do you make the most of them? That's a great question. And this is something that I feel very unique to our generation the ability to make more income than your job or whatever brings on a regular basis so yeah I think it can be pretty powerful especially if you like. We all have different skills in your skill can be monetize if honed. Oh you know as gotta be honed enough to the point where you can start commanding income for it. Which means that while the way like you're going to have to go a period of time without making any money while you hone it working for free practising your craft for instance if I were a graphic designer like when you start like you're gonNa suck right so you practice practice dude things for free work for local or eggs and then eventually you do get to the point where and you'll feel it because you'll have more demand of more and more folks wanting your word and then you could argue for in then over time you can grow that rate you start participating you can be interviewed on podcast like this and so forth and you can share your thoughts about the the skill so to make it more. Concrete for folks like people think than an additional income is like one dimensional. Like oh I do earn income. But in truth you can make a multi dimensional by speaking on sharing your thoughts about it and then all of a sudden to take this example of a designer. You're being paid to participate in panels by corporates that wanted invite specific designers with a particular point of view in the happens to be you you out our marketing campaigns at feature up and comers and you know you've been chosen for the campaign and so now in addition to the eyeballs. Get from being on the AD also get paid for it you. Can you can write a book. If you'd like sharing your design principles. So I think today's economy allows you to be very multidimensional with your earning in that thing that I have put to practice over the past decade. More more than anything. Because remember I'm still hustling. I don't have a job as peak right like in for as you grow and you invest in more things you need more and more cash available to do so and if you're out there you got to devise ways that you can bring new value in charge for it and that's kind of wigger on. Biz Is all about and so for for example in my case speaking is a very big form of income for me. It's high margin his quickly But also you get to go and meet with different people all across the country that you otherwise wouldn't have gone to catch on social you shared on social and then it just kind of fees that beast because then you can get paid to do collaborations on social and you know for me. It's been interesting because I've discovered this entire new way of earning that back when I was a doormat in years ago. Like my my best. Understanding of how to earn income at that time was clocking in clocking in hours on the clock. Clocking out and for me going back to that first question of yours man. I put myself in that seat like the thing that was most interested in Passionate about was how creative can I be about making my own way? Like clock in and out like someone has prescribed value that they think my time is worth. And that's what they're gonNa pay me and fun you can. You know you can see Exist by within those confines but for me like an entrepreneur. Someone who's very curious of how what happens outside of those confines of is it really true that I can't find a way to make five hundred bucks in the week to replace my income. Surely I can come up with something and it just so happens that you know ten years ago it was delivered laundry but it you look at the economy of today. There's a lot of different ways that I would do now. For instance a locks Alexa devices are super popular. I would become an Alexa beast and figure out how to do. Really cool things with them and then get people to pay me to do that or you know you have to meet them the moment and yet you gotta meet the moment so for anyone. I guess to wrap this point for anyone who's listening. Whom is curious for one reason or another what they can do to earn income? Look around at the moment There are a lot of changes that are specific to literally right now. Twenty twenty and typically are slow to catch on but If you're curious in you dabble you do it out of fun and out of love and you do it for free for a little bit of time. Eventually you hone a skill so that you can be paid for and then you make Eskillson multi dimensional and you get to a point where no one job could ever replace. What you've built cumulatively over the years for yourself the question for any business owner out there is. Are you confident that you've got the right numbers at your fingertips serious entrepreneurs and finance teams run on net suite by Oracle the world's number one cloud business system nets? We'd offers a full picture of all your finances all in one place in real time right from your phone or your desktop. No more guests saying no more worried that what you could kill your company. That's why next week customers growth three times faster than the S. And five hundred and you can to schedule your free demo right now and receive their free guide. Seven key strategies to grow your profits at net sweet dot com slash product. Set Up Your Free Demo and get your free guide today at net sweet dot com slash product tongue that sweet dot com slash product hunt. I love that. That's so great and exactly as you said you gotta start somewhere right and where you find that that space where you can add value that space that you're really passionate about that. That part of what makes you unique that other companies want access or connect with or find more about That's absolutely where you should explore those opportunities and see where they can lead. You really great advice. Thanks for sharing so I WanNa talk about Harlem capital. I know that you know when tech crunch broke the news. In December the end of last year the startup community was buzzing with exciting years about forty million dollar fund because we know how hard it is for founders from underrepresented backgrounds with your woman whether Bachmann with your personal color to access funding. It's still you know. Single digit percentages if not fractions of a percentage of venture capital funding in the US. That's going to represented founders. So this is so incredible to hear this and it also shared that. It's possible you know. Sometimes I think founders like myself. I'm a woman of color here I think. Is it really so hard? Are there really no people out there that want to invest in companies that are serving underserved markets companies at our connecting with communities that established companies have ignored for so long? And sometimes you get a bit a bit disheartened. Because you start you can convince yourself that maybe that is the case. Then you know to hear about news column capitals just so incredibly exciting so I just want to know you know how you pulled it off and what you have planned yeah so. Us An interesting question which I asked myself and I'm sure a lot of folks. Do you said it will. Is it really that hard for like? Or why is it that hard for search or go out and get some funding and you know what we were on the fundraising trail? It really took for me. Anyway who is an outsider to this world? It took a long time to really understand. The dynamics at play you realize venture capital is a relatively new asset class was formed in the seventies. So when you think that compared to banking and private equity so forth the new kid on the block it formed out of almost like counterculture to New York finance style of running a business and in an style of growing being an entrepreneur so it grew Spirit OF REVOLT REBELLION. It was less hierarchical and it was more. You know an idea meritocracy and anyway so here was and it was concentrated in a handful. Is it codes. And so you know. The first fund that the first few bonds that were started several partners broke away and then they started the next fawns. Then same thing happened over over into you have effectively nasty class that the majority of dollars have circulated but but a handful of ZIP codes and who have ended but from a handful of schools and that would matter if venture capital is wasn't determining the the next companies that go public in the next companies of the future and so it didn't get a lot of attention until you when you look at the SNP or the Nasdaq like the most valuable companies in the world. All raise venture or a lot of them raised venture. You know they're growing so fast and they start young so anyway that to me was very very fascinating to observe and understand not just on paper but through hundreds of conversations that we had when you're on the trail you realize like man. This is a deeply rooted. There's a deep rooted tradition in venture in doesn't change overnight and then on top of that when you add the complexity of raising capital from institutions the bars even higher because you can't have a well-meaning person of color woman or white guy for that matter whom as a beautiful vision and you know is champion for the people has people behind them as a media behind but ultimately might not have the financial chops and technical acumen and the institutions. Need in order to feel comfortable to write you a big Ass Jack so now so then when you peel that layer back you say okay. Cool well you know. There are minorities in that dragon. Women that in that track of like you know Ivy League classically trained. You know financial wizards so to speak. But then you have to layer on top of that that kid or Gal or guy now has to have the balls to go out and raise a fun in a lot of them after you a crew all that student debt from GonNa Yale or Harvard. Wherever you'd much rather go be a consultant or a banker and may four hundred grand a year to start and do that for ten years in get rich that way because it's much more certain and so to scale it all the way back like you know it's it's difficult because you have to have the right group of people that are impassioned that meet the moment that have the skill set all of the various things that are needed to go and the contacts and then be willing to pound the pavement and take the risks that you might not succeed and go out there and slowly convince convincing individuals a little bit easier. When you're raising a fund you might get individuals that right small checks in eventually build a coalition of support but the real moment for funds. When you're on the trail is you know. Can you win over institutional support in one? You do that takes you to a different tier of funds because not allowed and particularly not at all not a lot of first time. Managers never mentioned never mind you know under thirty black. An investing in black people like not a lot of folks crossover into that institutional attitude only approved. Now when you do then you know. Individuals individual so institutions like endowments. And you know you know. St John's and hospitals and big Bigger funds. They pull the trigger. Quite slowly to the courting process is not like when a startup pitches of e C two weeks to decide. You know these folks take their time. They vet because they're you know they're investing with a high level of scrutiny. So when they pull the trigger they gotta feel like okay. We're making the right bat anyway to bring in all the way around if that didn't you know I hope that sounded really hard because it is really hard and when you finally do have a team or an individual or or whatever that can bridge. All of those various daunting challenges. You start getting some institutional capital flow in that direction and by the way that was necessarily wasn't credit to us there. Were there were funds before Harlem capital that Garner's institutional dollars with respect to diversity focus but the truth is it all starts helping because then the windfall of institutional capital flows in that direction. And you'll see is very different. When let's add woman exits accompany? She makes seven hundred dollars and she puts you know five or ten million dollars to work at a fund like that's significant but it's more course changing when institutions at professionally managed. You know tens of millions and not billions of dollars surf flowing capitalist Direction des other funds like Harlem capital and others start securing capital and then that decreases the risk and the pressure that these diversity focused funds have to choose winners because when an asset classes new or sub segment of Essex's near light diversity focus investing. Is You know you can invest in every you cannot invest in every minority. Because it's still it's still investing like you. GotTa pick your your beds and then you're tempted to go with the safer bet because you. WanNa make sure you return capital because you feel the pressure that you're representing all diversity focused investors so anyway i. I shared that thirty thousand foot view. Because it's it's you know there's a lot of stakeholders at play. There's a lot of interests that need to be aligned in order for this to be actively wide so hard in that's why it takes time and yes parl capitals win Is a big one and we know that it will just continue to encourage more. Yeah and based on that you know high level view of how all the stakeholders are motivated to make decisions in this space. It feels like the more funds like Harlem capital that exist and invest in successful startups. That go onto scale increase. Their market share go public acquired CETERA. The more funds like this we will have the more. You validate that thesis and not means that ten twenty thirty years it will be even easier for underrepresented founders to access capital Yup. Yup that's right but certainly the hope you know we'll see but we're we're pretty confident that you know. The allocation of venture capital will continue to reflect the reality of the American population and the American population is not ninety seven percent white and three percent of color as you know currently venture allocated dollars lead to believe so. Yeah we'RE WE'RE OPTIMISTIC. Were hopeful An mean particular. You know I'm optimistic. Not only for venture as is growing influence. But we'll see what happens with venture because I I do think that there's a a correction in the market bound to happen and it won't stop venture but it will certainly have big impact on more like legacy companies with older jobs. And so everything's connected. So I'm curious. What happens to the workforce what happens all this like lavish media spending that we have you know what happens to real estate but one thing? I know for sure is that because of tacking social more minorities women and Unorthodox entrance are privy to How to get started if you got the right hustle. If you you are persistent asking the questions as I've you know kind of proved to myself over the last decade like you can build a little something and give yourself a little bit of an advantage like you might not have been bored with any advantages but you can start to build your own and you know I always like to zoom out because it's not just venture you know because there are some people listening that may be don't necessarily WANNA go and Start Amazon. It want to have like an additional flow income. They might want to dabble in real estate. They might WANNA just make more cash to travel more whatever and I just feel like. It's a good time for for us in general. I'm pretty optimistic about the current state of affairs in our economy and as a as a population and then obviously the election year. So we'll see Escape as well so man just a lot of big questions in the air and more than anything I just. I'm just to be like a positive members society as contributing. I love that. And sometimes that's the best that we can do just focus on the spheres where have influence and live our values through those in the NBA positive in world. That has a lot of negative energy in that. So yeah I appreciate that. I think that's really great. One thing I wanted to ask before we get close propping up is what you do to invest in your personal development. Because I know you're someone. His professional life is very full. You're working on a number of projects. You definitely maximizing your utilization capacity which is really impressive. But of course you wouldn't be able to do any of these things of yourself on always growing. You know you've sold your first company a decade ago but you continue to excel challenge yourself further and I just wondered what you practice in your life to be able to continue growing and learning yes. That's a great question I do think that the person you are needs to grow as you are to grow. I wish I had like really nice systematic way of doing this. A lot of colleagues do like a lot of peers of mine are are very methodical and organized in the right down new skills that they wanna learn like stuff like that for means a little bit different like I realize ever since I left school and started my first business that I just Kinda learned best. Buy just trying new stuff. That's been my thing over the last decade just experiencing many different things as as make sense for me and by the way then that prosecution will how do you know how much is too much in the answer is you just gotTa keep going until you screw up a lot and then when you when you're screwing up your real at least this is how I learned right like I can tell when my plate is full when I'm dropping the ball on too many fronts? You know like there's no paper formula that would tell me what is my limit until elected and then I can scale back then. Scaled BACK TOO. Far can tell because actually my tunnel my hands and so. I've just kind of ebbed and flowed have hosted a television show as an example like that was in on paper. The most prudent thing I could have done because I was in the middle of a lot of other things and it took my time away for three months but cool. I've I've done that like I built a life experience. I can say I've I've done this. And it builds my skill set elsewhere. And so for me I really can say I live based on kind of what captures the imagination than when I find something interesting and exciting and I can't stop thinking about it for me. That's usually you like man. I want to go and do that. And that to me is all the personal development at the moment that I could want because it keeps you learning all kinds of new things you get beat up you know you bad mistakes. You're usually not the sharpest one in the room but firm believer and willing to take this bat. We'll see how plays out the next ten years. I really do think that you know as a result if you live that way like you're GonNa Learn so much across the board and develop like a really smart way of thinking and and combining worlds at least as the bet for me so we'll see. Maybe I listen to this in years from now the man I should have focused on one thing but ha well. If it ain't broke don't fix it. Working have a lot of fun with this. So we'll see where it gets cool so before I let you go being a product. Podcast can't let you go without asking you about products that you love so maybe these are apps that are on your home screen. Maybe it's some new gadget. You just got for your home a gift. He received even just You've discovered this is where you get the chance to share it with our community Well lately I have really been on my sodastream. Nice little device at carbonated water and so funny but it's such a simple device that for me has made like a notable improvement in I in my water intake because I could just quickly carbonate water at lime and then like I'm just drinking water a lot more regularly so there's there's Espresso Pretty Dope. These on the go. What else do I also have? This like little. Led Ring Light. That I bought for Black Friday for like two hundred. Fifty Bucks is just us be powered and you press. The button ended illuminates. You like the perfect way. So if you need to take a quick video call from home or whatever you just press that and you know it makes you look like you're in like just a beautiful office pretty much anywhere. You know. Row googling that's right now so I can get from an x video call. Yeah so those three things right now. Oh my gosh. That's incredible. John Thank you so much for making time today so for folks for this thing. I want to find out more about you your projects on Capitol. Where should they go? Hit me up on twitter. Twitter dot com slash Johnson restyle among their more these days in instagram. Less these days So hit me up with a little dialogue on and I hope you have enjoyed this. I'm also just as a note. I'm happy to dive into specifics of wealth building investing and entrepreneurship. At any time. I try to keep things somewhat high level on a show like this because I just want to get more understanding of the framework of it all and that isn't that scary and then this happens to interview and you like like light to learn more sure. Hit me up anytime you can hit me right up on twitter email now always get back and saying thank you so much for your time. Today thank you. I really enjoyed it. Everyone. Thank you so much for tuning into product hunt radio. I've got a favor to ask you. Will you take a minute to review us on ITUNES APPLE PODCAST or wherever? You're listening to US right. Now thank you. Thanks for tuning in. We'll be back next week. But in the meantime shared the podcast. Your friends on twitter and tag. I guess you'd like to hear if you drop zone season.

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Raquel Willis

Going Through It

29:41 min | 4 months ago

Raquel Willis

"Before we get into this week's episode I WANNA. Let you know that it evolves themes around suicide in self harm. If you're worried about yourself or somebody that you love please please please reach out to the national suicide prevention hotline that number is one, eight, hundred, two, seven, three, eight, two, five, five South Carolina everything. This is going through it a show about women who found themselves in situations where they said no no thanks. I'll have nine and they made a decision to make a change in turn something around. I'm your host, Tracy, Clayton? They're all of these like successful algae. Hugh plus folks Thank it gets better. It gets amazing. All these different things and the truth is for a lot of people that doesn't get better. That's Racquel Willis. Today Racquel is a writer editor and transgender rights activist. She's done organizing work at the transgender law center and she was executive editor for out magazine. Big things big things happen. But at this point of her story, she was just trying to get a footing. So my relationship to Queer and Trans Activism prior to Leila Alcorn stuff. was kind of non existent I also had been in the closet. Gender identity working, and almost the middle of Georgia. My first job as a newspaper reporter picture of. The year is twenty fourteen. You cannot get rails happy out of your head and you also cannot stay off tumbler because tumbler was it. It was the place to be. It was so revolutionary because people there were using their own voices to talk about themselves learn about their own realities and there was a fourteen year old trans girl from. Lee alcorn that Raquel became aware of who did just that she used the platform to discuss and process her life. So Leela alcorn with a Yang Trans girl who really had learned so much about her identity she was active online as of millennials she became known in our community when she wrote a suicide letter that was set to publish on Tumbler after she had died by suicide Leila had battling both depression and parents that she felt were really unsupportive. It was kind of that bizarre instance of using technology to kind of say you know what you were. Going through and then to also have this translates youth telling the world that she was GonNa die because she couldn't a future for herself. When I sat with Racquel, she read the part of Leila's suicide note that resonated with her the most when I was fourteen I learned what transgender meant and I cried of happiness after ten years of confusion I finally understood who I was I'm mmediately told my mom and she reacted extremely negatively telling me that it was a phase that I would never truly be a girl that God doesn't make mistakes that I am wrong. If you're reading this parents, please don't tell us here kids even if you are Christian or are against transgender people don't ever say that to someone especially your kid. There was so much of Leila that Racquel on herself even reading this now I'm like, yeah, this was like me at the age came out of fourteen out gay I didn't have the language of transgender and I grew up in a very catholic environment. So the idea of like charts turning back on you and your parents choosing their faith of our farming you was was an imminent threat I. Always when we're cal I read Leila's note she felt so many fill in all at once I bar since it's here's just as I read more and more about her and I don't something just compelled me to do something different and not care about being. Silent anymore and I stagger these boxes on my like little rinky-dink coffee table and I put my laptop up they are and I recorded myself and I I made this short video where I'm dislike crying you know about this that feeling of helplessness like as a Black Trans Woman and the South I knew what that felt like Racquel hill posted a video to youtube not sure what kind of response she was going to get it got picked up by. BBC They saw it and they asked me to be on this radio show Racquel knew that this opportunity with the BBC could really open up the conversation about Black Trans Women that nobody at the time was having. She had just one little problem. I wasn't out at this now, second job that I was I was like, what's the point of being out? You know let me just like navigate as seamlessly as possible like I did in my last job but killed knew that in order to speak on Trans Women issues in the importance of their voices, she had to use her as I. I really only had like a day to kind of thinking through and I told my immediate boss was woman. Yeah was trans and that I was going to be talking about my experiences on BBC and then she talked to her boss who is like the the of like entire company. Who was a straight man? And I was Oh, how could this go but he also was like very supportive of and they were like you should do it by your voice is necessary inside did speaking on the BBC was a huge turning point racquel found her voice and now she was not afraid to use it. Soon she grew huge following on twitter and before you know it, she became somebody that folks looks who regarding issues facing the Trans Community I think the situations around Leela and subsequently being on the BBC just made me felt like I could be a mirror for other. Trans People. Now I sit down with Kale right as the pandemic it but it was also before the tragic murder of George Floyd. So we didn't get into questions around the protests that followed that. It was also before the historic historic March for black translates in Brooklyn at sixteen thousand folks showed up in the middle of pandemic mind you were cal was there she spoke and when I tell you that everybody felt it then and we still feel it today. Amazing. And Black France. Tower. Is going through. Before you stepped into your full role as an activism, Mike realizes the importance. Did you ever have moments of fresh when you were like? Oh, I just wish that there was somebody around that I knew of I look to or somebody who could speak for me or somebody like in the media that I just like look to forgotten about all the shit this happening around me lake. It's so interesting but I think before. Reading that letter from Leila. I had gotten so used to not sing myself and media and seeing myself around me. And I didn't know other Black Trans people before I. Left College. That's also the really sad thing is that I I literally grew up pretty much isolated from other transpeople. I wasn't in a big city so. It's not like I knew people who were out or I would even see people out in the bow. So that idea of having possibility model. Wasn't even fathomable to me. I will say that I did always know that I had a story I knew that as the as a child that I had a story that I was different. And then I was going to have to say something one day and it might not go well but that the clock was ticking and I needed to make sure that I was strong enough to make it through. Why did this become the beginning of your activism work? Like what was it about this moment? Honestly I think that Leila's death and the media rounded coincided with a time of my life where I finally was finding community. That looked like me with finding black. Hugh Fox in Atlanta and that I felt a little bit freer to say the things I really felt and advocate for the things that I knew our community deserved because I wasn't end small town Georgia anymore. I just had such a fear before moving to Atlanta for my life and my safety for my survival that I will lose my job and then have to go back to Augusta and I sure as hell not trying to. Do that no. So you to Augusta and this just all kind of coincide together because it wasn't the first and sense of Anti Trans Violence that I knew about I knew about what happens Ilan nettles and twenty thirteen I knew about the story of Gwen Arrojo mostly through the lifetime movie you know because my mom watched lifetime so I saw that movie but this was a time where it just foul. So concrete in terms of me. Visualizing what I was capable of doing now that I had a certain amount of safety myself So you decide okay music my voice things are happening this impactful. I'm going to step up my game. What's the first step? Where do you start? How did you learn like what is in the activist starter pack or what was in yours? It's funny. You ask that because I feel like a lot of happen organically I will say, I think the starter pack is. First of all, figuring out your own story. Okay. You know what are what are the things that you need to hill from? What are the of your story that are empowering? What are the parts of the story that you think can be used empower others? And then I think it's about finding. Community finding other people who may share similar stories right figuring out what they are ways of working through their own traumas as as a relates to what binds you together are a and then I think it's about putting it all into action right so a big part of the word activist is the word act what we're like your actual actions like did you go to rallies? Did you tweet about it more? Did you? stage. One person protests Dow mainstream like what was the What was your particular action? So it was a lot of things. I definitely tweeted a lot about what was going on and the Movement for black lives what was happening around the lives of Black Trans, women and Trans Women of Color I was doing work canvassing and doing survey. Data collection with Solution Punishments Collaborative Snap Co, and I also had a moment that was very powerful to me was our transliteration Tuesday action and Atlanta. So I really kind of spearheaded that brought folks together for that, and so it was a huge community effort we gathered. Upwards of one hundred plus folks would I think at that point if it hasn't been eclipse now was one of the biggest rallies specifically around Trans lives in Atlanta you are a journalist and activist and know that capital J. Journalism at least supposed to be objective like you have to like write the story facts only like leave yourself out of it but activism requires a lot of feeling how do you reconcile the two and does it ever create any tension there? Do those two identities ever bump heads so honing the identity of journalists and then also the identity of activists doesn't cost tension for me anymore. Early on yeah because I did go to journalism school. So I, remember you know those lessons around objectivity. No editorializing exactly. But the problem with that is that. There's no one's arrogation of the fact that the people who have overwhelmingly made those rules, the people that it was so easy for them to see themselves outside of the rest of the world. Had the most privilege on then were white cisgender heterosexual man with a certain amount of class privilege. Probably Christian all of these different things and Alba Black Trans woman from the South I. learned that I didn't really have that luxury to see myself outside of the story, right especially as the Movement for black lives was popping off. It just felt ridiculous to me. It's to pretend like. I was talking about something that didn't. Play a role and how I navigate the world. Yeah. Now like when I'm talking about Black Trans woman being murdered, I have those stories the right billing like my life with endanger. Yeah. When I'm talking about interactions with the police, I have those stories or my let me on the other way because this could go down in a number of different outcome. Yeah and you can't like leave that part of yourself out of it because it impacts the way that you see everything that you come across in the world. That's a really good point and also I would imagine that once people who are not. And started getting hired. They didn't want to hear how we felt about certain things because it was probably this is racist sexist. This is trash. So there's like an added stake in the NBA like you know what? Leave your thousand feelings out of it just the facts Ma'am just the facts exactly and it it Selah Romania. I, mean, there are so many different types of journalists So yeah. If you're doing straight reporting and doing a news hit you, you're just gonNA scribble down the facts. Right? We also forget that objectivity and a lot of instances it's kind of impossible. I mean there's bias and even what we choose a subject that is deemed worthy of being covered. There's bias and what we're going to present to an editor and what they care about. Absolutely. No there's by dealt with the bias of working at a newspaper that wouldn't let me frame arguments. The way I wanted to in my opinion columns because it was too progressive for the community. Unity I'll. Yeah. I I will get even for the things that I would write I would get hate mail about being too naive or needed to watch my back all that kind of stuff I got an email once saying that I needed to watch my back because the KKK was alive and well in this area. Wow. What area in Georgia. Georgia I thought you meant in New York. City for a second now was just like number one I'm not surprised. We can't see because they don't have them there. I can't imagine. The weight of all the work that you do, which is so important but very heavy, very, very heavy. Please them. You got a good their fist. How are you taking care of yourself do you? Bet Vase means. A look I am in truth. And This is safe face. I. Actually feel like I'm going through a really bad therapists breakups. Nine now way but I had a phenomenal. They are pissed when I was still living in Oakland about a year and a half ago. Best, they're pissing my life like I know the one that got away. All no black and queer and a woman and Corn exactly and then I moved here. Any even I felt like I definitely need they're more you know living in New York list. I just was so drained because I had finally found her found the one, and now I just don't even want to play the. Phil. Go through that Labor because overwhelmingly my therapist experiences have not been great like I think a lot of folks right and I'll be very clear I. don't want another white therapists Y- nor should you have to have would I want a male therapist and if they can't be Queer I guess we'll work it out but I wouldn't prefer not have a straight therapist. So that's what's difficult for me. I also have much about healthcare when I was in California to be so frank, this sounds like a forgivable situation I got. A good their fifth straight now but I mean like, how do you take care of yourself like what things do you do to keep yourself from just being Mike? The world. Awful. There's no hope lake is all just trash whereas the media until the hurry up when I had that other therapist, I was able to kind of carve out what care looked like to me. Okay. So self care from me believe it or not as like planting. Planting plan plans. Thought I have like a bunch of plants in my players. I particularly have a fondness for Sake Lance. They forced me to open my. Cartons and let sunshine. Wash. So that's the thing I also say now a Lotta Times you know I kind of put it simplistically that my sisters are my self care. but it extends much more than that. So I try to make Sharma no regular schedules talking to my mom. It's not like oh it's Thursday. Let me talk to her. It's like a just a feeling. I haven't talked to my mom east I feel like a little Liz around. Right. and. I I try to talk to my friends more I go in and out like how I am of like, I'll be talking to them like all the time and then I fall off anything sometimes you just don't get it it is. So. I have a question. This is not about me says about my friend. Stacy the first question So. We're going to start the interview now. Question number. One So I have this friend named Stacy and stacy in spite of being kind Mouth sort of in like she knows how to use her voice, but she is very paranoid about sometimes because she's she's also a black woman and. She was just what a train you know that like. Women who's begun black women in particular. The like it's just a thing that you should do because didn't your your needy, your high maintenance, your annoying. You're winding. You're making a big deal out of nothing you're reliability nobody's going to hire you. Go through her head right but she knows what is right and what's wrong. She knows that the things that she speaks up about are worth speaking up about it's just like this paranoia about how she'll be perceived I guess. Do you. have any advice for my good friend Stacy who has not me at all? Well stay saying. What is there was do we like? Everybody. You know I always think the most important thing in any in answering any kind of question like this to make sure that you let people know that how they're feeling as valid because a lot of times. Especially I'm black community. If you'd be like all, don't be worrying about bad all that kind of seven and it's like, Whoa, no, I'm already worrying about it. So it's too late day nowadays, you know it's like if I can't speak up for myself and certain moment I, I don't beat myself up over it. I just try and look at what the conditions were giving myself benefit of the Dow. And then just try an pomace myself to to do better. Next time you know every day is different our energy levels fluctuate all the time but it's about US standing that we're a dynamic where human homeo-, stasis is the thing for a reason. Oh my gosh, I'm going. And like we have to understand that we're not going to always feel empowered. But it's about having faith you can feel empowered again. So as about being nice to yourself as sounds like, yeah being always the answer to all of these deep sold virgin. Be Nicey, appointees you know. Having grazed having these conversation we process as we're talking to other foul, absolutely all the gas in the world you just know somebody like. This is real right like is this is a big and you have you have helped my friend stacy tremendous out. Is actually going to be. Okay. I. Loved it. I just wake up. Like. I don't know I don't know it. I WANNA take it back a little bit where we started with. Leela and her letter in twenty fourteen. She gave a call to action on how to make the world a better place for Trans People. How do you think she would react to the world today? Wow I hope that she would seem. More ourself in the media and the world. Now, we obviously have posed and a lot of brilliant folks on they aren't. Folks like India more folks like Angelic Hurrah. Them say Rogatory guys Dominate Jacksonville Florida you know folks who are. Not, only living these fabulous lives, right. But continuing to champion their stories individually I think about the Janet mock who are creating more spaces and opportunities for folks. To elevate their stories and and obviously you know the Lombardo Kochta's. But I also think about you know the Andrea Jenkins. You know the people who are running for public office. A black. Trans. Woman on the first Black Trans woman to be elected to city council and so the work she does I think about my friends are doing so much. Work Ahead. Tell. Tell Him. And Snow doing powerful work. She's now the solutions not punishments collaborative. Side. Think about all of that. You know I think about the voice of that. We have now and it doesn't feel like. We're so isolated anymore like in those days in two thousand fourteen and I also will say no more and more folks are understanding the complexity of gender in the babies the bay and are leading day. Are I think about? And I think that's true where we're already on the path, we've just got to lean into it. Talking with Racquel really put so many things in perspective for me and you know I just had to ask my girls what they thought. So because of social distancing in the time of the coronavirus me and my girls got together and had a virtual dinner party to talk about what activism looks like me. Are we activists. Cheers everybody here. Technology. I think would struggle to consider myself an activist. But in the same vein, I feel like everyone has the opportunity to be one think for me. Often. I. Get caught up in it looking like things that I post on twitter instagram and like being aware of other prominent activists on social media. But really I think it's Smaller than. Chris. Sure. I sent struggle is calling myself an activist as well, and then I was like wait that's what their presser wants me to do. They want me Lake Creole small and feel like. Power at all absolutely I think like for me. Obviously, I'm a black person and like I feel like naturally that is like just an activism like Jimmy being a black person in a lot of white spaces being a black woman like there's just so much against you. So naturally, there's that yeah I've had like old roommates or friends you know. White people in my past like message me on facebook years later and be like. Oh, my God I learned so much from you which on the one hand is like. You know but also like a Lotta Times I don't even remember what they're talking about and so it seems like what you're saying it's just like Oh. You just realize that I was a person and in that was. Helpful to you in some way. It's weird too because like I feel like sometimes I have to advocate for high blackness even in block circles leuze more. Like In a way that. People will say things that are inherently anti-black that they don't realize like making fun of someone with Nappy here might making fun of someone like Bell Pepper knows whatever their somebody's name yeah or someone's name and it's like. Even in your circles, you have to be like so dedicated to what you're the mission which is seeing that everyone is equal everyone has valid and everyone deserves to have space here on earth. There are so many times that like even with dealing with like other black men apt to be like. What you're saying right now is so anti-black. What you're saying right now is so black woman. You can't really call your. So an activist for black people when you're continually talking bad about black woman. I feel like I mean humans instinctively want to be like homies tasteless we want to be in a warm. Environment that's comfortable and it just sucks sometimes when you go outside your home and the people that look like you're not providing knock. You gotta like problem like this is. Like check your saw him. I write family and friends. Thank you so much for tuning in. Yet again, going through it is an original podcast created in partnership with Malcolm Pineapple Street Studios, executive producers for going through. It are Geno wise Berman Max, Linski and Garish a great shout out to the producers of going through it. Our lead producer is Josh Gwynne production by just Jupiter Emmanuel HAP- system now Anderson and production support by. Alexis. More. There she is editor and her name is Leila. Day. Also, thanks to the voices of the folks you heard sound off in this episode you know what I need I need to hear those. Makila. I'm Maya Original Music. Is Bad. Anthony. Our engineer is Hannah's Brown special. Thanks to Eleanor Kagan for being the Alpha MB originator of this hope. Stay intact family on instagram effort party. We sell all your friends about the show enemies to make sure rating subscribes with going through apple podcasts spotify. PODCASTS I sold. Out Gel, that's it come back next week I'll be so sad.

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Under the Covers with John Gerdy

Charlotte Readers Podcast

26:51 min | 8 months ago

Under the Covers with John Gerdy

"Welcome to this under the covers episode of Charlotte, readers podcast. Authors give voice to their written words. This is the Friday version of Charlotte Readers podcast where hosts land is Wade and his author. Guests get under the covers, thus, Roy. We get in and out because they're just too many interesting books, engaging authors in the region and not enough town, and just like the longer version of the show, you'll learn interesting facts about the authors and their books, and the authors will read their work and also liked the longer version. You will find images, links and information about the authors in the show notes. CHARLOTTE READERS PODCAST DOT com support for Charlotte readers. PODCAST is provided by Park Road Books, the oldest and only independent Bookstore in Charlotte conveniently located in Park Road, shopping center, and by Charlotte Mecklenburg Library a connector of readers, leaders and learners with twenty locations and a twenty four hour online presence raw, so grateful to those of you offer member support for trump pleased off return member, only contact curated with our authors and myself you. You find out more about this members only content how you can help. Authors give voice to the written words at Charlotte Raiders Podcast Dot Com when land is not getting under the cover it bookstores at events and on the road he does it in the well-equipped podcast studio at advent co working located in the Belmont community near Uptown Charlotte, but enough with the prologue. Let's get under the covers. I'm your host Landis Wade. Thank you for listening. Listeners. Welcome this under the covers episode of Sherlock. PODCAST I'm here today with Jon Gruden. He is the author of Alpha Bone orchestrates and alphabet book help children learn. And get excited about music and offer dolts tidbits of music education. Through the grace notes sprinkled throughout John Welcome. And full disclosure we went school together. Many years ago many years ago many years ago and you're you're you're in town here? Watching the wildcats basketball. And, of course, this will come at Jan. they'll be done playing basketball then, but You you're my first children's book. Right? Yeah, it's GonNa be fun before getting into that. Let's talk a little bit about you. nineteen seventy-nine Graduate College. All American honors and graduated career, leading score in school, history and basketball record stood for thirty years. Who broke record got on him Steph Curry. An. Anybody GonNa break his record among. But you, but also you didn't have the three point line, right? That's correct. Yes, who knows right? Never Mind Shot A and like. You worked at national. College Athletic Association. For six years, and then you went to the southeastern conference current left sec to be a stay at home, dad. Began teaching got more schooling became a doctor not that you could operate on anybody. Operate now. And then you had this sort of now. You've been playing music for a while, but you had the sort of. Shift in Focus and passion to community music. Work Right what what is. As I. Left College Athletics and stay at home parent as the kids got older, I just wonderful opportunity to reinvent myself. I could have gone back to college athletics, but been there done that and. As a lifelong musician and educator I started doing the research on how? Music programs are being cut across the board, not just school music program community news programs as well. And at the same time there's all this data and research growing seemingly every day about the. Power and potential of music as an educational tool, a community building tool an economic driver. Even now the next frontier is. Music for healing. Using it for individual therapeutic and public health purposes so. You know thinking globally acting locally I got some friends together, and we did a small fundraiser thinking that we're GonNa. Get possum music musica instruments for the schools, and it just exploded, and so now music for everyone is the is the nonprofit that that we founded. and. Our mission is to cultivate the power of music as an educational. Community building in public health tool in Lancaster County, and you invested almost one point. Eight million dollars in school and Community Arts Organization Yeah. Yeah, we're over two million dollars now and everything from instruments to instrument repair to instruction to after school programs and summer camp programs so yeah, we're excited about it, and it's really a testament to how. Generous giving the laxed or community is so we're excited about the what we've done in the opportunities out there and I can see where we're headed here. Alphabet Orchestra is sort of arising out of this passionate. From. And we're getting into that in just a second, but proud alphabet orchestra. You authored five books most of them academic in nature. You're comparing. Basketball. Football. you know, and you had this book about airball American Educations Field experiment with lead athletics, but those are a totally different kind of book than which you've written now they re they really are they're? They're academically oriented mostly just about education reform, and the role that sports and arts and music plays in our educational system in our society, so yeah, very research oriented very dry. No pictures. Illustrations this much better than I am. So. What was the first instrument? You Played The alphabet orchestra? I'm not quite sure. Have to get a look at the book. Your Tar player. I played and that's not. PNO. Guitar but mostly guitar and Cussin'. I said the four get under the covers this book by the way you hold on your stage name. Is William Arbel. Okay, we'll. Blues Blues. Guitar Right Lose Yep Try to get you to bring your car and. You're not traveling. Before get under the covers Let's talk about the book cover itself. Of course the audience here can't see what I'm looking at but. For Force what? With, they're going to see on the cover this book. Well, it's it's it very clear. Skopje colors and what I did with all of the letters of the alphabet is i. I painted. The letters included somewhere on the letter. A bell of a Horn trombone saxophone horn the bell. Sometimes there was one other letters or four or five. Three or four bells! And they're all being played by. This funky triangle headed guy. Crazy, looking guy who took named doctor, dude be Funky who was a famous world, famous musicologist, who travels all over the world in search of of you know music and different instruments and. so anyway, so it's so. It's very very fanciful. And, but it does what happened was I. Started taking a painting two years ago. I don't remember you being much of an illustrator when I wasn't. But I always want take a painting so two years ago I started taking a painting, and and it just sort of evolved in you. I saw this triangle headed guy somewhere. We're in Peru and I saw painted on a wall somewhere like A. Triangle headed guy so that's interesting. Let's mess with the but. But what happened was I started I got this idea about the off always wanted to do at Children's book. And, I was I was thinking. It would be about the blues, but. Timing because I couldn't illustrate it now that I was paying I could find the illustrate. And So. What through all the letters and fifty two of them upper case and lower case? so it's a lot of painting over about an eight month period. and. Then started doing the the a writing the very alliterative. Prose we're GONNA. Get into that just a second, but as far as the illustrations themselves go. You had to sort of. Take a leap there right because you're not. You're not a painter. You're not an illustrator. Said something you learned some lessons through this process. Yeah, well. I guess I am a painter. No SORTA now. Get started right right well. What happened? What happened was so so I regularly every other week or so I go into selects early education centers. It's a early Education Center for Preschool. Kids and I play Blues Forum and you know he's played. Give me instruments to shake around somebody's. It's fun. And, what I started doing this I? You know I started to Use them as a test. Group and I would bring in the paintings just to see. Do they recognize them. They like them derives light up. You know and and they seem to love them and they seem to. Yell out to the letter that was that I showed him and they all looked around for this Funky Guy Dr Dude Funky, because he he kind of appears in weird places around the side, he's got real long arms and but they really seem to like it and I started thinking. You know maybe maybe I. Got Something here and you're. You're sorta coloring outside the lines. Oh, totally toward that's well. That's that's one of the things that. That painting has taught me a wonderful teacher and. And when I first started I was always concerned about eight inside lines and I'd make mistakes Oh man I messed up. You know on all use okay to paint outside. The lines so the beat. You GotTa be bold. You gotta gotTa, take a chance. Are you ready to get under the covers sure? Like our mission of helping authors give voice to their written words. Please consider leaving a short written view about Charlotte readers podcast on apple podcasts or the podcast platform of your choice. Because when you leave a review, it helps authors reach more listeners. You can keep up with news about the show and member only content for member supporters by joining our email list. We promise not to spam you because well. It takes too much time, and if you do join the list, we will give you a free e book written by me. First Book in the Christmas courtroom trilogy. Charlotte readers podcast is a member of the twin city podcast network powered by Ortho Carolina for more information. Go to Queen City PODCAST NETWORK DOT COM. All right, so we're back here. Alphabet. Orchestra you talked about Dr Dude Be Funky as any John Gertie Dr Dude be funky. Just little bit UH. Dude every now and then you head in quite as triangular area. So, let's. Talk about it so when I read through this book and it's a fun read. US A lot of alliteration here I. mean you know if you're looking if we're looking at page one of this book starting with the Alphabet It is an alphabet book, so we start with the letter a so we've got two sides of every page right. I mean every see turned left side is as you're drawing of the letter. The capital of the cat'll up rick and it's. It's got something. Everyone who has a horn feature to it. There's that's correct and something blowing out of and then the page to the right of is going to have the lower case letter correct. It's GONNA. Have some alliteration The uses the word a number times to leave off, and then a grace note was the gray. The Gray Snow Is. Essentially a fun fact, grace note is kind of an extra note at the end of it within a within a song. or at the end of the song, so it's like a fun fact and the reason why I included those is. Yes. This is an alphabet book. Yes, it is to help. Kids recognize ladders. The alliteration helps them recognize words and. Things like that, but it's also kind of an advocacy book as well so include a lot of different fun, facts or grace notes about different things. Lot of them are directed at adults. you know! Some of the benefits of of exposure to music increases test scores. Things like that so that? Hopefully the kids are excited about it. Hopefully, the kids become curious about music but also that the adults reading that learn things. So that they might about the value of music, and so therefore they might be more inclined to to keep their kids involved in in music programs. Now you thome in your your website that I looked at talks about sort of three. Target audiences age zero to five. The alphabet right and fun kind of way. They just five ten year teaching musical terms because you have. All, these graphics and pictures of these instruments and tied to the letters, but you also have a glossary in the back that that describes all these instruments and what they do. And then you've got the adults. which you talked about with Rice knows now. I was interested in grace knows because you got such things as long ago, bagpipes for used to scare people away a little. Braveheart right. And then musical training develops language skills improve memorization instills discipline and nurture the creativity. But then you got someone in this one in here about it helps. Plants Grill I'm not sure about that. Apparently, that's the case. Is there only if you play music plants they. Could you? Would you mind reading little bit? Okay, but I'll start with a the a-bone alliance always accompanies accordions on acoustic anthems in areas. And the grace note on this space now now you mentioned that the upper case letter being on one side of the page and the lower case letters on the other side of the page. And Accordion can sustain a note for longer than most. Now I do want to say something about that. When anthems and areas that's what's wonderful about the glossary of musical terms and instruments. Because let's say the kids. Hey, mom, scenario, you can go well. Let's go to the glossary of musical terms and a description will be there of the areas. the B bone. The B bone belongs in big bands, booming, bellowing and blasting with a bunch of bagpipes. Bugles, bells and Banjos. And the grace note is Lago, Bagpipe for us to scare people away during battle. The see bone club can include clarinets, cornets cello, crazy cajones and crashing cymbals. The grace note is musical. Training Develops language and math skills improves memorization stills disciplined in nurtures creativity. Dan the, dentists dawn, the doctor and Daffy duck all dig the dynamic deafening debone. Grace notice playing music is good for your heart. The e Bone Ensemble enthusiastically entertained everyone with an excellent example of an enjoyable exciting encore. This is one I. Bet you probably didn't know grace. No a song that gets stuck in your head. You're not song. Get stuck in your head. It's called an earworm and I did not know that fun. The F. Bone. Federation flew to France for the fantastic flute fashionable. Grace note is a flute is the oldest instrument in the world to play notes. Then, there's a g bone g bone group gathered there gaggle of green gongs. Golden Glock and spills and grody guitars with Gusto. Grace note in German Glock and spill means to play the bells. The H. Bone is a heavy horn humming in harmony with you, harps and hush turn Monica's. Grace note is world's best-selling instrument is her Monica. The I bone is an Itty bitty, incredibly interesting and impressive impressive. Instrument. Grace note is playing Music Group Orchestra Develops Communication and banned. Work Skills. The Jumbo J. Bone jubilee in June is in Jamaica. Decrease notice there are few activities in life that utilize the entire brain and music is one of them. The kooky kangaroo from Kalamazoo kept his Cabo and keyboard on a Kayak and Kenya. Grace Notice multiple studies. Prove that singing group. WHO's your move? So where there once was man from Nanto kit or something, right? Now. This is how we can just sort of shift into the writing life segment now, but when you're. You got to illustrate and write this book so when you when you doing the writing portion of this. Did you come up with the illustrations first and then use that as your inspiration, or did you have these ideas in your head? I did a conic simultaneously or in. You know as I started to get the ID. I started working on the two aspects continuing to paint paint painting paint, but at the same time no going through the dictionary and look I many cases. That home together and somehow the sourcing the. fucking exactly exactly all. Going through. Spend a Lotta time dictionary and. We had humor on your choice of courtesy talks about that. If you. If you want to have something that ties together, you have to sit down and make a list. Come and then Chelsea how they fit together. But in your case, not only did you do that, but you had to do in these kind of bite sizes, because it only works when you have like a short sentence, right because you want the kids to kind of get excited about it right, and and and did a lot of. Reading to yourself, reading out loud just to see how it sounds, roll off the tongue, and and listen to the other thing I did the first place I looked actually went to. A dictionary of musical terms instruments. To get as many musical terms as I possibly could to a certain letter and occurs to me not when I was reading and listening to you read. This book could also be helpful to children with speech problems because they can practice. Speech with these words that are difficult to put young Peter Piper picked tech. Peppers. I, so you've written a number of academic books. Now, you're right this children's book and illustrate it. What's the difference? Do you outlined story board? I mean there. And what are the challenges I mean I? It's a different kind of challenge, right? It is a different kind of challenge and this. This was kind of more organic in nature than my other books. I'm in the academic related books you really do you have to? Get an outline, think things through and make sure things fit together, but here once I figured out okay. This is the concept in terms of illustration. Okay, go to all through all the letters and figure out where on the letter you can place a of Horn. The Bell of a Horn that looks cool and makes. where are you going to place? Dude? Funky in the picture appears all different. Crazy places on different pays kinda find Waldo. Right, and then once I figured that out. It's like okay well. Let's how what would be a fun way to to to narrate it for lack of a better term to the pros that will be needed and. Liberations just a fun way to do. It was very challenge in terms of. The design Leeann itself because you got different colors on every page. You're right well I. got it I got to give a shoutout to a group I worked with the connective is the name of the company. They are a design firm. And marketing firm and so I gave them all the paintings, and they digitally photographed, and then we talked about okay. What are we going to include? That's where we came up the idea of grace note. And how are we going to think about the layout of every page and they did a great job of. Really designing a fun, really fun and colorful way now. Having done this and for others it might. Have A. Creative notion day to do something similar. Would you have any advice for people that? Maybe aren't necessarily illustrators. Children who think they have a story to tell me. What do you suggest I first of all I? Think everyone has a story to tell. Children's book. Again I think it's the issue of you. DON'T WANNA BE! Don't be afraid to color outside a lot year. I mean that's the one thing you learn with playing around with children going and playing blues with them. There are no boundaries with them. LEGOS? Gets color and. Bright colors and crazy images, and and it'll go along with kids so You said that you went out and you sort of. Tested some of this with children. How has the book? Men received children when you go out to to read from show to them, they seem to really like and what they really start. You play around with them and say you know what letters issue. You make them guess it I guess, and then they start looking around once they figure out. There's funny looking guy, and he's all different colors in hair, styles and shapes and. The triangle head Dr Dube Funky. They saw start looking for him, you know. Some pages he's hidden a little bit more than others. All added that guy so. I think the kids have enjoyed it. So what's your goal for this book? John What are you hoping? This would I'm hoping that it will get kids excited, not just about about reading. About the visual arts about bright colors. And certainly about music as well and. Including things like the glossary of musical terms. That's an illustrated glossary as well. The grace notes I think it's I'd also like it to end up. Being a tool that that helps to advocacy in terms of. Teaching people how are convincing people? How important! Music is why investment in music and the arts is so critical. Now back and we went to reunion recently. You know people are saying Landis. I would've thought you'd have been the last person to ever write a book or do a podcast and I'm thinking back. They probably didn't have you in mind in college to be a children's book. Out Second second in line. For that, yeah, I know! How? I'm having a blast with it. It's so much fun and. And it's something that. I've done this first one. I'm trying to think about okay. What would be I sort? Crafted, Dr. Dude funke's as a character who could possibly be used in future books. Not sure where that's going yet, but I have some ideas about how to use. USE HIM AS A. A tool to educate. About different subjects. Now you're you are into all. These creative projects done in and mortar com. What are you currently working on at the moment? Yeah, I'm I'm actually working on a my next book. It's going to be more academically related again. It's going to be music and arts related. And he said what I'm going to edit a book which I never been. No one of my first five books did edit. Out at the end of that narrative, never do it again. Because rounding up fifteen or so people to contribute a chapter is like herding. Cats got to nudge them to get it done, and then it'd have to. Stroke to Egos because you have to some some think their writings perfect needs a lot of work, but you have to pull it all together, and you have to manage the process fifteen people but. Dr Funky Dude on. Yeah, exactly, but what I what I found out glad. I did that because I said back then I never do. I am glad in looking back I did. Because I ended up learning so much about sports sports role in school I ended up learning so much that. Informed a lot of my writing for the next decade and this book I'm going to asking people to write about the creative process how? How you you can educate, it can transform. It can heal and. It will be a book that will provide a lot of information or ammunition for people who are interested in advocating for the arts about different narratives and Statistics and studies. That will help in terms of The importance of investment in music and the arts so a lot different than this. Well, that's great well. I've got I've got a little glossary now that I can check up owner running to know what musical instrument pick up. Learn next, and so where can people find this book? They can find an Alpha bone orchestra dot. COM would be the best place to get it. Our listeners we're going to have information in the show notes about John, and about this book and links to. The website his website into the Alpha bone websites. You can find this book and if you're you got a child or grandchild or friend. Who's a child that you'd like to share fun book with and. Learn, some facts yourself about An Orchestra that on the back says is fanciful, whimsical and so forth. Can Sit consider child's first music lesson. Way To look at. It s a good way to look at I. John Thanks so much for visiting been fun catching up and Let's Let's keep moving forward with these new ideas. We'll do it. Thanks for having me. Well, that's it for today. Another author giving voice to the written word Landis will be back next Friday getting under the covers with another interesting author, but before then coming on Tuesday, we'll have another long form episode with readings and conversations about the written words and the writing life of a local or regional offer. Landis loves helping authors give voice to their written words, but he can't do it alone. If you're inclined to help me help authors give voice to. To the written words, please consider becoming a member supporter. We'd love to have you as a member now when you join at certain levels will give you access to memory content curated by the authors in me. Would you like to hear more from the authors, perhaps a variety of presentations on writing craft or additional readings or tips on marketing and social media? Would you like some behind the scenes, insights and reflections from me or some edited content from previous? Interruptions, you can find out more about these member only benefits and how to become a member supporter at Charlotte readers. PODCASTS DOT COM. Thank you for your sport and thank you for listening until next week. I'M LANDIS WAY FOR CHARLOTTE. Readers podcast.

Charlotte Landis Wade basketball Grace Charlotte Readers Jon Gruden Alphabet Orchestra Graduate College Charlotte Mecklenburg Library John Charlotte Raiders John Welcome Roy Steph Curry Horn College Athletic Association wildcats Skopje Park Road Books
823: Pay Off Your Credit Card Debt and Have Personal Finance Success AND Should I Rollover my 401k? by Philip Taylor

Optimal Finance Daily

09:25 min | 1 year ago

823: Pay Off Your Credit Card Debt and Have Personal Finance Success AND Should I Rollover my 401k? by Philip Taylor

"This is optimal. Finance daily episode. Eight twenty three pay off your credit card debt and have personal finance success. And should I roll over my 4._0._1._K both by Philip Taylor of PT money dot com. And I am, Dan. I'm the guy who reads to you from some of the best blogs on personal finance each and every weekday and actually I read about business as well. You can hear me narrate articles about management, entrepreneurship, freelancing, productivity, creativity, marketing, social media, and so much more over on the podcast optimal business daily. But for this show, I have to post for you today from a guy we were fortunate enough to meet at thin con the past two years Philip Taylor before we get to those two posts, you know, hiring us to be hard multiple job sites. Stacks of resumes, and confusing review process. But today hiring can be easy with ZipRecruiter where four out of five employees who post a job get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. Day. And now my listeners can try it for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash oh FD. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash. Oh FT. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Now. Let's get right to it as we start. Optimizing your life. Pay off your credit card debt and have personal finance success. By Philip Taylor of PT money dot com. Do you have debt? I've carried my share of credit card debt, I signed up for my first two credit cards in college. You know to get the free T shirt by the time. I left college. I had a decent amount of debt and to warn out t shirts, I wasn't paying this off every month. And so I was paying twenty percent or more in interest charges looking back. It's hard to believe I left college with his debt considering I graduated with an advanced degree in accounting and was preparing for the CPA exam. I guess I was living for the future thinking that. I big payday would bail me out after college? I got a few retail credit cards. You know to save ten percent on more t shirts. All this eventually added up too late charges credit dings and a bunch of high interest stupid debt bottom line. I let the credit card companies dictate when I applied for a credit card, and I wasn't being disciplined in the use of those cards. Well, there comes a time when we need to take this control back and be intentional about your finances. In other words, grow up. Well if. You're in this boat. There's never a better time than now to do this. Why I paid off my debt? So I paid off my debt for the following reasons. One. I realized I was sick of paying for something that I had long since used dinners out movies vacations at cetera too. I realized how much money I was throwing away on high interest charges and three I wanted to feel in control and in charge of my money and not have this burden hanging over my head. How I paid off my debt I paid my debt off as quickly as possible. The first thing I did was look for a balance transfer credit card offers so I would eliminate the high interest charges. There are sometimes offers without a balance transfer fee. These deals usually run around twelve months before more interest kicks in there are dangers in doing zero percent balance transfer. But if you're disciplined, you will come out better off on the other side next. I simply divided my balanced by the number of months left on the deal and plan to make that payment each month for. Sample if the balance is two thousand five hundred dollars, and it says zero percent interest deal for twelve months. The monthly payment would be around two hundred ten dollars. That's twenty five hundred divided by twelve that was considerably more than my minimum payment. But I was ready to make a change getting out of this debt was going to hurt a little if the monthly payment had been to high say in the thousands. I would have considered doing a second balance transfer to stretch zero percent to twenty four months if the credit card companies wouldn't extend me this euro percent offer, I would have listed my credit cards out highest interest. I and plan to pay as much as possible each month on the highest one until it was paid off. Then I would move to the next highest interest card extreme measures. The next thing. I did was a little extreme. But it was what I needed I cut up my old cards and the new card I had transferred to so I couldn't add any more credit card debt to my life. This was hard to do. But I was really excited about taking back control. And I wasn't going to let anything get in my way. And I have another post from PT, which I'll share with you in just a sec. But I thank you again to ZipRecruiter for sponsoring this episode. Hiring us to be hard multiple job sites. Stacks of resumes. A confusing review process, but today hiring can be easy. And you only have to go to one place to get it done. Ziprecruiter dot com slash oh, FT ZipRecruiter sends your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards, but they don't stop there with their powerful matching technology. Ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invite them to apply to your job as applications come in ZipRecruiter analyzes each one and spotlights the top candidates. So you never miss a great match. Ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five employers who post on ZipRecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. And right now, my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this. Exclusive web address ZipRecruiter dot com slash FT. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash. Oh FT. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Should I roll over my 4._0._1._K by Philip Taylor of PT money dot com? Every day. Someone leaves a job and asks should I roll over my 4._0._1._K most of the time the answer is. Yes, if you reasonably left a job, you should probably roll over your 4._0._1._K. But there's more than one way to answer this question. If you look at it closer, the answer really depends on where you are rolling over that 4._0._1._K to there are many places to put your old 4._0._1._K funds. You could roll it over into your checking account, a new 4._0._1._K a rollover IRA or even a Roth IRA, let's review each of these moves and answer the question using each location. Should I roll over my 4._0._1._K to an IRA the 4._0._1._K rollover to IRA is the most common type of rollover, you know, that commercial with the little green line. This is the type of rollover, they're referring to you. Take your money from your 4._0._1._K and put it directly into what's called a rollover IRA. It's a specific type of traditional IRA where you can stash your old 4._0._1._K funds. What's great? About this move is that there are no penalties. No taxes. And if you use the right broker, you get a lot more control over your money with much fewer expenses than if you left the money in your 4._0._1._K note that even though this is the best way for most people to roll over their 4._0._1._K. There are some reasons not to do a rollover. You're retiring early. There are stock options in your 4._0._1._K, or you're planning a Roth conversion if that's the case discuss it with your CPA before making the rollover, should I rolled over my 4._0._1._K to a new 4._0._1._K when you leave a job you're most likely headed to a new one where you'll start up a new 4._0._1._K account. It's tempting to want to roll your old 4._0._1._K into your new one. You can't do this. And this may be right for you. If your goal is simplicity in general, though, 4._0._1._K's give you much less flexibility and control than an IRA therefore with less flexibility and control you'll be less likely to ensure that your funds are being invested according to your needs. This isn't a bad. Move. But in my opinion, it's not the best. Should I roll over my 4._0._1._K to a Roth IRA, you can no roll over your 4._0._1._K directly to a Roth IRA, but because Roth IRA's have different tax treatment than 4._0._1._K's and traditional IRA's, you'll have to pay taxes on the rollover, don't let this necessarily scare you away from this move. Roth IRA's have a huge benefit when it comes time to retire study the difference between a 4._0._1._K and Roth IRA to help you understand. If it's worth it to do a direct rollover to a Roth IRA from your 4._0._1._K. Should I roll over my 4._0._1._K to cash well, unless you are in dire straits, you should not roll over your 4._0._1._K into cash by doing this? You will essentially be taking an early withdrawal. You'll face a tax penalty from the IRS and you'll also have to pay taxes on the money. If you receive a check from your old employer for the proceeds from your 4._0._1._K, be sure to roll it over to an IRA. New 4._0._1._K or Roth IRA as soon as possible in conclusion, it makes sense to roll over your 4._0._1._K after you leave your job. Just make sure you roll it over to the right place. You just listened to the posts titled pay off your credit card debt and have personal finance success. And should I roll over my 4._0._1._K both by Philip Taylor of PT money dot com. And that'll do it for today. Thanks so much for being here and have a great rest of your Wednesday. If you're listening in real time, I'll see you back here. Tomorrow where your optimal life awaits?

Roth IRA IRA 4._0._1._K Philip Taylor ZipRecruiter Ziprecruiter Dan IRS zero percent twelve months two thousand five hundred doll two hundred ten dollars twenty four months twenty percent ten percent two years
How Gary Vaynerchuk Got to Where He Is Today | A GaryVee Film

The GaryVee Audio Experience

11:14 min | 5 months ago

How Gary Vaynerchuk Got to Where He Is Today | A GaryVee Film

"Everybody a lot of to work with major media. Good news we're hiring. We're hiring creators. Specifically right now, and we'll keep updating this promo throughout the year. Video and design capable individuals, people that have good ideas and would know what to do if we needed to sell watermelon or or bubblegum, or so or wine or stickers we're looking for Michio and image creators think about stuff I put out on instagram that kind of stuff are you scrappy or you hungry Gary B. E. dot com slash creators with an ASS go fill out the form please join our team at Bainer X. Because I think some of these people are going to go into one thirty seven. So we're going to go to be in her talent mainly rain or media, and maybe the occasional person for teen Gary be if you want to join the Family please go check out specifically right now for being media though we saved the resumes and move them around to Gary, be E. dot com slash creators with an S. This is the Gary v Audio. Experience. Hey everyone. My Name's Jason I'm the editor of the film your about to listen to a little behind the scenes of this film. Gary hit me up. I'd say about a month ago now and he wanted to Redo the video that sits on top of his website. It's basically his real. So means Iraq, we spent two to three weeks making this video and it's forty four years of Gary Entrepreneurial Journey because love it hit guarantee up on twitter that Gary. And let them know that you think thanks guys a lot of words to describe you Social Media Mogul Entrepreneur Internet personality all this stuff I. Would you describe yourself I think I'm an entrepreneur. Somebody asked me today in an interview. What do I do with my downtime I told them that I start other businesses. This is my hobby. This is my passion. So what I love to do I love building businesses fun for me. I'm. A purebred entrepreneur for real for real for real like documented. This all start. What happened with me is I had the great benefit of being an immigrant. I was born in Belarus in the former Soviet Union and came to the states and seventy eight setup in queens and my parents lived the American. Dream they worked very hard. My Dad was a stock boy liquor store and Clark new. Jersey. And eventually saved up enough money to buy a store in Springfield. New Jersey. I was lemonade stands baseball cards real hustler kid anything to make a buck and at fourteen I got dragged into the store heard the Internet my freshman year of college heard that sound. CUCKOO. Knew that it was special and in one thousand, nine, hundred, six, I launched one of the e commerce wind businesses in. America. Called Ybrid Dot Com took over my dad's business running day to day in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight alongside with him and from ninety eight to two thousand and three helped grow that business from a three to sixty million dollar business. But growing a business from three to sixty million was just the beginning. Let's see what Gary created after. Leaving Wine Library I was thirty four years old when I started. I spent the twelve best years of my. You've building my dad's liquor store for him I left that business had no money had no equity I was worthless to the bank banner media started in somebody else's conference room because we have no money for ramp. So it was a ton of risk by normal standards when somebody reads it on paper but not necessarily for me, it just felt like. Progression. I run beaner media. We are an eight hundred person firm one, hundred, million dollars in revenue in four years from zero we work with GE and Pepsi and under armor and Toyota and the biggest brands in the world. What is an immediate? Do we're a modern day? Madman were Madison Avenue Agency the same people that used to sell commercial time on Radio and television. We now do that on facebook snapchat instagram and we produced the creative for the brands to sell stuff through the fold. We are living through a revolution this my friends this. Is the television. And the television is the radio. And it's one, thousand, nine, hundred sixty and there's a huge opportunity what does being a contemporary communicator me? It means that you understand where people are paying attention whether that's twitch or Tiktok or believe or not organic linked in, and then are you capable of creating the creative, the videos, the pictures and words that are contextual to those platforms to make the agenda success? Fainter, media grew into a global advertising agency with five offices across New, York London Singapore Los Angeles and Chattanooga Tennessee as time went on Gary created Venus ex a modern communications holding company that houses different ventures like the gallery media group the Sasha Group vader productions Tracer Vader Commerz and speakers Gary also continues to build other businesses after four years of building. A restaurant reservation, it's sold for nine figures to American Express in two thousand nineteen. Gary's also extremely strong business collaborator in twenty seventeen, he became the face. Of case was his collaboration helped contribute their two, hundred, million dollar plus exit and twenty nine, thousand, nine, hundred shopping cart below. If you're not buying this, you're breaking my heart. He's also co founder of empathy wines, which was recently acquired by constellation brands. So you just created empathy last year. Yeah. This is one of those one plus one equals eleven with both sides of the equation bring so much value. CEO Garissa Chief Executive Officer of vein ex but how would gary describe what he does at its most pure sense? I am an operating entrepreneur. So let's take a deeper look into what drives Gary and how he operates. Who started working all the day I left college. I walked into library about six o'clock. That night worked for two hours then went home and literally from that moment literally the day I left college to the second I'm sitting here right now i. have never not been the chief operator of a business and I've made payroll re single week since I was twenty two years old and I'm proud of that because it's practical as Fuck I've picking Bainer media as CEO and CEO for that matter operated it every day I've taken it from zero to two hundred, million dollars in revenue with no cash infusion started. It in a conference room it's now my second company that I built and what I WANNA do is inspire to fourteen year old girls in Kansas City right now to build a billion dollar company on having a bunch of employees hugging each other in the house, and it is not lost on me that I am taking the gifts that my mom and dad gave me and I'm giving them to the world and my happiness framework, and the way I treat people is for some reason becoming cool and an I'm just gonNA squeeze the shit out of that because. It's leading to good I. Know I'm onto something. So fundamentally different and I know that I can fire people to do it because it's going to have the empire par to. See that's what people don't get the reason I'm going to win. Is because I've got both the honey part. Means that you want to go change the world. The empire part means you'll do it at all costs I'm neither Gary has a natural ability to see consumer trends which led him to an early investor in companies like Uber Twitter, Tumbler facebook snapchat. Ben Now, I'm predicting that facebook wires instagram fifteen users for instagram probably GONNA push thirty next year, and I just had this funny feeling. That is gonNA. Look at talent look at that APPs ringing in House. So I was on Pierce Morgan is opening line is this companies five, hundred, fifty days old how the hell is it worth a billion dollars? And my opening line is they stole it. I get out of the studio and literally there thousands of tweets of people calling me a fucking idiot, and then I guess last year this time right facebook bought WHATSAPP for eighteen billion and every article the next day after the news came out, it's like Oh wait a minute they fucking stole instagram and more recently Gary predicted this acquisition. Joel Rogan inevitably announces that he paid one hundred million dollars to exclusively beyond whatever pop platform he's going to go on I have a funny feeling. Everyone's going to be like wait a minute I have an announcement. The podcast is moving to spotify Gary's also involved in a variety of organizations like charity water, pencils of promise bojangles, and they've Mac the challenged Minnesota rocker Venus ports, and more. Now let's take a deeper look into Gary personal brand at Gary Gary Vader Chuck Aka Gary is self help media mogul one of Gary's core beliefs as a marketer that every company and human being is a media company, I? Because of that, he built team garrity. A team of strategists, editors, writers, and designers to help them grow his personal brand garrison putting out content for ten plus years across the platforms of the time. Starting with wine content with Wine Library TV then he moved to hosting the ask your show QNA's show between Gary his audience. Then he started documenting his life's journey through daily and weekly like it's so obvious to me what's going to happen daily? It's GonNa be so fucking crazy what it looks like. A year from today and he also started a livestream QNA show called T with Gary. Gary's also five times New York Times bestselling author and travels across the world for keynotes and has a top business podcast where he talked to some of the biggest entrepreneurs, investors, artists, and leaders of our time. took. When Gary Sunset, what do you want to be meant? That I gave more than I took. I really want to be remembered for. All right episodes over please leave a review and subscribe up on apple it would be A lot to me. Thank you very much. Thanks. Gary Today's highlighted review is following since two thousand thirteen by Angelica Gazette Gary V. Man Thank you for everything you do for us Gary appreciate you. Thanks Angelique. Keep those reviews coming. We could highlight yours next.

Gary Gary Vader Gary B. Gary Sunset Gary Today instagram facebook Gary V. Man editor CEO and CEO Michio Ybrid Dot Com Jason New Jersey Wine Library Springfield Belarus New York Times twitter
Things Are Looking Up

StoryCorps

09:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Things Are Looking Up

"I'm dave i say founder of story core support for this podcast and the following message. Come from morgan stanley. A proud sponsor story core. Morgan stanley is committed to giving back into fostering meaningful dialogue among people and communities. Morgan stanley dot com. This is the story or podcasts from npr. I'm your host communica. Shawny now the twenty twenty behind us. We're embracing the new year so we're celebrating other moments when change was welcomed and even desired. We're going to hear from two people who made big changes later in life both around their careers for lanham. The shift was inspired his childhood. In two thousand nineteen. He spoke with his friend. John lane about growing up on his family. Farm in south carolina helped him find his calling. My grandfather began to build a farm in the nineteen twenties and my father saw it as the responsibility to stay on the homeplace. He didn't leave the soil. And i saw the land as my father's heart my grandmother. She would stand on her front porch and she could holler literally from across the pasture across the holler. That's what i always thought that holler meant. No it was a geographical thing going back and forth between my grandmother's house and my parents house. I would stop to investigate. Whirligig mls and bob white quail were usually in some thicket somewhere along the way it might take me a couple of hours to walk that. It seemed like a thousand miles. How far literally was it less than a quarter of a mile. Once i left college. Everybody said you're good at math and science. Be an engineer. Make money drew. So i tried that but hated every last moment of it. Dead was fifty two when he died. There were arguments about what would happen on the land. And i can remember coming back home all of these wonderful forests that i'd grown up in had been clearcut and losing. That land was like losing my father all over again. I remember leaving that day. And driving up this dirt road. And there's this prairie warbler that singing z z z z z z z z z z. Z z z. And it was the most hopeful thing for me. I never believed that. I should be an engineer. I said i can't do this anymore. Went back to my apartment dark night at a so. I got a big bowl of fruit loops and thought about the next steps. I remember i going out to study. These eastern bluebirds and the work was often hot and long hours. But there were these moments. When i would look up and there would be flocks of bobble links or the songs of meadow larks and taking the moment to realize that i was doing what i had always dreamed from a very early age. I believe that i would be someone who who studied birds. Who somehow found a way to fly. And so i would like to think that my father would see my turn towards the study of nature as carrying a legacy forward. That's born theologists. Drew lanham talking to his friend. John lane in clemson south carolina after the break. A job that many of us never even knew existed love literal and downs. Stay with us this message comes from. Npr sponsor subaru and their annual. Subaru share the love event. By the end of this their thirteenth year subaru and it's participating retailers will have donated over two hundred million dollars to help those in need by partnering with organizations. Like the aspca. Make a wish with every sue purchase or lease through january fourth. Subaru will donate two hundred and fifty dollars to a charity of your choice. More at subaru dot com slash share love. It's what makes subaru. Subaru kid is rethinking new year's resolutions. All this january. We're thinking about both really big and really small changes if you're wanting to change up your life and start fresh. We've got you covered if you're looking to just make your home. Oh little nicer. We've got you there to listen now to the podcast from. Npr dad Next story comes from jacksonville florida. That's where barb able houser found her calling. she's spent most of her life working in an office when she was fifty one. She decided to trade in her cubicle for job. That came with you in two thousand nine. Barb came into one of our mobile booths with her friend. john may number. She told him about why she wanted to spend the of her days as a bridge. Tender the pays horrible. The benefits are worse. But i have the most gorgeous view. In the entire city i mean executives who make hundreds of thousands of dollars do not have my view. And i'm getting paid to stop and look that's the thing i think i love the most about this. You must see a lot of things that the rest of us miss you know. I think about that a lot. Because i've been sitting in the same exact spot for all these years and i see the passage of the seasons. I see the alligator that hangs out below my window. And when she lays her eggs. I hear baby gators sparking and people don't even realize where they're the walk past us and say the most intimate private things and we hear them. People go on dates on these bridges and they propose you so you get this little tiny snapshot of people's personal lives that they don't even realize that they're giving you. There was a fisherman that used to come through the bridge every morning like clockwork never knew his name. We had a connection. But we don't really know who each other is and one day he came through. I waved and i found out in the news that maybe ten minutes later wall. He was on his boat heading out fish. He had a heart attack and passed away. This boat washed up on the shore of the river. He was on the boat alone. So i was the last person that saw him alive. Makes you think makes you appreciate you know. I'll be out there at three in the morning. There's no traffic. It's quiet and i'll look up and there's the moon and i tried to thank the universe at least once a night for this opportunity. You know i could get hit by a bus tomorrow and if that happens i want to have woken up that day and not thought. I don't want to go to work you. How most people don't have that. I love it That's far able hauser. Speaking with her friend. John may number in two thousand fourteen. Barb moved to seattle where she became a bridge operator for the department of transportation from bird watching two people watching. That's offered this episode of the story court broadcast to see animated versions of both of these interviews historic core dot org. While you're there you can also see the music we used in this episode along with original artwork created by lindsey mount. This episode was produced by me and silviu john. S kendall is our editor. Jerry floyd is our technical director and boat our theme song. That sumi edgy. Soccer is our fact checker special. Thanks to jasmine morris. Aisha turner and louis sullivan. The story court podcast. I'm communicating catch you next week this podcast is brought to you by supporters of story core an independently funded nonprofit organization and is made possible in part by the corporation for public broadcasting a private corporation funded by the american people.

John lane subaru Morgan stanley Drew lanham south carolina bob white lanham morgan stanley npr dave aspca clemson Barb houser Npr barb Npr jacksonville
Advice for 20 Year Old Entrepreneurs

The GaryVee Audio Experience

08:10 min | 2 years ago

Advice for 20 Year Old Entrepreneurs

"In this is Gary v audio experience protocol. Middle am- Rouge from India. I moved to the US team for college, and I think some of last summer I saw videos notch out about us. Are you scared about what people are going to do? The graduating? Yes. And that continued through my mind and I was like, I need to know this guy is here. What is it about this is that I've been falling you on every possible and I want my seat over here. I'm aware fission he has aware on. So pretty much. Cool. So it's. Claude established industry. Of course, I'm twenty two, yes. Jumping from side also deciders tasting tasting everything. Initially, what I get going to get on any satis woman could move in daughters. Of course, I, I, the moment I my older on the wall. This is it. I think that's a good trait. As long as it's grounded with, you're not gonna make a million dollars. You know, you have to balance optimism with practicality thing, everything. Literally every idea that runs through my head including the two that have happened Wallaby listening to you guys. I always think is going to be everything. I think that's good. I think to your point and it was funny to see your reaction after listening to your story. I've been talking a lot in my content right now to twenty to twenty five year olds around tasting. Everybody's biggest problems. I don't know what my passion is good at. I'm like so taste like if you don't know what your favorite food is takes shit, eat salmon, eat broccoli, CR chin, eat burgers drink like, and we don't have that system in place. And I think for you know, for the rest of us here that are a little further along after twenty two. The thing you realize twenty to thirty s exactly when you do high risk because as we start building families and other things in life happen, those are we have to react to that that puts us on defense. And you know, I've been really thinking a lot about, you know, it's funny. I'm kid who started working literally the day. I left college. Like when I drove from Boston to New York that night when I got to store around three or four PM because I left in the morning, I actually worked for three hours at why because I always worked when I was home. So it wasn't like wasn't symbolic normal, like got there for and like you don't go home at four. I just got the liquor store for, but the traffic. So I just, I don't know. Just literally literally park the car gave a huge hug to one of my best college friends who was taking a bus to the city, and he was on his way to life. And I literally just like helped customers for next hours until dad was ready to go home and we just went home and from that day to now I've always worked. So I didn't do morally ninety nine out of a hundred times. Everything you here for me is vice that I've done it myself. So that's why I'm so confident. Ironically, one of my favorite pieces advice right now is something I did polar opposite of which was because I found the meal that I became addicted to very early, but I've come to realize that wasn't the case for an isn't the case for most. And I just think it's practical. To hustle at this age, try different things. Some of us stumble upon it in an alteration of our own business. Sometimes we just bounce away from it. Everybody's got their own stories of it young like this, like his business, very conditioned to the market behaviors. So I'm sure he recognizes this a good era, but it could get bad. And so what am I gonna do when it gets bad when there's a, you know, but it's great that you're tasting and should think everything's going to be a million dollars. What you wanna do though is not get caught in a couple of ways. Number one, I think a lot of people get caught on good. So where you could get caught is you could actually make one hundred thousand and that I actually this is on its way to a million, but the upside was only two hundred thousand always. That's very sneaky. One very hard to dissect. Good for the, you know. All three of of great, you know, like taking good over. Great. But you should feel comfortable in your taste thing. Tonight. Okay. This gonna work for me. I gotta move onto the next thing I got. I do have to cry. Nobody's gonna. You know, one thing I tell people is you're never going to know the alternative. You're never gonna know that if you quit the day before the next day, it was going to be the beginning of the future. You'll never know. And that's how I live. Like that's how I strategize like the answer is Terry, I'm commenced. There are millions of people millions. Ten thousand people running around right now that we're literally one day away from it clicking and they went and got another job or went back to business school or a mill that's real life, and nobody wants to be that pertinent somebody watching these videos, like, fuck that per stem. It'd be devastating, right? That would be devastating. That's devastating to me. It's a function of something else. It's a function of humility and what your aspirins are. Let me explain. The reason I'm was destined to win is the process was the win I'd won before I started. I being an entrepreneur was hit. So to me, I never had to worry about that because I never allowed the way I lived my life and I mean expenses. Look if you're willing to live in a studio apartment with three mates in a ghetto neighborhood, you forever can be an entrepreneur. People only talk about the money like I'm gonna make a million. I'm always thinking like I can live on ten thousand that keeps it in the game forever. So so I think a lot of this has to do with what one does you could you? Could you have the luxury of time right now? You know, hopefully you stay healthy forever and like you've got eighty years of brunt of you. Minimally with modern medicine. You got a lot of fucking time, and I think the only thing that can hurt you is what hurts everybody at twenty to your parents pressure your own pressure on yourself, because you see your friends starting to accomplish certain things. Good. So to me, I had psyche that was crazy. I loved that a twenty six. Some of my friends were starting my good student friends. We're starting to make money because they went to a good school and they went to Goldman Sachs and we're making money, and they're buying a BMW and watch, and I fucking loved it because low motivated me and a great way because I knew I knew who I was and and the snarky comments. Now I'm Gary Vida. Everybody let me just tell you just listen very carefully. I'm twenty six. And I worked for my dad's liquor store. Like you got to really understand where I was. I, I'm twenty six and I'm working for my dad's liquor store. That's the stats. My brand amongst my circle, four years out of college like now because I wasn't promoting that the business was growing very rapidly. You know. I attaching your own happiness or sadness to somebody else's actions is the quickest way to lose. Your buddy making money has nothing to do with you. It just legitimately has nothing to do with you. Your buddy making money and getting pretty girls because of it just to generally has nothing to do with you. I understand that twenty two, you wanna hang out with pretty. I get it. I understand what people want in life. I understand the psyche of men, women young old. It all makes sense. It just doesn't have anything to do with you. And the sooner you can get to that place. I just shut everything out because then you can stay patient lights. But that's where people get caught. You know, parents pressure or trying to keep up with the Joneses outside forces.

Gary Vida US am- Rouge India Joneses Claude Goldman Sachs Boston Terry BMW New York million dollars twenty five year eighty years three hours four years one day mill
The O'Reilly Update, September 14, 2020

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

13:08 min | 4 months ago

The O'Reilly Update, September 14, 2020

"Bill O'Reilly here Monday September fourteenth two. Thousand and twenty you're listening to the O'Reilly update. Here's what's happening today in America to deputies in Los Angeles critically injured in an ambush dozens of people shot in Baltimore. NFL ratings continued to decline. A boycott bills against a local Florida restaurant after Senator Harris shows up for meal Bob. Woodward goes after President Trump on sixty minutes. Also ahead the price of kneeling for the anthem. But I to l a police officer shot while sitting in patrol cars in Compton over the weekend. The department. Confirming the officers are quote fighting for their lives while it launches the largest manhunt in years anti police protesters attempted to block the ambulance from entering the hospital chanting we hope they effing die. Surge in violence leaving at least forty five people shot eleven dead in Baltimore. Since January first city of just six hundred thousand has witnessed two, hundred, thirty, three homicides, hundred, forty, two shootings no comment from the black lives matter movement on the murders or similar situations and Chicago New York City or Los Angeles. For the NFL's opening game dropping double digits down sixteen percent compared to last year. Angry fans in Kansas City actually booed during the pre-game. Ocean. Recent poll from Gallup says forty percent of viewers are turned off by political statements at. Games. Liberal magazine the Atlantic wants to cancel the Nobel Peace Prize because President Trump has been nominated. Meanwhile Bob Woodward scorched Mr Trump on sixty minutes over cove it last night. Don't know if any of those things matter at all. Restaurant Florida facing backlash after Kamala, Harris and her husband stop by for lunch the owners of a maze Latin flavors telling reporters they weren't notified of the visit saying quote we don't use our company for political reasons. There is no reason to target any restaurant for serving any politician. A meal. That is flat out wrong no matter. What side the political equation. Has You in? Don't do that. In a moment nfl protest the on intended consequences. Right back Are you tired of not being able to fall asleep pardon upon EB has developed a science back solution the targets, the cause of sleeplessness racing thoughts. This drug free solution has been changing lives using ebbs precision cool technology. The cool drift verse a headband softly wraps around the forehead and cools it to the optimal temperature. A personalized algorithm maintains continuous cooling. You'll finally fall asleep and stay asleep take it from me. Plus I'm able to take it with me wherever I go cool. Drift versus ultra portable design and rechargeable battery makes it easy use whether you're in bed stressed at your desk or lounging on the couch you'll get the rescue needs. So you can do the things you love. Just. From my listeners save twenty, five dollars by going to try EBBA DOT com slash bill and using Promo Code Bill at checkout. That's five dollars off your order and you can try it risk free for sixty nights. This is a great deal that's T. R. Y. E. B. Dot. COM SLASH BILL TRY EB DOT com slash bill use Promo Code Bill to save twenty five bucks time. Now for the Riley, update message of the day putting your money where your knee is. Fascinating, see the nation's intense culture war played out in Kansas. City before the NFL's opening game, the chiefs largely stood for the national anthem and some players actually put their hands over their hearts. My deceased father and grandfather both wartime that's would have been proud. The Houston Texas state in the locker room for the anthem and I am thankful for that. It hurts me to see my country in salted. So I'm glad I did not have to witness mass kneeling on the part of the Texans and I approve of clarity I. Now know how the Houston football team feels about America. Announcer Chris Collingsworth was extremely annoying virtue signaling that he stands with the players in their social justice protests. Hey Chris spare us we all know how noble you are and I'm happy to discuss your opinion on my news analysis program anytime. But using your entertainment platform to push a political point of view is exactly with the Academy Award pinheads do. In truth, the bravest thing done at the game was play by play. Guy Al Michaels a brilliant announcer totally avoiding the culture stuff by staying silent Michael's knew he would be hammered by the woke mob which is exactly what happened. So. Here's what's going to happen to the National Football League. Annoyed by the political correctness, many fans will stop buying merchandise from teams that huge source of revenue will plummet with the Houston Texans leading the way. TV Ratings for the first game were down substantially as I reported. The teams are paid billions regardless of rating so they'll not suffer there, but the networks will. Of course, a pandemic is severely limiting fans from going to the stadiums. So the ten dollar beers and six dollar hotdogs will be raised from the bottom line along with the thirty dollars parking fee. Right, now, the average salary for an NFL player is two million per season. The lowest of all, the major sports that's because most players come out of college and signed for Minimum Union wages the NFL means not for long many players are quickly injured and replaced by other young athletes average time in the league less than three years. What the players do not seem to understand is that the fans pay them. And many spectators perhaps most do not want to see politics on game day I am among them. I do respect descent and well understand social injustice. I have a charitable foundation that donates millions to help Americans who do not have equal opportunity not virtue signaling just reporting. The reason I'm able to give away millions of dollars is that the United States provided me who had zero money when I left college the opportunity to prosper. The climb up was tough requiring a massive amount of hard work. I couldn't have done it in Sweden the NFL players could not have done it in Sweden. So. Bottom line watch what you protest particularly if you're alienating those who pay your salary. I'm bill. O'Reilly on I approve that message by writing it disagree I want to hear from you bill bill O'Reilly Dot Com also, please consider my new book killing crazy horse you like it. In a moment something you might. Not, know my go-to Financial Tech Research, Executive Jeff Brown as a top notch newsletter that helps us profit from exploding tack market. He provides investors like you and me with Wall Street's inside intelligence knowing how rig the whole thing is Jeff's mission with brownstone research is to stack the deck in our favor. So we can grow our wealth and beat Wall Street. He researches the best technology companies, the newest trends, the biggest opportunities before they appear on Wall Street's radar, and that's why as newsletter far outperforms most hedge funds, he's recommended the number one SNP stock of two, thousand, sixteen, Eighteen, and nineteen, quite a record. Now Jeff subscribers of seeing a four, hundred, thirty, two percent gain in forty one days with rocks with doc you signed three hundred and thirty, two percent with crisper and the winter list goes on and on. So please go to bill five G. DOT COM right now that's bill five G. DOT com. and. You'll be happy you did now the O'Reilly Update Breezy something you might not know. Americans. I said are tuning out the NFL but also the NBA and Major League baseball in big numbers ratings down double digits for all sports on TV across the board. According to a new poll from gala a growing number of US adults now view teams negatively. More than forty percent of US say we're unhappy to see athletes make overt political statements before games. Despite the decrease in viewership, the players are getting paid more than ever before but that could change the biggest contracts quarterback Patrick Mahomes, Russell Wilson Ben Rothlisberger Aaron Rodgers, and Jared Goff in the NFL, they each earn more than thirty, three, million dollars a year. The median for baseball players is four and a half million annually biggest star Mike Trout of the L. A.. Angels makes a whopping thirty eight million. And that's California angels I believe. Athletes in the NBA earn about seven point seven million dollars on average top paid. Stephen. Curry. Russell Westbrook. Chris. Paul James Harden John Wall each making more than thirty eight million dollars a year. That's astronomical. Hockey players generate the least of all major league sports players on the ice make about one and a half million dollars on average highest paid at fifteen million. Are the Canadian players. That's the average up there, and here's something else you might not know. According to the Gallup poll America's entire sports. is now ranked the third least popular industry. In the USA, just thirty four percent view. The league's is favourable while four in ten. SAY THEY'RE TURNED OFF The number two spot goes to the pharmaceutical industry. America's not happy with high prices for daily medications. The least admired institution in America ready, you may have guessed it. The federal government. That's because the federal government is looking out for itself, the swamp and not the folks. The most popular groups in the United States of America take a guess. Farmers and grocery store workers. Back. After this, Hey, investors seeking steady cashflow ready to diversify founded in two, thousand six and are a has become. One of the nation's leading specialists in institutional caliber private real estate investment with more than one point two billion dollars in assets under management. As their slogan says, they specialize in realty and getting done right you can also use your 401k or IRA to invest. You could receive steady ten percent monthly electronic payments for your bank account with valuable property, not just paper assets securing you and obtained returns with bonuses targeted at Eighteen, twenty, one percent and our as fourteen year track record and one point two billion in new construction development back Hue. So learn how you can invest in this hard asset real estate cash flow fund today please call two, one, two, one, zero, two, seven, two, seven, two, zero, one, two, one, zero, two, seven, two, seven, or visit and R. I A. Dot net. Thank you for listening to the Riley Update. I am Bill O'Reilly no spin just facts and always looking out for you.

National Football League NFL America Bill O'Reilly United States O'Reilly Bob Woodward President Trump Chris Collingsworth Los Angeles Jeff Brown Florida Baltimore Senator Harris NBA federal government Houston Compton EBBA DOT Kansas City
1848: Unsure About Your Goals, Start Here by Josie Michelle Davis on New Year's Resolutions

Optimal Living Daily

08:10 min | 3 weeks ago

1848: Unsure About Your Goals, Start Here by Josie Michelle Davis on New Year's Resolutions

"This is optimal living daily episode. Eighteen forty eight unsure about your goals. Start here by josie. Michelle davis of josie. Michelle davis dot com. And i'm just a your personal narrator. Where i get permission from the authors of the best blogs i can find on personal development minimalism productivity anything. I think will help you live a more meaningful life and then i simply read their content to you for free happy new year. Welcome anna twenty twenty one. Twenty twenty was not what any was expected. But let's hope we turn a corner this year and things start to go back to normal but even if it's off to a rocky start we can still work on our personal goals and make progress within ourselves so at that. Let's get right to it and start optimizing your life still unsure about your goals. Start here by josie. Michelle davis of josie michelle davis dot com his january which means everyone and their mom is talking about one thing goals goals resolutions intentions. Whatever you choose to call them. They can be straight up terrifying. If you aren't sure where you wanna go and all those people saying you've got to get clear on your goals only making it worse. How are we supposed to magically get clear on your goals when you feel so unsure of everything. It's like that scene in friends where they ask phoebe if she has a life plan and she says i don't even have a pla- saudi find clarity on your goals. How do you even know what goal to said. When you have no clue what direction to take your life in. I feel you seriously. There have been so many times in my life finding myself once again wondering where do i go. Now when i dropped out of university for lack of money and found myself living at home again with no job or plan or what. I realized a career i had been working on for years when fit with my long term life goals or pretty much a million other times in my life. I felt lost at sea seriously. I've not had a plan more than i've had won. The truth is fine. Your goals is a process. All those youtubers who make it sound like a twenty minute exercise and bam. You've got a life plan. Obviously don't understand feeling lost. The truth is it's harder than just creating a vision board or spending ten minutes brainstorming. These are the ways. I've slowly but surely found clarity when i felt completely lost on what to do next explore. The world is your freaking oyster. You can do anything but you can't do everything throwing a few more cliches that are way overused but are good nuggets of truth. It's all true. But sometimes the vast array of choices makes it even harder. Personally i wish i had about ten lives like do all the totally different things. I dream of sit down and write out any and everything that interests you you in crazy things to them all out of your head then take time and work through the list. Research each ideas. If you're really going to pursue it this can and should take more than just an afternoon fully. Flush out each idea until you know whether it's a real possibility or if it doesn't make sense for you right now. When i realized working fulltime stylist wasn't going to fit with my long-term dreams of working remotely and having flexibility with where i live. I started researching new options. One of my top ideas was to become a registered. nutritionist dietitian. A few weeks researching the ins and outs the requirements. What schools i could potentially go to an lurking at boards of rnd's to learn the goods and bads in the end. I decided it wasn't going to fit with my big life goals and had to let that idea go at least for now but i can now look back and feel good that i really spent the time to rule it out and can sleep well knowing i made the right decision sometimes. A big part of figuring out what to do is figuring out what not to do so. Don't get down when you rule something out. No matter how crazy your ideas might be. Give them the due diligence of exploring them seriously. Try not to hold those ideas too closely but be willing to let them go when you see red flags. Maybe you'll find that one of those crazy ideas was actually the perfect path for you. Experiment as adults. We often don't let ourselves just experiment and try new things out without the pressure. Make it our life's work but oftentimes. It's the experimenting that can teach us more than anything. When i left college. I had no idea what to do. I realized i was really interested in event planning so emailed all of the event planners i could find contact information for in the philly area. In one responded. I took an unpaid internship and drove over an hour. Each way to work for her all while also working a fee retail job. As much. As i could to make money even though eventually decided. That planning weddings wasn't for me. I don't regret it for a second. I learned so much from the internship. Most of all what kicked businesswoman. Looks like you don't have to take an unpaid internship to experiment. Try taking classes and things that interest you or go to meet ups ask someone in the field if you can shadow them for a day or just learn from online tutorials. Try to let go the pressure that this thing will be your ultimate goal and just let yourself something new. He sat experimenting. The can teach us the most about ourselves. Remember it's okay seriously mitts. Okay manno you don't believe me. I know that. Because i never would have believed me. Sometimes mentally beat myself up for not making the forbes thirty under thirty list. Although i do technically have a few months left for that one but i have a feeling is just not going to happen. Not where you thought you'd be at this point in your life. Forget it seriously. You won't get anywhere if all you're doing is focusing on what you haven't done practice himself. Love take a deep breath and girl believe in yourself. I have spent too much of my own life beating myself up for not being where i wanna be in wasting. That energy has never held me. The only times of truly reach. My goals are when i let go of what was behind me and just started focusing on what was ahead of me last year. I started practicing meditation. And it's really helped me to learn to live more in the moment. let go and move on. That's my mantra. In the end the best advice. I can give. You is just invest more time in yourself. You won't figure out your life calling over stressing yourself obsessing over it every day. believe me. i've tried work on understanding and developing yourself and you'll start to see your path more clearly. You ll into the post titled unsure about your goals. Start here by josie. Michelle davis of josie michelle davis dot com. A real quick. Thanks to anchor for hosting this podcast. Anger is the easiest way to make a podcast. They'll distribute your podcast for you so can be heard everywhere. Spotify apple podcasts. Google podcasts and many more you can easily make money from your podcast to know minimum listenership anchor gives you everything you need in one place for free which you can use right from your phone or computer creation tools. Allow you to record in. Eddie your podcast. So it sounds great. Download the anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. I definitely related to this post. I experimented and tried so many different things before landing on this podcast. And i believe i found what i truly love to do. So thank you for being part of it and listening. The grace thing you can do for me. This year is help. Spread the word about this. Podcast we talked about goals in this article and our goal or resolution is to grow this edition to all of our shows so any help. Sharing the show is greatly appreciated. Sure you have some friends or family that would love to know that this podcast exists. Or even what. Podcasts are seeking point them to old podcast dot com or even better simply show them how to subscribe for free right on their smartphone. If they have one for doing that it means a lot. But i'll do for today again. Happy new year. And i'll see you tomorrow. Where optima life awaits.

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The Developer Tribe - 008 - Joe Quigley

The Developer Tribe

38:23 min | 2 months ago

The Developer Tribe - 008 - Joe Quigley

"Welcome back to the develop detroit. Everyone and a big thank you to take you a song to listen. This podcast tells. The processes and practices coaches educates is and beyond offering their insight. Giving us cause to reflect. Thank you for being here. However you got here with this jump in my guest today. Is joe quick leap. Ncis engagement coordinator in culture mental with his company jo quickly. Coaching job spent nine years out in the us. Coaching soccer on returning to the uk decided to redirect its attention to one-to-one work with young people needing extra support a number of other projects on the go including his own. Poke costs talking mental health. I met joe. Walsh coaching the us. Let's say a while ago. An glad south stayed in touch with a full full compassionate practitioner. Welcome to the greats a heavy hitter. Tell us about your journey to while you are the Ncis engagement goal nights. A long journey like you said when i left college went out to the states. That was kind of of my professional career. Wasn't merely a thing that i had much expectation of at the time. It was just a case of away on a try. Something different experience new country a new culture different people get away from home for Try and go. i didn't. I chose not to go to uni after i left college. I wouldn't say i was a great student. I was more of a hands on kind of persons. Wanted to go out and work and learn about myself in in another country. That was my unique experience so that initial nine month contract signed for turned into nine. Yes that makes very simplistic wasn't as simplistic is not. But you know that was my Twenties left left college at nineteen out to the states back and forth a couple of times and ended up there in five years full time and then left in the summer of two thousand sixteen came back to england and yet when i came back you know i i still wanted to do coaching. But you for football like in this country. It's quite fickle business. It's quite a tough business to break into Of coaching full-time the money was really possible. So i of had to redirect my thinking a little bit away from just coaching. You know at the time when we move him wife had to apply for a visa to come because she's colombian so there was a kind of cloud over in the sense that i had to be in a certain salary to make the application possible so i applied for so many jobs jobs i applied was that many. I couldn't even have guessed. Proudly say over two hundred jobs in about six months just to get my feet under the table to get myself salary where could than apply to kelly's visa and that actually ended up driving me towards nuncius. I had a friend who worked friends. Yes at the time he was telling me about it. And how much involve young people in you know groves in the community in personal development stuff not interested in so i was looking up to find a job within. Ncis with a month chester which was close to home so kind of took it in. That was my mind. Ncis journey Still to this day. I think it is a fantastic program. He gets meet so many amazing people in say come on this journey from a space to appoint further in time. You know it's It's something i enjoy doing work. People i started will commit kids when i was about fourteen or fifteen at local youth club that was associated with my primary school emphasis. Then you know. Coaching football in the states coming back. Ncis so will towards personal development once a woman young people a very short version of how i got. Yeah it's a it's a a winding road for for so many of us in so tell us a little bit more about what. Ncsa's in what that looks like for the young people yes. Ncis is a national program. That was run by the government in two thousand nine. It was a project to david cummins before came from minnesota and kind of rolled it out. The idea was to just to create a bigger community bringing people together from different backgrounds to to understand each other in just to learn together and to grow I think the first year they run in london is one pilot projects Very small nuts now grown over eleven years to overhaul familiar Since i started kind of changed slightly It's always adoption. it was when i was doing manchester. We run a full week program in a number used to october hawk to program in a february offset program. The company doing it with now three week programs for the conduct. Sean a little bit but still has all elements to it so it's not typically week People may never meet at school outside of school or outside of nci so it's bringing together so that that is a great way to stop just throwing him into these outdoor activities wrote Climbing can't even wrap building whatever you whatever you wanna call it so many different activities just just breaks the ice you know just get some tolkien guests in thinking without without being too awkward rather than just sitting down at the circle in ohio. It's a it's a fun way of doing it. And then the second week is a skills based week so they get learn some stuff you know i. I did public speaking things. They've may not necessarily do at school or college. They don't need going photo of find useful at some point in the end of the program is social action where they do a local Projects in the local community raising awareness for something raising money for some than doing something that he's gonna benefit people in the live a long term which is good. It's a good deal. So yeah i like it. You know. it's a good program. i'm involved with it for. It'll be three and a half years now for me. It's about seeing that development of young people garnered from the point where they the only one to the end of three or four weeks weather. Got ten fifteen twenty mates you know and then six months later you see them all out in the trump center or wherever. They're nick didn't even know each other. So it just gives. Young people shoots together Different it's not all good. Sounds like a pretty program in a good fit for you. I if i were to be fortunate enough to come shadow eufor dot couple of weeks you. How would i describe what you do in those months to really support young people and mental leader coach Facilitate the so many different names. You could call on the umbrella. Safeguarded officer a listen to somebody. Talk to somebody so tight grew somebody you know the the this different job roles. The kind of people sign up for this coordinate is leaders group assistance. What team leaders team but within those titles you in so many of the things for the people. So it's a. It's a learning experience for the people but it's it's also a learning experience for the stock as well. You know the muscles that you go through on that three or four week program and you come up with thinking why. I never thought of a situation like that. I would've have never dealt with something like that. So it's it's a good eye opener for your people. But i think you know from my point of view is while i can. I've probably met two hundred people through. Ncis the axe. No i'm in contact with different members of Programs different people. I would imagine just there in most of our base now so yes great for people on a personal level. It's been great for me because it's kind of helped me grow my network back in the uk. I didn't really have. When i came back from the sites. Yes fantastic. so the they're clearly would have been some skills and abilities from your time as a football coach that you brought into that role. What kinds of things did you have to learn quickly on your fate severe successful in that row in its s. Yeah and she has a funny thing because you will you. Not working with kids really. You're working with young adults that gave eleven year twelve. So you know my background. Essentially states with predominantly would come with young players Initially when i was doing sessions with three four and five year olds in just making shows environment you know them. Working with under eights nines tens all up to two hundred twelve. There's been coaching with all the players. As well predominantly it was younger place so just adapting to how life as a teenager moss. When i started. Ncis very how life as a teenager was me. Sixteen years ago when a nice So i was working with fifteen sixteen year olds in this country for the first time and it was just a quick linden experience because the law is is very different to what it was for unite grown up age and i think have been away from the uk woodside. las took. It was just very different. To what i was used throughout the states. So just yet adopted. Two people needed it. you know. i didn't want to go in there and say right. This is how has to be. Because that's not who i am. You know. i'm a big believer in letting people have voice and letting them think for themselves explore the world. Because that's how i known for me how to go about life. So who am i to say. This is how they have to do it so for me. It was just a case of listening in china. Understand what was that they were looking for. Not just ferments. Yes but from the next two three years going off to college in the university. What was that journey to them. And how could support even just three or four weeks just to be won't just one person in Even saying that right the one post walking wheel of probably a thousand dollars they deal with the over that that say fifteen set nineteen years old ages so just having a positive impact on the understanding that to change the life of save on that to just give them some guidance and some support. Just offer something that is looking for and it's a it's different for every teenager. Some of them came from okla- weeks some canes put something on the ev. Some of them came to meet new people. Some of them came because the parents wanted them to go so every Reason for being the and they also have a different need when there was also just adopted. Two different people on the program was was a big thing for me. That's that's interesting in and so much of the people that i told to within coaching roles within youth roles it's about not knowledge of the person knowledge of the player and then adopting our gambit techniques options as a result of the program. Cool team talk. What was the gap. You noticed for the reason why he put that program together. Teams was just commented that the initial idea where it came from. But so you know working on. Ncis snowden coaching at the time as well having conversations with fifteen sixteen seventeen year old. They were the they were given was the school to constantly being told what to do. Think in you know when they go home trying to talk to parents but parents troops relate to what is it that going through so the idea was to bring teenagers together. Talk about common issues. That was the the Giving them a safe space can come together and just have a conversation about whatever is it. They want to talk about where nobody's gonna soldier. Nobody's gonna tell him by that's wrong. It's just a space for them to vent to disappoint. You'll have to understand that. Hey world different. But we're all going through similar things and it was just a way to make them feel comfortable talking about things that aren't necessarily comfortable to talk about with parents or with guidance counselors School relating to in a way that says okay. Yeah i'm struggling. Are i've been through to understand what you're saying because you know teenagers understand. What is it. Teenagers garden through. We understand what it is. The adults go through. But since we don't necessarily we can understand that we can listen but it's hard to relate to a sixteen year. Old is a zero three year old so it was just the space for them to talk to each other. Have someone who have experienced. Could facilitate the compensation guy conversational pro with a particular question at times get. Somebody's open up. Yeah it's being able to have that distance from their other parts of their lives. Where they they might feel an teams often feel like they have to perform in those environments that they're expected to behave in a certain way to then have the opportunity speaks candidly know that they're not going to be shut down. And the people around the moore experiencing those same things at sounds so valuable in terms of developing social awareness of others but also just just knowing that others are going through the same problems Certainly for myself as a teenager. I felt very insular with some of the things that i was going through and never really felt like i had an opportunity to speech. I probably did have those opportunities but definitely didn't see it that way so to how someone like yourself facilitating that for for these teenagers. Just sounds like such a a positive spice for them amongst all of this youth walk you do work with adults as a coach in a mental a similarities to those roles or is it vastly different. I think the there are similarities in the sense that everybody wants to talk about something. Everybody's delivered something whether it's a minor thing or a major thing. Everybody wants to talk. But i think the biggest thing for me. I've learned over the last probably couple years back home. Especially in as i've grown up as a person is the skill of just listened. Someone you know. I think a lot of people now want to give their opinion and they want to be right all the time which is fine but you have to ask coma point where you stop talking to new listen. You don't need to give your opinion. You don't need to give your experience or your feedback. Oh this is how you should have done it on this. I would have dealt with it because you might be going through. I've never been to an only want to do is talk about it and just got a little bit so that was one similarity found not only from young people but from adults as well they just want the space where they can go and talk about something and it might make them feel a cool. That's a than they did before league. They started the conversation but thought little bit helps than that's that's a positive in my eyes i guess one of the one of the big differences was the kind of. I don't want to say sometimes book. Young people are so focused on social media that they think is a seven way to live based on what they say online whereas adults because they've had the experience of you know there are a little bit older for example. Someone like myself in thirty three. So i didn't grow up with a phone in my hand. I didn't grow up with all these different social media sites where i could go on and see how this person was living How successful my idolised etc. So you know when you talk to young people and they wanna they wanna talk about how they feel the pressure based on what is it. They say they today. They consume so much that they congress Because the brain's not fully formed yet so that struggling to understand why this person post a why they lissa way whereas when you talk to obviously because they're older they have that understanding so for them. It's more it's more personal. They want to take step forward. They want to understand why the struggling with a particular thing or they want to understand. What is the you know not not necessarily missing. But what is that. They're looking to achieve. You know so taking a step forward into space where they feel more fulfilled. I think would be the best way to describe it whereas teenagers don't start wants fuel fulfilled. They won't feel and so it's yeah i got it every person's different you know i could have to adults that. Say the same thing feel about it. The two teenagers went through very similar thing but in very different ways that which for them so you know as a coach as a mentor. I'm not the kind of person that will say. Oh this is how you have to deal with it. I'm more What works best for you. As a person are you dealing is if you tried that What else can you try. you know. So it's it's not a case of me giving my opinion in telling people how to live their lives. You know. i'm not about not on fulham that to do is to listen. Awesome questions that they may not necessarily be the full about our ask themselves then just facilitate conversation. Give them as much support as they need. An may be two or three sessions. it may be ten. It just depends on the person what garner through. How much support looking for so really accident description in clearly i hastened maybe not call an active listening But but that is one of the descriptions of of that kind of behavior. How do you develop those skills. I mean it's clear ever since nine years cleared you you know you have some of those natural affinities for this type of roller at what's hard on it as well. So tell us a little bit about that journey and how you develop those skills that you see is so important mentioned actually. 'cause i'm quiet introverted person. I'm not a big talker. I never have been You know even now. When i was young. I would always sit and observe. Watch to see what was going on. You know try and make my own mind by certain situation. But i never realized how bad it was listed until a couple of years ago you know. I think everybody thinks that we're really good listener and then over sudden something you just think. I'm not even listening. I'm just you know i'm here. What's being said. I'm not physically taken ended up absorbing what's being said or i'm thinking about my response as the tolkien rather than hey ramona saying just leading. They not was one thing. I learned when i started into personal coaching Whatever you wanna call it learning how to listen to what somebody was saying without actually thinking while i'm going to say next and just letting big so if a client is sitting opposite million that token about a particular subject or scenario rather than me trying to put myself in their shoes insult scenario being distracted by something within the rave just really focusing on what they're saying also trying to listen for things that are not actually saying at first. I was really hard to do because as a human when. Somebody's folks the first thing you wanna do respond and that was my initial instinct was to just respond or reply or give advice or yeah. No you're saying because i've been put myself in that position whereas you know loon. It's not really about you when you coach once one. It's it's about the clients about the person who you'll sit in opposite on next to so it it really was it. It's really tough to just sit and listen whilst somebody continues to hold the space when there is a pause and there's a silence you know just letting silence linga way in is it might to respond over. They just thinking Given enough space to think and then you know one thing. I remember a guy. I did a coach in program with recently online. I asked him the question. I said how long the acids link fall and he said let it linger for as long as it needs to lingga because the person who is you know they might just be taken a pause and restructuring centers. They might be just taking time to maybe eliminate something they don't really won't say that's kind of what you're waiting for. And he said if they are finished woken and they're waiting for you to respond. I'll tell you you don't have to interject any point inside done joins you know they'll say you know if the if stalking communist talkin now linguists let it linga and then when they're ready to get responsible you already to give question than you can go ahead and give it it it. It was interesting you go from thinking you are really really good. Listen some thinking actually have enlisted. I've just been hearing things a coast A paradox nara of once you become aware of that the more conscious you are of it the less likely you are to be picking up and noticing those those things that actually want to be responding to so surreal dilemma for people that lack in these in these spaces. Once when they're trying to develop up. I was gonna say while with with young people especially teenagers but all of them when you're dealing with something that's a little bit harder of a social or emotional nature behavior nature and you austin the question you're trying to point them towards pops a more Adaptive behavior more pro social behavior. The often have a bash first to save. They can kinda get why with ever is that said and so often all a coaches will just like if you if you notice that they're trying to get away with it. You can see on that face you can tell by the way i've said it fuel just quiet as you described. Don't know that that's not flying. That they're not getting away with it and they'll have another go on the second attempt will be so much closer and so much more honest than that first attempt that they've had the yeah and it's mentioned up because of the coaching training Was if you if you ask somebody a question whether it's a simple question. Difficult question. generally the first uncivilized solve the service level. Answer it's not deeper on. It's just simple onset. How can i ask this question and get it out in the next one but if you ask the question you gotta response international same question. You'll get a different answer if you got a deeper on. So that was one thing that i never thought about coaching. You know when when you when you learned you know when you go through. Coaching badges ask questions. Get into a little bit. Okay yeah a question but Me personally. I was never taught to ask the question three times. You know so. That was something really interested in found in this coaching development is just how are you. I'm okay. how are you yeah. I'm struggling y- you get different. People just want. It's almost like a baseball. They throw the ball. You bought it away not sit you also the next you know if you stay the pinch and you get three pitches. You're gonna either hit miss. It hit you know what i mean so that was really interesting to me. I think those are the two biggest things. I've learned about myself over the years. One needs to be a better listener and two is not just accept in a first answer for what it is trying to go a little bit deeper mall that i'm trying to blow show if i'm working on that give me some fine. It's okay no big deal but really how is it you know. Just just getting that's to open up. It's tough and it is a skill but it can be one of those moments than why you'll walk in with people and you notice in yourself that you're not really properly paying attention How do you navigate that. How do you re switch the button. Go back to a place where you all able to really pay attention to what's happening in front of a big self critic are used to be and after i would do a coaching session. As the kids are walking off the pitch are used to stunned their deductible or just go our thought it would go. We'll could have. That's terrible you own great myself but i would. I would think to myself that went okay. But it could have gone better. you know. That was yeah that was a concession really enjoyed but it could have gone back. I've always wanted not to be. Because i don't like that word but i've always wanted everything better than it has been so for example if i think okay. I'm a decent listener. That means i'm probably three ten. Maybe four ten. And if i am selling the product where i'm telling people i can help them grow and develop a cot three or four out of ten. I have to be ten out of ten singles on. I'm not going to be at every single time. But if i put myself in a position where. I can give the best of myself for the person i'm working with given value for money but i'm also helping them as an individual. I'm not so sure. I don't think that's right. And you know. They used to be destructions. Distractions my phone was a huge one. Even just having my phone in my pocket would distract my mind. Be you know. Never take my phone into a session with a client or into a hall. Lorenza teens will resemble but i used to have my phone nearby. Even when i was coaching football knows in my bag on the savage probably say looking back now will be given myself eighteen percent to the players and twenty percents thinkin texts of about notification of email. And my mission. Nicole where is if i go to a session with a client. I'll leave my phone in the cough. I don't need a session. What we need it for you know. What am i missing in an hour. The conway done with discussion. Who's paying for my time. Pain from my expertise in my knowledge in my listening and whatever else paying for that don't pay for me to to give them senate they one hundred percent mind tensions. I'm gonna give it to them. The phone was a simple one. Because it's always that the things i used to be like i said before i was. I was pre a decent student at again. Probably five ten. Let's say and even now know a big window out of a window look like if a window in the room. I will look every now and again. No because i'm bored. Not because i don't care about the person i'm in the room with or anything like that. My personality type uninventive. I want to go places. I want to see things. I want to meet people. So that's kind of my way of okay. I'm just watching tv. But if i look out the window. I'm looking to be somewhere else. You know so now. I have this thing where if i work with someone and i can sit in a place where the windows behind me than my focus is on them. If i'm looking at them the windows behind them all the windows to my left every once in a while much some of the old guards and again it's only a small thing but it's taken mine. Focus away from what is the. I should actually be doing so choose. Low things tiny little things that you can think about before you get into a place where you actually need to think about them. Make a big difference fascinating in clearly. You spent so much time getting to know yourself having that self awareness and lose interesting speaking to as michalak sometime ago on this poll kosta speaking for my research and how often they say that self awareness is so k. To them being able to really support the people that were working with great to hear you tolkien times. I'm really interested in doing so many different things. They're all in the same space. you're doing many different projects. I'm really interested in how you navigate between them not not literally but mentally. How how we talk about putting on different hats and they'll be similarities in these roles of course but that will be differences that you have to set up in a slightly different way. What does that look like. For years to be honest. I i train so i've always tried to keep looking homes two separate things. I always have an. It's been hard this year because obviously locked down the way things are welcome home in one place. I was always of the opinion. That work is out. There and home is here. This about relaxes where i spend some family. My wife just completely switch off now. Almost reasoning by thinkin. Because it's not possible at the moment. And i've always tried to like keep home with students things now that they are almost one and the same. I'm a different person. When i go to work because i say besson so now i've kind of just thinking of stop trying to be two different people and be worked. Joe joe joe you go to work. You spent time except uso. It was it was almost a linden experience not not almost bringing those people together and realizing that even if a coach of the best or if welcome in the model of group of adults or a group of young people learn coaching football team. I'm still saying doing so. That was kind of that. I guess realization that. I don't need to be different people to serve. I can be the same person. I can adopt signing on not so people very differently than i would talk to treat sample if i was doing a coaching session yourself. You know moscow cup would be different. My mannerisms were be different but still the same person. Values is still aside. I am doesn't change based on homework. And so i guess to go back to the question it was again like you said lennon about south. I used to think. I had to be different. People depend on who i was working with. I don't have to be defeated. The offense excel to everybody because that's how they can connect with me and if people don't that's fine you know i don't. I'm not going to connect with them. Elect me in the way i do things. That's one thing. I have learned over the years. I always used to be a people pleaser Likely because i thought you know as you go up and you start to mature you realize that you're not from everybody and i'm okay with to be but now and if somebody wants to work with me great i will give them hundred myself. If they don't wanna to me that's fine. I have no issues. I'm not gonna go jason people and tell them that they need coach him because ost actually posted. Social media can really struggling. I have to help you. You have to help you about the you know shawn watson and the needs always animal is available to listen and i'm not going to change who i am based on the vessel working with. I'm going to be my all sides of an that's not for everybody and i'm okay with them. Yeah yeah so often. The strengths of that relationship will be far greater. If someone comes to you seeking not support in genuine way and you'll you'll automatically onto a bit more of a winner Because they're coming off it from from a point of view they genuinely the are after that support still the still be people that say they are and then nods but it reminds me of some experiences of being educator know within those spaces as almost a performance going on between between birth myself and what i think coach educated needs to look like and then the the people on on the coils and they think i need to sake and it's really about breaking down those barriers than i fully. Believe in an agree with you that the moral fenwick i can be the more humble i can be in those moments the more likely i am to break down those barriers and have a much better relationship with those people and ultimately be more successful a just just on that point you know when you work with young people. If you're not your offense out they will see right through you if you pretend to be something. You're not will you tell them something. That isn't true. Don't pick up on it so quick. They will call you out and they will up. Say they want to share. Because they don't believe you'll be intrudes to them. So why should they give you what it is that you'll pretending to be you know you people about Adopt crazy the bullish At the end of the day young people are smart. They're not stupid. They pick up on things you know and if you go in there and pretends to be something you're not they will call you out just a switch off from you because that just not getting. Amelia rarely rarely could point. Do have one last question for you if you to choose one pass to have an audience with day a quick question. Let's talk because there are so many people. I local to I think just think of the journey The moment in the space not amid a stink ought to names in my head. And i'm hesitating. Which ones pick so. I'm gonna give you both pick one in a minute. What i've giving you my okay so the first one you know anyone who knows me. I'm a big football. I love football on monday. Night at find alex works and to me was just. It was almost like a god as growing up because she cuts favorite football team because he trophies or that sort of stuff. I think it's now that i'm older. I appreciate the leader that he was appreciate what he did. But the place that he had under his management you know having read a couple of his books and just watch videos. Listen to talk on abuse and stuff he. He's just a normal guy from a place. In scotland bringing them made the most of the situation. And so yeah i think talking to him about leadership in dealing with people would be a great conversation and the name of my mind is done bobbins. Tony robbins some people know some people don't some people in some people down You know he. He was kind of the first person. I saw in the coaching. Space away from a pitch. That i thought you know what i love what. He doesn't want to do that as well. He had a documentary on netflix called. I think it's called on berra that i saw probably three years ago. Now i just watch out. It was amazing hobby transformed people and he just helps people and the end of really really connected without. Because i feel like. That's the kind of person i i like to help. People i like to support people between those two toss tough. It's really tough time. I think you're gonna make me just take alot just like everyone else at known sticks to one. Sorry i suppose i have to let you just. I'm just imagining that roundtable. Weather's yourself in those two trying to get a and ways. I probably wouldn't get what in probably would bother me. Just listen to those conversation. I'd be quite happy to sit for five hours. Heats drink some more listen to those talking and take notes just big almost a dream if if it ever happen. I expected invite Joe thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it on site if anyone wants to reach out please. I'll make sure that you have access to contact for jug and that once again thank you so much pleasure might appreciate your meal. That's it for episode eight joke. Wrigley details are in the description. She wants to reach out to him and his work on social media channels mission. You're listening to is by bb phoenix once again. Thank you for taking the time to listen. And i look forward to having you back here next week.

Ncis football joe quick nine month david cummins three week four week eleven year five year fifteen sixteen year two three years thousand dollars four weeks uk Ncis snowden fifteen sixteen seventeen year nine years six months sixteen year zero three year
Don't Be Afraid To Be Multidimensional

The GaryVee Audio Experience

13:49 min | 2 years ago

Don't Be Afraid To Be Multidimensional

"In this is Gary v audio experience protocol. So are my name is max Maxwell from North Carolina's well, so I took max Maxwell. My name is max Maxwell. I'd have at least four million more dollars. So I took your vice ten months ago started documenting what I do. I'm real. I'm a real estate investor kind of exploded. Now it's like I'm at the point where you know, real estate stuck for me, you know, entrepreneur by heart, but you know, you throw shit at the wall and that's what happened worked. But I feel like I'm being boxed in as the guy that talks about real estate. Maxwell, would you answer this one until you start talking about bureaus or watches, or fuck, and kicks or wine or fuck in the Redskins. So how do I make that? So I wanna talk content just start doing. This is worthless. This is where I always talk about, like watch. Hi, I'm always watch what I. Yeah, like everyone's can't do that. I'm like, why. Like in a fucking real estate episode, whatever you wanna talk about next, throw it in and watch what happens. People are people like in real life. We like each other for the layers. Like, yeah, we might be homeys because we both liked that video game. But then later we find out we both love root beer floats and riding bikes like like, I don't understand how people don't understand this, like people are so ingrained, you know what? It is, man. This is all about ideology. Everybody's in their own. Fucking right. We're all stuck in our ideology on the real estate dude. I can't like I dunno, like make your next dude. I'm out there fucking buying shit, garage sales and flipping it. Do you know insane that people kinda weird emails? I get from my friends like yo, are you okay? Like, you know, you're like ruining like like, so I literally just ran from your. I was literally just at the Google building with Eric Schmidt and the president of Cuba. Right. That's where I was just was before. Right. So like one of the homeys that's in that meetings like literally this week, dude on Monday, you're going to be a Google headquarters with Eric Schmidt and the president of Cuba and today you're out garage saling that's in the morning, buying people's old trash. What are you doing? And I text them back. It was like, yeah, last night. It was with Sam darnold at like at a super hot spot in New York City and more people came up to take selfies with me than him on like this is my life. I guess what Mike the content of Mike, my old trainer, any of you know, like he texted me while it and he's like, yo, my mom just called me. She just had a call me and say her favorite content of yours is when your garage saling. It's definitely the most creative. I still Shah like I don't do that shit normally. Like, I'm like, trying to be out there like fucking real creator. Oh, my fucking missed it. It didn't work out. Leaving New York. Like you can do it, fuck you want. And for the thirteen percent that ditch you because I'm here for real estate max Maxwell don't be talking to me about sneakers. You're gonna pick up twenty nine percent that are in a net score. You're gonna win. Because the biggest advantage we have is on real estate. Dude, I love can snow, Globes. I like love the raiders. I e pizza like my brother's my best like the advantages. We have our the layers and everybody's trying to sell the Nella when everybody wants to buy chocolate. I'm selling chocolate not just like, I'm one thing we're missing the layers. Everybody's trying to Nella themselves into like on the crypto currency gal, and you're awesome sister, and you're great at skiing, and you have thoughts about Tiger Woods coming back and you love like your foremost expert on fucking peanut butter and jelly. You see what I mean? Go ahead. I think that a lot of people are watching you 'cause they dig max Maxwell. So you need to tell the people your story. Why are you moving to the next thing and why should they come? And why is it going to be interesting? I think if you build this report with your audience over the next couple of days weeks and then transition them to something else, they're gonna come because they love you not just real estate, and there's maybe people that are watching for real estate, but then they, they learn what a baller you on your doing x. y. z. over here, they wanna learn more about it and they get motivated, and then that audience comes and you become friends with them and then you move on the next thing from jewelry, boutique, snapshots, YouTube to ease sports. Those things aren't contents dad's. Yeah. Logger. Now. Selling on the shots things, but there is no dad, Gary, because that's the thing we decided to go the other way. So it's not everything. It's gotta be you right? Like like I went completely private on the family part like everyone's doing their own thing, but that's your strengthen your neatness. And to shonda point, he's probably right about like build it up and convert. I'm just like, fuck them. Just make a barber video out of nowhere near like what the fuck my channels that max Maxwell about the fuck like it all can work like through. It just can all work. I think people are over thinking it and they self identify, but I think we're going to vanilla and I'm trying to push creators of bloggers and individuals and businesses to like show all the layers because there's a lot of people that literally bought my stickers. 'cause I'm a jets fan literally. That is a single reason not content for them, not soci- entrepreneurship, but like we're a small little community and we're mad at everybody and like he's a jets fan. So fuck it. I mean, new pair sneaker you gotta give people more reasons not less like, and you weren't even that guy ten months ago. So again, we're overthinking, like, you know, by the way, let me give you some real good news. Nobody gives a fuck. You know why? Everything works for me gives a fuck. Like, you know what? We get way too serious on our selves. If I tomorrow starting the Plato dude, like at the end of the day, everyone who sat here like, fuck, I really loved when he did business fucking content like not about this Plato life. Like I promise you this. When I go fully into Plato and twenty four, seven, there's no business for you and you're like, fuck that sucked because we loved it like you'll all leave and do your thing. I promise you a month later. You'll forget you may because it was good for you. Go back and watch your favorite episode or piece of content, but like it's going to be okay, like and I really started realizing that when I Kana people were dying in the last five years I watch and I'm like, fuck. And I say this often prince only gets a day and a half. Then like nobody gives a fuck max Maxwell. You know what I mean? Like if prince only gets a day and a half before everybody moves on and nobody gives a fuck will, then we'd better get real serious about what the fuck are we really and realize I navigate everyday knowing nobody gives a fuck. And so it makes me very easy to do my thing and let the chips fall. And I think that kind of level of humility to go along with the confidence to do whatever to fuck. You want back contradiction. That's all the fucking magic is like who like like, you can't make that transition because what somebody's going to leave a comment be like, yo I fucking came here. I subscribe for real estate stuff like they do that to me all the time. And I'm like, there's nine trillion more of that coming. And there's nine million back and like people feed you today. It's about fucking buying Barbies flip in it. You got it. I just had a a young guy in my office. Lot of times people randomly Email me and say, I love your passion. I wanna know what I'm gonna do in my life. Can I see you? And I have no time. Those are usually the ones I take. I always feel like that's going to be the person I might need in the future too. So I'm not just Mother Theresa, but real great guy, Greg Mueller, young kid, and he was talking about what he's doing and wine in green movement tack, and he's going out to San Fran, but something struck me during our conversation. He said, you know this, this thing that I've got, it's my identity. I don't want. I was like, you know, you need to blog and you need to tell people who you are. And he said, it's my identity, and other people have been saying that too, and just real big follow up to distractions yesterday, you know, you're not. But explode. Nobody can define who you are guys. I mean, the, you know the game has changed. You know, we talk about all these products. Don't be scared to be multi-dimensional. You're not unfocused, nobody in this world should define who you are. You could be so many things. I don't wanna be just the wine guy. I know a crapload about wine, but I don't want to just the wind guy. I remember when I did Joe Torre rant video. How many people left the comments then Gary stick to wine, what people they stick the wine stick to what you know, stick the science, six stick cooking why we always want other people to stick to. I don't wanna stick to crap. You don't wanna stick to. I want to stick to what makes me happy what I want to execute again, that's what I wanna do. I want to execute against my DNA always talk about that. I am not going to allow anybody in this world, not the media, not my friends, not my detractors. Nobody define who I am. I'm gonna find who I am for myself and of course care about everybody else. Anybody who knows me knows that you know, whenever. Gets zinged. I always Email that person. I care about what everybody thinks, but ultimately not as much as I care about executing against my wants and my needs professionally. So please, if you do anything of the videos I've ever put out, never ever allow somebody define who you are never be half pregnant, half pregnant is dangerous. Go in all the way, half pregnant kind of in kind of out. Go all the way everything you want. Don't worry if you're known as the mechanic and you wanna listen to opera good for you. My man good for you and don't worry if you're a green kind of chill kit and you've got a little entrepreneurial spirit, go kill it. You don't have to ever again, especially with all the tools that allow us to send our message out there ever again, be pigeonholed execute against you. And it was funny to reaction after listen to your story. I've been talking a lot in my content right now to twenty to twenty five year olds around tasting. Everybody's because problems. I don't know what my passion is. What I'm good at. I'm like so taste like if you don't know what your favorite food is. Take shit, eat salmon, eat broccoli, CR chin, eat burgers drink. Like we don't have that system in place. And I think for you know, for the rest of us here that are a little further long after twenty two, the thing you realize is twenty to thirty s exactly when you do high risk because as we start building families and other things in life happen, those are we have to react to that that puts us on defense and you know. So I've been really thinking a lot about, you know, it's funny. I'm kid who started working literally the day. I left college like when I drove from Boston to New York. That night, I got to store around three or four PM because I left morning. My actually worked for three hours at why because I always worked when I was home. So it wasn't like wasn't symbolic. Normal. Like I got there for and like you don't go home at four just got liquor store for the traffic. So just I don't know. Just literally literally park car gave a huge hug to one of my best college friends who is taking a bus to the city, and he was on his way of life. And I literally just like helped customers for an extra hours until dad was ready to go home and we just went home and from that day to now I've always worked. So I didn't do morally ninety nine out of a hundred times. Everything you here for me is vice that I've done on myself. So that's why I'm so confident. Ironically, one of my favorite pieces advice right now, something I did polar opposite of which was because I found the meal that I became addicted to very early. But I've come to realize that wasn't the case for an isn't the case for most. And I just think it's practical to hustle at this age. Try different things. Some of stumbled upon it in an alteration of our own business. Sometimes we just bounce away from it. Everybody's got their own stories of it. The young like this, like, you know. His business very condition to the market behaviors. So sure, he recognizes this a good era, but it could get bad. And so what am I gonna do when it gets bad? When you know there's a, you know, but it's great that you're tasting and should think everything's going to be a million dollars. What you wanna do though is not get caught in a couple as number one. I think a lot of people get caught on good. So where you could get caught as you could actually make a hundred thousand and that first year actually this is on its way to a million, but the upside was only two hundred thousand always. That's very sneaky. One very hard to dissect. You know, good for the, you know. All three of of great, you know, like picking good over. Great. But you should feel comfortable in your tasting podcast. It's me. Pretty news for everybody who owns a Roku. Amman it now. And so if you have a Roku, you should be able to find it. So if you wanna check out the article on how to sign up on Roku, Gary v e. dot com. Slash Gary E Roku are. Okay, you and I'm excited about it. I think the distribution of my content on OT's as important and and I'd love to get some feedback. I wanna see how the experiences anybody can hit me up on Twitter where I'm engaging tremendously. Let me know how the Roku experience is with my content who enjoyed today's podcast.

max Maxwell Gary E New York City Roku jets North Carolina Redskins Cuba Google Eric Schmidt Tiger Woods raiders Twitter president Joe Torre Sam darnold Mother Theresa shonda point YouTube
Circles or Squares:The Company you Keep

THE SHEER RESILIENCE PODCAST

27:47 min | 3 months ago

Circles or Squares:The Company you Keep

"There may or may not be a baby on the way by somebody who was outside of the house and you're constantly being being privy to these conversations you arthur shoulder. Your friends are crying on and talking crazy about their men that also my friends has the. Propensity to have you sign in your relationship so you also have to watch that to. Your Tony and to the sheer resilience podcasts. The brown girls guy to facing lives hurdles without giving up tuna weekly as we share candid conversations and an occasional. Kiki. To help you bounce back and be the best version of yourself. I am your host Brandy Lucas less cut up. And we back and we back we back what is up cheer squad. Welcome to episode eight of the Sheer Resilience podcast. I am so happy to have y'all here. Can you hear rb really legit pumped about the time that I get to spin in your car and your air pause however, you are ingest in this good Ole teatime time that we have together I am. Happy about it so happy to have you here welcome back. So I'm going to hop right into the dope that I am digging this week because it is pretty dope. You know all of them are pretty dope, but this is this week dope nece and I am digging on the black love documentary. So this is a show on the own network. So are good sister Oprah. Is helping us to see black love in all gloriously splendid, just richness and diversity, and I am such a huge fan of this show y'all. So this is the show's fourth season and it is the brainchild of a husband and wife team I gotta look up their names I'll put it in the show notes, but it's a black couple and they have you know recorded conversations on different topics with different couples. This season has by far been my favorite season last week my daughter are washed the episode. Where a couple share their journey of experiencing loss of a child, and of course, it was emotional. It was heart wrenching for them to share. You know this tragic thing that they endured but they be the way that they loved on each other supported each other You know how you can see a couple in the kind of finish each other's sentences, and you just know that it's a whole Yang type of thing these who took it to such a deeper level that was like in awe lie. This is beautiful. This is so important and impactful for people to see because I think that people have the wrong idea or a limited view of what black love strong black just those type of relationships are. So the opportunity to hear how Black. Couples. Endure things go through they model resilience. Had to throw that in there is just incredible I. Love Black Love. If you have not seen it, you need to if you are a person who's in a couple watching with your spouse, it is incredible and it is a great ways to start dialogue some of the topics that they touched on. They talked about how they allow love started. Of course, newlyweds they touched on mental health in relationships finding a rhythm the episode that I told you all about that just knocked me off. was called stand by me and they have an episode coming up call making it last, which already assume is going to be incredible in hearing how black. Couples make their relationships in door. You know there is a lot of you know. Public display of black relationships, not making it. So I am all the way here for the narrative being shifted in the way that black love is doing it. So of course, you guys can find the information if you are not already privy to where you can check out black love on the sheer resilience website et sheer resilience, dot com all of the dope thinks that I am digging are featured there with links and more information. So y'all make sure that you are stopping by the podcasts little part of the Internet for a little more of a deep dive into the topics and information that we share here. So we're going to get into today's episode Y'all ready. Let's go. So, today we are chatting it up about circles and squares I want to. Generate some dialogue about the topic of our circles. The people we rock with the people we row with the people that we have around us. So I pulled up this quote because of course, on this topic, there is no shortage of. Cute little antidotes in post for social media. But this one resonated with me and it says surround yourself with those who only lift you higher that came from our good girlfriend Oprah Winfrey and you know she is in a circle of winter. So I take her word is bond are circles can give life. Or they can take them is so important that we pay attention to the impact that the people who are in close proximity to us have on our lives they can have a major impact on our parenting, our finances in our relationship. So let's dive into those three topics and talk about how our circles play a par. So when we talk about parenting y'All I. Am in the season of getting all the way checked by my children you know they are young adults. Now they are eighteen and twenty one. So we are able to have open conversations about the things that my husband in idea in our journey of parenting and how it affected them. Now they are young adults they have their own voices they have their own opinions about how they look forward to appearance in their own kids. Thank you Jesus that they had yet. Thank you Lord but. They are vocal they are vocal and I welcome their feedback I. Welcome hearing how? You know things have affected them and what things look like through their lands of life and one of the big topics that both of my children have Take to task about is discipline. Discipline. Oh my goodness. If I had the opportunity to go back. There is one that is one of the areas that I would definitely try to clean up some mistakes and This is why so I have a very high spirited realm. talkative, very very all over the place son, and then on the other hand God bless me with a mild manner. Chiel just you know to herself daughter. My parenting skills with both of them had to be different. Of course, because they were different people I have to be honest and say that as a parent to my son who was my first child I became a mother with him at eighteen had gone away to college, and here he comes very early into my college career. So it was a bit of a detour. It was you know a a surprise type of thing I had to come home and tell my family about so that really shaped the way that are parented. Being a young mother and not wanting people to think that because I was young mother that I was not capable of doing a good job and then my kid would not be disciplined he would not be clean and he would not eat well, and all of those things I was very much affected and impacted by the people around me because I was the first mother out of all my group of friends so. I also feel. The Need to be the model parent in that because. It was a surprise to them to our mom you know becoming a mom so I feel like none of them are Mama's gotta be the one to that I have this mothering thing down pack because I'm young we all young and here I am with the baby. So I at least have to do it with some type of grace have together once. I started. To do hair and get into salon and even my family, and just I have usually been the youngest person in some of my circles. So idea feel a responsibility to parent in a way that show these people who are older than meet at on what I was doing and my kids were going to be okay. That really impacted in a great way in some aspects. But like I was saying in the beginning here in for my kids, some of the things that I was doing was not the best things I was like. hyperfocused one discipline hyper. If you ask my son, he probably felt like I beat him in whoop them and just you know for everything I don't think that I be but. To. Perceptions two different lances that we're looking through it ask time has passed. I've gotten the opportunity to ask myself why was is so laser focus on disciplining and where I feel regret is my motive. My motive was to come off a certain way to people who one PM bills when raising my kids So in that aspect, my circle made a huge difference in the way that our parents. Parenting we also can fall in the trap of keeping up with the Joneses depending on who your circle is depending on who your friends were. If you have friends who by his everything and accuser and Jordan's and they live in a certain neighborhood and their kids go to private schools and this, and that in your story is not exactly written that way. You might feel a little bit of pressure or influence to play up what you doing or sometime probably ban out of your means based on your circle and then activities that kids do you are around a lot of sports parents or you know they keep doing ballet and they're doing cheer a lot of times you don't want to be looked at as the parent who just let your kids play xbox and swipe left on the IPAD all day so. The. Pinot. How you looking at it it could be a good thing. A bad thing. It was a bad thing. Some of the choices that I made because my motive was not from pure place. It wasn't like I want to discipline my children in a way that makes them well rounded great individuals. It was like Nah I want these older people around me thinking that you know 'cause I'm a young mom on my going to. Be Wow. So in hindsight, if I could do it over I would there's nothing I can do about it now but I am going to be a incredible grandmother and I hope that you guys pay attention to some of the choices that you may be making 'em parenting based on your circle. Like I said, they can make good choices or bad choices we all. Know that the circle that we around has an opportunity to really like build us or breakers when it comes to finances I choose to look at this from a positive standpoint I love that all of my girlfriends are go getters. The people who are close in my circle are hustlers. So when you are around women who are like close in age your. Key as a close in age, you guys have not walk the same life, but you know you kinda come from the same place been around the same things have been presented with similar opportunities to see them winning and to see them like doing incredible things is an inspiration I have always been inspired by my best friend I talked about her on a previous episode. She was the first of our group to go to college. We all went to college leaving high school. She was the one that finished. Out say that she has since gotten her masters degree in I have always been like so inspired by her approach to her education and just seeing her actually pull through an finish, both her bachelor's in her masters And it has all ways. It didn't motivate me to want to go back to school or nothing like that because I have always been comfortable in the lane that guy put me in regards to beauty. Once I left college the only reason that I thought about going back to be more folk focused in on serving or business. It was still this entrepreneurial line. I'm here but she has been an inspiration to you. Know always keep pushing I saw that her getting her degrees presented opportunities for her different jobs i. saw that her income was different and you know she was able to afford things and do things based on her making the decision to stay in school and your circle is you know people who are about that life they are people who are close in proximity to where you are financially an above it pushes you forward it. Makes you want to level up. You have people who you make go to for information and insight if you have a girlfriend or France in your circle who is into stocks and to investing is so good to have people like that in your circle where you can call and ask and you don't feel like well, my looking stupid because I'm asking her about this is this something that I should already? No, no, no, but you. Know. We think like that often having somebody in your circle who is privy to information in finances that you aren't in it's just like your girl I'm telling you. It can definitely help push you forward help you to level up I have another girlfriend who are in France with for forever she's in the beauty business also and she is solo traveler extraordinaire. This woman will pack a book bag and goal to anybody's country own win. She just moves like that and I have always been. So inspired by her ability to just you know whatever she got do put a coin to decide book the. The plane ticket, get on the plane and go and mate wherever she is like her own. She just you know she'll find her a uber driver or whatever connection she needs to make. She has not let fear cripple her. She is just out here moving and shaking and it's inspiring to me. So you know I can call and say, Hey, I, know you took. This trip to over there are there some things that you would suggest that I do? Is There Asia that I goal to how much was the trip you know it can be a little uncomfortable accent folks about monetary issues. But when these are people in your circle already, these are your girlfriends. You don't have those barriers so it is incredible to make sure that. You have a circle around you in regards to finance of women who are on your level and above don't be shying away from being in relationship women who are above. Now let's flip this finance thing on the other side when you are in close proximity to people who are not. Financially focused who are not financially responsible in who are often robbing Peter to pay Paul now no Shea. Now, we all have been there and will walk through some seasons where you know things get a little lane you know but there is a complete and utter difference than being surrounded by people who is girl going to be able to go. the go on vacation and is just like what you want to go out every night. We all knew trip. Yes I WANNA go out every single night because I'm on vacation and when I'm at home, I cook everything single naive my family it can be stressor and limiting to your relationships. Then if we about it when you are in close proximity to people whose bar is much lower than you in any area but right now we're talking about finances it will make you feel like are you out here poppet? because. If you've got, you know ten K. in the bank and they have a thousand dollars and Nathan like they just hit the lottery, it will make you and your mind think that you are own something you know. So I am always looking for opportunities to surround myself with women, men people in general that are in that inner circle of people who inspire me when fluence me, who pushed me to be a better version of brandy in especially in the area finance. Now. We had talked about relationship shop depending on. The good or the bad a good relationship in being in close proximity to people for us. I'll say women who are in positive life-giving relationships can be so inspiring. You will have a girlfriend who maybe she's a newlywed and she just so in love in you know Oh, this is my boo I gotta go home girl like. is about her and him if you are in a more seasoned mature relationship that can kinda light a spark for you seeing that new love it can help you to remember how things were popping way back win. It can reignite that flame now own the other hand if you around a whole lot of women who are in negative relationships and do don't become a home and. there may or may not be a baby on the way by somebody who was outside of the house and you're constantly being being privy to these conversations and you are the shoulder that your friends are crying on and talking crazy about their men that also my friends has the propensity to have you sat in your relationships so you also have to watch that to. Either you're going to be given life or you're going to get little sprinkles of death in your relationship based on who you around. So if people are happy in their relationship It's easier to kick it with now. He's. So if you got a group of girlfriends and you know three or four everybody is coupled up y'all can go out and kick it but you got that one couple like worst movie Tyler Perry Movie Get Marry Angela and her husband always cutting up and you know snapping on each other at the airport is just like they're in the friend goop group. But everybody knows that they crock in that is liable to go down. They may embarrass us now. Yano we gotta look at this thing from both sides if you are in relationship with a circle of people who are in good relationships in you are in a not. So good relationship. It does have the ability to make you hyper focused on all the things that are wrong in your relationship. So you just have to take that as it is. That might be guys way saying says, it's better out here. You see me waving the flag on this I you need to be over here. It just depends on how we see everything. So imprinting finances and relationships as well as so many other. In, our lives, the company we keep is so important eakin either cause us to be inspired to push for greater version and just viewpoint of life or. CAN KEEP US stuck and Have US living small. Yeah I. don't even have to expound right there too long. It could just have living spall because if you around a lot of small thinking people who are just barely making it, they just getting by. You be. Okay. I ain't got to push too far. I ain't got you know go outside of my comfort zone because everyone around the is basically doing the same thing but when the sky is the limit and your whole crew. Oh my goodness. It has such an amazing impact on your life. So if you find yourself in a situation where you have A lot of squares. In your circle I would highly suggest that you do the work to connect yourself with more people who are moving in the direction that you like to see your life move in. I am not here to be telling nobody to fire Ali friends and all of that crazy stuff but you. GotTa evaluate your situation if you're seeing yourself in patterns and doing the same things if you are not motivated and not inspire and you hang tight with the same people that might be something to consider nine saying what to do just saying something to consider. But what I would say that you should do is be intentional about making partnerships relationships, hanging out with people making connections with people who do inspire you and do have the likeliness to motivate you to move in a different direction. Mentorship is also an incredible way to inspire you to open your eyes up to new and exciting things often what I found in mentorship. Is that when your partner with the right person, it gives, you the unity to. Be looked at through lands be inspired by someone who sees something in you that you might not be able to see in that season. So you circle could be just you know a bunch of France that you hang out with, but you also can be intentional of building a circle of mentors. Sometimes, you have to pay for mentorships but some people depending on your job career, you know the the opportunities you see, cow, you may be able to just lock arms with people in a way that you know you can take a little something from here and take a little something from there. Also which you watch on social media, what you subscribe to. So we had a hit these buttons in all I give our attention to these pages to these people be mindful of what your digital circle looks like. Are you all shade room and tabloids and negatively and foolishness or are you looking at finance pages and investment pages and are you looking at happy relationships and are you looking at positively and home decor and things that? Speak to what makes you feel good. You get to create the life you want to live and things as small as the people that you are around whether they are squares or circles. Whether, they are leading you to be a better you or keeping you stagnant pulling you down. You GotTa look at that and then make the necessary changes. I would love to hear from you about how this episode impacted Judah conversations that it started and what you may potentially have to do who you might have the fire as a result of it. So. Yeah Yeah. Let me know head over to the sheer resilience instagram page and leave me your comments again, if you are interested in the dog names that I am digging from today or other episodes head over to the sheer resilience pie cast dot com for all of that information as well as additional resources to each and every episode. Also, I would love for you guys to help me get this podcast in front of more incredibly dope black. Women and you can do that by rating commenting and making sure that you subscribe on a major high cast platform of your choice. Thank you so much I will see you guys back here. Next to stay in. We will be having a very dope conversation about boundaries. We all need them, but we all have them and we don't talk about it. I see your next week until then keep living, keep learning and most importantly keep loving by.

France Oprah Winfrey Brandy Lucas Tony rb arthur shoulder Jesus Ole Joneses US Lord Jordan Judah Tyler Perry partner Nathan Yano spall
Josie Duffy Rice from The Appeal

PEN America Works of Justice

21:48 min | 10 months ago

Josie Duffy Rice from The Appeal

"In jails across the country people Are released daily thousands of people early. Staley there are people who work in these institutions who go home to their families and so when we think about it spreading when it spreads inside a correctional institution and it spreads and size it inside of a jail or present that has implications for everybody outside of it as well. You're listening to works of Justice. Podcast by pen and uses playing an important role in the cove in nineteen pandemic. It's keeping US informed holding power to account in creating expansive archive of global tragedies in victories. But it can also feel overwhelming as our understanding of the virus emerges and his policy adjust in response but we know changes often dramatically our to our and sometimes minute to minute in her role as president of the criminal justice focused news organization the appeal and his. Co Host of podcast justice in America. With Clint Smith Josie Duffy Rice. Understand the impact of news better than most seeking clarity for our own small contribution to pandemic era reporting. I S shows you for some advice once journalism role in this historical moment. What criminal justice news item should we be looking for an eating it myself? How can we stay sane in the process? I'm Keith Kimbell Hen. America's prison injustice writing program intern. And you're listening to our new rapid response series temperature check cove in nineteen behind bars Josie thank you so much for talking with us today. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here. You're both a lawyer Journalists I'm curious about what led you to focus on criminal justice work. Can you tell listeners? A bit about the appeal in your path to becoming president of the publication shorter so I Became a lawyer because of criminal justice Because of criminal justice work I worked for the public defender in the Bronx right after I left college about ten years ago And that was a really life changing experience for me and led me to go to law school In Law School. I did a lot of freelance writing and discover that I liked writing more than I liked. Lawyering so I've over time since I graduated from law school. I've had jobs doing criminal justice work and basically a lot of different ways from like policy and activism to kind of changing switch aimed towards journalism and eventually Coming President of the appeal I joined the justice collaborative. Which is the umbrella organization dot? The appeal lives under about three years ago. And I've done a lot of different work for them Over the time And about ten months ago got named president of the appeal. I've been writing for the appeal since it started which was about two years ago So it's been a really incredible experience And I love working at the appeal. We have such a great team and I'm really honored to be to be part of it in this moment of pandemic upheaval. It seems many are both grateful for in overwhelmed by the news cycle. Some might be the loss of a beginner. How does the up to date? You've quite a bit of experience parsing through the news to decide which stories are important. What are some of the most pressing issues being recorded on at the intersection of cove? Nineteen in the criminal justice system. Yeah I mean I think it's an interesting question. What we know about. The Corona virus rate is that. It's like highly contagious and that When we think about the criminal justice system we don't often realize that the people in it can impact the people out of it What we know right now is that it's spreading pretty rapidly and institutions and correctional institutions cross country and jails president immigration detention centers And what that does that really mean just on a human rights level. That's very very concerning The fact that people who are basically trapped in a cell Are Getting a contagious virus and cannot socially distance cannot do anything to protect themselves but then the other part of us is that like we. You know people who are in prisons and jails eventually get out right in jails across the country. People are released daily. Thousands of people are release daily There are people who work in these institutions who go home to their families and so when we think about it spreading when it spreads inside a correctional institution and it spreads insides it inside of a jail or prison that has implications for everybody outside of it as well right if someone You know a prison guard go gets it and goes home to their family. They're spreading it to their family who may spread to other people. If someone who is actually serving time gets it and and and gets out there they also are spreading it So beyond the implications has for people inside of these institutions also has pretty significant implications for those outside. And I think that's a pretty pressing issue I would say the other issues that really Were focused on right. Now is just driving home. The inhumanity of these systems. And how a pandemic really Puts that on display when you talk about the fact that we have a virus that has killed upwards of ten thousand people in our country so far You know that where the rate is higher in New York City than it is anywhere else. In the rate and rikers island is ten times higher than it is in New York City People's in jail in prison And those in jails many of whom have not even been convicted of a crime yet. are are paying the ultimate price in a way that they kind of consistently have throughout this era of mass incarceration And it really brings to head the fact that these systems are Fundamentally inhumane that they don't have the sort of healthcare and human rights protections that they should and what that means in a time of of of mass illness like the one that we're currently living in right so it sounds like this crisis has really exposing the inhumanity that's always existed within the system. Yeah absolutely I hope he might be willing to offer listeners. A bit of the behind the curtains process. I'm curious what it's been like to pivot publication in response to Kobe. Nineteen I can imagine that with prison. Lockdowns affecting access to communication systems. It's probably been more challenging. Get in touch with sources on the inside is one example. Can you tell us what a digital newsroom looks like in the time of Corona virus shore so I should say we have just an unbelievable editor in chief. His name is Matt Furner. He's I mean I just couldn't ask for any better sort of partner in this process. He did an incredible job. Current preparing our staff To pivot to Kobe. Nineteen and has really done a great job of Centering the coverage around the issues. That really matter we also just have I mean. I can't say enough. Good things about our staff from the writers who have stepped up just unbelievably and our Our pivoted to a topic that like they didn't know that much about nobody knew that much about and are covering it with the sort of With the dexterity that that you you know sometimes just unbelievable and how great it is and then we have incredible editor as we have an incredible Copywriting staff we have incredible back. Checkers just have A staff that has really met the moment and so I've seen the first thing that any digital newsroom needs right is good people and we've been blessed beyond belief to have an incredible incredible team And then beyond that. It absolutely has kind of changed the way that we cover stories and that like systems are shut down people. Can God side and report Right Everybody's kind of priorities have shifted. Sometimes it's harder to actually reach the people that you need to reach sometimes Getting inside sources like you said is virtually impossible and I think the number of stories that are possible to come out of something like this are so numerous because this disease is spreading. The virus is spreading in prisons and jails again everywhere across the country. Right and so. We've relied a lot on On the earn credible freelancers also. Who have like you know. Fine kind of stories on their own and pitch them to us and we've are building a sort of new base of sources That's not just people who are experts on criminal justice right but on housing on healthcare on the general concern of a shared vulnerability that we're all experiencing right now We recognize that in a moment. Like this When there's a pin democ spreading across the country the two things are true and they both seem kind of. They seem opposite of each other right but they both sort of exists. One is that we're all at risk right now There's nobody who can't catch this virus or knows exactly what's going to happen to them when they catch this virus no age is immune even though obviously the younger. You are the better chance of having a mild reaction and everybody is sort of uncertain and having to follow these new social guidelines in order to keep us all see and so there is a sense of shared vulnerability and there's also the sense that at the same time this pandemic highlights the inequality that exists That already exists. Through our country class inequality race inequality You know access inequality right like people who actually can afford to go to the doctor and people who can't or people who can have the opportunity of working from home and people who don't And we find it critical to kind of tell those stories as well so this moment has required us to kind of expand beyond criminal justice and also into other sorts of societal issues that highlight the harms that exist in a time. Like this so in thinking about how inequality within the criminal justice system is now more on display is listeners are consuming. The News perhaps a good question to ask in the back of their minds would be looking. Americans learning from this moment in regards to criminal justice reform that we can carry out beyond the pandemic timeframe. So I would say that. There's so much you can learn from this moment right in terms of criminal justice. They're really so much in one of them is that you can see for yourself. Just how How callous people in leadership positions everyone from governors to prison system officials to the president are when it comes to addressing the possible infection of people serving time of incarcerated individuals? This is a real constant reality in our system. But I mean I don't know the last this on This on display. We see that they just very often. Don't really care about what happens to the people in jails and prisons and again many of these people have not even been convicted of a crime. Not that I think being convicted for crime means that the government should treat you with total disregard. But you know any of US could be arrested tomorrow and not be convicted of something and Really experienced this this total you know Callousness towards towards that the government has towards people who are incarcerated. So that I think would be the first thing I think. The second thing is when you don't have a strong safety net and this goes again beyond criminal justice but I think it's I think it's especially apparent here when you don't have a strong safety net when you're not creating environments for people where they can be at least healthy right This is going to harm those community so much more. And we see that in a place like rikers island. Where the rate of infection EST ten times outside of the site of the jail in New York City this is it really highlights or every kind of inequality in every kind of issue that we've discussed That we've highlighted over the past couple years the appeal and that I've been focused on for the past decade and then I would say the last thing is like what we're seeing in some places that people are being released Not Enough and not as quickly as we would like but in some states you know thousand fifteen hundred maybe been more Incarcerated individuals have been released because of what's going on and in prison Imprisoned jails in terms of the infection. And we're not seeing a rapid crime increase or anything right we're not seeing really crime increase at all. We're not seeing these people who we are convinced. We need to be locked up because of Public Safety. Quote Unquote actually have an impact on public? Safety tells us and at the same time I should say like. We see a lot of law enforcement unable to work because they've been infected so I think I think it's something like a third of the. Nypd has called out sick now like And those are people actually on the streets and again crime isn't going up right. What it tells us about like our criminal. Justice dismissed too big If you can let out a lot of people and they you know and that these fears that exists that these people will go out and commit all these other crimes because they're not you know in a in a whatever for by six hour you know whatever it may be you are that those are unfounded fears. We actually have two big system and we can see it pretty clearly because we're trying to kind of rapidly or some places are kind of trying to more rapidly shrinkage than they would have Otherwise and there has been no impact negative impact of that so you said Jersey. I'm curious in your opinion. What can readers or listeners of the news do if they're moved to get involved in advocacy at this time? What are some ways that people on the outside can support efforts to help stop the spread of Cobra Nineteen among incarcerated communities? So the number one thing that you can do is contact your leaders. Whether that's your mayor you know your prison system officials in the state your local. Da Your local sheriff chief of police the governor and the president right and may be your local congress. People depending on what's going on in your city town And State you. You can ask them to make sure they're testing in prisons and jails to inform the community about what that testing looks like to release numbers of Of people from prison in jail and not just one or two people and not just ten or fifteen. But you know to the extent possible to thousands of people To make sure that it you know we're not basically sentencing people to death by sentencing them to any time in prison in jail. And that's that's the real riskier right. And so you can advocate for mass release Just from home just by reaching out to your elected officials in demanding that they really addressed this problem and really people don't reach out. It's very unlikely happens. And so it requires the work of everybody. You know who is just listening? Or maybe doesn't know that much about that issue and wants to do something or cares to actually make those calls to see any level of change And then the other thing you can do is stay informed the extent possible. So make sure that you Are demanding that your local news. Cover this issue at the local prisons or jails wherever you may live. You're remembering to kind of look. Look at WHO's suffering. You know in our correctional facilities as much as we look at who suffering outside of them and finally as somebody who lives breathes the news. I have loved to learn about how you balance staying informed with self care. Can you share any advice on how to navigate the privilege in desire consume news without letting the gravity in abundance of IT OVERWHELM? Us You know. I wish I could like provide some good advice and the truth is that I really. I can't I am. I am reading to my shoes. I'm online too much. I'm letting this like I'm letting this impacts of Miami Data Day in a way that probably is too much and I have a toddler at home. I'm having another baby in September and so that like added level of responsibility is particularly Makes this a particularly stressful time? Obviously I'm not going through what you know. Many many people are going through. But I think we're all sort of experiencing this collective like massing Zaidi right. It's like I don't know how good it is for any of our long term our long-term help I will say that like there is something terrifying and almost Almost calming about the fact that there is not much more. I can do right like I can stay home. I can demand policy change but I am not writing the laws. I'm not signing the laws. I'm not I can't help what everybody else does. And recognizing sort of the limited ability to control something like a global is probably probably in a lesson. I'm that you know in many ways is actually helping me Despite the fact that it's also making me more stressed out and I watch a lot of currently I watch a lot of Disney movies. My two year old is very into the muppets. He's very into the lion king and You know that's all as as a good way to see a major moments of stress that end up. Okay so I'm trying to remember that this is not forever And that one day. I don't know that we'll ever get back to what we were before But it's an opportunity for kind of a new a change to some of the systems that exist in this country To a new consideration of of wealth inequality racial inequality costs and equality that existed in America. And a chance for us to change something In a moment that is so drastic and so scary. So that's my optimistic. Thought that like I deeply believe that There's going to be so much loss in this moment and an opportunity for a new a kind of a new beginning at the same time. Josie thanks for talking and sharing your time with us in this critical moment. Thank you so much. I'm I'm really happy that you guys are putting this together and happy for all your work to stay up to date on news about covert nineteen fact on incarcerated communities. Visit the appeal. This episode was mixed by Robert pollock support from Elizabeth Fiore researched in hosted by myself key camel produced by cades. Messner for Penn. America's prison injustice writing program. Thanks for listening to temperature check.

president America Josie Duffy Rice US New York City rikers island Kobe Clint Smith Keith Kimbell Hen Staley Disney Corona intern Bronx Nypd Matt Furner partner
Three Transformational Events in My Life

THE BRENDON SHOW

18:33 min | 1 year ago

Three Transformational Events in My Life

"It's Brennan bazaar. And welcome to another episode of the Brendan show. I was like to say there's only two things to change your life either. Something new comes into your life. New possibility new opportunity, new person new lock you win the lottery. Something comes in direction. You're like forever or something new comes from within and you make new decisions for yourself. You set new standards, a new deeper level of motivation, or drive, or hunger comes into your life. And by necessity you decide to activate your potential again. And I think that there's been three times in my life, that were completely transformed because both those things happened almost simultaneously. I bet you've had things in your life. You can think back to like, what psychologists call critical incidences like moments in your life. Where something was so significant an event happened to you that cause you to have to change that made, you want to be better, you know, maybe you didn't want it to happen to you or maybe. Did it was luck or it was bad luck. And from that moment of luck, or bad luck you decided to transform the quality of your life. And that's exactly what happened to me three times. I really think shaped me the most as a person the first time some of you all know was when I was young kid, and I had a break-up with the first woman I ever loved. We'd gone to high school together. We thought we were gonna get married the relationship fell apart, and because my whole identity was tied up in new her and the relationship, then I fell apart when the relationship broke and I became a broken young men, I fell depression, into suicidal thoughts. And so this is one of those experiences where you did not want it to happen to you. You know, if you've ever been at someone break up with you. You didn't probably want that. And it was just a really dark period of my life, and I remember in the depths of all of that, though, I as been even car accident. And I decided I really needed to transform I needed change my whole identity. I didn't need to like make I didn't just need a new morning routine. I needed to transform meat. I don't know if you've ever been there where it wasn't like. Oh, I need to change one habit. You're like no. I need to change my identity. I need to become a different person because who I was was not someone who is, you know, fully who I really want to be. And so it's a transformation of identity. And when you make that shoot shift in your life when you say I need to change who I am fundamentally. That is always a pivotal moment is always changing day. That is like a time in your life. I bet you remember some people that happens when they graduate high school or they get divorced. Or the kids leave the house or. They quit one job, or they move from one city to another one. It's like a toll transformation in their life. But what makes that work or not work is whether within they now, get clarity on the identity of who they want to be what type of person they want to become what values are important to them, how they want their emotional quality of life to feel how they want to treat other people. In other words, when you get that changing moment, you got to be more intentional like you really have to be way, more intentional. Because the first time we go through something we're kind of bumbling through and just going through the motions or reacting, but transformation begins with a greater awareness to who we really want to be an a more intentional way of living. Right. At least that's what happened for me. I said, I'm going to take control of my thoughts and I got into personal development. I started listening Dale Carnegie type tapes or. Or like Napoleon hill, reading Napoleon hill books or zig Ziglar on men, Dino or Tony Robbins, or, you know, Wayne Dyer Earl Nightingale. I've got really dorky into the personal development world and also studied psychology I started studying like Alfred Adler and call Rogers and Abraham Maslo. And a lot of people in philosophy is, well who helped me shape. How to think about life. Hell be realized life really is short helped me realized life is precious helped me realized that either, you are reacting in life or you taking command that we will, and these types of things really helped support my transformation to becoming a happier. And just a better man. The second time where that happened where it was like something happened to me, and I need to make shift within right. Something new came into my life, and I decided activate something within at the same time, and that was when I had the opportunity to quit a job. And most people say they had an opportunity to job, but it was like I went to a seminar and I was sitting in the seminar. And a guy was basically talking about how you could write a book and have a career as an author and that could be a real thing. And I didn't writing and I wanted to write a book but I didn't realize it could be a career. I thought it'd be like a hobby thing, and it made me quit a good job. I mean I left college I had a good job doing work for consultant company, one of the world's largest consulting companies at the time called Accenture, and I was doing leadership development programs. I was working at a high level at amazing peers coworkers. I was making good money and yet I knew. In my heart, I wanted to write a book and that opportunity that new idea what you could do this as a career when that God in my head that was something new coming into my life. Right. New idea, a new strategy new way and forever changed me. Because also in that moment I decided to go within and say. I need to believe in the dream that has been sewn in my heart that the judgment I made was, you know, up at that point, I was always trying to earn a job. You know, go to college like get the job like work with this team. And I was always just like kind of forcing it, and, like taking the world by storm kind of stuff, but in my heart, I just wanted to be more of an artist and, you know, write a book and I didn't know how to do it. I never gone to a writing class, but I wanted to share my message with the world and writing my book, life's golden ticket, which was my first big commercial success book and I just want to tell the world you have second chances. And when you have a second chance in life be more. Intentional be more thoughtful be more loving be more courageous. And that's the story of what the man goes through in my book life's goal and ticket, but those two things lining up something. New coming into life. A new idea for abundance and, and becoming an author living as an author. Oh, that's a new idea then activate something within. Oh, I would have to be so courageous to quit this job, I'd have to be so committed to my dream to my art to this belief that I can share this message. I'd have to go all in, and that's where I did I quit a job. That was really good. A lot of busy work, but it wasn't my life's work, and that transform the quality of my life forever because the book came out and it did okay? But it forced me to learn to share a message to communicate on video to write blog posts to do all two years later, social media came around. It just it just taught me to believe in my ability to share a message and to have a career doing it transformed forever that moment. I would say the third moment where those two things collided. Something new comes in and something new activates within was when I had my brain injury, some of your with me, actually, I was been on YouTube for a long time and doing podcast for a long time. In two thousand eleven Iraq, four Wheeler ATV, you know, for we and wrecked about forty miles an hour. I you know, just rolled over what happened. I just hit this. Little pillow of San I didn't see lift up four we're in such way landed, boom. Threw me off the bike I rolled several times. Luckily, bike did not land on me, but I snapped my wrist clean off. I you know throughout my hip, in my shoulders. I broke a couple of ribs and later ended up without without knowing that I had post custom syndrome and TI traumatic brain injury. And it. It was not something I wanted it felt like bad luck. And yet win these things happen to us, we have to ask, what am I going to do with that? I can either go within and just suffer and be sad or I can activate something within to cope to be better, you know, to, to, to grow, you know, that old thing you often hear sometimes of like some people have post traumatic stress syndrome when something terrible happens to them, but psychologists are also finding some people also have post growth syndrome, post traumatic growth syndrome like meaning after something negative happens to them, something in their mind like digs deep within to be resilient to Klein out to improve. They take that bad thing as a reason to become better. And that's what I did. I had the brain injury. And I lost the ability to control my mind and my emotions, I was hurt physically. I was not in good health, obviously. And I said, okay, I'm going to have to take care of my health. In such a way that I control everything that I can in a positive and healthy way, so that I have brain health. Well, your brain is connected your body, so everything you your body, obviously impact your brain, your brain is part of your body. Right. Of people say, like there's this big difference between brain bottom. No, it's the same. The brain is the body, the body, the brain. And so what you eat your mouth goes. In affects your blood flow, to your brain affects nutrients it affects your hormones, it affects how you feel affects like everything the, whether you work out or not has a dramatic effect on your both your mental emotions your physical vibrancy, but that's the stuff of brain like how you feel at any given time is operated by ultimately your brain. And so I wasn't taking care of my body enough to really recover from my brain injury faster. And so I saw all these nutritionists and these neuroscientists psychiatrists who said, hey, here's some things that you can do to really optimize your health so that your brain heals faster, and that was transformative for me because I never really got it. Never before that accident. I never really understood the brain body connection. And so those are like three times in my life. When I really had to take something that was going on in change myself because I wanted to live a better quality of life. And if you're there, I would invite you right now to, like write down those times in your life that were, you know, psychologists often, call critical incidents like moments in your life when something significant new came in your life. Good luck or bad luck. And how you decided to respond to it. Because it really tells you a lot about who you are. And how you ended up where you're at today and possibly where you're going to go from here. You know, I can think of all sorts of things that were significant my life from times. I moved to times. I took big risks two times. I play catered to times. I was fearful from times, you know, I was wasn't nice in a relationship or I didn't do something responsible. We all have those times, but I invite you today do the personal development of thinking through those major times in your life and ask, how did I respond to them? Did I use those critical incidences as moments to be more intentional thoughtful kind courageous in the next go around, because that's where transformation comes from? We all think translation, just happened. Suddenly, something happens to us from I was like actually real transformation happens when you take everything going on your life. And now you use it as a tool of self awareness to say, okay, what's the next level for? Me who do I want to become now how do I want to feel about life energetically emotionally? How do I want my mind to operate, how do I want to care for my body? How do I wanna treat people? How do I wanna spend my days? What do we want to really do with my life? How do I want to shape my days agenda? So that me and my family can have joyous, abundant loving connected life. These are the questions we ask when transformation is the foot. And so if you're watching this video, I just I ask you make sure you go to transformation week dot com because we actually have a transformation. We challenge going on right now. You can click Lincoln in, in this post and join us in transformation week with that is, is it's me. And my wife Denise we basically throughout transformation. We obviously transformation because seven six seven day thing, right? We're. We go. And we give you new training every day for seven days, and we're also live in the chat role, taking on your questions and interacting with you so that you can really find where you need to transform your life is like you need a significant shift in your relationships or in your career you need significant shape shifting in your health in what you're doing with your life. This is all part of transformation week, where every single day. We give you a new video that helps you develop the mindset for personal development that helps you give you a specific habit that we know if you implement this habit, you do increase your of success in light and there's no question about that science. You do feel more confident more happy. You do feel like your relationships improve that you're more focus and productive. You're more. Influential more courageous. These things are possible if you line up the right habits. And if you know anything about me, I've spent my entire career studying the habits of the world's most success. People. So he brought that into transformation. We, we also give you all the tools and the resources in the community to help you grow. So if you ever loved an online challenge, you'll love this one, it's called transformation. We can sign up at transformation week dot com for free. As most of you all community and things that you can do that. Help you change your life. I would love for you to think about that today. What did change your life? What were the transformative moments of your life? And when they happened did you determine did you step back and say, how will I use this to create the best quality of life that I possibly can? That's why I'm always here cheering you on Denise. And I my wife, she'll be more videos and podcasts as we go throughout creating this new HP, X community for us h stands for the high performance experience. Right. 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Episode 5 - Mark Ellwood, Travel Writer, Cond Nast Traveler, Robb Report and Co-Host of Bloomberg's "Travel Genius" Podcast

Hospitality Forward

22:59 min | 5 months ago

Episode 5 - Mark Ellwood, Travel Writer, Cond Nast Traveler, Robb Report and Co-Host of Bloomberg's "Travel Genius" Podcast

"Welcome to has Kennedy forward a podcast to will hospitality and travel professionals learn how to earn the media. I am Hannah Lee Press Geno Hanalei, Communications Award Winning Public Relations Agency to me. and. I might go and standing I'm freelance writer who covers food and beverage. Editor in chief Hanley Communications Our podcast is our agencies way of supporting beloved hospitality and Travel Community. To help it rebuild and rebound. In this episode, we chat with the well traveled finance writer. Mark L.. Mark is contributing editor for Conde NAST. Traveler editor at large ROB report and podcast co host of Bloomberg travel. Genius. He's also the author of the Book Oregon Fever at a shop in a discounted world. Hi Mark. Hey guys how are you? Thank you so much for joining us today cools. So we call our podcast hospitality forward because we're optimistic about hospitality and travel industry. So based on your experience in what you're observing and hearing what steps should hotels and travel destinations be taking to move hospitality forward, oh Michael, what a question if I had the real answer to that, it would be A. Million wouldn't it be a million dollar plan I could sell that could bottle him. So it I think I think everyone right now realizes that we're in two steps forward one step back kind of place and the way to move hospitality forward is flexibly I am the most anal most planning person you can ever imagine and I'm having to learn a new. Skill, which is changing on a dime and realizing that every plan and every preparation might have to change. If you look at some destinations, Tahiti is on this brilliantly essentially eighty has said where reopening to tourists. But if anything changes and I think pay for any deposits done worry if your country locks down and you can't come, you can postpone if we. Look down in Yukon come you can postpone if anything hands you can postpone an eat is the embodiment of flexibility and I am trying to do brain yoga to make myself a little more flexible in a let mark I'm going to join your club because that's what I need to I'm a planner every minute of it and it drives me crazy but. That's more. Flexibility is. That's what we have to embrace. I start to me mark. So you were born to be a traveler and storyteller. So how have you been affected personally? And professionally by this pandemic. That's a great question. I'm very lucky that personally in terms of disease I haven't been hit very close to home at all I feel very fortunate in that. In terms of the white my life has changed. It's very surreal. I was in Germany for the first two weeks of March for an assignment. If you check out rubber bullets, August, issue, you'll see might starvation Spa Simon I flew back on the thirteenth of March and I haven't set foot on a plane since, and that is the longest time I've been in an apple since I left college. And it is really really strange and I have to say I know people hate airports. I. Love Efforts I really Miss the Delta Sky Club JFK and when I get there for the next time I will metaphorically kissed the ground say it's lovely to see it. So addition to writing and quite prolific you're a follow podcast her and the host of travel genius on Bloomberg and your frequent guest on the today show and other TV shows travel expert. So how was your day to day work pivoted and what are the biggest changes that you've seen? It's it's interesting because I think we've gone in phases. If you look at how travel editorial changed in the wake of the pandemic immediately, that was a collective gos- because. Travel and hospitality was most immediately impacted in terms of just being suspended. So I think the initial sense that was a wonderful tweet from the travel editor of The Sunday Times. In the UK basically saying, Hey, guys, we don't know what we're covering. You've got about with us with just GonNa make as we go along whereas confused as you all I think that transition next to solutions an awful lot of travel editorial. In the first two months was I need cancel flights. What does this mean for me how I've got plans that I need to change I spent a long time for travel writing stories about what do you do with your imminent travel plans now, I did a segment on CBS this morning recently and it was essentially saying how do I go on vacation I need it I need some time off but I don't know How to do it because it feels complicated and also I feel guilty and I think I was this is one of the things I time. The hospitality and travel is the seventh largest private sector employer in America going on vacation and taking time off is good for you but it's also good for people's jobs. You're not being inappropriate for king vacation for a week because the woman making you that. Amazing Pinochle order. That you'd feel like a sitting by the pool this the best thing ever she's paying mortgage with the tips you give her she's working, but it's a job to not make you think she's working because that's the key of hospitality and I think that's often why hospitals he gets a really short shrift in this situation because it's the job that pretends it's not a job. So people forget that they need to get paid. All right. So you've been very busy writing over the past several months. So for the remainder of twenty twenty, what kinds of stories are you going to be working on? So that's the question I think everyone wants to understand is what do we do for q four? And I think there are two kinds of stories that all really really looming. which is both the dream far ahead plan now Galeta what do I do for twenty twenty, one giving people the chance to think about I want to go to Mozambique. Wow I want to go to the temples in India I've always wanted to go to a Greek islands. You can plan that the twenties when he won and you'll writing about that now with the understanding that it's like, Hey, guys, we all know that right now it's really complicated do that but you can be. And then there is that very straightforward. I need a vacation where can I go? How do I do it? What is the new reality and a Roper Pool for example? We've been covering bubble charters. A bubble charter is essentially you charter private jets or you you charter fractional jets and you buy out parts of a hotel or a villa, and you effectively only encounter a small amounts of people on your journey and when you get on store remained the same and you on minimizing your exposure to other people. Now it's pricey but certain resort destinations realized that's a great way of. Bringing travelers back even if just one percents of the one percent, it's still gets people moving. So mark. So you've written so many articles for the past few months in a from hotel to cocktail to go in name it and for your upcoming stories as well. So how'd you come up with this story ideas? I mean today come from pitches from people like us from according to It's a combination it's a combination. You know I read every email pitch I gets I didn't respond to them but I, was read them because they take people's as long as here's the thing. I. Read Them. If it doesn't say deb mock the talk if if the name is wrong but I feel like I don. I, think that's that's sort of a basic spending. I wouldn't open an envelope that was addressed someone else. But for example, one of my favorite stories that I've done the pandemic was Chris loud a full shoutouts with Asa Christmas, a friend of mine who I'm sure. A lot of listeners will know he walks in the business and lives in China has lived in Asia for a long time love he and his wife are Ex pats who live in have lived in Asia and have a brilliant understanding of Asian culture. and Chris was posting about delivery cocktails in Shanghai and how they'd always been a thing in China, because China always delivers everything in modern China but in the lockdown boss had taken to making delivery cocktails are wonderful theatrical thing and I just saw that on facebook because I'm friends with Chris and I messaged him this is an amazing story. Is, can you tell me about this? Tell me the story of how this works because maybe bar owners in America will see this and it might inspire them to kind of e-. Counts a little bit of money when the pandemic resilient its first, and so you know I look at facebook it's really barrels social media. Super Helpful People Super Helpful and you know I read a lot of magazines. I'm always surprised when journalists on someone with piles of magazines and loads of pockets article safe pockets on the APPS because I thought if you love writing, you should love reading all the peoples riding and also it's great the story I do. Amazing. Amazing. So I guess the social media is very important part of your tool to find your story angles and story ideas. It's it's interesting because I'm I'm I think. It's a great way. If you're looking globally social media is global especially instagram it doesn't require language. So if I'm looking for a story from India I'm going to look on instagram and dig around a little bit and especially when I'm grounded. It's a great way I was doing a story about Muslim Mozambique, which is one of my favorite destinations in the world and I needed a little bit of Intel over and above the replacing bank from a trip and I I went to Instagram I looked up a few things I damned. If you people that was my new wave researching it because I couldn't go said to you use. Hashtag to search for the topics. Do you WANNA see? Very much. So I think I think it's I'm I think on a bit selfish when it comes to social media and I, my new resolution is to get that but I take a move from social media than I give. And I go to instagram. We're all post once in a while if I find something super interesting but instagram is really a great source for me and I think you'll very good at this that didn't understanding that social media even personal social media will be followed by the regular media and come Dover hundred percent and it's really not a waste of time. To attack a few things on instagram because actually it's a work efforts not just show host a picture of yourself. Make sure you look amazing and face Choon the heck out of an exactly. To attack. So what advice would you have to our listeners? Hospitality and travel who wanNA share their insights and expertise with you. You know especially those who may not be ripped by PR agency. So the to simplisafe things I'd say if you on not appeal pro like you guys or media post like May and you want to get a story out there. It's all about personal stories about people. Tell me your story and then tell me a customer story talk to me about the as you have. If you want to tell the story of Your Ball, tell me about two of your regulars and how say during the pandemic they volunteer to help out with you and say here that stories about two regulars who help towns. If you own a hotel, tell me the stories of the people who you let take refuge in your hotel during the pandemic and become temporary residents. Remember it's really really personal the more personal and insightful pitches. The more character has and the more like a story it feels it's a bit like don't put your Tuxedo on to go and meet your. mother-in-law just put a really good Polish. Be Professional but relaxed because no one wants to meet the guy the Tuxedo. Latte. So a aside from getting your name wrong in the pitch, which is an immediate disqualifier what what are some of the other don'ts to people should avoid rather than Tun's can I can I give you some news because i? Okay. So I always count I was an Sasha will know this. There's a publicist that I know and work with who came to my attention because he was he pitching Berlin Leah by email and it's an example I always give the best stories come from culture not from you. They are hijacking Zeitgeist and Dragoon Bing it into your service saying, Hey, something's going on and we want a piece of that. And I remember Sasha email and he said. I think boldness is big right now Natalie Portman is bold and Viva Vendetta. TYRA banks all top model contestants where bold caps for a challenge and I have a brand new head shaving razor. Don't you think you should write about it and that got a double page spread in a massive newspaper. Because he saw how his products or his idea wasn't unique nothing's unique unless it's time travel. It was part of what was happening and therefore it was a great story. The other thing I would always say to people is everyone's ego is way bigger than we pretends and I will coup. I will me. PUCCA. PUSSYCATS. If you open your email with high mock I sort amazing story wrote lost week I loved X. Y. About us. I. If you even if you're lying all never know but I will be completely bowled over with the fact that you love what I- rights and it's so disowning flattery is such a big weapon. You GOTTA DO Homework Yeah, which is that's you know that's a less seizures way. I think all of us want to feel like when we receive a pitch, we all receiving it because it's aimed at us not because they were forty people to email. So. If you open by saying I saw you wrote X. Lost Week it instantly shows you'll know just search and replacing my name. Even, if you kind of all great insights, some are just like you we love traveling in will love staying at hotels will love love love hotels. And in although it's very challenging time and we know that hotels are here to stay. So question few. How important will hotel food and beverage be? In. Rebuilding our hotel industry. So I think that's a great question and for. Let's say I think it's fundamental question. In the last ten years hotels have double down on jewel audience the. F. and B. in hotels has become a properties ambassadorship to its local audience. Essentially a hotel now has great fm be not really for the guests, but to make money out of and to win over the local people. So I actually think the reason fm be really masses in a post covert or a covert under semi control of world is that you will get support from your community you F.. B.. is about getting your neighbors in to have a cocktail on your patio socially distance but just to bring a bit more energy and then the guests who are staying in the hotel rooms feel like they're in a fun place and essentially your neighbors acting as human furniture and it's a win-win gap. Totally I mean I miss much of our Time Square Edition Hotel, and as you know, we handled PR for entire. FNB and that's just magical place in fun as so much know interesting food and drinks and entertainment and. We miss that place I. I can hear it in your voice and I think anyone listening all of us who love hospitality. I miss that won't than the intimacy because what covid nineteen has denied US social distancing is about is about creating lack of intimacy for good reason and so with craving that amazing moment sitting at a ball next to someone you don't know hearing them ordering a drink and thinking it sounds amazing. I'll have that too we can daydream. and. You know what that'll do for now I'm happy daydreaming list of places I'm. GonNa run to the minute I'm allowed to. Can can we. pry. I will tell you actually I was supposed to be going to Mozambique in Mozambique South, Africa in April, and then I pushed it back to September and I've now pushed to June twenty twenty one. one of my favorite destinations in tons of long hold s nations. I can't wait to go down to Miami and stay at standard SPA, which is one of my favorite chill-out places on the other side of south beach from ocean drive and sit by that pool when everyone has no stresses no worries and have a glass of frozen and feel like the world has were terms that will feel and get into one of this. It's a lovely spot hotel with a giant rolls up off outside the ruins and when I get into that boss the next time it will be sort of like drawing a line under all horrible nece. Love ALGA. To go out to hear you come with us. Yes to speaking about hotel it could be that brings us to the listener questions segment of the show far away I didn't know about this far away I love this hate. So we have a question from Chris, lower he's the director, the James Hotel in Soho New York You wrote a great story in June on hotel going contact lists and taking other measures for social distancing. He wants to do you see these as temporary or a fundamental shift in our hospitality culture. I think the good bits will hopefully be permanent. So let me tell you this was a story I wrote on travel about how hotels will change in covert and postcode. And some of the things I really loved for example. They want hotels. That's you know we're going to fill of offerings with more towels so that housekeeping isn't essential everyday if you don't feel like it, I don't know about you been I've been dying to be excess tells in the bathroom so I hope that state. I think created ways of doing turned down. So another hotel instead of going into the room would leave little little door hang is with a little punnet of strawberries from hotels foam and an extra shampoo bottle and a little note from the room attended saying if you need anything, just call us instead of going in. That to me is kind of lovely. If you're I don't really WANNA get disturbed when I'm probably having a ball at six o'clock and I'm relaxing. I think that. Could and I hope does stay. Remark this has this. So great we'll can our listeners find you? They can find me they can find me on twitter at mark. J ellwood on Instagram at. Moskowitz and please do download listen to a podcast co host with my friend sign at Bloomberg, which is called travel genius when traveling. But hopefully, it's where dreaming You K. S geniuses traveling chemistry. She's the small one I'm just I'm the comic relief by defers she knows way more than the ninety guys as so Christ. So when is the season three starting because we tune in? Exactly so we were we were due to be. Recording season three's starting. We recorded one episode just as we before we locked down and longtime listens, we'll have heard us we decided it just didn't feel travel genius is all about goofiness on the fauna travel and we didn't feel very goofy and fun in April and May. So we decided to push back. Our quota will be back in two full where we're teeing up to pick up where we left off, which is really exciting because it feels another returned to normalcy a little bit. We'll. We'll be waiting for it. Absolutely. Tuning in and I wish we could talk to you more and more and more because we love listening to you love listening to your insights and. What an inspiring conversation and Maher is such a charmer and now that you know Marcus looking for and that he isn't about flattery. If, you have a worthy story idea to share reach out mentioned that you heard them on our podcast. Chorus Jazz remember marks advice induce end up. If you learned a tipper to and subscribe to our podcast and tell your friends and colleagues please review us on Apple podcasts. In our next episode, we'll interview take creator of Bloomberg. Tune to listen to this writer and culinary, authority learn how your stories can get her attention the your next week on. Kevin. Join us as we move hospitality forward together.

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Ed

Coming Out Stories

13:20 min | 11 months ago

Ed

"Media this is coming out. Stories is about cost about one of the most important conversations of your life. I'm Emma Golf Swell Ed so far. So now he's the editor in chief of mine about world. Gay Travel magazine well. He grew up in Boston. I interviewed him in a coffee shop in New York City. Just in case you're wondering what the background noise was. Well I think like a lot of people I probably questioned it. When I was quite young I remember at age. Five in six thinking. Oh I'm a little different from other people. I like dolls. I like things that my either boys don't seem to like so. I kind of started questioning things early early on. Did you worry about it at age or did you just sort of go with it with adult playing? I did actually worry about it. I thought about it and I think you have to think about at age. Five or six someone. Having to consider such job ponders weighty essential question. What does it duty at neurons right. I mean I think kind of in it probably helps hurts. I think it hurts gay. People in some ways it makes can make them neurotic but I think it helps gay people in the sense that you're firing synopsis that you probably normally wouldn't use for ten twenty years really so gay people having to think okay do do. Why hide this? Imagine at age five or six thinking I think I have to hide this from people. I know the only people like my parents like so you start thinking about gays in their ability to lend in act you know. Be Creative around how they present themselves. I just think I mean it's a long answer to question but yeah I did think about it quite a bit when I was younger and I kind of knew that it was quite wrong or wouldn't be accepted. So did you modify your behavior. Then did you try not play with dolls. Yeah I mean I. There was a moment I know I remember when I felt free and I was just doing whatever I wanted. And whether it was playing with dolls hanging out with girls whatever and just but then I realized that people askance at that so I had to modify behavior so yeah very early on. I joined every sport imaginable that my parents wanted me to join basketball baseball football and I happened to be good at a lot of them. Unfortunately so I was stuck in there every time I want to quit. The coach would call that kind of thing so it was kind of annoying in that sense but yeah I kind of tried to blend in as much as I could the other problem or maybe curse and blessing that I was always ahead of all my other peers in school in my grade so might have five brothers and sisters all of whom have multiple degrees written books. All this has happened so very smart group of people but even in that group I excelled beyond a lot of people. They weren't necessarily criticizing me for being effeminate or gay or but it was a little bit of like you know you gotta you got one hundred years. Smart TEACHER'S PET. Everyone likes you know so. I I think I suffered more because of the perceived intellectual superiority either already being bullied. Yeah never bullet was actually never bully knock on wood. I had muscle in my feeling like the free brought through straight brothers and two sisters and everyone there was never any bullying of any one of US really. We all went to a tiny little small Catholic school so I had the same twenty five fellow students more or less for eight years so in that environment. You people aren't allowed to bully are believed. It just doesn't happen. The nuns were very strict. So Luckily I've avoided all that okay. But this isn't boasted Ryan and matching. That's quite a fairly progressive city. Yeah yes and no I mean at the time especially I you know. I'm fifty now so that was quite a while ago and Boston has had deserved reputation for being super racist especially the Irish against every other every everyone else and there was a cover of Time magazine. Were like there was like this terrible bussing. Incident were blacks. Were being bussed into white neighborhoods and there was a huge from revolt by white people against it was pretty ugly. So Boston has a really strong history of Ugly racism and homophobia alongside there's the intellectual aspect of educational systems the progressive women who were early supporters of suffrage or the Boston. A revolution took place in part in Boston. So there's always those strains and when you think about gay marriage the first place gay marriages was permitted legally permitted was Massachusetts right. And you think Oh. That's a progressive. Not really it's actually kind of conservative. Marriage is a conservative institution so in a weird way. Massachusetts is progressive and conservative at the same time. It's hard to describe so gay people gay people who would walk around like. Oh yes my partner. And I we live in the south and we have a place in providence hand and we have a car and we have a dog and this is the perfect light so it was almost as that precipice heterosexuality but in reality a lot of times. Those perfect relationships weren't so perfect. So there's this attitude that you have to appear to others how you want to be perceived that doesn't happen in New York and San Francisco and other places so Boston is unique in that sense. So what was your personal coming out like? They must be the time when you thought I can't hide this any longer. I'm GONNA tell people. Yeah absolutely so I was saying earlier. I've had having five brothers and sisters in shoe parents and living abroad and doing all of a sudden I've had a long series of coming coming out and I think you just keep coming through your whole life. You sitting on an airplane in the past. The guy next to you is like what do you do is like on the editor in Chief of a gay travel magazine? You've just come out so I just roll my eyes. I get my business card. It's like Oh my God. Can I not escape this but but I was in college? I went to Harvard College and it was a very supportive environment even though in the eighties. It wasn't that supportive outside. I was in a bubble. I didn't really. I don't think I realized that came to my friends and a lot of people were coming out at that point in the eighties and so it was very quickly accepted and I came up to my sister. And she's like you're the second person who came up to me this week. Our best friend came up to her that that same week and so he and I ended up dating and she was so pissed off but so a lot of weird like it was completely fine but then after I left college I moved to France and it wasn't that accepted there my partner. His grandmother really hated me because she thought corrupted her son because she was old fashioned and my parents didn't councils much later. My brothers and sisters. I waited until they were a certain age and maturity level and I came up one after the next five to ten years. Much more five say didn't communicate with each other. I'm sure they did. I'm sure they all my direct coming out to them. I thought that was important to do for each one of them so I try to do that. And then you know my first job. The one of the bosses was gay so that was kind of easy for me to come out so the first one is in college when I kind of just I remember being in the shower and just thinking i. I've tried to date. Girls just is not working had a girlfriend at the time. She was at Yale and she turned out to be less. Call to the gay man generator because she three guys she dated. I'll turn gay. I was like boy honey yet. Crank on the mound very funny but it was convenient for me to have a girlfriend in a different city right. I mean obviously so I just thought it was very intellectual the way it did it was like it was like a switch was flipped flicked a switch. And that's it I'm gay and that's kind of how I I don't I deal with things you know. That's how it happened so revelatory moment in the shower that's like. What were you doing in the shower contemplating my life and I was like you know happy doing really well at Harvard. Had A lotta great friends but fundamentally unhappy well why well there was a disconnect between the person I was and then the person I was everyone else I wasn't signed. No one knew that person inside I thought and I thought well I want to bridge those differences. I want my friends who are so amazing so supportive to also know this part about me and it was maybe a little bit easier because I two friends who are just like shoe forward out ballsy gay guys just unapologetically gay and I liked that unapologetic aspect of it. I was talking to kind of had to apologize for being gay. But they kind of taught me. And this one William from Iowa from a small town Iowa like population five thousand a rural community but his parents are super progressive so he came up when he was wow to them in Iowa and they supported him when he was my friend in college. I thought if he can do it. I can do it in Boston at Harvard and Cambridge Massachusetts. For God's sake so. He was like one of my role models in the eighties to be gay and young in. Boston was a blast. The Club Scene. Superfund there were mixed men and women. Queer whatever. It was a really fun. Time to be gazed. So I gotTa Kinda got a lot of the fun and then of course AIDS kind of blew up everything but But it was a good moment for a while there so I felt supported and I felt like I could come out to a very positive reception and indeed. That was true. And then what about when you did confront So I I was living in France in Paris with my then partner for five years. The French guy and people visiting my sister Paris. My sister came back and said to my parents. Living with this guy. He's I think he's gay so they kind of out of me so I wrote a letter. It was like before emails. I wrote them a letter then when it came back to visit at Christmas. Confront me and my father was a funny super supportive away. He's Italian school because like my boss is gay. I you know he goes. I think people shouldn't be bullied. They shouldn't be discriminated against. I think it's terrible. I hear about a physical assault against gay people. I just didn't want in the family so it was a little bit of like the old fashioned Italian thing and my mother was just like you know the first word in AIDS is acquired. You can get you can get aids from anyone so she was more concerned for my health. And so I said I was overly intellectual with them and I didn't allow them really time to kind of catch up but I basically had my responses prepared for both but that was how it came out thirty years later. Whatever it is if they are the most unbelievable supportive you can possibly imagine. What was it like sitting down writing that letter? It was hard I mean. I knew that they loved Jerome. And so I knew that the thing about being anti-gay was very kind of general but the specific aspect of it. They really liked Jerome. And so when my father said when we really liked and he goes we don't want people in the house is to be set aside. I said well you don't want out every single one of my friends that they had invited to the house. I said you don't want Sabrina. Don't want Richard. You don't want Chris you don't want and I just made this whole long list. Said you don't want any of them back in the House. And they think they knew that it was ridiculous to say that they didn't want them in hospice. They really like these people but yeah the letter was hard to write. But it's actually easier to write a letter in some ways to talk to someone in person it's going to go and then you wait for the bombshell to happen. You wait for the response so it was interesting. It wasn't an email wasn't like quick. It was a couple of weeks had passed so good. Oh that's a good question. I should ask them. God bless them. They'RE IN THEIR LATE EIGHTIES. Kick in the doing great so yeah frame someone. I know I think they probably ripped it up and burn but they. They're interesting if a gay bashing occurred in. New York my dad call me making sure I was okay of course but also just to say you know express his revulsion towards that and his the horror that they felt about that you know they're really incredibly supportive. It's amazing all. Yeah yeah well. That's kind of destroy a lot which is great. Yeah you're stuck with your family and Vice Versa. And the Senate makes obviously I had a great story compared to kids who got kicked out and beat up a committed suicide and who on here to tell their stories and that's why we're telling our stories now right so kids don't continue to do that probably will always happen. But you know you're stuck with your family in a way so years will go by certain point. Hopefully something will crack and they'll just be like Africa. Say let's just you know it's not that big of a deal let's keep. Let's get the dialogue going here. It's difficult for people so visit anyone listening. Would you have any advice or words out and proud gay fifty year old man? Yeah well I don't presume to. Everyone has their own path to walk. But I think like when I was really young you know maybe I wish I talked to more people about it just to confide in someone I mean. I went from age five to eighteen without saying ever. I think I'm gay to anyone. That's thirteen years of fourteen years. Whatever it was. That's a longtime for young person to keep something inside them. That affects you for the rest of Your Life. So if you can if you can find anybody supportive. I mean as far as I can tell my family. There are no other gay people. It's bizarre dozens and dozens of cousins. And as far as I can see this no gay people in my family but somewhere deep down there's either a neighbor or friend or family member that's probably queer that you can talk to find that ally chased at for sharing a coffee and his story with us and you can find out more about at Anders Trouble. Mark Levin a Monopole World Dot Com. Please do subscribe wherever you get your podcast from. And if you WANNA find out more about this podcast paps Oscars a question or even of yourself for an interview. Well you can follow us. Come out stories on twitter all coming out stories part on instagram. We'd love to hear from you. I'm Emma goal swell. Coming out. Stories is a what GOES ON MEDIA PRODUCTION. Next time round you'll hear from writer broadcaster. Amplats compensate sir. Iain Dale in out a bit later in life but once he did pay told me there was no going back I did have feelings for them and I knew what kind of girl liked what. Kinda girl I didn't like so from that point of view could say I suppose yes. I was bisexual suit off but once I discovered Cocom afraid there was no going back.

Boston Gay Travel magazine Massachusetts partner editor in chief France AIDS New York City New York Harvard College Time magazine twitter US Paris Iain Dale Iowa basketball Jerome
FashionCast  Michigan Fashion Summit Part I, Loren Hicks, Marv Neal, Alex May

PodcastDetroit.com

25:14 min | 1 year ago

FashionCast Michigan Fashion Summit Part I, Loren Hicks, Marv Neal, Alex May

"You're listening to the podcast visit. WWW DOT past detroit dot com for information welcome to fashion cast we're at the Michigan Fashion Summit with Warren Hicks founder of Michigan Passion Week and Michigan Fashion Summit one. Welcome welcome thank you. I'm so excited to be uranium. Fish heads so how did you get started with this particular event so startled the Michigan Besson's summit. I'm a designer myself and being a designer and I didn't know where to go for resource so as as I got older as I kind of dove into the war started figuring out thanks for talking to keep it from networking just really finding the resources that I need for my own Asha business and so I saw a lot of other were in the fashion design business fashion modeling session photography. They're looking into actually learn and fashion. It's so cliche but bashing is actually a real business thirty eight billion dollars and when I see people that really want to break into the industry industry they have to be able to know how to do it where to start how to grow their business so I saw a real need for educating people in the bashing visits so you said your background was as a designer. So where did you graduate and had done some designing or you connected in with selling pieces and designing. How's that actually my real macaroni statistics degree from Brandeis University so was nothing about fashion but after I got my degree I just wasn't fulfilled. I know a lot of people say that but I literally was just not fulfilled and I love and so even when I talked to other people like fashion you. You can't make a career out a fashion. I'm like you just watch me and see who I really started to kind of just told me hone in on my passion when I really love to do and then from there I I started taking courses in fashion design courses and sewing so I started my own line been several magazines. I've been on Fox News. Accelerate customer pizzas at took a small break from awhile started family. I'm getting back into it now selling pieces and really just kind of doing what I you know. I wish I wish to listeners could see your jacket. Hey what are you calling. The Georges doesn't mind today at the summit so I haven't really put much thought into it yet but it because I'm getting such good feedback from it. I am going to go ahead and put it into production but I loved. His jacket is perfect. If you have somewhere to go to throw it on the fabulous attorney Lauren. Can you tell our listeners where they can find you if they wanna look designs yes so you can just go right on my website and Lawrence L. R. E. N. D. Hicks Beco- okay great and are you on Instagram at the Lauren Hicks dot com or gray so so what is the objective of the summit other than you know. You're providing a platform essentially for people interested in the industry or is it more for for designers and yet in general and it's more business like here's what mark. Yes we have a lot of. Let's imagine it's a hobby right now but I don't believe that everything has to be a hobby forever. I do believe that you can tap into the thirty eight billion dollars in the bash industry writer Michigan so yes is for people who have who may close Monaco's people who are influencers so it really just learned the Omaha entire bashing. I can't believe what you gave up a career and statistics on your job over. It depends on what you really truly love. Yes that's great so in terms of coordinating. It's a pretty big about. It seems like you've got. There's a lot of pieces to how many people are helping you. How many people are tending you know. I know that your husband mentioned. There was some issues with the venue. You've had to go back got a Lotta peaks and valleys. So how long does it take to do this. I want people to know you know what maybe and maybe fed were wearing long time ago at night ear brainstorming the idea and and then from there little pieces at a time you know talking to people just a little bit at a time just chip away a day took away name and then it finally gets chippewas. Hold up a little by little plant early. You know surround yourself with people that can. I help you and that's he got a wonderful. Miss Tiffany sinise and this is the third years you second year second year. I scream second. Many years sure it's going to yes but when you're when you're asking some of the lecturers and people that are participating today because you have quite lineup. I mean it's pretty amazing to me. Some of the people that you've got here so are they are they. Are they putting them are they. Are they being tamed or how did you get interested. What's their motivation to find people looking to help. People don't mark those people who actually WanNa help people who who see the vision of icy and it's our time to give back to the that stupid and give back to some of the people who may not have the same opportunities. I I do look for people who are looking to give back who can't help people with the business that they they do and I think that's very important finding speaker so I I do look for people who really want to give back like our keynote speaker was miler from the F. I G. which is a nonprofit fashioned rule and she loves she ever mention. She's a designer with the newer so just having her apartment to off and that's great that you or doing the here defray who really need that. We need to bring fashion. Yes back to Detroit. Are you noticing that there's more energy the whole fashioning yeah. I think would help like fashion cast other people that are really trying to do something in the fashion industry it helps if you have something in especially doing put on the the starter pack at starting because of more of us had does it the more it won't be a snowball on bigger and more. I'd it's not like quite a few designers quite a few people like Detroit is Newport Roslyn and we've we've worked with Eric Yells at Detroit Donovan Aaron wet slow down at Orleans and Winder. I mean there's just a lot of people that we've met so. We know that there's I underground energy. You know and it seems like you're validating but that's actually going on and this today. It seems like there's a lot lot of people in here. We can off elaborate help each other out who your audience. My audience and we're all are really shooting for the same. The goal is to bring back here in the ashtray yards. Put Detroit on the map met free. Yes yes so my my last question is where's. Ah What is going on and he was in your noble compassionate impact yeah. He's a he. He was actually at our last summit so he's awesome guys for next year. Bring Bring Mrs Michigan instead of Terrorism Hicks. Thank you so much. We really appreciate you the invite and hopefully we'll be back next. Thank you thank you welcome back to fashion. cavs were at the Michigan Fashion Summit our second gusted. The day is Marv Neal. He's a celebrity. Maybe maybe not but just a stylist can explain that but Marvin one day ask you what what was your motivation for participating today and other than Lauren is a great person on church twisted. Your arm is still good. But how did you get involved in this and what is your background in terms of fashion and being a Stylus okay. I'm I'm I got involved just because I feel like it's a d. here. Michigan for people to learn I wish I had someone poor class war. this whole thing that we're doing. I wish this available available for ten it years ago when I started my journey so I'm always here to willing to help. I think this is a great thing. They always picked the right then you. It's always very organized the gene that people so that's one of my reasons why I do it but my background comes from of course the retail detailed background at first the love of wanting to be a fashion stylist work. Well actually the love of wanting to be a designer. I I then moved into fashion styling just because I was like I don't really know cone sitting behind so machine so that's what I love it calms and then just prom building a hard copy portfolio like old school way shooting shooting shooting went from that to dealing with celebrity clients so I do have some celebrities and local US outside well. You got to come uh-huh okay. Do you really need the little singer rb. Singer Adler gets a heart medication Joseph Park near Arkansas from the cardinals. So when you're doing styling wasn't those types of celebrities. How often is it do they. How often do you talk doc and meet and consult will usually as a majority of the time. It's really kind of like a fast paced kind of thing because they're either in Thailand for the day who so you may not have time to pre set up like you would do where someone that's here in Detroit so it may be by I might get an email at eight o'clock in the morning so it just so you know that sort of thing happened with them. Santa Toni Braxton was coming to the city and then Herreid she needed a dresser award of Stylus. She had a team of hers to me. She wanted someone from Detroit. So young lady named Piper Carter reached out to me and said well. You're the best here in the city. We want to offer you to dive. You know you come down on my mind audience so I wanted to just get everything that they needed needed. I have my own home seeing everything she wound up having a lot of her own stuff so wanted this coming up to Nietzsche's. Pin One it's like you know for this part because she had a lot of of a quick changing outfits because she hasn't slept for Vegas tenure owned so it really maces dishes stuff that they had so us. God so are you working with. A lot of local designers are local designers. That's like when you for instance when you were styling for a Tony. Where did you also take a lady here that Hernandez Dianne Berry. Oh really really pick for like high end dresses like red carpet gowns something that you wear to the grammys learnings they have mining and everything like really really beautifully made rapport a Lotta guys and you're sitting yeah herself is Dianne Berry. Ah put a lot of stuff from another young lady Santa Trees CNN from Detroit as well Kim Moore's cousin. That's one love and hip hop on inside basketball why it's one of those She's a Detroit native too so that's her cousin. She got her stuff on her so a lot of stuff that you see on a show she's worn so I just reach out to my network of people here in the city and that's good that you're supporting local desires you have to after a while. We've seen at one point. She got on her so we're GONNA use that. Remember actually styling for more women or more moons. Even in is pretty. I mean of course men don't step in that round and much much women do who when the pitcher's I'm for anything so I work with a lot of let me as well. I started out working with so wha- just as we're thinking about it. This is usually your question. See is so where can folks for you. They could buy me. We're coming around Marville all social media media facebook instagram Myanmar on twitter and then on my website whereby portfolio per folio. WWW dot marc take a argument and a RV and you good okay so when and you got. How long have you been in. This is the second year. Would you here last year too so I was here year before last. I don't think it was. Oh okay because the Laura was breaking last year so two thousand seventeen. I think yeah yeah but anyway yeah whenever she calls me I it was just me being sitting in front row for a fashion show so start with that and then when she started having more of the panels and everything she she asked me to compensate for class planning our class for one then this year talked to classes commended the power so you know one of the things I wanted to ask so you're here as a participant I mean actually you know participating in the event not here. You're here to educate essentially so have you learned something to being here. Have you made connections with other folks. I WANNA set and other people classes so the Glam doctors cheated she does make a Saad Larson stuff from her just because a lot of tabs on set using creative director of everything so sometimes the make. I may do one look and a Lotta Times. I've had them be like I need you to touch up their makeup with this impetus given this lipstick to put on so it just little stuff that I learned this from the only guy sometimes I'll say so when you were designing. How long did that go on. What what were what which is at that time because I didn't know how I know how to soldier's hands so a little bit so all of this stuff was just a lot of sketching and not really executing security sketches? The sketches wound up getting. I want us to get into Parsons school design and he went to personnel got accepted. You got accepting. Why don't you go twenty years ago. 'cause a lot of money. I know a lot of money in minute graduated from the new school last year when he well he was in the lane so that's you know that's a different division within the university but Parsons a bunch of friends that were in their program twenty years now aged Gosh twenty years. I got accepted so that was my love of being a designer through music and find out what awards that's star. Yeah I love you. You're the second stylus that we've just recently affect Latrice Delgado I I show she started as a designer and then she switched over. It's a Will you work with the designer a lot of times. You wind up sitting with a designer eight. You all collaborate eleven. Canada's only difference is I just don't have the patience. It's a sit back so I respect this but you have the vision of using scare clear but just the whole execution another guy so we'll get. I just want to thank you. Thank thank you mark. Nieto live from Michigan Fashion Summit. Welcome back to fashion cast. This is our third guest. I at the Michigan Fashion Summit. It's Alex May Alex is actually a participant today came here to learn some things. He's an emerging designer so we want to talk about that so go ahead and introduce yourself out please so my name is Alex. May I run my the company is called. Tony Mac naming the fashion industry they call me as Tony Macaroni. INSTAGRAM is Toni T. O. N. Y. M. A. C. Dot coke. Co and you design men's clothing. Yes men's and women check so they are. Unisex two bomber jackets. I have a couple exactly and the sizes I have right now are small medium large for right now and then eventually for the next addition to be extra small and extra lunches so are all the pieces going to be a good idea yeah because I see that fashion a lot of fashions Unisex. Now I notice we're seeing a lot of the science smells yes well. Some of it has to do a sustainability in that kind of thing so that's very interesting. I didn't know that but you brought a jacket and the listeners can't see the jacket but it's impeccable looks great. It's unbelievable. It's is it. Is it sourced in America. I know that it's being it's being manufactured down south. Yes so it's manufactured down South we import fabrics for billy fabrics and then we make them down south both in Alabama and then and then they are shipped who quality it's based on quality on. That's why it's there are telling Wolf thing about to definitely with a lot of people especially men know about war that their suits and everything it's a great fabric duff occur wearing on on a day to day basis with your breath ability of a wall or natural affable and also or outside where with if it's raining or anything was really well for water resistance. You came came to the Michigan Fashion Summit today. Did you have an objective certain things you really really wanted to learn or whether some speakers or you know what motivated you to come to this about the big thing for networking with other people like minded in Michigan and don't really see that even in the retail business a lot of people do it for the money which is which is not a problem at all with you try and become a designer trying to become a stylist. It's hard to find people that have that same vision and so coming here her to a summit you can meet a lot of people that are driven to start a business in the downtown business. It's a good way to bring together so go back to your particular line so let's say that the line is up and running which it is and it's it's growing up more pieces are. Are you trying to sell online. Are you actually trying to get into specific. Stores are upper and stores. Yes yes so that's that's the long that's that's is to get into higher retailers and to get stores stuff. We don't introduce this once. They have manufacturing available. I will be producing here in Michigan right in some of these companies are actually coming to Michigan. The PH is coming in and I think they have a I don't want to speak out of school but I think they own a broad range of different different retail companies so the opportunity especially in Detroit in not just Metropolitan Detroit centric centric is I think it's pretty good and we've spoken to a number of these people that either designers or they actually own you know shops and businesses manufacturing factory down there. I love him too. Well Aaron choose an Easter market at Orleans Winder and it has the same honey Unisex feel too but it's high end fashion. She's a merchandiser. She's a designer but this is the kind of thing that is it be great for them to collaborate elaborate. Absolutely that's so there's tremendous opportunity. So how did you get in the fashion business. What what sparked your interest initially initially yeah. Have you always been interested in fashion go. She started. I'd say two years ago. I Left College Dropout Alex College. I got into retail store. SORTA working there and realizing ensue business at least on that there was no middle ground between cash and with our jackets that kind of gives you the browns take off that sport jacket it go this bomber jacket on go hang out and go on a date or not it could be both formal and casual as long coats jeans fans. Hugo sweatpants good at wath days. Got Some crazy on what what pants deal why cardigan absolutely so. You're more really at this point. It seems like you're more in tune with the men's market because you're working where you work okay so menswear. How so you see a lot of the styles styles commissioner. I think they've they've really upgraded that whole store and of course there's been a merger and so forth of course Joseph the Buddha's heavily involved so they've really upgraded that so you see you're on the front line of looking at the trends and seeing the truth. So how do you normally help on a customer who comes in and says you know. Let's start from square one. I'm not sure where what are you looking at for that person other than size. They wanted to do with it where they WANNA go. If it's for work what business is it formal. I'm all the occasions and then you lay out the kind of customer you. WanNa put some personality into the outfit. They feel comfortable on now so when they go into interviews they go into the business to go on a date. Don't feel like they have someone else's clothing fair comfortable yet. You feel comfortable. They can let down with guard just go. I wish our audience can see right now. Sharp look beautiful the whole Levin Dirt Laser. You don't see much off a yeah floral button up shirt how nice slacks and shoes you got. The listeners have to go onto storrow marv style. Uh So what is your instagram account again. It's Tony Tony. They go on the website. Tony Mack Clothing Dot Com Alex may thank you for joining us today on fashion cast at Michigan Fashion Summit. It's been a pleasure. Thank you thank you.

Michigan Fashion Summit Detroit Michigan Michigan Fashion Summit Lauren Hicks Fox News Brandeis University Lawrence L. R. E. N. D. Hicks Asha Donovan Aaron Georges Mrs Michigan instagram attorney Tony Mack Santa Toni Braxton Warren Hicks Hernandez Dianne Berry basketball Tony Tony
The Man Inside the Radio

KCRW's Unfictional

26:26 min | 8 months ago

The Man Inside the Radio

"From kcrw I'm Bob Carlson and this is unfixable and you were listening in your car and maybe had a few friends over. Maybe you were in your house. Whatever everyone had nice stereos with big speakers back down? Because that's what you did right unfixable as a program of true stories personal documentaries and radio movies and on this episode the man inside the radio a story about L. as rock radio history and mine and this is the final episode of this podcast season. All of them were conceived in made weeks before we all had to go inside and stay but the stories on the season are all about fantasy in one way or it's a dark time and the hope is that these stories will transport you somewhere else for a little while it's also the Tenth Year of unfixable which began in fall of twenty ten as a radio program and I still think of it as a radio program. Even though it's a podcast I now so on this episode of personal appreciation of Radio in two parts it's unfixable and the man inside the radio. So Hi hi how are you? I'm thirty five years. I know you sound like I remember you sounding though. Yeah. I don't look the same though. I talked to Jim Nelson veteran radio. Dj Programmer Industry Journalist. We've both worked around radio for a really long time and went to high school in the same era. We didn't have youtube on our phones in our pockets. We didn't have the Internet. You either had radio in your car or you had a cassette or an eight track in your car and that was it. There was no other options and it was during this conversation that I remembered something. I'd forgotten why radio I couldn't remember what made me consider radio fall things as a career. My College Major was yet but it's an industry. Now that seems like a relic of a different time. And in fact Jim reminded me of the time. When radio was God head and why it seen so epic and loomed so large in my formative years it was specifically rock radio. It was a time in our lives. You and I happened to be in high school and when Rock Radio in Los Angeles was really good. That's the time in your life when music has an opportunity to play such a huge role. Because you don't have the responsibility of a mortgage and family you can go to liquorice pizza or tower and buy three or four albums for twenty bucks a little things waiting for Columbus. On Warner Brothers. Records five sixty nine six ninety nine laker space and radio was K- The musical lifeblood of High School Visit Ninety four point seven community Los Angeles. It's about two minutes before midnight. Two minutes before the change of the day all hail the American night they were so big and such a major force in this town in the late seventies. Cami t was the default soundtrack for surfers. Donors for one thing. I was neither but it was a significant constituency of my southern California high school. And you were listening in your car and maybe had a few friends over. Maybe you're in your house. Whatever everyone had nice stereos with big speakers back then? Because that's what you did right. I remember that the Music Knicks was perfect. Like every song was good every single. Dj knew everything about all the music and they were all interesting to listen to. Hey yes little. Salamander hanging bureau tipped up on Jim Ladd now sitting here minding my own business in who should walk through the door. Oh look out. Look out breaking half the men's hearts and Long Beach. You know you'd have Cynthia Fox. Bob Coburn Jack Snyder. Or as they would call him Jackson. Bee's Schneider Fisher. Cal is what they would name Paraquat Kelley. Mary Turner Jim Ladd. They were cool and very prominently political anti Nixon Anti Reagan. The station lead official protests against nuclear power plants and in favor of marijuana legalization. But you're just a number. The number just two digit on some tape somewhere. So it bothers me a lot you know and Bothered Bob Seger and enough to Write this song called feels like a number. So let's play this song. I'm going to Light up A number and you know just for the 'cause I figure we remove him we remove them one at a time and that's or later of everybody re burned up to three numbers day. Pretty soon wouldn't be any left anywhere this game. I think that's right. And oh by the way they got paid for. It was the height of Rock Radio. Power you could see. Eye catching km et billboards. All over town usually hung upside down to make them even more eye catching. I definitely understand why I would have thought of it as a prestige job when I was in Highschool Levi's Gordon flares and Levi's denim flares are made to last when my clock radio went off every day. The first thing I heard was the morning team of Jeff. Guns are an ACO. Irvine's back-to-school failed today. Thanks merv genes in. Your chromebook aren't bad either. Art Many major world events of the late nineteen seventies. I heard I from more Tan. I'm as Yan Hugh up-to-date informs in California Now Ama Tea Rocks California rock and roll Tuesday morning and Jeff Cons and Tom Petty rigorous. There are two important events in my early life when rock and roll radio stopped being a fantasy and got to see it being made in person. Here's the first one once a month. Jeff guns are in Asia would do broadcasts from a venue that used to be called country club which was in Reseda in the San Fernando Valley. An hour's drive from my house in the South Bay. I got up before sunrise when Friday morning during the summer and drove to recede and for the first time I saw people in real life doing radio. I'm Geoff Johns. It's finally Friday on Thursday in the country club. The Beatles on Ed Sullivan launched a million bands seeing Jeff. Guns are an acl and live at the country club. Made ME WANNA do radio. La's own answer to the to sturgess. We really on the radio guys. Wow how are the fact that we were in a rock and roll? Then you made people do all the things they normally do in Iraq club drinking whiskey and coke for example but now it was six o'clock in the morning. I think we did once a month with different teams and different guests and it was Insane this is Jeff. Gaza and as far as drinking goes the waitresses who worked the night before. Whoever was the country club with stick around until six o'clock in the morning because the tips were infinitely better from our audience. Then they were from people who are coming to see some band from your perspective. What was the Cami t listener like at the time? I was a suburban kid who drove in from the South Bay. Well they were you guys. There were people in their twenty S. There were people who were looking for a soundtrack of their lives. Our listeners were people looking for something to identify with. That wasn't kind of plastic prepackaged and something that was very relatable getting stoned surfing. It was Ultimate Southern California lifestyle. Tanno six and a half you're up-to-date scammy forms of and Malaise Amity Rock. It was a terrible place to try to do the news. This is too noisy in the background and by the first hour. I'm not going to do anyway. People are passing around way too. Many things we've done is we've done three hours already. You believe it. We'll be back cameo tea rocks the hell ranking seventy two. I started and I was there for fourteen and a half years in fact I think I have record for the longest person ever to be there. Maybe doctor Demento with as Sunday night show there was longer. I almost forgot to mention doctor. Demento originated out of Cami. T the weirdest thing to listen to the night before school. The next day came of Group of commercial rock stations in the country who had their roots in the underground rock Radio Movement. The late sixties. Where old time. Rules of on-air behavior were being rewritten. It was an attitude of doing whatever you could come up with. Could imagine being a better time for radio than I faced during those names for example we were doing the underground nuclear test in Nevada and they would tell us exactly what they would take place like a twelve noon or something and they wanted the public to know too because they did shake Las Vegas and we were talking to the maitre d' of top of the Dunes hotel with champagne glasses all filled with water to see if they would jiggle when the bomb went off. You know real or we had a joke thing. Dog that was real. That was real. New maitre d' was such a funny guide. So do those live on radio in the top of the tunes more sway and stuff like that. We just milked it for everything was worth clear you want as a teenager. I was pretty straight laced so I didn't party as hard as the Cami t lifestyle but I could still enjoy the wild ride in the same way. I didn't surf but it was entertaining to listen to the surfer. Part Co two chrome cassettes as the federated grew. Here we onto ninety four seven checking out the Sir Wisdom Hoya surface. The first thing I did was there's no Ephron surf report someone living in the San Fernando Valley doesn't know if it's foggy in Malibu or if it's breaking waves every one of these out for the South Bay. This is the flavor for the surfboard became huge. In fact some of her surf. Reporters were actually sponsored in there. Were pulling down. You know fifteen hundred dollars a month just for sponsored. The SURF report those guys reports and Santa Monica. This is Jennifer. We another warm day in different about one with special until I talked to. I don't think I fully appreciated the quality and depth of the News Department a rock and roll station the idea that we would have correspondents all over the country. All over the world in London this so and so you know that was so cool to do that whenever we could. Some great coverage you were local story at the end of the story. I'd say Emmy Teeth ahead of the Times in times of of course being rockets beat was Angeles Times an Ace young hired Pat Paraquat Kelley as the after news guy. He was part of the idea of making news. Fun and interesting rather than something. You just tune out to a story from the Hollywood bowl and it would be from the Hollywood bowling alley or whatever just whatever we wanted to do. His most memorable feature was probably salaciously. Fish does landing West County reports. Twenty-three anglers nine hooked nose. Necrophiliac CARP FORTY FIVE psychos this report. With a beat yeah. I don't think it'd be on the radio and some of the names script. Frankly was that it was fry those Pan Pudding Burner Mary Turner. It is true that when you listen to the old KFI recordings a lot of the jokes. Sound really cringing. Now there's a lot of objectification of women and humor. That hasn't aged well but for the times it was all in the service of the Cami. T style of Freewheeling Fund. They were into whatever their listeners were into and when they wanted to Cammy t could mobilize that connection with listeners. Pat Paraquat Kelley got his ironic nickname from an herbicide used against cannabis fields in Mexico in the early nineteen seventies. Paraquat was used to kill cannabis but it could also kill people and the United States was assisting in the spring so KABC was really involved in the protests to get them to stop in then having rallies from San Diego Santa Barbara collected two million signatures and for me to follow that up and deliver those two million petitions to present Carter at the White House. Not only covering the story the way we should cover it in. No one else was covering it by the way to very end and getting them to stop the program. Asia is somewhere in Washington. Dc Day. Not only for me but for the thousands of southern Californians Participated Miss Incredibly successful program. And I'm happy to see going to fruition at this point well as we'll be looking forward to talking with you tomorrow and have a good Stay in the the big. What is it the big Dome Washington DC on the Big Peter Plantation? I listened to me all through high school. It always just kind of felt like clubhouse like everybody was just sort of hanging out ready to do their thing. I mean what did it feel like to be? There felt like a clubhouse we just Kinda screwing around. Here's Jeff Concert again. But I think that was one of the problems with our longevity. We didn't really take it as seriously as a business that may have been the reason why it was so much fun for us. And for you to listen to and you know because we felt like the audience was all part of the grant collective you know it was like a Supernova right as I graduated. Km et was at the height of their popularity. But this was the peak of seventies rock and roll radio even though it seemed like they were doing it for fun came. Et made a ton of money and helped create the whole idea of classic. Rock the biggest payday for team meet. Even we influence an awful lot of people and the indiscreet and kind of was a template for rock and roll radio stations with nineteen seventy six to nineteen eighty four and then it was kind of struggling and as soon as the companies started. Dick around with the format and bringing consultants was the beginning of the end plus K. Et had competition. Their rival. Rock station was Kahlo. S but the stations also traded staff back and forth as fortunes. Change mean we've talked about came t quite a bit in this conversation but Kale. Os was also really good at that time and so you had to really good rock and roll stations in Los Angeles when we were in high school and college. When I was two years into college and taking an Intro to broadcasting class they had a big book of internships and I got one in the programming department of Kahlo S my first official position albeit unpaid as a man inside the radio. That's coming up in a moment from. Kcrw it's unfixable from KCRW. It's unfixable I'm Bob Carlson. An episode called the man inside the radio. When you'RE GONNA be coming to a radio station for the first time this was fairly intimidating because you know for years if you live in Los Angeles you know every now and then or driving up and down Las Vegas Boulevard and you always see the big signs said Kahlo. S Go like Oh. I wonder what that's like inside. Not just anybody gets to go in there and then to be actually parking in the parking lot and then going through and there's like a security desk had to check in and then you'd walk in and then immediately there would be the programming office where we're oh. Yeah if you if you don't turn left immediately you miss it. Yeah so you're you're you're inside but she s inside you've been hearing my colleague. Jim Nelson Radio veteran. This is where I worked with Jim. Thirty five years ago. We were the interns. We've had our careers and it all started right there and what a great way to get. It started yeah. Can you describe how you look like in those days? Yeah I had shoulder. Linked hair always had a beard always wearing jeans or shorts and tennis shoes in it. Definitely a rock and roll t shirt and short had long dangling earrings. I was living the lifestyle so I looked like somebody who probably worked in rock and roll for about a year. I short hair button-down shirt slim. Jeans live the rock and roll lifestyle as an intern at Kahlo S. I was a fly on the wall as rock and roll characters pass through the studios. I saw the Dudes who sang that radar love song and the dudes from journey. Tom Petty was there. Mitch Ryder and the Detroit. Wheels Stevie Nicks looked at me this one time but it didn't really feel like a clubhouse by this time rock radio is a cutthroat business. One close I was always on the rating the morning. Man Was Frazier Smith who is now direct competition to Jeff guns or Cami T. I always remember when I was coming in. They would be finishing and he was always show mode. He'd walked through there to go in and have his a meeting with his boss. So that was what was on his mind and it was on a very very very very superlaw. Hallway. Yeah we were at one end of the hallway and there'd be like studios which we're about halfway down on the left. Yeah occasionally when you go into the deejay booth because who is all vinyl records and so the the deejay booth always had to have the most pristine copies of each record and so carefully you'd have to walk from the programming office and hand deliver a fresh copy of a vinyl record to the DJ. And I was always crazy nerve as like. Am I going to open the door at the wrong time? Am I gonNA COUGH ONE? Dj who was off and on during my shift was Bob Coburn. And he had been one of those deejays on km et. I'd listened to but now he was over here at Kahlo us. He was always so cool and he was the first one to like. He started showing me like how everything works in. Like how at this point the compressor will kick in. I had no idea when an audio compressor was at that time and interesting our main job was to maintain the LP vinyl records that were in the current play rotation of Kahlo S. If the records got scratched we got to call the record companies and get new copies and this was where you got a little bit of a sense of power as an intern. Because you got to just call the record company from the ROLODEX. Just ask them to send another one and they would we need. We need five more copies of the Boston's debut album please and Five copies of fleetwood MAC. Rumors and five copies led Zeppelin three. But this was a whole different time for music. Nineteen eighty-three at this point. A lot of listeners were tuning into the more punk and New Wave Kiro Q. And in the Kahlo as programming department there were discussions of what even constitutes rock and roll. Where do the bengals where do a flock of seagulls or ABC or the Thompson? Twins fit on the spectrum of led Zeppelin Pink Floyd Jackson Browne. Bruce springsteen and Bon Jovi DEF leppard great wife. So you almost had the old guard which wasn't really that old. At the time the classic rock that is now known as pink Floyd Jackson Browne et Cetera. My intern partner Jim was primed for the rock and roll life so he was hired out of the internship after a few months and he stayed at Kahlo s for a long time I worked there for five and a years altogether and by the time I left Bob I was actually the interim music director by the time I left it you I you know. I'm sort of an introvert anyway. So I think you know it takes me months even get comfortable anywhere so i. I don't think I ever felt grin anywhere beyond that. Nervous intern phase. At any time that I was there in real terms I was only there for about a year but I was hoping Jim remembered something more than I did. Remember this guy who is a funny guy. He was always dressed like a skater and one day he laid down this LP record down on the desk on top of that he put one of those little busts things that drives around the record and then an speaker atop and it plays and he was playing thriller. Who I'm talking about vaguely. Do you remember when I was standing on a desk to reach a high album and my knee gave way and I crashed down on top of our supervisor. Lynette assistant to the program director. Wow I had not remembered that until you brought it up yet and that was weird. I had this weird knee issue when I was a teenager. Everybody looked at me. Like I had lost my mind like I was attacking Lynette. I Left College in Southern California and went to school in Boston for two more years where I was introduced to punk music run DMC and the world of public radio but Cammie T was my station in High School. And it's the soundtrack to all those memories good and bad. Kahlo s was the first radio station. I ever set foot in and it set the idea of what a radio station looks like. Even today as I do this program from the closet of my House. I salute the Rock Radio. Gods of the nineteen seventies stood the stallions and in need of bean main sail. Numerous purity I see made to she from KCRW. This is unfixable and you're listening to an episode called the man inside the radio. It was written and made by me Bob Carlson with big things to Jeff. Guns are ace young and my old intern. Buddy Jim Nelson who nowadays you can hear weeknights in Los Angeles on eighty eight point five. Fm Please be sure and subscribe to unfixable wherever you get your podcasts and catch up on this season's episodes you may not have heard yet on this season of unfixable. Chrissy Barker swooped in to provide vital production assistance which included but was not limited to playing the musical saw and singing in a siren. Lakeway we say. Good bye and thanks to the award. Winning managing producer of the program Carla Green Support from KCRW included episode graphics by Alex Sarala Digital Content by Drew Tewksbury web support for Christopher. Ho and thanks to Kristen lapore of KCRW's independent producer project theme music by Alex Western with music help from Joe Augustine and Narrative Music. This season of unfixable is dedicated to my kcrw colleague and close friend Matt Holtzman. Who was born on Halloween and died on Easter Tony? Twenty of cancer. He was a great producer motivator an educator and he liked to have fun. I'm Bob Carlson. Thank you so much for listening to take care of Yourself. Please join me next time for unfixable from KCRW.

Los Angeles Jeff Cons KCRW High School Kahlo intern Bob Carlson Jim Nelson Jim country club Pat Paraquat Kelley Dj South Bay unfixable Floyd Jackson Browne Mary Turner Cami Southern California Asia Las Vegas
#1339 If I Knew Me

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

34:20 min | 3 months ago

#1339 If I Knew Me

"Thanks for listening to the atom and Dr Drew. Show. On podcast one. Love me some butcher box. It's hard to find one hundred percent grass-fed finished beef free range organic chicken heritage breed pork. That's the good stuff you remember from your childhood not the weird dry stuff that you're getting now. Or wild caught salmon at the grocery store today sponsor butcher box thinks you should have one last trip to the grocery store and better more affordable selection of Protein I. Love Butcher box or eat it on almost nightly basis at the Corolla House my kids love it. My wife loves it. Each box has between nine and eleven pounds of meat enough for twenty four individual meals. It's just around six bucks a meal pack fresh shipped, frozen, vacuum-sealed, free shipping nationwide except for Alaska and Hawaii. And Right now, new members get two lobster tails in to Les mignons free and their first box that's two lobster tails and to filet mignons free. In your first box just go to butcher box dot com slash Adam. That's butcher box dot com slash get to free lobster tail fillet tune quick stops for this and that into quick stops for cash back with new chase freedom flex, you'll earn three percent cashback at drug stores learn more at chase freedom dot com restrictions and limitations apply offer subject to change cars issued by J., P. Morgan Chase Bank in member. FDIC? was coming to. Join me every week for the Michael Irvin podcast. We'll give you the four imply experience. I'm talking everything for football to fashion. I will be chopping it up with playmakers, headline makers, and I am throwing haymakers I'm the VP. Don't Miss. New episodes of the M Ip the Michael podcast every Thursday. On Apple podcasts podcast one in spotify. It was too much secret family story to tell you all in one in one show. So we have to pay it out on this show and We're going to watch a little video from the World Health. Organization, guess what turns out they were wrong shocking aright tell about lifelock Tober national cyber security awareness month. Make sure you have what you need to stay safe and secure online. Remember if you connect it protected take proactive steps to enhancer cybersecurity and protect your part of cyberspace. It's important understand how cybercrime and identity theft are affecting our lives every day we put our info on the Internet you could. Miss Certain threats by just monitoring your credit alone good thing. There's lifelock. lifelock detects a wide range of identity threats like your social security number for sale on the dark web. If they detect your information, they'll send you an alert protect yourself with lifelock, right? Matt. No. One can prevent all identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses. Lifelock can see threats that you might miss on your own joy now and save up to twenty five percent off your first year by using Promo Code Adam call one eight, hundred lifelock or head to lifelock dot com and use Promo Code Adam for twenty five percent off. Recorded live at Corolla, one studios with Adam Corolla and board certified physician and Addiction Medicine Specialist Dr Drew, Pinski. You're listening to. The atom and Dr Drew Show. Doctors Ace with the board, and he's got a certification on kind of specialist Percy that right Yeah. All right. So drew ski we talk in in the last show about the secret life. And how you've? Held that against I did not sorry my my sister freaked out about it a little bit and I started defended my mom. She's eighty something she's made at this long. She wants to take it all the way. To the grave here's another piece of comedy. Let's now. Sorry. I don't say you've held it against her. But. You. Have done a thing which I think everyone is guilty of doing it where you go of course I mean that's she was you know that's the kind of person she will you know what I'm saying you and I think maybe this is just something's currently on my mind. We're all KINDA guilty of that. Of course, kind of kind of thing with people. Yeah. But it's not. It's not always that you know there's like. The there's something called the fundamental attribution air where we attribute something to the character, the individual that we should be. Considering the circumstance. Right, and so sometimes, there's a version of. Sometimes. There's a version of. You Go. Oh I'm going to the airport on Friday at one o'clock, and then I go to the airport and. Then somebody goes. Oh, I forgot my backpack turn the car around then turn the car around and you come back in. An? Ego. Emmy. And someone goes, Oh, he's gone and you of course serious I leave he leaves and then they go. He's buying supplies and copier counter right and you go. Okay I shouldn't have done that a course right that thing. That we do. Now the problem is, is if Ami, the employee has a history of doing it, then you go of course except for their versions of it. Yeah and people do it with the truth all the time that's What I'm saying is. I got to fucking much information for my parents way too much about them. I mean sorry I. Wish it was information I got too much emoting. I much of. Your Dad's upset. Your Mom's upset were freaking out. You know we don't have money I gotTA freak out. Mode. I. Wish. Would I wish my mom had been a little more discreet? You know kept it to herself a bit. A little more STOIC will closely the bear so Not Laying on a child is not a bad thing. Right, and however right it felt like growing up. Like there was something wrong. And when a child feels, there's something wrong here she blames themselves. So I had an elaborate fantasy that I must have been adopted that would explain it really like there was something. Was that fantasy just? I concocted a fantasy that would explain the disconnect I was feeling. But disconnect wasn't from the secret family situation was that your mom was wired well, who knows she was wired and situation couldn't connect but I had a feeling that there was a secret. Our Rail Yeah and that was the way I sort of, isn't that weird? I'll pick that up and not one sure at events. was I ever exposed to the secret without a ceiling between your mom and your dad that sort of push that out there at it out we'd actually what even though I had the feeling and then the fantasy when I actually found out, I was dumbfounded some rock. And you found out at the ripe old age of fifty five or something or fifty and. What I found out I went oh I didn't say to myself Oh. That explains that feeling I had. Until years later, rice started sort of examining all this gonNA. They'll probably explains felt that way. That is a tough. That's a tough one. Feel away and then not. It's sort of blame yourself or people tell your crazier. What do you think about it? It's a fancy I guess it's that thing it's like when someone in a relationship is cheating and other person exact does it Sunday for a year and they keep telling the crazy and you're being zach saying you're being paranoid and then the then probably. The worst thing. To do and you and I probably will go here pretty easily is. You start questioning yourself so you would question yourself I would question. You know someone said you're acting this way you're doing this way you've go yes. Yes. I I must be or what am I doing? Yes. What what, how, how could I possibly feel like this and my mind you the filling in with the idea of a adoption is the same thing. Right like how can I explain what did I do? Oh, I must have ended. I must be flawed. I must've been unwanted Herman. So you went and did you seek out the dentist? So you and I were in Santa Barbara in this woman, a wheelchair came up to me and she's we remember we you may not know this we did a little wine. There's a meg Ra- tasting before the event in Mar.. Swimming, came up to. Hey listen my grandfather needs to make an immense to you and I go. No she said I need to make a on behalf my grandfather I was like. Really and she said, oh. Yeah. You're my grandfather's married to your mom and I go oh, fast wheel woman wheelchair. Yeah. Oh. Wow. The grandfather was married to she's the granddaughter and she said Yeah My. Dad Is the dentist he's in Stockton said I'd like to talk to him like to find out what actually happens I called them, call them a couple of times. And picked his brain and didn't really learn too much. Except about granted from the Beverly Hillbillies when we know about you? He seemed to know who I was fog and I guess from probably love line asked stuff Super Nice, Guy and was you know they'll do the older retired guy now but again have listened to all those repetitive stories about Johnny Weissmuller and right? Right? Sure. Times Oh. Yeah and then missed the the one I was living with every day. Every Tuesday night on the beverly hillbillies. Again I. It's. See that that's endanger falling under the heading of. Again I. I'm I'm having trouble sorting out. In life and I I deal with it a lot where people go. Well, that's because you didn't do that or she did this but I, never even heard about grandma. Maybe. She didn't think you cared about grammar didn't know or just whatever maybe wasn't a thing you know what I mean I, I'm starting to. Think about seventy, five percent of the things I do people take as something, but it's really just nothing. Yes I agree with I just didn't say anything like got something like, Oh, he sent a message in. Coach me up that it's because you don't have it as a priority CARE. Lance thirty Madison Wisconsin Lance. Hello Adam thanks for taking my call Hi. Guy You can tell already. So, I just had a question. Do you think you and Jimmy will ever team up and do especially something together? It's unlikely given his schedule and given my schedule although a crank yankers is coming back. So we will be getting together for crank yankers episodes but. I I don't. It's not really his style or my style kind of go back to the reunion. Yeah. Stuff and also I mean, let's face it. These are turbulent times and. I'm considered. Minor Pariah. down. In the man show in general isn't something that I think. It. Obviously. Jimmy. Gotten. Gotten gotten a shaft over some stuff he did twenty years ago. Which I defended him on. Of course. But I I don't think he's in any big hurry to go back and relive the some of the stuff that got him in trouble ten minutes ago twenty twenty years ago you know what I'm saying. Yeah that makes sense. But I talk to Jimmy a lot and he's a he's a dear guy and a dear, dear for. Totally. Would still friends I didn't know. You know things change over time. That's cool though you know good for you too. Now, we had a very a very long talk the other day. Very nice talk. Yes He's a Dr I have Great Law Firm Thanks Lance. Hey Robert Twenty Tulsa. Yeah. It's going to have listen to. The classic line episode. One. As. Before my time I guess but it was. It's it's I. Guess it's still. In Thanks one of the More recent episodes, we're talking about Tori Amos and. You talk about a story where I guess when your nephews wanting. A corvette. Back. Three or somebody taught him. You Buy. You've I'm one when he turned eight sane, but it was going to be. Like an old two, thousand one. I wonder if he ever did that or any. Did I. No. Of course not but did I say two, thousand and one. I think the. Interesting? Thing. That's interesting about my nephews but just sort of. Kind. Of People in general, I've noticed. Family members and folks like that way. You can see even sometimes folks kind of grew up with and stuff. I'm not talking about like a purely monetary thing, but you know I think it'd be cool to have a rich uncle. Yeah. All kind of grow up wishing we had one of those I didn't didn't but. But I've always been interested in how independent everyone is and I'm saying that a little euphemistically. Never. Sort of. If I, had me as a couple when I was nineteen, I'd be living at that. Right right and it'd be a constant like Hagen idea for TV. Show a reality show be probably pitching I'd be pitched my nineteen year old version. A myself would be pitching me documentary ideas and. Wanting to ranch on the claim. To. Beaten down and low self esteem to make that happen. I don't know I will. So when I was young when I was eighteen or nineteen, I was so rudderless right that I was finding into by the way you say that, but you're fucking college drew I left college for a while and I was really amazing to Europe to Bang Model. The point the point is, is man you got my adolescence raw I was I know you've you've felt. Internally I was hey, attic hair allies with depression low esteem panic. Loss I couldn't I couldn't ask how Lanao di. You're you're miserable miserable bright but. You had a place to go Monday mornings. Called College. No fucked up I. Left it. Then I started drifting it was bad I, know. But that that covered nine month period of your life. You went from high school to. College and I left that I could return yes. Yes. But when I was drifting I was really drifting man it felt like a huge chunk time but it was probably from nineteen and a half to twenty two three. or Go back to it pretty quick. Okay. What I'm saying with Deva's mind. From fifteen to twenty five had a decade of like I don't know what we're doing. I don't know what I'm doing tomorrow. I don't know where we're going. I mean. I was talking to people about you know being a merchant marine going opal-mining Australia. For that one. Friend of. Mine Todd. that. I remember when they're talking Galati guys my. Austrailia to like. Frozen lobsters, crazy. Remember somebody talking about Alaska. Alaska and I can remember people talking about Going to rebuild Iraq or Saudi Saudi. Get a strategist guys making guys making three hundred bucks day cash know stuff like that, and I'll go I. couldn't I. Didn't know anybody can do was walking in a fire stations I I went to a place on Van Nuys. Boulevard. Just. Walked in and got brochures like be an ambulance driver. Medical Tech but. Be a stock Grocery Chelsea of some weird training stuff. Shiny brochures. You could be an ambulance driver and seven weeks. If you take this whatever like throwing things down on the table looking at him, you know like I. But but the training seven, hundred dollars half seven, hundred dollars you know. But I I could drive an ambulance. I was. Just just just endlessly drifting yes I mean the only way. The only reason I got into construction, I mean, if you WANNA. Think about. How did you become a carpenter? Sitting in my dad's garage. Nineteen years old phone rings at night. John Gillingham. Some I'm doing a job in Silverlake I'm they need someone a polite off the side of the House you WanNa come to my Okay. PICK ME UP I'll pick up at six. Okay hang up the phone. That's how I got into that business. Just sitting in. Sitting in a garage looking at a phone. Thank God he didn't have a gay porn set had to be on the next morning I would have been on the gay porn is like I. Okay. Pick me up pitcher catcher went to the whatever. went to have enough to proud I went to the house pulled off the whole day, and then the guy at the end of the day is run tests. I thought it was a one day GonNa make sixty bucks. A one day. Come back tomorrow. And there was a lot of drifting in the seventies to. Of this this eighties but still I think of it as a seventy x phenomenon well. If thing. Yeah. Yet how much the eighties were part of the seventies for four years? Yeah. So if I knew me And someone had a shop, some cars and some work and some stuff I would have been johnny on the spot. Yeah. We. Not because. Well in in unison with being I would be interested in cars. I'd be interested in building or be interested all this stuff. But even if I wasn't, it's still be a place to land. Yeah I've I've just something. Yet it's the weirdest Saying to someone today you know the the the worst is nothing. This is nothing you know what I mean and. That's what my family did I wish. You know it's one thing my dad was very strict. But in good times, there were those were good. But Mad Times is bad. He drank a lot and you know and he he was good. But sometimes he wasn't in our he'd get a raise and by Cadillac and then he'd get fired and we next you know we're living in a hotel you know that kind of thing but I'm telling you the worst is nothing worship just nothing. To you know what I mean. Like I had my friend Chris had a he had a bad dad but he was a little grandiose a little a little. And he'd like come home. With a motorcycle a trail by yeah. You Know Honda Seventy and say to my buddy he say Chris go I'm GonNa put a ninety CC engine and bad Bush soup it all up for you you know and of course Chris hoke good. Corsi never did right and you go. Well, that's disappointing. Are That's kind of bad dad sobbing but it's still something like he did get this bike he did wheel at home. He did turn ranch on it never finished it. But. We in Chris. SORTA, had at least this dot of Oh that's going to be so cool and that things sitting on it in the garage with no engine in it, you know no one tap on the shoulder and said, you know that days Never GonNa come you know the parents are GonNa get divorced. You'RE GONNA move it apartment Blah Blah Blah but it was still something even if it was kind of something bad you know and he would. He you know he probably drank and did some drugs and stuff like that. But each still pick us up in that pickup truck every once in a while bird. He think. James Rockford didn't even five Ridge Kristan he had. No you're thinking of Jim Rockford I. You're you're telling me but I could've snowed the razor thinking Jim Rockford is because my buddy Chris's dad looked like Jim Rockford or I can't believe I did that and my dad looked like angel. Angel's the Groveling Coward Guys Jim Jamaica's bad dudes. Money a lot of money. And it's funny name as Jim, Rockford and angel was kind of like. You GotTa help me out man. He's guys are GonNa break my legs as always that that guy. Every one of these, every one of these. All these detective shows had kind of groveling snivelling kind of weak gives like I got I got information for Jimmy about Oh. These guys are bad dudes. And it's like angel you made me a promise. No more gambling. I know I know it was just sure thing. Jimmy. Like funny. Picture. My Dad and Jim in Angel is character actor I. It's so funny that Chris's dad looked. But by the way was completely befitting like it was on, it was on brand like, of course, your Tach, Jim Rodford, and my dad's angel. And so he had a pickup truck. He had a pickup truck. Yeah. He may have had a sporty car somebody. He had a transmission shop. So he he had had a pickup truck. No sedan. From. The, Jim Rockford. Jim. Rockford thing. All right. Let me hit Ziprecruiter here. Businesses have had to be flexible this year from working remotely pivoting to long-term universal growth and. It's like restaurants everyone's moving outdoors. We eight when we have that steak and we can half ago we two weeks in a row two weeks in a row we gotta keep that party going man my turn to pay. Yeah we went out the eight outside and That's enjoyable. But they're they're shifting. They're moving the growing they're being fluid. That's what I'm saying and you got to keep going with ziprecruiter wonder four out of five employers who post on. ZIPRECRUITER get a quality candidate within the first day I. don't know if it gets any faster and that man let ziprecruiter take hiring off your plate. So you can focus on growing your business go to Ziprecruiter dot com slash ads. Raymond. See for yourself right now you can try ziprecruiter for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM slash ads that ziprecruiter dot com slash ads ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire. Spencer Gun an interesting statement Spencer Forty to Salt Lake City. Gentlemen thank you for taking my call campaigns number one atom I need you and Gary goes to stop telling everyone about Salt Lake City. or You guys know this place this place is the dump do not come here and then number two when it comes you gals three weeks ago. Dropping my nineteen year old was starting his Mormon mission down there and there are billboards that what's up being able to get a picture of billboards in Dallas Texas advertising moved to California my favorite being the picture of the Hollywood sign it said dreamers wonted. There's your there's your tax dollars Eric Gentleman. Rally they're. They're trying to get you can look it up they're trying to get people to I. I look. At least two or three of them, one advertise come to Venice which. If things. Awesome. Right now with all the homeless people dandruff talked about the. The dreamers wanted Adam. You're not a big dreamer to appreciate being there. They. Want the immigrants that are don't have they want those dreamers. They one those dreamers Oh. This is a Hispanic thing. I betcha. Oh, I bet this what we're going for here because we don't want taxpayers. All right well, speaking of La being closed now is this thing This broke off my toilet truce truce. Looking at some hand me a piece from his toilet yet. Seat down. I, Know How do you order that? What do you call that? Fell off the toilet this morning because that. Sleet or the seats slides. Yeah Yeah. Yeah, you probably have to go to like Home Depot and get a little kit with the little. Nylon Amazon, oh? Yeah. It's. Nine. straits, Nats quarter inch of quarter-inch. Metric. could be something metric, but it's a quarter inch, nylon, toilet seat and. Get a little pack or something. All right sorry. When a player clip The we got a video. and. It's the special envoy to Covid nineteen director David. Shirt starts with a journalist Andrew Neil who's asking Dr Navarro Mubarak question when this is from. For the answer of the details after. We. Had Professor. Gupta from Oxford University on and she was implying and I mentioned you because you have global mandate a global view was a problem. We don't think about lockdowns isn't there very nationalistic that if we lockdown our economy that it, it's our gunman, but it also means we are not buying stuff. We're not trading with weaker economies. We are not just destroying our own jobs with destroying the jobs of all those that in the poorer parts world that export to. That seemed to me to be a reasonable. Really important point by Professor Gupta. I wanted to say it again. We in the World Health Organization do not advocate lockdowns as the primary means of control of this virus. The only time we believe a lockdown is justified is to buy you tom to reorganize, regroup, rebalance your resources, protect your health well, considering source did but by and large, we'd rather not do it just look about to the tourism industry, for example, in the Caribbean or the Pacific because people aren't taking the holidays looks what's happened to smallholder farmers all over the world because they markets have got danger. Look what's happening to poverty levels seems that we may well have a doubling of world poverty. By next yet, we may well have least doubling of child malnutrition because children are not getting meals at school and their parents in poor families are not able to afford it. This is a terrible ghastly global catastrophe actually, and so we really do appeal to all world leaders stop using lockdown as your primary control method developed better systems but doing it work together and learn from each other. But remember lockdowns just have one consequence that you must never ever. Belittle and that is making poor people an awful lot poorer. Mr News somebody say. What do you think? Now? Fifty thousand jobs in southern California. Just Disneyland. Why do something about that got write back? No. nope. We. Lockdown lockdown people. It's it's. Gary Love, if you'd send me the last couple of sentences in a in a email later whenever you have time. What's Last couple cents since I want to tweet that out. I want to tweet it out of that part. We says, we do not recommend lockdowns. It's only makes poor people poor. This is what And it makes mentally unhealthy people kill themselves or do drugs. The I I don't obviously around my small wave had enough friction and my family. My kids are lying on their bed doing schoolwork and I'll kits weird and it's also. I Sir any is there any I mean Gary I don't know if you can find some of that stuff I think twenty, four, twenty, six, thousand, college students got infected. None of them were hospitalized. Of course, I'd. Most symptoms haven't we figured out that kids are safe and schools are safe. Don't we know that? We do know it however here's what the pushback is and this is legitimate kids are spreader. We didn't know if they were there not they are, and so we WANNA keep teachers safe. That's it right but I just flew flown. South West Eighty time. We figure out how to make keep the flight attendants. And we figure that shit out beginning of say fucked over his national security cyber security awareness month. Make sure you have what you need to safe and secure online. That's why I was reminded you better friends at lifelock. There's a saying if you connect it protected could thing there's lifelock take proactive steps to enhance your cybersecurity and protect your part of cyberspace need to understand how cybercrime Identity theft or affecting our lives every day we put our information at risk on the Internet even we don't intend to we end up doing it and you could miss certain threats by monitoring your credit. Good thing there is lifelock lifelock detects a wide range of identity threats say your social security numbers for sale on the dark web if they detect your information, they send you an alert. Can it is lifelock right man no. One can prevent all identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses lifelock and see threats that you might miss on your own join now and save up to twenty five percent off your first year by using Promo Code Atom Call One, eight, hundred lifelock or lifelock dot com use Promo Code Adam for twenty five percent off. It's funny. When During the last debate. Trump that this thing and he couldn't hear it from Biden but you had to listen closely trump's like people want to get back to work. If they need to get back to schools, people want to go outside that. WanNa live their life and bind people want to be safe. Okay Oh. My God. I'm sick of it myself. I'm just Kinda done. I would be sick of it if I did any of it. I don't participate in it. I literally have not participated. In these activities. But I seem for me. So many things that I wanted to do recently couldn't could. Cruise canceled and Blah Blah Blah I'd speaking I was going to speak another. John. Saying I, I just got back. I've been all over the place but less of it i. mean it comedies kind of waken back up a little bit but I can't go to the comedy store here I. Well, anyway, it's not openness why my car's broke they wanted to do something in the parking lot. Down my God that this is the start that's crazy that he. Just. They the comedy store had plan to open up the parking lot and West Hollywood said fine and and Los Angeles said now. Shutdown. Why are we not having white talk about why isn't there an uprising send tweets every day going hey, pussy sheep wake wake up wake up sheep wake the fuck up wakeup. What's going on I've called everyone pussy in fucking cheap I don't know what you want me to do. I, don't wake up. At that's the scary part. The scary part is how hurdle everyone is he? It's awful. It's off it's California guys. He other states you feel totally differently I got an Perla Dot com for all the live shows everywhere. We'll keep keep you updated. I don't know about Lafayette coming up at the Cajun Dome could be tomorrow could not beat around Scott Dot com, figure it out I stand up and everything like that. Finally, locals get the APP, check it out Dr Dot Com a family pods there in the stream we do everyday. Until next time I'M CRAWFORD DR. Maha.

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Matt Clapham  A perspective on appsec from the world of medical software

Application Security PodCast

28:15 min | 1 year ago

Matt Clapham A perspective on appsec from the world of medical software

"Matt Clapham is a product security person as a developer security engineer advisor and manager. He began his career as a software tester, which led him down the path of figuring out how to break things. Matt lives in the medical software world and visited the healthcare information and management systems society hymns conference. Matt shares his perspectives on application cybersecurity through the eyes of the healthcare industry. There is much for us to understand by viewing. How other segments approach security and privacy Matt believes in stepping outside the echo chamber and experiencing how other industries see security, and he achieved that by visiting this non security conference in sharing his experiences with us. And remember if he visits your booth at an event, you better know, how your company's make secure product or solution. I wanna take a moment to introduce you to security journey at security journey. We believe security is every developers job we work with our customers to help them, build long-term, sustainable security culture amongst all their developers are choice to provide security education that is conversational quick hands on and fun. We don't do lectures. Instead, we let the experts talk about what's important modules are quick ten to twenty minutes in length. We believe in hands on experiments builder and breaker style that allow developers to put what they learned into action. And lastly, fun training. Doesn't have to be boring. We make it engaging and fun for the developers. Visit WWW dot security journey dot com to sign up for a free trial of the security DOJ. Oh. The application security podcast here. We. Hey, folks. Welcome to this episode of the application security podcast. This is Chris Romeo CEO of security journey and one of the co hosts here on the podcast, and I'm also joined by Robert, hey, Robert, hey, Chris. This is Robert threat, mulling architects, offer security architect and very enthusiastic about application security. So we're joined today by a guest who has been on the podcast two times before. So this is his third. Visit and that is Matt Clapham. And we were just talking about where we had actually done these podcasts interviews before. And so Matt Nye had done. Our last interview at converge conference in Detroit, Michigan, which is actually coming up here in a couple of months, and so if you're anywhere near the Detroit metro area in Michigan or anywhere in the state of Michigan should definitely come down. And be a part of this event. It's very cool. Lots of good stuff happening. Matt great to have you back on the show. Show again, thank you for being willing to share your expertise with the industry K happen to be here. So we thought we would refresh your origin story seems like it's been about time. Right. We have to refresh these things now and again, and so especially because your origin story that's going to impact the rest of the things that we talk about here. What what's kind of your origin story or how'd you get involved with security? Sure, I started out as a software tester. I'd been interested in software and went to college to learn about technology and computer science, and as I left college. I started as a tester, and I found that I really enjoyed breaking thinks right? And then as I got better and better at finding the flaws and whatnot. I said we'll, hey, why do we why do we not look at things like of risk management like question why everybody's running as an admin on windows all the time. Right. And so that that actually made me a better offer tester because I could start to to bring things in new and interesting ways and so. Experimented more with that. And I also learn more from talking to co workers and reading distribution lists and whatnot and kind of expanded. My my knowledge became kind of a self made in my my security expertise there. And then finally after a number of years is offer tester I moved into being in a security position where I was like the scurity advisor the security person at change management for an operational enterprise IT security hosting solution. And that got me deeper and deeper and learn more and more about the operational side of security, and then I looked at policy in the impact that policy has on it. And Finally, I took all those different skills. And I put them all together as security adviser for software development teams. And I've done that. Now a couple times for both the entertainment group at a company, I work that doing games, and such and now also for medical software, and that type of thing, and and as I've worked in that area and built it out more. I've you know, sort of help to define refine the product security leadership discipline and kind of define almost like I think what they're calling today. A blue teaming kind of thing floor within our company and really make that a more holistic thing for how we develop product software, and then recently, I moved into being a manager there. So I kind of took that knowledge of the Bill of working in building operating those into being responsible for directing the team in taking a small team of advisers and making them were efficient, and and better suited to what it is that we're doing there to to help the teams you've crossed over into a whole other realm of of the universe that. Right. And and. Are you still getting hit chance to put your hands on technology or you kind of focused in on directing other folks and managing getting people? You know, getting everybody going in the right direction bit both. I still managed to get my hands dirty in the tech sometimes. But yeah, management's really has its challenges of if I get to deepen the tech than it might mean. One of my employee's doesn't so there there's a whole there's probably old podcast right there. Just on education security advisor ship management, midweek, do that some of the definitely I'm adding that to my list of things to do in the future application. Good thing to cover it worked on both sides of that. There's a there's a great idea because there's all sorts of lessons learned about how to what do what not to do. But anyway, what they do want to clarify while we're we're talking to here. This is Matt Clapham, the independent person who has twenty years of software experience in a variety different industries kind of operating independently and not that of employer at all. It's when I make sure that's clear. This is just some old crotchety. Software guy who's saying. Hey, here's what I I noticed. The Genesis of this conversation was Matt was telling us about inexperienced he'd had going to a particular conference that was focused on an industry, and what we realized coming out of that is there's some there's some interesting things for us to consider as security people and his developers when we start to think about this particular space so mantha conference. You went to is what was called his hymns hymns H I M S. It's stands for health information and management systems society. I went to their twenty nineteen conference. It was in Orlando Florida, and it was in early to mid February. And it were exactly the few weeks ago about a month or so Bill. Okay. And so when you say health info- information managing systems, so this isn't health devices or anything like that, this is the systems that people are using to protect health data when it said the doctor's office, or when it's at a provider or insurance company or something like that. Right. Is that what we're talking about even broader than that think the the electron ick medical records systems or the the imaging archive systems that the the IT the operational IT that makes a healthcare delivery organization or hospital more efficient in providing care when we think about the way that healthcare organizations work now, I mean, they're using technology everywhere. They can they're digitizing anything that they can they're really growing greatly overused term in the world of digital transformation. But when I look at at healthcare companies, and what they're doing now at truly feels like they're going through a digital transformation because they had stuff that they were doing by hand and on paper that that it's trying to move everything into technology based system. Absolutely. The digitisation is getting deeper and broader, and they're looking at even how might integrate with some of the devices while it wasn't the focus of the conference. There was something. I saw there in that. They had example devices that could link to the MR take some of that. Data automatically send it out to be gathered and collected for later analysis and whatnot. So you had some thoughts about how this space of health information and management systems fits in in kind of a general context with the world of IT is health information and manage systems are they cutting edge are they up to speed with where the rest of the industry is from a security perspective or where do they fall? I think he's parallels to general IT tech across the board. There there are some some of the newer companies that are, you know, all brand new modern stuff. And then there's plenty of companies that have been there that have been iterating on their product for decades and have some of the past problems in and future challenges there. So I really think you see that that tire spread in general or they behind the times from where where we would think that these companies are going to be or is it depend on whether they're newer or. Or have been more stylish for years. It's difficult to say for certain. But what I did see is that there is a lot of stuff. That's that's been there for a long time. And maybe it was a, you know, something that's been incrementally. It rated on and and was Ridgely enterprise tech. And now they're trying to expand that in use it across the broader set of solutions went so I see a lot of parallels or here. I'm hearing a lot of parallels between when you think about the world of internet of things I o t tech at least when I first came out a few years ago or more than a few years ago now, but ten years ago, there was a lot of companies that were taking some traditional product that they used to make that never was intended to attached to the internet, and they were adding a network stack to it that they bought from somebody else that they had no idea where it came from. And they were putting that device out on the public internet with no security. No ability to be updated. None of the other things that you actually need. So it almost sounds like there's there's some parallels between. Where health information management systems are now? And where I t is Bannon where it continues to be I would say those are well-founded like all software it's going through its own cycle. And compared to what we see in the enterprise where it's gotten more efficient and whatnot. I would say in general, the health information isn't systems aren't quite there yet there I would couple years behind at least. So from a kind of a cloud perspective is that is are these folks all look in the move stuff to the to the cloud is that is that a trend that you're seeing in the world of health information and management systems. Absolutely. There was a lot of cloud push as a service startups and whatnot. In fact, the your typical big three cloud vendors were there. So if I may name a couple of names that I saw there in the vendor section, Microsoft, Amazon and Google all had booths. And their booths were really not even folk. Based on them per se. They certainly mentioned you know, why? They're there cloud was the best cloud run some sort of health information system, but they were really also pushing the success of some of the startups and some of their partners who do all these sorts of neat health information management stuff on top of their clouds. So it's for me for me shared responsibility than perspective of these partners are providing their services through these other cloud platforms. And so and so so they're likely relying on a lot of the underlying security technology and architecture that these cloud providers provide to act as a foundation, then right, definitely. And specifically the Google booth had a an entire wedge entire section just about their cyber cybersecurity stuff and trying to say how from what they build up into where they hand off into their partner, and they do their darndest. And I'm sure all the cloud providers to this as well to make a nice secure solution. And they make it easy for additional vendors partners to build on top of that. And then that. Leads them. You know with is is tight of an insecure of a solution that they can get to up into where they hand off to the actual healthcare delivery organization at that point. Right. You get into your traditional hepatitis stuff. Right. Where there's a certain amount of expectations that are just expected to be on healthcare delivery org. The hospital if you will and they need to then make sure that their vendors provide all that. But they really want to make sure it was clear that they were already doing their due diligence ahead of the curve to provide that entire full stack from, you know, running silicon in the data center all the way up into the edge of this offer as a service solution their their partner put on top. And so when I think about this as an thinking about a lot of our audience members are application security, focus people or they are developers that are that are learning more about application security. I just wanna stop per second kind of kind of summarize for them what I'm thinking of. And why this conversation is so important what this is telling us is when we look at it for. Figure part of the industry so particular area of the world of technology. There are different levels of knowledge and different levels of experience in different approaches that are being done you may you may I don't want people to just assume that hey because it's healthcare. There's this hip thing that I have to sign every time I go to the doctor's office and that so so everything's okay. Just like any other industry health has challenges at has companies that are operating at different levels. And so it's important to understand the industry as an app person when you're thinking about how my going to help make solutions better within a given given company. That's a good way to think of it. Yeah. And the security stuff that we've learned in in any app. Sect's areo absolutely would apply. Even in the health information space, Ryan because you're talking about really sensitive detail stuff that's probably similar to like managing and storing credentials kind of thing because you're talking about people's personal health information. That's very. Very specific to the individual in often is something that they want to keep very private, and it's it's up to that entire stack and that entire ecosystem to do their darnedest to make sure that that health information doesn't leak and when I think about the term PHI personal health information thrown around women. We haven't used it yet. But I managed to work at in here. But when I think about it the thing that always strikes me about HI. And why these conversations we're having right now are so important is I can get a new credit card. I can't get new medical records. Right. That's a historical thing that you can't just disable my old medical records. And once that information's out there. It's out there. There's no way to bring it back in a credit card. I can just have the credit card number cancelled and get a new card, and then sure it might have caused me a challenge for a little bit of time. But health information is such a different level that we need to secure because you can't get it back. Absolutely. It's it's so personal at that people expect as well, they should and me having personal information myself, I expect it as well that we've got to keep that protected across the board. It, you know, if you think over an upset design perspective is really about saying all those really cool things that we need to do. Yeah. That so coming back to your experiences at this particular event at the hymns event, you said you saw that some kind of mom and pop style smaller companies. There was a section focus on them and their approaches to cybersecurity. Well, what did you see kind of from that perspective with a smaller company? There was a whole section on cybersecurity. And what they had were there were some other that were others that were sprinkled throughout the vendor hall, but I had a whole corner section about cyber security was focused on largely on. What am I call each scratching where there was a lot of companies there some of which you might be familiar with from the antivirus space, and they were all they're trying to. To solve some niche problem. So for example, maybe they were trying to figure out a way to provide additional security layers on top of existing Email systems. So that a Email system that had could be certified or protected for transmitting that that we were talking about. And you said you had a particular example of one in the Email space that we're going to be very careful. We're not here to shame anybody. We're not here to point fingers at anybody. But there was something in kind of the secure Email space where US them an interesting question anytime, I have a chance to chat up a security vendor. I love asking them how they themselves make a secure product or solution. And so I did that with one of the vendors I talked to and I got a not a totally scary response for just a one that that kind of actually would be a a good discussion further discussion point in that the developer. He couldn't tell me he was he was a developer at the company, they were smaller company, providing these services, and they had some software components that they had to plug in. But he couldn't tell me how they engineered and developed secure solution for their customers. So here's a security tack that can't tell you how they security, and that story is not just limited to small companies to I mean security companies in general, and I used to work for really big company that had lots of products and the security products were some of the most difficult in the early days because people would say, oh, no, we we have we're a security product, don't you know, that they'd be talking to me like so that means. You're doing all the things all the correct things from security on the life cycle perspective. Crickets, right. No, no answer. Because they didn't even know they said, oh, we're security product. Well, that's not an answer. Like, we're a security product is not an answer to how you do product security correctly. So it's not a default. Switch and say now it's secure because it is a security product at no. Almost seems like there's a t shirt in there somewhere fun little bit of Matt storytime there years ago, where there was this antivirus client that. I noticed used. I think it was FTP to download the latest signatures and me being a budding security guy. I was like, hey, wait FTP. Maybe there's something in the file that defines the signature that means that. Yeah. Go ahead to download it to be FTP doesn't matter because there's a signature. No. It was just a text file with the signature details. No hash no signed values. None of that. So basically, it was an unin- unin- cryptic data file going over unencrypted channel. And so I'm thinking home gosh. This is a this is a security tech. This an antivirus client so actually went to the effort of hunting down somebody who was the Representative of that company. And I said don't you think this is a problem? And I got exactly the kind of response that Robert talked about will. But it's a security technology like you just. You just don't get it. Do I wish we could say that that problem was solved, and we never gonna we're never. We don't hear that anymore. And we're never going to hear it again. But unfortunately, I don't think I can say that in good faith because I don't really think it's true. I think there's still people that have that that kind of thought process going through their brain that that. Yeah. This is this is the challenge and one of the things that I'm really passionate about the our audience knows about educating people and part of that is educating across the board, and that's one of the advantages of taking a pro-trade we're going to educate our entire company across the board from people that worked the booth from a sales perspective all the way to our most experienced engineers. Everybody has to have that basic understanding of security and when they do somebody at that booth. Like if that the person at the booth had said, you know, we take security product security seriously, we have secured of my life cycle, which has some steps about how you could how what would the things we do to secure our product, and we're using static analysis. It's new for us. But we're using it. We're doing stuff with it. Like, I feel that would have caused you to walk away going at least they're thinking about it. Like, you would like how do you think you would respond to to an explanation like that? I would affect him and been thoroughly impressed because the Mike. Experience is more of the what I saw which is the folks who are there, even if they're in development, they just they they don't have the talking points. They don't have the experience they might not even know what the actions are what the answer there is. Yeah. So we have got work to do as an industry. Definitely. Yeah. As always. So you also mentioned something about third party technologies kind of defending themselves. What were you thinking about there in that service Kurdi section? There was a lot of defensive tech. And some of it was like that Email example, right where it's it's it's adding trying to take an enterprise tack which the hospital might already have and apply some sort of the digital layers of protection to make it into something. That's internet ready right to convert it from one deployment new scenario into another or to provide one set of us constraints, which was originally some thick client saying that was only on the hospital internal network and make it available in. Sorta shape or fashion for medical clinicians with their personal mobile device being able to somehow access the information and make use of it provides better outcomes, but they're trying to convert existing enterprise into internet or existing enterprise into some sort of cloud scenario. So they're in their dealing with the challenges of trying to do that and maintain security as well. The trying to add security on top where one something didn't exist before. Right there. If anything they're they're kind of contributing to that tech that problem that we talked to talk to about one of our previous podcast, right where I was reeling against Technic. 'cause it's something I'm really passionate about and that's perpetuating the problem in some respects. Because if if all these other these other solutions had new versions that include all of that stuff, which to the credit sometimes they do. But if we didn't have to try to ads stuff on top of the old focused on just building the new with all this extra stuff, we wouldn't need all these different integrators. We wouldn't need as many of the additional layers of tech on top. We can actually have something that was natively capable of being run and connected to the internet and provide everything that needs with respect the two factor. Authorization for patient records access or something like that built in versus bolt on right is our age old debate of security, and nobody uses that term everybody. Everybody uses. It's gotten this new fancy shift left kind of idea. And I think I've mentioned this before I heard a great quote from somebody that I've been borrowed and started using myself, and that's don't shift left start left. So it's going on T shirt somewhere. I didn't buy one when he has left. Yes. I'm not the originator. I'm not the one. But I've used it enough times. Now that I can pretend it was me. But there's somebody else that that I borrowed it from and he gave permission for me to continue using it. So I wanna come back around here. And kinda summarize do some conclusions. I'm gonna let a man I'm gonna have I'm gonna come to you last for this, Robert I'm curious as to kind of what would or some of the conclusions as you're drawn listening to talk about this, health information management system society and all the different things that he experienced in interacting with these companies and providers. It sounds interesting because I have some experience with it directly myself. I've done a lot of work in the healthcare industry consultant for number of years previously where I was helping different healthcare companies and try to manage this trying to figure out some good solutions and. A lot of times just came down to some of these were talking about disapplying, so good security principles to these problems. Try to figure out how to manage the data properly of his concerns about hip and so forth. But you know, I think we're on a good track. I think at least we understand some of the problems here, but we have ways to go as we talked about. And and it's good to see that. We're we're talking about people are talking about it. But I I like to see more, and I guess Matt before I let you kind of have the final word here. The one of the big takeaways, I took from this is we need to step outside the echo chamber, we spend as when I'm and when I say, we say, we referring to all of us is security professionals who spend all of our time at security conferences, talking to security people where we're all talking about the same problems, and and were commiserating perhaps, but we're not really impacting a lot of change because. Because we're talking to the same people that we've always talked about for these problems. And so that's the thing that I've that I've taken away from Matt from your experience here is that by stepping outside the echo chamber in going to a conference that was not security focused, even though it had security companies that were providing solutions there that wasn't the primary focus of it that I think that's really really powerful thing, and you got to interact with a whole other group of people who aren't gonna come to Defcon black hat apps. USA all those type of things that's my takeaway, man. What you what do you want to leave our listeners with as far as a summary and conclusions? I love your equa chamber concept because. Yeah, getting out of your comfort zone and seeing how a different industry experiences the exact same problems. He might be experiencing in the enterprise space or any other software world is was I opening for me not that I hadn't seen that stuff before. But it's like to have that comparison there, and I mentioned earlier, I'm big on tech that so I think we need to make tech. That removal and renewal an even more common saying in. We're getting all of these these phone Dacian pieces that should make that a a non issue, but we still find ourselves as a technology industry. Just kind of letting us coast by the same stuff for a long period of time that that has to end we have to get into the new world where we can more iterative -ly keep going through those those those pieces of software that we built to keep them fresh to keep the vulnerabilities down to improve enhance. What are we need to do? We can't just take something toss it over the wall on drop it on somebody else's machine and leave it there for twenty years. It just it doesn't work in the modern world. All right. Matt thank you for being here for a third visit on the F occasion security podcast, and we look forward to your fourth. Visit. I think we're probably gonna talk about becoming a manager in the world of absecon is the working title going from thanks for being here today and look forward to that next conversation. Awesome. Thanks. Having thanks for listening to the application security podcast. Our interim us is eight but kung FU by born TJ, and our outra music is southern delight by Stefan Carden Berg, get find the show on Twitter at absecon podcast or on the web at WWW dot security journey dot com slash application. Dash security dash podcast. You can also find Chris on Twitter at f- drought and Robert at Robert Earl bond. Remember security is a journey not a destination.

Matt developer Matt Clapham Robert I advisor security architect US Chris Romeo Michigan Matt Nye Google Detroit DOJ partner Robert Orlando Florida Twitter