35 Burst results for "I Left College"

Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:58 min | 9 hrs ago

Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

"Big announcements about vaccine distributions from the biden administration. Dr peter hotels who specializes in molecular virology microbiology at baylor. College of medicine says that the newly increased goal of one and a half million vaccine shots per day. The old goal was a million shots a day. Now president biden's has a million and a half shots per days. The goal dr houghton says even that might be enough. He's now arguing in the pages on the op-ed pages of the washington. Post that to get closer to what we need. We need to three million doses a day. How possible is that. And why is that the right number to aim at star peter. Hotels is co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's hospital. He's dina the national school. Tropical medicine at baylor dr hotels. It's a real honor to have you back with us tonight. Thank you for making time. Thanks rachel great to be here so these are big numbers. And it's hard to sometimes conceptualize what they mean. I know that we just got to the point as a country where we can do a million point one. Maybe one point two million shots day. Why do you say that that number the number we need to be aiming at is actually triple that we need to be up to three million a day. I first of all. I think it's really important not to diminish the the accomplishments of the biden administration. We've now got a national plan in place. We have a national vaccination strategy. We didn't have that before so In a matter of a week we've already got a national vaccine plan in place that's so absolutely important. So i give a lot of credit to the biden administration. I'm a little concerned. However that we're not picking up the pace fast enough. The reason i say that is our estimates. Indicate that in order to stop virus transmission remember. There's two things these vaccines do they keep you out of the hospital. In the icu. But if enough americans get vaccinated we could actually hold virus transmission potentially and we think that number is around three quarters of the us population of two hundred and forty million people. Most of the vaccines are two doses. So that's about half a billion immunizations that we have to take care of. And i want to do that by the beginning of the summer. Not the end of the suburb. Erase ahead of the virus variants. So the simple back of the envelope. Numbers are five hundred million over five months. That's a hundred million a month three million a day so we're only a striving for half of that and it's not good enough because we have the according to the centers for disease control now the uk variant may be the dominant variant in the united states by march or april the transmissions. Go way back even up way back up even though we're down by about twenty thirty percent now from where we are. That's only temporary. I think we're in the eye of the hurricane in those numbers are going to go back up. So i feel like even as ambitious as the plan is the biden plan is still not ambitious enough and we can have to vaccinate of half a billion people by the summer in order to prevent that terrible number of six hundred thousand. That's that's the bottom line. I want to save

Biden Administration Dr Peter Hotels College Of Medicine President Biden Dr Houghton Center For Vaccine Development Texas Children's Hospital Baylor Dr Hotels Baylor Dina Rachel Washington ICU United States Centers For Disease Control UK Biden
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 12 hrs ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport as NPR's Joe Parker reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country. And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be a fact, if for one thing they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for stars and so that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China. Caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Hopeless. He's nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the with the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives. A vaccine. Made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca's also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in several countries, including India. That country is also likely to have a vaccine candidate that will be inexpensive and widely available. But Judith Twigg says there's already another major entrant into the international vaccine arena. Back on August 11th the Russian government with great stand, Fehr announced the first in the world registration of a vaccine against Cove It twig is at Virginia Commonwealth University, and she follows Russian health policy closely. The Russian vaccine is what's known as a viral vector vaccine somewhat newer technology than the two leading Chinese vaccines. The Russians chose Sputnik V is the name for their vaccine. Tweak says They did that for a reason. They're very deliberately invoking imagery of Russia re emerging is great power status. We're back. We're at the scientific and technological top of the world, and we're ready to start sharing our technology with everyone. The problem there is that they had not only barely Started phase three clinical trials, They had barely started ramping up productions that was back in August. Twigg says production has ramped up and Russia now claims its vaccine is more than 90% effective, although data for that claim haven't been published yet for other scientists to scrutinize Several countries are ready to try the vaccine, including Argentina, Mexico and India. One thing is clear the world is going to need a number of vaccines to work if the global pandemic is really going to be brought under control. Joe

China Joe Parker Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Vassar College NPR J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Russia U. Polio Sars Judith Twigg International Vaccine Arena Russian Government Center For Strategic And Inter Indonesia Brazil
Coronavirus Economic Downturn Has Hit Latinos Especially Hard

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:15 min | 15 hrs ago

Coronavirus Economic Downturn Has Hit Latinos Especially Hard

"Economists hosted. Mondays is the president of the american society of hispanic economists which just released its annual report on the economic outlook for hispanics and by the way for this episode. We are using the term his annex as interchangeable with latinos because data how it is used in the report and by our guests and unsurprisingly report focused mainly on the effects of covid for example looking. At how the initial spread of the pandemic those first few months last year fell disproportionately on hispanics. You're talking about a group that already explained something like thirty three percent of all cova cases. Which is the highest among all the groups and they only constitute about eighteen percent of the population and part of the reason for this disproportionate effect. Is that hispanic. Households simply contain more people on average the non hispanic households. So it's easier for the virus spread. Yeah and more. Shockingly hispanics are also more than four times as likely to be hospitalized from covid as white non hispanics. And that's partly because hispanics are also more likely to have co morbidity like diabetes which may catching the virus more severe ms economic effects. The unemployment. rate for hispanics shut up higher than for any other racial or ethnic group in the early months of the pandemic survey from pew research. Find the nearly six out of ten hispanics lived in a household where someone either lost their job or took a pay cut. And this is partly because of the specific kind of work that disproportionately done by hispanics in the us. They were in a lot of ford facing jobs. A lot of central worker jobs that were either being laid off. You know forced to to go to work and eventually exposing their families to to cove it. So you're either you either have to go to your job or you're in a low pay job that was hit because of closures made by different governors right so you think of the restaurant industry. There's lots of cooks that are out there if you think about personal services so how many people have some over to their house to clean their house About forty percent of that industry is hispanics. Were doing that so when you are no longer allowing household employment to commit when. You're no longer allowing people to to do that work that that's a loss of income that's going on for hispanic workers. There's also an important distinction between the experiences of hispanic women latinos and hispanic men morning. You've got to see. It is the former president of the american society of hispanic economists and also contributed a study about latinas to the new hispanic economic outlook. Latina's tend to be areas that are very specific to service so leisure and of retaliatory or other services on retail sectors were had contact with clients and also tend to be sectors. That are are flexible. In terms of time or use of time but also sectors have very few benefits and overall latinos are more likely than non letting women to have multiple children and especially to be carrying for younger children and the burden of raising the kids often falls to them more than two hispanic men and latinos who are roughly in their prime working years aged twenty five to sixty five participate in the labor force at lower rates than women of other races ethnicities but in the years right before covid their participation rate had actually been going up not anymore. Latina's were starting to see. Alight economy was growing and and the social norms for changing too cold lead. The crisis has rain for some of those social norms and this dan impact latinas even further and covert manned up having another effects on the kind of service jobs that latinos disproportionately working but size that. It's how a latinos are in sectors in were the job kobe's subsitute by technology and during covid we are finding new ways to do things and even finding new ways to do services in the future what i would like to see what i would like to do and i would like to see. It's what is happening to this. Job are latinas laughed and how many of them are coming back. For example if more people in working from home after covid because of teleworking technology then there will be fewer customers for the restaurants and hotels that cater to them. And were many hispanics worked. Finally there is another way. In which the kobe pandemic made a big lingering effect on the economic future for hispanics the disruption to schools all the closures and reopenings and the different methods schools are using as they tried to teach kids sometimes online and sometimes in the classroom hispanic students already have big educational gaps between them and everyone else. For example hispanics are the least likely ethnic and racial minority group to have a college degree. Hosa says those gaps were likely shrinking over time as each successive generation of hispanics integrates more the us but the gaps are still big and the media in hispanic household has less than one fifth. The wealth of the median white household and so hispanic families are just less able to afford the kinds of workarounds. They can keep their kids learning at the right pace. You're not just talking about these. Twelfth graders you're talking about these fifth graders fourth graders. He's third graders. How do you teach things like reading. How do you see things as a fine ex through this type of interface. That gap is going to be there. It's gonna be persistent i. I know i'm gonna feel it on the shores of college when we see that their students arriving who are not ready and we're going to have to make adjustments to deal with with those things to deal with having them catch up. And so for hispanics. There remains a lot of uncertainty about what their economic outcomes will be throughout the rest of the pandemic and after both straightforward things like getting back their jobs and incomes and their kids learning in schools again but also for closing the disparities that still exist between how they experienced the economy and how

American Society Of Hispanic E Pew Research Diabetes Ford Latina United States DAN Hosa
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

02:57 min | 16 hrs ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Thank you. And the Corona virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport. As NPR's Joe Packer reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country, And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be If active for one thing, they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for SARS. So that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Copeland sees nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the With the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives of vaccine made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca is also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in

China Joe Packer Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Sars NPR U. Vassar College Russia Polio Copeland J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Indonesia Brazil Turkey Center For Strategic And Inter Oxford University
UCLA gymnast celebrates "Black Excellence" in viral floor routine

Dave Ramsey

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

UCLA gymnast celebrates "Black Excellence" in viral floor routine

"College athletes really know how to make a moment. Go viral. She starts on the mat by strutting like she's on the catwalk, then Nia Dennis gets to work. The U. C L A. Jim This is going viral after the school put a routine on social media that celebrates black excellence. Dennis says the routine was as much a mission statement as it was a reflection of those who came before her. It comes after another viral moment of hers last year, where she did her gymnastics floor routine to Beyonce's crazy in love. In both events. She got nearly a perfect score.

Nia Dennis A. Jim U. Dennis Gymnastics Beyonce
Hawley files ethics counter-complaint against seven Democratic senators

The Conservative Circus

00:20 sec | 1 d ago

Hawley files ethics counter-complaint against seven Democratic senators

"Josh Holly is filing a counter ethics complaint against seven of his Democratic colleagues. The Democrats last week requested an ethics probe into Holly and Senator Ted Cruz for their objections to the certification of the electoral college vote. Holy claims they filed an improper complaint without citing any relevant evidence.

Josh Holly Senator Ted Cruz Holly
New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:15 min | 2 d ago

New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

"Now anybody who has had any experience of life on this earth the last year or so. We'll be firmly of the belief that one strain of covid nineteen is more than enough as it spreads itself around the world however new variations keep being detected including one in the uk which appeared more readily transmissible a south african one which might be might be rather somewhat resistant to vaccines and brazilian one. Ditto small numbers of both of the latter have already been identified in the uk and dot dallas present elsewhere or on route. One joined with more. By dr chris smith monocle twenty fours health and correspondent also a virologist at cambridge university. Chris as we have discussed many times before all viruses mutate. What they do. Is this one doing so unusually quickly an door. Dramatically hello andrew. We don't think so in some respects. This is to be expected for the reason. You've outlined that the that all viruses mutate and change this one's no exception and therefore we're going to see a gentle drift or evolution of the virus specifically. We're going to see that happening. Most often. in parts of the world where the prevalence of the disease is highest in other words. Where you've got lots of people being infected. I'm passing the virus to lots of other people. That's loss of the roles of the genetic dice that the virus can take in order to accrue changes and optimize itself because at the end of the day viruses optimize themselves in order to spread most efficiently in their particular host and this is a new infection humans therefore it was pretty well adapted to us but not perfect. There's some room to maneuver and that's what the virus is doing. Its adjusting its behavior and its biology. A bit in order to spread most optimally among us. Humans the different variations though in different places those responses by the virus to local conditions. I guess whether it's it's climate or something else yes. Any kind of organism on earth is going to adapt itself in response to selective pressure applied by the environment in which it lives. These corona is a living in a human environment and therefore all behavior to a certain extent affects the behavior of the virus as we apply more selective pressure to it by making his job harder to spread between us for instance by social distancing through various other public health measures and spread control infection control. You'll going to select for viruses that all reproductive fitter in other words. They're better at doing what they do. And and in that way you'll get something that is usually more transmissible. That's what we saw the slight surprise here. Is this question about whether it is causing more severe illness or not now. Obviously the jury is a little bit out on this. At the moment we do have some directional data than that may be the case but it is early days of only just begun to take this trend. So we're not entirely sure whether this is a statistical artifact just a product to the fact there are lots of numbers and so the viruses is producing lots of infections. So we're seeing more severe infections or whether the genuine is evidence for higher talapity rate in each of the cases. So that figure we've been given by the uk government that suggests that the uk variant might be thirty percent More deadly which is an alarming sounding figure. Is it possible that figure is either less alarming than it sounds or actually not entirely accurate. Will the government put this across a downing street. Press briefing country balance-sheet presenting numbers in terms of deaths per thousand. And he said if you look at say a sixty year old man the risk with the parent strain of corona virus of that person passing away. If you had ten people with a thousand people with krona vars you might get ten people with die with this new variant that ten rises to thirteen or fourteen hence a forty or thirty percent increase in the mortality rate so they are nevertheless odds to emphasize the case fatality rate remains very low so in other words we haven't got something that's killing thirty percent people what we've got something that appears to based on the data that initially have been analyzed. Be a little bit more lethal as in not for the person. Obviously if you die but it's on average killing slightly more people than before but we don't know for sure if that's the case i mean. We have got a number of studies that present this london school hygiene tropical medicine of showing that the the risk ratio is about one point three five times greater with the new variant than the over one point three five. That's a thirty five percent increase. Imperial college of donna. Study then numbers range somewhere between high twenties to mid thirties. In terms of percentage increase in risk ecstasy university They did a smaller study. One point nine one was there multiple in other words. It's ninety percent worse. A public health england cited figure one and a half or so so therefore all of them seem to be centering on there being an increase in risk. But we don't know exactly how big that risk is but we think there is one but we need to reassure ourselves. This is real finding. it's not just a product of the fat. We're seeing lots of infections with this new air. It might be that. We're there foreseeing because of the disguise of the the problem more people who are at risk of having a severe infection. Cropping up with this very factional. They are trying to control for that so it doesn't like it might be real

Dr Chris Smith UK Cambridge University Dallas Andrew Chris Imperial College Of Donna London England
Trump entertained plan to install an attorney general who would help him pursue baseless election fraud claims

The Daily Beans

04:49 min | 2 d ago

Trump entertained plan to install an attorney general who would help him pursue baseless election fraud claims

"Lead story. Today comes from the new york times and they say quote. The justice department's top leaders listened in stunned silence this month. One of their peers. They were told had devised a plan. Along with trump to oust. Jeffrey rosen as acting attorney. General and we'll the department's power to force georgia state. Lawmakers to overturn the presidential election results. This unassuming lawyer. Who worked on the plans names. Jeffrey clarke had been devising ways to cast doubt on the election results to bolster trump's continuing legal battles and the pressure on georgia politicians. Because mr jeffrey rosen had refused the president's entreaties to carry out those plans mr trump was about to decide whether to fire. Mr rosen and replace him with mr kark danial remember. We were talking about like. who's this. Jeffrey rosen person. And i was like well his career official. I don't think he's going to go along with the bullshit. Turns out we were right. He did not go along with the bullshit. The department officials convened on a conference. Call then ask each other. what would you do. If mr rosen was dismissed and the answer was unanimous. they would all resign in protest They're informed packed. Ultimately persuaded trump. To keep rosen in place calculating that a furor over mass resignations at the top of the justice department would eclipse any attention on his baseless accusations. Voter fraud so he didn't he didn't do it for the right reasons. He said If you everyone resigned and mass it would take. He wouldn't say and mass if everyone was designed all at once. Take away attention from my lies. And so he didn't and trump's decision came only after rosen and clark made their competing cases to him in a bizarre white house meeting to officials compared with an episode of the apprentice albeit one that could prompt a constitutional crisis. This should be looked at and light of the impeachment article that will be sent to the senate as majority leader. Chuck schumer has agreed to delay the impeachment trial until february eighth. Some people think that this shows weakness. I do not. I think this was a calculated political shrewd. Move by chuck schumer. I think it allows more evidence to come out about the insurrection which will make it more difficult for republicans to acquit. And i wanna be clear here not because they have morals but because voters do and voters will be holding them responsible It's going to be more morally difficult for them to acquit. And a lot of people say well. We had the momentum. Right after the insurrection to get this vote to acquit and then additional vote to prevent it from running for office again. But that's not the case they wouldn't have had seventeen republicans and they still don't today but as we start to learn more we may be able to push more republicans over the edge and again not because they have morals but because the people who vote them into office do and some of that evidence came to light this weekend including the arrest of a man who had plans to assassinate alexandria. Ocasio cortez self-styled militia members from virginia ohio and states also made plans to storm the capital days in advance and then communicated in real time as they breached the building on both sides and talked about hunting for lawmakers and that's according to court documents filed tuesday while authorities have charged more than one hundred individuals in the riott details in the new allegations against three. Us military veterans offer a very disturbing look at what they allegedly said to one another before during and after the attack statements that indicate a degree of preparation determination to rush deep into the halls and tons of congress to make citizens arrests of elected officials and they even mentioned sealed sealing off the tunnels and and putting gas in them. Us authorities charged the apparent leader of the oath keepers That's an extremist group. Thomas caldwell sixty six of virginia. They're all from virginia in the attack. Alleging that the navy veteran helped organize a ring of dozens who coordinated their movements as they quote stormed the castle to disrupt the confirmation of biden's electoral college victory. Despite this current department of justice officials and federal law enforcement officials are privately debating whether they should declined to charge some of the individuals who stormed the capital so politically loaded proposition. But one alert to the practical concern that hundreds of such cases cases could swamp the local courthouse. You know tough shit. Internal discussions are in the early stages. No decisions have been reached whether to forego charging some of these folks and that's according to multiple people familiar with the discussions and we also learned that trump's campaign paid more than two point seven million dollars over two years to individuals and firms that organized the january sixth rally that led to the riot And that's according to the center for responsive politics and these payments which span trump's reelection campaign. Show an ongoing financial relationship between rally organizers and trump's political operation they were all made through november twenty third the most recent date covered by the federal election commission filings. Which is before the rally was publicly announced. I'm sure we'll see more in the next. Fcc filing so. That's where we are.

Jeffrey Rosen Jeffrey Clarke Mr Jeffrey Rosen Mr Trump Mr Rosen Mr Kark Danial Justice Department Chuck Schumer Donald Trump Rosen Georgia Ocasio Cortez The New York Times Virginia Thomas Caldwell White House Clark Senate Alexandria
The second Trump impeachment trial is set for February. What happens next?

America in the Morning

02:35 min | 2 d ago

The second Trump impeachment trial is set for February. What happens next?

"After the hour. The impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is scheduled to start early next month. As the Senate lays out plans for the action correspondent Clayton Nevil tells us some Republicans argue a trial doesn't deserve much purpose. Former President Donald Trump was impeached for the second time just days before his presidency ended. The House voted to impeach on grounds of inciting insurrection related to the deadly breach of the U. S. Capitol earlier this month. Some lawmakers argue Trump had a role in the violence by repeatedly touting unproven claims of election fraud and riling up a crowd is electoral college votes were tallied. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the impeachment trial in the Senate will begin February 8th. With House managers reading the articles at seven o'clock tonight

Donald Trump Clayton Nevil Senate U. House Chuck Schumer
Interview With Dustin Marks, A Former Crossroader

Gangland Wire

05:01 min | 2 d ago

Interview With Dustin Marks, A Former Crossroader

"Welcome all you are. Tappers out there today Have our friend mob museum blogger larry. Henry and larry also is a regular blogger for the casino industry at www dot. Casino dot org. You might wanna check lessons website. Www dot destined marks dot com. You can find his book cheating black. Jackie may learn something. Maybe can go out and win a whole bunch of money at blackjack. Is that lose it like i do. Welcome destined welcome. Thanks larry good to have you here. Great to be here gary thanks. Hi dustin looking forward to it so it'll be fun so dustin you're a crush rotor. I- learned that term on your website that a gaming cheat in the casino industry is called a crossroad. Her now are you a crossroad. Are you a magician. You started out as a magician. Ombo but i'm retired crossroad. And i just don't do the magic across rivers. A person who specializes in cheating. The legal casinos and i was mainly doing the crossroad in las vegas nevada and nevada but mainly grace and this was back in the knits so destined. You got your start as magician. Tell me a little bit about how you got your start as a magician amid just come to you. Natural ngop just growled to cartridge or actually My father took me to see an amateur medicines front of the family as just seven years old. And he's older provenance sixties. Now didn't move very well but the mad at those cards in his hand he became young again and it just looked like magic to me out. Flip right then and there. So did you start like plan with decks of cards and learn how to shuffle them. Fancy and manipulate them and hold them own. Yeah but back then. There is no youtube or even videos library and get magic and try to figure out how to do the card tricks. Manipulations have maze. All your friends with your card tricks. Yeah of course yes very young so my audience besides my parents. Yeah really did you continue on as a young man. Did you try to earn a living as a magician and always happy who is more of a hobby than i went to college when he's throwing clinton fraternity had all the active members. Think i could read their minds. Wouldn't mess with me as much nagging. Little shows and stuff and i got really really interested in magic and i started buying books now over mateen nineteen twenty and i started realize all the best card meant that mainly to card magic lived in las vegas nevada and these were just magician. Jimmy ripple michelson. All hairs garo list goes on and on so. That's what really made me move to las vegas nevada back in nineteen eighty-three to learn more about magic. And i guess there's a lot of work for magic axe would imagine out there interesting. So how did you want you got out there. Did you immediately think these cartridge If i can manipulate the cars. Could i then go in. Earn electra. money at the casinos by manipulating cards. Not immediately there was are still going is called. Jerry darwin's magic. They started in the seventies. So i found out about it. Eighty-three took there's no internet took me about couple of months track down. We're in the hill net. A finally found worthing. Matinee met at that time wednesday night. Starting at nine pm so remember walking in there the first night in there i see allen akard i see paul hairs i see jimmy group all naser. All names familiar with. Is i their books back in the mid west room from and they were very friendly they welcomed me and showed me stuff so in about nine then months went from like ten percent. The ninety percent is studying with the best world. Wow really exciting for somebody never met anybody in the magic field per say what would be an example of something that they taught you. That was like to me would look like magic. Where would be an example of a lot of it was principles more than the actual moves. How not to look guilty. When you're doing a move out of being natural how to use misdirection. You can't catch anything if your attention is over here. And i'm doing something over there. That's the whole concept. Not just for magic but for now cheating at the game of blackjack any game so is managed. Somebody's attention interesting. Really really interesting. And then of course it showed me moves at one even both shad stuff. They were working on so it was really a fantastic education.

Larry Nevada Gary Thanks Dustin Las Vegas Jimmy Ripple Michelson Jackie Henry Jerry Darwin Allen Akard Paul Hairs Youtube Clinton Jimmy
Impact Learning with Jared Magee

Overthrowing Education

03:52 min | 2 d ago

Impact Learning with Jared Magee

"The school we've rebranded as impact learning. I would love to hear about impact learning so the impact then is we. We basically take in some of this exciting stuff that we do and rolled a lot of into several of our dynamic programs together and so we clearly. You recognize that one's high school education is going to have a pretty decent impact on them right. And we're hoping that we can through impact learning this sort of Attempt at dynamism make it even more again personalized and something that a kid can feel great about and so if the learning is interesting to that student research shows that they'll learn retain more if they believe in what's what they're learning is really important to them in their future research shows they'll learn and retain more and we also and the research that we've seen says that if you do something rather than just listening or watching and being passive it you'll you'll learn and retain more so impact. Learning is is a combination of two or three programs. We've had in the past. One is our co lab program that is short for collaborative learning. We type it out really funky. Because it's a mash up of two words. Co lab is collaborative laboratory. Yes just so for those of you. Who are listening at home. Sure you are. It's capital c. o. L. and then lab in in the middle of that is all caps and then thank you so much for that. I appreciate that. It is a little confusing. When i say at allowed right but it's right it's a it's a cool idea when you see it. The visual of it is very telling about whether it's all about so in that way. Tell us what it's all about sure. Well the concept is for these courses the miniature courses and they've had lived many different lives have been reincarnated time and time again but the brass tacks are that it's interdisciplinary utterly immersive in utterly collaborative between a group of students and their instructor essentially well before cova came. And reinvented the world. It was very much field-based just constantly in the field trying to certainly emphasize fundamental skills and habits mind but also helping students delve into interests or cultivate passions. You know explore those curiosities and make sure that is a passion that they want to cultivate an in that you know. Of course you try to touch on character and risk taking and persistent all that good stuff but you know time and time again we tell the story in in our co labs we also have it as part of our collaborative program internships and independent projects. So a student can be a little bit more independent in that that reach other than the faculty led stuff and one good example of of what we're talking about when we mean cultivating that curiosity and insuring. It really is something passion that you want to move ever forward with is we had one young lady. We arranged for her helped her get an internship at a local hospital and they were there. Were a great partner hospital there in gardner massachusetts and she went in and saw some blood drawn day one of her of her nursing ship or sort of pre nursing internship. Pass right out out out right. And here's this girl. Her entire college search her entire high school trajectory had been aimed at med school. And all of her. She's a senior oliver schools. That she's looking at our nursing schools in one day of hat program like the actual practical application of that in. Just you know seeing if this curiosity really truly is something. She wants to cultivate into a passion. She pursues she very quickly. Sort of took a left turn and decided. Maybe this isn't for me. No and it's so much better to do with hat when you're in high school and there's still plenty

Cova Gardner Med School Massachusetts
Walter Bernstein, Blacklisted Screenwriter of ‘The Front,’ Dies at 101

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

Walter Bernstein, Blacklisted Screenwriter of ‘The Front,’ Dies at 101

"Nominated screenwriter of the Magnificent Seven Walter Bernstein has died. The Brooklyn born prolific writer long time member of the Writers Guild, East counsel. He often, though, didn't write under his own name because he was blacklisted for years because of anti communist sentiment during the McCarthy era in the U. S back in the 19 fifties. He talked about constantly being interviewed by the FBI was always the same. It's stopping saved like talking. I'd say nothing. They go away. Let you know they knew where you were what you were doing and we have friends were scary. Was not fun. Bernstein also penned semi tough The Molly Maguires Fail safe. He used his own experiences during the McCarthy era to write the Oscar nominated script for the Front and later years, he taught screenwriting at Columbia University and why you and City College Walter Bernstein was 101 years old.

Walter Bernstein Writers Guild Brooklyn FBI Bernstein Mccarthy Oscar Columbia University City College
Walter Bernstein Dies: Blacklisted Writer In 1950s Who Returned With ‘Fail Safe’ & ‘The Front’ Was 101

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 3 d ago

Walter Bernstein Dies: Blacklisted Writer In 1950s Who Returned With ‘Fail Safe’ & ‘The Front’ Was 101

"From a black list to the Oscars. Screenwriter Kevin is, too young writer Walter Bernstein has died. He was had amazing career in television and movies. He was a TV writer in 1950 when he was a band because he's been a member of the Communist Party is a college student. Bernstein talked about how he found out We're changing the format A. We need from writer even using you too much. Whatever the reason you give writers And But you're on some kind of list. Russell didn't know It was some kind of list. I was on And that was it. After that. I knew what it was Bernstein camp working with pseudonyms and ultimately wrote about his experience in Woody Allen's the Front. I'm not a right Don't be a defeatist. The guy's wrote those scripts, not May. I put my name on them. They were. They were blacklist that I was helping him out. It's it's my name and their scripts. He want a Writers Guild award and was nominated for an Oscar for that script. He also wrote the scripts of the Magnificent Seven Fail Safe and many more. Walter Bernstein was a longtime member of the Writers Guild East Counsel. The guild named an award in his honor in 2017. Died Friday night. His wife says The cause was pneumonia. Walter Bernstein was 101.

Walter Bernstein Bernstein Oscars Communist Party Kevin Writers Guild Award Woody Allen Russell Writers Guild East Counsel Oscar Pneumonia
With COVID-19 variant positives, Michigan pauses athletics

News, Traffic and Weather

00:38 sec | 3 d ago

With COVID-19 variant positives, Michigan pauses athletics

"Major College sports program has had to pause all of its events. It's because of Copan 19 says. ABC is Todd. And while many schools just had to postpone games, the entire University of Michigan Athletic Department is shutting down for two weeks after several individuals tested positive for the UK Variant B 117, while acknowledging that canceling games is something they never want to do, Michigan's athletic director, said in a statement. Quote with so many unknowns about this variant of covert 19, we must do everything we can to minimize the spread. The Wolverines men's basketball team is right. Seventh of the country and beat Purdue on Friday. While the 11th ranked women's team lost to Ohio State Thursday. Both teams could potentially miss four games.

Major College University Of Michigan Athleti Copan Todd ABC UK Michigan Wolverines Basketball Purdue Ohio
Yarning & Darning, Meatloaf Catapult, naughty Limericks, Raptor piles. - burst 7

Keep Calm and Cauliflower Cheese Podcast

15:53 min | 3 d ago

Yarning & Darning, Meatloaf Catapult, naughty Limericks, Raptor piles. - burst 7

"Newspapers. And we them to a trump or indeed a trombone. And so i i up on the ocoee. This This session we have women. Crates genderless pack of playing cards so at queen trump king So in the day and age where we're conscientious and i'm passionate about gender equality. Have you ever stopped to wonder why. The male monarchs still trump's queen in a pack of cards. This is something that doesn't sit right with a twenty three year old indian. Melnick says she decided to take matters into her hands. The forensic psychology graduate spent a while thinking about how she can make a change after a lot of trialing creating agenda listen race neutral deck of cards king queen and jack instead replaced with gold silver and bronze the gupta modern set of cards of the modern world. If we have the skyrocketed the king is worth more than the queen and this subtle inequality influences people in their daily lives. But it makes me think though is the joker the joke i mean would he be like a unit. Would he be genderless. So there'd be no bell shaking his head. How does one play old made. Now could all may be an old queen maybe Maybe it's just all three contract and the data shown off the incredible harry potter theme secret. Hideaway cry different. Dalton the cupboard under the stairs his creation is far from the dusty room full of spiders. Harry called his bedroom and does the household with dad finishing the project in time to unveil it to his eight year old daughter at christmas. The outside of the cup is decorated with portrayed and the fat lady who caused the engines to griffin tower with visitors having to know the correct password to gain access the dole then swings open to reveal raven clo- flag the house in which is door to assorted into and the floating candles hanging from the ceiling. But i'm just thinking the dad is correct. Corrected is wondrous harry potter kingdom for his daughter. They can have to have an extension especially for hagrid. Who's a slightly wider. Wizard and a chinese restaurant owned has been praised for extremely honest menu descriptions before taking the plunge in ordering food from a new restaurant. People often look at reviews. Tripadvisor google But what you expect to see the only the restaurant leaving their own critique But fair gang fe avant die in montreal. Canada prefers to give customers extremely honest opinions of his food. The menu was shed by finding the restaurant came and the user praised the owner for keeping it. Real so with the orange beef the owners words comparing it to our general south chicken. This one is not good anyway. I'm not a big fan of north american chinese food and not say your call if you're going to choose it so the owner also revealed that he's not a fan of the sweet and spicy pork strikes for this different version. He used a eaten at university. In china I would hate him to describe the essence of prom balls his menu as sarcasm a lot more sour than sweet with added msg and the woman. Hsieh's genius liberal attest to find out if your partner is cheating. A woman has been praised for fbi levels of investigation after sharing hilarity. Simple method discovery. If you're never gonna has been unfaithful us. It's more than one point. Seven million followers and discovered clip the captioned how to fund it. If you man's cheating is wrapped more than twelve million views she lady. If you want to find out if your guys cheating on you get yourself and roll it all over the carpet. Andrew andrew. The news of the lint roller over the floor in bedrooms boyfriends bedroom picking up plenty of dust along the way appear to be a few strands of red hair has impossible to spot before i mean in this case i mean what what happens if it was the most impressive red headed hound. The nova scotia duck tolling. She had one of those in the pack and could be picking up the red hair off the carpet and it was a nova scotia. Duck tolling retriever. Who has been locks as well or maybe. The boyfriend had some sort of poodle. Perversion and the manny changes his name to selene on. After having far too much to drink a thirty year old man decided to change. Name to selene dion. After having too many glasses of wine thomas dot otherwise known as slain. Had the idea while watching the canadian series concerts. He thought it'd be great idea to pay eighty-nine eighty nine dollars officially take her name but completely forgot about The official depot documents landed this wednesday On his doorstep and really and the found out that he had actually whilst drunk changes name to indeed celine dion Apparently had had enough wine to sink. The titanic the and he just said salabi. My heart will go on But he certainly didn't feel like he was king of the world after that and oscar mayer is hiring. Hotdog is dry. The of bill. Have you been looking for something that will stand out on your resume. Are you the kind of person who wants to work your buns off while meeting hotdog fans across the country or maybe history into jarring driving away com. This could be your lucky day. Because is looking to hire new approve hotdogs to drive the oscar mayer wiener mobile the chicago-based companies looking for recent college graduates to take a one year. Pay job crisscrossing the country in a long long twenty foot long hot joke shaped vehicle. I mean you might need bernie to come along and sanitize the wiener mobile It may not be a good example to encourage hot dogging especially when hot peppers or pickles are involved and a bodybuilder is married. A sex though revealed she tragically broke just before christmas. Yuri took all go from. Kazakhstan is now waiting to see if his wife called. Margot can be repaired in time. A just after christmas. She's broken now. she's being repaired. She's in another city when she recovers big gift for both of us. He did explain how margot that he married. The sex dole got broken. And i guess in this case it was a sex. Wasn't just for christmas so there were no trusted frolics for him. Maybe next time he should try. Would've not crocodile certainly more wooden in the bedroom and indeed have a capsule jaw and south carolina couple accused of having sex and a two hundred foot. Tall ferris wheel is facing lewdness charge of public lewdness and the incident was captured on video. Which police allegedly found uploaded on a porn site. Eric and laurie harmon or both arrested. Charges of indecent exposure The record shine police found the gio having sex in a glass chamber in the landmark Be sky will but apparently there had sex on the other Rides as well. I mean this case. I mean in this case. They were caught dilling on the dipper. Fiddling on the ferris. Luckily there were no cotton candy or sticky toffee apples involved. Apparently they did feel that they had the patent pass which was access to lara's and finally the first preserved dinosaur bottle is perfect and unique paleontologist said the first dina. Dinosaur battle ever discovered the shedding light. Where the sun doesn't shine the discovery reveals how dinosaurs use this multi-purpose opening scientifically known as the local vent off all all three items here number one two and breeding as well the dinosaurs dairy so preserved research. You could see the remnants a small bulges on its back door which my house musky scent glands. The reptile possibly used during courtship. I mean in this case. I wonder if these press stark poopers ever had hemorrhoids. It could it could indeed be a ruptured raptor. Okay okay so we have. The twenty-first limerick in the twenty one salute for the president joe biden. And i think we we do we do without a doubt have to do a a desert. there's no doubt we have to do. We have to do one of the ones. There was a young lady named hitchen who was scratching across in the kitchen. Her mother said rose. It's a crabs. I suppose she said yes in. The bug is rich in okay. So let's open the antique anglo. Ach so in the anglo and got this week we have some more foods We have the bird's-eye custody trifle So basically for all of our listeners. All around the world who did not travelers at the bottom. You have canned fruit. That has jello and jelly. And then there's a layer of English custard in the middle and then it's whipped cream on top and you have lashings of sherry. I remember many years ago. My mother will attest to this are is at school. And they were serving trifle and the gentleman who was serving it In gave me a dollop of this trifle. And i said i do. Hope this sherry in it sir. My mother always put sherry in the costed. Seventy one like sasa i one bird's-eye custard a trifle custard. And then i never remember this but capris did instant mashed potato now. I know that was an advert where there were basically robots doing the smash potato And they were making this robert sip-it like cement mashed potato and that was something that we ate in the as well instant mashed potato and then you had the delicious caramel banana flavored angel. Delight is basically for americans pudding and it's a powder mixed it with milk stirred it up. And then i think. Let it in the fridge for a little bit. And you have the most delicious pudding the caramel or or salted caramel whatever. It was and the banana flavor. Were out of this world. It was like heaven heaven in a little glass bowl and all the other children in the eighties. Were were eating that but the best of all legs gentlemen. Let me introduce you to via natta. Now i think we have via netter every sunday during During the summer is an ice cream. Basically and it was layers of creamy Vanilla ice cream with very slender pieces of dark chocolate spread all the way through. It was like an dot chocolate bars and chocolate on top. We've creamy vanilla ice cream and let it melted a little bit because you don't want to completely frozen and it was absolutely delicious and some of the people on twitter would say in celebration also the vetter always sought the annetta. Look like cuttlefish vice versa. thursday night always shopping night. Vinet gone by eight o'clock It was supposed to lost to wake lived on these during three power cut. Three power cuts. We just left them outside the floor out. Veneta was only served in a sunday dinner. it was a classier ice cream any other night. It was the awful vanilla from the plastic tub and a mate with trying to impress a girl invited around for a meal border veneta for pudding but left it in his bag and it started to melt. He genuinely believed that if he stuck it in the freezer reconfigure and it did not Every time we went to my aunt betty's it was the pudding choice then at a hands down hands up everybody who spent ages trying to cut through the bottom layer frozen chocolate before realizing it was the brown plastic tray. So there we go. That's the Antique anglo ark. This week we have veneta bird's-eye Trifle and we had the angel delight delicious dessert three marvelously. Nine hundred eighty s desserts. So thank you very much. Listening to the podcast is been a momentous week. The world changes week. Isn't it so nice to have boring game either. The boring Regiments have government going on as normal without hysteria twitter 'isms and everything else. So we had all twenty one limerick salute for the irish heritage of joe biden. And thank you very much. For listening to the podcast. This week we did ever touch on. Liz hurley's bikini marmalade exploits. We didn't touch on me trying to reintroduce the perfect baked potato. We have time next week. Folks we have plenty of time. We have all the time in the world to discuss The wondrous Baked potato and how you should cook it. abbas hurley making marmalade in a bikini. Which i think. I'm going to try this week and then i'm going to maybe a champagne marmalade in a in a in probably a man caney bar style this week and hopefully there won't be any smattering without a doubt. But it's been lovely to have you here Lovely to have you on the podcast. This week keep coming cauliflower cheese and cheese on twitter at keep coming cauliflower cheese on instagram likened subscribe. i'm across spotify apple music Also i'm a shoot in iheart radio pandora everywhere people everywhere and yes logging. Enjoy it I mean it may be something. Maybe i could send you a sleep at night. If you're insomniac it could be. It could be the you know the better than the sound machine. Although i have to say my love did get a sound machine and the crackling. Fire the crackling fire is absolutely delightful and it makes me sleep. The baby and i highly recommend the sound machine if you have trouble sleeping and is absolutely wondrous invention but that's been the podcast We all going to finish with a never shameless heaney poem. One of biden's favorites to to close the day. It's bell doug they just keep turning up and were ford as those foreign one eyed and benign. They lie about his house. Cranston's out of a ball to lift the lid of the pete and find this pupil dreaming of neolithic wheat when he stripped off blanket bog soft piled centuries. Open like a glib there. Were the first plough marks. The stone age fields the tomb call beld turfed and chambered flawed with writer. Comb landscape fossilized stonewall patterns repeated before our eyes and the stonewalls of mayo. Before i turned

Griffin Tower Selene Dion Harry Potter Andrew Andrew Salabi Melnick Tall Ferris Laurie Harmon Hsieh Dalton Hitchen Oscar Mayer Bell Montreal Harry Manny
Philadelphia Eagles interviewing Washington Football Team DB coach Chris Harris for DC job

Weekends

02:38 min | 3 d ago

Philadelphia Eagles interviewing Washington Football Team DB coach Chris Harris for DC job

"Naturally After After the Eagles made the higher Of Nick Syriani. Started wanting yourself. I will. What's the staff going to be? You know, looking like here? I wonder who's gonna hire Willie Go with a veteran coordinator on the offensive side. What happens on the defensive side, etcetera, so In Rapoport rap sheet at rap sheet from the NFL network. Tweeted out about nine minutes ago that the Eagles are interviewing Washington football team defensive backs coach Chris Harris for their vacant defensive coordinator job. According to a source hey describes him. Rappaport does as a fast rising coach. Harris also played eight years in the NFL. So There's a name. Um You know? Certainly again. I always say when we're when we're talking about this kind of stuff, um Yeah. Even though the name doesn't blow you away doesn't mean that person isn't necessarily The right choice for the gig. Right? I mean, you know, certainly someone who I would think they I'm not saying they want to go like completely away. From Jim Schwartz. I don't mean schematically, but maybe Personality wise approach Y so Harris is he'll be 39 in August, Always 38 years old. He's AH D backs coach for the Washington football team. He was drafted by the Bears in the sixth round in 2005 played his college ball. Louisiana Monroe. He was on the Panthers, the Lions and the Jags. As well S O. That's his background. He, you know, kind of bounced around during his career. He's coached in Chicago, He was hired his defensive quality coach, and that's the way a lot of guys start under John Fox. 2013. He then went to the Chargers in 2016. I'm guessing this is where he and Syriani cross cross paths. With the Chargers. They were there at the same time aunt he joined the Washington football team as the defensive backs coach this past season under Ron Rivera, so That's the little quick bio the quick M O there on on Chris Harris. So that's what we're looking at. There

Nick Syriani Eagles NFL Chris Harris Harris Rappaport Football Willie Washington Louisiana Monroe Jim Schwartz Jags Panthers Bears Chargers Lions John Fox Chicago Ron Rivera
Samantha Tomaszewski, social strategy leader, BuzzFeed, on career in social media audience engagement

Journalism.co.uk podcast

08:09 min | 6 d ago

Samantha Tomaszewski, social strategy leader, BuzzFeed, on career in social media audience engagement

"Today. We're gonna talk about audience work samantha. I think maybe a useful place to start might be with you. You're of course the social strategists of commerce for buzzfeed. He told me exactly what that means. Yeah so i. Focused specifically on buzzfeed has an entire shopping and commerce. Vertical on that helps generate revenue for the site so i focus on the Social strategy that has to do specifically with. Yeah our shopping. Vertical commerce that we have different facebook and instagram account We should affiliations through the app. Trying to get people to view and hopefully convert and shop from buzzfeed shopping's content and you'll training is actually journalism. Right yes yeah. I went to lehigh. University and i studied journalism political science. So how'd you go from as journalists to to what you do now because they seem slightly not far apart but they of course. Different skills and disciplines. Yeah an. I honestly think this is why i enjoy doing a lot of like student. Mentorship conversations is something that i do in my spare time because i love to talk to students about how i went from my studies university to Where i am now and the kind of important middle pieces. I also worked for huffpost for about three years as an audience editor. That was definitely more than new space before. I made the transition to commerce but it was definitely my treating from school. That got me there where i did study. You know a lot of social media. And i worked for my student newspaper editor-in-chief so i think a lot of practical experience that i get in college was able to help me leverage interviews and opportunities that they did come up after i graduated. This is going to be useful for more. We're about to about to talk about what i don't understand is where does your journalistic thread really still help you today. yeah i think in conversations with students are being active on twitter. And i think yeah. It's definitely helped me again. Even though i am in the commerce face now that i do approach it from maybe a different perspective somebody who has a marketing background or a different sort of training. And i think that's helped me sort of succeed in that role in yet. Maybe look at marketing ecommerce from a different lens at a different angle that kind of that journalistic training and news is still kind of always been like my passionate. My background yes. It's been cool to kind of approach. A new different challenge in like a slightly different discipline. With that lens. so samantha at the stop december. You had a twitter thread which seemed to go on a quite a bit of attention and just gonna take a few moments to read through that for our audience who may not seen it. You say i was on the mentoring cool with a student about to graduate college and she told me that a member of a fairly popular journalism organization gave her some discouraging advice. This person told her not to go into audience work. she was taught. That should be better off working in a reporter all covering political committee even if no one read her work. I was shocked. And that's really the main part of the the tweet you to talk about the kind of skills that you acquire through working in social and how that might help to make you a better journalist editor in chief had of audience etc and basically saying the audience. Work is a valid career path for me. What kind of stuck out with this. And what seemed to be the main thrust of the compensation that audience roles in journalism at least are perhaps not taking seriously as some of the more traditional roles still existent in the newsroom. So can you recap on. Wherever where this threat came from the impetus for that was sure. Yeah i expected to take off as much as it did but obviously it was very encouraging to see that so many people have strong reactions to it. And we're coming out in support of what. I was saying that that was great and i think it was just that i had spoken to the student and i had such like a you know on one hand infuriating but on the other hand like poignant sort of anecdote from her about somebody telling her that she shouldn't go into audience work in that she would be better off being a reporter doing work that nobody was even reading which doesn't really make sense to me. That was just. She clearly had been so affected by being told that even though her passion was an audience. I just wanted to try and you know in my conversation with her. I tried to tell her that. That certainly wasn't true. I've been able to find a path for it myself. But i just wanted to speak to that to the journalism community at large in some way Because i was so shocked that someone would tell like a growing journalists that I'm not asking you to to name drop of course but can you be more specific about the type of news organization. That had sort discouraged her in this way. And i don't even she didn't even name. I don't know the individual who it was and that's obvious he never would. It was about but you know a fairly large digital mu organization in one that does promote journalism and digital media yagi Specific affiliation with the organization. Or anything like that. You know what. I'm trying to get a picture of where that kind of attitude has come from. We're talking about you said digital media company based in the us deny yes legacy your print media. That's what was interesting is that it was coming from somewhere that i wouldn't have expected this sort of advice navy to come from interest and in your experiences this like an isolated event. You hear this a lot. Yeah i mean. I think i've also experienced a lot. Even you know by career so far in you know. Both of the newsroom's i've worked in and buzzfeed Post there obviously. The vast majority of people are incredibly supportive of the audience team. But i do think it is sometimes struggle to get your foot in the door in certain meetings or to get your opinions out by certain journalists. Who may be you know are entrenched in some of these older schools of thought about what even is audience worker. Why is it important. So i think i've seen that. There is still a learning process. Even when i've been in newsrooms trying to do the work that i do cleaning they'll put you off. No no because. I think it is. It is important so i think it's really rewarding when you do maybe get through to somebody who didn't understand how you can help them in. Their story goes viral on twitter. Because you mockup a tweet thread. That does really well. Then they see the value of it. I think there's constantly a need for audience enters to try to prove and show results and data for what they're doing and i do you know have found that rewarding as well to be able to show people like. Here's what we can do to elevate your work like look at works that it's really exciting. So i mean the thrust of that conversation. Was it very much. That audience roles are just not as integral to the newsroom. Or was it that they just kind of look down on a as i said from the beginning like not taking seriously. What was called the main bone of contention like disgust here. Yeah i mean. I think all of those things are potentially depending yet. I think who you're talking to. I think obviously. I was speaking to the student as like a career conversation. She was about to graduate and she was trying to figure out what she should pursue. So i think it was. You know maybe they aren't as integral to newsroom so she shouldn't do it because maybe they're not stability there but again i know i shared with her. You know it's just one experience. But i have. I've experienced stability in far in my career. you know. obviously they're always layoffs in media yet. I think against you that if you wanted to have a future in journalism she was getting told that maybe this wasn't the right path for her. Because i think that was another point in my thread is she has an interest in politics. She was getting told. You know if you wanna go into political journalism you have to be like a beat reporter and that's the only way you can get there but again i don't really think that's true and something else. I tried to outline in my throat is how many great skills you do learn being an audience that can transfer to being reported. You know people who have moved into production or product or any sort of area in media and beyond so. I think i was really just trying to emphasize that it is a valid career path. We shouldn't be telling young journalists that it's not

Samantha Twitter Instagram Lehigh Facebook Navy United States
It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

04:43 min | Last month

It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

"Hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers.

Florida Michigan Mary South Florida Chicago Golf John
"i left college" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:46 min | 9 months ago

"i left college" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Those leaving college do what you think is right doing what feels good what's convenient what's easy that's all kids thank unfortunately a lot of so called grown ups including some with fancy titles important jobs still think that way which is why things are so screwed up that notwithstanding states and territories continue loosening virus related restrictions CBS news update on top forty and KCBS news time now at the nine net thirty two has our news watch continues this week we've been airing a special series highlighting the fight against the covert nineteen pandemic in one of San Francisco's most vulnerable neighborhoods the Bayview district in this rebroadcasts of the series we are calling a crisis and community KCBS as was across reports on the community organizing at the heart of that fight begins with a strong sense of neighborhood pride San Francisco's Bayview offers more than relative affordability it is a true community says artist Nate Watson who moved to the neighborhood about four years ago more than you know living on the lets you street or Oakland or any of the places that I live here in the bay area I feel like people really get out of their homes and they talk to each other here you and I really don't know why that is I don't know why that can't happen other places but I do know for sure that absolutely happens here the neighborhood is one of the city's most diverse with significant black Latin necks and Asian populations and thirty year resident Yvonne Hines says good things are happening in babies we're a community that is like a Phoenix we are on the rise here however baby also has some serious challenges the area's median annual income is just over half of the city's overall median income and.

San Francisco Nate Watson Oakland Yvonne Hines Phoenix CBS KCBS
"i left college" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"i left college" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"We're not GONNA have that this year and it's a it's a major bummer. And I hope and I don't think this'll be the case so I do hope since Cole Anthony is kind of in the same discussion different player. Obviously but man it would really just be dagger of Carolina Season Carolina took a predictably bad loss. Just in terms like they weren't close against Gonzaga on Wednesday. Stay night like if we look up a month from now in Carolina's like barely treading water at five hundred or even under five hundred it. Would it would suck doc if Anthony has decided you know what we're not GonNa make the tournament. James is already done this. It's a knee injury for me. I'm just coming back DOC. I showed what I do certain extent although I will say anthony has not been efficient. He's been needed. He's been a high volume player. He's got you know a good good ceiling but also a low floor. Let's hope that history does not repeat itself on this specific front with him. But I can't say I'm James Wiseman and I and I think we fortunately I'm interested to hear what what Peres says about all this as well. 'cause you know we can poke fun. It has Talking so much about Memphis on the podcast. But he's he's tied in there he's plugged in and his stance on this what I think we'll be his stance. I'm happy to see that. The general public has evolved in this dance the sports following public over the past decade. Like get this happened. If James Wiseman situations details were the same happened in two thousand seven and he did this. I think you'd see a lot. More people criticizing criticizing him for the call including sports writers. You're not gonna see that as much because of the fact that the incident in its rules on amateurism in restricting James Weisman's earning power to its maximum capacity. Essentially right. Now we've moved past that point so I don't think you're gonNA see many people going after wiseman and they and they shouldn't over also also. That's you know that's my initial take on this literally in the moment as this is all this is unfolding in real time on a Thursday Thursday afternoon just three games. He was awesome in the three games. Though by the way I mean if he had been able to even remotely keep up his pace he would have been the national freshman of the year. Li listen to this one forty three point five offensive rating. That's that's a joke. Seventy six point nine percent effective field goal percentage seventy six percent shooting you. Shooting percentage was grabbing twenty six percent of Memphis defensive rebounds when he was on the floor and twenty one percent of his offensive rebounds shot eighty percent from two point range and by the way. Ah Pretty Solid Foul shooter as well seventy percent. They lose that how the team reaction going forward. We'll be interesting. I gotta believe that the players have known for a little bit. Maybe the earliest Thursday morning. But I don't think that this was all dropped on them out of nowhere as well it'd be interesting to see who wiseman ultimately signs with and and where he winds up going in the trap but that's that's a conversation for down the road and we'll touch on this more again gotta have parish get his word in the plan I believe still as parish flies over over the middle of America right now on his way to Las Vegas is still do a podcast late Thursday night east coast time now. The reason why I I am doing this right now is unfortunately I have been dealing with Physical known as pure form syndrome. So a lot of people probably don't know what second 'cause I didn't even know what it is a long story short. I can't go to Vegas because I can't endure sitting on an airplane for five hours I've got I've got a muscle. In my in my left buttocks that is pressing down on my Sciatica and good God it is so so painful so it was a an excruciating call to not go to the CBS sports classic. I held on as long as I could and did not even make that decision until Thursday morning I wanted to be there wanted to see. GP wanted to do couple in-person podcast and IT'S A. It's a frequent coincidence that I decided not to go to you. Know try and get better. And oh by the way if you've had this and you have stretching coaching or exercise recommendations. Email me tweet me. I will hear anything at this point. I have seen a doctor. I just got massage. Therapy actually was. I was getting therapy for this when I walked in the door and I got the text message like crazy about wiseman and I'm like okay. What now did he get suspended again? Do we have do. We have now a season long suspension. I wasn't on my mind that he would actually opt to go pro but anyway so that is why I will not be in Las Vegas. Hope to be able to recover ever get stronger and better Quickly as soon as possible because my goodness I can I cannot sit for long periods and and standing and walking is even Even a bit of a chore there so that's just a little behind the scenes but to also explain why I'm not there but otherwise all is well. I think I'm going to wrap it up. I mean we're going we're go in your we're encroaching here on eighteen minutes. Just wanted to give you a quickie reaction for those. That are listening to this now. Maybe a little bit delayed and you got that next podcast in your cue fire it right up. Hope you guys enjoy it. We do want to try this season to give you win capable like if I'm out of pocket or Paris out of pocket one of us if if if a story line breaks and is of such an urgency like James Wiseman leaving we want to be able to deliver for you as soon as possible because we know you enjoyed. Okay thank you so much. So kind of a weird different flavor me riffing Solo here For Eighteen twenty minutes. I'm sure we'll have a situation Later the season where it's going to be the exact opposite in Paris is going to have to take the reins and we'll do that. But we basically want to give you a podcast to fulfil that tell you what we know what we feel about subjects in real time and this is a reminder minder please do rate and subscribe Apple podcasts are preferred preference. You can still submit questions. We're going to do those mail bags every single Wednesday so please submit. Get Your questions or if you've got a great comment we're still doing that for Sunday night. Appreciate that as well and if you use a different service and there is a rating and review system do that let us know and we'll seek those out not as well but that's what we have for now. We'll talk to you later Thursday. I anticipate at the absolute absolute latest Friday morning. But I don't think that's going to be the case. I think we're going to try and turn this one to give you another podcast on Thursday night Okay and by the way we also have breaking news that Michigan State Senior Guard. Josh Lankford who has not played yet this season because of foot issues that have gone on for more than a year. At this point he is not going to play this season at all. Tommaso told reporters after after Michigan. State's practice on Thursday. That Langford had foot surgery. I'm recalling correctly. I think he went to New York for that. I'm calling that from memory Lankford stun. That's an issue college basketball. Stop the ride. I WANNA get off. This is turning into quite the busy Thursday. But that's another piece of news that will frankly we're also going to get to that on the next podcast regardless GP does the shouts. So I'm GonNa Kinda let that be his thing and I'll just wrap up here. I'll be back with shortly. Thanks for listening be sure described and I'll talk decent yeah..

James Wiseman Cole Anthony Las Vegas Josh Lankford Memphis Carolina James Gonzaga James Weisman Sciatica basketball Paris Vegas Li Peres CBS Michigan State Senior Guard New York
"i left college" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

"Like, we already talked about how bad it's offense in line is to meet they have so many other glaring holes on that team a quarterback isn't gonna fix them when Larry FitzGerald goals, people will tell the truth about the air on a cargo. He's like covering up. The fact that what the quill says, but he played for played for the Browns and airs ONA despite they went to the Super Bowl that one year. But they're really a lot like the Browns particularly here in recent years. I think it was a mistake to go up and get Josh Rosen. I had question marks when he started. He had other agendas beyond being a great quarter. And to me that's a sign of arrogance. When you leave college football to go to the NFL, that's such a dramatic leap. If you're not self aware enough to know is mice. What I didn't. College. But that league they're different beast here. Everybody go it's intangibility to this. Yeah. Hit that for you. Jimmy here to help us talk about our pooper ratings for Tyler Murray of Jimmy. To get the man who made you. Oh, man. I man, you know, all of this is just this big uncle, Jimmy merch. We got going on Mertz. Yeah. We gotta going on like, you know, first of all, let's be real. It's very rare to see picture on the T shirt and somebody dead. Or not like this. What are you sell them? Chris. I'm not knocking them off down at the slauson. Swap meet they go. They're knocked off their that. They're saying boy man hit me up on the Twitter. If you wanna get a copy, you know, what I'm saying, the toys, GMI know. You know, what I'm saying Medecin made me do it movement. Here's a highlight from our discussion earlier about Kyle murdered. Somebody got into the interview room didn't like kinda Murray, and the way he responded told Charley Casserly, he repeated. That is news this time of year. And you can take it for what it's worth if you are the number one potential overall pick they'll talk to you. And like man, I do mess, and you just gotta make sure you do measure reporting in this moments and these moments, and I don't know of Charlie's comments come off as measured. All right. Jimmy. What's your take on kinda Murray, then on until until you game, man? The Kanban culturally biased and everybody knows what the Wunderlich. Know, the Columbine. You heard me it's culturally bias, explain how well, you know, the more you sit over there by my nephew to dumber you get most forty yard. Dash hello. Girl, come on. You know, we dominated hundred yard dash go on back to Jesse own. I mean, we can't be touched in a hundred Carlos Hussein Bo you say, hey, wait a minute. More extreme. Moist green only good thing that ever came out of Sligo highschool Hanson. We take go silver. Bronze we take. Every time. That's what we do. But we also do on the forty you know, what? We all wanna Ford we win the forty to us. We okay. But But but what? what they're talking about. The you didn't go well, bro. Who's doing interview? Steve Harvey, Tom Joyner Harper. I mean offered in interview. See they will never let us ask the questions. Kawamori would have sounded completely different today. Let Jimmy do the interview. What would you ask stuff that we can relate to like who was the better apple POC all eyes on me or big ready to that time? We got tight what does that have to do with football. Not not a damn thing. But what Jeff Ireland asking about Dez Bryant mama's personal business have to do anything. Let me answer that now today I'm saying that's a that's a good point..

Jimmy merch Tyler Murray Josh Rosen Browns football Larry FitzGerald Sligo highschool Hanson Twitter Carlos Hussein Bo NFL Mertz Jeff Ireland GMI Dez Bryant Kawamori Medecin Kyle Chris Steve Harvey
"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And if they aren't ready to note, they are ready. Let's get Anna in here from Warwick, Rhode Island high, and I welcome to the program. Hi, jane. Thank you. Go ahead. So I went to university in the fall of two dozen nine right out of high school, and I kind of just coasted through high school, and I had no real work ethic. But it was one of those, you know, gifted children who was so smart, and I didn't really develop any Bill hardworking skills, and I wasn't very mature enough to go to university. And when I went I I ended up being way out of my depth and developing some substance abuse issues and my first semester. I did. Okay. But due to my substance abuse issues, I actually was sexually assaulted and the second semester. I just I failed all of my classes, and I really wish that my parents had been able to see my grades. I feel like they would have been able to reach out to someone to help me when I had no real support system. I've known Anna. Thank you, Dr Morris. Another example of how parents can be. More involved should be more involved, but often often aren't or can't be right and one of the things I write in my book is how parents can detect if their student is suffering from depression or PTSD after a sexual assault. It is hard to know. But sometimes if students are, you know, seem less joyful, not they're not spending time with friends their grades go down as you mentioned that those are signs, and again having that open dialogue before they go to school is critical and saying you can come to me anytime, you can call me anytime is critical. So what should parents do if their child comes home announces they wanna drop out? What should they do? What should they not do Dr six hundred you first so minutes Kitson, I see who come home and under done by the first semester to want to prove themselves in their parents. They can do it so insists that the that they wanted to the back a second semester. And i've. Gene, virtually nobody to be able to cut a get it together to to emotionally or academically or just image. Image emotional maturity wise to do that quickly. So I think that if kids come home, and that they're basically done or they're overwhelmed. We tweet this as a gap here new we tweet this is let's think of something else to do. Because clearly colleges isn't you're ready for college. I think the kids we should tell kids that only like something like thirty or thirty two percent of the population has a college degree going back a couple earlier caller said I think also we should tell kids that it doesn't seem to matter very much where you go to college interns. Our success? We are how much money are that may make a happier. Yeah. Just an also that so many we should tell kids more about this. The the many successful people in this world who flock staff who didn't go to college who who had late trajectory like many of the callers that they have this idea young people as idea that that the the the path is success is the straight upward climb as just not true for most people Dr Morris. What would you add to that? I have a slightly different twist on this because I working with students who, you know, maybe a billion about college, and I often will bring the parents into the discussion. I think that it's important if someone comes home for thanksgiving or Christmas holiday and says I want to leave school is to for the parents to sit calmly with a student and find out what the problem is. Because there are some problems that are very solvable and might be sadness over break up, which usually people get over. There might be a more.

Dr Morris Anna Rhode Island jane Warwick Bill Kitson assault PTSD depression thirty two percent
"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I was like a coil undone. I had no energy left to go to cloud. No drive. It was just as if my very soul sucked out of my body. And I ended up late dropping all of my classes, and that drafter semester until I left, and I went on this journey of self discovery. I started to. Businesses and they were both fairly successful. And recently, I told them off. And now I'm back in school using the money that I made from those businesses to really drive my purpose for word Inc. Finally, get that degree without that time of self discovery. I gotta tell you. I was lost. I didn't have my parents being over my shoulder beating me into like a state of that mission to get the classwork done to me everything. And without that. It was just there was nothing there it worked out for you Bill. Thank you so much for the call there from Tampa, Dr Morris, I'm curious one piece of this. Is there a divide among lower socio economic demographics? When it comes to dropping out of college. I is there. What about first generation students? How does that piece of this puzzle playout? I have read the statistics that show. First generation students are more. Likely to drop out from college and actually tomorrow night. I'll be speaking to a group of high school students who will be first generation college students about how to succeed in college. Because they're they're more vulnerable. Most schools do have mentor ship programs for first generation students either with other students or with faculty.

Dr Morris word Inc Tampa
"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I think it's an outstanding idea for many students who do feel they need their. They don't know. What they wanna do. And they may even feel burnt out. Many countries actually have a have students do service for a year or two. So I I so I think it can be an excellent idea. But one thing that came up in a lot of the earlier discussions is having purpose in doing something that's meaningful and for some students that may not be college. It may be doing a lawn service. It may be be in Germany. They have apprenticeship and more manual is skilled manual labor of there are so many things that can be done in life that is enjoyable that even can pay. Well, so I think we have to get out of the mindset that college is the only choice for everybody. Get Jennifer in here from Atlanta, Georgia. Hi, Jennifer, welcome to one point. Hi, thank you. I do like the idea of a gap year. And I would like to say that thirty five years ago. I was a freshman at a major university in Atlanta nationally internationally, re rank university with a full scholarship. And so I did have a lot of pressure. In fact, I even started school this summer after high school, I didn't even take the summer, and it was a huge mistake. I was very depressed by the end of the year. I would say that I was somewhat suicide it'll I finally withdrew. I put the summer the next summer and thought about it, and I went to a small private college. And it made all the difference. I wasn't a number. There were people who are invested in. How I turned out. There were people that cared. And your son's going through the same thing. Now. Well, fortunately, he is graduating this semester as well. As my niece. My other niece also graduated several years ago, but they did go through the same things. And in fact, my son tried to get mental health services on campus. And it was months to get in, thankfully, he's fine. He knows what he wants now. But who three years ago, it was a crisis? It is for many many families, Jennifer, thank you so much and good luck to there to your son. Kenneth is in Columbia, South Carolina, high Kenneth you're on the air. Hi, I'm a director of financial aid. And one of the things that people must consider when they're making a decision about taking a gap year or whether to start school right away is financial one aspect of taking a gap erase to make sure that the scholarships that they've applied for that. They can apply for will allow them for a gap year. So a lot of times students get offered freshman scholarships that are coming in first year college. And if they give those up they may not be able to get them back later in the future in order to get them when you've taken a gap year, and that's something that the called you really need to consider also make sure that they have an allowance for gap year is windy are looking into their scholarships for incoming freshmen for student have chosen to take a gap year. When you're talking about things like class rank he'll those are weighted differently students been out for a whole good information. Good thing to know Kenneth thanks for that. Here's from our Twitter account. Jones says I was pushing myself so hard junior and senior year of high school to get into the best college developed an. Eating disorder. No one knew by the time. My folks drop me off at college. I was hitting rock bottom. I cried so hard the day. They dropped me off. I had wanted so badly to get out to break away from home have college solve all my problems. But it didn't I came home on thanksgiving. Let's go to Bill in Tampa Florida with another story Habil, you're on the air. Hi there. Hi. So back in I'd say two thousand eight by graduated high school in in stead of taking just the summer to get a justed. I enrolled into early enrollment at the university of south Florida, and I gotta tell you. It was probably the biggest mistake of my entire life for my entire life. I've been gained pushed by my parents to excel exceed be the best because the best are the winners and everyone else's losers. And when I got there too 'cause that finish line. I wasn't here prestigious program. And then it just all thought underneath me..

Jennifer Kenneth Atlanta university of south Florida Jones Twitter Germany director South Carolina Columbia Georgia Florida Tampa Habil Bill thirty five years three years
"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"In psychology today addresses, how parents can help their students access care students may not be able to get care on campus. But usually there is a campus case manager someone was. Social work background who can link student services off campus. Is this thing is this something new though, Dr Morrison have have college students always struggled or are. We just feeling like we can talk about it more. We can take action more what difference between now and what we've seen in the past. There is definitely a an increase in mental health problems in both high school and college students there's also somewhat less stigma about getting help. But that doesn't explain this increase in just getting back to what Dr sticks through talked about this pressure students feel this excessive pressure to get into the best college. And then I see the college students feeling excessive pressure to get into the best graduate school get the best job. And there's actually a study that show perfectionism has gone up dramatically in college students. It's called externally driven students who feel they have to have. The best job make the most money. Even look the best that's gone up by thirty three percent in the last twenty years. Let me get David and here from Charleston, South Carolina. Hi, David graduated and welcome to the program. Hi, Jane, thanks for taking my call. My daughter struggle with depression. All through high school, and my wife, and I. And she chose to Colorado, which is very very far. You know, we actually just better back last night on a Red Eye because their flights got cancelled. But we really did a lot of preemptive work to get her where she is right now. Which is basically almost moment to moment. We've got counseling on on on campus such goes to thought a counselor before she went to college that was outside the university system that goes to we tried to prepare her front. Some of the things we never did was we never put any pressure on her as far as getting into the best school, and you know, having to go to college. In fact, we really wanted her pick your off, but she was insistent on going away. And when she got a scholarship, and you know for us. It's almost moment to moment. We don't know if she'll make most relaxing now pretty confidential make really looking to see to make some year and then to feature, but it's really. For us. We just set these short-term goals her meat, and hopefully get it seeing any very open with her David you talk about these things. And if you have a problem, give us a call. We'll we'll help you. I talked to her own wars of the night. I talk to her she'll call me at three mornings. You'll call me, you know, eight the morning when times are great. And let me know she's having a great day. Like, she just did before I went on this call to you know, dad, I don't know if I'm gonna make it in is coach her and help her try to give her, you know, it place on how to make the moment almost like just make it so today. Yeah, we'll see what happens one day at a time. David. Thank you. Yeah. No. I appreciate it such an important story and good luck to your daughter there in Colorado, Dr Morris, there's David really engaged with his daughter carefully monitoring her the had some preemptive issues that they've tried to to solve with her before going off to college. What appearance of the issue? What if you know kids don't want to tell their parents, they need help? For the most part. Parents most parents are very caring. But you're right. Some students do not want to tell parents, they think their parents are under pressure themselves. Their parents might have their own mental health issue..

David Dr Morrison Colorado Charleston South Carolina Jane Dr Morris thirty three percent twenty years one day
"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"At NYU, what advice do you have for parents for college students who are living through this right now? I think ultimately you have to know that you can recover from failure. And that's not going to be dark Mark against you later on down the road. I think that so often because we want things to go well, so badly young people teachers parents we want students to have successful experiences. And so we hype them up a little bit. We make it seem like this is the most important decision of your life, and that it can change everything. And what I would encourage students considering dropping out or parents may be dealing with this at home to do is to look at all college decisions as one in a series of formative steps towards successful and fulfilled. Young adulthood, instead of the end all be all Raynsford, Saddam for all the best for to you. You've taught us a lot today. And we appreciate you being with us. Thank you. Thanks so much for having made in Q William six hundred what did you hear in Raynsford story? They're a very common story in. In bright people who think who in in high school think that their major job is getting into good college. And when they get there often is deuce dissolution. For many of the reasons that she talked about, and I focus a lot on what we can do to prevent this kind of thing as well. As what we do once it happens, but I wrote the article because by October first I'd seen a new six kids who've been maybe October fifteenth who'd already been come home in from as a freshman in two had already come home us off Moore's. And so I think it's very common. I think that that if if we if gift his as growing up the idea that we're trying to do is to develop themselves. So that they have something useful to offer this world as opposed to setting this. The major goal of getting the most of the league college possible. I think things get much better. I think that what we what we stress. I in our book is how important is for young people to have a sense of control over their own life. And what we're as was saying, it was she experienced at the college into this wasn't what I expected in felt so overwhelmed, and such a low sense of control that she needed time off she needed to figure out. Why am I doing this develop yourself? You know, my guy. No, so many kids go to college with no idea of why they're doing it gets some calls in here. They're rolling off the board Chelsea in Annapolis, Maryland, your first high Chelsea welcome to the program. Hey there I called him. Because the things that you're saying really hit home for me. I graduated from high school ten years ago and try college for about a year and right now on just getting back into college again. And I really didn't understand where I was going to go in life when I first tried college. And so I felt like I was just throwing money at a school because that's where I was supposed to be. Whereas now, I love the program that I'm in. I know how it affects my life, and I feel like I'm actually growing as opposed to just sitting in a classroom. So that I can take somebody to sit in a classroom. Chelsea thank you. Thanks for for sharing that I really appreciate it. Here's Joey in waynesboro Virginia. Hi, Joey, what's your story? Hi, I just feel like the entire time that I went through middle school and high school hall that I ever heard was unless you go to college. You're not gonna have a happy and successful adulthood, and that's all that I've ever heard I've come to in my own experience. In for my mother who works with special needs people that college is not necessarily the best fit for everybody. There comes of trade jobs that need to be filled running out of people to do. But for some reason, it seems like being generally have this down look on people who do those jobs that if they weren't there to do them. We wouldn't have homes we wouldn't have stores where you didn't have running water electricity. Yep. You got Joey thank you so much for that important comment. Let me bring in another voice into this conversation view from campus..

Moore Joey Chelsea Saddam NYU Annapolis Maryland Virginia ten years
"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Be too tired and too stressed for too long. So the pressure were putting on these kids, you know, it's hard to take. Right. Well, it it is for many. And if they have the many kids have the idea that that the most the only successful people in this world, our top students and people who never feel at anything. And I think that that I spent a lot of high energy trying to disabuse kids of this notion that it makes so much difference. Where you go to college that it's worse sacrificing to a healthy brain to get into an elite college. Is that that so yeah, I think it's worrisome. Women in many kids there used to be that kids would fight back. You know, the kids would say get off my back thing. And and now so many kids, they just internalize all this stress and pressure, and this delusional idea that some of the only way you become successful is driving yourself continuance in and just doesn't work. And so a lot of these kids thirty percent college freshman not returning to college. As as sophomores, regardless of the reason for returning home. It can be quite devastating right for students who feel that they've somehow failed for their parents who have a variety of emotions attached to this child of theirs. Who's dropped out of college early. I guess you've seen both ends of the spectrum. There is devastating. And I see a lot of kids who I consult a lot of kids who didn't make the come back home. And they meet with me. And I'm struck by many of them there was this no chance. I mean, if you could predict that they would be home by by November. I by by thanksgiving that just didn't have the chops to do it or they just they just weren't. They weren't that. Many. I see a lot of kids. I say are you really looking forward to go to college. And they all say, how can hardly wait are you are you are you re looking forward to spending hours in the library in this kidding me. You know, and they come home in many kids feel they feel stupid. The Phil embarrassed. I feel like getting behind their friends. They feel terrible about wasting their parents money or. About the academic debt that they're incurring they're taking out loads. So it's very painful for everybody and can be real a real game changer can change the trajectory right of of some kids very early on in their lives. It does in one of the first things that I tell kids is the first time I went to graduate school. I went for twenty straight weeks at the university of California Berkeley, and I didn't turn into single assignment. And I fly I flunked out. And it was the best possible thing that could have happened to me and telling them that the tone somebody who's had a really charmed life, basically flunked out of school in encouraged about I try to normalize it so common the these days that this to happen. But kids feel terrible about it. And it does for some kids that really takes off track. Although it doesn't have to there's there's as many kids who uses experience as a way to grow. And they understand that they weren't ready. The figure out what they need to do to get ready, and they do that. Let me bring another voice into the conversation. Now, joining me from Owensboro Kentucky is Raynsford staffer Raynsford. Dropped out of college after her freshman year, moved home to Kentucky Raynsford. Welcome to one point how nice to have you. Thank you so much for having me. So you were an overachiever in high school, you had great grades. And there was little doubt in your mind that you'd excel in college. But then freshman year came tell me what happened. I think it was a culmination of a lot of different things that lead me to ultimately exit school at the.

Kentucky Raynsford university of California Berke Kentucky Owensboro Phil thirty percent
"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"William sticks root, welcome to one point great to have you. Thanks so much. So thirty percent of college freshmen don't return to colleges sophomores that really get your attention that number. What are what's behind that statistic to your mind? I think it's very complicated. And I think that many of the kids that I see who have anxiety disorders learning disabilities. ADHD th they don't have the academic competencies related to to to to manage college independently. I think there's also a huge mental health crisis on college campuses. So vulnerable kids, go to college, and because college environments are so just regulated in terms of sleeping, and drinking and putt smoking that for many vulnerable kids, they just can't manage the lack of structure, the lack of predictability. And certainly the party culture of college. Some kids can't handle that and the disrupted sleep that somebody has experienced in college another huge factor. So it's a highly distributed environment. But as you sent the mental health picture for young people has changed dramatically in the last twenty five years. Tell me more about that. What are you saying? Well, certainly there's there's research suggests that people in the early two thousands that high older high school students and college students were five to eight ties more likely to report symptoms of anxiety disorder or major depression than people were at the height of the great depression during World War Two during the Cold War, it even the last five to seven years. There's evanston. There's been a dramatic increase innings -iety and depression in high school kids, and in college kids, and so you write in your piece in the New York Times with regard to these college freshman who are not returning as sophomores, you say, many, parents and presumably college students think of. Getting into college as the finish line of a race in many ways. That's really not the case. Tell me about that. Well, many kids it certainly certain parts of this country, including the DC area where I live many kids think many parents think the most important outcome of addle essence is getting into the most elite college possible. And and I think that from my angle angle, my co-authored Ned Johnson of our book, we think the most important outcome is still developing healthy brand and many things that kids have to do to get into colleges are not good for the brand such as such as sleeping six hours. A night is senior most high school seniors now average somewhere between six and six and a half hours of sleep where they need nine and a quarter not to feel tired such as just a workaholic kind of schedule very very high levels of stress and sleep deprivation and really a formula for developing anxiety disorders or depression is..

Ned Johnson evanston New York Times twenty five years thirty percent seven years six hours
"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

Rich Bitch

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

"Super exhausting though it's probably why had anxiety attack let's be honest i mean most women things i it's because they're in the masculine energy that's really why weavings iety that's like like my dead people probably asked that like oh would you regret it data i'm like no i wouldn't have been debt i wouldn't have done anything like oh this is fine only reason i worked hard because i yeah fuel i was like oh man i gotta pay a hundred thousand dollars crazy yeah crazy all crazy to start doing some closing questions oh i'm ready do you have a favorite poem everybody the red violets are blue i love me ball and so do you barbequed i don't know next why are you laughing that's right there what book would you recommend to somebody getting started on a personal development or self help or whatever growing learning journey unleash the power with tony rob tony boyfriends yeah you do i do i do believe you sold a car to be able to go hey tony you're listening to this do i did one time when i was like nineteen almost twenty i was like joni i must see you and i sat like second row and i was like tony dedication week demi so it's worth it basically paid for the wing paid for the week yeah that would be that would be it i mean there's four hour workweek tim ferriss and all that stuff but i believe that a lot of tony's work is a good foundation it's a good fundamental way to start seeing things and then i also love rich dad poor dad that's a really good i love robert kiyosaki that book changed my life and i from young age was like okay this is how it works what is your do you have a favorite triumph that led you or your biggest wile we'll let's see if i can talk here.

tim ferriss robert kiyosaki tony rob tony hundred thousand dollars four hour
"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

Rich Bitch

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

"Fuses humor place silliness lightness into his life even as superstock man and he believes this day he's like it saved my life from depression anxiety and they're showing all of these cases of people who are healing themselves from play like the doctors are you know literally time people like just go outside and be with your kid go farther out and i mean you've obviously had in the place date you know the field like us don't even know what happens you're like oh my god where was i was laughing so hard even know and i think that's when our body is just allowed to heal itself and all the dopamine and endorphins and it's just i'm just such a huge proponent of play no phillies links just go be weird dollar this right like you go play cody check out but it's cool that they'll thing i realized it wasn't all the things i was spending thousands of dollars on i spent so much therapist and i went to acupuncture everyday and cryotherapy it i was like trying everything under the sun i spent like ten grand trying to figure out what's wrong with me and that read this book and i was like oh my god oh my tom i spent the last few months just not even working as much because i just needed it it was so intense for so long built the business i just i was a doer it's how i made a lot of money that's how i got i felt myself worth that's how all of these things with don't even really matter at the end of the day that's how i got it and so whether that's from childhood my dad who knows but it's weird now to be in a state where i'm like well could i have an impact and have a great income just by being in my feminine eighty percent of the time and just being me and just being instead of doing and that's what i'm discovering right now that's like my next challenge is that play in that being and i would get validation from my dad if i was a doer hey i did this today and i pushed and i knocked on doors they made phone calls and i think he would always praise me for that like being that that masculine you know and energy super successful because she does stuff and now i'm like man.

dopamine phillies cody
"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

Rich Bitch

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

"Of all of them and i had my first panic attack in it's so crazy to think about because now i have so much compassion in love for people who experience downs or panic attacks or did they call them like psychotic breaks where people have this perfect life and then all of a sudden they literally can't function it's crazy that's basically i had a psychotic break i don't think i've ever really talked about this this fully on a podcast but it was really weird i couldn't function for awhile i don't it was just crazy and it's it's weird that from that i learned so much about myself and compassion and empathy it brought me closer to the higher spirit like it was it was a a moment of a wakeup call for me to a lot of things and brought me really into my body and since then i've been really passionate about brain health and mental health really passionate to talk about depression breakdown i just think that we're not talking about it enough and we all live this really hectic crazy life and a lot of female entrepreneurs are dealing with this and they don't talk about it and you see their perfect life and their business and a lot of them secretly i'm friends with with a lot of great entrepreneurs who are having breakdowns on a weekly basis and are freaking out or on meds and i just not okay with that i don't i don't approve of you know a lot of the medications that are out there i don't think that truly fixes the issue and it's sad because i think women right now is entrepreneurs are trying to be men and we're pushing instead of being enough and it's causing a ton of zion so yeah i'm definitely pretty vocal about it now with my audience and i want to talk to them more about it because i think that mental health is such a big thing that we just don't talk about and men too are dealing with it and they're not allowed to talk about it because it's not the manly thing to do and then there's men having heart attacks and that's pretty much just built up stress and it was crazy it's crazy so so what have what did you you talked about doing a lot or.

"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

Rich Bitch

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

"About people always wanna talk meatball does he poop you're about the changes food i already know everything about me let's be real it's happening if you guys have figured it out yet meatballs her dog my boyfriend no my boyfriend june bugs so funny but i would like to talk about anxiety because i know you talk about that a bit and you've experienced that which i'm sure having anxiety as an entrepreneur as somebody who's in this quote unstable you know place where you don't really know where the next paycheck is coming from you don't really know for sure where things are going how has was been your experience with that and with anxiety yeah yes so i didn't know what ings eighty was four years ago i thought it was just when people are stressed and if you're listening to this and you've never had a full blown exiled attack bless your soul because it's different if they're very very different full blown anxiety or panic attack is actually i truly believe it's almost the stomach like it's chemical i didn't know what it was until one was it mother's day three years ago i'll always remember the day of course i was in a car and all of a sudden i had my first bone executive and i was in and out of here's therapists acupuncturists mediums joe schmo in the basement who reads aura does anyone in anything because i thought it was dying for no reason and that's really what you think is happening you don't know what's going on you think you're losing your mind it's the scariest feeling in the world and i still to this day don't fully know what happened that day and i've i've released that a little bit because it will attack planner petek it lasted a few hours and then it came back and it lasts three weeks i lived with a panic attack for three weeks sleep i didn't eat ios really scary so a lot of times they only last a few hours mine lasted literally three weeks i couldn't shake the cycle and was the most terrifying thing i've ever experienced i lost fifteen pounds i didn't eat i didn't sleep it was very very scary my family to know is going on i didn't know and it was when the business was really growing fast so that could have been the variable of not processing the upper limit it could have been.

executive three weeks fifteen pounds three years four years
"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

Rich Bitch

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on Rich Bitch

"This episode brought up a lot of emotions for me and the episodes a little bit more of a grounded energy i know you usually get the really hyper very vibrant angie but this episodes a little bit more of a grounded energy so this is perfect for a long drive along walk breeze the host of the shadow light podcast at in this episode we dive into my super vulnerable story about my first panic attack full transparency i actually haven't shared this yet with anyone publicly so here it goes to thousands of people but i'm owning authenticity and i'm owning that my mission moving forward with my personal brand is to really really be real and this is part of that process and i also want to shed light on mental health and take away that stigma and for you to know that you're not alone if you're listening to this and you've dealt with exiled or depression i want you to know that you're not alone and what happened to kate spade last week really really touched me and it made me realize that you could have all the money and success and choices in the world and still not be fulfilled and still not be hoppy and that needs to be discussed and this mask of perfection female entrepreneurs needs to be just ripped off and your happiness comes before anything any ringing money followers any of that bull crap it comes before all of that your happiness and your film it's and taking care of you comes a for all of that so i hope you love this episode i hope it inspires you to make your own damn rules and to live the most incredible happy life that you want to live not someone else's definition of happy but your definition of happy and as always if you love this episode and you found it helpful let me know send me a dm say hello i love saint hide you i love getting to know you guys you're my fam you're like my sister's you're my community you're my tribe you're the most bad ass listeners and i appreciate you and when you love an episode it helps me to know what type of content you want me to create because my mission with the show is forever going to be to.

kate spade
"i left college" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"And talk as you would to a friend colleague classroom paper on martin buber no one knows who he is martin buber was a philosopher of his time probably still taught somewhere and i wrote a paper about him on his great work called i and thou i'm the only one in the whole college you knew what i and that was about it's a very complicated piece of philosophy i and thou no one knew what he was talking about he was a philosopher of a high order so i wrote a term paper on i on on martin buber zion doubt well i gave to a after i left college and went somewhere else i gave it to a relative and she told me that she used it with her name on it she got an a plus then she passed it around i'm sorry i heard i didn't do it i heard it became one of their most frequently stolen pieces on us on the other names of all pieces in the history of queen's college now i would read i and that find it now i don't know where it is i'd love to see what i wrote i don't know what i wrote when i was eighteen or i would if i read to you from utah archive and one of my properties of almost every scrap of paper have you ever written on i'm obsessive and a lot of them are unpublished stories for example but some of them are actually published magazines from the time in the late sixties the psychedelic era in new york there was a very big flowering of some crazy stuff some brilliant stuff in the psychedelic on the world of the lower east side of manhattan so i i was actually the associate publisher of a little known literary magazine at the time called exit magazine and i have the original copies of this i don't think they're available anywhere i looked at it the other day and i have it up there at the hill it's very creative i don't know who the other gentlemen are who are the editors it was a very exciting time for me i remember going to the dingy flats and.

martin buber queen new york associate publisher literary magazine exit magazine utah manhattan
"i left college" Discussed on The Russillo Show

The Russillo Show

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"i left college" Discussed on The Russillo Show

"So as i do i didn't leave college for set in the five thousand dollars he says well these are the rules you've got to hope the sixers don't draft us or what can i do they the sex is not draft for me he says you way to 82 he told you you what we're up there he said get to 285 your way to 82 now he's run on what the sixers adraf me so we went on a forty eight hour bender two danny's we want to dennis for two days eight is minute parent cake because i could get in my mouth for breakfast for lunch we want to like a a cafeteria buffet at night we went to a big steakhouse we did that 48 hours street so we fly out of philly are you on the scale not wait brio too old out of six is called me every name in the book and i'm travel to laugh laugh at inside i'm like boom did don't draft me but i was trying to be professional and when they call with the fifth pick and address the philadelphia seventy six take charles barkley i thought i was gonna die pau told i was in trouble i was like holy crap are left college percent at five thousand dollars okay so they drought for me they're not gotten a little bit of shape before got back to school a about 295 so now not do this brave what moses web moses is the most important person in my basketball career so i'm not plan much early in my rookie year i'm not in good shape a good enough she'd the play an nba i could get get by three hundred pounds in college because did a you know three years i was in college i led to actually see a rebound with every year but you know uh you're not gonna get to play in the nba right and just to remind people to like this team is off a championship two years ago they had gotten to pick from the clippers and so div and be able to draft you with guys like moses and jane bobby in cheeks and tony like it was a stack team to have somebody like youth that's that's just i think for younger listeners they need to understand that's a bigger reasons why you wouldn't blank do correct.

sixers danny philly philadelphia nba clippers moses dennis charles barkley basketball jane bobby five thousand dollars three hundred pounds forty eight hour three years two years 48 hours two days