20 Burst results for "Hyneman"

Sun beats Storm in Sue Bird's final game in Connecticut

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Sun beats Storm in Sue Bird's final game in Connecticut

"The sun had four players score at least 12 points in an 88 83 win over the storm Alyssa Thomas led the way with 19 points for Connecticut which scored the last 5 points to improve to 20 and 9 And the teacher hyneman hit a tie breaking three pointer with two 42 remaining the game's final basket Brianna Jones chipped in 13 points one more than Courtney Williams and dewanna bonner It was the final regular season game in Connecticut for former husky star Sue bird The 41 year old bird finished with 14 points and 7 assists for Seattle I'm Dave ferry

Alyssa Thomas Hyneman Brianna Jones Connecticut Courtney Williams Dewanna Bonner Sue Bird Seattle Dave Ferry
"hyneman" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

06:10 min | 11 months ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"Thanks, Dan. My name is Jamie hyneman. I'm the chief technology officer for John Deere. My responsibility is really to build up the tech stack that all the products that the Anna just mentioned, that technology gets deployed on to put to useful, useful purpose for the customers that we serve. I'm going to start with a little story. I was in Iowa in July. You show us the place, drove a tractor, drove a combine, had this great experience. And then we have dinner. And you guys saw me go all crazy about what we did there. But you didn't tell me anything about what I just saw. It's really hard not to. How hard was that? You kept this under wraps, like come on. Well, there's so much technology for us to share. It was actually easy to make sure that we wowed you with all of the technology that's already out in the market that farmers are using every day on fields all over the world. So we didn't need to let this cat out of the bag because we had so many other great technologies to share that all have built up to this point in time where we have the opportunity to drive autonomously in the field across many, many acres of farmland. Now give me a little backstory because our top of mind is if we hear about artificial intelligence, we think Tesla, we think Qualcomm. We don't think of John Deere. And that's probably one of the biggest misconceptions. But I obviously would like to know more about the backstory of what I just saw with this automated tractor. This is the culmination of how many years of work. I would say 20 years, which is probably part of the reason why we keep it such a good secret. Technology and agriculture, I may as you well understand now is one of the best kept secrets. It's highly technical industry, technology driven farmers are early adopters of technology generally. So this autonomous tractor really has been in the works for I would argue 20 years since we started to put satellite navigation on tractors in 2002 time frame, and they started driving themselves through the field with an operator in the operator station. Now why automation and farming? I guess that would be like the biggest question is before that trip I did not see John Deere's a tech company. And now for me, I honestly have a hard time seeing you as a farming company just. But why automation informing? Yeah, there's several reasons why automation has become so important in farming. And it really comes back to the purpose of every day, getting up to feed the world and clothe the world. And today, in farming, timing is really critical. If you miss your planting window by a day, you can sacrifice a percent of your yield every day that you missed that planting window. If you miss spraying a weed, it can grow four to 7 inches in a day. And not be able to be terminated and can impact the yield in your crop. So timing is really, really important. Then there's a ton of uncertainty. We're here in Minnesota today where it's going to rain most of the day. So not a lot of farming can get done today, but there's crop out there standing in the field waiting to be harvested or a field waiting to be prepared for next spring. And if the snow comes, they'll miss that opportunity. So the uncertainty of weather adds a whole nother set of variables to that timing issue. And then finally, people are moving from rural areas where food is grown to urban areas. And so the available labor to grow the food that we all eat is decreasing as well. So farmers need that automation to ensure that they can get the job done in a timely fashion and do it super precisely, literally at inch by inch to make sure that they can get the most out of the land each and every year. And I think that's an important distinction to autonomy as people generally understand it. We're interested in autonomy and agriculture, not just driving the tractor from point a to point B but it has to do a useful job in the process, right? And tillage or planting or whatever the case might happen to be. It's not just the act of moving the machine and its occupants from point a to point B, but it has to do the job that the farmer expects it to do. And it has to do that in a way that generates a lot of confidence that it's being done in the proper way. So the farmer has confidence in the actual work that's being done, because if it doesn't do the job well, their business suffers as a consequence. I think that that's probably what struck me the most. In economies of scale, in a country as big as this one, and I was showing my son yesterday how if you don't have a combine. It's impossible for humans to be able to harvest all this land in the amount of time that a combine can do it. I know that it's always this concern about labor. And it's probably one of the questions that I do have here. We have to worry about giving jobs and everything. Yes, we do. But can humans actually do it? Give me an example of a combine. What time does it take for the harvest of a mile, for example? Yeah, so X 9 combine is an example of our largest combat. I think you had the opportunity to see that this summer when you were in island in July. That machine will harvest 40 acres of farm ground in good corn production per hour. So if you think about that to your point, it's just not humanly possible for us to have enough labor to harvest 40 acres of corn in an hour. And that's not just taking the ears of corn off the stock. It's shelling all the corn off of the ears, processing the corn, making sure that it's clean, clean grain, right? So that it's useful for the next step in the agricultural production. And then I noticed that there's even a camera that will tell the farmer how the corn is coming out. Exactly. Right there. Yep. And change the settings of the combine to make sure it's not putting too much pressure and cracking the kernels, but also not too little pressure to let material other than grain like cobs and leaves into the grain tank. Because the farmers paid for a clean, damage free sample. And so for them, it's really important. And so those cameras aren't just their to help the farmer see. They're making the decisions that a farmer used to make on how to set that finely tuned machine to run as optimally as it can. And last week in Nebraska, we were able to demonstrate delivering 93 semi.

John Deere Jamie hyneman Qualcomm Tesla Iowa Dan Minnesota Nebraska
"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:58 min | 11 months ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg best I'm at Baxter And I'm Denise Pellegrini All right Denise now we get to talk about that autonomous tractor We heard all about it from dear CTO Jamie hyneman Bloomberg said ludlow kicks things off here really kind of grilling hindman about it Let's listen in Is this a truly autonomous vehicle or is this like a Roomba robot for farming where it's in a small geofence field it goes back and forth doing whatever it needs to do in the crops It's great to be here Fully autonomous That's the first time ever that we've been able to take the operator out of the cap of the machine You know in farming as you well well understand we've had the connection between the operator the human and the machine for forever And this is really groundbreaking in the sense that we finally get to break that connection and the machine goes out and does this work on its own There was some surprise particularly from investors about this announcement the speed you've been able to do this Is this a market ready product I mean how many fully autonomous tractors will be in fields this year next year What volumes can you produce that Yeah we're still playing around with volumes We're going to be slow and introduction We want to make sure that we get this right We're thinking ten to 50 we will be in market this year though with those products with growers in their fields doing work for them in their operations So I talked to a lot of folks in the trucking industry for example and we talk about autonomy especially in the COVID era where drivers have dropped out sick as a really good tool Where does this fit in in agriculture Is this something that creates jobs or does it take jobs away That's a great question So the issue the issue in agriculture is labor availability We've had this movement of population from rural environments to urban environments The world population growing from 8 billion to 10 billion people by 2050 food production going up by 50% as a consequence of that All of those things really drive this intensity around producing more food with less and less labor as one of those things that we need to accommodate And we really see autonomy as the solution to that Farming in any market whether it's the United States the UK Europe for those farmers the margins are very small right The capital investment for this machinery is very high People are going to be able to actually able to afford to implement this technology Yeah I think so I think the way we think about it certainly reduces the amount of labor that's required but the other significant portion is agriculture is very time sensitive And it's important that the job that's being done gets done at the right time of the year And if you don't have the labor to do it you often pay a significant penalty in terms of the amount of profit you can produce And so I think the payback for growers is pretty straightforward In many cases it's a difference between getting the job done at all and not getting done One funny quirk of this is that a farmer can control the vehicle with their smartphone Just talk me through how that will work Why would a farmer need to be able to have control via an app Yeah sure This is all about the farmers business right So they want to be able to interact with the machine They want to see what it's doing They want to make sure that it's doing the job that it's expected to do at the quality that they expect it to be done at And so they want to interact with the machine in the way that they would have interacted perhaps in the cockpit as you mentioned but since they're not there we try to emulate that experience for them on a mobile device All right give me the inside scoop Who are you talking to on the commercial side which fleet operators which kind of scale volume deals are you doing Yeah you know I think that's the great thing about the solution is that it really scales from small family farms all the way up through larger farms That labor issue that we talked about earlier is really persistent no matter what the size and scale of the farm is whether that's one tractor or ten tractors All right we just got 30 seconds here but what does farming look like in 5 years from now How many Or what proportion of tractors are autonomous I think it's significant I think the adoption for this technology is going to be quick We have conditions Operators of machines over the last ten 20 years with higher levels of automation and autonomy is just that final step We've got customers who are actually asking us why do I have to be in the cockpit at all This is the solution I think they'll die And that was dear CTO Jamie hyneman with Bloomberg's blood flow Well how'd you like a small three wheel one person EV That'd probably be a lot better for me than an autonomous tractor But it is what electromechanical CEO Kevin pavlov is working on And here's how he describes it to Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde at the consumer electronics show in Vegas The idea of this vehicle was its purpose built vehicle for an individual Everything you would do individually And what makes it really special is the idea that it's not an EV that a lot of those are coming out because the market loves them But it's a really efficient and fun to drive EV It's centered around one person It's a quarter of the cabin.

Denise Pellegrini Jamie hyneman Bloomberg hindman Bloomberg ludlow Denise Europe United States UK Jamie hyneman Kevin pavlov Caroline Hyde Vegas
"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:29 min | 11 months ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is Bloomberg best on Bloomberg radio This is Bloomberg best I'm at Baxter And I'm Denise Pellegrini All right Denise now we get to talk about that autonomous tractor We heard all about it from dear CTO Jamie hyneman Bloomberg said ludlow kicks things off here Really kind of grilling hindman about it Let's listen in Is this a truly autonomous vehicle or is this like a Roomba robot for farming where it's in a small geo fence field it goes back and forth doing whatever it needs to do in the crops It's great to be here Fully autonomous That's the first time ever that we've been able to take the operator out of the cap of the machine In farming as you well understand we've had the connection between the operator the human and the machine for forever And this is really groundbreaking in the sense that we finally get to break that connection and the machine goes out and does this work on its own There was some surprise particularly from investors about this announcement the speed you've been able to do this Is this a market ready product How many fully autonomous tractors will be in fields this year next year What volumes can you produce that Yeah we're still playing around with volumes We're going to be slow and introduction We want to make sure that we get this right We're thinking ten to 50 we will be on market this year though with those products with growers in their fields doing work for them in their operations So I talked to a lot of folks in the trucking industry for example and we talk about autonomy especially in the COVID era where drivers have dropped out sick as a really good tool Where does this fit in in agriculture Is this something that creates jobs or does it take jobs away That's a great question So the issue the issue in agriculture is labor availability We've had this movement of population from rural environments to urban environments The world population growing from 8 billion to 10 billion people by 2050 food production going up by 50% as a consequence of that All of those things really drive this intensity around producing more food with less and less labor as one of those things that we need to accommodate And we really see autonomy as the solution to that Farming in any market whether it's the United States the UK Europe For those farmers the margins are very small right the capital investment for this machinery is very high People are going to be able to actually able to afford to implement this technology Yeah I think so I think the way we think about it certainly reduces the amount of labor that's required but the other significant portion is agriculture is very time sensitive right And it's important that the job that's being done gets done at the right time of the year And if you don't have the labor to do it you often pay a significant penalty in terms of the amount of prop that you can produce And so I think the payback for growers is pretty straightforward In many cases it's a difference between getting the job done at all and not getting done One funny quirk of this is that a farmer can control the vehicle with their smartphone Just talk me through how that would work Why would a farmer need to be able to have control via an app Yeah sure I mean this is all about the farmers business right So they want to be able to interact with the machine they want to see what it's doing They want to make sure that it's doing the job that it's expected to do at the quality that they expect it to be done at And so they want to interact with the machine in the way that they would have interacted perhaps in the cockpit as you mentioned but since they're not there we try to emulate that experience for them on a mobile device All right give me the inside scoop Who are you talking to on the commercial side which fleet operators which kind of scale volume deals are you doing Yeah you know I think that's the great thing about the solution is that it really scales from small family farms all the way up through larger farms That labor issue that we talked about earlier is really persistent no matter what the size and scale of the farm is whether that's one tractor ten tractors All right we just got 30 seconds here but what does farming look like in 5 years from now How many Or what proportion of tractors are autonomous I think it's significant I think the adoption for this technology is going to be quick We have condition Right Operators of machines over the last ten 20 years with higher levels of automation and autonomy is just that final step We've got customers who are actually asking us why do I have to be in the cockpit at all This is the solution I think they'll do it And that was dear CTO Jamie hyneman with Bloomberg's blood flow Well how'd you like a small three wheel one person EV It would probably be a lot better for me than an autonomous tractor But it is what electromechanical CEO Kevin pavlov is working on And here's how he describes it the Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde at the consumer electronics show in Vegas The idea of this vehicle is its purpose built vehicle for an individual Everything you would do individually And what makes it really special is the idea that it's not an EV that a lot of those are coming out because the market loves them But it's a really efficient and fun to drive EV It's centered around one person It's a quarter of the cabin space of a four passenger vehicle The heat's fast it cools fast It's a quarter of the battery size which charges fast And you get all the same range and mileage It's just a really well built vehicle for the purpose of urban mobility challenges and actually we're finding quite a bit of great solutions for last mile delivery small parcel things like that Why not a motorbike Well.

Bloomberg Denise Pellegrini Jamie hyneman Bloomberg hindman ludlow Denise Jamie hyneman Europe United States UK Kevin pavlov Caroline Hyde Vegas
"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:27 min | 11 months ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Denise Pellegrini All right Denise now we get to talk about that autonomous tractor We heard all about it from dear CTO Jamie hyneman Bloomberg's had ludlow kicks things off here really kind of grilling hindman about it Let's listen in Is this a truly autonomous vehicle or is this like a Roomba robot for farming where it's in a small geo fence field it goes back and forth doing whatever it needs to do in the crops It's great to be here Fully autonomous That's the first time ever that we've been able to take the operator out of the cap of the machine you know in farming as you well well understand We've had the connection between the operator the human and the machine for forever And this is really groundbreaking in the sense that we finally get to break that connection and the machine goes out and does this work on its own There was some surprise particularly from investors about this announcement the speed you've been able to do this Is this a market ready product How many fully autonomous tractors will be in fields this year next year What volumes can you produce that Yeah we're still playing around with volumes We're going to be slow and introduction We want to make sure that we get this right We're thinking ten to 50 we will be in market this year though with those products with growers in their fields doing work for them in their operations So I talked to a lot of folks in the trucking industry for example and we talk about autonomy especially in the COVID era where drivers have dropped out sick as a really good tool Where does this fit in in agriculture Is this something that creates jobs or does it take jobs away That's a great question So the issue the issue in agriculture is labor availability We've had this movement of population from rural environments to urban environments The world population growing from 8 billion to 10 billion people by 2050 food production going up by 50% as a consequence of that All of those things really drive this intensity around producing more food with less and less labor as one of those things that we need to accommodate And we really see autonomy as the solution to that Farming in any market whether it's the United States the UK Europe For those farmers the margins are very small right the capital investment for this machinery is very high People are going to be able to actually able to afford to implement this technology Yeah I think so I think the way we think about it certainly reduces the amount of labor that's required but the other significant portion is agriculture is very time sensitive right And it's important that the job that's being done gets done at the right time of the year And if you don't have the labor to do it you often pay a significant penalty in terms of the amount of prop that you can produce And so I think the payback for growers is pretty straightforward In many cases it's a difference between getting the job done at all and not getting done One funny quirk of this is that a farmer can control the vehicle with their smartphone Just taught me through how that would work Why would a farmer need to be able to have control via an app Yeah sure I mean this is all about the farmer's business right So they want to be able to interact with the machine They want to see what it's doing They want to make sure that it's doing the job that it's expected to do at the quality that they expect it to be done at And so they want to interact with the machine in the way that they would have interacted perhaps in the cockpit as you mentioned but since they're not there we try to emulate that experience for them on a mobile device All right give me the inside scoop Who are you talking to on the commercial side which fleet operators which kind of scale volume deals are you doing Yeah you know I think that's the great thing about the solution is that it really scales from small family farms all the way up through larger farms That labor issue that we talked about earlier is really persistent no matter what the size and scale of the farm is whether that's one tractor ten tractors All right we just got 30 seconds here but what does farming look like in 5 years from now How many What proportion of tractors are autonomous You know I think it's significant I think the adoption for this technology is going to be quick We have conditioned operators of machines over the last ten 20 years with higher levels of automation and autonomy is just that final step We've got customers who are actually asking us why do I have to be in the cockpit at all This is the solution I think they'll evaluate readily And that was dear CTO Jamie hyneman with Bloomberg's at ludlow Well how'd you like a small three wheel one person EV It'd probably be a lot better for me than an autonomous tractor But it is what electromechanical CEO Kevin pavlov is working on And here's how he describes it to Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde at the consumer electronics show in Vegas The idea of this vehicle is it's a purpose built vehicle for an individual Everything you would do individually And what makes it really special is the idea that it's not an EV that a lot of those are coming out because the market loves them But it's a really efficient and fun to drive EV It's centered around one person It's a quarter of the cabin space of a four passenger vehicle The heat's fast it cools fast It's a quarter of the battery size which charges fast And you get all the same range and mileage It's just a really well built vehicle for the purpose of urban mobility challenges and actually we're finding quite a bit of great solutions for last mile delivery small parcel things like that One on a motorbike Well this is a fully enclosed cabin We made a niche right between micro mobility which our motorbikes and scooters and cars And part of this it's classified as a motorcycle It does classify there But you have power windows power brakes You get in eating cooling air conditioning You can see backup cameras So it's everything you could expect from a vehicle Highway speeds 80 miles an hour a hundred miles of range It just gives you a lot more flexibility in all kinds of weather That you might not get out of a two wheel vehicle And then it gives you all the efficiencies that you would get on before wheel So how many have been delivered today We've got over 60 vehicles that we've delivered to consumers and fleets And that was electromechanical CEO Kevin pavlov with Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde All right now let's get to some of the bigger vehicle makers because Ford is doubling capacity for its battery powered F one 50 lightning to 150,000 trucks after getting a lot of interest in.

Denise Pellegrini Jamie hyneman Bloomberg hindman Denise Kevin pavlov Jamie hyneman Caroline Hyde Bloomberg Europe United States UK ludlow Vegas Ford
"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:38 min | 11 months ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Schuch This is Bloomberg best on Bloomberg radio This is Bloomberg best I'm at Baxter And I'm Denise Pellegrini Now we get to talk about that autonomous tractor We heard all about it from dear CTO Jamie hyneman Bloomberg said ludlow kicks things off here Really kind of grilling hindman about it Let's listen in Is this a truly autonomous vehicle or is this like a Roomba robot for farming where it's in a small geo fence field it goes back and forth doing whatever it needs to do in the crops It's great to be here fully autonomous That's the first time ever that we've been able to take the operator out of the gap of the machine You know in farming as you well well understand we've had the connection between the operator the human and the machine for forever And this is really groundbreaking in the sense that we finally get to break that connection and the machine goes out and does this work on its own There was some surprise particularly from investors about this announcement the speed you've been able to do this Is this a market ready product I mean how many fully autonomous tractors will be and fields this year next year What volumes can you produce that Yeah we're still playing around with volumes We're going to be slow and introduction We want to make sure that we get this right We're thinking you know ten to 50 we will be in market this year though with those products with growers in their fields doing work for them in their operations So I talked to a lot of folks in the trucking industry for example and we talk about autonomy especially in the COVID era where drivers have dropped out sick as a really good tool Where does this fit in in agriculture Is this something that creates jobs or does it take jobs away That's a great question So the issue the issue in agriculture is labor availability We've had this movement of population from rural environments to urban environments The world population growing from 8 billion to 10 billion people by 2050 food production going up by 50% as a consequence of that All of those things really drive this intensity around producing more food with less and less labor as one of those things that we need to accommodate And we really see autonomy as the solution to that Farming in any market whether it's the United States the UK Europe for those farmers the margins are very small right The capital investment for this machinery is very high People are going to be able to actually able to afford to implement this technology Yeah I think so I think the way we think about it certainly reduces the amount of labor that's required but the other significant portion is agriculture is very time sensitive right And it's important that the job that's being done gets done at the right time of the year And if you don't have the labor to do it you often pay a significant penalty in terms of the amount of prop that you can produce And so I think the payback for growers is pretty straightforward In many cases it's a difference between getting the job done at all and not getting done One funny quirk of this is that a farmer can control the vehicle with their smartphone Just talk me through how that would work Why would a farmer need to be able to have control via an app Yeah sure I mean this is all about the farmers business right So they want to be able to interact with the machine They want to see what it's doing They want to make sure that it's doing the job that it's expected to do at the quality that they expect it to be done at And so they want to interact with the machine in the way that they would have interacted perhaps in the cockpit as you mentioned but since they're not there we try to emulate that experience for them on a mobile device All right give me the inside scoop Who are you talking to on the commercial side which fleet operators which kind of scale volume deals are you doing Yeah you know I think that's the great thing about the solution is that it really scales from small family farms all the way up through larger farms That labor issue that we talked about earlier is really persistent no matter what the size and scale of the farm is whether that's one tractor ten tractors All right we just got 30 seconds here but what does farming look like in 5 years from now How many What proportion of tractors are autonomous I think it's significant I think the adoption for this technology is going to be quick We have condition Right Operators of machines over the last ten 20 years with higher levels of automation and autonomy is just that final step We've got customers who are actually asking us why do I have to be in the cockpit at all This is the solution I think they'll about it readily And that was dear CTO Jamie hyneman with Bloomberg's at ludlow Well how'd you like a small three wheel one person EV It would probably be a lot better for me than an autonomous tractor But it is what electromechanical CEO Kevin pavlov is working on And here's how he describes it to Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde at the consumer electronics show in Vegas The idea of this vehicle is it's a purpose built vehicle for an individual Everything you would do individually And what makes it really special is the idea that it's not an EV that a lot of those are coming out because the market loves them But it's a really efficient and fun to drive EV It's centered around one person It's a quarter of the cabin space of a forecast in your vehicle Heats fast it cools fast It's a quarter of the battery size which are just fast And you get all the same range and mileage It's just a really well built vehicle for the purpose of urban mobility challenges and actually we're finding quite a bit of great solutions for last mile delivery small parcel things like that Why not a motorbike Well this is a fully enclosed cabin We made a niche right between.

Bloomberg Denise Pellegrini Jamie hyneman Bloomberg ludlow Jamie hyneman Europe United States UK Kevin pavlov Caroline Hyde Vegas
"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:37 min | 11 months ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"What John Deere the leader in agriculture and construction machinery is promising after an announcement at CES that sent its stock soaring deer's CTO As Jamie hyneman joins us now for more on this live from Las Vegas an edge you're going to take it away Yeah thank you Caroline You see the images there on your screen a tractor in a field with no driver in the cockpit Jamie is this a truly autonomous vehicle or is this like a rumba robot for farming where it's in a small geo fence field it goes back and forth doing whatever it needs to do in the crops It's great to be here fully autonomous That's the first time ever that we've been able to take the operator out of the cap of the machine In farming as you will well understand we've had the connection between the operator the human and the machine for forever And this is really groundbreaking in the sense that we finally get to break that connection and the machine goes out and does this work on its own There was some surprise particularly from investors about this announcement the speed you've been able to do this Is this a market ready product I mean how many fully autonomous tractors will be in fields this year next year What volumes can you produce that Yeah we're still playing around with volumes We're going to be slow and introduction We want to make sure that we get this right We're thinking ten to 50 we will be in market this year though with those products with growers in their fields doing work for them in their operations So I talked to a lot of folks in the trucking industry for example and we talk about autonomy especially in the COVID era where drivers have dropped out sick as a really good tool Where does this fit in in agriculture Is this something that creates jobs or does it take jobs away That's a great question So the issue the issue in agriculture is labor availability We've had this movement of population from rural environments to urban environments The world population growing from 8 billion to 10 billion people by 2050 food production going up by 50% as a consequence of that All of those things really drive this intensity around producing more food with less and less labor as one of those things that we need to accommodate And we really see autonomy as the solution to that Farming in any market whether it's the United States the UK Europe for those farmers the margins are very small right The capital investment for this machinery is very high People are going to be able to actually able to afford to implement this technology Yeah I think so I think the way we think about it certainly reduces the amount of labor that's required but the other significant portion is agriculture is very time sensitive right And it's important that the job that's being done gets done at the right time of the year And if you don't have the labor to do it you often pay a significant penalty in terms of the amount of profit you can produce And so I think the payback for growers is pretty straightforward In many cases it's a difference between getting the job done at all and not getting done One funny quirk of this is that a farmer can control the vehicle with their smartphone Just taught me through how that would work Why would a farmer need to be able to have control via an app Yeah sure I mean this is all about the farmers business right So they want to be able to interact with the machine They want to see what it's doing They want to make sure that it's doing the job that it's expected to do with the quality that they expect it to be done at And so they want to interact with the machine in the way that they would have interacted perhaps in the cockpit as you mentioned but since they're not there we try to emulate that experience for them on a mobile device All right give me the inside scoop Who are you talking to on the commercial side which fleet operators which kind of scale volume deals are you doing Yeah you know I think that's the great thing about the solution is that it really scales from small family farms all the way up through larger farms That labor issue that we really that we talked about earlier is really persistent no matter what the size and scale of the farm is whether that's one tractor or ten tractors All right we just got 30 seconds here but what does farming look like in 5 years from now How many Or what proportion of tractors are autonomous I think it's significant I think the adoption for this technology is going to be quick We have conditioned operators of machines over the last ten 20 years with higher levels of automation and autonomy is just that final step We've got customers who are actually asking us why do I have to be in the cockpit at all This is the solution I think they'll die readily All right a dream come true Tractors farming autonomy Carolina I'll throw it back to you in New York And great interview as always and just after the break what we're going to be talking to you a little bit more about an EV car you know well in fact you tested it yourself right The three wheeled solo car manufactured by Canadian EV company Electra.

Jamie hyneman John Deere Caroline Jamie Las Vegas Europe United States UK Carolina New York Electra
"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:36 min | 11 months ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Go on sale in the spring of 2023 and sold out in just 12 minutes CEO Mary Barra spoke with Bloomberg's David Weston and Romain bostic about the big rollout We're going to bring him to market as quickly as we can We anticipate that we'll start with the work truck variant and that will be available in spring next year and then in the fall we'll have the RST and we're going to work to get them to customers as quickly as we can And the reception I have to tell you David has been great the first edition of the RST sold out in 12 minutes and reservations are still coming in so we're super excited about the response that we're getting because this is a ground up EV truck that has so much capability we're so excited to share it with the world So Mary congratulations on all the people ordering array There's the demand there At the same time as you know so well you're a year or so behind where Ford is with the F one 50 How are you going to catch up And maybe as important is it important for General Motors to catch up with Ford when it comes to the full size pickup Well David when you look at the EV race we've already had the bolt out for several years and now the bold EUV were shipping hummers right as we speak the Cadillac lyric will be out in just a couple months and then early next year we're going to have not only the Silverado but we're going to have next year The Chevrolet blazer EV SUV as well as the Equinox So I am so excited about all the electric vehicles that we have coming And that's why I'm so confident by mid decade we will be the leader in EVs with the battery plants we have with the assembly plants that we're putting in place and with the models and the volume segments of the market We are going for total leadership here What Mary with regards to the accessibility of some of these vehicles not just the vehicles the GM makes but a lot of your competitors these are still relatively expensive vehicles that can sometimes cost 50 $60,000 or more once you get them fully loaded here When do we get to a point where we see a little bit more price accessibility so that we see a little bit broader adoption of EVs Well I think that's why it's so important that we've got the Chevrolet Equinox EV coming out because it is so important to get to your point into that affordable part of the market the 30 to $40,000 is a huge volume segment and that's exactly where we're targeting the Equinox and it's going to be nicely equipped when people when we reveal that shortly just to not too long into this year People are going to see just how much value they're going to get for that starting price of $30,000 And I think that's when you're going to see that huge adoption especially with the work we're doing to make sure that there's adequate charging So I'm super excited to get those affordable EVs into the marketplace because as you know what General Motors we really want to bring everybody in And we know that a big part of making this more affordable is of course improving the drive chain and proving the batteries to the point where they are a little bit more economical to produce and as a result that brings down the cost of the car How far along are you in GM's development of that technology And of that battery manufacturing where you can have some confidence here that the price can come down meaningfully for consumers What we have that confidence when you look at the previous generation battery technology we are using on the bold EV and EV to what we're launching with all team first with the Hummer then with the lyric then with the Silverado the equinox and the blazer that's coming on our new generation of all team technology that is already 40% less expensive than what we have with a bolt And we believe by midday decade that will be 60% GM CEO Mary Barra there And the battle in the EV world heating up and Tesla still the biggest target All right ludlow with us again to talk about the latest Bloomberg quick take ad Walk us through the big take of the week and the two automakers really trying to take on Tesla Yeah we saw in that tape there the kind of splashy announcements of the last few years have been about Ford and General Motors and electric pickups But we have to talk about the two biggest automakers in the world Volkswagen and Toyota because they sell 10 million a car cause a year per piece right That's ten cars for everyone that tests the cells So this is a really big year you know these two companies put their money where their mouth is And now we need to learn what they're going to do to take on Tesla because they are the biggest in the world What's Volkswagen strategy What's Toyota's strategy Yeah so if a Volkswagen you know they channeled their inner Tesla Herbert D.C. the CEO's channel is inner Elon Musk He's going full send basically on electrification a $100 billion commitment over 5 years both on software and development of EVs and they want to electrify the whole fleet and do it quickly And why everyone's excited is this huge manufacturing footprint They may not yet have the technology proven what they do have is their legacy and a history of manufacturing and delivering vehicles at scale How much does Elon Musk care about all this How much is he paying attention Yeah you know he has this line that you and I have discussed time and time again Prototypes are easy production is really really hard You think about Volkswagen in the first ten months of 2021 That's what we have the data for They sold just a little more than 300,000 EVs right So they have such a long way to go to catch up and manufacture these EVs at scale and they feel tested They have a technological lead right Where they can give you heard it in that package Mary Barra the best value for money bring the cost of battery packs down and pass that on to the consumer and Tesla bullish right And so their investors because tester continues to invest in the manufacturing process and try and build it their advantage not let it slip to some of the legacy players like a Volkswagen or a Toyota for example who is still very much focused on hybrids and even hydrogen without going fully into battery electric vehicles So when you look at the market ahead which carmaker is really the closest to challenging Tesla in terms of market share in terms of quality equity market investors have given such a lot of credibility to Ford and GM because of the pace of what they've done But they don't respectfully have the scale of Volkswagen And I think a lot of people if you read the research notes they're waiting for Volkswagen to go big and 2022 could be the year that that happens Okay I'd love to Thank you so much for that update And that does it for this edition of Bloomberg technology Join us tomorrow We're going to have much more from CES including the CEO of electro mechanica Kevin pavlov and the CEO of deer Jamie hyneman Plus we're going to talk about the role of social media One year.

Mary Barra GM David Weston Romain bostic Ford Tesla Volkswagen Bloomberg Chevrolet David blazer Elon Musk Equinox Toyota Tesla Herbert D.C.
"hyneman" Discussed on The Hockey PDOcast

The Hockey PDOcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on The Hockey PDOcast

"Like there was that one game where they basically just feel their HL team and be the leaf 7 one. And if anything like that's almost more entertaining, because I'm just like, man, this is like the only organization that can pull shit like this off where just like they have Rodriguez's scoring a bunch of goals and danton hyneman and they're just lighting it up and you're like, what is going on? I think we just haven't seen it enough for us. We get this year, right? He's only been alive for a couple of games. He's clearly working his way back into game form. So we'll see. I'm willing to bump them up more once Crosby's at full health and molk and eventually comes back and they actually have a full lineup. But you're right, for right now, it's like only maybe for the defensive purists and guys who just like people who were really love four checks, maybe maybe out of payments can be higher, but for us, I think it's fair to have in this low. 20 6 is next on my list, I believe. I have the New York islanders. 26. Skip a few? Well I've already done a bunch of my low ones. I guess I have 27. I have $2700 Blackhawks. So I actually should we should do them for us. I don't even know what to say about this. It feels gross watching them and so I have to admit I haven't watched much Chicago Blackhawks hockey this season. As a result, especially over the past couple of weeks, they've obviously been playing better since their coaching change. And DBD, but yeah, it seems like the on ice product is kind of doing a deep dive on it right now just seems a bit ridiculous. Yeah, yeah, I feel that, I mean, I have at 28. I have the senators. They're rebuilding team. I'll give them credit for that. They've got some nice young pieces that I'm interested in and seeing how that develops. And I think that they can be an entertaining team on any given night. But I just don't have I think they don't have the poll really to prioritize them over some of these other rebuilding teams that are making more traction. So they're in there. I will say Matt Murray watching him is an adventure, any night. So I do, I might, I might give them a few extra watchability points, Matt Murray's a net just for the sake of seeing what might happen with him between the pipes. So they're there, and then if you want to catch up at 27, I have the Columbus blue jackets. I think that blue jackets have some of my least favorite uniforms in the league, not crazy about their entire branding. They lose some intrigue without Patrick Lin a in the lineup. And I have like I have a general curiosity as to what they are right now and where they are, but beyond that, I don't think that there are all that crazy exciting to watch. I have them at 25 and I've actually enjoyed watching them play this year. They're actually kind of sneaky fun. It's kind of a ragtag group of veterans and young players and you're heading into the year. I had no idea what to expect..

danton hyneman molk Blackhawks Matt Murray Rodriguez New York islanders Crosby hockey Patrick Lin Columbus
"hyneman" Discussed on Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

"This person. Gross. This is the longest we've made it without you. Usually, I know, I usually am like fucking juice. I know. Wait, Danny, you're not Jewish, though. No, I am. I'm Jewish. I mean, I'm not a practicing Jew. I'm joking. Come on. I was on touring. I just got to say Tori just gave me a world class. That was so many people do. That was the most the many people do because of you. Like, oh my God, just something like for a second, and I'm gonna do something we never do. I can't wait. And ask the guest question. So this is what I want to know. How many push ups? Can you do? Oh God. We used to have a push up contest at MythBusters where you would do as many as you could between takes and you'd write it on the board and everybody in the office from the PA, the researchers. Did you do girls? No, I'm a super strong. Have you seen the size of my arms? No, they're crazy. God, that's a lecture. I wanted to carry more than anything but not in the me too. Wait. No, no, no, just touch just touch. Oh my God, you actually are. We do a lot of push ups. We just who would win those any castor was it? No Superman. Yeah. Yeah. You're good. Yeah, there's Australian. He was like super. He was talking about saza. I have a very good friend. When I go work out, I only do my arms, but I also feel that right now. Oh man. I know. So I do hard. I don't know, yeah, don't do the left when that's not his journalism. He's your case jerk off from. Left one that's fucked up, but the right one is like, we're never getting another job again. No, I'll hire you. I promise. I'm very successful. Y'all are gonna be y'all are gonna be the people very retweet this fucking podcast. So here's my question. So let's ask questions about that. If I can't get another job, you promise to give me one. And we're gonna talk about your book, I promise. We don't have to. No, I want to, 'cause I think it's just offered to let us stand up. I can live here. Were you all from? Texas. But this is really the truth. You can't believe how many people live here. This house? In this house? Well, why have my friend? Leslie Bibb lives here. Right now currently. She was Will Ferrell's wife in Talladega nights. And Sam Rockwell's girlfriend. What's going on forever? And she lives here, but you always have people here. No, well, she's staying here now 'cause she's shooting American housewives. Yeah. And so she's shooting it currently right now. Okay. I'm going to get to my question for these two. Right now. Wait a minute okay, so on us. Where are you originally from? I'm from character just outside San Francisco. It's called Los gatos, California, but education, parents, family. I've had family. I have family and education. Well, tell me both of those things. Did anyone ruin you? I mean, did you have a happy a little bit? Did you have a happy child? Well, there's a book about it called crash test girl. You can read about my childhood. Well done. Well done. Nice plug. There you go. Right now, guy get a picture of crash test girl for me. Because I will stay away. As a family, everyone has a story. Kerry was very supportive of he started it and he started at dot com. Danny created the me too movement with his own fucking talk. Okay. So MythBusters goes on the air. How long after, 'cause I remember when MythBusters came on, you weren't on from the beginning. They didn't go to the they didn't have the magnificent three who in my opinion made the show and then when they were gone. That's a show blue donkey balls. But what, but wait, time out. I love now I love it. We just no, I felt that's really sweet. No, but I mentioned it. So how many years on before they brought C our first experiment was in 2002, it aired 2003 and then it ended 2000. It was three, it was 6 episodes. The first season was 6 episodes, and then they brought us on. Is that right? Yeah. I mean, I was helping out on the first ones. You can see in the background. I was in. What are you doing on the first ones? Well, my first day is an intern for Jamie hyneman, was also the first day they started filming MythBusters in the shop because I was trying to be a toy prototype, and getting into special effects. Right. And you're an artist, right? Yeah, I was trying to be a sculptor for actual money instead of my art, which nobody bought. So I went to Jamie hyneman shop. He gave me an internship and it just happened that MythBusters started filming there, and it was before TV on cable was a thing. Things, so it was just like filming behind the scenes. So like in the background, I'm holding ropes or laughing or just being there cleaning things up. So what yours is? 2002? 2000. Yeah, it was like 2000. July 2002 is when we started. But then it aired in 2003. I watched those early episodes. And so being sort of Jamie's intern led to the show. Yeah, you look in the background for there was one called falling lawyer where a guy kept proving how manly was by throwing himself against a plate glass window in one day. It's called barstool sports, and you see me in the background just like I had like black hair in a red streak in overalls. And I was just laughing because I'm like, what is this? This is the weirdest show. I a little further out of college than I had wanted to be for not having a real job. I was about 20 6 or 7. How do you know? I'm 43 now. Okay I'm 40. So like I was the same, like when I jumped into my first job turning sports new. I had a lot of weird, small jobs and I really wanted to figure out something fun. I have a dream of being on air though. No. Yeah. We talked about never? No, we never so shy. But if you're like, did you never really have a maybe? Have you ever had an Academy Award speed? Did you hold your shampoo bottle in? Except for the water. Or the bangles, but just 'cause she was so awesome. She was awesome. She's still so awesome. She's fucking awesome. I think we did. Yeah, and we were like, holy shit. And we definitely saw heart together. Remember we were so we nerded out at Nancy Wilson. And she let us come back soon. And it was amazing. And I fangirled out like the worst. 'cause I was in a band in high school and my band and I had we had a female lead singer and we were going don't mention your band. So how did you, how did you get backstage? Did you just Nancy Wilson? But how did she know you were there for like followed me on? Oh, nice. Damn it. You know you do remember inviting me out at south by Southwest? Yes, I was actually because then it was like pouring balls. Oh, yeah, that was super terrible thunderstorms. We had a big gun. I was giants demo. And I was like some panel of talking about I don't know whatever like getting a job. From Twitter or some shit like that and I spoke at some south by myself. Oh, it was me and Meghan amram. Oh, really? Oh, yeah, yeah, it was really fun. It was fucking. I thought it was gonna be. It was like pouring balls and whatever. Yeah, we were.

saza Jamie hyneman Danny Leslie Bibb Tori castor Sam Rockwell Talladega Ferrell Los gatos PA Kerry Texas San Francisco California Nancy Wilson manly Jamie Academy Award Southwest
"hyneman" Discussed on TNCnow

TNCnow

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on TNCnow

"Blue gummy muster support kosovo Night it will grow with thousand Sa my migrants excited value your health as well Naive endorsement union grew equals. Start coming in and then these laws about you of what's inside than they also started inviting their friends inside ruled thousand members so So in everything that you did you heart using saturday. People Sincerity do provide solutions for the business number. New sincerity with provides insurance. Now when within. I brought up now. I m sanitizer Out is this product essay. Assume osama coming coming my mother. So i did not only gonna use an ambulance over that down pat. I did enough. I've known him. Boys sheltering osama benefits that you the astronauts Uncle each ingonyama an upcoming. Now that's why launch shit so on base for our needs. Unions sincerity greenwich Ago we found out dominating find out in the nick of you this you'll have somebody No so you and then the next one inside you make up. Set up front or You'll you'll see. Here's yeah. I think you were always working on the weather. No one else in asia They move for this You can you. Can you bring the app. Megan so michelle unemployed experience Abundance elvis eating so. I wanted to help golfer as to. Why don't mainstream snow of being one earthy ready for her. So that's why you'd think vista michigan and then of course snap by just Mommy seats Seething wells didn't Up a van majors as if you go. So you'll Roundup menu because that's that's not Away you who need so. And we know the hindi. London that's why we launched because we want other people under the options safe options for being being golfers yet or dm rest feeding the salt shop around sets us again so this inserted the of what we want to serve What we want to is there. So i up by new orleans like that No name gagnon yours. So thank you. How's it going next On being serious not all. I like i know at this year neck. Messiah family members small meaty members At the in casino. Moms now mcginnis brownlow For others and out. So my lemon amandus up. I hyneman among say you might not. Will you mentioned your your mana in Yuma voice many balance Alum lilliana stage landa Or in ages event. I want the no on us among your the agers null and then undecided about at ends the freelancer At businesses a mobile missile and we have percents deserve worry I was young when i was when studying. mitchell the mummy in week three authors. Who have again super union. You wanna get with nation deaths Some so registered But in a sense you know mama by nestle. The just need Ingrain he beat them on owner of nugget india genuine. So talk about what. They're usually a whistling labor interest in. So you know what's going on in school and make bitcoin. Missile highnesses super protective bubble over a blake. Better with us. Oh you have been super overprotective. I don't mean made over. And i this finding my niche in I don't know that as you said that against super high off now Up front holding them visit you know market sending so you you so was my nothing this anemone though. I don't know you're not gonna know that i would want them be looks especially Providence still michael business. He's in governmental Swimming our maceo. I always check on thimphu view. Emotion stayed up. woody. I also experience nyla to Explicit my dad ended up on the phone so you and then take on lane plus Out began and then. I'm going to end the movement that dinning a senior was not. Do something era incident. So are you missing enough sitting doing nothing. I'm begging going Visual limited so you just have been no. You're already doing priority. billingham baggio who Force all either home on the new gregory. So why am i gonna. I mean same since you mentioned about this meghan of being among you're up yitz. They wanted in the who by the way the my advice s among is two hundred. I'm in dozens. Did i get into the government. Aided for free Moms so huma advice atlanta. They wanted net montgomery net noon responsibility. as the first among in the same.

osama mcginnis brownlow hyneman kosovo gagnon Megan michelle asia Yuma Ingrain michigan new orleans nestle London mitchell nyla india billingham baggio Providence woody
"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Envoy to tell North Korea that the door is open for talks. Former Japanese Defense Minister Shigeru Ishiba has dropped out of the race to head the LDP and which would effectively if he had one become. Prime Minister. Taro Kono still leads polls. Yamamura is reporting that issue of plans to back corner China is urging the U. S demand its ties in the face of potential Biden trade probe. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken in front of Congress today, said U. S had to abide by the August 31st agreement or risk attacks from Taliban and Al Qaeda forces. Apple says that it is fixed to security bug that would have let hackers operating out of Israel take over iPhones. Singapore has introduced a new parliamentary building empowers the government to investigate and stop Foreign actors from influence national politics and inflaming social issues. US. President Joe Biden plans to call to vaccinate 70% of the world's population by September. 2022 listen to what New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority is doing to deal with the pandemic. Says it is going to withhold death benefits from unvaccinated workers. This was first reported by The New York Times. Wow, by the way, New York City schools open today, along with the first day of the vaccine, carding for indoor dining and theaters and sporting events in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter, This is Bloomberg Bloomberg opinion informed perspectives and expert data driven commentary on breaking news. 9 50 PM on Wall Street time to check in with Bloomberg opinion, and we're joined today by opinion columnist Shuli Rand, who is writing about immigrant and how it's going to be like the hunger games for its bondholders, So this surely is a top story. That we have been following today. And we were talking earlier to our guest, Michael every from Robert Bank as well. And he was sort of making a similar point that you make that just because you invest and now doesn't mean in China that you're necessarily going to get bailed out. And you're saying those wishing for an orderly wind down will end up disappointed an empty handed. How do you see this playing out? So so like her when when we talk about orderly wine dying one down. It depends on the vantage point. If you're bombing investor, and you think, Oh, you might have a priority claim to other cardinals water balance. She investors ever grant that That would be a misconception at this point. I mean, we all know China is sort of redrawing the social contract with the new come on prosperity pushed. So So what happens is that smaller investors or retail investor that somehow Uh, Long to Evergrande via shadow banking products. They are likely to get the priority claim that in that sense, it's going to be like hunger games. Whoever who who is more aggressive and angry going to the street for protests, they're likely to get their money back first. So surely I'm wondering because the financial advisors that will be looking at the capital structure. There are two of them officially now, and we've been focused a lot on the credit side of the ledger because obviously there's more than $300 million in bonds outstanding. Do we know that the equity people are going to be left standing at the end of this, or will they be entirely wiped out? Do you think? Well, the restructuring basically wipe out the equity shareholders. Never say never right, because hurts actually came out pretty strong earlier this year, But I think at this point, the equity shareholders will likely to be will very likely be wiped out because we're not just talking about balance sheet. Uh, liabilities now were also talking about off balance sheet wealth managers and products that Evergrande wealth. Has sold over the years and we don't know how much should they have sought. To be honest, they always off balance sheet and then now, like a small investors have claimed to them. So I would say quitting. Investors have Pretty much nothing, Hmm. A lot of analysts coming through and saying that this is unlikely to morph into systemic risk or further contagion. Maybank among the latest reading their research note. Can you explain just for a broader against global audience? Why, as you point out that this is not going to create financial contagion that investors don't have so much to worry about. I'm in China already has quite some experience that bailing out the biggest troublemakers starting from, uh I'm banging a china and stuff. I mean, they the bondholders did have to take up. Substantial hits, but you didn't see a A it blow up so far right? So China already has some experience in the past. What will happen? Uh, it's likely, uh, wind that is a slow and gradual. Um, it doesn't mean that the recovery will be any good. It's just going to be slow. I mean, H n a s still going through the Hyneman High court and then you don't see blow up so far. And it's interesting because as I'm listening to you, and I'm thinking about what that would situation here in the U. S is vis a vis the Fed and this messaging that has been constant consistent and it's been deliberate. That we're going to have at some point of tapering. We're going to have a tapering at some point, I think in the case of Evergrande, there's also been a constant, gentle messaging that there is a problem here. There's a problem here. So I think the point that you're making here is none of this is really a surprise. But if you then consider the What the PBOC is left with in trying to manage this situation. Does this necessarily mean that a lot of ever grands bad debt is going to wind up on the balance sheet of the central bank in China? PBOC by law cannot carry out all these Baghdad, uh, balance sheet like cut that Steak council forbidden. So what happened was that PBOC housing the past look for the so called white nights like those that bad managers, including Barhoum, which is in trouble itself, and then also like a you know, like a Provincial governments like ever. Gwenda is headquartered Ancient Jen and in the Quantum province, and it's a very wealthy region in China. Right so maybe the local government can coming and do something, but the PBOC itself will have a very clean balance sheet. When we look at immigrants assets we've got the bonds pressing in this near certain likelihood of default. We've been looking at the big fall down in shares as well. At what point do we see further concerns about immigrants? Assets will be get to a point where we just see she is halted. Um, I think her I mean, they have this, uh, like a dollar bond that has a payment due Sept. 23rd. So, basically next Thursday, so if ever growing cannot pay that interest payment, then it we're going to default of all all of the immigrants all about posing like a 15 $20 billion and I can see that by then the shares will be halted. I mean, ever. Grint and game is very, very year. We're going to see that in the next one or two weeks they spent the company is still in trying to sell off assets. How has that been going? I'm obviously not very well later is, uh, like a solution for the wealth management product. Investors like they were basically saying, you can take out and so parking lot at as much as 50% this country market price that there was a lot Let's talk a little about what we saw in Shenzhen as well, Quite extraordinary. These protests. Is that something that's kind of quite common in China. We We've seen that before. I think Stephen Engel was telling us Yes, absolutely like in 2013. So every time like the those investors in those those wealth management products, they don't get their principal among back they would like to take to the streets and in the past, even like BBC, they have back hold under this kind of street protest pressure. So so I think that this is quite effective way. I mean, even in Hong Kong, you see, like a, uh retail investors protesting the central district. It's quite active in the Chinese design. Actually thank you. Great column surely ran is Bloomberg opinion columnist. You can read more at Bloomberg dot com slash opinion and on the terminal by typing, Okay,.

Shuli Rand 2013 Ed Baxter Stephen Engel Taro Kono Hong Kong San Francisco Michael Shenzhen Sept. 23rd BBC September. 2022 70% iPhones Apple Maybank Al Qaeda PBOC Bloomberg August 31st
"hyneman" Discussed on Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

"To the nurses and that was that and i just assist such a shock you know i have all the stuff. I have his car rolls tools. He rented a whole shop right beside my shop was going to. Who's gonna try to start a business doing something. He just wanted to help them. At every aspect is trying to help facilitate his dreams. Hopes injuries in I just i also want that. Just want to make a point that said before we started his people are saying this sorry to may because i lost a friend in in of course but i also want everybody to realize aaron. It was a big big part of the maker community. I mean he loves like obviously those you know he. He worked on mythbusters and he told me was always a big dream of his to get a job on mythbusters in. Probably have the timeline wrong. Because it wasn't an explicit conversation but something to the effect of he knew what he wanted and he went to film and television school of courses learned enough and then figure out a way to get on mythbusters got on mythbusters because he was a fan of mythbusters and got to work on the show for about three or four seasons and it was to him. It was a dream come true. And he loved being behind the scenes. He loves like he never like needed to be in the spotlight. He didn't like being behind the scenes for him was was what he loved below figuring stuff out he loved helping people in the in the frontlines he loved being like the part of the system that is so critical that not everybody enjoys doing in. It's hard like in this community. Everybody wants to be the star and aaron just like being there he didn't have to be the star and that's that's fit so good in here and i'm not saying i wanted to make him a star but he's like now. I'm fine and finally. When i put him on stories and stuff he would kind of dip out a little bit. He didn't really want to be in the stories. And i remember like when when shooting hold the sister. This is like you want me on camera. Might get some kid. He's like i don't like just shut up getting there. Just hold that do that and then it became more comfortable for him to just do whatever needed him to do to help me on camera. He just became just he just became part of the cast in my life and then also my youtube videos instagram. Of course you know. I was so happy to see when clubhouse came out that aaron was starting the chat rooms with everybody and i never went into them. Because i didn't want to be about me. I wanted it to be about aaron. And i knew he was developing a little social circle of people that like minded and he'd develop some real great friendships and a minute dad. He felt like he was spending too much time on social media so he shut his instagram down for minute in everybody. Check the music. Aaron okay is that right okay mic. He's fine he just a from instagram. He finds it's kind of distracting him from his goal so he said if anybody reaches out just tell them I just don't need the distraction right now. Get easily distracted. When i moved his room. I like a hundred bucks that he wanted to read Model kit some things that he was working on. I knew he struggled with finishing things for himself. But not for me you know. He said he always said. I have no problem. Finishing stuff for you. When i worked for jamie jamie hyneman said i would just do whatever you guys need like. He he didn't even need to be told what to do. We just do it because he knew it would help. The shop and he literally became like a third hand. Like i didn't even. I couldn't even if he heard me talking about like this new knife or something like the next day it would be their new big door. Paid for it on my credit card. Might guess if he bought things outside of a conversation he would always make sure that he. I knew that it was not that i'm cheap. But he just was his way of just keeping things fair and any didn't need to like the other day. The computer broke down the main computer that we use for all the cnc machines. It broke down in like an hour. He went to best buy and not only in. He bought to computers not one. He put one of my credit card. What his credit card. He came back he goes now. We have redundancy if the shop computer breaks down by computer will be the backup. I mean he's so thoughtful but he always had a problem he he struggled with finishing things himself accused Selfless met like he really worried about..

aaron Aaron okay jamie jamie hyneman youtube
"hyneman" Discussed on Mo Egger

Mo Egger

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Mo Egger

"How you doing i'm good. What's what's going on earth. I didn't know what that was. I heard that it's like whoa. What is that a call back to to an old era. Yeah i love the banana fan thing. Anyway peres. i mean to me that was the that was the highlight of the night last night. Basically these scotty hyneman of the bullpen. It's like we keep trying to get rid of this guy and and he keeps coming back and you're like wait a minute. When did he come back. And then david. Bill puts him in immediately. Yeah david does mind well. He's gotta be better now and he never is and it's like how many times is it's been up and down and my thought i just blows my mind that they keep bringing this guy up and down but like i said that was my first thing that that jennifer as is e scotty hyneman of the reds pitching. I'm thinking what they should do with him. Because he keeps coming back and forth between here in louisville kentucky speedway is. Just it's empty. They're not having racing right what they should do. Put him. they're built him the villain. Yeah build him and scott hyneman avila there in sparta and those two guys can kind of live not quite halfway but seemingly halfway between cincinnati and louisville but no. Here's.

scotty hyneman david Bill reds jennifer scott hyneman avila louisville speedway kentucky sparta cincinnati
"hyneman" Discussed on Mo Egger

Mo Egger

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Mo Egger

"Pictures by the pool yesterday from l. with the family he's having a good time. I hope mo has vacation than me. I won't start the show with my vacation stories but at some point they're to come out it's inevitable. Although today might not be the day we got a lot. We got a lot on our plate today. Heck of a lot on our plate today. And the fact that i the fact that i had a miserable vacation some of you might enjoy that after you were upset about me talking about my vacation two weeks ago if you put that voodoo on me. I hope you're happy later in the day. We'll get to vacation story. Why why. I looked like i got in a fight. You gotta fight today when you saw me come in teheran. Don't lie First thing is you get to a fight by kelly drive. Take a swing or no no. That's not it says something and you had to defend. Your family didn't do a good job. If that's the case seven stitches in my lip. I am in for most of this week today through thursday. Not sure who will be in fry. I think take james. But i'm not sure i don't want to don't want to jump the gun on that. I am today through thursday. And then i'll be back on monday because monday is a holiday. And if it's a holiday that means tearing and i are on the ones twos and threes like that makes this three right if you're on the ones and twos this is the three. So you know five out of the next six shifts. I'll be in this chair so settle in wants to have some fun. I'm in a good mood. Here's the beauty of daylight. Today today. looks delightful outside. It's a thousand degrees out there so from in here in the air conditioning. It looks like glorious day out. The reds split their series with the braves have to losing four nothing yesterday. Batts can't get anything going to hitter. That should have been one hitter. Because there's no way that scott hyneman bleed her down the first baseline that three braves made a play on one of them had in his glove and dropped got hyneman gets base it the swan song for sky hyneman tyler. Molly goes six. He gives up four including maybe the hardest hit home. Run ever seen not the farthest home run. I've seen i've seen a home runs. Go farther but that ball by acuna. What one hundred and fifteen mph exit velocity. That's about as hard as you can. Hit a ball. Physically malley again continues to struggle a great american ballpark outstanding on the road. Ziara hovering right around two on the road. It's up near like six or seven at home. Splits aren't great for tyler molly. And he's in a little three or four game you know. He had that stretch where he looked like he was becoming an ace or look like a top of the rotation guy then he's had a little bit of a regression. That's not to say he was terrible. Look the braves are good man. Another record doesn't fully indicate that right now they've had some injury issues. They've had a little bit of issues. What their starting pitching. We'll talk about this later. I i love the brave style. Play there is athleticism everywhere. How many times in that series did a braves defender make a ridiculous play. That changed the tone of the series. And you go back. Friday night eighth inning. I believe you. And jesse winker hits one to the wall and heartache. Gobbles it up right at the wall. Kunia had one wall yesterday. Off the bat of india the could have sparked a rally and got things going. The braves style is so fun to me. But that's how they decided to build their team. They're building their team on defense athleticism. You saw that athleticism yesterday when they first got on the board my third inning. I think get a guy on second easily score on a single bing. Bang boom next thing. You know another runner flying across the plate and they just put so much pressure on you. Both on the basis and defensively with their athleticism. Somebody said it reminded reminded them of the eighties and nineties reds. Maybe you know who it reminds me of reminds me of those like those those cardinals teams with willie mcgee and smith and they just were constantly a nuisance defensively on the base paths. I like how that braves team is constructed. And then you got. You've got freeman the mvp. Playing i that that cleans up drives guys in gets things done. I really do enjoy watching that braves team but you get a split that means last week split to in minnesota. You split four with the braves and unfortunately because of the disaster in san diego. You're now three and seven over your last ten. The brewers get hot immediately after the sweep. Remember that remember how long ago that feels when the red swept the brewers and headed to san diego for a series with all the momentum. Winning thirteen of sixteen reds came back to earth. The brewers did not brewers have won five in a row. they're now six games in front of the reds. In first place they are twelve games over five hundred. The brewers remember our kept talking about eighty five eighty. Six wins might win this division. The brewers they have other plants and honestly if that brewers team can get to a pace and maintain a pace. Were they win. Ninety two ninety three games. They're gonna run away with this thing. I don't think saint louis can keep up. I know the reds can't keep up that we'll talk about reds braves a little bit as we go on and more so we'll talk about my emotions because that's what's important here right my emotions my emotions right now. I'm stuck between encouraged him. Frustrated and my fear is that's exactly where this ownership group wants me right just encouraged enough on those days that they win that you stick around just frustrated enough you stay invested..

twelve games six games Kunia Friday night yesterday today saint louis Molly thirteen minnesota Ziara monday scott hyneman willie mcgee tyler molly two weeks ago james first thursday third inning
"hyneman" Discussed on Mo Egger

Mo Egger

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Mo Egger

"Two against the turns minneapolis. Tyler molly. who's coming off his most dominant start. Maybe of his big league career struck out twelve against milwaukee the ball tonight for cincinnati against left j. Happ who over his last seven starts has an era of almost ten eight ten tonight live on seven hundred wwl. W you're starting lineup. This evening. india's at second base jesse winker de aging batting second on rights stevenson behind the plate vodka at first whereas third aquino's and left batting seventh farmers the shortstop he is hitting eighth. Scott hyneman starts again in centerfield. He will be adding number nine latest all star game balloting update came out this morning and nick castanos send jesse winker are still listed among the top. Three vote-getters in the outfield in the national league ronald kunia leads the way he is actually the leading vote-getter for the national league castanos with about four hundred thousand votes behind him. Jessie wicker with a roughly hundred in Maybe ten thousand votes behind castalanos. No other read in the top three at their position. The cincinnati bengals announced today that they're renovating or game will be win the play the jacksonville jaguars on thursday night football this game will be on. September thirtieth inaugural class obviously will include. Paul brown and anthony munoz the other two Nominees or the other. To ring of honor. Inductees will be nominated in Late july so that's the thursday night. Football game bengals and jags lawrence versus meyer versus taylor and the ring of honor night at p. b. s. There's also this quickly. And i don't know that i want to dive too into the weeds into this stuff today. We're we're going to get somebody on tomorrow. Show who can sort of explain it in real world terms what this means but the supreme court of the united states unanimously affirmed a ruling monday that provides for an incremental increase in how college athletes can be compensated and also opens the door for future future legal challenges. That could delay much more significant blow to the incidentals business. Model reading from espn dot com. The court's opinion uphold say district court's decision that the double was violating an antitrust law by placing limits on the education related benefits that schools can provide athletes. This decision allow schools to provide their athletes with unlimited compensation. As long as it is some way connected to their education. There's a lot more to this. I was thinking about this today. Because it does reignite conversations about student athlete compensation and whether athletes should be paid to play college basketball college football and when it comes to either how i operate as a fan or what i do on this show. I've i've always sort of abided. By general rule that we talk about college athletes different than we talked about professional athletes. I'm not a big fan of booing. College kid the level of criticism or even to a degree vitriol. You might aim at a professional athlete to me is far exceeds what you should be aiming at a college. Athlete have always believed. These guys aren't getting paid. You could always talk about well you know so and so needs to play better or this guy was out of position on this play but the way we talk about professional athletes says to me at least always been different than how we talk about college. Athletes i.

Scott hyneman Jessie wicker Tyler molly Paul brown ronald kunia tomorrow anthony munoz twelve monday thursday night Two tonight Late july today taylor j. Happ third Three vote-getters nick castanos eighth
"hyneman" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

Chatter with Alex Fennell

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

"People that are that are doing that. Through clubs eilly only one glades. There might have been one or two but no you. I think you're lonely one. I'm sorry i'm proud. I'm proud to be. The only one should be proud Now that was really cool for me getting to connect with the. I'm glad that we could. You know up on the podcasts together. But yeah like i. I know what you're big into tiktok like rolling without so much. And i know you're clever and with different people off of clubhouse which is great and we you know we we talked about all the social media haters through tiktok and like that how you've been coping with adler honestly think that's incredible because it's such a hard thing for people to go through biak like i wanted to dive deeper. You said With with your to school getting to film and and radio broadcasting like would you want to be on tv show. You want be like a producer. I don't know what you can do with that degree because if let's say you don't get rich and famous. Let's say tiktok has just like your side hustle. I know you will medical hypothetical word Somewhere along the lines in media be producer or like being on a talk. Show like at all a anything about that industry like. It's something i'm interested in. And i don't know what i want right now as they haven't done the program yet so i can't really give you a definitive answer. All i know is goals. We'll i would like to have my own talk show or maybe like a movie or on my life like who's our big dream that i have. I mean if the like there. I would like to go down the line in a few years. Start a family. It's like these are all like goals that offer my life but like me. It's it's about staying in the president and like being okay with not thought when it hosts a single saying the president. I love it. it's super big in. I mean i like that. You have a bigger purpose kind of going forward and you're kind of just not like obviously you're having fun. You're leading to kind of like breeze bile in life kind like work for you and it's awesome you just like no. He wants to continue to pursue these bigger goals. And you will like you have the right support and people around you. That's what you need right now. Is that people around. That are going to take extra mile and support you. And i not super big. Do you have any what is already do talk show like did you have people look up to the head like a talk show or just like basically share your message like something like this where we're just kind of like the interview thing or something like this like i just think that lake i like entertain people. I like talking. I liked helping people like issues. Like all the ingredients of like everything that i like in a job or career is doing this So wherever that may take me. I don't know but like even if i'm not rich and famous that's not the point of why doing it but like it does help. Don't get me wrong and like i'm not saying that life isn't hard it's fucking hard like about the hardest year probably might tire life But i can say that one hundred percent worth it So if you're thinking about doing starting some things or you're not sure you're feeling like you're in the middle. Just do it like you know what already what you're feeling now which already know it matters. What tribe can already go back each angle back to your own. Life isn't go back to what every now but we don't know is like what lies ahead. tha that would be. My piece of advice is just to try stuff. Basically it's like just to be able to to kind of dive into stuff and not be scared like what your reputation is going to look like what you're gonna end up in like ten years or something like even do delay us. You try like you try dots. It like sauna. Failure is not like oh. I shouldn't have done that like imagine like you. Not knowing that like you didn't try only like i'm trying to think of a good thing to say because that's like super big right is just like i wouldn't have any. I wouldn't have done any of the things i have done in my life. I wouldn't accomplish anything. I wanted to make the relationships that have. It wouldn't be worry. I'm right now. I wouldn't have his podcast right. I wouldn't have this five former. Wouldn't have the people in my life. Who i do if i didn't try new things and just kind of dive into opportunities. I'm really big on. That is dislike diving into -tunities and just like doing. That's like a philosophy that i like people who know me know that i'm big on that Going into like like what's the what's the key thing of like. What are people doing that are successful in like better happy in their fulfilled. Like what are they doing. And like the answer is just doing like they're literally just like going out and doing things and acting on new situations hopping into the new things and trying like something. That's like scary to them. you know. Stepping out of the comfort zone is like flato. Just doing what do the do i keep saying. Because it's a super important thing to do. No matter where you are in your life you should just never want to be Like just like say where. You're trying new things. Like i love that. Like what is this school thing to you where you're going in like actually going through broadcasting as alex something that's scary to you or you just like abdu just refund thank like that. Anything is scary. That like requires change while he's fermi so it's something like that. I want to build a career with so like things are on the line on taking a risk wake there is good risk and then there's flake unhealthy so it's just like picking what works for you. Okay so there's good risk unhealthy risk so like like like it's kind of like the defining factor like a lot of people gambling like a million dollars best not a really smart idea like hey might win with two million dollars but like might lose everything you have. That's what i need. Yeah exactly understand. I feel like a lot of people would be like. Okay how do i calculate difference like how can i see. This is a good risk of. This is a batteries. Like what's the defining akers. Obviously you know if you're to go kill somebody if we're gonna go gamble your money but i feel like a lot of people would be like weighing their options. Like 'cause i understand what you're saying like. This is a good risk as the battery. That's not like for people to understand and like figure out if this is a good risk batteries. that's like the the whole thing about the risks. You don't know where it's gonna go right on the unknown it's scary. How how would you like. 'em up with somebody like jamie hyneman office like a good risk your a like how would i go into. It is kind of hard to answer like a super individualized right i. Yeah i don't have that answer but if it scares you and it's not harmful is probably a good thing. I love it. I love it you know we. We share a lot of the same values jamie. I really appreciate you as a person who was really cool you know. I think you're an incredible person is super bowl or to see you in go do incredible bigger things. I like a lot of like what's going on. And we get a continue to see them up there. You're gonna start your own clubhouse room as i feel like you should. I don't know. I don't really like to because then i'm just left with leh starting around but like i've thought about it like but i don't know if it's something i want to. I have a lot of options. And i'm just like taking my time like i'm focusing on my trusting the process and maybe i will like we'll see i've done a couple of rooms in the past but like i don't know i don't know that's what i wanna be. But was the yeah. Okay we've been on the guest for a little bit For a while now. I just wanted to ask like one. Probably maybe one final wrap up question Because i know you have a lot of followers on tiktok. And i know a lot of people have incredible stories exactly like yours and they want them to be shared and they wanna get their story out there. That won't build to know who they are. The one advocate for change and a different arena. Or wherever and i know there's like hundreds of people out there that are trying to do that and they're trying to grow tiktok. How did you get where you are. How did you get to the platform that you have given advice for anybody. That's trying to advocate for change. I know i asked questions. No i.

jamie hyneman two jamie two million dollars ten years five one hundred percent hundreds of people each angle million dollars one one final wrap up question single alex lot of people adler tiktok
"hyneman" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"hyneman" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Big mouse in the whole of the relish for chaotic dinner break $300,000 additional long, but I'm always right. So no, I shoot and I know other fun. I'll tell you, I'll tell you twice restaurants like a thief in the night, but I'm writing them alone. Is that it? Come back inside. I don't give me something that makes all the money You owe me on the rest of the papers. My baby. Oh, gee, I've been running this kid's got a game with a shot of my Johnson. Everybody shuttle car going out with young and I know I ain't going to like you guys go to Paris. Just imagine. Deal she begging for attention out here. Happy about wishes you could see us million cash. Because whenever I got a real I got some indiscreet won't beat me. I got the initiative trying to be me. I just go, Ray Charles. Think I see me? I'm in a Rolls Royce like fishing. I'm always mad, Lord shoot, And I know a lot of fun. I'll tell you. I'll tell you touch ready school like a thief in the night time morning when they can't and the family. Yeah, I stop. Collaborate and listen. You have to pay attention. Because I got that Candice casts off of the hour. You've been waiting for it, And I promise I'll give it to you. No games on facts. No cat, baby right here on file in the sixties. They can't last because guns every time you come around you, he's all night. You make everything from fine. Where you about those homes. Voisin is waiting down. Yeah, I get those goose bumps every time I need the Hyneman go that just I e get those times every time you were not around, you know that I get those 70 times, seven wonders. Great one young body Only. Why? Naomi up fliers. Okay, I'm simple, Okay, honest writer writer. When I pulled in right beside you not start them arrived when I take stick game. So a sack on a Bob Was that China tea? Oh, she fucking player already getting way at the top, right? They're all doing any. Yeah. Oh, no, I can't quit job. Yeah. Wear my squad. I am I doing wrong? Yes. All saying inner city don't get misinformed. They're gonna pull up on you. Yeah,.

Has the COVIDSafe app been worth it?

Coronacast

03:44 min | 2 years ago

Has the COVIDSafe app been worth it?

"So it's been just over a month since the federal government released the COVID SAIF APP which is all about digital contact. Tracing at the time it was sold as a vital tool to reopen the Stralia economy to get things moving again. He is the prime minister. Scott Morrison said in early. May there are currently over three and a half million downloads and registrations of the COVID SAFE APP and there needs to be millions more. How has the APP being used since then? Has it been the key to get things moving ours? Has it been forgotten about well today? We got reported aerial. Bogle Vac to help answer those questions and many more. So I t and Hyneman. So what's going on with the APP? These days it was salt is a vital pot to get us out of look down but We haven't really heard much about in the last waco so that's right so back. In late April wind APP launched. The government was using really strong language around it. As you've discussed describing it as sunscreen tying really explicitly to the lifting of lockdown restrictions. It's like not putting on Sunscreen to go out into the blazing Sun. We need that too so we can open up the economy. And that's what's so important. So if you haven't downloaded the APP yet downloaded that rhetoric has kind of died off lightly and in fact we only know of one instant so far with APP has been used as part of the contact tracing process. That's in Victoria. Where it was used to identify one person who contact tracing had not picked up so we don't really know too much yet about the APP. Success do we know much about numbers downloads? But then also there was talk early on especially that perhaps it was hard to use it correctly. Do We know about downloads? Also usage figures. It's a good question so the government said as of this week more than six million. Australians have downloaded the APP. But that's pretty different number to those who are still using it. I mean some of that six million. They may have deleted the APP. What we really want to know is daily active users. How many people have the APP on their phone? Using it correctly with Bluetooth turned on all those things that make it work and those are the kinds of numbers. The government has repeatedly said it caught. Shame doesn't have access to or is really not measuring so we don't really know the exact number of Australians. You have quite a bit safe operating correctly on the fines today. So the digital transformation needed say they're responsible for the APP. There's a whole series of controversies around. Its use on the IPHONE. I've got an IPHONE and I keep on getting messages implying that it's not on when it is on just in the background. What'S THE STORY WITH? Iphones versus androids and the functionality. Well this was an issue early on so when the APP launch the government insisted that it worked perfectly a lot of people who had some technical expertise. This space. Question this from the start so as you might remember. Singapore has its own contact tracing APP and we all knew that Abbott. It had problems with performance on iphone and we were wondering has strategy fixed this problem. How they got around this it turns out they hadn't so it did emerge as weeks passed since the APP launch. The APP had reliability problems on iphone. So if the APP wasn't full grounded a visible on the screen and with the Foreign Arpan. It was not always reliably communicating those in crafted dazed funds with the APP or collecting them. So the government has continually updated the APP and it looks like they may have fixed some of these iphone issues but we still hearing reports of people running into problems when they using other Bluetooth Devices Sabo headphones so we really still need a bit more clarity. I think about just when the is performing as it should and on iphone even if some of those obtaining problems have now been fixed.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison Bogle Vac Stralia Bluetooth Devices Sabo Hyneman Singapore Victoria Abbott
Advice for Freelancing With Python

Talk Python To Me

09:35 min | 3 years ago

Advice for Freelancing With Python

"Is the topic I'm really excited to cover because it touches on these things that you can do to sort of take your career to the next level which is always that I'm really really excited about. We're GONNA talk about freelancing getting into consulting some of the things that you WanNa do some of the things you want. Avoid all that kind of stuff but before we get into those I want to ask you two questions but not the two questions I normally ask folks because there's different commonality. Outta here so let's start with both of you talking about your podcast that you run. I think they're pretty relevant to the conversation so reuven you. WanNa kick us off. Tell us about the freelance show short. I'm one of the panelists could say the lead host at least on the freelance show I've been doing for about four or five years and it's basically a weekly panel discussion plus occasional guest talking to people about how he created freelancing career doesn't say a lot of people are especially people listening to this podcast right now are excellent programming but in order to be a successful freelancer actually a lot of business skills to and so we tried to talk to people about everything from marketing to support to good clients too bad clients to finding a niche and so on and so forth so that you can have a successful business not just be good at technology. That's really cool. I've listened to some of the episodes. I do enjoy it and I'm trapped. That's a good one now just to set the stage for us. the set the perspective here. Maybe just quickly define what freelancing means to you guys. Oh Wow is it just straight consulting gene. Is it like if I worked for a consulting firm in my freelancer like what is the AM. I personally freelancer running my own software business probably not right if finding ploy I'm probably not where would you put that I would say. Yes you say yes. I am yeah I mean I'd say if you are a business owner. As a small enough business and yours is just as his mind then definitely call you a freelancer. I mean there's so many different terms like freelance. Consultant contractor and I cannot quibble over the differences. This is too much. I think it's at the end of the day you get to decide what projects you're working on and you're not reporting to a boss who tells you what to do. I put that roughly in the freelance yeah awesome. Nobody can tell me what time to be somewhere or what to wear a probably puts me in there and I'm still GonNa Floyd Casey. How about you those about your show. Yeah well I I do. Thanks for the special treatment getting questions differently for US yeah. I don't make this up for everyone. Not just wanted to let you we run a show so I run a consulting firms offer development consulting firm and our engineering team produces a podcast called Friday afternoon deploy which is tongue in cheek for the thing that we should would never do but often find ourselves doing the point code on a Friday push deploy go get a beer walk. Go wrong exactly many things it turns out which is often a topic topic of the show but it's aimed at developers. We talk a lot about python on that show because that's our main back in language here at our company is what's your company name. Just the people know what it is. Can you say lofty lofty labs and yeah so we talk about how we build apps web development and mobile APP development and really just kind of capture what you would maybe call the water cooler type conversations that happen around our office answers aimed at other developers at two point of Catharsis for us were weakened lament the terrible things that we shift to production that week and the joy of client services and all those sort of things. It's a lot of fun. We've been doing it for almost a year. Oh now that's a good show as well very cool and maybe you could just tell me what you do day to day so folks know where you're coming from Casey. WanNa start with you sure so I'm the CEO here era lofty which means a lot of different things were still pretty small company. We've got about eight people and so my job changes every day but ultimately this company. Eh is the incorporation in my freelance business so I incorporated as a freelancer and then just naively stumbled into accidentally overbooking myself self in hiring people. That's kind of how we got here and so today I still write code occasionally. I try and keep myself out of the project work to build a more sustainable business. I do a lot OUGHTA work on sales marketing vision going out and promoting the company in those sort of things but I don't know I wear a dozen different. Hats sounds like a super cool job yeah it can. NBA for sure. There's a lot of stuff going on so I I find the hat and go oh. This is a fulltime job domina hire someone to do that and they'll have less work to do and then. I just find that there's a new job that I have to do so that's my job. I hire people and then find out that I have ten new jobs every time I do yeah. I know how that goes super cool reuven. How about you. I had my financing business for about twenty twenty five years now since ninety five started off doing coding and projects little consulting and I was always doing some training as well and it was a variety of languages and technologies and it was probably ten years ago that I said you know I really should concentrate on one thing. I really love the training most of all and there's tons of demand for python training. Why not just do that and nowadays most days most weeks most? I'm in a different city different country different company doing python training everything from Hyneman for non programmers to advanced workshops and that's most of my time but I also have a bunch of online courses that increasingly selling inclusive courses and then weekly python exercise size which you'll be surprised to hear involves a weekly hyphen exercise man you name that so well and or lack of creativity they go ahead and yeah it is like to keep people fluid and improve their practices ecall so you both have a lot of experience in this and you've you've walked the walk and I think one one of the interesting themes here is like so. I want to quit my job so I can wrote go right all the code I want and it turns out. There's all these other things have nothing to do with code that you have to figure out so so we're going to get into those right. That's the great irony of it so we talked a little bit about what is freelancing may through this out to both both of you. We've seen the on the T. O. B. Indexes and we've seen the stack overflow article the incredible growth of Python and we know that python is growing very very large ways at large but if I have some python skills how does that translate over to freelancing is python a good space to be in. I know like if I did say dot net. I could walk up to like an enterprise customer and say hey I want to consume it to you and they would probably take that because those are both places that use that technology and they're willing to pay tons of money to solve problems because they have large businesses what about python. I definitely think it is a a AH good space and a part of that part of that's at growth right that pythons been taking off and and and a lot of that growth comes from it's taking often in a lot of different industries stories. I think that makes it a pretty remarkable skillset right because being a quality python developer is applicable in the work that we do and web obey software cloud platforms those sorts of things but this huge shift in data science in. Ai Towards Python has opened up new. There's a ton of opportunities on that side whether that's predictive analytics or business intelligence or just a lot of things like that there's a lot of great it devops tools built on or working with Python and so because of that I think that it's a pretty broad market and I think that may be different from specifically glee some other programming languages that are a little more purpose built to singular purposes say. PHP like swift for example or PHP right where you're definitely only building for the web with that Pythons Apple and so you won't find an enterprise company out there. That's not doing some python were to SRI. They've got big. Dot Net teams but they've got business intelligence teams and analytics teams and not necessarily in their software product development but there's python going on everywhere. You know one of the things that struck me as you're speaking. I totally agree with what you're we're saying. There is if I'm doing C. Plus plus or if I'm doing Java. Let's say what it means for me to be. An expert in that technology probably is hard to achieve. There's probably people have been doing that for fifteen years and they're just really good at it. And how am I gonNA go well. I've been doing this is for three. You should hire me and share right like that's a hard sell but there's so many new things in python that nobody has been an expert for ten years in intensive flow in the web space. There's so many new modern web frameworks Masonite JAP- Rondo et Cetera et CETERA. These are a handful of years old. Maybe no one has been an expert for many many years on these things and so I feel like you could maybe break in as a specialist in some area easier because of that so just go back to something that you had said before Michael Go. If you're dot net developer you can go to these enterprises and you know there. Are People solve their problems the keeping they're looking to solve problems and increasingly these companies are increasingly recently the using python to solve those problems there saying we'll could use done that we could use Java but we want to use python for a variety of reasons and so yeah impose impose a great space to be in but I don't think you're going to get that far. Just being a python expert or a technology expert. You want to be an expert in solving some kind of problem that it just happens to use python as a really hard mindset for a lot of programmers to adopt like I'm going to go to use python really well to analyse log-files. I'M GONNA GONNA use biathlon to do the Delta make the servers run more smoothly and when you're solving these problems in your savings companies

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