35 Burst results for "Hydro"

"hydro" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:43 min | Last month

"hydro" Discussed on Security Now

"I got on the radio show over the weekend somebody said She's my email is disappeared and I said, what do you use for an email program? She says, you know just email and finally, of course, it turned out was browser right? After it's that's we do everything in the browser these days. But if you're using office three, sixty five whether you're using outlook dot com or the outlook program you've got email coming in, that could be a threat to your business. Fortunately, there's a company that knows threats and knows how to stop them cold. That's Barracuda the best known I think one of the best known names in cloud enabled enterprise grade security solutions, not just for email, but for networks for data for applications, very few enterprises you go into, they don't have a Barracuda box in the rack, they're doing their protection. Email is really interesting problem because as we already know virtually all cyber-attacks start with email with phishing emails with emails containing malware This is how ransomware gets on your system We were talking about Norsk Hydro, that big I loved that article in Bloomberg BusinessWeek about the Norsk Hydro ransomware from last year that was an email generated attack and it was a clever way. It was a conversation hijack. so as an email legitimate email from an Italian client going to the North Norsk Hydro headquarters. But it was intercepted a man in the middle and the attachment was replaced by militias payload how you stop that Barracuda Barracuda. Total email protection. You got employees working from home. Already they're outside of the protection of you know the office network they are subject to spear phishing ransomware account takeover conversation hijacking like that Norsk Hydro attack. Multiply those thousands of email a day by how many employees one click on one wrong email can cost you. Everything money customers, reputation cost North Hydra over sixty million dollars to remediate that ransomware and they had policies in place they did everything right but there was just that one email it's snuck through. Together they didn't have Barracuda total email protection Barracuda researchers have seen a steady research in as an example, spearfishing attacks around covid. Six hundred, sixty, seven percents spike since February since the end of the month of February. Because, of course, hackers look for week Mrs, soft spots, they impersonate the World Health Organization or the CDC. These these emails look genuine. They look real they offer information. Provided by the CDC to help. You stay. Safe..

Norsk Hydro North Norsk Hydro CDC Bloomberg World Health Organization
Legendary Seattle disc jockey Pat O'Day dies at 85

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

02:46 min | Last month

Legendary Seattle disc jockey Pat O'Day dies at 85

"Remembering the life and legacy of Pat O Day. The truly legendary Seattle deejay and concert promoter who became an icon to a generation of northwest music and sports fans. Pat has passed away the age of 85. And Cuomo's Corwin Headache has this remembrance Today programme is 27 minutes late 65 with a hammer green in Seattle. He reeled off that classic top 40 deejay pattern to perfection. Wasn't it a good day today that I was around 51? It was as natural as breathing. Currently it's 49 in the sky. There's Pat was a pitch perfect pitchman. Did you ever get on a plane enough to walk through the first class? Section? Your seat in the back? Don't you feel You know, why can't I sit here? Right? Go to the back of the point. Well, you'll never see the day on a West Coast jet. But you could say I had it down. Pat taught many other rock jocks how to do the same. During a radio career that helped raise the first Northwest rock scene to national prominence. He promoted bands like the Kinsman and the Wailers at the Siri's of Northwest team dancers. His concert promotion company brought the Beatles, the Beach Boys and Led Zeppelin to Seattle and friendly Young and upcoming guitars. Jimmy Hendrix. As Pat told another iconic local deejay Bob Rivers. I was on an airplane with Jimi Hendrix and and on the road with Led Zeppelin and we're handling Elvis. And and now I look back and go. Oh, my God, that happened to me. But for all that Pat might be best remembered as the voice of the Hydro's. Calling the Seafarer races for 40 years old coming out of the north. Turn. Here they come. What a beautiful side, six screaming, unlimited hydroplane streak and passed along boom and into the Mures around a bridge turn. He re created those calls for Co. Moh in 2013. Have mentors, many a broadcast professional. He wrote several books and he enrich the lives of radio listeners around the Northwest. As Pat himself once said, I've had a great run. Corwin hate Homo news. Pat Love to tell the story about taking Jimi Hendrix back to his all mater at Garfield High School when Jimmy was 25 years old and how painfully shy Jimi Hendrix wass But the two of them have quite a history paddle day in the sixties operated Ah place called the Spanish Castle between Seattle and Tacoma and Jimi Hendrix opened there for another band. In the early sixties. He was 17 years old and was playing a $50 Sears, Roebuck guitar.

PAT Jimmy Hendrix Seattle Pat O Pat Love Corwin Headache Led Zeppelin Northwest Cuomo Wailers West Coast Bob Rivers Garfield High School Beatles Siri Tacoma CO
"hydro" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:32 min | Last month

"hydro" Discussed on KOMO

"Be August without Hydro's nonprofit seafarers been creating lasting memories for Northwest communities for generations. Because of Kovar, 19 no see for whatsoever this year. But for those who need a fix, and I can only do so much playing the sounds of the airshow in the hydro plane's and deceiver pirates and fans As of today, Sunday and for days on end here, you could go to the Sea Fair Facebook page. They've got a three hour special, including highlights from the 2019 Seafair, including the Air shell. The whole street Bank Cup hydroplane races, interviews with some of the pilots of the Blue Angels. Some of the newer hydro drivers, fans and so much more, It'll be enough to motivate you to build your little wooden hydroplane until behind your bicycle. It's going to be that good. Get your seafarer fix at the Seafair Facebook page and it looks like we have major C for sunshine for the week. I'm r. Christopher Major Seafair fan, and that's another co Moh extra yourmoney at 20 and 50 past the hour on Comeau News. Now your coma propel insurance Money Update with ART Sanders Big Tech continues to steamroll through the pandemic and strong gains for some of the markets. Most influential companies on Friday help Wall Street clothes out its fourth straight winning month. Dow Jones was down as many as 300 points before finishing the day up 114 to 26,428. As automakers introduced more models powered by electricity. There may not be enough public charging stations to handle the load. 26,000 public electric vehicle charging stations in the US with more than 84,000 plugs. Country will need thousands more for drivers to accept.

Christopher Major Seafair Hydro Facebook Kovar Blue Angels Dow Jones US Moh Comeau News
"hydro" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:34 min | Last month

"hydro" Discussed on KOMO

"Wouldn't be August without Hydro's nonprofit seafarers been creating lasting memories for Northwest communities for generations. Because of Kovar, 19 no see for whatsoever this year. But for those who need a fix, and I can only do so much playing the sounds of the airshow in the hydro plane's in the sea for pirates and fans, As of today, Sunday, Ever days on end here, you could go to the Sea Fair Facebook page. They've got a three hour special, including highlights from the 2019 Seafair, including the Urschel. The whole street Bank Cup hydroplane races, interviews with some of the pilots of the Blue Angels. Some of the newer hydro drivers, fans and so much more, It'll be enough to motivate you to build your little wooden hydroplane until it behind your bicycle. It's going to be that good. Get your seafarer fix at the Seafair Facebook page and it looks like we have major C for sunshine for the week. I'm r. Christopher Major Seafair fan, and that's another co Moh extra yourmoney at 20 and 50 past the hour on Comeau News. Now your coma propel insurance Money Update with ART Sanders Big Tech continues to steamroll through the pandemic and strong gains for some of the markets. Most influential companies on Friday help Wall Street clothes out its fourth straight winning month. The Dow Jones was down as many as 300 points before finishing the day up 114 to 26,428. As automakers introduced more models powered by electricity. There may not be enough public charging stations to handle the load there. 26,000 public electric vehicle charging stations in the US with more than 84,000 plugs country will need thousands more for drivers to accept vehicles..

Christopher Major Seafair Hydro Facebook Kovar Urschel Blue Angels US Moh Comeau News
Gov. Newsom asks Warren Buffett to back removal of Northern California dam

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:28 sec | Last month

Gov. Newsom asks Warren Buffett to back removal of Northern California dam

"Governor Newsome has appealed directly to investor Warren Buffett to support demolishing for hydro electric dams on a river along the Oregon California border. The goal is to save salmon populations that have dwindled to almost nothing. The governor on Wednesday wrote Buffet urging him to back the Klamath River project, which would be the largest dam removal in U. S history. Dams are owned by a Pacific Corps, an Oregon based utility owned by Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway company.

Warren Buffett Governor Newsome Oregon California Border Klamath River Berkshire Hathaway Company Oregon Pacific Corps Buffet U. S
The Hydrafacial Talent Directory - A Great Initiative

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:49 min | Last month

The Hydrafacial Talent Directory - A Great Initiative

"Hydra facial as many of you will know is an as a technology and product company with a pretty good reputation. It must be said they've got some great products and solutions. Now, as a result of this current crisis businesses obviously suffered a little bit and they've had to let some people go but rather than just let them go and say by by what they have done is created the talent directory, which is essentially a website where you can go to find all of the people that have been late, go from hydro facial and getting contact with them if you're looking for people. To hire in your business now it's listed by the skills and experience. You can select someone from marketing skills or our deal sale technology it all sorts of different skill sets and it's got the profile of the individual. It's got their regime made contact details. You can basically hit them up. It's essentially a free recruitment. So but it's designed of course to try and help the people that have helped hydro facial at Iraq, and it is a fantastic fantastic example of what businesses really should be doing to try and look after the people as best they can we count all keep everybody employed On the business, just sustain it but going the extra mile and setting up this talent directory that fateful set up is a great way to at least try to help the people that have been let go to secure other employment. So go and check it out I'll put a link to that in the comments below. Thanks to Leah. Agenda for telling me all about these because I think it's a fantastic initiative hats. Off the Hydra facial go and check out the Hydra facial talent directory. If you're looking to hire anybody in any of these areas, sales marketing technology, it pretty much anything in your business go check out the Hydra facial talent directory website. I. Think initially once again, hats off very very, very impressed with what they've done

Leah Iraq
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 2 months ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago, but we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous. Huxley's Utopia and not finding it. Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades and we're increasingly lonely. whereas in a utopia, everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen, forty-three, the psychologist Abraham Maslov developed a theory of Yoga. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in a utopia we decide for ourselves what we need and how we're going to get it in Huxley's Utopia. Citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds pretty good right then. Why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society, to work, we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism, even family. See for yourself if a utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch, brave new world now streaming only on peacock. This is advertising content. Hey. This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
20 Minutes About A Smart Rowing Machine

20 Minute Fitness

05:48 min | 2 months ago

20 Minutes About A Smart Rowing Machine

"The day we have an interesting guests. Bruce Smith from hydro reuss. Why don't you just introduce yourself little eight? Great to be with you on the show and name is Bruce Smith I'm a Canadian living in America, and and the CEO and founder of a company called Hydro. What's grow? Yeah, hydro is a indoor rowing machine, and it uses some pretty revolutionary resistance mechanism technology to make it quiet, but the coolest thing. Thing about the machine. The part that we love the most about it is that we broadcast not fitness classes, but we actually take the experience of being out on the water rowing, and we have instructors out there. Who talked to you directly live on a beautiful twenty two inch, high definition screen with great speakers, so you actually experienced being out on the water and being part of a rowing crew you know from. From your living room or your bedroom or wherever you machine, so it's like having a penitent Kloss, except it's on a rowing machine that is extremely quiets why it whereas like putting us more broad, you know like almost feeding like you're dancing. Really off focusing on you know creating an immersive experience of being out there rowing exactly so we have trademark this idea of votaw reality and I love Peleton we have A. A time in the office they're they're totally great. It's really fun and it is. You said it's exactly right. It's like being at the club with your friends. You know you're not drinking or smoking, but you're you know you're listening to music or super photogenic people. You know it's fun experience and we love that that's great for us the coolest thing that we could think of doing to take this concept of live. Elo are and create an immersive experience so rather than going to the club every day for your workout, which is great, we can have great music and really really charismatic instructors, but you're actually out on the river, or on the bay, Miami beach or rowing by London, bridge, so, who do you think is it for? Is it like somebody that Audio Patent Than They WanNa? WanNa to mix up the workout as really somebody that is looking for different experience because they don't like going to a club, but they wanna have liberal quietness of actually being outdoors and row. It's for people who are looking for the very best experienced the best workout experience and the best way to connect with their friends, so Peleton has a leaderboard which is great. Great, but you're really competing. You're competing by yourself and you know not that many people have actually wrote out of the water in a boat with other people, but the experience of it is unbelievable. You're right on the water, but most importantly you're moving in complete rhythm with seven other people, Ya, howdy, howdy create that because if I'm Roy like, let's say like on. On, a big rowing team or like even dragon boating like a need to be in sync with everyone right because as soon somebody's out of things not working. That's exactly right. In human beings hardware. They love to do things in synchronicity with other people. It makes you feel better. It's like it's a genuine way of connecting and when you're biking, you know you're. You're like ninety five or one hundred beats per minute, and and really not moving in the same rhythm as as the instructor like you're having a shared experience, but it's not exactly the same rhythm when you're on the rowing machine, you're encouraged. It's actually really easy. You move every part of your body in exactly the same rhythm as the instructor, and so there's some brain. Brain science behind this you know the brain is an aerobic organ like a muscle, you not energy systems like like the rest of your body, and so every time you make a decision in your brain. You're using some energy, and so when you're exercising, you have to keep deciding to exercise and they're really really cool thing about rowing especially when you're rowing crew like. Like, not just on a machine by yourself in a room, but when you're rowing as part of a team, you turn off that decision making process in your brain, because the person that you're following the person in front of you is is making those decisions. You don't have to make them, so you achieve the state of flow much much faster and we know from. From our experience and I know from my experience as a national team coach that has it actually has a profound impact on people. It is the best exercise you can do. It's also US eighty six percent of your body's muscles when you're biking like forty forty five percent of your muscles with you have to use your arms and legs. It's like a full body. And your core and it improves your bone density also, so it really is like. If there was one pill that you could take, that would like. Make you friends and make you healthier. You take that pill. Of course. We feel like we've got that pill. We all would like that, but say so just saw. Listeners can really imagine how the product experience looks like so I'm imagining now you're sitting on a rowing machine and you have like a huge monitor of some sort right, and and you see an instructor like. How do you create that experience off? Somebody actually sitting in front of me. Somebody's sitting behind me and I'm not competing against. Against them, but we actually working together like how you create that certainly question, so this isn't like we didn't just go. Go to the river with some of our friends and get some go prost. We don't talk about our our workouts as we talk about them as episodes and we hired this really really amazing film team, and so we take all the experience that Hollywood and television. Television have created in the United States and we apply that skill in that art to capturing the whole experience of being out on the water, so we have four cameras. We have a team that is mixing and editing that you know. The most important part of this are two things number one is the rhythm, and so you never lose that rhythm and the instructor. Who's WHO's out. Out there with you is encouraging you to be in rhythm with everybody, and it's very very easy to follow like you do it instantly, even people who've never done it before within like two or three strokes there in the right rhythm, and then the other part is that emotional connection and two things contribute a lot to that one is music, so we have an amazing library of. Of Music and the other is making sure that when you're filming, you captured not just the rhythm, and the experience of being outside, and and the you know the environment of being out on the water, but also the eyes of the instructor is are the window to the soul, and it's it sounds trite, but it's. It's unbelievably true like you have to see. People's facing to be able. Able to read what's in there is and it, it's that experience being able to move your whole body in the same rhythm, AC- instructor and also connect with them. Because you feel what they're feeling, you know they're out on the water and they're excited about what they're doing. They're you know they're training for the US national team and they're sharing their passion for sport that they love. Love more than anything else, and it's really it is genuinely inspiring, and we thought just a crazy response from consumers, which is really encouraging, and

Rowing Instructor United States Hydro Peleton Bruce Smith America Kloss ELO CEO Hollywood Founder
UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

Science Magazine Podcast

08:19 min | 2 months ago

UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

"A UK mega trial designed. Test Treatments Cove Nineteen Haikai Sarah. We're talking about the UK's It's called the recovery trial and it hasn't differences with other ongoing trials of drugs for Corona virus. What are some of the big differences with recovery? The main difference in some senses said it's a really really big trial they have. More than two thousand patients now. In an outbreak like this if you really want to have really good clear, robust result, one of the most important things to include a lot of people to get a really strong signal of secrecy, that's something that recovery has been able to do, and really no other trial in the world has been able to get those patients numbers. This isn't a UK. And the United Kingdom has a lot of cases for its size. Is that one of the reasons that this trial has been success? Yeah, absolutely I mean if they didn't have that many. Many patients in the first place of today wouldn't be able to enroll that many patients some of the people I've talked to so for instance one of the scientists. He's from Norway. He was saying. The recovery trial is really successful in the sense that one in six patients that goes to UK hospital with Kobe nineteen ends up in the trial. Well, you can kinda wonder why they managed to include that many patients. One reason is that they have the National Health Service all the hospitals took part in that and the top doctors in the. The Nation wrote a letter to all the hospitals and all the staff. Saying you know here are the three trials that we want to prioritize in. Please try to include patients in these trials. If you can, so that's kind of how they they ended up with those huge patient numbers in the first place that allowed them to in a very short time. Get some some answers as a result of having all these patients enrolled and kind of coordination at the national level for recovery. They've seen a lot of results in a short time can. Can you talk about some of the drugs? They've been able to either give a thumbs up to or thumbs down to I one. That was a really big deal. Was the hydroxy chloroquine arm of the study so much has been set written about hydro or Quin, banning a lot of that was based on trials, either with very few patients or trials obsessional, so whether patients were randomized to either get hydroxy chloroquine or a different drug or placebo, but basically looked in retrospect and compared how patients did who got hydroxy in patients who didn't? The recovery trial date has the best data we have for civilian patients being treated with hydroxy chloroquine, and they didn't see a significant difference in how the hydroxy chloroquine group did versus suspended care. Group And they put that out in a press release, and within a few days, a lot of other trials that were ongoing that would clearly not have stronger results were ended. I wouldn't say it's quite the end of that drugstore quance Saga Probably, but certainly mocked the attorney on. And on the other side of the roster here we have a drug that actually help patients that were in the hospital, so that sex method zone. It's a steroid drug that's also been known for a long time quite cheap. It's widely available, so it's really nice drug to be shown to be effective against covid nineteen. There's been a lot of debate from the beginning about how much of the severe illness at the end in patients is really the overreaction of the immune system, and that's of course where the steroid drugs attack the pathogenesis really so they can have damp and. And Immune System, and the hope is that that will mean that that the symptoms of patients will be severe and people are more likely to survive, and then that turned out to be the case I mean they. They found that mortality when one third in patients that received accent medicine. That was really the first big randomized trial in this outbreak that showed a clear difference in mortality, the national. Health Service within hours after the result was announced, changed its standard of care to include some episode. This is pretty surprising. These aren't peer reviewed results. These are press release results. Yes. That's been a huge point of contention. There's just kind of tension inherent in this fast-moving pandemic between you know having really robust results in getting them out there as fast as possible and I talked at length with Martin Landry, one of the principal investigators of the about it his argument. Is You kind of get? The baseline results I. You can look at the data and see okay. There is a difference in mortality and might be some changes in the percentages, but nothing major, but then there's a lot of other data that you want to put in the paper that takes some. Some more work, so his argument was. This is an important resulted to change the outcome of patients right now so let's put it out and then try to get the paper out as soon as possible. After that in the paper ended up coming out I think seven days after the results. Yeah, it's a bit of a wild west. Now place is different. Hospitals have different standards of care like in the US. A lot of hospitals are using convalescent plasma. This is a blood product from a person has recovered from cove nineteen and they're using that to treat patients in the hospital. But convalescent plasma hasn't been subjected to the same level of scrutiny at the same level of evidence has been obtained. You know for that as a deck of Methadone the drug. We just talked about right and I. Mean that's the two points though that I find really interesting and one is. If you're going to give patients these drugs, anyway, you might as well be using that to generate data that then shows whether the drug works said they aren't collecting data on these treatments, so they are collecting data, very. Very. Often right, the problem is I. Mean it does back to what I was saying about randomized patients, you can treat patients with something and then say okay. We're collecting a lot of data and we'LL GONNA look back at how the patients did that. Receive Drug and how patients did that didn't but there's a hierarchy of evidence and really in that hierarchy a randomized trial just because it gets rid of all the bias season, who would receive a drug or not otherwise so everyone? I talked to really agree. Agree that we need in this particular situation that's condemning when you want to see as fast as possible whether a drug has a big effect on the hard outcome like do people die or do they survive what you need, a large randomized trials, and when you ask people why they do, it also goes back to what you were saying. A lot of people said when they tried to convince doctors to take part. The doctor say well, but I have a good feeling I think. I know what works, right. Right maybe I mean doctors sometimes willing to accept a lower standard of evidence to guide their decisions. It then becomes very difficult to get to that higher level of evidence because to do that. You need to accept that half of your patients are not going to receive whatever you believe to be the most useful. That's inherent tension in the whole enduring these kinds of trials when you have some observational data already, but you don't really have the kind of strong data that let's say with confidence. Okay, this worse. I'm here in the US. We have many many cases, but there isn't this sized patient group being randomized. Is that because of what we just talked about, or is it more a lack of coordination? The US has done one big trial though the National Institutes of health the first. Study that was a randomized placebo controlled trial that included a lot of patients. And did give a robust result didn't really see a difference in mortality, but it showed that patients receive from severe. Stay in hospital for a short time period. Why haven't more trials like that I? Think it is a lack of coordination. You can argue that the whole response in the US to this virus has been marked by lack of ordination, and then, of course it does help when you have certain structures in place so again. The National Health Service in the UK with all of these hospitals. Part of this National Health Service. Of course, it makes it a lot easier. You put in place this one structure, one ethical board, and then you kind of do it from there while if you have to piece together coalition. Coalition of different hospitals and different investigators, it becomes a little bit more complicated. I think right, but given the the sheer amount of cases, the US has had i. mean certainly data could have been generated that would have informed both the US and the rest of the world a lot better about what works what doesn't.

United Kingdom United States National Health Service Chloroquine National Institutes Of Health Norway Attorney Kobe Martin Landry Methadone Principal
How Hard Can I Prune Mature Bushes This Time of Year?

Your Gardening Questions

03:21 min | 3 months ago

How Hard Can I Prune Mature Bushes This Time of Year?

"I've got several huge bushes. Their Expire Bushes HYDRANGEA VI- burn. And for Cynthia and they're about eight to ten foot, tall and huge in size and I'm wondering. When's the best time to trim those? And how short can I cut him to get him back in shape to look good around the house? Talk about when and I'm GONNA come back with that. Basically food ruled now when you say fire, Bush thinking probably mean burning Bush. Yellowish doesn't have a flower that we're really concerned about you. Can Almost Rooney at any time then when we come to the Hyde ranchers that by Burnham and we have two different categories of plants. Let's just go with the by Burnham and Pacific for civil right. And Lilac et Cetera have to be pruned soon after bloom, which means now. Not Today but at the same time very shortly because they set flower buds very soon after the middle of June or first of July for the following year. And therefore you should prune them now. to to keep them well in balancing whatever you need to do, as as a matter of fact that the hydrogen and hide ranchers are one example they flower some on last year stems on this year stems, and some kind of as they wish. Now. Let me try to explain that when you prune following the bloom. On a vibe Burnham, which most finished, but let me now before Cynthia. You can prune them. Anytime should really be doing it very shortly on the Hydrangea, you. have to go with the kind of plants it is and and you'd have to go back to the tag and see whether it blooms on new or old would, as it's called, stated I I generally, and they're so darn many. Well, anyhow, it's enough to drive you nuts knowing what a hydro-engineers on other things though. That for example rose of Sharon that won't bloom now until probably September or soon thereafter or before. They have bloomed last year. They are now growing out. They will set the flower bud soon. And blew on this fall spy rea-. Another group of plants is going to be one that has well. It has come up hopefully getting going strongly. Then it s flower buds on the new stems. So as soon as it blooms, you would finish pruning it. Now hopefully that answers the when now the how much. When you talk about what are apparently big old plants, I'm going to go back to a general rule now. Usually I'd say. Don't remove more than twenty or twenty five percent. I know that on big old plants. When you're doing the right time and so on, you can take as much as a third of them, and that's just your you know your judgement. You stand back before you start burning you kind of look at the body of it. The number of stems at the bottom and so on, and you try then to take out the oldest stems, which will probably have the darkest bark. The perhaps any dead stems that are down in the crown of the planet, the ground, and get those out of their first. Then you prune for shape and size

Cynthia Bush Burnham Hyde Sharon
Fauci: Hydroxychloroquine not effective against coronavirus

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Fauci: Hydroxychloroquine not effective against coronavirus

"Nations top infectious disease doctor says hydro Cllr Quinn is not an effective treatment for covered ninety in doing so doctor felt she became the first member of the trump administration to make that claim trump is unfolding the anti malaria drugs for weeks as a possible pre treatment for it not as a treatment for the memories taking this before he thinks it with the possibility of preventing it from getting this disease and we are gonna have a reporting university of Minnesota this week that will tell us whether their study for that very purpose worked or

Cllr Quinn Minnesota
WHO spokesperson sheds light on 'second peak' of coronavirus

Morning Edition

06:01 min | 4 months ago

WHO spokesperson sheds light on 'second peak' of coronavirus

"We approach one hundred thousand deaths from the coronavirus here in the US the world's top health officials are warning that coronavirus infections could go back up in the middle of this current outbreak they're worried about countries including the United States lifting restrictions too quickly this is separate from the so called second wave expected to happen in the fall here's Dr Michael Ryan the director of the world health organization's emergencies program speaking yesterday we cannot make assumptions that just because the disease is on the way down now that it's on them it's going to keep going down and then we're going to get a number of months to get ready for a second way we may get a second peak in this way I'm joined now by Dr Margaret Harris a member of the WHO's coronavirus response team and a W. H. O. spokesperson thank you so much for being with us doctor hers thank you very much for having me Rachel can you just explain more what the concern is about a potential second peak in in infections during this current moment this current outbreak so we sing with different countries quite different patents and what needs to be understood is this coronavirus is not the flute so a lot of people have put what a cold the flu lens on their expectations they keep on thinking it's seasonal but if you look around the globe we've got countries in the middle of the summer and autumn having large large outbreaks so we're not seeing a seasonal Patton what we are seeing is indeed when people ease too quickly that they do then C. and a rise in infections so we certainly don't say you have to be a lockdown but we're saying he's carefully so what are you advising the U. S. and other countries to do to prevent a second peak so first we'll know your transmission and this is because the US is a huge country you've got many many different states communities cities experiencing very different transmissions so they all have their own outbreaks at different stages so they're full of course they need to pace it according to what's really going on so how do you know that you have to be testing you have to be tracking and you have to have a very clear on his own what's happening with the transmission in your community so as you can pick your moment has the W. H. O. Boenning conversation with the trump administration about the urgent need for more testing wearing conversation with administrations with health authorities with health experts around the world all the time these discussions go on continuously but I don't have to tell you about the tension between the United States the trump administration and the WHL president trump has threatened to pull U. S. funding for the WHL or just leave altogether I mean given those tensions are you concerned that the US is not heeding the advice of the guidance from the WHL the US is a fantastic partner and the US has got extraordinary depths of great scientific expertise that they sort of tensions obviously are concerned and we do not want to have the U. S. leave we know the world benefits enormously from the public health leadership and the role the US is always played and we hope that will continue I want to ask you about clinical trials for the drug hydroxy Clark one of this is a drug that president trump has touted publicly the W. H. O. announced this week that it's temporarily stopping clinical trials of that drug why so there was a large observational study that was published in the lancet last week when they looked at people who were taking a number of medications and they found that there was an increased incidence in negative outcomes including death but also how to reach me is so it's essentially nobody will be randomized while that safety data is being reviewed president trump says he's been taking Hydroxycut workman for some weeks as a preventative measure against covered nineteen is the W. H. O. advising physicians not to prescribe Hydroxycut Laura Quinn either preventively or to cover nineteen patient so we advise physicians to prescribe hydro Sickler queen full the things that it's used for normally in the normal population such as autoimmune disorders we are not looking at it as a preventive or prophylactic measure and finally I mean we saw new Zealand's prime minister Jacinda Ardern celebrate the fact that that country currently has no one in the hospital being treated for covert nineteen they have turned the corner on this and then you look at the United States which is perhaps going to suffer a second peak in the current outbreak what is the state of affairs right now when you when you take a a broad look at the the global impact of this pandemic where are we now we are really seeing very very large outbreaks in many parts of the world so in fact last week every day we recorded the largest number of new cases that we had seen so one of the issues is when people see their particular outbreak coming down they think oh well that's done done and dusted but that is not the case certainly countries like New Zealand has shown what can be done with very clear communication very clean structure very clear decisions on what to do when and how and there's very very strong commitment by everyone in the community Dr Margaret Harris is a member of the WHO's coronavirus response team thank you for your time we appreciate it thank you

United States
Players’ union responds to MLB health and safety proposal for delayed 2020 baseball season

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Players’ union responds to MLB health and safety proposal for delayed 2020 baseball season

"Steve the baseball players union has responded to the league's health and safety proposal they want more frequent cove in nineteen testing than what the league proposes multiple times per week at the union also addressed protocols for positive tests protection for high risk players and their families access to pregame and postgame therapies that's a big one two players think the ban on hydro therapy and showering at the park is over the top they also don't want to show up to the park already in uniform and they think they they don't think they should have to get permission from the team to be able to leave cardinals shortstop in Mets killer Paul the young says he's fine I was somebody off the field limitations but he like a little more freedom when he's at the ball park he called some of those restrictions like no spitting into sunflower seeds silly the young **** simple question okay what what if I get dirt in my mouth and I have to spit but he says he understands where the leak is

Cardinals Steve Baseball Mets
Michigan dam had record of safety violations before failure

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:47 min | 4 months ago

Michigan dam had record of safety violations before failure

"Now an update from Central Michigan where more than ten thousand people were forced to evacuate as five hundred year flooding swam the area that water powerful enough to rip homes from foundations a home floating downstream ripped from its foundation by raging floodwaters one example of the devastation in central Michigan this morning there's concern floodwaters may be mixing with toxins in containment ponds from a nearby Dow chemical plant which shut down its operations the company says there's no risk to people or the environment due to the amount of water across the county it will take multiple days to recede close to ten thousand evacuated Midland county as the floodwaters came gushing in power is out in many areas and it's still too early for some to go home I don't know what's going to happen our town is current Courtney Casper hope she'll be able to get back into her house today a neighbor center these photos of water swamping her home the basement with water to the ceiling she's not the only one members of the family are in our basement and they're floating they're ruined Jerry Allen told us the flooding will cost her family tens of thousands of dollars and she's frustrated the breached Eatonville in Sanford dams worked in better condition both are owned by boys hydro which had its licence of the nearly century old Eatonville facility revoked by federal authorities in twenty eighteen after more than a decade of safety violations raised questions about its ability to withstand a major flood like this one yet when the dam came under state supervision it was deemed to be in fair condition this could have been prevented and it wasn't it's all happening during

Central Michigan Midland County Courtney Casper Jerry Allen Eatonville Sanford
Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

"The corona virus pandemic is delivering the biggest shock to the global energy system in seven decades according to the international energy agency NPR's Jeff Brady reports plunging demand for energy is hitting fossil fuels especially hard global energy demand will fall by six percent this year seven times the decline after the financial crisis ten years ago I E. a projection show oil and gas hit hard but demand for coal falls by an extraordinary eight percent the largest decline since World War two the agency says renewable energy fair as well while among grows much as in the past the IEA projects electricity generation from wind solar and hydro power will increase five percent the agency says all this will reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change by almost eight percent the largest annual decrease ever recorded though emissions will rebound in an economic recovery unless countries focus relief packages on boosting clean energy Jeff Brady

NPR Jeff Brady IEA
Why Don't All Skeletons Become Fossils?

BrainStuff

04:47 min | 5 months ago

Why Don't All Skeletons Become Fossils?

"Wanted to explore why there have been billions of living things on this earth across billions of years that life is existed but only very few have left direct fossil evidence brain stuff. It's me Christian Sager. You know when I'm digging a six foot hole in the middle of the desert. I start to wonder where all the dead animals shouldn't we be waiting? Need DEEPEN FOSSILS. Every time we go outside. I know that's morbid but you can probably guess that. Not every animal. That dies leaves behind fossil evidence. But why is that well just to get our terms straight? A fossil is any physical remnant left behind an organism that died long ago. In many cases. Fossils might only be things like preserved footprints or nest sites but today we're looking at direct remains of animal bodies like bones the likelihood that any particular animal animal body will become fossilized is amazingly small. It's actually less than one percent. So let's look at the stations of the obstacle course to fossils ation. I there's body type. Fossils ation has a strong preference for animals with hard body parts like bones teeth and shells animals with soft bodies like slugs and jellyfish. Well they usually just decompose completely disappear after death and except in a very few rare cases like freezing dry mammoth occasion and peat bog preservation. The same thing happens to these soft tissues on all animal bodies skin organs eyeballs etc. They all make excellent meals from micro organisms and are thus consigned to the ravages of rot the second main hurdle to fossil ization is exposure to become a fossil. You need to be one of the rare animal bodies that is rapidly buried. Soon after the animal dies this is most likely to happen in or near the site of a moving body of water like a river or a flood plain where runoff floodwaters or regular flow may quickly cover a dead body in sediment in might also happen in arid desert settings where wind can quickly berry animal remains in sand dunes. If the remains are not rapidly buried scavenging animals are likely to scatter and then consume them after all nature hates to pass up a free lunch and even a clean skeleton left out exposed to the elements will eventually be erased by the ravages of the weather that's decalcification erosion and corrosion. But let's say your bones are lucky enough to be rapidly. Buried somehow the next big hurdle is the sediment itself a nice dry sand or alkaline. Mud might be a good place to become a fossil but if your bones are buried in soil with a higher temperature and higher acidity your prospects are a lot slimmer acidic environments meaning soils with a low. Ph tend to dissolve hydros. Appetite a calcium phosphate. Mineral that is a main structural ingredient in our bones so many soil types unearth will simply destroy all the bones they swallow but even in friendly sediment over a long enough period of time bones can break down the organic proteins in bones like Collagen eventually decompose and the inorganic molecules in bones can be crushed dissolved or otherwise destroyed by physical force over the centuries. So if you want your actual bone structure to survive you have to be lucky enough to undergo a little transformation most really ancient bones we find such as dinosaur bones aren't the unaltered original bones that were buried millions of years ago instead. They're either a mineral modified versions of those bones or be stone photocopies to processes represent the majority of these cases. Perma mineralisation and replacement in PERMA mineralisation. Mineral rich water seeps into the buried bones and fills the pores of the bones with its mineral content. These minerals formed crystals inside the bones causing them to modify and harden over time. Sometimes this process is also called petrified in replacement the original bones can be completely dissolved but still leave fossil copies as the mineral in the groundwater completely replaces the shape of the bones over long periods of time. So let's say you're the rare dead animal that wins the fossils ation lottery and you just happen to pass all these tests. You still have to be found. The total surface of the earth is almost two hundred million

Why some diseases come and go with the seasons, and how to develop smarter, safer chemicals

Science Magazine Podcast

10:01 min | 6 months ago

Why some diseases come and go with the seasons, and how to develop smarter, safer chemicals

"I'll now speak with John. Cohen a staff writer at science. We'll be discussing his feature from the March twentieth issue of the magazine. An exploration of seasonal effects on different diseases and the sort of research. That's being done to identify those effects. Hi John Hydro before delving into your seasonality feature. I'd like to pick your brain about the present state of the corona virus outbreak. It's currently Wednesday march eighteen. And you've been deeply engaged in reporting on corona virus for months at this point. The White House has been addressing the public on almost a daily basis regarding its response to the crisis. Could you describe the United States's response thus far and how it compares to the responses of foreign governments well? Each country has gone through a similar pattern of denial at first not really wanting to accept what's happening in very few countries have jumped on it aggressively early on and each country has to tailor make its own response based on its culture its government its laws. The United States on February Twenty. Sixth which seems like years ago now but is less than a month ago created a Krahn Virus Task Force the White House and on that day president trump stated that there were fifteen confirmed cases and he hoped it was going to be going down to zero looking at that today. It's obvious that he was wide of the mark. We stopped hitting the snooze alarm last Thursday and it was a confluence of events that led to that one was that the World Health Organization. After long flying against the thinking many epidemiologists refused to call it a pandemic but last Thursday declared a pandemic. We had a beloved and famous actor. Tom Hanks reveal that he was infected and his wife who is well known and beloved and we had an NBA player who confirmed he was infected. Which led the NBA to cancel games and we had Italy melting down the measures they've done and steadily increased have become more and more restrictive to the point of locking down all of Italy and that lockdown only began in some villages a net and moved to the entire north and then moved to the entire country. Are we going to lockdown cities? Are we going to lockdown states? Are we going to lock down the country? I don't know the notion from February twenty six that we were going to contain this and it was going to go. Poof was ridiculous and so we've had all of these warning signs. We have warning signs obviously from China to begin with but then we head South Korea and we had Iran and we had Singapore and we had Hong Kong and we. We've had one country after another. That is ahead of us. Wrestle with this and we've been slow to really mountain aggressive response. What are the specific responses? That are happening right now. On March eighteenth the the fundamental priority is to test widely as you can to contact the people who are in contact with confirmed cases and get them to test and to have people who test positive isolate. That's one strategy than the other is social distancing which is really physical distancing and that takes on many different shapes and forms from closing down bigger arenas to closing religious services to closing restaurants and bars and social distancing can also be locking down entire communities shutting them. Down What Tony. Are you sensing in the many conversations you've had? Lots of people are still calling me and saying you know. It's just hype. Is this real or you know. Come on or then you know I just I just WanNa go get my nails done or I just want to go out to a restaurant or you know. I'm really really angry at this aspect of the government's response or I'm really frightened and depressed. I have a nine year old mother. I'm extremely concerned about her. And this virus killing her so I think we've all been going through this process of coming to terms with the reality of the fact that we did not dodge. This bullet the model is that. Dr Really predicted. We would be in a situation something like this. I wonder if anybody could have predicted something. Like Congress discussing a trillion dollar stimulus right or yeah or the closing of the Canadian border. Maybe in a worst case scenario on February twenty six the presidential press conference I mentioned trump was only asking for a little over a billion dollars to respond and the Democrats had a bill for over eight billion and trump said. Okay so you want to give that to me. I'll take it. It shows you how far off the mark the administration was and this was against a background of the testing kits in the United States that the Centers for Disease Control and prevention made were faulty and the top scientists who were advising the White House. Were saying things that were in conflict. With what the White House itself was saying so there was tremendous confusion. What what she and others said was that we could launch early phase one studies in a few months and indeed we have launched one but that it would take two or three months to get results from the phase one early trials which only look at safety and whether the vaccine triggers an immune response and then in order to do the real efficacy trial that would take at least another six months to nine months to get answers if everything went perfectly well and then trump turn that into. We'll have a vaccine in a year. It's going against scientists. It's not an opinion. It's not something you can buy. It's not something you can politically muscle. I think you just got an important point too that maybe people these past few days more than ever are coming to terms with. Will this fire now not just affect people you know through the school year through June but six months nine months eighteen months even I think one of the most frightening things is that no one can answer the question and there is so much uncertainty right? Now it's frightening. I appreciate you updating our listeners and sharing your knowledge sharing our experience because this is weighing on everyone. Why don't we switch gears and discuss your recent feature on disease seasonality so although your story mentions Corona virus it's not specifically about corona virus but rather the interplay between seasonal changes and many kinds of infectious diseases. That's a pretty popular topic in medicine. In general one that stretches back to the age of hippocrates as you note in your article but what scientific research has been done to address the underlying nature of this relationship the I coincidentally started working on this story? October you know months before. This corona virus reared its ugly head. I've written vaccines for decades. And the seasonality of disease is the central topic. Influenza has probably received the lion's share of attention it's such a clear cut winter disease in temperate regions and it moves between the northern and Southern Hemisphere each year in this very predictable pattern and that's why it's so difficult to tease out the factors that drive it. What are some of the factors that drive seasonality? A lot of research has gone into looking at changes in different aspects of climate. So looking at temperature looking at humidity and looking at the duke point all of it speaks to the idea that at certain times of year certain viruses or bacteria. Whatever the pathogen is are going to do better in that environment and maybe at summer. Maybe it's winter with influenza. Like a lot of viruses. It has a second outer Shell Membrane. All viruses have what's called a capsized holds them in holds in their guts but many viruses like influenza have a second membrane made of lipids fats. And it's fragile and the leading thinking. Is that these viruses that have fragile outer membranes are more susceptible to changes in humidity. Temperature humidity certainly correlate with influenza and temperature and humidity affect things like evaporation rates and. Evaporation affects things. Like the pressure automatically on the water moving in and out of membrane can affect the Ph. All of these factors can lead to a virus like influenza being more or less viable. It seems likely that in the wintertime. It's a more favourable condition of temperature and humidity. That's one line of research is looking into these environmental forces. What are the challenges with understanding these factors one of the things that we have to wrestle with is confounding variables in the United States? We have the Christmas holidays. The holiday season in December as one person in my story one researcher notes influenza seems to appear when Christmas shopping becomes popular. And of course. That's silly I this. Christmas shopping doesn't have anything to do with an infectious disease spiking each year and I focused on the research of Mikhail Martinez. Who has a provocative theory that she's pursuing that maybe it's not about the environment per se? But it's about us it's about our immune systems. Maybe our immune systems are changing with the seasons. And there's that confounding variable that you mentioned the confounding variable absolutely and how do you separate the chicken from the egg

Influenza United States Donald Trump White House John Hydro NBA Cohen Tom Hanks Dodge World Health Organization Italy Staff Writer Congress Centers For Disease Control Hong Kong China Dr Really
Is a climate wakeup the silver lining on a horrible situation?

The Big Story

04:24 min | 6 months ago

Is a climate wakeup the silver lining on a horrible situation?

"Look I don't know if this is really a silver lining or not in all of this but I could use something right now. A Claire. Remember how we used to talk about change on this podcast? How often we used to do it before. Cova nineteen took over everything Yeah that was literally the big story every week and it's hard to believe that's not the case these days. Well I'm sure you've seen some of the posts going around with pictures of what some places around the world look like now. That industry is stopped. An tourism has stopped and everyone's inside. They are drastically different. Yeah I I still can't stop thinking about those photos from NASA from a few weeks ago that showed reduced air pollution over China and all those photos that we're seeing now of clearwater with more fish. It's to be honest. It's kind of Nice to see right now and look at this point we should probably just savor the good feelings where we can find them but I also wonder how much of that is just us wanting to find something good in all this and this is what's available yeah it does make you think I mean when all of this is over key word when it will end and we can finally start thinking about other things will we have changed views I mean will people finally realize what kind of measures need to be put in place to protect the environment will. Yeah I mean you said when and it is not like we're gonna live like this forever. You know even six to nine month timeline. That seems a incredibly awful right. Now is not that long in the grand scheme of things in you know in some countries where where they seem to have a handle on at the lockdowns are ending and people are going to go back to work soon. And we're GONNA see them ramp up to make up for that miss time and so now we're going to do something we're familiar with. We're GONNA talk to a climate scientist about whether or not any of the good things we've just seen can last when industry turns back on or if they all just vanish and will head down the same road. But I of course news Claire. How bad or not bad. Maybe did it get yesterday. Well there's a new poll out that says one in five Canadians believed the corona virus crisis is being blown out of proportion and while yes most people are taking this seriously Executive Vice President says that that twenty percent could jeopardize the nationwide effort to slow the spread of covert nineteen candidates chief medical officer Dr Teresa. Tam says we're seeing cases of community transmission of the virus as opposed to travel related. A right. Now it's about half and half in Saskatchewan. The health authorities predicting a worst case scenario a thirty percent infection rate up to fifteen thousand deaths and not enough hospital resources and in Ontario. Hydro rates have been cut temporarily. It's been changed to twenty four seven off peak pricing and that's expected to save the average home about twenty dollars bill. There are now over. Twenty six hundred cases of cove in nineteen in Canada Quebec. Now has the most with over a thousand and there have been twenty seven deaths across the country. The idea of Mother Nature as a personality is hundreds if not thousands of years old and just as old is the notion that if you piss her off she will fight back and in a crisis like this where everything is confusing and there aren't many answers. It is kind of comforting. Maybe to think that that kind of cosmic order applies to this. There's no evidence for that. Of course but on the other hand the more we learn about our world and all the systems that inhabit the more we learned that they are all connected. So no miss. Pandemic isn't the result of a vengeful mother. Nature out for blood but the result of it is a massive collective change in human behavior and that has ramifications everywhere. And some of those might actually help us learn in the long run once we find a way through this

Claire Cova Nasa Executive Vice President Clearwater Scientist TAM Canada Quebec China Saskatchewan Dr Teresa Ontario Medical Officer
Minneapolis development to use groundwater to heat and cool buildings

Climate Cast

03:51 min | 6 months ago

Minneapolis development to use groundwater to heat and cool buildings

"Gas A. Minneapolis Development Project will use groundwater for heating and cooling. The technology is called. Aquifer Thermal Energy and the city of Minneapolis seems to be embracing it as an alternative. To greenhouse gas emitting natural gas but how can aquifer work as an energy source in? Minnesota's frigid climate. Nina Axelson is the vice president for sustainability and outreach at Evergreen energy they are partners in the upcoming tower side innovation district. Hi Nina Hi Paul Geothermal energy one. Oh one I. How does it work? So a lot of folks are familiar with using the energy stored underground whether in our soil or in our water to heat or cool and Minnesota are aquifer systems in our hydro. Geology are really special and lend themselves well to this. Type of geothermal is counting on the energy stored in the water in the Aquifer to help heat and cooler buildings. What's the water temperature in the aquifer that this project will be tapping for the city of Minneapolis? I think we'd be looking at about a forty to fifty degree temperature as a starting place and then as the technology goes into US. You're actually removing heat from buildings. Between let's say May and October and storing it into a part of the Aquifer that allows for a reserve of heat in that Aquifer so that in the winter that part of the Aquifer that you're extracting from the heat is going to have higher temperatures more capacity and is that able then to generate enough heat or cooling for the buildings. It wouldn't be able to do it alone so this is under the trend that folks here about of beneficial electrification. Which means you're GONNA pair electricity in this case heat pumps with that geothermal capacity in the aquifer to either extract heat from the building during cooling season or to increase the heat enough to be used for heating the spaces in the building or for a hot water uses so this project in Minneapolis. How many buildings are planned to be heated and cooled with this project in the tower side innovation district which is part of the Prospect Park neighborhood of Minneapolis and also the saint. Anthony Park neighborhood of Saint. Paul there is been a lot of development The Green Line surly and the University of Minnesota and the public private investment into that area. So right now out of the gate for this coming year. There are four buildings that are interested in connecting to the first phase of the system but the capacity of the system is fairly limitless so once it's infrastructure is in place all new development in that area would have the potential to connect how new Issaquah for thermal energy and as Minnesota and early adopter in the US. So it's actually been around for at least over twenty years. Most of the applications are in northern Europe Netherlands Scandinavia where? There's over a thousand sites there are not A lot of these in the US so this is absolutely a place for Minnesota to lead that combination of are forward thinking policy on clean energy. The city of Minneapolis has made huge commitments to decarbonised the city and are looking at ways to get away from natural gas as their biggest carbon contributor so this technology is going to be A little bit newer for the country and a little bit newer for Minnesota. But the replica. Ability is really high so once we get the tower side project up and running there are actually three other projects being studied in the state of Minnesota because that Geo

Minneapolis Aquifer Thermal Energy Minnesota United States Nina Axelson University Of Minnesota Vice President GEO Prospect Park Anthony Park Europe Netherlands Scandinavia Issaquah Paul
"hydro" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

06:29 min | 6 months ago

"hydro" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Hydro hydroxy core Kleiner Clark wine thanks for planning will hear its name right it is like that since many have yet that's it the stock market that's what it is it's a possibility absolutely they've got to look at every single thing it's a malaria drug they also treat rheumatoid arthritis it's widely available it's already been FDA approved it is very minimal side effects so you know this is when you start throwing stuff against the wall and these French doctors and what I've been saying Hey this thing is real let's use this that's not been peer to peer just remember everything's up here at this point in time it's about let's see what's available to us right now on the shelves that may help it's not a cure it's a treatment right that's the thing what's the treatment of this that's the thing well there is a parasite very different from a virus but studies from China showed that he did reduce the ability of the corona virus to enter cells so the studies show some promise but I don't know if it's ready for prime time yet why not what what what's the risk if it's as minimal right because from what I'm hearing from doctors there like already figured out how do we you know can I get it some doctors are saying well I've ordered some because if somebody comes in and they're there at that point where they're not a symptomatic they actually have it and it's affecting them how can I give this it is not just that they also have to give you a what they're saying is and the studies have shown you recover at least in this small sample size in about five to six days when you take it with this certain antibiotic you recover much much faster much much faster in fact within two to three days you're in a much better situation which is what we're looking for again vaccine nine months at super best realistically probably twelve to eighteen months how we treat it how we treat it well that's that's that's what we should be looking for at this moment in time three two three five three twenty four twenty three at Chad Benson shows your Twitter feel free to tweet at me you can text the program as well again California's all locked down big time why as a nation state forty million strong we've been organized around and attack rate as we refer to it about fifty six percent that they have iris will impact about fifty six percent of us you do the math in the state of California that's a particularly large number yeah it is it absolutely is it's a huge number hi Italy's what like sixty million people so you're looking at forty million in a singular state the question ever is asking what where's the money coming from your telling nonessential businesses you can't open right so you have a shoe store you're not gonna be up nobody need ships right we need should do you know what I mean grocery stores these they open people need for pharmacies obviously right places like that those things need to stay open you're asking for two weeks right social distancing will bit of essentially self quarantining many keep a small group of friends maybe you guys get together you figure a way to to get through this thing but then you're asking about the money well the battle is gonna go on the house is on recess for the next couple days because now it's the Senate's turn to to roll out a third phase stimulus plan what does it look like this is what the Senate GOP plan would be two hundred fifty page bill under twelve hundred dollars per person a one time payment that would be an additional five hundred per child the payments would be based on income so individuals making up to seventy five thousand dollars annually or married two hundred fifty you get twelve hundred right income is defined as wages so screwed benefits in any pension income right so if you if you get all those and you have seventy five thousand dollar salary you're gonna get twelve hundred if you make a hundred grand ANA right like that it well if if you make seventy five to ninety nine thousand you'll get something but it will be gradual so you might get a thousand from seventy five to eighty and it works its way down from there right I get five hundred Bucks per child trump thousand dollars per person five hundred dollars per child as soon as possible hoping to get it into people's hands with an three to six weeks six weeks later identical would go out if the president still has us in a state of emergency Democrats two thousand dollars per American followed by subsequent payments stepping down over time again this is all live we get to that point where six weeks from now we've got twenty million infected and you know the half a million deaths right you know but we're still on super lock that and that's still a big if the numbers I'm looking at twenty five thousand by Monday hundred two hundred and twenty eight hundred fifty thousand I next Friday if we're in that range we're not talking desert on people who are have tested positive and and her being treated not a symptomatic pave pay at patients because we we maybe had a situation where where we've had a million people already you might have if they're saying that.

Hydro Kleiner Clark malaria
Coronavirus Spurs U.S. Efforts to End China’s Chokehold on Drugs

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 6 months ago

Coronavirus Spurs U.S. Efforts to End China’s Chokehold on Drugs

"Chinese state media have raised the specter of using Beijing's pharmaceutical leverage to block critical components and supplies for dependent US drug companies and sent America into a quote the hell of a novel coronavirus epidemic unquote well in the in several European nations play critical roles in the global medical supply chain China is among the top providers of active pharmaceutical ingredients they calm API's the basic components for antibiotics and other prescription drugs consumed by Americans with the coronavirus crisis threatening to strain the US government's largest stockpile of such drugs health experts warn China's own outbreak and related societal shut down could mean major shortages I had his Chinese factories struggle to keep up production of the API the trump administration lawmakers from both parties are now calling for a dramatic revamping a domestic US drug manufacturing operations I have been outsourced to China and a handful of other nations over the past twenty years the formal letter an online news site covering the pharmaceutical and biotech industries all right some stock numbers on US dependence on Chinese producers China cord accounted for ninety five percent of US imports of ibuprofen ninety one percent of US imports of hydro chorus that's a big deal seventy percent of US imports of let's see ascertainment from forty percent to forty five percent of US imports the penicillin forty percent of US imports of hopper as heparin I can read the one I really I can according to commerce department data and all eighty percent of the U. S. supply of antibiotics are made in China ladies and gentlemen China as an enemy it is a communist regime it is doing everything it can to harm our country without straight out war

Beijing America China Heparin United States Ibuprofen Penicillin
Wild Hydrangeas of the World

In Defense of Plants Podcast

10:22 min | 7 months ago

Wild Hydrangeas of the World

"Dan Hinkley it's great to have you back on the podcast. Welcome thank you very much Matt. It's great to be back. Well you've already been on the episode before and we've talked a lot about your background but for those that didn't listen or new to hearing your name Tell us a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Well essentially A glorified gardener. I am the director at Herons Garden in Kingston Washington Nets Garden that I started in nineteen eighty seven with my partner Rubber Jones. I currently have a personal garden in India. Nola just twelve miles away from Heron's book called win cliff. Both of those gardens are open to the public. If you should ever find yourself in the areas of the we encourage people to come to walk around and and then I do a little writing. Delo speaking some design consultation so a lot of a lot of fingers in different pots but all in all plants in on all the blast. Ya Fantastically charmed existence for any plant lover but You Know People WanNa know more about your background in You're working plant exploration. They can listen to the previous episode. After that was recorded we talked a little bit about maybe diving into more detail into some of your favorite groups and we both agreed that the hydrangea. We're going to be the topic of discussion and I'm really excited to pick your brain about this. This group of plants today great. I mean it's one that I have had an infatuation with ever since I've been a kid and of course it's another one of those wonders of the plant world at once. You get to know a little you you realize how little you know and so you know it's unfolding but ever so entertaining both four in a plant explorer but also for a gardener at the such great application to gardens of North America and in Europe. Weather not necessarily native to write. And this idea that the more you look the more you realize how little you know about this group I mean. This exemplifies my entire experience Since we talked about doing this episode of growing up my experience with hydro was largely just a couple of pom pom varieties and then a little bit later on meeting. At least one or two are native species in the wild in southern Appalachia but I had no idea the breadth of what this genus in this family overall has presented the world. It's been very successful in north and south and east and West and just like you had a hydrangea. Nekia Lada outside our back door in northern Michigan. That's like zone. Three B thing. Some managed to survive in blonde some every year. And then we also had hydrangea lessons. Annabel and everybody my age at least to live on the east coast new or knows Annabel because it was such a mainstay a mop head. Arborescence wanted a heartiest hydrogen. Just so you know. That's that's where my introduction came as well but as I started traveling I was dumbfounded. By how many niches they have occupied. How successful the genus. The family as Ben as a whole and also at least in the Pacific northwest. How many of those can be brought into cultivation in? Add a great deal to the garden not only by flower but with foliage as well. Yeah and so thinking broadly about this. I was actually new to the idea. That hydrangea had. Its own family. I kind of limited with CAPRA fully. Acc so sort of a broad spectrum treatment for taxonomy sake here. What's going on with this group Obviously is a lot more refined but it was even a decade ago when I first started looking at these. You'd oftentimes find Hydrangea For Gay she was one of those bags of everything that didn't know where they belong. They put it in the sanctuary. Casey so It has now been refined obvious. Leads through a lot of different means available to taxonomic. It is a family to its own. Hydrogen Jasey and they have Would quickly dissect this. There's two sub families in hydrogen JC Eighty and James Yoy D. And then within the sub family HYDRANGEA LADY. They have made two tribes. Which are the hydrogen d. e. In Philadelphia? So it really for the sake of time in one hour fairly gonNA scratch the surface with just hydrology e which is where the the breadth of ornament event is but the the other tribe in the in the hand I drank. Philadelphia's obviously has Philadelphia has dude see as a tremendous number of other plants that we are familiar with in our garden so they're lumped rate in with hydrogen JC. Now that's awesome. Yeah then there's you know it's one of those things where again I looked deeper and realized I recognized a lot of those those. I guess that makes sense that they're related but again for the sake of time. The hydrangea you're going to be our focus specifically the genius hydrangea and roughly speaking. I mean we're we're still working and I'm sure things will change In the years or decades to come but roughly speaking how many species are within the genus. Hydrangea There's you know it changes. Because obviously lumper's lumper's splitters continually added but it ranges around sixty about sixty species. But you know they're still discovering new species and in particular in northern parts of South America just three years ago they identified. I think it was fourteen. Fourteen or fifteen new species of climbing Evergreen hydrangea from the mountains of northern Ecuador and Peru Bolivia Colombia in there. So you know. It's still a lot to be learned about true. Hydrangea as out there. They certainly have not all been discovered yet. Another big realization for me in trying to get familiar with this genus was this diversity of life-form you mentioned climbing and I'm sure. Plenty of gardeners will recognize climbing varieties of her Georgia. In of course the obvious shrubbery ones. I mean this is a really cool thing that that seems. Like hydrangea has found different ways. To make a living as a woody plant depending on where you're you're looking for them yet no Absolutely Obviously most people in North America will be familiar with hydrogen novela which is an Asian species. That's the hardest most dependable deciduous flowering plant for Shade Climbing Planet. I should say ourself clinging plant for shade in climates But new go south on occasion in Asia's while you find climbing evergreen species of hydrogen in I would say ninety nine point nine percent gardeners even in the Pacific northwest where we can grow. So many of these are aware of the fact that there are climbing evergreen branches at provide grateful during the summertime and wintertime and then beautiful flowers. That are dead ringers. For what we in our minds think of is a hydrant right on and in thinking about sort of diversity at least here in North America You know sort of West East divide always stands out especially when it comes to gardening You're located on the West Coast as you mentioned what you have over there or is this something that at least in. North America is largely assigned to east of the Mississippi and Sorta down south from there. So like in a broad sense mad here. I'm I'm sitting nine Sonny Bloch this morning a rare sunny day in the puget sound area and right off the block that I live on the two hundred foot bluff repeat Assam. We have native stands of our native Philadelphia's Philadelphia's Louis named after obviously Lewis and Clark fame and in the broad sense that is indeed in the hydrant JC. So I can't discount the those plants. If you to California now you can find Wesleyan Carpentaria and of course James Lia and a few other genera mostly not all that ornamental so. I can't say that west of the Mississippi is deposited in hydrogen JC but Zero through hike packages zero. So we have to get east of the Mississippi before we run into the only two representatives of the genus in North America. And you. You've already made not worth one of those are Bresson's which is very widespread from New York. Even Southern Quebec all the way down into Florida and the Gulf states and has variations of geographical variations within. But just a darn good dependable plant for gardeners and then Hydrangea Chrissa fully. Which is more? Gulf state oriented a beautiful very distinctive. You know probably one of the most distinctive hydrogens in the entire family is is found in in the Gulf states and You know turn the breeders loose on these which they have with Gusto in the last ten to fifteen years in your ending up with these new pink varieties of our lessons and then all of these extraordinary forms of The Oakley Hydrangea. So far cry from what was available to me as a young lad when we had a Annabel that was about it. Now we have you know pink the pink forms bread by the Maestro of plant breeding. Tom Rainey at North Carolina. State University is really Extraordinary things expanding the breadth of ornament within that that one tax of

Philadelphia North America Annabel Pacific Northwest Mississippi Gulf India Dan Hinkley South America Matt Nola Herons Garden Capra Michigan Heron Tom Rainey Delo Director North Carolina Kingston Washington Nets Garde
"hydro" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

03:38 min | 7 months ago

"hydro" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Announces your identity. That brands you is being healthy. In devoted to saving the planet for Tweens and teens personalizing your hydro flask water bottle with say turtle. Stickers is a thing so to posting selfies on Instagram. Of course while casually dangling said colorful water bottle that puts you ahead also while wearing crocs on your feet extra points. They're poor a vida bracelets on your arm and a scrunchy in your hair and if your daughter does any of this with these particular brands and more she's a visco girl and she and millions liker have rocketed. The Hydro Flask all the way to the top of the market. Which will get to injustice minute? But wait I hear you saying what the heck is a visco girl visco the way you pronounce an APP spelled v. Seo is a cellphone APP. Us to edit in share images it has twenty million users than New York Times reports and those millions of users mostly teen girls often fashion themselves around the brand. A VISCO girl is beach. Ready Interested in the environment and easygoing according to NBC News. Ryder Callahan Rosenblatt. She's also devoted to certain brands. Including Berkinstocks Brits B.'s lip balm vans sneakers and the brands previously mentioned crocs Poor Evita and Hydro Flask Hydro Flask was founded in two thousand eight by Travis Rosbach and Cindy Weber and outdoorsy couple with an environmental bent. The two heard that plastic water bottles contain the harmful chemical. Bpa or some of them did at least and they began using existing metal water bottles but didn't like them one had a neck that was too narrow. Another didn't keep water cold and so forth so they invented their own insulated stainless steel water bottle. Sourced it in China and sold it. At farmers markets in Bend Oregon. The product took off almost too fast by twenty eleven. Hydro Flask still selling. Just a single style of bottle was bringing in two million dollars. A year. Rosbach was working around the clock and living on airplanes. He was miserable. Well the couples split up and Ross box sold to an investment group in twenty twelve. That group brought on a veteran tech executive Scott Allen to lead hydro flask into uncharted waters. Alan added more new products and up the brand's social media presence in two thousand Sixteen Helen of troy the one point five billion dollar parent company of oxo brands. You know those kitchen tools with a rubber handles oxo well. Helen of Troy acquired little grass roots. Hydro Flask for two hundred ten million dollars Allen St on the brands president he recently announced his retirement. He stepped down March first. Well Today Hydro Flask Sports. Some one hundred different products. Water bottles travel mugs flasks and the like costing between thirty dollars and sixty dollars under Allen's management the brand shocked at the top of an eight billion dollar global water bottle market. It's a great place to be especially considering that there's still plenty of room for growth. The market should be worth ten billion by twenty twenty-five according to grand view research but it does have stiff big-name competition there's Yeti clean canteen and swell among them and there's also now gene Remember now gene in the nineteen seventies now. Gene was a small plastic lab equipment company. Scientists began sneaking out their own small plastic bottles when they went for hikes in short order. They realized they had something commercial on their hands. Now gene began marketing. Its bottles camping equipment. According to the blog eater the rest history now. Gene is still around like the others. Turning out new products new colors and like hydro flask a line of stickers.

Hydro Flask Hydro Flask Gene Travis Rosbach Scott Allen New York Times Ryder Callahan Rosenblatt Helen Bend Oregon NBC News Bpa China Ross Troy Alan Cindy Weber president executive
"hydro" Discussed on Popgram Podcast

Popgram Podcast

01:46 min | 7 months ago

"hydro" Discussed on Popgram Podcast

"So. I thought it was interesting. I lost some kind of way I wanted to mention. It's not to say that little devils rights longer. Because look as you say who knows. You did his own ships as well. I'm sure the folks at the montage is nothing is always as seen. Nothing sometimes. Always have this. And this is the thing maybe next podcast could have a bit of a touch on in so's because I've been reading I've fallen down the rabbit hole on inside your because I find it fascinating and because I feel that a lot of it has to do with economics dorm show do said no but I also feel that's not only does after economic sales hostages social media because is helpful is lying. We're kids or you don't have to be beautiful you just need to be smuggled. Glory do books as a go. Then you come out. Are you actually hold on competition? North asking zero degree weather woods. Most of the guys are good for the pretty goals so maybe as a society we need to actually not be honest. Look man do pool of spouses. Maybe a bit limited if you do not look as a way if we don't have is a lot of money and if we have that honesty easy to accept but it's very difficult eighteen or nineteen ninety-two estrogen and this is a riptides with money at inches of joy. Awhile I hot dog gold. True Hydro deny that had been telling but analogy matters really cutter. He comes kissed in something. Yes satellite case. No one's getting much analogy thirty breaking news but continuing during this.

Hydro
"hydro" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 10 months ago

"hydro" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They like I was like there's a little bit the word cymbal in war right to build the contract so but yeah so what role of the hundreds of women still well maybe tell through live Phyllis and and with that yeah how many guys is one of those moments you know again when you feel like people are just waiting for you man you know we have still is one of most prolific conducted on Underground Railroad but unlike many other conductors you do these interviews every time somebody came to the station he had some sense that this would be of great historic importance he worked hard time in a lottery time it appears a lot is files and when the fugitive slave act this is passed in eighteen fifty he takes all these files in the hydro one is crazy we got them somewhere you know crazy just but hold on hold on to the stories he knows that they really really important and then usually laws passed America goes crazy you know they're also it's a you know resistance movements and you know armed resistance by you know abolitionism black folks in the north and it was a really excited that someone I would love the right not to this is a really exciting time and after the civil war with him still goes to retrieve all the stories any publishes them as if the volume this is the craziest most exciting just a do you see stories black people are you know fully as we say in the.

Phyllis Underground Railroad America hydro one
"hydro" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"hydro" Discussed on Security Now

"There was able to put them out wearing there is it conceivable. I mean, the when you hear that something's targeting six hundred machines that sounds like a nation state going after individuals. It's not a mass attack. Right. Correct. It's a ragged attack. It's they're estimating in five months. A million people in milliona- suicide customers, you know, check. His heart is normal Acis update process. Exactly. Yeah. So couldn't a bad guy who had access to a Seuss's network perpetrate this. I mean, it sounds like especially a nation state bad actor perpetrate, something like this. Yeah. And I could see why issues should be very slow to respond because this looks really bad. They're like going holy crap out there. I mean, the first thing if I'm the Cisco at at as some going guys, let's find this intruder. Let's figure this out. I mean, I've they're very they're they make beautiful. I just wanna make sure that it doesn't mean necessarily the ace whose is a right somebody inside might be bad, or in my opinion. I mean, look at all the companies that militias nation state. Hackers have gotten into through an advanced persistent threat where the person has really deep access to. I mean, like again, it seems to me that that the database where customer to MAC address sales records are is different from you know, that the software update stuff. Yeah, we're the MAC addresses sequential or just random, and we know anything about those six hundred no, in fact, in twelve days Kaspersky that that thing is there to casper skis own that SAS. It's the security analysts summit in Singapore. Where they're going to present a paper. On this. So we should in two weeks. We should have some more information from them. Very interesting. I mean, it could have been us could have been the NSA. Yeah. And you know, I mean, but again, it's it's weird. Because it's limited to a Seuss customers. I mean, no Nana ace customer. Well is going to you know, you start with a Susan you get your in. Right. But they're six hundred of them what if you were of interest somebody? But if you notice that I don't know these rarely embassy had just purchased a large number of a Seuss computers. Yeah. I don't know. I I think that we need to know more. Obviously that's a good point too. Because it it certainly could be that. There is a I if this were were targeted we don't know targeted by home. But if if for example, ace uses a major brand, there's probably some many enterprises who have who have standardized on a Seuss hardware. That's what they buy. And so if you know that like all of your employees are using a sous laptops sack, and you could somehow get a list of who's who's using which laptop by back address than or organization. You know? Yeah. I mean, maybe who knows it could be Lenovo doing this. We we we wanna make Basu's customers unhappy. Yeah. That will do it. So speaking of making people unhappy Leo we have the Norsk Hydro ransomware attack. I have a picture in the show notes of that someone took of the one of the what was scotch taped. The the notice scotch tape to the door of one of the Norsk Hydro plants. It says it has dated I think it's the three nineteen. So it says warning cyber attack against the hydro network. Please do not connect any devices to the hydro network. Do not turn on any devices connected to the hydro network. Please disconnect any device prints phone slash tablet, at cetera from the hydro network await new. New update, and then it was signed security, and then there's some note handwritten in probably Norwegian, you know, next to the one that's in English. So and you brought this breaking news to us during last week's podcast. It was just happening as funny. I we saw a dental something in the door couple of years ago during the a ransomware attack was immersed. I can't remember who it was. It was Maersk the shipping line. Same kind of thing in the door. Don't connect network. Yeah. Wow..

Norsk Hydro Seuss Susan Kaspersky Singapore Lenovo Basu Leo five months twelve days two weeks
"hydro" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"hydro" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Brown. The cyber wire studios that data tribe. I'm Dave bittner with your cyber wire summary for Tuesday March nineteenth twenty nineteen Norway's Norsk Hydro one of the world's largest aluminum producer's suffered an extensive ransomware attack last night against its facilities in Europe and the United States, the company said in a message to investors that IT systems in most business areas are impacted and hydro is switching to manual operations as far as possible. The Norwegian national security authority or an essay said the attack is suspected to have used a fairly new strain of ransomware called locker gogo. A spokesman for hydro told the BBC the company was able to continue production by reverting to manual methods. And that it has data backups to restore from as soon as the attack is neutralized. Currently, however hydro is still working with the NSA to contain the attack and identify the extent of the damage employees have been told not to turn on their computers or connect any devices to the network and all communication is taking place via telephone mobile devices and text messages there have been no safety related incidents. As a result of the attack in a press conference this afternoon hydros chief financial officers said quote, the situation for hydro is quite severe. Adding that the entire worldwide network is down and quote affecting production as. Well, as office operations, he said, the attack began in the United States and escalated overnight, but he didn't specify which facility was I affected or how it was compromised. According to cyber scoop, the company has remelted facilities and Kentucky and Texas and has offices in Baltimore. The company's website is still down. And there's no timeframe for how long the recovery may take the locker gogo ransomware was first spotted in January when it was allegedly used in an attack against a French engineering consultancy called Altron technologies earlier today, researchers identified a new strain of locker gogo uploaded to a public malware repository from Norwegian IP address Palo Alto networks unit. Forty published a report yesterday on a new variant of the Mirai button. At malware. This version is using the total of twenty seven exploits eleven of which are new it's also targeting a wha..

Norsk Hydro United States Dave bittner Europe Norway producer Altron technologies Kentucky Palo Alto Baltimore BBC Texas
"hydro" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Commissioner Dan hydro thinks this is a big deal they'll be right here on Staten Island and. That's that's tremendous comfort to the people here into the firefighters who. Also benefit. From the skills Members chief of department, Jim Leonard's his squad members receive additional training first of all they taken operate role has Matt technician They have, the ability to work in confined spaces They also have the ability to work high angle. Squatty will open by the end of the year the closest squad now was in park slope in Staten Island Peterhansel w CD NewsRadio eighty new lawsuit is claiming an amendment to the New York state. Budget that relaxes standards for Jewish schools is unconstitutional I'm wig there says there was, only an hour to, a day, at his Sheva devoted to math science social, studies nearly no one took it seriously. Parents students and teachers and nothing after age thirteen, for the first few years after graduating from Sheva my life wasn't shambles which is why youth advocates for fair. Education claims the Felder amendment named for Brooklyn senators. Simcoe Felder is so troubling prior to the amendment all non public schools. Were subject to the same statute after the amendment these. Ultra orthodox schools are subject to different, standards attorney Eric Wong says that violates the established Clause of the first amendment is state is actually going out and passing a law that endorses or religious choice the suit names governor Cuomo. And other education officials Cuomo's spokesman tells WCBS in a statement the administration's committed to achieving.

Simcoe Felder Staten Island Sheva governor Cuomo New York state Commissioner Dan hydro Squatty Jim Leonard Eric Wong Brooklyn technician WCBS Matt attorney
"hydro" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Just fascinating food scientists learn about enzyme technology and you know this is right around the time that the molecular sort of movement started and so i was just kind of like learning about all different kinds of hydra colo's and what's a hydro coal hydro collides are gelling and setting agent so anything from aguilar to gelatin to different starches so cousy or cornstarch it's funny when people say they're not into that stuff i'm like well you probably use cornstarch gelatin in your cooking so but you are actually whether you like it or not yeah so did you need an agent when you do those things why didn't i mean i was actually blind interviewed for that and then they called me and said you know we won't hire you for this team that was a two year project and i was i was running citizen cake and kind of going back and forth to parma which you know wasn't doesn't tell it wasn't a bad job all these places so he's taken you switzerland and you've got to what did you do when you went to switzerland with emi oh my gosh well that was that was just last year and it was great because we met all these we went to these little farm cheesemaker like just so boutique cheesemaker kind of people and it was brutal we had to have fun do for lunch one day and then the next day we had redclad with potatoes and lots of corner shawn's and all that stuff it it served with that melty delicious cheese we went to the cop caves and saw all these cheeses aging in the most beautiful environment and.

parma shawn aguilar switzerland two year one day
"hydro" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The board members were all appointed by manitoba's conservative government so it was surprising and unprecedented to see the provinces hydro board resign on mass this week nine of the ten board members walked out after premier brian pallister vetoed a multi million dollar payment to the manitoba may t federation the payment was almost seventy million dollars for the construction of transmission lines that would run through mateen land premier pallister said the payment would set an unfair precedent but the manitoba hydro board had approved the payment so ninety percent of its members resigned david shaw tron is glad they did he's the president of the manitoba may t federation today though we reached him in penticton british columbia mr chartrand what does it tell you that manitoba hydro's more of directors resigned on mass this week well firstly i think manitoba's we should all be concerned it's never been done in history the largest corporation would have everyone resigned especially when great fanfare was displayed in two thousand sixteen because these were very high ranking people very well respected in not only in manitoba canada lot of these individuals that that decided to put their voice to the process to see they can help out and dealing with the challenges that meant to baio face but to be treated and such disrespect by the premium out until he would not even give them the time of day not even getting thirty minutes of meeting last year in fact he decided to punish them in which he's done now premier brian pallister has called the payment to the may t federation the payment of sixty seven million dollars which is at the center of this dispute he's called it her suasion money.

manitoba brian pallister manitoba hydro board manitoba may t federation david shaw penticton t federation sixty seven million dollars seventy million dollars million dollar ninety percent thirty minutes
"hydro" Discussed on ESPORTS

ESPORTS

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on ESPORTS

"All right will you heard it here i thanks for giving us your insight in the nhl see us you can give emily a follow on twitter at if i'm lee oh and before i forget emily was actually on our espn east sports video studio this week so if you wanna watch her talk about clutch gaming and overwatch ly you can check out espn dot com slash sports but before that and if you have time you can leave us a rating and a review itn's and let us know how we're doing you can also tweet us your thoughts originally on goo at usps underscore e sports and again emily's handles at league of emily you can also find us in the espn app and if you subscribe to eastwards in it we can send you an alert whenever we have a new episode customize your shave new schick hydro five cents equipped with shock absorbed technology auto adjust to how you shave available in three refill cartridge jill formulas try schick hydro five cents razors and refills available at walmart gamers like to customize everything from their gaming rig all the way down to the way their characters book and now schick has developed a way for them to customize their shave to introducing new schick hydro five cents razors and refills equipped with innovative shock absorb technology the razor auto adjusts based on how you shave backing off or adding pressure when needed three custom joe formula was refilled cartridges in able you to further personalize your shave available and hydrate gel with coconut oil to hydrate throughout each shave cover gel with herbal extracts comfort can and energize show with menthol to wake up tired looking skin customize your shave with new schick hydro five cents available now at walmart for an everyday low price for more savings visit schick dot com.

nhl emily twitter schick hydro schick walmart espn itn joe
"hydro" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

Giant Bombcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

"All right got check some things out here let somebody that spicy clean in chinatown man it was a disaster i wanna go to the spicy spicy king queen and spicy emperor and they're all spread out in the city you go to all three learn of a secret location right in the middle probably well luckily if you out there have tales of gastrointestinal stress wanted to know we're all people do this i just need to know there's a venue air those coming right up after this yeah oh the after show about your bowel movements well because you guys we'll be live again shortly with that thing yeah cutback in talking about poor over and stuff yeah hand tampering all right well let's get out of here says yes and set up for that this has been the giant bomb cast see next week customize your shave with the new schick hydro five cents razors refills equipped with innovative shock absorb technology the razor auto adjusts to how you shave three custom gel formula raise refills enable you to further personalize your shave while five ultra plied blades maximize context help reduce redness and irritation try schick hydro five cents razors and refills and experience a customized shave today available now at walmart for an everyday low price for more savings visit schick dot com that's s c h e k dot com.

schick hydro walmart
"hydro" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

Giant Bombcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

"Great that's plo to close you better than i would ever want to know me but yeah so i think it's okay i think valve is going to tweak some things for like people have pointed out some things that have very good complaints about i don't think it's a perfect system yet but i understand valve wanting to monetize doda a little more especially if they're not getting that new user growth i think this is actually somehow a great way to get people in if they're willing to pay money for a game that they don't know if they like yet if you're kinda crazy this is for you i wonder if they end up doing trials or something about hey if you've we know you've never played doto before we're going to give you a month whatever i think it's okay i think it's that are on the cosmetic front i think the other stuff is inching a little bit and addiction i don't like but i think it's far enough away that similar in league because they're yeah their business model is so like hero based yeah right okay and cosmetics obviously yeah did a phone call time to take a break news right back with other stuff it's time to shave your way what is my way i i don't know what your way i don't either okay what are we gonna do about this you get to experiment and find out with the schick hydro five cents razor sounds high tech i'm gonna take it in the shave lamp.

schick hydro
"hydro" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"A one has got an asean my hand one more time hydro power was trading at all all the good thing going bye bye no you needs the way to you ps these kids a kid me cute glad glare donald this fear in the field in fears pioneer one is not an inswinging by one more time i though i am wildly say volvo the by needle under got an asean mind one more time 'fore i go i up was trading all romiti brad and angie traffic traffic brought their poison iraq southbound lakeshore drive really congested abmp sent in north thirty one cubic growth from hollywood he also have a really heavy tooth bound jay.

hydro power donald brad hollywood asean volvo iraq
"hydro" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

Monday Morning Podcast

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"hydro" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

"And it doesn't get any real estate that's something you stadia friend and now that i have a kid it's just like entering understand what the fuck my mother them even more give blocking clinked wine collision and that's it you don't say it to you not we're checking carlos i just watched the ship hydro transformer add that made those dollarshaveclub ads make even more consents the blade literally turned into one of those balkan robots why is matombo wagging his finger at me like he just blocked a shot in a mobile one commercial is he out of nba money with the fact that he come from nowhere that he by one too many can goldchains assumption and easily called up as aged rodney to work again schwarzenegger i don't i don't know i don't have my ads i'll let to tweet the at the end of this thing whenever whenever the fact that thing comes in i have no idea all by the way i forgot to bring this up season's three ff is for family is gonna happen thank you so much to everybody you watched we are now breaking stories for season three it's eta mations so season three ought to come out somewhere in late twenty nineteen now we're hoping that we can ever come out you know we came out make thirtieth of this year so we're that's when i personally that's what i'm shooting for now i haven't communicated that to anybody at work i'm working with.

real estate rodney schwarzenegger nba