20 Episode results for "Husted"

Want to Renegotiate Your Lease on Life?

Dr. Gary Crow Presents AUDIO TIDBITS

06:28 min | 1 year ago

Want to Renegotiate Your Lease on Life?

"The funny entertaining. Of course. Yes for sure. Say Tell us maybe you are totally cool with your lease on life and have zero interesting renegotiating. You lace if so right on you. Definitely one of the lucky ones. It's also possible that you think own your life and not reduced to the leasing or even worse certainly not being just a renter. I suspect you also have the perfect dance and when asked how many of you it would take to put in a light bulb you know. Don't you show you do? It would only take one of you. You could just pulled a light bulb and the world would revolve around you. I'm sorry I know that's not you. I just husted in there. Put off any of those high and mighty types. We might have unintentionally pressed play and started listening in on our conversation. They think they are above the rest of us. You know the type they end above anyone but she'll think they are. They also think they are entitled and don't know that they are only leasing. The space they have among us in can have their lease cancelled without notice it any time but we know we totally get it. So let's talk about our Lisa's. What are the terms of our lease on life? Yes there are always terms their space. Each of us occupies by contract lohman. It's important for a Steno. The terms of alleys terms of AL contract for if we don't hold up our end of the contract we will sooner or later to get new. Vic Did and unfortunate outcome indeed. Let's give some thought to just what the terms of contract to get to live among the rest of US actually. Our allies on life has both basic and premium provisions. Here is to catch the basic provisions. Apply to each of us. Under not negotiable. Thi- spill out. What is expected of us? Failure to comply gets us. You'll victim from my place and usually gets us. Downgraded conversely the premium provision of benefits. We get from our place in the scheme of things and I usually at least somewhat negotiatable that can be changed taken away without notice on negotiation. We held firmly to the basic provisions and have to comply. We have some choice about the premium provisions that have to cope with the reality. That AL lease on life comes with no guarantee whatsoever even so some premium package is a much safer than others much closer to guarantee. Think about him. Likely this. Suppose my place. Among the rest of us is to want movies that is the basic provisions in my lease the premium provisions. Specifies the movies I watch. There is a sub provision that requires me to actually watch every movie. I'm giving access to it really is like life since we also have to actually live through every day. We have getting back to the movies. My safest bet with life and the uncertainty that comes with my lease on life says that leasing one movies safest especially if I accept the really old movie letting everyone else has seen a no one wants the chance of losing access or having you taken away as Nestle Dunham. Hopefully I at least get a chance to peek. A movie I like but again there is no guarantee but I want more than one old movie to watch stay alert. The fine print starts here in my one movie space. The basic provisions of my lease only include keeping track of my one movie. And making sure that it does not get rendered useless and it does not get misplaced or taken away sure it's boring tedious indifferently not fulfilling after awhile even so my space is reasonably safe and I can certainly handle it over the long haul. You can likely think of a few bad outcomes but for the most part my life is pretty safe and predictable but would you be okay with a one movie place in life me. Neither one old movies not nearly enough. I wanted to renegotiate my lease on life. I want an upgrade to a better life. Space his the RUB and upgrading. The premium provision has a corresponding ramp up of the basically provision concurrently. The upgrade requires us to take on greater risk sticking with the movies remembering that we have to watch every movie we choose. Selecting more movies requires more time and energy to select exposes as two more risk of having to watch movies and we hate to we stick with what we have. No we can handle order. We take a chance within our life spaces how options feren negotiating are about more than movies. Do we stay where we are relocate to we keep the job we have? What change do we stay now? Current relationship will move on. Do we exercise more? Stick to the pouch. Do we eat less audio with being fat? Do we become more active in our community or just continue letting others do the work and make the decisions. Do we save for that rainy day or do we just hope that it never rains to we. Renegotiate our lease on life knowing that the basic provisions will change in the risk will likely inquiries or do we settle for the status quo while figuring that things always work out in the long run. You may be hoping that. I have a startling conclusion or helpful advice for you if so now would be the time for it. The truth of it is that I don't know what you should do what I do now. Is that if you decide to renegotiate? You should be prepared to manage the changes in the basic provisions or requirements. In Jolie's that will come with your new life space and be ready to take on the increased risk that will unavoidably also show in your life. Let me share a little riddle before I leave you if there are two flies in the kitchen. Which one is the cowboy? It's the one that is at home on the range. If you plan to renegotiate your lease on life just be sure you are comfortable with settling into your new home on the range knowing that things can heat up without notice in farming entertaining. Gesture subscribe coming.

AL US husted lohman Nestle Dunham Vic Lisa Jolie
S7E3: Sara Hendren

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

31:59 min | 1 year ago

S7E3: Sara Hendren

"Welcome to the design of business the business of design where we introduce you to people from all over the world from different industries and disciplines or here to talk about design business and the values that govern how we live work and thrive together I'm Ellen mcgirt and I'm Jessica Helfand the design of business the business of design is brought to you showing me everything he knew about the world and I was meeting than people who are blind and people who are deaf people are wheelchair users and so again my imagination just sort of was caught by this utilitarian significant that's what John has get says is going on in design its utility and significance and I thought wow this is so pragmatic for my child and for all these and then I discovered that okay if I'm going to go on in my chosen profession which is in academia riding making things teaching I can probably do my best work actually if I don't do it from a simultaneous deeper politicisation about what it means to have a deep interdependence with a child who's many many gifts are also out of sync with the kind of gallery making practice I can probably do more in the world in terms of an activist and sort of justice perspective if I work deep inside technology I mean I'm asking you like all material culture says something is an index of ideas about who's using them and so the medical logic of so much prosthetics that was really apparent to me like oh things like go to specialists doctors into physical therapy clinics and to occupational therapy and speech therapy and those were some hard years for sure and they were also just replete with visual culture I suddenly noticed all the tiny little ankle braces and all the little gadgets that adjusted based the a lot of these things that are being built our broadcasting a message about bodies that need to be fixed and meanwhile I was with this child who was dynamic in singular I also had my first baby I of my three and that's my son Graham who has down syndrome and his arrival was every child's arrival for the sat it's an unusual story in my twenty year career how an artist person trained in arts ended up in in an engineering school and I would have been surprised even tenure who are in my life now and also deeply expressive about what it means to be human ability capacity all those things so that's kind of the short version of how I got into the field so you can market smarter and grow faster now what Tim that's what learn more at mail chimp dot Com on Today's Episode Art Engineer Sarah Welcome to the podcast thank you pleasure be here a lot of your projects look at disability and design can you talk to us a little bit about how you got there yes league glasses to the ears of an eleven month old child and I started to think about all the people who were behind shaping those things and also started to think about how that material culture ago you told me this is where I would end up and I kind of toggle between making things as a very young person as a student that is I started in painting and the it's unacceptable and by the do five years of soul-crushing red tape to make a new thing Sarah Henderson is an artist design researcher and first time is always a kind of deeply politicizing act because it just routes you in the world in a particular way and also to have a child with distinct differences was this the main stream operations of the world but also it just opened my imagination in ways that I can't even begin to describe because immediately we started to do hiring and accessibility so that feeling that can be done should be done the current state of things is unacceptable. That's what I never get over it was just people going I self that questions still now where can I do my best work but in engineering there is for in the design world of engineering around prosthetics there is one overwhelming sir the Olin College of Engineering in Needham Massachusetts she's also a writer her book what can a body do how we meet the built world comes out next year want in the bodies that they're in and we all get a better future when we do that right ask people who've never been asked before but not what you need to help me rescue your your body that's broken but how can the world move toward you a little bit more flexibly a little bit more in an elastic kind of way so I could talk to you all day about the kinds of on genuity that disabled Ori which is that we build things to fix poor broken people who need us and we are going to rescue them with tech and I thought actually need to an engineering school to say like actually just ask people what the creativity that's come from disabled people making the world for themselves and that's what I WANNA do inside an engineering school now let's dig into some of the process here you started a blog Abe ler Was Hater remember in two thousand nine people were still reading blogs and of a particular way so social media had not yet consolidated the way we people and they would call themselves disabled not differently abled we can talk about that if you like but I could talk all day about the technology that have come from the deep creativity the urging of culture and nickel twilly was writing about food as an index of culture and There was another landscape blog at that pruned at that time that was looking at a called a blur in two thousand nine how did that help you understand the world that you were exploring what kind of stories were you telling and collecting yes consume in an aggregate Sort of topical interest and at the time I was reading things like building blog so jeff writes about architecture as an index sorry this monolith of sentimentalize disabled people on the one hand being again in the protagonist was always the technology swooping in and the landscape again as a an invitation to really free associate between like using architecture or food or the landscape as an organizing principle and then what using extended gear so Rebecca Horn for instance or Lauren McCarthy so people in the past people in the present who were all using adaptive technology are all the sites of flows that go through thing and I thought I want to do that but with prosthetics why because again I could see this hero store some which were yes gee whiz awesome engineering and innovation and breakthroughs I definitely covered that stuff in sort of blog magazine-style fashion and then some of them were artists people were rendered kind of passive in these stories and I thought actually the body is using tools all the time all the time so abe was meant to be this big house for prosthetics I got almost a PhD in history and to think about culture and I was kind of trying to figure out my way do I want to write about this offer won't be making things so in the middle of that to do something more unusual so Laura McCarthy's work is all about making technologies that help people connect socially better and get over their awkwardness so it's like a prosthesis for a dinner party or something she has a little box that you would put in table at dinner party and it has four screens around it and it will prompt you with social cues about what because it's true right so I thought able was a magazine style blog right where what would happen if those Gee whiz prosthetics right beside Laura McCarthy's thing and also the right up beside very clever ordinary you know zubets that are a little gadget that turned shoelaces into magnetic locks for any shoe you know so it was again that Gizmodo kind of wired magazine Standard Story About prosthetics like oh it's the future it's trans humanism like that to me was a kind of ejector seat away from what's happening right now in disability politics and also just in our everyday weird lives built with stuff glasses and pens and forks and all the things that we use so Gabler was written say for a very particular reader I was imagining a software engineer in Silicon Valley on their lunch break like smelly sandwich at like what are all these technical tools doing what I wanted to do in all that is to just estranged the reader from his or her received idea about the sort of dusk like clicking around like a down to like that scenario and I thought can I get that person who is sort of convinced that tech will save the world to read this thing and work in terms of the accessible ECON project specifically would you talk about how that captured so many people's attention yes that project continues to to do it says like ask a question you know or empathize and so there's something in ridiculous about this idea that you would need oppress these to connect over dinner table and yet of course it's Be Surprising to me too so Orient listeners the international symbol of access is that blue and white image of a wheelchair and a person in a wheelchair that you see everywhere and it is ackley where to find that kind of assistance I was paying attention to that symbol because I saw some informal variations on that symbol for instance at Moma but for me to aggregate by writing a rationale for doing my work which is to then claim space in an engineering school to say like an artist can be here too and to have a point of view taxed indicate places where your parking spot is reserved and there's an elevator president so that blue and white symbol right now I can get on a plane go somewhere in the world ride don't speak the language and I know so at my local marshals here in Cambridge so very small percentage of the time I would see graphic designers who had clearly an internal design job had just tweaked that symbol a profound active standardization graphic design in the built environment rights. It's not that old it's really a profoundly new idea that you would through with a little bit so they had made the if you look at the original international symbol of access you'll see the arms and the feet on that image are rectilinear they're completely Jimmy Trek whereas most isotopes in the built environment show a body that has bodily shapes which are all organic body does not have right angles on it so I would see these variations on that recive and political image but it doesn't actually embody those values so I started to collaborate with a philosopher friend of mine international symbol of access what could we do that would make you see it again so much of design right or redesign is about actually just waking us from our slumber about our everyday Khan and I would think gosh given how political and profound this images why doesn't it express its dynamism in the world it's such a stuff and just pointing to it again so the early stages of that project were a clear back sticker that superimposed on top of that international symbol of access different symbol which is a symbol that has a wheelchair user leaning forward with those rounded organic edges and being proverbially in motion in the world and so if you look at was really convenient to be at the at the computer I want to actually take us back for just a moment and ask you to talk a little bit about the communication of your who is also a graffiti artist who's not it's combination you come across very often but he was suggesting that it might be possible to a kind of street art guerrilla mode to alter some of those we represent each other historically and also to suggest a kind of possible way forward so that symbol was covered in the press as a kind of guerrilla street art think again about a little bit and it also able was just a way I mean I think Remco husted this right writing away into practice so it's clear to me now that Abe was away object and you can imagine that the kind of click beatty understanding of that work was like Oh do we care that artists are facing public property in the static and in fact to set up a classroom where prosthetics are made. I'm not sure I would have been brave enough to do that but able was this way of like ok well long runway to do that Nelson had three children in five years one of the original street art version it's got this kind of Itala sized version of that icon on top of the old one and our aim doing that was to sort of both point to the way better transportation and education and rights in other words the graphic was like the node entry point to get in and not really the point in and of itself now after think appropriately so it's been interesting I think given the political climate where in that there has been a subset of folks within my disability community who say say we've had an overwhelmingly positive support that that project has gone on to become a public domain images free for use anywhere we've never made any money from it so that the law that actually that that image is not representative of people with disabilities for instance if they're not wheelchair users or there there's a kind of problem within disability representation long story of the accessible icon project was just a free in the public domain new icon if you want to use it and people do everywhere in our our names have kind of exited that project and a lot of ways and and way gentlemanlike I roll like artists again doing their thing which was convenient for us I had been watching tactical art practices for a long time because we we got to say like I think that's an interesting into this story it's not actually interesting got the microphone to us and to our allies who worked with us on this project with disabilities to say what they want which is like just kind of respectability politics of being like see despite my broken nece I became the thing that you can applaud that's a super crippling thing and you can imagine how problematic that is the disability kinda leftist disability seen there has been this some internal consternation over like how do we how do we represent each other and I just some thinking a lot about that called super creeping and what that means is needing for folks disabilities to represent themselves as athletes or over commerce as superhuman in order to be acceptable humor they gained when they actually collect around a single image which is a metaphor and symbol it's not meant to be a one to one representation do you see what I mean yeah so within the right now because for me that project it's actually not about a correct graphic design it's actually about a provocation that starts with material when it's also about a collapsed sort of process with people who are coming at it from very different points of view and may not even know each other who are all surrounding this very tender topic and trying to say something about meaty so I have to work to say like let's let's return to what what is two types do they do standardization that is their virtue they do in other words they can we do stencils on our parking lot and repaint our parking lot as our work together and what happened there was that we use the icon to actually be a way for people to connect to one another so in other words that act of repainting it was much more social kind of interaction and that's I think what you're describing that was the collaboration the physical literal in the world that's correct and and also accommodating the feedback they get what have you learned about those kinds of collaborations because that seems to be the thing that everybody needs to get autism and said can we use your icon as a like a service day project we have a bunch of lawyers who are coming to do their service day normally they would paint the walls or clean the basement uh-huh Ivan Illich talked about convivial tool so tools for conviviality are noncoercive open and flexible so by putting it in the public domain we hope that it's like a social but now yeah I mean I think this project really taught me a lot because it came alive when a nonprofit here in Boston day center for adults with developmental disabilities reached ration- of painting this thing together was the cause them for a conversation to say what our misconceptions about one another and how might we meet each other better and I think our hope is that it become the by mail chimp so you WanNa grow your business now what male chimps all in one marketing platform allows you to manage more your marketing activities all in one place what are we trying to advance together you're also talking about this really interesting line between what is familiar like an ice type and what is adaptable not just in terms of the tool in that way where there's not one way to use it what that means is that people use it in ways that I wouldn't use it you know what I mean that they may be telling kind of sentimentalize story about disability I mean this is what every seems to me every justice movement has to ask itself is sort of what's the story of us in Marshall Ganz terms not just a story of self but the story of US tation which is a really interesting construct for somebody like you working in this world so there's activism there's artistry there's collaboration as Ellen brought him go adaptability for people who might have different ways of moving in the world but in terms of how we interpret it for our own use and I'm thinking of Victor Schlotzky's idea but defense the design of business the business of design is brought to you by mail chip we talk to people at mail chimp headquarters Atlanta about the role of design in their business my name is Mark D Christina I'm the head of brand and Mail Chimp Studios Classic Work of art that is to undo your ordinary conceptions of the world for a moment to do that productive estrangement back toward the world returning to the world off the work and says you know whether or not this thing actually solves the problem we're trying to solve it's valuable because it's we're learning something we will employ male chimps on one marketing platform allows you to manage more of your marketing activities so where does the arts come into this where does arts education contribute to the and so we pulled out of the parts Ben it's a great and not be wasteful SORTA like recycling so we take these ideas that we've had we repurpose them put them into a new context and give them ain't going to be offended and building prosthesis together that was the estranged version like it was not the medical device is the for me that's the method because what's my this is so for instance in my classroom we have worked with Alan Shepherd who's a wheelchair dancer and Alice came to us and said we build a ramp with me connect so that the next time you think just get on that sort of easy treadmill of practicing being with people who unlike yourself you know site is accessible they will be unafraid to make the phone call to ask the user to come in and tested out right so I mean I have people who are blind in my classroom we built a lectern for short stature and we are the social act try out of US making stuff together just speaks past all of our nervousness awkwardness and all of their wondering like ooh am I going to say the wrong students because they're like it is physics right I mean it is but what Alice isn't actually coming to us to ask for our help like you see them doing that not looking for a ramp that's an entrance to a building I wanNA ramp to us it's physics to make dance like just acceleration and resistance and so you can imagine what this does for these young engineers but we have this idea that when things don't go the distance we can put them in this imaginary parts Ben and what that allows us to do a couple things one is it sometimes takes the pressure on dreamlike mine I have a class called investing normal and it is precisely a house where we do very practical work and some of this snow skis estrangement work that's kind of undoing in their minds but what so again talk about convivial what so convivial about that is it alison the room doing beautiful things with her body using a chair as it's geared these studies is called the kind of difference very broadly between a medical model of disability and a social model of disability so in a medical model we understand impairment that lives just on the body it's the proper have situations where we'll be working on a project and we'll realize that this thing that we were working on three or six months ago or however long actually might solve this problem they're not going to go out and make art these engineers most of them most of them are gonna go to software companies in harbor companies and so on my hope is that the next time somebody says we need to think about Harwood one thing I love about design that mail chimp in any creative project that we undertake you know there will be lots of different things that we explore and not everything always clears the bar or goes the distance yeah I think it is partly this estrangement work that is the classics one classic Modern Strategy of of the arts is to help us undo are categories I think in one place so you can market smarter and grow faster now what mail chimp that's what learn more at now tim dot com engineering education or just the the social part of becoming accustomed to the world being broken not the person yeah you're naming their sweat in disability I'm for women with dwarfism my students are very nervous about this and most people are if they have no experience with disability so a big part of what I'm doing saying a making practice is an occasion for people to what makes a graceful ramp you know and those things I must say are difficult for my students I mean we live in a time where stem is still so heroically champion tabling than legs that don't ambulant through the world into you know so that's why people like Amanda People like Alice would call themselves disabled people so what did the arts have to do with that you know again for engineers what what's magical to me is insisting that we when we build a ramp for Alice it is useful in has to be need that person and therefore it kind of the responsibility that person but in a social model of disability that's why people would call themselves disabled they would say no it's actually a world full of stairs and no ramps is more it has to hew to these kind of pragmatic constraints and it has to have expressive qualities. So I guess what I'm trying to bring to my students kind of is just a kind of I for aesthetics that my students who are very smart they've been kind of tracked into math and science in the quantifiable and so a lot of what we're doing what I'm doing the classroom it's just to try to help them understand the the culture is as old as time there is no no society ever existed without making art to what are we doing telling our stories to each other well of course a lawyer would say that is the mother yes and I'm particularly interested in other children that came along after Graham and how that collaborative family environment how does that impact the process the work your perspective these multiple lenses yeah nobody ever asks me that really it's very welcome and full at has to obey structural kinds of qualities and so that's where that's where design is truly magical right because its use in poetics use in poetics where ramps in part of the issue was how can alice get the dramatic descent she wants stay safe and they had to understand there were very particular you know and I would all day long like maker disposition vernacular and then like context you know what I mean those are three different things one that is not getting mentioned which you'll forgive him but I'm really interested into say to my students this is where I lodged firmly in design as a person I often say I'm an artist who uses the language of design in the House of engineering that's a very particular it's kind of beautiful ramp is one that doesn't kill anybody you actually have to operate in a world that's exactly right and then we did that when she when Alice came to campus I mean we were prototyping Shen story that happened like people can't imagine that actually a child who they've carried a pregnancy perhaps or plans family and they have they've only thought thank goodness Lori and I'm pro-choice and not everybody should make the choice that I did and so on but it the story that's not being told is this imagined they're all you know pregnancy in this country is structured to see to render down syndrome it purely as a risk in the defect you know as a closure in your life right and people are telling you that story Ellen what you said before about the capturing imagination think it's it's is deeply tied up with mothering that I think people can't imagine having a child that is also an opening to other kinds of experiences that we wouldn't have had right so if I'm in the classroom with my students and Alice Shepherd is using wheelchair my students are suddenly thinking Oh s. heartaches and all those things that are also not available to you without them and I think people find this the idea that you would have both closures and openings truly in any life of your oldest brother think you are nothing but a fantastic human I cannot imagine that space I mean it's really something and I'm not is is really surprising to people I think so yes am I talking my neuro typical other two children through this this question of like what's it like to be grams per so she's making movements that are not available to me actually as a walking person I am also then saying to the world I live in a family that's having experiences enjoys and powerful things in our lives defies language at some some in some way and and when I am working with Alice when I'm working with Carmen Papa Bolia a blind artists on do you ever feel that they're the engineering mind precludes or prevents or sidesteps the artistic investigation that you as a painter aside won't end up like that person going to have a healthy baby in non down syndrome baby that is what most people are thinking they can't imagine that in our family down syndrome grown up but I think what would I do without him I mean really and truly if you could see so that is a story that of course has like so many of the most that is what they mean and they need the kind of for them a certain metric of scale ability and certain metric of one usefulness is that for them is delivered instrument for playing the built environment with his navigational cane. I'm working with Amanda Election for short stature this the raw heat of that animal love going to pretend that we don't worry of course we do about the span of his life but when I think about of course people have thought in the past Oh what will you know my younger two children do when they're ver- so at some point you're planting these seeds and hoping that at a moment of tension or friction or exhaustion or inspiration it will we've seen the way it moves the levers of the world and for them that feels like a more amorphous immeasurable you know that's it's a hard thing so it's the world moves right and we all have our story about that what's the lever by which the world moves you know we in this conversation prize the work of culture other and what must it be like to have your eldest brother greet you every day as though you've been separated for a month what must be like that engineers at their best understand the world as unfixed because they understand the world how it's built so at their best they're like so that's the that's what maxine greene who was philosopher of aesthetics called social imagination thinking is if things could be otherwise like when you and I are in the presence of an artifact and his money its venture capital money the unlimited upside it's the liquidity event you know which never happens for fine there's no liquidity event coming for fine artist long for how long you how long you got a resounding yes you know I mean that is to say sort of like you know how in baseball in training people use like a heavy bat in the spring so that then when you get to the real lighter weight bat it's easier hey that I've I have plenty of students who entire investigating normal and they meet people like Alison they say look Sarah at the end of the day that was an interesting thought experiment for me but for me if you know for my child is like it's like a slow burn you know just like you know what I mean it is it is a deep well of creativity kinds of things to help them what is Jackson position what is so but I will tell you that just the other day I showed some engineering students have documentary about Pena Bosch and we talked a little bit come back up teaching very existential that way you sort of believe it's like gardening you know you go like well might something grow from that and it's not for everybody for that reason but I will after go like why why why should we do that and I'm Kinda like because it's amazing like I I have had to sort of generally like like estrangement being on the show thank you so much pleasure in terms of its inner workings so it is it can be so it can be such a kind of impoverished you know foreclosed brute four check out our other podcasts design matters with Debbie Millman and the observatory featuring Michael Beirut and me and please consider subscribing to race ahead dot com there you can find more information about today's guests Sarah Hendron plus conversations with dozens of other people about the transformative role design plays and their business say that at its best the thing that so magical about working with engineers alongside engineers who do know how to do stuff including my undergraduate students that I don't know how to do a lot of the time right at a restaurant that'd be like this table sucks why is the join around the corner like this because they know it could be otherwise what I'm saying they're not just complaining they know it could be otherwise muscles are stronger I find that working in engineering schools like swinging the heavy bat because I'm because because I have to justify it all the time in the design of business the business of design is a podcast from design observer our website is

Amanda Election Khan Nelson Abe Remco husted beatty five years eleven month twenty year six months one hand
163: HOW TO START YOUR PODCAST TODAY

THE HAPPY WORKAHOLIC PODCAST

29:49 min | 2 years ago

163: HOW TO START YOUR PODCAST TODAY

"You're listening to the happy workaholic podcast. I'm your host. Kellyanne government this this show was once about business lincoln and my life with an autoimmune disease and then one day i found out i was misdiagnosed so i had a switch things up of it. Life is so short when you're given a second chance. You better believe i'm going to take it. Celebrate it and share it with you. I'm on a mission to help. Women take their business and life to that next x level. They deserve to be at this. Show is intended to elevate your mind. Upgrade your business enhance your life and become part of a positive and uplifting community you inspiration motivation and determination are what got me to. I am today and i cannot wait to share these amazing stories of other female entrepreneurs worst who will be featured on the show. If you have a story of brand you wanna share send me a message on facebook and instagram. Today you can find me at the happy workaholic. I would love to connect with you. Do wanna live chat during this episode. Make sure you're listening on iheartradio. I'm here to remind you to work hard. Stay stay humble. Follow your dreams and never ever give up. Thanks for taking the time to subscribe to the happy workaholic podcast and now. Let's get get into today's show. Hey guys welcome back to a brand new show today. When i talk to you about how you you can actually start your podcast today now for those of you that know and knows of you who may not know if you actually listen to the entire intro which i don't know about you but sometimes i skip pass that if i'm listening to it all the time on somebody's show but i just want to give you a little refresher i of why i they have this show so three years ago august. I was diagnosed with m._s. I was then diagnosed with an autoimmune disease called m. O. turns turns out. I was actually misdiagnosed. Nothing was ever wrong with me. There's a million things that contribute to that but that's the extremely long three year long story short so now i just wanna share with you that the reason why this show exists is because as soon as i found out i had a mass and then this autoimmune disease am oh that could potentially leave me blind and paralysed. I had no idea what to do. I was living with my best friend. I had her signed off on like all my medical record. Who's my healthcare proxy. I put my friends in my will. Well like my life was over like i didn't know what to do. I freaked the f out so i took some time to myself. I realized i was bringing my twenty plus years of business experience into coaching programs to help other small business owners an online entrepreneurs like myself move forward and take their business to another level so so that's what i was doing it was business and then of course lincoln which you know i love. Lincoln and i became a lincoln coach because i wanted to create. I wanted to put <hes> <hes> programs together. That would help create a difference in somebody's business online on that platform. Lincoln has been my number one. Go oh to over the past two years on how i've been able to get really large deals done and i love networking on there. Although i will say recently it just becomes those banff manse actually driving me nuts but i still do love the platform so then when i was sick sarin kind of all over the place right now when i was quote unquote sick the first thing i did besides trying to figure out how i was going to make money being sick end in bed for the rest of my life that was when i found out i had asked when i found out i had an amount that i could potentially become blind right away then that plan just kind of. I had to put us up to that. I didn't know how that was going to continue to happen. If i couldn't see i wouldn't be able to use my laptop now. What i so at the time i was listening to gary viola and all these other people on youtube and i just needed to start right away a just needed to do something and i'm like what could that be. Well what i was listening to was gary vienna's podcast and i realized i need a podcast because if something happens with my vision i can still talk so very quickly. I started. I mean i don't even remember sleeping. I just was on google. I was on youtube. I was doing all the things nice to research like how the hell am. I gonna put a podcast online now granted. I know how to design websites and do all the design for that and other projects projects but i've never done. The texted never produced never like how the hell do. I put a podcast together well three years ago. I taught myself now. How that is all i do. My business linked in podcast. Coaching programs have really turned into podcast hosting coaching and producing every we day all day long i help other women create launch produce and monetize their podcasts. That's it and that's my story. It's very crazy. I was sick. I needed a an outlet to make money. I needed an outlet to share my story if you for this story a million times i'm sorry but for those of view that are new to the show when i found out i was quote on quote sick. The first thing they did was film a facebook live. I was hysterically crying. I was shaking because i was doped up on steroids like you can look back. I've left them all their even youtube channel and i needed. I needed to share what was going on with me because i knew i could help other people. I was also looking for answers myself. So when i first launched this show it was about business linked in at my life with an autoimmune disease because that's all i knew listen listen. I have always preached that there are no rules in podcast like who the hell creates a podcast about linked in and her life being sick me i did and it's very very successful and the reason why it's successful is because honest i'm sharing my story and i'm helping other people at the same time so you want to build that no oh lake and trust factor right. We'll in the beginning. I was just sharing my story because i knew i cannot be the only one and i wasn't a lot of facebook groups with other patients so i was sharing what was going on with me and a lot of the time you don't want to be seen on camera especially when you're up on a whole lot of drugs and the way that you look my appearance earns was so different i gained like eighty pounds of the last three years just from all these drugs and stress and sometimes. I don't want to be on camera lately. I've gotten the courage to do a lot more. Thank god for filters but it's just insane what a podcast can do and you're reaching a global audience and people that are searching for this kind of information so that's my story. That's how i started the show. That's how i got to where i am now and i just wanna share with you if you we'll have an important message to share <hes> i have a client that actually was going through postpartum depression and she would be up in the middle of the night searching for content and and it wasn't there and how many of us the first thing we do when something's wrong or you're feeling weird or just something health related you go to google you go to youtube and you go to pinterest right so she wasn't finding any information that was helping her and she's up in the middle of the night and not feeling doing her best so her podcast started off as a way to help other moms out there going through postpartum depression to help them with with her tools and techniques and just things that she personally did and she's become relatable so all these moms are following her now. We're show has evolved just like mine has is i had to do a complete rebrand when i realized that i wasn't sick. I'm not gonna talk about my symptoms anymore and going to make it more positive husted and create a show. That's more about your mind body and business so that's what i have now and i did this rebrand. I think february <hes> and it's just completely changed and that's okay too because again. There's no rules and if you're somebody that searching for content out there. Why don't you be the one that's going to create it. Why can't you be the expert. Why can't you share your story to help other people instead of taking the time. Excuse me any to cut are the worst allergies last few days <hes>. Why don't you take the time to create the content or to share your message. There's so many ways free to do this but if you have this fire and you're good and you're just like i need to do more. I need to help others. I'm telling you a podcast is the absolute perfect way to do it. I'm not not just saying this because of my program. I'm saying this because this is what's helped me get through everything i was going through and also help a lot of other people that reach out to may through my youtube channel through my website through my instagram through facebook people in other countries messaging me. Thank you for this episode. Thank you for sharing that. You know aw a lot of the times i'd be hysterically crying on episodes and if you've been listening to them from the very beginning you know what trump dogging about and it's just so crazy see you know that this is even happens like this. Podcasting has literally changed my life and going back to if you have an important message to share you know if you're looking for something health related or family related or something with your children or for me like i've been looking for for adoption podcast lately and other people to follow an instagram that have adopted children. 'cause that's my next step in life. After <hes> this legal cases this is done so that's the content. I'm searching for well. What do you think i'm going to start talking about my podcast in a couple of months. I'd option because i wanna share my version of the story. I want to be the expert and share my two cents and my process because everybody's process is different. Everybody's business is different. Everybody's the outlook of everyone if we're looking at the same thing there's three of us looking at the same thing. We're learning something different right so create. It's something that you feel is going to help. Other people on this isn't just for business. This is just sharing message. It's so important and that's it's what i do in my business. Is i provide a service. That's going to help other people and so as far as business goes a lot of people ask me like why would i do to a podcast. Why why am i got. I seriously can't talk. Why would i invest in it. How can i make money back from it. I could tell you right now. The three ways that you're gonna make money from a podcast is driving traffic to your website affiliate marketing. If you have any of those links they live in the show notes producing commercials of your own. That's continuously driving traffic to yourself your website your products your brand your services everything and bringing on sponsors. Those are the three three ways. You're gonna make money. How do you do that. I have a complete process that have gone through and i share with my clients or i do it for them. Depending on how they hire me because i have a lot of different programs that you can choose from but i've tried all of these techniques and i know which ones work best it's taking me. It's taken me <hes> <hes> you know almost two and a half years to create this system. Will i be adding things to the future. Two future programs absolutely absolutely because we learn as we go along you know apple podcasts or i tunes or however. They want to be called right now. Everybody's referring to ideas now. Oh for updating their <hes> category for their podcast which i just did one of my clients again this morning and i was texting thing her asking her which category she would prefer. I just updated mine three times to perfect it but those are things that are going to change and ended outside of our hands and if you don't accept change i don't know what to tell you. It's always going to happen in life and any certain situation situation. Change is always the best. If you look at it from that point of view right so going back into business with a podcast you wanna be able to create free content for example. I'm a podcast hosts coach producer. I've created in multiple podcasts where i'm helping you with apps so that you can run your business on the go. I've created podcast on how to launch your own podcast at created podcast episodes is for you to learn how to market monetize your show just like i have in implementing these systems that actually work in my business and actually work in my show to drive traffic to to my website to then get me clients so there's just the whole process so once you've put in the work you want to make sure that you're sharing your episodes and it's not just once there's hundreds and thousands of podcasts right now available to be downloaded you you cannot just upload a podcast episode and post once and hope for the best. You have to be extremely strategic. You have to repurpose your content and speaking of repurposing. If here's somebody that lives on facebook and loves doing facebook lives and wants to repurpose those you absolutely can because you pull the audio from your video and that at my friends creates a podcast episode and when you're short on time and you're sitting on a ton of content you can actually create a whole new series on your podcast with just old video content from facebook or from youtube so there's so many outlets that you can use and so many creative processes that you can utilize to create the best possible assode for you to love and for you to want to share and re purpose to your social media audience to your emails to the clients that you have in everywhere else online and then also you can even repurpose your podcast episodes as videos on your youtube channel and as videos throughout your social media media platforms and especially pinterest pinterest is not social media. It is the key to s._e._o. As well as google and youtube so get that out of your head it has not social media. I re purpose all of my episodes every single week and that is how i got into sixty countries globally. This audience has expanded to something. I never thought i could you know. Could i just couldn't imagine this ever happening and here we are so that's what i wanna. Make sure i'm consistently you know coming on and sharing messages and sharing these other incredible female entrepreneurs and sharing in all this information with you when it comes to mind body and business so that you can take what i'm telling you and have the best productive day whether it's personally or or professionally. That's the whole point of this podcast. You know i've been through hell and back but i'm putting positive spins on it and i'm hoping that you're taking that information so that you can have a positive experience yourself and nocco through a lot of the things that i've already gone through and when it comes to having a podcast for your business you want people to know like entrust you. You want to share you know your unique stories and you wanna be able to stand out amongst everybody else and having a podcast allows you the opportunity to do so at allows you time and freedom mm-hmm and so many things people want in their business and if you already have a show sometimes we need to rebrand. Sometimes we need a little marketing refresh rush. Sometimes we need to hardcore start pitching big brands for series that series that we might be coming out with soon and that's already been done in my business so that's why i now create the service so that i can help other people learn how to do that so start. Your podcast today is for the beginner who has a message to share or is for the business owner that needs a funneled to drive traffic to their site that needs another outlet for free content that needs another place that their audience can connect with them and build that know like and trust factor another place for you to share content and share yourself elf and share your stories and your experiences and just be you. There's nothing that i've ever faked on this show. I mean if you go back any episode. You can totally only hearing my voice a drop the f bomb a lot. I have an amazing guests on. I never had our shows. Even when i have bronchitis unfortunately finally i like to keep them real and raw and i do that for a reason. I can spend hours upon hours and make sure it's like completely perfect but i'd prefer to have the real messages. Stay put where they are and have all the laughs and have all the cries and have all the f. bombs uh-huh because that's what keeps my show real and that's you know not for everybody you know you. We all have an audience that we like to look up to. We all have an audience is that we like to follow her that expert on instagram or no. Why are we following them because we like what they have to say. We like their message the way that they share it so be that person put in the work and be able to just do it yourself and that's what start your podcast today is all about. We worked together together. It's my one on one coaching program that is under two hundred dollars and this is for a limited time. I have four spots. What's left as of today so if you're listening. I'm not even kidding. They're probably going to be gone if you wait another day the prices unheard of looking for this type of content first of all if you have a message to share and a business that you need more traffic to an in another place to share your content. This is for you. It's also for you. If you already have a podcast in as i just mentioned you need every brand. You need a marketing refresh refresh. You need more to take your show to a whole 'nother level like you're just stuck right so i've invested my time getting my show where where it is so now. I want you to invest your time and let me help you do that. I've already put in the work for you. I've already done it for my own show so so now i can show you. How so the way that i created. This program is it's two phone calls to phone calls. That's it and i have a ten step program. I specifically put together and let me just look on my website here. 'cause i wanna share with you. Oh what the caller about so on the first call we talk about finding your voice the name for your show who your audience is going going to be etc etc. What is the purpose like. Why are you even doing this content creation as the next what we're going to talk about on the first is call. We're going to be finding royalty free music which is a must social media integration how you're going to have a community create that community eighty four your listeners and your followers as well as launch plan. How are you going to launch and have a successful launch. I know this because when i launched i did not have a launch watch plan because i didn't even know if i was ready for people to hear me talk about being sick so i just put it out into the universe so this is why it's so important on on the second call. I'm going to share with you. How you record the equipment the software you know how you convert things and by the way i'm recording this episode on my phone. I'm staring at microphone on my desk and i'm recording on my phone because sometimes i just don't feel like using my microphone and that's okay you do not need to invest in fancy equipment and software so that you can have a podcast. I just want to tell you that right now. You need to be organized in scheduled with anything that you do in life and in business we're going over. My favorite techniques with hosting in syndication is something else we're going to be talking about how to pitch brands uh-huh and of course my favorite. There's no rules in podcasting now as a bonus. I'm actually throwing an additional thirty minute phone calls so you're actually going to get two hours on the phone with me and this is where we're going over marketing monetization s._e._o. Jio implementation and all of my strategies when it comes to key words and really making your episodes live on mm forever repurposing them and all that fun stuff so that's actually a bonus so do you wanna know the price of this program. It's one hundred forty nine dollars. That is it. My hourly cost is one twenty five so i should say price so you're getting a steel. It's actually three nine thousand nine for this program and it's one forty nine today so as i said there's only a couple of spots left and if you have a message to share and you need needs something else for your business. It's going to work to bring money in the door. A podcast is going to help you do just that now. This is a mini you program that i'm offering right now if you're interested and hardcore one on one coaching for three months at a time so i actually show you how how to do every single thing in your podcasting business or show rather that is under your podcast production. There's a number of other programs grams that senior this one that are available there for example the complete package the plugin package my d._i._y. Coaching program and then production says well. There's four located under your podcast production dot com start your podcast today. Dot com is completely separate for one forty nine. You get two truthful hours on the phone with me and i'm giving you all the information that you know you're taking it and running on your own. If for the chant if you want to to move forward and work with me for a couple more months and do coaching if that's something that you're interested in or having me design your website or producer shows or utilize the plug in and build it into your website and help you actually create the scripts for your intro. You're out show your show description description and all of the hosting in syndication and get your show somewhere worldwide than not is what your podcast production election is all about. You actually get half off of those programs when you purchase start your podcast today. This is how i ran this program a couple of months ago and it worked out very well and i was able to help so many women launched their podcasts and never did i think the this would be my job right now and it's just insane and throughout my twenty plus years of being a business this person and owner and employees and somebody that i pride myself on providing the best service possible. All this is what you're seriously going to get with two hours of calls. It's unbelievable the amount of content i'm just trying to save you time and money or time is worth money and headaches and stress and highlight hers and pens and white out and all the ways hugh fill up your journal and your notebooks. Oh pucks taking notes trying to figure out how the hell to launch a podcast. I'm going to show you how so simply within a two hour timeframe and the reason i can do this is because i m organized and structured in my own business and i have everything mapped out to a t. So the only thing you wanted to be able to do is com prepared and be able to put in the work. That's it. I'm going to show you everything else and you take it from there. Two hours out of your day and actually i should say it's sixty minutes thirty minutes and thirty minutes so we're actually not gonna do it in one day unless you really want to. It's totally up to you but most people are a little overwhelmed for wellness. After the first call then they're good by the second but if you want to have a global global audience and be somewhere where i am right now on apple podcast android no emailed r._s._s. feed google podcast <unk> tuna on iheartradio spotify. I mean the time now. The time is right now. The time to jump is right now. There's no where on the internet where you can get this amount of content content for one hundred forty nine dollars nowhere. I've done the research. It's like literally impossible to find this amount of information and things that you can start implementing in your business right now or on your social media to share message that are going to help you do this. So if if you guys have any questions whatsoever you know where to find me on facebook and instagram at the happy workaholic you can visit start your podcast today or dot com or the happy workaholic dot com. Everything you need to know is there. There's only a couple more spots. You can message me on my website as well but you know this is just something i'm so passionate about and if you look on my website every single thing that's there that i'm selling as a service and the reason behind it is because it's something that i truly love and i value and i just want others to half because it's amazing and that's all i have to say that i'm just thinking like. Is there really everything on there. Yeah it is every single thing. I have my professional organizing services my meal prepping services. My business linked in podcasting services. I have free documents even so that you can download for your business mindset and something that's going to keep more organized. Those are free like everything on my the website is a service hugh and that's just what i like to do is help other people either growing their business share message. That's really important. Get organized east and just be happy. Life is too short and i've learned that unfortunately the hard way so i just wanted to share with you guys today how important the courses to me and how much i truly love it and help. I love helping other people do what they really want to do. And why is the price so low because not everybody has money. Not everybody has the funds to invest in a big course so if you wanna learn now if now is the time because you're never going to see that price again after the fifteenth but these spots are going to be gone by then so like like i said earlier if if you have any other questions seriously just reach out just shoot me a message and let's just talk about your needs and what kind of show you want to put out there or even if you just several couple of questions and you're not interested in the pro right now. I live online and you know that so. I hope that you guys are having a wonderful day. I'm going to be going live on facebook book again later today pretty much every day this week. 'cause i just really want to share more about podcasting that. I don't think a lot of people are aware of and how easy it is is to start so the sun is shining out in san diego right now. Thank god 'cause yesterday. It was a little june gloom in august it was so hazy and i'm about to go outside and get some vitamin d and fresh air so i hope you guys are having a wonderful day and we'll talk again soon. Thank you so much for listening to today's show. If you liked this episode please share it with someone who you feel needs to hear this message and don't don't forget to tag me at work hollick on facebook and instagram so i can feature on my stories and if you have two minutes and listening on itunes or apple podcasts. I would love it if you can leave me a radio. Those messages means so much less podcasters and they really helped me create more of the content that you'll love wanna continue today's conversation it's simple had to facebook and search for the happy workaholic network facebook group answer the question and you're in for more information nation on my self coaching programs weekly newsletter and more visit the happy workaholic dot com to happy workaholic podcast is part of the iheartradio radio podcast network be sure to follow the happy workaholic podcast on iheartradio or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. I hope that your day continues to be happy. Happy healthy positive and productive and i'll talk to you again soon.

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Au Re-VAR PSG

ESPN FC

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Au Re-VAR PSG

"Welcoming solicitation ESPN AFC down Thomas much shack. So Craig Burley and Stevie nicks. We thought last night was do not dramatic the burn about water about today. Then in Paris, Manchester United being PS, cheap three goals to one who's the perfect Safia ninety the gift that the facts will talk you make it one nail. However, the equalizer that cheats, but then the half hour Mark phony spilt hay racks for Sean Newcomb making two one on a controversial penalty was awarded. I'm in the both Marcus Rachid steps up takes us thought case scores meaning that mantis United advance the quarter-finals on the away goal rules. Oh, we were surprised last night. Nice neuro here. I acted what they did to reality trid. That's a big arguments in that. This is even a bigger shock considering not only were PS. She's such big favorites going into this with the to lead, but Manchester United it was a reserve team. It was a reserve team. And it was depleted, and it was demolished old travelled by this PS PSG's site what had much strength team. But thinking this to- we're going to approach it flashed mentioned arrogance for Real Madrid. This this is European was greatest bottlers the biggest bolt which all of Europe's elite because you mentioned that find a way to shoot themselves in the foot. We had the possession. We had the players have the on tonight that of the know how of the final quality and the bottle. On tickle as used another court that is going to have to take responsibility for one of the biggest shampoos that's club public in for a while with the billions that they've spent and the thing is they've set the sign want high when it comes to shambles and his petition in that they aren't just cereal choke is seen you take it back, of course, to boscell or a couple of years ago that goal difference that they just threw away once again, they are not in the round of sixteen this this is embarrassing. Yeah. I mean, we thought we thought the Boston Alona result would never be told. But this Husted top dish because munchies tonight reserve team and you look at it. And you will does the blame lie and the truth lies fifty percent with the players on the field and fifty percent with tickle. The two goals fuss. Two goals shocking. Cara. Nervous and please holy will bypass the second goal. Why are you playing you second-string goalkeeper and the Rona sixteen in Champions League? And it's just been too clever to nice the best managers in the world would cut your throat as soon as looking if needed and Chami tickled tonight piers g without one decision. One decision. You play your top goalie, and that doesn't half certain. I'm questioning whether boof on signing was Tommy to all this was PSE hierarchy wanted to bring in a big name goalkeeper department that they feel they've struggled yet. Bring in all be at his best one of the best of the game has ever seen. But the wrong side of his career. No as you mentioned, Steve you've got before narrow la- who split league games down the middle. Half-off got before and coming into high pressure situation. Not anything that his team and on the face of it as we said, no actually taking away from from from PS. Gee, how boof on improved pitchy of last season is simply beyond the generous markings as to say have rotting but not gonna set and considering the. He's there's another job Di Maria. Swans around week on that have the stomach for the mind United gig and the Premier League because money United struggling on as a big player. When you go your club a club struggling you. Roll your sleeves up even more and show you call any couldn't wait to get there. And he goes to league on swanning around and showing off the talent annoys the seventeen points clear we gave Han so effectively twenty. But when when hem and he's a wanted on the Rubik occasion against a period. Eight eight on the night. I mean, I don't know where else to go with us. But the factors why why the hell are they write checks anymore for this club to win league on his no Satan and win the next Champions League. No sign whatsoever. Do you think we do because it was so good against Chechen eight to truffle? Do we do because you look at that team? And you take him Bobbio to the flare. Drexel's not fun tastic team arrears. Bottlers creek said you got Benard who's a fool bike to midfielders. Monkey news Barati are better gone. The other way them up guys you want and edge of the box play a little balls in behind the be clever. So where's actually the flair? I think with this team. Whereas it personalities whereas leadership in this side. Okay. Imbaba's not having his best day ever yet. Still. He's only one who seems to be shouting around to the rest of the team. Let's keep calm. Let's keep our heads about us. Because all you needed was somebody with a little bit of leadership, Lebanon respect and a little bit of voice because a two one they go through to put it onto this being a bad day. But somehow we get into the next round, and we fix it yet still the current do that I'm not putting all the blame on competitive doorstep here. Ultimately, he's one who can see the penalty. But you look at that dressing room devoid of really ship. Name is not a leader Rian need somebody who can stand up. I'm become team is playing well, no complaints of competitively. There is a big debate going on certainly some pundits back in the UK saying it's not a penalty. We. Table percent in back in the UK up and Scooby they play along. I mean, let's be honest a penalty of law and the I'm telling you back as a kid, right? Fees or the chairs a summer a bit more painful ever as you gotta take it does nothing in the laws of the game. That says you should be raising your Han to protect yourself from bowl. That's going and settling when you're telling you completely on not bowl. So there's no complaints the VAR eleven to referee to that. Because I've been difficult to speed. And then he went over and fair play it it took his time because it was a huge huge time. But you absolutely got it. Right. But what scenario took oh here, I'm not absolving him of blame. Here. An argument between the club in this Bolton director of whether rob y'all can play on over the last few weeks, the come as you con- multi talented midfield player who gets you goals can win tacos. And he certainly bear in their the nuclear. They've got settling McKenna's because he's a defender because he wants to leave PS G as the only club that exists and you. European football spot the dummy. Oh, no. I'm not saying the deficits, but artichokes. Not gonna help manages teams when you've injuries and they have dangerous and keep possessions, the center of the park just to go back to the Humboldt for minute. If me as a goalkeeper, I'm approaching a striker who's coming at me. I leave my hands out wide intentionally because I want to make my body bigeye went to make it more difficult for the school, but I'm allowed to use my hands. So no if to be is going. I should've thought of that before. So no if compelling be noses shelters coming in. And he's talked with Hans old wide as a goalkeeper would. And it's trikes his own. He can have no complete when the reports these books don't in a sense at this point for me because this is what I what I should practiced to do when I was playing yet said, no you doing it at this level as a defender, and somehow you feel aggrieved when refugees spot. No, it's a penalty all the everyday shin. Did you tell me about you lose control? So he has no his noise excuse if he stays shoulid. He's good five yards away from the straight. If you stay shoulid, and you keep your hands by your site. And you're in control of what's coming regardless of what is going to hit to face. You're in control. Shouldn't you turn around and take your eyes off the bowl body? You lose control. And he's apparently cake, social, hi. Well, let's just remind you of the players that weren't available. Pope was suspended and that whole list of injuries as well. We were talking we were looking at the bench and plays. Well, look. Oboe rejuvenates talk. Rejuvenated dummying score player, Harare rejuvenated on a show. Stop letting God rejuvenated Marcial this same Montes the same Covey. They loved. Eric bye. And what? Because he was gonna shock this. Because the change shape and knew it by four. But here's another injury TI to that. I mean to get. I mean, it's a bunch of kids. So how much give social for this? Well, listen, you've got to give him credit because I think the credit for me as much as belongs to to Russia Lukaku, the what they did tonight, both shades, the balls incredible. I mean, there was shopping of when you normally when you do not watch what defensively takes away from what you do going forward takes aids shopping show we but for the ninety minutes they were on tours just win for any little mistake which made a harbor g. But really PS g ended the game. We're playing against a bunch of kids, and they didn't have the composure of leadership or any normal things that you associate with a real football team to keep the ball and killed again. They got the outdone by a bunch of kids just the start and the reserves the finished up getting done by kids. We were looking at the bench. Probably only namely Brealey recognize was real who associate column, but to Steve's point about Russia and Lukaku again, I thought it was outstanding. I'd like to give so Scott credit one plan to front you have to go out and you have to win the game. So you maybe you understand that. But you tell Kaku go and play right on your show Levy centre-half, which is what brought the first goal. And then the second goal, I feel that if you not enjoy a whole lot of possession of the ball when you do get it. You don't take a shot from twenty five yards? Unless the magic tells you keep an pressure. He used to be. Great put them under pressure. I'm not exactly right for did. Right. He had no reason other than somebody seeing him take before on to try that showed when he did before made a massive it on new Kaku following in again. I think as we should I believe those messages that came from from the manager, I'm giving soc full credit. Not social PSG made a pig's. That's the thing social, and you're not this about pants Jean Pierre mistakes. But he he's with young Tommy has much experience with Fred and the mental part who's been hopeless. So. Complete regional and so a nigga those thanks to go his way, but also Stevie stayed in people to be on the toes defensively and on the toes forgetting some scraps over the years, you've probably cut legislate full out from from from before on from young carer is just as an experienced from hammers. But he's made a decision, then you native Hong, but a tell you, honestly, a cocktail you much credit out gift to Russia full apparently K, listen, you know, we've seen. Tomfoolery beforehand. Are- was being brilliant. Really, not seven simplistic something tweeted to me day. Oh, plus, you get paid millions score penalties that simple and particularly with the pressures on boy was on there. Absolutely, Greg composure from the mother did a will put unity killed again, PS she and and the guy that you want going through on the go key won. I don't it was one of us star. And then was going to happen. Other than the ball was gonna up buying the nap, and he slips and falls. How? Who was it was it was earn AM. It wasn't. Yeah. That was a hard sale to the bold room. Yeah. What was he going to say what I need complete revamp again going as you're gonna stay with PSE out of the Champions League United through to the final aids. And they are full favorites. Now to win the whole thing. Ten to one according to the bookies city rivals city favors. Drama in Portugal as well today. Remember, it was too on an eighth after the first leg and ports. I would get the opening clash against Roma though. With the equalizer from the spot getting a second though forced extra-time late drama as von intervenes. Gesture at freeze you take a look at a postal penalty to penalty awarded Porto converted Fourtou then through to the quarter-finals Rome. Unite and guaranteed a place in the next round. I'd let pool sake on you to newly gone into your in city with a three two lead shocked about gaming England to me on the ball and Liverpool and Munich. It's crazy because Xiaojian Leo not lose two sides than than as bonkers. Not quite. Vall was I talked about beer it was. Wow. You know, it's. That'd be wanted to pay everything that the other and that is everyone's questionable. It was ridiculous expectation that one's Vaud comes in there'd be no more to be an every every decision would be one hundred percent. Because ultimately it is somebody looking at the replay and still having to subject and use their own opinion to to make a decision. So you always have we always have these debate points, especially once team's and unbiased he's become involved. But at times, you still have to question that you look at some of these new question late incident. Apparently, I thought the sheet pulling yes, no question, apparently, the one for Ruma. Stevie point clip on the Hughes inside of the box that needs to be reviewed. And if you take a long hard look at that. I'm not sure how you come away. Seeing you got it right on the field play on. I think whoever's involved in that incident Butler, but fast, they'll cleaning up the game all the decisions more. So than than the not because take incident Lord and the raft and give the penalty, and then vowed decided nothing was going to happen. So that decision that change. But other decisions rightly other decisions have been changed for the fall. The right result. The penalty kick and the PS g game. So it's never an we've never said. It's going to be a perfect. I better. Well, I think is better than than just relying on on on human decision making there. And then I'm I'm a huge fan over well humans involved. That's the thing. Isn't it? You'd always gonna get. I mean, the referee in the roller one Porto is like thirty yards away. We please in front of them. So absolutely the job of the guy behind VAR to and at least tell them to have a look Florenz endurance Davey. You know, you're gonna get caught with that shirt. So obvious. We need to do is defend you have to be a hundred percent sure that your mom's going to get on the end of it. Right. And if you think that you do not hoping that nobody sees it. No, obviously, we've are as even harder than though. But that's what he's doing. She vows not exciting for those people in the ground. But as we were starting to green room, obviously that was cold last minute. And we've aside once even over at the monitor we were going to going to give no he's not we're all going right now is going to really. For people watching nothing, quite particularly. If you my to fund as entertaining, obviously, the big argument has grown, and it's on the big screen if you haven't got one then it can be TD's for funds as it really Bado for this decision at home watching TV as entertaining as he's extra time sometimes league, we'll be talking about champions a lot more that be sure to join us on the website. This is strong argument to say that this is being Real Madrid worst week ever out of the carpenter array, of course, without home defeat against Barcelona followed by any chance of winning league distinguished by once again that Voss alone, and then humiliated home against is in the champions. They sit low with us said who's getting the blame Peres the players also lower know who's getting most of the blame out of those three. I'm glad you made that correction because you're right. The answer is of everybody think in fact, she salaries not gang a huge amount of the blind. Because I think it's a recognition that here's a guy who came in in a situation of cross. Here's a guy who came into a situation that was very difficult for him to change one or two key changes with seemed to have improved things. But the underlying problems remained the has been a lot of pointing the finger Florentina though in truth, something from a media point of view in from the point of view of some funds groups, those people that were ready inclined to blame him. I think a lot has been said, of course, about the departure of Kris Jenner and outta in terms of blaming players. Will we had Marcella a few weeks ago? But he hasn't been blamed for this. There's been a focus on bio or they're not so much in this last game as being a focus on Tony Cruz. And of course, there's been some focus on on Saturday rambles who himself that yellowcard in the first leg deliberately to miss the second Neg. Because of course, he felt this was a foregone conclusion and in this season. I think you see encapsulated part of the problem. Hammered that sense that this was done is perhaps one of the reasons why why it wasn't done. So what happens next said obviously santee well loss where they give into the end of the season. And then bring in marina in the summer. Well, what we do know is that realm Judah discussing whether or not it's worth acting now whether whether there's any sense in doing so I must confess my sense on this is well, what's the point? What's the point of bringing another manager? Now who gets burnt between them in the season. Look to put this into context for you. Rummage it around of all three competitions the die before their birthday the sixth of March. What that means is that basically it will now be six months before round your play game that matters in into the first couple of weeks next season six months, so obviously they can bring a manager for the last free, basically, relevant months of the season in of course, things get so bad that they have to fight for that final Champions League place, which I don't think any of us expect that's happened. But then none of us really expected this either. So I don't really see the need to change the salary unless they suddenly see that in danger or unless they feel that they want to bed in. But I just don't think you bed in manager in this kind of circumstance. So my guess is that he stays in the season or someone else does in some fashion, and then they get someone in some don't forget that when they announced Larry they officially announced him as temporary manager and only change that state just because league and federation rules force them to quickly said, we've got twenty seconds Marino. Yes, or no. Is it going to happen? I wouldn't be surprised we got that's very short for you said life. Thank you very much. Time has always said lot more reaction to what happened in the Spanish capital available over on the websites. And you can join us tomorrow. You wrote a plea, of course, and tomorrow. Join the voice that we looking back at the opening leg of those. Jesse you boys? Well, the toll. That's really I wanna find. Chamblee nothing borough. Yeah. Next thing before it bullets if you think, yeah, we fully ice cream. Can to survive. This the other side Z, I think it'd be given. Because I am revived his he was given one more year. And I think similarly to he'd be given one more year. I repeat of this kind of shambles and suffer a similar feature to Amri. If you the owners, right? Well, you think that must be closed. You must be setting good. Why are we putting all his money in this because every year falls apart? Stays will go if you were the owner. It's a hard one. How can you stay? Amri lost league unconverted champions most survive to survive by this marina wars, he's he's lucky the way jobs might befall in has people will attend NC all these clothes that might be looking for over money news. That's the end of the strikes office an ice cream. We'll be tomorrow until then goodbye. Welcome to extra time Chapman's these board nothing ever happens in that rule beef Reich. You arrive at two Julianne is on. Well, see you're not doing now the rest come on this show wearing a crush Hilmer. Again, did he know he said he will only go to the game. 'cause it was over. Over. He's Texan knee. Thanks. These who should be more. Embarrassed realm. You're losing too young. I Exide high OPSEC losing home to very depleted United Site for the eighteen year olds out on the pitch. Goo questioned the worst. Yeah. You know, Real Madrid of being. Put another way a bike of spot in those most of the year, and he's done what you're gonna get from them at least PS GOP legal. Moshi slopping result today, which we the United one because I asked played some great stuff for load to put some crazy stuff. United united. Gratien do when you when you think United had what less than fifty percent possession ons to go through against a team that cost as much as as it did. I mean, they have been investment in this team purely to win this competition, not not to go to to miss much people. Which would you choose the last six months of this one? I think you said on the show, this one's more humiliated. Yes. Just because of the opposition. Launa capable at the best beaten anonymity, by sakes. We have the full Saito day messy was incredible bags along with the other ten very good. Good this tissue. Native is. Nicely by the end of the the twenty one team was playing as well. So let's up -solutely was the war has Stevie changes opinion lukarco. Lukac who was fantastic tonight low question. They did absolutely everything that you'd want the defendant effects good sports defensively. Made a difference for them not save you the ball. And then he was only stores. I mean, obviously getting getting a dull the after the minute and a half sets you up for the rest of the game. But it was. Okay. Well, well, yeah, I'll tell you what Imbaba taking hoses will. Copies. That's what I that's what I. Lilly. Ship Murray be banned from managing again. It's coming around which. Lovely. How? Well, he's been against some big job office. I mean, he has been talked about for PS PSG before grail. Yeah. PS g. Was always muted. With tickle their. Well, it's going to be a little might not be. As long as we thanks. Late lately should ram Drako off to social. I still miss. Not why. Listening. He's been talked about for the PS g job before. And he's talked about he wanted to manage him FRANZ. But. Chuckle was going to be that long tem that might not be the case. I don't know. I'm gonna watch says. Drako after socially that next. Lottery ticket is loving life. And finally, it's old friends Romer Moore out. Oh, y'all. Yawn way. Let's be honest. The they go done lick kipa and this gin. Would apparently they lost the end of the game. They had a stonewall penalty than show. Mojo Vaa decides to see up salute and often doesn't by the way. The somebody speaks fall. I mean, that's that's joke. One. The concede was funny. Right. Well done that he's as good for. Join us tomorrow Europe league games as well. Mortal be a big story. I'm telling you. Oh, no.

Stevie nicks Tommy United football Manchester United Kaku Steve Porto Russia UK Champions League Europe Boston Alona Craig Burley Champions League solicitation Marcus Rachid la Husted Paris
12: Theresa Caputo: Talking To Dead People

888-Barbara

56:14 min | 1 year ago

12: Theresa Caputo: Talking To Dead People

"You're with Barbara. Hey Hey hey it's me by reporting and this is eight Barbara Breath. That's right it's time to all your burning questions from the boardroom. To the bedroom nothing off limits. So listen up some advice on powder live your best life. Each week I'll be answering all your burning questions and sometimes I'll be asking them to interview view some of the greatest folks. I know to learn the secrets of their success. So I can share them with you today. We have with US Theresa Caputo. You probably know her as the Long Island medium. She's GONNA share with us how she handles this gift. She she has or might even call it a super power. She talks today people. Let's hear what it's all about Teresa almost frightened to sit here with afraid afraid to call my mom and dad in there going from the past or something like that. Nothing like that. Okay see that's off-limits just for the information here's off-limits okay. Tell me what a medium really is a because a lot of people have their own idea about what a medium is or isn't what do you do and can you really talk today. People I have the ability to sense and feel our departed loved ones. You know people always say you psychic. I don't predict the future. I don't want people's People's loved one's telling them what they shouldn't do with their life decisions and choices from a very young age of four. I've had the ability to sense and feel things is that nobody else was in the room and I was so I can remember a clear vision at four years old. Always sing a woman standing at the end of my bed. Wow Ricky but to me. That was normal but as a four year. Old you laying in bed at night and you see somebody at the foot of your bed. I think any shall be frightened to death. That didn't frighten you remembering it at at that time. No at that exact moment but my mom would say that. I would wake up with blood curdling screams and like somebody was literally attacking me and there would be no one in my room. I didn't sleep walk. I would just get up and just have extreme anxiety and felt like I needed to get out of that room out of that bed and I just didn't want to be in there and you actually remember that as a child I remember that triumph fear. Yes that were bed people in your room. Whoever was young at your bed now what I found out later in life? It was my my great grandmother who had passed before I was even born. Oh my gosh. That was the first soul that I can remember. Seeing I would never communicate with her I would always just see her are and feel her when you were feeling her and waking up with a scream and being so frightened as a four year old we you actually thinking there was someone there to harm arm you or is it a good energy or was it simply afraid because you didn't understand what was going on. I didn't understand what was going on. But did you tell I would just say this someone in my my parents did she think you're crazy. Huma no because I come from a very spiritual and a strong faith family. My brothers still tells the story of one night that I convinced my parents that there was a man man looking in my window with big green. Is that at like three o'clock in the morning. He had my dad out there on the ladder on the roof of my brother and it turned out to be my neighbor's cat nowhere. No I swear hardly psychic phenomenon I would I was sensing and feeling was real and I can feel that watching over but no one on ever really made a big deal about things that I would say might bring up people that have died in the past or I would just see things and nobody ever really made a big deal about it. They just embraced. I it so you had the perfect family to welcome your difference. I did which you can't say about a lot of families don't you might have just as easily been labeled a freak song cow. I say that all the time I might have been diagnosed. Maybe with schizophrenia or some other type of disorder. If I was with the different family I say this all the time also. I know my path has been chosen. And this is my souls destiny. Because I feel that I've lived a very privileged life and when I say privileged I don't I don't mean by financial means privilege to have a loving and supportive family. Of course I only lost my grandparents within the past ten years so I was well into my forties. He's still having my grandparents here. I still live right next door to my parents. And I'm fifty to even the WIKIPEDIA says I'm fifty three. Don't believe everything you read as telling you specifically about the dead people. Are they happy to be dead. I always wondered. This is again one of the misconceptions that people have of what I do that they show show me the other side that I have this untold vision or story about heaven or what the souls especially shows maybe yeah it all came to the process of me accepting who got intended me to be here on the physical. My Soul's journey because growing up I never felt complete I it was felt that there was something missing and I share this part of my story because I found that a lot of people might feel that way. Maybe it's with a relationship a job they just feel something's missing deep within their soul and it wasn't until I embrace my gift is when I felt complete. That's how I know that it's my destiny so I struggled and why was I chosen. What am I supposed to do with this? WHO's GonNa WanNa come and see immediate speak to their relatives that have died and this happened wintry so when your kid position you're already grown up? I was growing. It was later in my twenties raising a family. Raising a family had just had my daughter Victoria and you had continued to have different spirits. Welcome welcome cells into your life and then you finally said one day. Hey this is a gift. I should do something more with it and bring it to other people. Yes because I didn't realize how life changing it was. And how were you using it up until when I wasn't using my gift I was hardly at a spirits. Were still visiting or you were locking out block them out. And I was ignoring from what I was sensing and feeling so his spirit wanted to visit you for example even back in that chapter of your life. They don't down the door they don't say let me and I'm going to kill you. There's something like that. They just will graciously leave. If they're not welcomed right like I would just not answer them or acknowledge their presence. What happens is his eyes? Start to feel certain things and then whether sphere pushes me enough to get me to say something is when I know went to proceed with what. I'm sensing dancing and feeling good. I want you to understand why I also chose to do what I do. I found out from sensing I had gone to a spiritual awareness class to learn how to relax. I had a lot of extreme anxiety. I couldn't leave my house. I'm empathic so I feel how other people feel I. I feel the soul. How they died with they want to communicate to their loved? One just walking around the street so you go to your local delicatessen. And if that gentleman I don't mean lost his father five years ago suddenly that dads behind the counter to and you're feeling their messaging coming out. You'll when I walked in this room. I felt that there was was a father figure in this room. I had a laboring of the breathing in my chest which means that they pass them something of the chest whether it was a heart attack could be lung on cancer. Sometimes if someone drown I will feel like I fill up with fluid. Maybe someone was murdered or tragic departure out feel like I taste blood. Oh Oh my God. It's just for like a split back but I've learned over. The years had a channel and to communicate then to the person that it is their loved one and more importantly that the soul is at peace. So why I chose what I do is because I learned that people are left with burden. Gilts there are left with a should've could've would've an only if none of these things is it I've ever been left with. That's why I share with you before very privileged of not having to go through a tragedy losing someone at a very young age so when I channel and when I read someone I can't have an opinion I can't have a personal thought feeling or emotion and it was validated on. I don't know if you noticed. I was on doctor authorize way. Of course they read my brain as I was reading someone and they say my brain literally like flat lines. How do you do that to yourself? Though in other words you desensitization no it. Since it's who I am. I don't know how I do it how I don't do it. I just know went to Jason when not to say something not every spirit has to have a positive message or are those the only spirits you hear from what about the bad guy that wants to say something negative could you hold that to yourself an op. Not Spirits not allowed to. When I put my gift in the universe is hands on instead of this is my soul's journey place me the path and the opportunities yes and I will follow? I only want good things if it can help someone or prevent something. I don't WanNa know about it. But can negative dudes help someone to get a negative message. Message something excelling that's negative. I'll use this as an example of this'll answer your question. I remember doing a live. Show this young woman was murdered by her boyfriend. And I'm channeling her to her mother you know. She's saying she's at peace she described. She looked like how beautiful she was. Because the mother had visions of the way the her physical body was left the Matt so she was visualizing Hanta. How would I know that I wouldn't know that? So the daughters having me deliver this message and I said to her. Your daughter wants me to deliver a message from someone else but I can't see him. I can't get any messages directly from him. which is my symbol for that? His soul is at a plane with God in God's white light but he wants to apologize and want you to know that he does know and is remorseful and knows what he took from you your Precious gift your daughter and that boyfriend had already passed away. He committed suicide after he killed her. But I couldn't directly sense his energy because is he wasn't in positive light yet and the mother said I came here wanting to know if he was remorseful and if he knew what he took from me. Wow so you were able to help the poor mother move on her daughter's soul I was just the vessel that the daughter used when they say. Did you deliver negative messages. I'm channeling someone's loved one. Maybe they die tragically. Maybe they were murdered. Maybe they lost their child to cancer or they feel that they were improperly taken care of by doctors or a hospital that is negative So I have a hard time when people say things about negative messages real. You'll people saying something negative about messaging. You're able to give them piece by reinterpreting. What really happened or how? They should or shouldn't feel rise. There's always the positive light what you get something negative. Let's say you get a spirit who's pissed off and wants to be heard. Do just turn that a way to keep it to yourself. Love to feel obligated to share it with never had that they will make me feel how they felt before they died anger frustration because of an illness but that is never their message or their intent as they channel. So they're intent also paralleling. Your own is to bring peace. Yes do believe that all ghosts or spirits orig- or however you might want to describe them have positive energy one they go yonder and they come back as peaceful people because there's a lot of bad people in life a thousand percent how the soul chooses to reenter. That's a different story. What do you mean by? I've done past life regressions. I don't know if some people refer to as reincarnation however however you want to interpret it where our souls have had many different journeys here in the physical world so you will interpret what the list and you might have looked like right. The time and time again. It happens ends where maybe a husband will come through and they're speaking to their wife and saying I see now from the other side how terrible I was to you how I never told you how how much I loved. You are how much I appreciate everything that you did for me. How you cared for me and for that I am sorry and then the woman in front of me is breaking down and saying? That's exactly how I feel. Oh he would say mean things to me before he died he would throw his food at me. Would yell at me but it was the illness. It was the frustration so now she would be beating eating herself up here in the physical world. I have done better. What could I have done differently? And not being able to heal at the end of the day every message that spirit has made deliver it husted deliver peace. Give something that that person is holding onto that is holding them back from healing traducing those messages of peace because coming coming through you as a medium. And that's who you are. Would you think all the spirits out there that have passed on have peace is at part and Parcel Russell. Being the spirit from what spirit has told me. Is that when the soul leaves the physical body. They immediately leave behind disabilities element hatred behind behind. When a soul comes through and apologizes? That means that the soul to relive their life through our eyes to feel what it was like for their choices and decisions on how it affected us. How would hurt us? So that is how they're able to come through on apologize. No I want to ask you. How do you nor voice voice? Let's say you're going shopping. You have your normal chores to do you have your laundry list. You want to get it done in everywhere you go you feeling a spirit. There's gotta be tons MM floating around. What do you do to ignore them to lock them out? Not everyone might need to hear from their loved one. But let's say you're by yourself and you're not counseling anyone doing a reading of you just walking down the street and you see a spirit sitting on a stoop. I don't see the way we see her in the physical world. It's more through a feeling I just Sense so I can feel a presence. For example years ago I can remember I was in Bloomingdale's and I was at the counter and all of a sudden I smelt a big wolf of Gardenias. I'm standing there and all of a sudden this woman is asked my look over and the smell gets stronger and then I hear. Please tell my George how much you love her perfume. Wow Spooky so now. I don't say anything I wait and the woman turns to me and she says it's so hard to pick out a new sent sent when you've been wearing one for so long and I'm like yeah. Oh by the way I said I love your perfume. It smells like Gardenias. And she looked at me and started crying and she he said I'm wearing my mom's perfume today's birthday and when she was alive I would yell at her. Stop wearing that stinky perfume. So I wore her perfume today. In honor of my mom woman didn't know that I was that I heard. Tell my daughter how much you love her perfume or how pretty it is right. Now have to have that conversation station so I was able to deliver a message in a way that it just wasn't like hey your mom pass. She's here and she wants you to know something. These are the things that what I realize that people go over are after time and time again of the little things that they hold onto and that they remember after the loss of a loved one to remember. You're in my office for your show and you were. You're feeling the spirit of both my mother and father here. I remember much of the detail of that afternoon that we spent but was so shocking to me I remember number is that you ended by saying that there had been a tree planted and my mother was so happy about the tree. You floored me knowing that after my mother the pass from Alzheimer's Disease Six along and you said a rich rich which was Japanese. Maple which is read that you were able to tell you that detailed it was spellbound knowing how are you able to get not just a the spirit. That's relaying messages to their loved ones. But how you able to collect that kind of detail that in my mind were so much credibility to everything else. You're saying because that's one of my requirements spirit. I learned that there are a lot of common things. I'm the first one. Say the what I was crazy. Anyone can say what spirit has me say and there are a common burdens and guilt that we carry common ways people die but with every hailing message that they have me deliver. They have to validate it with something. Unique to the person that they're speaking. So that the person you're speaking to a relaying the message to write leaves you right so important spirit knows when I give a speech when I do my little mental preparation. They know when I'm ready to communicate my rules. Aw I need to feel the bonds and relationship that they shed with the person I need to know how they died. This is all in my preparation of when I read somebody. Well you know you had the experience. You didn't ask me anything. No but you told me a lot your loved ones told you yes well said but it seemed to have such credibility because of the amount of detail correct. But that's what they have to do. So what every healing message. They have to validate it with something so unique that there's no way I would know about could find out about it. I'm on the the cusp. Now of trying to interview with you and trying to block out things I sent Sinfield because this is also what happens I walk into a room and immediately spirit either starts coming or people know who I am and they start asking their loved ones. Oh this is an opportunity. Please step forward so when you sharing the story to me before about seeing the tree planted I kept seeing a quarter. That's my symbol for where someone carries something of of their departed loved ones with them. Maybe it's a quarter. Maybe it's a key. It's something that their loved. One character they carry in memory of them a lot of times. It is chain or someone did have a coin coin collection but there is that male. Figure that father figure so whether it's a grandfather someone's father could be an uncle that was like a father to them. The laboring. The chest is myself for that they pass them something of the heart lungs chest and then there was also something about change as I'm talking to you. That's what I say. I see flashes ashes of things and I just sense and then feel the things Theresa. How do you get alone time? How do you find peace out? You Click aww and just honestly have normalcy of any kind in your. I'm just starting to learn that. How do you do that? I started by starting to really take care of myself I self. It's a hard thing because I think we look at things as a selfishness or being selfish or self absorbed. I've learned that I deserve quiet time. I deserve apiece and I think spirit also realizes that because I'm always channeling whether I'm filming for Long Island medium or during a live show. I'm always channeling sauce and it's interesting on how over the years spirit has learned how to kind of step aside a little bit Ba- clear non needed it yourself. I need you dictated. Did that with your thought. I think they saw it and realized that it was becoming very taxing on. I make what I do very easy. It's the hardest thing that I have to do. is to feel feel someone's emotions pain sorrow a loss and grief and then in the next moment have me do something to give them the gift of laughter. That is one thing another thing that I require them to do. Because that is the best medicine for the soul. You mean you require that the spirit gives you something to get their loved ones laughing about or the justice mile. Yeah of course. It's the greatest gift but then how do you really chill out. You have a whole afternoon. We don't have any spirits visiting sometimes. I'll just sit and now just like binge-watch like friends. I'll just literally go in my bed and just lay down and just close my eyes for for not taking up but just kind of you know. Think about about things that I want to accomplish. Or let go of any type of stresses even if it's just like for two or three minutes and you just taught yourself that they caused that to happen. Why that life change? It's a big one. I realized that it's important. You know after losing my grandparents. My Grandmother was just gone ten years. My grandfather five live. My Life was so busy and hectic and crazy realizing being away how important family is in how I can't be good to anyone. What else I think hit me? One time when I was flying you know and I and I fly all travel all the time and the flight attendant said and you hear it over and over put put your mask on so you can help someone else. And I said to myself batch a rule of thumb in everyday life while Siam no good to no one else if I am at my weakest moment or if I'm not a hundred percent and I think after doing that I'm recently divorced going through that grieving my thirty three years with Larry. I just felt that things needed to change for me So you think I think sour divorce worse turned a page in your life. I've got to take care of myself. This is too stressful. I think it was everything. I just felt that there was so many changes and why not continue positive changes and I think that we only take care of ourselves when we're sick think about it. When do you go to the doctor when you're not feeling good right? So I think it's important into Kinda nip that in the bud beforehand. Same thing with the healing process. Sometimes when I look at how someone's life changed. Because of the loss of love to win and the choices that they made because of a burden or guilt that they carried held different their life could have been shaped. I think I see that a lot when I go to the prison and do readings us for some inmates their choices and it stems back to the loss of a loved one and to be able to give them that peace and you know a little bit of hope. Don't have the strength to even do in the first place to welcome that into your life. I think we're all meant to be here in the physical world to do special and amazing things. I want to get back to being married to Larry Thirty three years. You come through a long divorce. It felt like to me. I don't know whether to what did you learn from divorce. And the breaking of along loving living relationship. What did you get out of that anything good you know? I learned that I don't have not one regret and the respect that Larry and I have for each other and where we are today where we were at the end of our marriage is so much better to be able to realize that you've grown in different directions or you want different. Things in life was simply just not happy anymore. I still love Larry. He's the father of my children. Did you have spirits like your grandpa announce your mother giving you advice from yonder onto what to do the nothing. Can you coul- help when you want it for yourself. I always ask for higher power I personally call on God I believe in God. That's another whole topic your grandparents. They don't come in you. Don't call them up and say come to me. Is My advice here. What I I ju? In prayer meditation I always look for guidance. I put out there and I always ask the universe to guide me. ooh I will get messages just like everyone else. Signs and symbols. Is this the right choice. Am I making the right decisions. These are my free will choices voices but I would always get that validation whether it be if I would find a white feather some people why feathers some people find shakier that song on the radio. Oh get that validation that I know that spirit is guiding me and that I m making the right choices and decisions I also do feel when I am guided in a way that I shouldn't be going things do happen. Put me at a halt you from the other rumbled from work better judgment. A second gas plays a part in that as well. What do you say to people who say that? The work you do is not credible that you're kook that there can't be any credence anything you're doing. What do you say to those hard? Hard core cynics. My first thing is always I get it on the first one to say that what I do is crazy. Speak to someone that has had the experience. So you call on a witness an expert witness people have a right to their own opinion and I do get what I do is crazy. But it can't change the fact that the things that spirit had me say to someone and if it changed their life in a positive way why would someone want to take that from them because people are using a left brain to figure. You're a lot out so I could picture someone analyzing very badly because I have that in me to go both ways. You're saying this doesn't make any sense. It's an illogical kemp passively. Be There's no spirit talking to me this lady's a Kook okay. So take that person is your way you can then call their father or grandparent in Paris into the scene and say Oh yeah you think McCook will your grandfather's here and he said you should of never stolen that car from the show you could like put them in bed like just as a closing down if they were open to it. I will never push my gift. I will never use my gift to prove or try to defend my gift in any way shape or form your well. You're much bigger women than I. You know what I would do. I would immediately look for a spirit to call them out and put them in their place. I would be so annoyed. Yeah truly is an honesty bar. But when I say I get it I understand why someone would critique that or criticize or be a skeptic I get it but in the past I have been asked them. We'll have there been times where and then sometimes I might see something like. Oh do you ever see the same time on the clock all the time. Are you waking up every night at three. Am for no reason in and these are also sometimes signs and symbols that we don't put together that's our loved one. May I ask you. I wake up faithfully every night at three. What does that? I just WANNA leave that. That was a coincidence that I said that I saw three. AM and when. I say waking up same time for number or seeing the time the same time it could be the same thing because sometimes people don't wake up. I mean I'd like like to get rid of it. Frankly why we wake up and this is from what spirit is told me is during my spirit. WHO's here or a spirit? I did see him other energy. Okay okay when we wake up at a specific time we have teaching hours. It's when our minds at rest. That is the best way that we're able to connect with Spirit on our own is what our mind is at rest so it's the same thing like if you get in the car and you're going about your day you turn the radio on you. Change the channel on a song comes on old song. That was your loved ones favorite. And you're not playing it on purpose. Not a coincidence Edison. It's almost like spirits energy getting to do things getting you to recognize things. Spirit refers to the middle of the night is our teaching hours. So who's trying to teach me at three I. It might not be teaching you something. It could just be a validation that their soul is present to you the same gift you have children. Yes how do they deal with it. It's it's different though. My son is a very good intuition. My daughter is a little bit more like me where she senses and feels the souls energy and things like that daughter is held. She's He's twenty five now. Do you think she'll follow in your footsteps and share that gift. She's had cher information like if she feels things around someone but she does not take get to the level that you are calling. Yeah Yeah May I ask you one question. 'CAUSE you're not unusual position always speaking with spirits. Are you afraid of death not anymore and what happened that you're not anymore because of the reading because of what I do. I know there's something more like my first book. There's more to life than this I know. Oh that we're greeted by our departed loved ones on the other side of departed. Souls have described the moment that they're so leaves the physical body of what happened and people will say that's exactly what happened. How would you know that my mom was reaching calling out for her brother? So that gives you tremendous credibility. If you're able to tell someone that when your mother was on her deathbed did she was reaching out for your brother individual. HASTA gives you credibility for that K. I'd believe it my whole thing also is and I'm not trying to be rude. People could say whatever whatever they want about me. I don't care if I did carry wouldn't be where I am today. You're tough cookie. I'm sure people can say what they want. It's your well. It bothers me that people have that in in that they feel the need to be mean especially on social media. When I post a picture with me and my daughter? Do you have to comment that. My daughter is fat that my daughter gained weight or or that. You think that I shouldn't wear my hair this way. There's no need for the past role going to be nice people anyway. What you said? I hope they learn from that. They'll have to relive if they left someone with a burden or a guilt after relive that so they can feel what it was like for their actions on how it made other people feel Got It she so we're going to take phone calls. Yeah sure okay. I can't wait to hear the advice you give because your headset is so different than mine. We're GONNA take a few phone calls can help some folks out as best we can. Hi Barbara My name is Amelia. And I'm calling from Florida Florida. You said that self doubt is one of the worst things to have. You know as an entrepreneur and I've been slowly starting a company For the past two years it's gone slow due to a lot of kind of personal issue than upheavals including divorce and infertility and things like that and kind of because things haven't worked out in other parts of my life. Pardon me is really doubting whether or not this company can also work out so. I don't know how to get rid of this stuff. Stout thanks for the question. Amelia and you're double dipping today and having a very unusual advice from Theresa Caputo. I feel lucky. Hi Hi Amelia. We listened to your question and Tricia is going to speak to you first. So a million I. I like to say that self doubt whether as an entrepreneur just a human being I think is one of the worst things that we can do to ourselves. You know beating ourselves up. You don't think for a minute. I thought my career of talking to dead people like how was I going to do the roadblocks that might come my way or how people would try to put me down with Barbara and I would just discussing before I never ever allowed any of those things to deteriorate my soul. Make me feel like not to believe in myself and I know it is hard you know. I recently divorced as well. You're starting your life over when things just don't work out in so many different parts of your life but none of these things are your fault you know. We can take responsibility for certain choices that we make the number one thing is you cannot beat yourself up at all should be the opposite. You should be giving yourself. Oh cable cable. I had this opportunity. This is what I've learned from that it didn't work out. Take what you've learned from that and then apply it in moving forward. Okay thank you Amelia. I want to ask ask you a couple of questions you threw out the words and I think I'm quoting you right. When you say do a lot of personal issues including divorce an infertility and things like that got it almost made it sound like divorce and infertility? Were not a big deal to questions I have one has divorce infertility come together. Usually people are having infertility. Problems struggled to have children when they are with someone you were trying to have children assume and then you became divorced after that. Is that how it goes. Yeah Yeah Yeah. That's how it went and at the same time. I worked a long time on Wall Street in a very high pressured job. which I I enjoyed the actual work of it was trading and sales for I worked for seventeen years for major banks and hedge fund a big career foreign exchange? I enjoyed it the actual work but you know as you rise higher and higher to the bank just so political and the fights you know it was kind of all the turmoil with on the workfront the home front and then they health issues to all came to a head at the same time so I think that was what was hard as for me was every area of my life was hit at the same time and and that's where the discouragement came from. We'll Amelia. I'm going to Relabel what you are labeling a self doubt. I don't think that's the issue I think the issue who is exhaustion. Were you successful in having a child no it. How long were you struggling with that? You're going through in vitro all that stuff. Yeah I was going through the process but the results also were very very bad so we decided not to move ultimately forward without because on doctor's recommendation so it was just a a process of testing and retesting and deciding what you WanNa do to move forward. We decided we couldn't move forward with the process. It just wasn't gonNA work. It was GONNA be a multi year battle. which would possibly not have good results at all? possibly catastrophic health result. That's when I decided to divorce. There had been a lot of ongoing issues issues that had been pushed to the side while delayed having a child because of this big career okay. I'm GONNA paint a different picture of your life the way I'm seeing it okay. So you're in a tremendous stressful will pay them. Sure position in the financial field which is probably the toughest industry I believe in doubly doubly tough for women to succeed in but there you are slugging it out you decide you're gonNA leave and start your own business and at the same time you're going to dress. Such a large urge life issue to be a mother and to go through all of the roadblocks through the testing. I know I've been there myself before I had my son. I'm Tom. Thank God a miracle but to go through all the emotional strain of that concern totally emotionally exhausting and at the same time start a new business which is like giving birth to a child that needs to be fed loved and picked up out of bed every morning of your life right. I would say hey you were expecting yourself to be a superwoman. And then on top of that for an unhappy ending and another totally emotionally exhausting thing to deal with in life you you go through a divorce as pleasant could have been. It's always emotionally draining. Yeah I know for sure for you to actually expect yourself to be not self doubting outing and I don't think it's self downing it's exhaustion that it's impossible for you to handle all three of those balls in short order in the air almost at the same time. My Hat's off to you but I think you're not shop approach that I definitely underestimated such plow forward plow forward compete compete compete. He was on the trading floor. What you make every day is who you are basically you know and you can be fired at any time? It's kind of like a price on your head. The pressure to perform performance though being used to that environment for so many years I underestimated severely underestimated my ability to plow through things when my personal life was in turmoil and then I realized out was able to do that. It's a totally different kind of plowing. Here's the difference. Okay you were in your field for all those years accustomed to dealing with and living with high pressure and taking us it came the infertility. Struggle is start that you can't succeed in from the beginning getting it's a stop sign that you're trying to plow through. It's not like you get a little ad time and you get used to the pressure. It's not that kind of thing. It's a new start. Then a divorce worse is a new ending. Okay and a business is a new start so it's birthing versus maintaining hugely different. And and doing it all at the same time. Let me ask you a question about your business if I may. What kind of business I you in now? And how long have you been business. I've been in business judged under two years. There's there's obviously been a lot of thoughts starts as I put it to the side for periods of time to just focus on healing and my personal life and kind of moving on but My business is geared to retail investors which provides trading in financial market education and strategy to the individual investors. Suggest you. Do you have a part of your work with in some regard. No it's just me but you know what I say. I say you are expecting way way way too much of yourself too soon. What do you think Theresa I think it all stems back to what I said? She's putting way too much pressure on self and beating herself up for things that isn't even in her control. What can she she do to help? He's self-care is the first thing and knowing that she was not solely responsible for a lot of things. Well if you go to work everyday everyday and you don't trade and you don't get your late taking off too much that's where you would take responsibility. But as far as a marriage and infertility and it takes to you know one is solely responsible for something in that way you say her starting her business. By herself she decided to do that. Got It off. The ground has been working for two years. Who is responsible if not her? That's not really the sole issue right here. The solar she was her the sole issues exhaustion exhaustion and her putting her own personal personal needs on the back burner. But I think she's getting it. You're finally starting to see things a little differently. Is that correct Amelia. Yeah starting to see things differently. We were just talking about before so we have to take care of ourselves first so we can take care of everything else in our life. Yeah I've spent some time now outside of New York City 'cause I lived there errors so it was good to judge regain new perspective going somewhere else a little bit to change focus so that help. Because you know it's so Taipei Alpha. I was so into Wall Street. They are you need a break. I think from that. Can you take a break from your new business. I kind of have often on you know I started with a new relationship now which is really good so I wanted wanted to put time and effort into that because my whole career basically was putting time and effort in my career and not putting time it up into my personal life. So it's kind avenue phase which is kind of strange to be an entrepreneur during that phase when you have a different life phase and you just WanNa put time and effort into your personal relationships now I want to say I'm not so career focused because I feel like that's what's best for me but that's such a weird thing to say as an entrepreneur when you're starting your company when I feel like everything's about the company and your sole focus should be the company though I guess that's where I struggle Entrepreneur because I did that my whole seventeen year career. And I don't want to do it again. I WANNA have have more space in my life for the important people Amelia. I would suggest that if you're putting your new business on and off on and off like that it will not work and so so you might as well get off that horse and take a break for yourself to focus on the relationship. Whatever else you do assure yourself up and he'll and and then decide what you WANNA do? I think that business is probably a potentially good business because you sound like you're a very smart woman and could make a go of anything but I think gets a wrong thing at the wrong time. Yeah the time it was like the first he was. She's got a plow forward with this business or not do it. But how do you tell someone to start job Lino. You know what's coming up. There's no shame giving up on something. was that the wrong time. I finally people with the least amount of courage starting businesses. Just can't quit even five years after they have no business. It's like ashamed quitting. No No. No there's no shame in regrouping on coming back none whatsoever. I felt at my first business. I thought everybody would be ashamed of me. Nobody even remembered he just need one success later on. That's all people remember so give yourself a little space. That's all yeah. It's hard to find a different professional rational identity. After like you know seventeen eighteen years you know what if you give it some space. That's what I believe and I know this sounds silly because we have to work for money but you have to do you love and all the money in the world and be unhappy. It's not worth it Amelia. I have to congratulate you on being halfway there to to. What's GonNa make you happy because you were wise enough to quit your job in? That wall paid high pressure position. You had you were smart enough to listen to your intuition intuition and quit it. I say listen to same intuition and put your business on hold so that you have space to get over the emotionally most draining portion of your life you come back later and start all over again or pick up. We left off. Yeah I think you will on your path Amelia. Good luck to you. Thanks very much for calling in Byhalia Tale. Yeah thank you hi Barbara. I'm calling from New York City. I'm a single mom. My husband passed away in Guess about twelve years ago. I have two daughters in college and my question. Twofold one is a amusing all my energy and it comes naturally to motivate and excite my two girls and to inspire them to try to reach reach their dreams through college and career. They might choose in the meantime. I'm finding myself in a very odd spot. I can't muster up my own motivation. Asian trading floor. I'm surrounded by no it all twelve hours a day and I feel like I'm losing my Mojo. I'm not sure what's going on. I just need to get back quick and forever thank you I appreciate you listening. You have a lovely voice story. Sorry Oh thank you thank you how are you. I'm doing fine and I also have Theresa Caputo here. Who's also answer your question? This is such a H Street from me and a shot in the arm for my usual day. I can't even tell you so. Your question is all about mustering up your motivation right. Are you working king on the trading floor. Now twelve hours a day as well. Yes yeah okay. And you feel like you're losing your Mojo yes and you just need to get it back not only quick but you want to get it back like forever. You said exactly so. I'm trying to figure out what I can do or tell myself or something that I can do internally externally to try to maintain that energy and my motivation to try to reach my potential but have a hell fun time getting there. I don't know how else I explain it. I'M GONNA suggest right off the bat that I don't think you're losing your Mojo at all. I think you've lost interest in what you did. I think it's your intuition that speaking to you saying you need to make a change. Generally when you're very successful in what you do and you plugging away and everything's coming up like the day before and things are fine and then all of a sudden you feel like you run out of gas. I usually always feel. It's your intuition shouting for attention saying something's got to change someone's gotta change and when you work against that and try to like muster up. I've done this so much. I can do this. I can do it. You can't manufacture fake emotion. You know what I mean. You might mentally get there be can't really put it on call. Give myself the energy and attitude you working against yourself. Because you're nearing tuition. Have you thought about doing something else. That could renew you and give you more excitement. Motivation and satisfaction. You'll work. That's Charlie where most of the solutions lie. It's funny you say that because I tried not to premeditate too many thoughts and just let the conversation go but I I was wondering if I was just playing board board and motivation on opposite ends of the spectrum as you well know right. Yeah well you've done it. How many years? Oh Gosh. I've I've been doing this basically since I graduated from college. And you've gotten it down right young actually just as an example yesterday I was saying to someone God at this market is so boring. And of course last night's activity shook me right out of that kind of reached these little low points like. Oh if anything anything could happen and then that happened and I gotta be careful what you wish for type thing but still even though you've had an abrupt change last night that jazz things up so to speak week. You still feel the heavy weight lifting again today like a little bit. Yeah Yeah and then there's a constant I mean twelve hours okay. Maybe it's ten hours not exactly twelve but when you're around like people on the energy that you're getting top tick that any moment linking the nature of the beast. You working smarter younger more aggressive more to prove yeah exactly. That's my belief that you need to make a change. But before I go there I just wanted to ask Theresa how she's reading this. Did your husband passed sudden even if they were ill. We weren't expecting them to depart at that time. We really never thought it was is going to happen. True true what I wrote down Before we even got on the phone with you was that you have always been inspiring. You have done amazing job with the girls and to stop the cycle of holding yourself back and that you were ready ready for a change. That was the first thing that I wrote down was ready for change now typically when spirit brings up something like this. It's never to tell someone what they should shouldn't do with their life choices. It's your choice but what is happening now is Y- your emotions are being validated through telephone. Or podcast podcast. I'm not even in the same room as you. And I can feel the energy and the emotions of your departed husband so you actually sitting by his bedside at the time of his departure. I was not so I want to explain what he showed me because I want him to explain more why you felt that it was sudden why he made me feel the emotion that you were not expecting him to depart and he showed me the holding of the hands and the whispering or the ear which is my symbol for that nothing is left unsaid. So if you feel that you wish you had more of a moment or said something more to him absolutely not there was nothing left. Them said what happened with his chest his chest. I keep feeling like I'm filling up with fluid or something well. He passed away from alcoholism but it was was a bit sudden because of the details towards the end. Get much more medical. I keep feeling this physical thing of where I feel like I'm bloating up and I'm filling up with something. Yeah he did have that. Yeah okay so that is just a validation of saying. I don't want you to feel or think that I ever could be or would be disappointed in you. especially if you do decide to take a different change in your life and more importantly start to put your needs I okay. Did the girls get a scholarship or I wish. was there a talk about something about funding or something about a scholarship. No no no. They're both in college but no okay. Did they receive anything any type of funding. No okay so there has to be say. Put me at a podium and handed me an envelope. So that's typically my my symbol full where there was some type of funding or something done in memory of someone so okay he said yes so I might not be interpreting it correctly. I'm going to ask him to give it to me differently. So what happened at one of the girls. Graduations was that like a special honor of something he might be trying to acknowledge about how how you are always inspiring and encouraging girls and a great role model for them. Thank you that was one thing that you always did. You always stood by okay. Everyone and anyone and always gave them the benefit of the doubt fair enough yes and he says and I want to thank you for never leaving my side thank you you understand that yes and he says and I know how hard it was for you to talk about my death. Yeah that would be true. Oh 'cause I said to him. Why do you keep putting that podium? He looked at me and I felt it was something else that he needed to say to you. He showed me my privacy side so so I will be a little vague. If that's okay fair. So he says I want to thank you for the way that you've handled me my memory and who I am with dignity thank you that was a A big focus for me K.. I WanNa thank you for that and in that it's time for you to change for yourself and that's where I commend. Okay could you afford to leave your position now. Always you girls in college. A I don't mean make the same amount of money afford to make a change or is it that every dollar that's coming in you have targeted and you can't afford lose any of those dollars at probably could make a change. It's not like on paycheck to paycheck. Type thing what would stand in your way other than knowing what you want to change to. What are the obstacles that would make you pause? You know if I was thinking about actually doing that like putting myself in that position it would just be more more about a security issue just making sure that everything would be on track and would I succeed Etcetera Etcetera. What would be the worst second happen? Paint a picture for me here. The worst that could happen which kids have to leave college. They wouldn't have the tuition. Let's just say no. I think I'd be fine on that. The worst that would happen is I. Would you know L.. Maybe live in a different apartment and maybe travel a little bit less. If I didn't succeed at something I was aiming towards. They probably have to think of something else. I've always wanted to write a book. I know that look about what I'm curious. I've always wanted to write a book I have a title actually actually good hardest part of book writing honestly it was growing up Griffin and I really wanted it to be more. Dedicated was very very close to both my parents But my father and he was such an unusual character. There's no other way to say he was bigger than life and and whatnot. I would love to talk about that. It gets a little more complicated. That's kind of what I would like to talk about and it would be really really funny. Let's just say for a minute. You took took a year off and wrote that book yet. If you wanted to get a similar position back again could you find one. Probably and so the security security you mentioned first off on the list of obstacles you know financially. It doesn't sound not valid because you could afford to keep kids in college. You get a smaller apartment. But that's about the end of it. That's all would happen financially too. I think so. I mean finding another job similar if you decided to. Yeah after you wrote the book. Yeah I think I've done this long enough that I could maybe take a lesser role someplace that needed my type of experience. Can't can't guarantee it would be there. I think it's above a rally. Seventy percent shot that I would be okay with us. You know what I think. myself and it's easy for meted Dole at advice. Because I'm not doing it but one thing you've done with your children all along is that you've taught them the power of a single mom to love and support them and do it alone taught them consistency. You've taught them hard work. And you've taught it not by any words you may have shared with them but you taught it by example and you know to this day I can pick out a child of a powerful single mom in a crowd because they always have more self-confidence and do you better in life than many of the children have to loving parents. I don't know why that is. I can't explain it. I suspect your two girls are totally capable of making a great life with themselves. They're taking care of already did done. They're put out there. They're on their way. Now you have an opportunity teach so one last lesson by example and that is to teach them the courage to make a life change and they will remember that forever. I say you have to go out and write the book you have to take a year off and if you decide you want that same with similar position back. I'm sure you're going to get it because when you think of leaving something always not sure if you could ever get it back but the mini leave it you find people come knocking on your door the real questions. We ever really want that position back. I doubt it. But maybe we'll do something related or maybe it'll become an offer author for a living who knows but to miss. That opportunity would be so sad and to miss the opportunity. Teach your kids the new lesson. Not only that hard hard work and dedication loyalty pays off but courage is needed in life to make a change so I couldn't imagine why you wouldn't give your letter resignation. I might go out there and do it right God. You'd have me cheering at the gates of Wall Street. Saying go forward noreen go go go go go you know. The interesting thing is is is when I say something from spirit and then hearing you talk to her. After that he had me write scholarship down their children. There Ero que. Oh you mean so. I'll she taking care of taking care of and it's also showing individuality for her being able to stand up. Don't say this isn't working for anymore. This served me my purpose of where I got to be now. I'm going to move on. I'm going to afford noreen. I think you've gotten the best advice as from each of us. Thank you challenge. Here's give yourself the advice to move on quickly. Don't ignore your intuition and even your deceased husband weighed in on this one which which is a new for me. A new experience for me here I. Yeah and if you don't mind me interrupting again. I'm very curious. Would somebody do something like flip. A coin do rock paper scissors. I was trying not to channel but I kept seeing things and I. I don't have meanings for this. I kept seeing like someone flipping a coin and then rock paper scissors. So would somebody do that. He was big on that. Who odd perfect just wanted to validate that? I was channeling on a podcast. The paper scissors. Holy Crap Theresa. How did that rock paper scissors come into your head? I just kept seeing flipping of coin and I heard rock paper scissors. Rock paper scissors show was almost like a code from her deceased husband. Webby right in saying that. This is true. I'm really speaking to you honey. Listen Yeah like I'll think about it. Anyone can say to her. You're a great role model for your children. Even things that you've said so I always ask for the little. validations is to give her the encouragement that she needs to do. What's best for her like? Look this doesn't mean you watch out there right now and gushed on it. I Barbara supports importance putting in my resignation. It's a validation of your emotions of what you're feeling in. You know what you need for yourself. You're the only one that knows what your soul needs And sometimes it's just nice to get that little encouragement from Barbara and sometimes from spirit on the other side listener lean. You could get all the encouragement you want from me. But that doesn't measure up to hear about that rock paper Saturday allegation. I'm resigning from my podcast. As of this afternoon afternoon increases taking it over night. Thank you noreen. I I wish you the best of luck. I have no doubt you're going to be a success in your next venture no doubt at all in my mind and I'm not hearing from spirits own intuition on working with a lot of business so you got it on both ends. I really appreciate you all listening to me and of course your advice. Good luck to you. Good Luck Take Care bye-bye and that's over questions. We have time for today. I hope have you found the advice. Helpful think I got it right. I think I got it wrong. have an idea for Greek guests. Come on give it to me. Tweet me up Barbara Corcoran using the HASHTAG. Eight eight eight Barbara and keep those questions coming into the eight eight eight Barbara Hotline. You skin. Subscribe to this show wherever you listen to podcasts. Don't be coy. Leave a review for the show at Apple podcasts. And keep the party going on. We'll see you next Stein. Eight eight eight barbers produced by Cindy's molins for orientation and Lila Man is our executive producer automation.

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Interview with Boum

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

49:40 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Boum

"Hi Jim Shock and most Web Comic View. They were sitting down with boom cartoonist. Who sit back. Relax and the Geek. Best Begin. Hey I'm bloom. I made the call boomer as for nine years and some and comics is actually how I got started into comics at all and now. I'm a professional cartoonist. I would be putting it humbly. I've got a badly the award. Joe Shuster Awards Jake Networks thank you and the bidding this switches the local Worship Martial Arts Festival. I'm fine list this year to it's a stranger for me. I'm I'm really really happy buddy. I'm just bummed that you know the whole everything pandemic thing. It's a shame Basically Affect your lot. I'm most my income is actually from festivals and conventions and It looks like I won't be doing any this year Thankfully you know like husted in supported the both of us that I won't be making money this year I'm self publishing a book. Every year and this year is my last glamorous book and usually a launch at a teeth and so now I'm just gonNa headed printed and hopefully sell issue on you know on the Internet hoping I can ship some round the world but it probably won't be as big as it would have been had I been to you know festivals in person but all sorts of because he calf especially at 'em Calf Arches. So fun to me. At just to be to hang out with other cartoonists professionals strangers and friends and people just see at t over here like like summer camp. It's like the longtime year where you can't hang out with these the people that do the same same things as you do and it's just so sad. We won't be doing this this year. I hope twenty easier on everybody. Not just the comics Not Not just a common community everywhere. Anyway it's scary time. Yeah definitely I mean. He's just a lot of chaos happened and of course. We have the credit murder Hornets. But you know I know I gotTa Start Making Fun of the murder. Hornets yesterday on the Scifi Geek. So he can you have some sort of really silly muster. It's hard not to make fun of it. You Know Godzilla. Wake murder warning. It's made me made fun of straight up. I'm still waiting for the SCIFI heard of the sci-fi channel. I'm still waiting for them to come out with their triple be rated movie on. Murder Hornets Japan last summer and I did I saw. I saw some of them were actually. I don't know if they were the murder Hornets. The nicer I'm dead really gigantic Hornets. Like dead on the ground and we had seen signs like the wear of the Hornets. And we're just like why do they put signs out and insulate you see that one on the ground frigging and so I know what it's like seen it and that is in America. I'm Sarah well. We'll we'll go we'll go. We'll be fine. I guess they're huge. They're scared kingdom only solved yet. One America not worried about when it comes to Hornets. We like know. We like our anti insect ray. We like her flame. Throwers we like our baseball. Bats are not worried about something big slow in big obvious. You know they're your things there right right. She'll tell me a little about your about to boomer. I started boomer in two thousand eleven. Actually I started on a day off your family with that. Probably a few than we did when Comics Hurley. Comic Day is on February first Every year and it's a day where up. I'm sorry may come all day like when comic every hour just to just to illustrate their day so it's kind of lake an auto. Baio comic strip kind of day and two of my friends were registered. You had to register on forum by them. Now it's free for all and everybody posts on social media have abandoned was on the forum and two of my friends had registered. And I wasn't doing even comics. At the time I'm a traditional animator by trade I studied the traditional emission worked in the field for a while and then when my friends which is third I was like. I'm not sure I'm you know it's kind of scary to me but this is a one day thing so I should try be fine so I did and I posted everything twitter and by the end of the day. I was like okay. I'm done slice said I enjoy doing it but as of restaurants I got on. Twitter was very positive. People were like no. You've actually found something as you seem really comfortable with and it's really funny and we warn more so I did a test run we are. I drew a comic Strip and comic strip every day for a week and I liked the experience I decided to. I launched a simple. You know when comics come express. Actually were wordpress website. And I did three comic strips a week from the one and I. I only stopped last February when I decided that I have to move on to something else. And then everything else happened from. There Astra six months sub during worries steadily. I I decided to self publish. The First Book Collection of the Web Comic sold out. It was a very very small print. Run that I sold out within a week. So was like okay. I think can Scott something so I kept going and now I'm having the tents book printed right now I just got the proof yesterday And from there I was able to tackle on bigger comic projects. I did a small Rafic. Mobile cold A small revolution was published in French and English. It was in twelve then in English. Wasn't two thousand seventeen and I. Yeah I've been doing only comex since I've never animated anything since two thousand twelve and I don't miss it back to kill her translate over a when you were doing animation. We interested in the our side of the story side. I was I was interested in her side. I think he shows just the way I draw. I can draw vinyl time. You know that good. I think my my strengths are more in the pacing industry. Telling I think one day it might happen where I would ride of a book and the joy it like. Have somebody else drunk before it's for me or with me. I have drawn one comic that I didn't eight. It's back on French only and it was an interesting experience but I did not enjoy it as much as I thought. I would come knicks or a lot of work and I have. I found out that I don't like joining enough to work so hard on a comic that I didn't right like I would disagree with some parts of the scenario in the dialogue and things like that and I would change this but I can't because I'm not the author the author wants it that way. So the book okay. I didn't do that while I I suppose I I. I supposed to do a sequel. But I don't think it's going to have him since years now and I would. I would probably say no just now I think I would rather be a writer. And they'll straighter so yes. Definitely sorry sight. Cool definitely appreciate that What was your process? When you're doing boomer age in terms of you know how. How are you doing the plot that sort of thing so boomers? It's ultra stories. It's all part for reality and it's much closer to reality than people thank you. They think it's you know I I. I don't make the book and I only I guess I could synthesize as license times. The conversation is going to be too long for four panel Simpson Do Quick context know. This was happening and this has been this happened and then punchline a so it basically wrote itself I can. I had nothing to do when something funny happens. I would write it down on my phone or whatever handy usually on my phone so I had a list of funny stuff that had happened to me and as time went by I got better and better at fighting was would be funny on the spot like immediately. After it happens I would know what for panel that would make And then I would just go directly to the the pencilling stage so goes thumbnails no snow script this four panel template that I made. I would just know trace the panels and goes directly to Pencils and then newly INC and a Quick Photoshop. Shading realtor in Photoshop just as cleaner than my pencil of can't pencil whatever and if I am not interrupted or I guess distracted by anything Usually takes me about half an hour to make from start to finish so it's pretty quick but now I haven't I haven't Dramas trip in a while. Missed it but I I needed to and slow Murray's to move onto your projects. 'cause I I didn't have time for anything else. I might go back to it someday. I still have a few like. It's so weird that I ended this right before the pandemic what. What kind of timing is because now? I have a bunch of news stories that I have never told stories of being confined and that kind of thing and would make an interesting book site I might do is. I don't know I'll see how they how much free time I have. 'cause the because right now I have. I also do children's restrictions on the size and now I have contracting now. That keeps me busy so the first off. Yeah I'm looking at boomers right now. It's actually a pretty decent art style. I mean it's not ultra-complicated that's fine. It's a Web four panel web comic like basically a gag strip. It is. Yeah so it's actually pretty good Some pretty good decent art. Thank you I can do better. But it's what kept me going. I mean how I was able to keep memories going on for so long was because he was simple like I. I wish I could have done caller. I would never have enough time to then I had I had two children and through pregnancy. And they're you know infancy anyway. Whatever I? I was really really busy with kids in edges things menu life and I still kept making comics because I had time to do them. Just because they're simple Them that way. I'm I'm trying to do something more complicated for my next comic project. It's still in the script stage so I haven't you know I'm I'm starting to work on. is not nowhere near completion. And even if I had started like if I start fulltime giant fulltime it might take me feeling maybe two years to make a few hundred pages but it's way more detailed that boomer is because I wanted to do something different. How much lifelong was doing memories that point that would have been something especially with the kids? That would have been something. You could've just gone to in just sort of a refuge. The refuge of sort. And how much of the lifeline and was visually. You're something get away from the kids say but it kept me. Sane for sure. Thrilled Trinity to you can. If I didn't know what the time especially first pregnancy it was pretty. I was kind of depressed. Seconds the hormones and everything and I thought everything Draw or the comics that would make. I thought it were pretty bad as I was making them the web. Comic format giving choice. I would make a comic and put it online and then it was out in the world and was too late now and when I read those comics from two thousand fifteen. They're not that I thought we were terrible and then I read them today. And I'm that's funny what's worse the problem. I just remember what China's state of minor was in and I felt terrible about my work but it just I think it helps me to stay. I guess grounded Because when you have children the beginning you kind of lose yourself. You're kind of like what am I. Who Am I? Especially when the first week swear. Don't sleep a lot and that all you do is feed baby and change diapers. Just this. You know occasional half-hour Withdraw Comex. It still made me feel like I'm still me I'm still myself is just. I had a baby now. It's the same life with a baby so it was definitely therapeutic for me the night. I didn't know then but it would. I. I learned later on that. It helped a bunch of pregnant women to cope with read. My comics link. Pregnancy COMEX may become extending. It would help them feel better about themselves or laugh at the kind of life they had now so it was interesting. I definitely lost some readers because of the baby things. Some people were living. You Know Babies Mike. Anything my cup of tea but I gained Atta whole bunch. More people suddenly parents were in my radar. I call mean he usually. I usually hear the web comic insanity rather than keeping people know Egypt. Say there's the weather works for in for me. I and briefly wish sloppy revolutioin. All of that and that hasn't English title was released in English as a small revolution. This one is about. It's fiction it's like a polar opposite to borders. It's fiction drama. It's about Country Treated I. Don't name is not important. I made it up so I'm a country That has been where there's a dictator And there's a revolution brewing. There's a revolution Being organized the main character is a child. She's about ten and she wants to take part in the revolution that the she's a she's a cancer. So what does she understand from the politic aspect of it and what can she do so as things happen in its her. It's about her own personal revolution. What she does she becomes. It's actually the character. The main character is a character created. When I was in high school must have been fourteen or fifteen when I came up with her character and her name. I just did not have a setting for the story. Just laid design. She was almost final. I knew what she has this year. I call hit her baseball head. Weird had the LOU. Cannell looks like a baseball And but I had no little story to tell and when I was in a university many years later I had Treated writing class and I also have the same day. Just actually right before my creative writing. I had a history of the USSR classed. And so I would go come out of that class the USSR with Lake images of Stalin. And and and I when I got into my dreaded writing class and and we we have to write a novella. I like these snower never I might. As well built this distill distill World and put this character and then so I wrote this. I had a good grade for it and people in the everybody in the class heads and read it which was really Scary is usually. I wrote a bunch of stories in my life but not only my best friend would read them and then Salim. My whole glass in university But then people liked it so Couple years later esther had begun. Murray's I saw there was a call for injuries for Polisher in Montreal and working looking for a short story that was like I'm kind of stretched the limits of their the rules for the submissions that they I was selected so my was like accomplish by them a year after so that was my first long for comic and it's not even that long. It's never enough in always read comics too fast. So it's those saddling to get to where comic for months and years and countless hours sound in the world and then your friend calls him and they're like your screen but I read it in twenty minutes comics used children as a metaphor for war. At least show make a comment on war Jewish pfeiffer monroe per apple's pretty famous example I don't know why I did. I decided tonight. I think it's just keep just to have some innocence in there. So what's your next project going to be on decided yet or has decided. I had the script. I know how long it's going to be slow. Things thanksgiving change on it's fiction. It's it's based on some aspects of my life but it's fiction it's With a bunch of new characters I has posted about these characters Wallace especially the main one on my social media I'm looking to find balance between this by light for in a smaller lotion than Beaumaris. 'cause bone is way cartoony and in smaller deletion is. I guess it's still cartooning because they have like ground faces huge is. I'm trying to find an inbetween And it's My books going to be set in in Montreal and business say Day but I'm not sure I read something today. It was interesting that now when you write a Surrey Lake is like before Kovin or astor lakes. We don't know what's coming like. My story is is was written before this whole happened but will we ever go back to like the same life so mine might have to set it before just so I know what I writing about. The future is so uncertain anyway. I can't I can't tell you too much about it. 'cause it's still in it's early stages and I WANNA to keep it cigarette but the main characters a young woman called Odette have She has his haircut illitch. She has this bowl bowl on. I think he's She's Cool. I HER ALLEGRA. Alec joining her a lot. So I'm a little bit of children's illustration that Bisham solid memories or pretty. Have a little bit more fun with it. It's very eyestone stuff. That's closer to Boras than it is to what I'm doing right now but usually it's in color so that's slightly different but what. I'm working on right now. It's a it's in French. It's a serious about which is and they specifically asks for a more Proportions Style and they had fallen in love with some of the MERMAIDS had John for army loss. You're familiar with this Hashtag that's that's happening. Nate Murph Mate where people jaw one mermaid. Every day in May I two years ago. You think way I two years ago did Moore may not sure finished it. You can jaw so many mermaids and awhile. I stood flake all mermaid that they had tried some some more realistic joins and they They wanted that. So it's fun it's different. I'm using it to Get us to some tools that I'll be been using in my in my graphic old. I WANNA do like the programs. That's how I taught myself Studio 'cause I had never used it before really and Us I usually use these children's with station important these to test some techniques and see if I'm comfortable doing long term projects with them and then apply them on a comic comic are more work than children's Trish. I find heavily for your from. Your perspective is a lot more kid because not only judy illustration but you're also having you the writing as well. Yeah I heart. What's your inspiration for that for your drawing style? I mean it'd be from. I'm looking at Fisher. Your children illustrating stuff yet. Looks like a mix of two. Certainly we nickelodeon Nick Tunes and some of the cartoon network stuff especially with the adventure time. That's cool. I've never really watched adventure time. It's probably blasphemy or whatever. I've watched a lot of Steven Universe and I think it's probably I think about have kind of I guess influenced where jaw. Moscow lake the Trendy Animated Mouth I'm not sure where I grab my version. I've I've John. My life and I've had all sorts of influences words. It's fine from comics to video games to Mango Anthony. I'M I've John Missile for years when I was a teenager so The the small revolution styles actually be closer to what I usually draw like John. More like this all my life than Beaumaris which is changed to Sam. Because I've done boomers were so low. Now it's my longest ever project and the notch. Some people have told me that Burma raise looked like a mix of peanuts and also she be style mega and I like that. 'cause IT'S SLEEK MINIMALISTIC CARTOON RESIST. Japanese influences and I think that summarizes it pretty well. Oh definitely I mean. Yeah super deformed our basically everything is drawn just as a almost childlike with those proportions is also. Yeah definitely awesome fun to be and have you got anything else out there. This sort of funding. I mean obviously besides reasoning small revolution. Everything anything else. I- I released the book. Classic was about pregnancy. And it's kind of like glorified as book because it's in the bullring style that so the book his it's the title is nosy. Mets Nelio puppets which moves morning sickness and other small Joyce It doesn't exist enables yet but hopefully someday. I want to get translated and published. It's not as easy as it sounds and so it's not ultra stories but it's inspired by pregnancy. It's ten lake and I don't WanNa say Educational China is his. It's like a portrait of like trimesters of pregnancy attempting. The it's it's real lot serious. I keep making fun of myself I need and it's more it's it's Because it's about pregnancy and it's very books to give to pregnant women it's more adult than boomer is under was. I didn't intend to be all ages but when I started selling two books I noticed that children were checked it by and then I had to watch out in that too. Many swear words in there so that worked though the pregnancy Gorkhas. Del More Has You know psalms where words some unity I talked about six. I talked about that tank saying More and I did it entirely analog so a watercolor and ink and a was a pain in the butt to do it was worth it and so he looks much prettier than boomer I wouldn't have been able to do. Worries the spray for nine years so it's just fun to see that same style and polished way. The Book Looks Real Nice to editor. The publisher is really well-known publisher in connect Europe Logistic but I WANNA do. I WANNA do a second one. That's important love really hard then. Nice thing to have that since I begin doing comics. You know this thing where you can show or sell or frame original pages. I can't really do that. Because Boras marginals are Kinda late on computer paper. They look really ordinary Smaller pollution was entirely inked on the computer. So my pages my pencils Dale crack There were just like a bunch of I wouldn't even face it. Sometimes this is where to hit somebody. Okay Fine Future. Fix Thinning walling and gone by that pregnancy book. Because it's were colour. The pages look really nice person and it's just the fine I guess same non-memory I can find a word see. That's where I told you I was in the struggle and just just fun to look at it. I have this huge binder with pages and I've been selling some framing stem on awesome kinds legacy. Yeah that's the way I was looking for. Sex Toy lacks looks pretty good. Thanks yeah that was fun. The first one I had I pitched it to Erica and Matthew. I I knew the minute I've met them before both of them. Ethnic admit them on Visiting real city I think Kimmel city confident but then the second one they reached for me. they reach out to me because they need help. Because Erica had health issues and They needed to have as many guests comments as they could and so they add just was within a year I think I had just published the first one about sex and pregnancy and it was really heavy otherwise seeing again and they're really fun to do. I enjoy the maintenance basically draw themselves. You actually have sort of impressive resume going thank you. I'm I'm busy. I like to keep missile busy. I like to try new things to the watercolor how much I mean. I know watercolors can't be knowing but at the same time. Leave look pretty impressive when you pull them off. It's still monochromatic though sides. It's not true or it's it's an ink as called. E. Coli Colliding another not sure how to pronounce it. It's water soluble ink and I only used one caller. I'm not good at color at all. But this use this just one color shading rinks. Pale late trump pale to dark. I had to three Toes I suppose it was easy enough for me like I felt confident enough to to use it but a fun story about that ink. Is that on? The INK? Kits belongs to my grandfather who passed away in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight so that ink is old. I am not sure if the pigment is even closed wedding was when he used it. Spec in the eighties. I don't know why ended up with. Might I think my mom kept it. My Mom's also artists although she doesn't ever joy anymore she like she knits. Now she's like. Oh you know basically the same for me like what the Hell Mall. So she gave me the ink. My Grandfather's INC and I've been telling myself that I wanted to use at least for one book before he will dry out. I don't know why not try out. Honestly and so. The ink is really really saturated. I probably some of the. The INK has if Evaporated and is just so such beautiful caller and It's been scan that will so. The originals are much brighter much more saturated than the book which is fine. His people don't know when they look at the book unless I like jaw you know unless I find a with little joining us the ink and then people like. Oh deaths what wet. That's that's the Kohler was supposed to be but I would definitely do another book. That ink was just loudly. Is the in king before it? That was not the best thing I use the light table. But I had to INC on I used Bristol because I want. I need paper to use. The the watercolor on but Briley table wasn't bright enough. So anyway it was. I struggled Chink. The whole book and the Watercolor watercolouring phase was the fun part. But was the last part was along no long battle until the fun part again. I think that's what I had to say like. Everybody has their own process. It's always fun to see what everybody does. In terms of you know how the creator particularly art form so and you're basically working through publisher right now and yes and no Gomez is a complicated case because All ten books some of which are prints forever were limited print runs not printing them Even if people have been asking for them it breaks my heart but I I can't do it. I don't have the money. I don't have the space in my in my apartment to keep people of these boxes and keeping adventure is is a not for me. I guess it's it's really hard so I sell publicity all the books but is find with publisher in Quebec which is also is. It's actually French for publisher from friends but they have BRENCH and I signed with to publish An omnibus like the whole at the complete collection Which is also why I ended where comic because to have a complete collections that stop at some point So yeah it was supposed to come out the same role. Covert happened so the first because it's not going to be just one book because one book for collection would have been sick as a dictionary. Maiming that you know very very thick and it would have been booked selling for a eighty dollars or something and publish it in. WanNa take that risk. They were like no one's GonNa buy it by that big. A book laugher Biden. Some hardcore fans might be they wanted to attract new fans so they're publishing Were probably going to do for books. But they're GONNA be bigger they're going to be hardcover might myself published Blowers are south. Covered there really cheap looking I wanted them to be at least expensive possible. So they're really thin soft covering really thin pages and black and white and the The omnibus going to be hard. It's going to be caller. But there's no way on coloring allnight Boeing Strips. I would love to but that's like sixteen hundred trips and that's about to full like two years of work fulltime. I don't have the time and I don't. I will be paid for this so now and coloring sub comics there's going to be also bonus strips and so that should come out French though September. I guess 'cause we don't know for sure and then I'm GonNa try really really hard to get An English genetic prentice as well. Hopefully maybe nine four books so I would have preferred maybe to kind of like A. Has You seen that complete girls with slingshots? You have okay. This one looks absolutely amazing. Love to have something like that to really big books. Nice let's GonNa be fine. Had like four four books and in might come in a box set at the end and they're going to be really big and bright and I'm really happy with the Which hasn't been revealed yet. I've done it by. I'm not even sure if it's going to be I it's been a look like everything's on hiatus but right now it was supposed to come this last April in the publisher. Not In a hurry to write me to write back to make. She's got other fish to FRY. She works from home. So you know on a real quick. What's different notice between working for publisher working self publishing froze of working with a publisher is definitely distribution and and on printing not handling printing house because printing is expensive Late printing gloom raise the self published books. Not so bad because there has There's small books you know. More like she really But once I did this. Really Really Small Zine Was in color was a collection of Congress Here and there. I just put them all together. And May Zine of it and because it wasn't caller headed printed at the same printer where I have my. I print my boat race which is Apprentice specializes in small trends. So you'll have to print three thousand books to get a price per unit on and so I printed I think hundreds zemes and because it wasn't color printing one hundred scenes was the same bryce and his name was like twenty pages. Or you know something really really small and it was the same price as printing. Three hundred boomers books sir. That was because of the color so right then then he was. It was a staple theme. The boomers book are bound. It's not staple this. I was just like okay. Color is an lake. It's something else entirely so we're talking with the publishers. Defiantly PLUS FOR ADS. Look at the book. My pregnancy is the best looking book I've had ever published its hardcover. It's got rows pine. It's really pretty the there's has again You know there's hardcover book and U. Penn The book. There's like these new patterns the first pages. I don't know how you call us. I want you more but Amari but okay anyway so the Book Looks Really Nice and we'll have discovered if I had done it myself on on the other hand. Sometimes you argue with delicious votes things sometimes. It can be as stupid as leitch come up like I don't WanNa come there but they insist they do it behind your back. I I ride my comics and I don't use a lot of punctuation because I think sometimes it's funny from Sunning sounding I guess the jokes from your. There's no period at the end of the sentence as it's all intentional. If there was no period that ended my sentence I I made that way. It was decision. I I took you know but sung publishers like that and they're like this is another sentence she doesn't have period and then if I argue with them they're going to have often going to have the last word like I don't get to decide they do Oh I didn't talk about distribution publishers. That have a wide distribution. That's definitely a huge huge tro. My pregnancy book is available in Europe. And that's boomer is I sell some on the web to. I don't know how been sold in France maybe fide. So this is a whole different world but also sometimes I deal with people who don't know because I've done everything myself. The page layouts and covers and the title desiring interesting. Because I'm used to doing it by myself. I often find. I often clash with the graphic designers paired with like sometimes I feel they understand what I want and I would. I wanted to it myself but I can't I have to explain to them. And sometimes disagreements and published. I never talk to them directly. I don't have to talk to the publisher Ad. They talk to the graphic designer. Then the graphic design your speaks to the publisher has to get back to me. It's always like it takes forever and sometimes it's something really stupid like can you please change farms on the page numbers and then it takes months before it happens and I have to to be really nagging and I think sometimes I would like to do everything myself again but then I rent. I'm reminded that older books. GonNa have much nicer distribution much nicer than if I had done it myself and also it's not me paying out of total target so there's pros and cons to every everybody. It's nice to be in charge when you're self publishing certainly nice to you decide you do whatever you want. How all right Yes the whole time to wrap things up and you final thoughts on anything. We haven't covered or anything. You'd like to say thank you. I said pretty much to say thank you. Thank you and of course tour. You if like to plug. Hey May being one of my best friends from for years? I don't know if you know her. Her Pen name is cab. Have you heard of her? Yes Navy not probably have this me so so. She did the web comic nuclear winter that was published by boom studios last three different volumes. I think was over the course of last two years anyway right now. She's working on any web comic town and So you like letter U Utah Comic Dot Com and it's gorgeous black and white and she uses creams and it's just one of the best looking what comics I've been reading recently and I'm not saying that because she's my friend. I'm saying that because I'm really proud and I it looks amazing and she deserves way more recognition for what she does and Yeah so. I guess let's plug so cabs you town comic. She's a started recently. Like a few months ago okay. I'll definitely make sure there's a URL listening for that. Well it's been great having you. Yes that's driving me and was a little bit of luck. I should be headed by this evening but it probably won't live to election next Wednesday. You were finish this. Oh Yeah it's earlier. It's getting late it doesn't matter. I'm a writer so I have insomnia thing down. Pat. I bet awesome. Okay thank you L. Be sure to spread. The word went comes at much appreciate. Have a great day thanks. This is a Webcam brought to you by positive. Dot Com. You podcast hard. Finding next bench will show. Positives has taken up by illegal to find the best podcasts out. There she's been less time searching more time listening as P. O. D. F. A. B. S. DOT COM and. That's our show. Those actions were initial. Check out our patron take dot com slash two spares Twa. Oh speech me cast next episode in Interview and I'm working on transcription vary shows. We also have an election. Staff offering to mini casts offering writing business. Tips wells affirmations to keep your writing. We also have curated playlist on Youtube with all the shows. Broken out of different playlists based on topic also include. Good part of the many castes is well as the elections freeze to police. A quarter page. Download the Alexis happens superb. You Youtube Channel and please talk to us on facebook. Thank you and have a great day.

publisher Hornets murder baseball John Missile Beaumaris writer Murray Boras twitter America Joe Shuster Calf Arches husted Jim Shock Comics Hurley knicks Youtube
#028 - Connecting to a Building Automation System using the BACnet Protocol with Todd Hustrulid

The Sprinkler Nerd Show

33:40 min | 1 year ago

#028 - Connecting to a Building Automation System using the BACnet Protocol with Todd Hustrulid

"Hey, guys. Welcome back to the Sprinkler nerds show. This is episode twenty eight and I'm your host. Andy Frey. Today, we are going to get into something that I've been working on for probably almost my whole career in the irrigation industry when I say working on that. Sort of a generalized statement it's a question that I came up when I was working Chapel Valley and there was building engineers that would ask us, hey, can you connect that irrigation system to our Johnson controls building automation system and back then I was Kinda like what can we do? What? Hun? No Mandy these timers are are standalone units that sit on the outside of your building or inside and the we cannot connect to it. So fast forward almost twenty years and today it is absolutely possible to connect and Control System to the building automation system. And to do that, we use a protocol called back net. So today's episode is going to be all about back net and I've got todd husted with me. Todd is one of the engineers at baseline control systems, and he is specifically responsible for helping to scope out back net projects and then visiting sites in projects and helping with the implementation on the server side setup. So today, I'm excited because we're going to. Get technical and we're going to go into full nerd mode here with Todd and discuss everything has released irrigation control systems and a building automation and controls, and how to merge those two together to provide a solution for clients that are looking to manage maintain in view the data from the allegations system on their building automation and control system. So without further ado, let's jump in today's episode with Todd all about back net. If you are an irrigation professional older new who designs installs or maintains high end residential commercial or municipal properties, and you want to use technology to improve your business to get a leg up on your competition. Even if you're an old school era gator from the days of hydraulic systems, this show is for you. Todd Hey man welcome to the sprinkler nerds show. Glad to have you today. Thank you good to be here. Yeah absolutely man that it's been little while. been wanting to have you on because you and I always have fun kind of bullshitting on the back into baseline about different types of technology and we have the I should say I have the luxury of spending time with you as relates to building automation and controls integration some looking forward to this conversation today, and before we jump into all that I kind of wanted to. Set the stage with with you and maybe learn a little bit about your background and how you found your way into the irrigation industry. Right. Well. I guess I. We had year Gatien on the farm growing up. So I learned a lot about moving hand line and all the other stuff that goes along with. with with dealing with irradiation there and then With the university and got eggington airing degree. So continued on with You know the agricultural aspect of my education and ended up connecting with baseline as director of sales was our neighbor. For Awhile. And so after he moved in and we've got no, we started talk more about. What the what we all did for a living and talk about baseline and near Gatien fees. We ended up for. That of building a bit of a working relationship there and I got involved with a company through him. So okay. So before coming to baseline. full-time you're working in the AG engineering side of things. Well, I was doing engineering. I ended up when I graduated it was The job market wasn't very strong and so the offer I got was from utility. Company. So I ended up going to work for a power company doing. More electrical engineering automation engineering. Down And So I did that for quite a while and then Iman partner baseline initially and. Work in. Technology application really is I think are the best lady despite my role whether it's internally within the company Director of Right. So when you're doing work for the power company see this is good I didn't even know some of this. This is awesome. engineering can mean all kinds of things mechanical and electrical and. What exactly where you're doing for the electrical company. Well. I was doing project work primarily, and so we were building new plants in the beginning and then my focus was on the automation side. So we started doing large control system upgrades and replacements. So the last big project had at our company was control system replacement that one of their big woods, the coal fired plant at that time and about twenty five, hundred megawatt plant, and or different independent systems that we integrated into one big system. You know very, very large scale stuff It was good job with a good project lots of different things to do and coordination and I kind of oversaw the implementation of the role that I had. We did the design. Do. We went out for bids and pick vander in then provided vendor support in the vendor we picked with actually inbox borough mass I got spent some time back there. s sounds wicked. Good. It was interesting. It was it was it was a big challenge and there were a lot of personnel changes that went the place during the project is the company that made the equipment got sold as partway through the job, and so all kinds of logistical things to consider. But that the end of the day the plant came online on schedule and stayed running. So that would really measure. It sounds much more complicated than twenty, four volt soul noise on and off. Well there was we used forty eight volts so. But. It's all about coordination and all about programming and testing and making sure that when. Excuse that when you tell something to do something doesn't doesn't at the right time in the right. Way and. Like what we're doing now with the irradiation stuff, it's just instead of controlling boilers and turbines and things like that. It's. It's more. Cool. So let's see before we get into the again the topic of conversation what exactly is your role at baseline? What do you do on a day-to-day basis? Well, you know I do all kinds of different things I think the best kind of the best way to capture technology application. So I do it it infrastructure support for both internally baseline and I knew that for customers as well. program application. So we have a bunch of different programs US within the company to manage our systems and our business processes and accounting and all that sort of stuff. So I support those systems and. Customer side you know we have our our our standalone servers and back net manager and so again, application it's about. What's the customer looking to Do what the? Solutions Are they looking to. And then how do we do that and so technically within baseline I'm under the IT. Umbrella. But I do I and support. Little little bit engineering once in a while software type stuff and then But a lot of my work is customer facing. Stuff that's you know that's where the Value Amis where I can generate. The most value is when you're helping customers solve their issues no optimize the use of their resources and integrate their systems so that they can they can basically manage their sites or their organizations however ABROA- their management those in a way that they're. Else, them basically all these operational things going to go into the background. So I know let's see baselines and Boise. Idaho your home where you from originally well I I was born in eastern Washington and now. Live in Canada now for the last ten years, and so I go back and forth now between west of Calgary. Outside the spokesman. So calm. Cool. All. Right. So let's see my I. I can still remember this is going back to about two thousand and two when I first got into irradiation business and was doing sales estimating for large irrigation contractor in DC. Baltimore. Area, we would occasionally have requests to. Connect negation system to the building automation system and. We were you know I I remember thinking I wonder why are they want to do that and then saying something like no, you can't connect you know this rain at the time. Esp. Controller to the building automation system. I, mean, maybe you could hijack the twenty four volt terminals on the controller and provide some sort of a relay to operate the system. But there isn't any way to directly connect these types of devices at that time. But if we fast forward. Fifteen actually almost twenty years now. It's entirely possible to connect. Irradiation system to the building automation, system? And so this is the topic I wanted to talk to you about and on the baseline side of things we have what we call the. Net manager, and so typically when I use the word back net, it's almost deer in the headlights people go what is back net? What are you talking about, and so let's just start there. You know what? What exactly does the term back net mean. Well. Back Nets is is an acronym it stands for building automation, and controls. Network. And it's was originally developed. In. The H back industry, the climate controls industry the way to provide a common language or devices equipment talk to each other and share information and. and Y- able to control each of send control signals in Beta. Sigma back for each other. And, before back net everything was done proprietary architectures. So if you wanted to talk to them under a product, you need to be new the vendor A. CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE VENDOR A. Computer box and. You know in many cases vendor a had a great solution for let's say air conditioning, but maybe not a great solution or other building automation environments. And so you ended up with multiple user interfaces and the operators ended up having to learn multiple systems and they day multiple systems than those just a lot of segregation between different functional elements of running the operating your systems, and so back that was developed of the way to try to provide interoperability between these different systems and send data back and forth. Allows them to. Collect. The information into. A smaller number of user interfaces and provide a common console basically to. Run. The London is. So would it be? Would it be fair to say that? Before back net, you would you would have to have all the same manufacturers Let's say thermostats in order to talk to them because you had to have that manufacturers of thermostats operating system to talk to that device but you couldn't use thermostat company as software to talk to Thermostat company B'S DEVICES Yeah. Basically, you know, I, it's things about more sophisticated really old thermostats were you know simple on off the vices, but as things started to get more sophisticated and you had. the ability to change you know the the the programming on time based things off. Based things and there's all sorts of additional parameters now that he'd been put into place and no, that information was not readily available and so When you start talking about working on a common platform, a common infrastructure, it's now These devices are speaking the same language and now you can have interoperability between. So in some ways, a rough comparison might be you know how people that speak a particular language. So English speaking people can popular each other and understand each other and then Spanish speaking people understand each other maybe not the English and Spanish. May Not be able to talk each other and so you come up with some sort of a common basis that allows you know information to. Translate through the system and and now everybody and understand sort of the essential pieces of data along before. Got It. So back net just to repeat you know that's be a C net which stands for building automation control network is the common language. So any device that is going to be connecting to the automation system. As it is today is developed using the back net language as the common. Language to connect all devices sat right. Pretty much that's the that is platform that is been standardized the across industry, and there's a committee that oversees the development and implementation and make sure that the everything stays current publishes the specifications on how it works and how to ensure that the devices that you produce a compliant with the. With the standards so that when you sell your device, it's back net certification so that you know as the end user, you can plug it into your system in but great. So let's Let's move along what is required to connect to a building management system. Can any controller do it I know we built special things of baseline but what's required? Well obviously, you need to have some infrastructure to utilize the back net data so you need a. Console that setup to talk to the devices out in the field, and so we don't produce that particular component, the user interface piece, the graphics development engine, and things like that. So you know you wanna have some infrastructure either in place or or being supplied in parallel with. with what we are not what we produce on the back that side. So you can talk to the end of Isis and then bring that data back in, put it onto the computer screen and neither we lay it out visually with maps or other graphics and things or just know. Presentation. That sort of things you want to have some back that infrastructure in place to? the talk of the back net devices Once that's in place than you know, you need the network architecture of the network infrastructure to provide the communication back and forth. Between, the different devices and once that's done, then it's really just a matter of figuring out what data you WanNa see what signals, WanNa. Know receive in San than and figuring that your console and pretty much that's it. There's some networking stuff that you need to configure. Obviously, it's back net interface that we work with is the Ethernet based or call, and so you need to have your network architecture set up to accommodate through the equipment. So you know Ip address and routing and all been so that back net. One of the special characteristics back is that it uses what's called broadcast message on a network, which means that the license all need to be on the same local area network it doesn't the past routers. Very, yards and tools to do that generally speaking it needs to be all on the same local area networks so that a broadcast messages. Vices. Okay. Got It. So let's talk a little bit intangible terms and we can speak to to how baseline connects because that's what we're both familiar with does the controller itself as the piece of hardware? Talked to the to the system or how how do we? Step. Back. To connect the controller to the building automation system right while we. Baseline the controllers they talked to. We have the APP manager application, which is sort of our proprietary data interface sensually. So at manager have a bunch of different features that are part of it developed out of base manager, which was the original application. So for lack of a better term, that's the central control software hate using that don't like using that word but for irrigation purposes that's baselines central control software which is the cloud hosted Herat it's it's it's a server. Application which yes, it's the central control. It's the place where you would go. It's kind of your your single or your first point of contact with the system. So you can use that to you and talk to the field devices. saw in in in many ways, it's got some similar functionality, the back net or the H. Back Network Systems. In that you know you're consolidating all the information into a single quarter of entries. Single user interface base manager is the baseline version of that and what we provide them as an interface from based from at manager base manager to the back net. the back that interface actually goes doesn't go to the control directly at goes from new, the the back net host that out to at managing, and then that's where the data exchanges, right. So on the baseline side of things just to repeat what I think you just said the controller talks to base manager, which is baseline central control software in the cloud, all the data. Is stored there in the database and then the back net manager piece, which maybe we can think of that as a translator in it extracts the information from the base manager cloud hosting software, and then makes it available to the building automation system in the language that they're looking for. i. e the back net language that sound right Yep. That's correct. You've got it on, of course. base base manager at manager's cloud as the cloud hosting instance but. There is the option local food. So it's but yes, the communication path would be controller. At Manager. Back. Manager the back that system and then back the other direction the back. About Manager. At Manager. We're kind of moving data around but has to hop through a couple of different places to get from the controller to let's just say the semen system or the Johnson controls system. It's gotTa go into our cloud server through the back translator, and then it's available in their building automation system. And so with that said, where does this back net piece which is server piece? Where does that live? Where does that get installed at the facility? Well, there's a couple of different options on that, but the back net manager software and the server instance for back net who's been beyond their local system. So the because it's talking back net, it has to be on the local area network on the back net server on the back net posters. So that it can share data back and forth back that manager does is it establishes a round of communication out to at manager and the manager on the cloud. The net goes out onto the Internet connects up after manager if the manager is on a local host. EPA customer site than it will talk to local APP manager which is also been connected out controllers in Lille. Got It. Well, no wonder it takes a guy like you set this up because what you just said for most people listening probably just went in one ear and out the other ear and they're like, what in the hell did todd just say Yes it's there's a lot of pieces to the puzzle. Love. It's. You know there's some diagrams in our documentation which probably a little bit more clear. But but there are you know some stops along the way for the date of between the will save the Irradiation Val and? User Console. Yup, and there's you think of near Gatien Control. There's a lot of data points. There's valve on and off. There are alarms like flow conditions there in the baseline system and their soil moisture sensors there's the water usage and so. There's a whole list of. Data. Points that could be collected I know that baseline has a list. This called the picks document that basically lists out here are the fifty data points that you can collect from the system and use on the building automation. System. Right. You. Better you bet the picks is a Essentially, document format that is while the back net standard and it says, it stands for protocol implementation conformance statements. So what it does is it provides all the information that you would need to understand what data the device is publishing and what data is looking to receive. An how it's do me. So it's got information about addressing. House the data presented in back there. Out of you send it males. And so yes, that that document is is on the baseline system website. Under the back net manager area. So let's. As we get closer to to wrap this up I, WanNa have a look into the future. I guess because oftentimes when you and I are working together and we started talking about back net, we start thinking about why did back even exist on these buildings and then we think about How does that affect our industry? One of the thoughts that I had? Is that if back net was developed to help. You could have many different manufacturers of components all on the same system today in the irrigation controls world we live in a complete virtual another words a baseline central control system can only talk to baseline controllers. A rainbird system can only talk to rainbird controllers a CAL since two cal. Since we there's no way to have one manufacturer software work with another manufacturer's hardware. And so one of the things as I vision out is that can become a real problem because if you are a city county municipality, School System University and you have a hundred different controllers and you may be have. Twenty that are existing on one manufacturer system and you have twenty on another right now, you have to retrofit the entire campus. In order to centralized them onto one platform. And so as I. Think about the future and where this could go. If irrigation manufacturers would or would develop a all develop into the back net protocol than the end user. Could. Write that into this back and say we would support any irrigation hardware that is also back net compatible. To to some extent, remove the manufacturers control capability so that it's not proprietary anymore you know they don't have to log into rain birds for these twenty log into baseline for those twenty. They can just look at their building automation system and see all of the different pieces of hardware and with that said, there are some devices that are just so old, they'll never be possible. But what do you think about that as it relates to where technology is going and maybe the software race versus the hardware race and proprietary hardware versus non proprietary hardware? Right? Well, I. Think you're seeing a lot of a lot of that happening in these various cloud platforms, these API integration data management, and sort of. The focal point of a lot of instincts single sign on as another example that you see. but you know how many passwords loggins the after remember in these environments and know how often are you in one system and you're like, aw man, it would sure be nice if I had this available in different system. So you know most of those cloud based systems that you see these days are primarily focused on on business systems, data management, but you. Know we see the same thing when you come from the process automation systems where you've got basically take Vera Dacian control system of bowels and sensors while ears and average reminders that span that by orders of magnitude and You know they've been dealing with this challenges well for many years and the more you can share data between platforms, the better you can Control, your systems, the more efficient that is for you keep track of what's going on. In. The easier it is to manage your resources and to monitor performance and monitor costs and monitor Come up with ways of improving how you run you run your business as alert. and. You know we have customers that do abloh reported, for example, and so were low across back net into their back net system at which point it turns around and sends it back. There you billy. Absolutely that's that's actually a great example. If all of the data is not stored in one system the user has to. Log into another piece of software with another password run a different report export that report may be consolidated in Excel to the master water use report. Instead of just piping that you're Gatien water use data right into the building management system where they already have single log in they already have the reports that they're looking for. They already have the messaging alarms and alerts that they want to have the people that want them sent to. And so it's that sort of consolidation of data all in one platform, right? Absolutely in in alerts in an alarm is another good example of that. First of all, you have a single point of low through. So there's an awareness of what's going on and then you can distribute those alarms and messages out in a way that it's your resource model. Right so if people take vacation, it's easy is you know about one area of? Contact the man the alerts the alarming make sure you're not missing things and make sure that people aren't getting woke up at two o'clock in the morning on their holidays because the alarm came into their cell phone. So it's it's really all about managing information having the ability to customize that information you know where it's going and seeing what are you doing? It's easy produced a, but you need to make that data useful. And consolidating data is really one of the he ways of doing that because it provides context of what you're looking at Yup and if the. Deregulation Gatien contractor if they're. Lucky but. It's rare that in your Gatien contractor has a weekly check up on a system. You know it's typically two weeks or monthly. However the facilities guy or Gal is there every day of the week and so if there is a High flow condition or zone valve or a soul in order issue at the nation. System. The facilities person can be right there to take a quick look and then call in the professional to assist you know when it's above and beyond their their control but there on site every day, and so they should be getting these messages with the ease of not having to get in and learned baseline system, rainbird system, Toro system, just right in the control system that they're looking at and managing every day. In there's real value to that. You know and now you've got. You know if you've got flow data link back your utility information and your usage data and your costs while it's all under one umbrella. So I can tell you by have a system that's integrated together like that. I can tell you in terms of dollars how much they can spend on irrigation last month right without having to log into the irrigation manufacturers system straight up in the building automation and Control Platform. That Yeah. Very cool. I can. We could vision where this is going to go probably most of that will eventually come true I an interesting parallel. In the home space and many of you guys listening probably have some sort of home automation controls whether it be just as simple nest thermostat or maybe a ring camera. ET CETERA I tend to link any device I can into my Amazon Alexa APP. So for instance, I have an outdoor plug plugs into the we'll call them the party lights and exactly one hour before sunset every day those lights come on and then Alexa turns them off at ten thirty pm but I can just get out my phone and say Alexa turn on outdoor patio lights. And the devices don't have to be made by Amazon, but they are just simply Alexa compatible. And just like you mentioned earlier taught it's not the device talking to Alexa it's the software behind the device, the two pieces of cloud software talking to each other. That enables that to happen. So it's not as if I'm. I could log into the the WIFI plug into that software but I don't really ever access it because it's connected to my Alexa APP. So I manage it all through the Alexa APP precisely in knots Berry Very. Similar to the way, the the baseline system works Yep just taking that that. Inter connectivity of data from the residential consumer level right up into the commercial and industrial level, which is the the back net protocol. Exactly. Awesome. Well, this has been a good conversation. We'll have to hit on a man hopefully for everybody listening you learn something new and if you'll learn. Take away just one thing it's that back net is the key word. So be listening somebody asks you about. Connecting to a building automation and control system, you want to ask them if the device should be back net, compatible and back night is the key word to kind of be the glue that ties all this together. So keep that in mind and keep a lookout for these types of projects and todd thanks so much for joining us today. Really appreciate it. Obstinately always enjoy visiting ends. We have good discussions. Thanks for the opportunity. We'll catch you on the other side. Have a good one youtube. Take care chairs. and.

todd husted Gatien Alexa Johnson Gatien WanNa director of sales Andy Frey Mandy Chapel Valley Idaho Amazon Boise Baltimore US School System University
Shavuot: The Ways of Receiving Torah

Elmad Podcasts

36:54 min | 2 years ago

Shavuot: The Ways of Receiving Torah

"And welcome to the Pol center for Jewish educators podcast series. Konica PASOK, import him into a ball, each episode rabbi see Hirschfeld we'll be joined by guest educators who will reveal the deep meaning each festival or year cycle, bent Battelle, mid says, Wayne wine enters secrets come out, so prepared to be intoxicated, as our great educators, each bring a text him. But encapsulates the spiritual essence unholy work that time of year that will change how and our students lives, the ever this podcast episode is sponsored by party seminar. Alumna winter two thousand fifteen Dopp to Judy and glencoe in memory of her beloved parents, ROY, and Joan Abrahamson, Zia, non liver. Welcome to the bar. Okay. Hello, and welcome to the famous and infamous. Jewish educational podcast from the party's institute, particularly from the parties center for Jewish educators. I got that, right. It's our Hanukkah Pessac and poor him podcast where we discuss the hugging the Jewish holidays with other fine. Excellent educators here at days with the goal of both offering you, little personal inspiration. And some if you're teaching and education, some ideas, you might wanna use with your suits, participants, our that might be relevant. We are, of course, discussing the upcoming holiday of shoveled. And with us today, addition to our executive producer behind the scenes Reuven Margaret who's holding the microphone. We have Seagram and Rachel Friedrich's, both outstanding teachers educators coaches whatever else we want to say who are going to share a taxed and some ideas and. Reactions. And here we go. So I'm looking to see who wants to start to see if anybody's waving at me, Rachel, yo pay if we start with you. Hi everyone. I'm Rachel rejects excited to be joining the podcast. Just in the Nick of time, the holiday cycle for the school year starts, wrapping up. So I picked the text from Ruth Rabba, obviously McGee that route is the McGee. We read on chevro-. And so it's as defined themes from the reading and the rabbis interpretation of that reading as it connects to the to the hug, but before we actually look at the drudge that I chose I just wanna talk for moment about McGee latte, route, and generally wise understood to be connected to the holiday of chevro-. So one can have straightforward answer is that Chevron is called Qasir the holiday, the harvest and the book deals with harvesting the wheat crop. And so there's that kind of agricultural connection, but of course, there's always other possible explanations, or interpretations, and one that I wouldn't suggest here is the kind of the theme of Husaid or kindness that appears. In the Makila, it's sort of motif that runs throughout famously right? No me is. Appreciates the kindness that root showed her by kind of staying with her. And, you know, even tells route that God will, then do kindness for you and exchange for the kindness, you've done for me, and the word Husted itself is repeated numerous times in the book. And so clearly that's one of the core themes of the book, and then so then the question is, well than does that have anything to do with chevro-, and the Madrid chose to discuss is kind of picks up on this team of class or kindness. And it's from the second pair of Ruth Rava fourteenth addressed there, which reads, I'm only reading a piece of it reads, I'm Ravi, Zahra mcgilla zoo aimed by looked to look tile for Lowy, Saul bellow hotel Valenica of. To come a scout. Tove ligamnents seem right. So it's interesting 'cause there is kind of making an assumption that, if there are no Alexa, right. If there's no clear answer. Oh, thank you. Yes. Of course. I'm sorry. Okay. Yes. Let me hint. Hint. Look at my Hindi. Translation that. Okay. Yes. Zahra says this book of Ruth doesn't have anything in it concerning with laws of impurity, or lords of purity, not with what's forbidden and not with what's permitted. So why is the book written to teach us the greatness of the reward for acts of loving kindness that we got? Thanks. Okay. So the Senate RV their makes, of course as that, you know, is there any point of to above that isn't dealing with and he has an answer. Wait, you might have -ssume that, but you're wrong because books don't deal with do, in fact, have purpose and the purpose of Mckee latte, route is to teach us how important. You know, acts of said of custody acts of kindness, are in the case of this book, right? It seems there's you get directly rewarded for those acts. Right. So you're motivated to behave in a certain way thinking of the needs of others, putting others before yourself. You know going above and beyond for the sake of others. All these things that we see in the vocal Ruth. Okay. So maybe that roots here to teach us about and we read Mickey latte route on Chevrolet. So. What's the connection? For it's terrible. The connection between said and chevaux so I'll let agronomical I answer, second. You know, of course, not there's possibility fee push back as well. But I wanted to at least consider it before reject the premise of the question. So I'm thinking out loud. I'm not convinced that this Madrid that you quote it over here is coming to answer that question. Right. It could be redressed as coming to talk about something else. But it's there is a connection between them. Then it sounds to me, like, assuming that shovel out this, the time that I gave us the Theron. That's what we are celebrating, then maybe that itself as an act of custard. And that was an act of that is modelled, and then mcgilla comes to model a whole different kinds of said, because obviously, none of us can give the Torah at least not in the same on did. Those nice, so. We'll have the background affects of the reveal take care of that. So my sociation wise that since we read the Sarah IV, bro. Dent the ten commandments and what's given first Jewish people, when God reveals his presence is law that you could come with impression that law is the only way in which we serve God relate to God, or the God is concerned about, so I like that draft as telling us that we're getting the wrong message. If we think that's the case has said, which is so hard to define because tartikoff with rules for us it right? It's more an attitude a posture a commitment that can express itself in different situations in different ways. So it's not a legal language in a lot of ways, and it's not concerned can never fulfill your requirement for us, or you're never done doing requested doesn't only apply in certain times of the day or during the week. So I feel like it's reminding us that whole world of religious spirit. You'll life. That is not rooted in how at least not in the traditional sense of the word. But it's rooted in something else. How you relate to another? But I've modeled here as an educator is outsourcing, the hard, intellectual works other people, so that you have to do it yourself note to teach is that they're listening great. Thank you for sharing. So, yes, you both think of an idea that I had my brain began maybe thinking about, but you each articulated them really nicely. Something to be said kind of this idea of 'Mantorras like a model of kind of this amazing gift. Right. And that certainly a form of we've as well. Got this wonderful treasure that generation we have. Exactly. You know, this idea that we're constantly receiving the Torah, and it's constantly evolving generation to generation as new generations, take upon themselves, mental of tower excetera that language that we often use right? Sort of the model of like the gift that keeps on giving. Right. This idea that the ultimate said, is when you in power someone to become independent, and no longer be reliant, or elsewhere, stucco, rather, but not reliant on Kearney more. And so, you know, we've been given this gift and we constantly can re engage constantly relatives relevant. So it's gift that keeps on giving so to speak, which certainly I think could be argued is an interesting model. For for us said. So as a teacher, I guess, another thing that I was thinking about, in general, what is that very often aligns with the end of the northern hemisphere and of the school year. And so, is there something that we can kind of mind there is this kind of leads us out, you know, wraps school year? Beginning of summer vacation, etc. And so if there's something about this intersection between you know we stay up all night. And we learned around that receiving the Torah and cherishing, you know, our tradition. And kind of with this veil now that I'm positing, we can consider as well of thinking about the role that can play in the learning of Torah. And how that might then also kind of connect to the end of the year. In other words, if you as a teacher sort of had both. At academe eight cognitive learning goals for your students, but hopefully also sort of affective. Spiritual heart goals for your student. Is there some opportunity here to pull these themes from show vote and kind of use them to culminate reflection coming at the year and spurred reflection in your students about, you know, how they've grown in Torah, and how they've grown in has set? And in what ways those things are interconnected, which, I think, hopefully, we think they are you shouldn't have one without the other. As, as a way for students to kind of embrace the learning, and the growing, in lots of different ways that they've done, of course the year. And of course, the set them up for the hug, and then the summer vacation, that's soon to follow. Yeah. I don't know if either of the other educators here have given thought to kind of the unique role that Chevron I think hug eighty SRI. And the start of the school year is something we think a lot about voted end of the year. I've seen less less discussing less written about physically. As you were talking Rachel, but struck me was that you were talking about said as opposed to. At one point in Qasr. We're give him in a fish infested as when you teach them into fishing. Right. And is really Ebeling of, of somebody to go out on their own that seems really appropriate for the end of the year because one of the things we try to do as teachers is I think is to get the students to the point where we become a necessary and they can go out on their own. So the end of the year, shove loaded a time to reflect on where they have come in that process of being able to go out on their own. How much have we been successful in Arcus to our students and making them really? Independent owners cursing races scary question at the end of the year. Do they see the tourists said or they see is this burden? That's put upon them right? And after year where they have homework and tests, and it's been part of their school experience. So now the question is have we given that? Sense that tower is not just another class or or topic, but it's something much more. We would want them to see it as a gift. And now there's something that's been imposed and Jewish. People have their problem also right with no one's using that means rushed. But the mountain over their head, right? That maybe we didn't. We weren't so excited when it came down to it received the tour either, but maybe God of the same educational problem you had to force sake, but he awfully wants us to see as I said, as a gift and not as something that's imposed upon us. So that's very powerful thought. Okay. It's grim at your up. You give me a perfect segue and good. I tried to. I was twenty with that mid dress to bring that here today. Chose a different one, but it comes through. Almost the same place. Madrid in the free. Interim trust. Basically commenting on sukey from Z new, but that reflect back on the whole scene of Tonto addresses phones. It's fairly long draft, I'll simply read selections from it because shindig lock those are fully tained to write these real, though. I'll you thrilled via to Nagoya are called when God king to give the two ratty through early didn't just approach Israel, buddy approach to all the other nations for it, and then drag goes through a series of nations, that he approached ask them if they wanted to receive the torot and each one of them for variety of reasons rejected it. Drives to be free and was in a holding the Kabila to run. We can't accept that because the two rivals against one of our core principles, whether it's corporate spoil of, of theft, our culture is based on theft raw culture is based on murder or something like that, until finally. God came to beneath rail ask them are you going to accept the two right? And they accepted it with, with Nova tation. They said, not seventy sh- Mars opposed to asking to asking what's invisible, the others did the said, sevenish mom, we will do it says. And then an hour, very Tillerson reversal. I love this Midrand child because I it was taught me with great love. And, and I thought the address said beautiful things about the Jewish people in house specialty were as opposed to the rest of the nations in the world. As a young adult. I had a lot of trouble with his drudge because it bothered me a lot, if bothered me that Madrid was knocking everybody else. You don't need to knock everybody else in order to in order to say that you're good. And then those Shen notion of, of the of the supremacism of, we're better than everybody else. And that's why God gave us the Toronto very uncomfortable with that for many, many years. I fell in love with this Madrid. Again. Over the last ten to fifteen years, because I began to look through a completely different set of eyes. When you look at the nations that are that are listed here in Madrid. So he goes to a soph-. He goes to jail. He goes to moan and MO off. And you looks I list of nations that list of Asians is essentially the list of people's from the Abraham line that were rejected. This is the story of Saint Brigitte. This Madrid is really the story of safer capture them and says, if you want to stand why God came to the Toronto the Jewish people, you can't possibly begin to think about that until you understand the context, the context of the book of Brite, and in a bigger picture. What does that mean? It means that essentially God really did want to give the Toronto everybody. God created the world, you'd increase Jews equally unions, and he wanted to have relationship with all people and somehow another forever reasons that we're not going to go into now but somehow or another that failed and failed once fail, the second time failed once when the story of no out could fill the second time. And the story of Vail until finally said, okay, we have to change plan. We have to go, and I need to work with, with, with one of them, I need to have somebody in the inside down there, who's going to work with the rest of the people. We choose our them, and it turns out that, that within our family. Some of some of, of the family was considered to be worthy of whatever reasons of continuing, but, but they weren't ready yet, right? I mean they had the potential to continue and others were not. And then the same thing happening. It's family. And what you have is you have a winnowing down the book of brief sheet is winding down of how God, chooses his partners here on earth. That's what this is all about. Who's going to be the giving? The Torah is nothing gift that is bestowed upon us. But rather it is it is the opportunity that God has given us to become his partners in sharing his message with the rest of humanity. Haven't we become emissaries to the rest of humanity? That's my simple. Reading of. My simple reading now of, of that redraft. So would it doesn't it takes all of the entire book of gray sheet, and, and says, now let me tell you what that is all about. That is how you prepare the people who are going to God's emissaries to the rest of the world. Now that doesn't mean that it worth perfectly from that point. Let's, let's get this straight. But, but that's the background behind behind this new drudge. The reason I chose to bring today aside from the fact that I think is appropriate for for shoveled out. And, and I think the message itself is a valuable message in terms of how view others in the rest of the world are we got gave us the tour because we're better than everybody else. God gave us the terrar- because he, he wanted somebody to be able to bring his message the rest of you, ma'am. I thought it was a profound profound message in my own. The all sort of interaction with me, Josh from general, this drudge and specific, we hear them as children, and we relate to them in very childish kinds of terms, and then we hit our adult years, and we challenge them in every way possible, and for good reasons because we're challenging the childish reading of the drudge. Some people get stuck at that stage and they say, okay and just and just flowed out. But the challenge is an important stage in order to be able to get to an appreciation of the Madrid as, as reflecting more profanity kinds of ideas that sometimes only adults can mean actually begin to pre sheet. I think we go through that our students to that as well. For teaching lamentably school, so younger children will will absorb. But if you give them and just take it in when they get to the high school year is going to be a lot of challenging, and we need to embrace that challenging. That's a very important part of, of Vetter relationship with tore up. And then to give them. Pathways that they can learn to explore on their own that, that will help them understand that the challenging is going to could lead them too much deeper appreciation of some of the cordial values. Responses. Yeah. No, I love that kind of arc that you painted in terms of progression that, I can probably many of us can relate to in our journeys as learners of Torah. And I think. Yet, I think that speaks to very much this idea of, you know, Matana arise you know. We were given this gift and now it's on us to make of it, what we will, and naturally within one person that a look very different and certainly between teacher and student that look different in between generation to generation that look different. And that I think, is that process is very much built into this whole notion of, of my time. And why are we learning all night each year every year because every year, it's a new Gaijin? There's something else to discover their we're bringing new self to that process. And so two something that we like last year. Now, we have a challenge for, etc. Something along those lines. I think that's a lovely idea. Also reminder of that difficult for softball question. Why did all the Jewish people got the Toronto fantastic wonderful, then why wouldn't God want everyone to have it, and I think they've okwu of universalism particularism, which I think for kids and young adults and everyone every Jewish person who's who also consider themselves. A humanitarian is is, is struggling with that question. And I think it's important reminder that as we're thinking about that question of the Jewish people receiving the Terada the next question for some is so why not everybody else. What are we saying? When we don't say it's everybody else in the same time we care about everybody else. I think as you pointed out. That's a question awesome words from safer. Braschi. Also, right? Why our ham, and then why is this family? Get whittled down until you get Jakko co authored the Taran hasn't really explained. Why one is worthy one is not worthy. So it shows that there's, there's a deep challenge in the celebrate ori- cheesecake base festival that could really emerge for a lot of suits. Once they start to reflect on it, in terms of receiving Matera. I guess I'm up now. Is that Greg grew ravines? So I chose something there very radical. I'm excited to say, I chose a son a contemporary Israeli sewn by shouli run surely run themselves. Very interesting character he was already an accomplished, actor performer in Israel, and he went through a whole process of becoming very observant. He's actually hiring D, but he's still sayings still performs those movie be seen. He's probably American audiences are most famous for that. So he wrote a song called our fell the missed or the cloud, and it's about Moshe going into the cloud. So I'm been a share it with you. I'll try to translate it. My translations terrific. But you'll bear with me. You can sing it. No, I'm not gonna sing that's when you decide to speak up for that moment. Okay. And so here it goes here goes, he Stokowski, Lahore, EA Horvat me smoothly Liamine, how call LA vote late ninety glitch veal Patel lebeau, Sean, who said our affil-. I looked behind and saw piles of ruins to my left and to my right? Everything was going up in flames, to my eyes was revealed twisting path in his heart smoke covered with a cloud all the people that were called Amish eighteen. I'm doing mirror Hoke, namely, deneen, ET spoke. So he's already identified from your Miano ES, share yell at Sma mel's has nine leave soil Toth our fell the entire nation was with me was standing at a distance. It was like daggers in their eyes. I was like a mockery to them. What will be will be said to my whispered to myself, this is the time to March into the cloud and then the chorus because they're because they're because there is got. Lola, Kosta plea rocks, Dali THAAD, the Nick de she, she at a sham ham. You believe code seem after Hurrell KOMO keyboards Passat, the though, I did not only with me food enough for one day before me or reform. I self I place the special God in my heart are thorns. But in my mouth or praise like an H int- hero. I walked into the fell into the cloud. Keep more your Hudson Sufian, but fame Michael owed are Neelam. Our Tom sharpie, she's VM call out a year. Sherry eating meat parallel. The comic nasty talk lower fell those who came before me were brazen, with sticks and shields, I unlike them saying, seventy languages what will be. I will be what I will be. I prayed for your honor. I went in into the. Fell. So where I like about the poetry there. They side that unshoveled, it's this festive thing. We kind of recount this certain way, the remembering of Harsina of Mount Sinai revelations, you said it's has said and gifts and being chosen in relationship, and what I like about this depicts emotion, who's very confused and frightened overwhelmed and understanding that the encounter with God is going to be surrounded and cloud. Like our fell has that beautiful language of a fuck where things aren't clear. And I like that image, especially for shovel because receiving the tower the not make everything clear. Right. That even that moment were things should been clear than they ever could be. Because God is revealed there should be no more questions. Everything should be cleared. Understood and our path is clear, and our job is clear. And our mission is clear and loan. The whole we discover that in this encounter, with God, nothing really is made perfectly clear Howard supposed to do it. And like you said, we keep studying the Torah, not only because their new things to find, but because there's no end trying to figure it out. We never come away with a sense of. I got it now. It's like maybe I have it. Oh, but see growl has it, and Rachel, has it and roommate has it and it's all different than me. How could we all have it, and we keep digging, and keep searching exploring because in a way always shrouded in this fog? And I think for me, that's very powerful educational message that it's never gonna be over. There's never gonna be this complete clarity. There's never this moment of total understand. Ending. You don't graduate from sixth grade, seventh grade because I now finished that piece of tour next year. We're going to smoke because break she'd I go now I know what that books about gone this other book. But in a way it's very challenging message for kids and for adults. This idea that, you know, you're not gonna reach bottom, you're not going to reach a point where it's all going to be clear, you're not gonna have questions, but you have to somehow celebrate being in the fog, instead of most of hard time being in the fuck you have to somehow to celebrate being in the fog. And I think to me that feels like an important reminder for teachers how important is for us to emphasize the process, along with the product, but maybe even above the product because, you know, you're never done with the answers, you're never done, knowing all the material, but how we learn how engage how to one another. You know, the questions we as students, and teachers and learning community bring to attacks. And how we involve as learners as three was alluding to. That has to be really important. Otherwise, you just constantly are stumbling around in the file feeling frustrated as opposed to feeling like well, we're, we're moving. We're going forward. We don't exactly where but we are in this for trying. Which hopefully could be impairing. As you reading the song I in my own mind, it was a whole different process going on. I wasn't thinking about the darkness fell, which is the name of the song, I was thinking about the way he portrays Moshe as very lonely figure. Meaning the people who are supposed to be supporting him. They gotta daggers in their eyes. And the people are supposed to be those who are supposed to be welcoming, which I referring to the angels. They're, they're approaching him also with, with tremendous amount of negativity. They're gonna be dressed him about this stuff. But what with that brought out was that we think of motion being the Representative of the people going to receive the Torah and this, this song talks about how lonely the process can sometimes be. And sometimes you just have to go it alone. The metal what I have to take that leap if the follow what your gut tells you and jump in there. And, and do the right thing. So we're gonna come back, and we're going to I'm going to ask both of you. How would you like that message of has said to affect you? How do you wanna come out of shove world a little bit change from how you came in? Rick. Yeah. That's obviously. An important question. I think for me when, you know life gets busy and demands, he feels like there's never enough time for anything. And certainly the rituals and rhythms preparing for five and the cooking. And the. To Coggan Chabad, and do you have enough food, and there's no childcare the base before all these other things that are in my mind. That's where my life is at. And so I think it's all the more important to just. I'm grateful for that between to hats that the thing over this past to be to go into that process. And then the hug itself, just a reminder of what I hope is being the ability to find some balance there in terms of engaging with others, and ensuring that Mike tourists that he and maim servants of the hug is in coming at the expense of thinking about the needs of my community. Yeah. I guess I can report back after would if I if I if I manage to do that, with any any successor grace, but via keep that family and community can report. Yes. Oh, much better. Yes. That would be a more offended tech friend stealing. Yes. Gromit the, the way you framed it. I think I think captures to large extent, my, my ongoing struggle with the universalism in particular them. And how, how that affects me, meaning I've got little kids at home. I teach kids. And what have you balanced that message of universalism in particular when you're talking to an eight year old or a twelve year old? They can't handle that kind of complexity. And how do you do that? So. Visit going to leave me with with big questions. Okay. So I guess for me, I have to learn to embrace the fog. I don't like I don't like driving it, and I'm like flying in it. I get scared when I can't see what's in front of me. I don't know what to expect and. I have to see this as an exercise, accepting the Torah in a fog and to sometimes I find myself pointlessly waiting for answers, or clarity, even though I realize it's not gonna come in and I have to embrace that as opposed to being angry about it. So I think that's the lesson. I always trying to learn that lesson. But maybe this year on make a little bit of progress around Chevron, if I listen to the song enough times, maybe that will help me on any closing thoughts from anybody question. Yes. Do you understand enough sevenish Ma and? Be trust despite the fog, we trust you despite the fact that we have no clue what we're getting our selves into. And how did you relate to that meeting jumping into something? You don't know is something to be often. Discouraged people from doing. Yeah. Although most of the important things in life that we do we jump in without knowing. Right. We don't know what it's going to be like living with the life partner that we've chosen, we don't know where it's gonna be like two parenting child children that were given the are no words, we like to teach the students that were about to face right? We jump in. Everything is not finished to a certain point are the big things because we trust that something good's going to come out of it, but we never really know. And I fight all those things too but. In a way were in. We're asking for students trust that some in the end God asks for our trust. And so, yeah. I think we're we move a lot of the fog. I think we try to resist it and we try to set up headlights and figure out how to make it sunk Renat in the flag. But. We're seeing things that maybe we're not actually seeing clearly wanna believe yes. So I think your point is really well taken the Jewish people were roic, but I guess, in a way being human being going back the versus point, and functioning in the world investing in things like people and tower and community and children, and everything else that we invest in is all an investment that we hope it's going to turn out, but we don't get guarantees, and we don't get, you know, the instruction manual as we do it, even the Torah is not an instruction manual in that sense that tells us how it's all gonna work out. So why we ended a deep on this one so called votes? I wanna thank both see and Rachel for joining an adding a lot of wisdom. And no, it's going to help my show, nine ten to steal what they said and claim it my name, I wanna thank rooting for his tireless efforts in holding the Mike and. And pointing to us orchestrating behind the scenes and it's been a privilege to be without anybody else. Any last words before we sign off. All right. Thank you guys. I hope not some and don't need to much cheesecake for mood digital content. Goto Elmont dog power, this don't and to learn more about sponsorship Email Jamie at podcasts. Don't. See you next time.

Madrid Rachel Friedrich Toronto Chevron Israel Zahra mcgilla McGee Alexa Moshe Mike Pol center Tove ligamnents Husted Makila chevro Senate executive producer Ruth Rava Konica PASOK Ruth
MBA1248 Must Read: When by Daniel Pink

The $100 MBA Show

12:17 min | 2 years ago

MBA1248 Must Read: When by Daniel Pink

"One hundred dollars show your business building companion every day with her daily. Tim business listens for the real world. Your host your coach, teacher, Omar's and home. I'm also the co founder of the hundred dollar MBA business training and community online. And said he's episode is a must read episode on our must read episodes. I share with you a book that I've read the has influenced me as an entrepreneur, I share with you. It's takeaways it's insights, and why you should read it to today's must read is when by Daniel pink, his book Daniel pink ghost around seven hundred scientific studies to get a better understanding of how big a role timing plays in our lives. He sift through data from fields economics anthropology, social psychology. And he gives you a thorough look at why we make decisions we do. And while we make them when we do I was Husted by this topic. Because always wondered how much does timing affect your success when he launched that product when you start that business? When you increase your prices this book, not only exports. Those things also explores win is the best time to do nothing and win to choose the right time that is optimal for your success. This includes the time of day as well as the time of your life. At what age are you most likely to succeed in certain areas? I'm gonna share all those insights and more in today's episode. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. Support for today. Show comes from Filo say goodbye, expensive, TV bills with Filo Filo is the simple powerful app. For streaming TV with over fifty of your favorite channels. Like, the Discovery Channel the history channel VH1. MTV, Nickelodeon and more enjoy live and on demand TV plus unlimited recording for only twenty dollars a month with no contract need. If there's never been a better deal on court free commitment free, hassle free TV to start your free trial. Visit Filo dot TV slash NBA. That's P H I L, O dot TV slash NBA. And if you go now, you'll also get fifteen percent off the first month. Again, that's Filo P H I L, O dot TV slash NBA. The author of when Daniel pink is a best selling author of multiple books that topped the New York Times bestseller charts over and over his graduate of Yale Law School also has experience in politics having worked as a speechwriter for Al Gore during his vice presidency. His previous books include drive, the surprising truth of what motivates us and to sell human a Daniel pink is known for taking the time to do the research that he provides in his books. It's hard to argue with his opinions when he backs with so much data when I was going through the book. I would find myself saying really is that true. And then he would give me case study after case study, and I'd be like, wow. It's kinda hard to deny that. So is really good exploring. Surprising truths. One of the things you starts out with that are found very interesting was this concept of an emotional pattern that we have in our daily lives believe it or not most people love. Their daily routines. Dana day, Al we brush her teeth. We take a shower we get up and have a Cup of coffee. You take the dog for a walk which the mailbox check. Our inbox remain catch up on the news. Whatever it is. We have this daily routine. It's a sense of comfort, but he also points out that in parallel to these habits. There's another subtler pattern to our daily lives. He shares it researchers at Cornell University looked at Twitter to try to get a sense of prevailing moods of people during the typical day by zagging five hundred million tweets from over a two year period. They saw a very clear pattern and that pattern is that. There's a general feeling of positivity and hope that peaks during the morning and drop swiftly in the afternoon. And then climbs up in the evening is hop is pretty much every weekday to pretty much everyone regardless of the race or nationality other. This was incredible. And it looked at my own life. My daily routine S M, I most positive. The morning. Do I go through those dips in the afternoon and go back up on the evening, and I had to agree. Yeah. Of course, Twitter isn't the best gauge for emotional accuracy, since it's not known for honesty. But nevertheless, this pattern has been noticed. In other studies to this daily pattern is known as morning peak afternoon, trough and evening rebound. What's interesting about this pattern is that has a direct impact on our work and separate study three professors at American business school analyze over twenty six thousand earning calls these are conference calls between a company CEO and the primary investors where to discuss how things are going in. What is expected these calls often determine whether a star price rises or falls? The interesting thing is that the study showed that calls a happened leader in the day. The more negative the calls would get so they had this call early in the morning. The better the result, the better the stock price and this study was done over two thousand public companies. This is incredible. So what does this mean for you? I share. A lot about this particular insight from the book, but I want to make sure that it's applicable to. You was a business owner you need to be mindful of this. This is true. This is going to happen to you. So if you are positive, and you are your best self in the morning as the studies show, and that the work will be affected by this. Then you need to make sure you do the most important stuff at the start your day, the things that are not as mission critical should be done later in the afternoon things like replying to emails any kind of social media that you have to do for your business Adleman work that kind of stuff do it later in the day at the start of your day. Do the big things that move your business writing content working on your product working with your team? These are the things that really matter. But then in the book, he also mentioned that this has to be in balance with your krono type such show that on average one in every four people has a differing internal clock. What's known as a krono type? In addition to the normal krono type which experiences. The morning peak in the afternoon trough, and then the rebound in the evening. There are two others the night owl. And the lark which is early risers. Researchers suggest that twenty to twenty five percent of people are als are night. Owls who excel at night like inventors Thomas Edison who the hit their peak around nine pm larks like to go to bed early and wake early. All these people. I like to wake up at five AM and get started funding. They say larks are the most rare type of chronic types. So look at yourself, and no we're your cycle is. I'm definitely not a lark. I take a while to wake up in the morning. I need about an hour just to fully awake. And that's after my Cup of coffee. So if I have a meeting in the morning, I need to wake up two hours before that meeting. Tim make sure that I'm on the money that I'm actually focused so be mindful of your kroner type, so you can just your day accordingly. Another part in this book. I really liked his that knowing your cycle knowing the ups. Downs. You need to be vigilant about taking breaks of void midday mistakes. When you're tired, you're going to make mistakes, we're gonna get frustrated he mentions babies, you know, babies get tired, the get cranky. They start crying. They get uncomfortable. They don't know how to express themselves and say, hey, I need a nap as adults. We suppress that. And when we get tired instead of getting all cranky, we just perform worse soils get cranky. But the point is is that it affects our actions. So sometimes you need a break. The Italians love taking a midday kind of coffee to pet them up around two o'clock through clock. And I love this practice because it gives you a second wind one gives you chance to take a break and step away from work for few minutes and then to the caffeine helps as well you mentioned that in Denmark. There's a lot of importance placed on taking breaks. He's as also the hospitals have noticed that standards of care have gone up when brakes were introduced in the workday. So be mindful. You can't be a hundred percent all day. Day long. You will dip you'll need to take a break. So you can come back at it stronger. Guys got more on today's must read episode before that let me give love today sponsor. Support for today show comes from Capital One with the spark cashcard from Capital One. You can earn unlimited two percent cashback on all your business purchases. Think about unlimited two percent cashback on everything you buy for your business. We know how business expenses rack up month after month, you might as well get some cash back and that cashback add up to thousands of dollars, which you can reinvest back into your business and keep growing take Ken Jacobus from good, sir packing. For example, Ken wanted his children to know that he valued the earth and had the courage to act on those values. So in two thousand and nine he started good start packing and began creating certified composed -able food service packaging packaging was easily accessible to restaurants everywhere and with the spark cash car from Capital One. He earned thirty six thousand dollars cashback, which you used to offer healthcare to his employees, so cool. Imagine unlimited two percent cashback do for your business Capital One. What's in your wall? Guys. I really enjoyed this book win by Daniel pink. There's so much more can share. But this episode to be an hour if I shared them, all and I left a few gyms. So you can discover them on your own when you read the book checkout win by Daniel pink. It's going to change the way you think about timing. Remember, the top of the episode where I talked about launching a business launching a new product changing your prices all those things are backed by decisions. There's a time when you make a decision about that you make a decision about launching make a decision about changing your prices. I highly recommend you don't make decisions when you're in one of your dips when you're in the mid day, or when you're tired, I actually like to make decisions on the rebound towards the evening. Why because I have a bit of perspective, I'm not overly optimistic as I am in the mornings. But at the same time, I've had a chance kind of see the day. And I'm not in the lowest point of my energy. I'm want more reflective and I'm not as hasty to make decisions at that time. So be mindful of when you make decisions because decisions are kind of those things that. Yeah, you can change them later on. But it will affect your business even in the short term. So make sure your your top former your best form possible. Thanks for listening to the hundred dollar ratio. If you love what you hear hit. Subscribe right now on whatever you used to listen to podcasts whether it's Spotify or apple podcasts or Stitcher radio or over gas were on them all by hitting. Subscribe. We make sure that you get your episode automatically right on your device. So it's ready for you. When you're ready to listen, so hit subscribe right now. All right before I go, I wanna leave you with this. This book win is very research driven. It's very different from a biography biography is a story telling you their experiences, and personally I can't read too many research driven books in a row, I will have to take a break after this one because to be quite honest. It's a little harder to get through. It's interesting. It's fun. But your brain is working overtime to process all the information. So be mindful of that. So if you're picking up a book like this understand that's where you're getting into meticulous longer to get through it. Then a biography, for example. But it still has great value because it challenges. Your beliefs and thoughts through research just a little reading tip for you. When you pick up this book. All right. Thank you so much, and I'll check you in some ours episode. I'll see you then take care.

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16: Mr. Wonderful: He Said, She Said

888-Barbara

31:17 min | 1 year ago

16: Mr. Wonderful: He Said, She Said

"You're on with Barbara. Hey Hey hey it's me by Corcoran and this is eight Barbara Earth. That's right it's time. To all your burning questions from the boardroom. To the bedroom. Nothing off limits. So listen up for some advice on how to live your best life. Each week I'll be answering all your burning questions and sometimes I'll be asking them to interview some of the greatest folks. I know to learn the secrets of their success. So I can share them with you. I've never agreed with Kevin O'Leary on an opinion about anything. Not One thing he says left. I say right uses up by say dem so. I thought who better to ask to be here today. Kevin O'Leary to answer the eight Barbara Questions. I thought what if I'm giving people bad advice and Kevin's got the best advice. So here he is. Today he was great on my other. Podcast business unusual. Hey catch that if you haven't heard what Kevin was like as a kid. You're going to be disappointed. I have no doubt. Listen here to Kevin answering the questions all wrong or maybe right. We're going to have a very different spin all the questions coming. My name is Brian and I'm calling from Munich. Germany nineteen years old. And I've been so inspired by you for a long time. I listen to to everyone of your podcasts. From a young age I've always had very big dreams for myself however my parents and siblings make it very known that they do not think I can deliver recently the so called a relationship the become very bad because of how resentful I am towards them. But is your advice on how to deal with close family. That don't have faith in you in your dream. Sad wants very sad I think first of all that's a very broken relationship between a parent a sibling. A brother sister. I think what has to happen here. Is this individual husted? Strike out on their own and tell their parents go fuck yourself. I'm GonNa go my God. I'm going to have to delete that from my podcast. You know exactly what I'm saying. This is ridiculous even talking that way to a child is just something really wrong about that. Well here's my advice to you Brian. I think you should use the insult of for your motivation. Nothing is more powerful and somebody deming you to hell and saying you can't do something because you can get your IRA up and you get out there and you say I'll show you come back as the victor and they'll have to acknowledge and if they don't you could acknowledge it for yourself. You're right barber. Brian is the winner up. But we haven't heard the parent side of the story. Yeah Yeah but I can just tell it's bad hi Barbara. It's dawn from Maryland. I've been married twice and I just wonder. Should I get married again? Thanks well listen. I'm going to take a stab at this barbara because I have various feelings about marriage. I've always felt that marriage while it can be a fork in the beginning when romance and love her involved really displays. Its true colors after about three years. If you comes at business because the reason men and women or significant others get together and Form Family. Units is to help themselves economically and emotionally but the fact is it's the pillar of financial strength that keeps marriage together. If you're talking about a third marriage the first to tell the story of what's GonNa Happen to the third? Why Bother? Why not just have some frenemies too my eight years? Don doesn't sound at all like she is even excited about getting married. I don't know why she's asking the question. But what when wrong. The first marriage what went wrong the second marriage. And would you want to repeat it? Barbara WanNA bring a point up. I think you may or may not agree with but if you look at an did this little study on divorce over a seven to fourteen year period which is study divorce. Well because I was very interested in answering this question and I had a good friend who was a divorce lawyer had been for thirty five years so I asked him. Don't bring the individual cases because he did a lot of work with very wealthy people fifty percent of unions and in divorce between seven and fourteen years. That's a staff that's been pretty steady for a long time. It's not infidelity. That breaks these unions. Apart in most cases he attributed to financial pressure L. I'm sure even the Super Bowl. She's been the case so one partner is not in sync with the other in terms of their spending investing habits or whatever it is and that brings such a Fisher to the family that they divorced for the reasons of money. So I'm just wondering if that hasn't played a role in Dawn's case if you're having trouble in your marriage look at money. First not in most marriages can survive infidelity. Hi Barbara My name is Diana and I'm from Maryland. My question is about how what I should do with my career. I'm sort of at this crossroads where I've been in a pretty comfortable family friendly job for a few years and I'm just feeling like if not fulfilling and I don't know what to do should I take risk or should I stay in a career. That's been pretty family friendly. Even though it won't ever be that lucrative. I've just been so indecisive and I don't know what to do just need some good advice. Thank what's not fulfilling and how about just trying to get a better position where you're working now. That's a good point. I told my daughter the same thing after her first year of work you know. She came to me complaining about her status in the organisation. Enter pay after one year. No I said we're not going to have this conversation. We've gone eighteen months because we did. We had the conversation again actually after twenty four months two years and then I said to her you know Savannah you've achieved quite a bit. You need to get a raise and going to tell you what to say but really it's all about what you've delivered because set goals for self. You've achieved them and now you have to get a race and she was quite successful not as much as I want her to get. Every father was more but she moved up in terms of two positions in her job title and a raise in one. All at once. I and this is why I'm going back to two this caller because if to set goals for yourself generally I don't like to look at resumes where people have moved every twelve months. I like to see a two year commitment. Humans Nice. But it's so forgivable today it seems to me as a typical resin. You're okay with a twelve month. I don't like it but I tell you. Most of the resumes that coming people hop around especially when they're young. I don't mind it at all. I used to really be bothered. I'm still old fashioned in the respect that I think should show the organization what you can do that takes at least twenty four months. I said we're look. You're not going anywhere until you really prove yourself here. It'll be the steppingstone and she has. She's now in her third year and looking at another race so I like to tell people set a goal for yourself once you achieve it go point out to your superiors that you did what you'd set up for yourself and for them and that you'd like to be compensated. Accordingly now Kevin. I get a lot of people that call in and I stuck in jobs and they seem to put enormous value over a family friendly environment as though they are afraid to leave in mistook as they can go to their kids soccer games. And what have you but what do you think about that? My impression is at most jobs say are family friendly. Things have changed and for people to get stuck in a job just because they think they're understood like this lady Diana I think is a mistake in holes people to John. Much longer than they wished to be here right most bosses. Most people that are running both entrepreneurial. Organizations are large corporations understand people should be measured by their ability to achieve tasks. How they do. It doesn't really interest me as long as they achieve them. I don't care where they do it. From as long as a they achieved them be they achieved them and see they do it on time. And after that you can be eclectic you know you can work in different ways. Most organizations are bending that way as long as they achieve their goals. And I think it's a good thing in America. Frankly of course have changed so much even people tell me. Look I wanNA work all night. I'm an Idaho okay. I'm cool with that. Let me give one little piece of advice to Diane Diane. I think he's GonNa have a hard time asking for anything and you're going to have to practice being aggressive. That's what I hear between every word. You say that you're not aggressive. And you're not confrontational. So I would suggest you go out and see what other jobs are out there if even online so you know there's other opportunities and you go look at yourself in the mirror and practice saying what you need to say to move on get a raise or to get the new promotion or to argue. You're worse but I with the way you represent yourself. You're not going to get anything because I'm not convinced listening to you that you believe in yourself one bit. That's at the core of the issue more than being stuck in the job. I think you have to be able to learn how to advocate for yourself and I don't think it happens overnight. You gotta practice on it. I was like the quietest lowest key kid in the world. And I'm a big mouth. Why because I practice for so many years being a big mouth you got to get out there and practice or just even practice in front of your family and friends to get accustomed to the sound of your voice being aggressive. That's taller. Hello this is Barbara Barbara. My name is Dustin. I'm the owner of American owning and sign out of Columbus Ohio. I'm calling you because I need your vice. It's not necessarily a finance question. It's more of like a moral dilemma question. We have been operating for almost two years and our employees range from seven. Nine employees mostly fulltime. But we have a few part time. They come in and help us right now. The construction season is a little low just because of the weather. We're not in stone as much. We are down a few installers because no one wants to work in this cold weather so our income is a little lower as well. I have a couple of fulltime employees. They're not producing enough. So basically we're not billing enough to pay for their salary. How can I go home at night? After telling an employee that we have to cut their hours to thirty two or thirty hours a week. I don't know if I can look someone in the eyes of the talent. GonNa make less money this week or next week. But we're not a charity where business and we're trying to grow. I just don't know if they're going to understand in my fears. They're going to quit or they're gonNA resent me. I just don't know how to do it. I'm hoping to get your advice. So actually as I listened to dozens details about that business and the season aspect of it basically has overcapacity in terms of labor. He's hired too many people. What he needs to have is a fulltime that he's getting the full forty to forty two hours a week out of if he went down to one person. Get that and then go into a part time contract with the others as the seasonality drifts through the business. He has not tailor made his business model correctly because of the seasonality the detailed about wintertime and putting up signs etc. The bigger problem is if he doesn't have what it takes to actually make hiring and firing decisions. He shouldn't be running the business. He maybe could be investment but he's got to get somebody that has the guts to tell the truth to these people. One of them has to go in my view and the other can be put on a part time basis or find work elsewhere. Ask you this Kevin. The first time you fired someone in Your Business. First Time you had to confront firing someone taking a livelihood away did it come naturally to you or was it a tough thing to do know. It was tough but I have in my career. As I grew my particularly my consolidation in the educational software business ended up firing tens of thousands of people and I learned. The most important thing to do in that whole process was to set up a system where you explain why it was happening. Be You found out and made sure you compensated them very fairly because what I learned. When you're dealing with that many people they are going to go into the market and talk about you being fair or not and in my case we made sure that we compensated them and found counseling services to help them find other jobs and by the time the fourth year came around as we were buying companies firing people he didn't need and just keeping the developers because we had our own distribution our reputation was very good and many of them came back and worked for us two or three years later as they moved around the market because we ended up being the largest educational software company in the world so these people came back that wanted to be in the educational that addresses one of his concerns that the people would like him. They might not come back and you found that they did if they're treated fairly but no one goes into a firing situation initially as a boss a new boss and feels comfortable firing people so let office who I would say to Dustin this. He's a very nice guy. We could hear that in his voice he has a conscience he wants to be a good guy all the way but he's gotta learn to fire and that's an ability you can certainly learn but I would say to dust in that. He could trade on how nice he is. It tells a nice guy so if he sits down a group of people a one on one and says hey listen. Business isn't right. We don't have the billable hours that we used to have. So we're going to have to cut the hours that everybody's working and I either guarantee you twenty hours or if you want. You could leave here and you could get a full-time employment somewhere else. But that's the best I could do for you. I don't think the firing for Dustin is going to be nearly as tough as he thinks. I think people are GonNa get it. I think he's GonNa Learn. That firing isn't the boogeyman he thinks it is. He's going to do a good job at it because people love me. Everybody loved me. Who worked for me and I was able to for a while. Get Away with murder. Frankly because I was like but in the national time people took it in the Chin and they said we understand and they walked out the door. It happen and so I think we've got to give Justin a chance to realize it's not as bad as he thinks. Just go do it. And people are going to be more loyal than he thinks I'm toured. You're sending too much of a combined pissed kids but I would rather have employees respect me and you've got to be fair because that comes back to hurt you. Economically businesses are about making money. They're binary of you make but you're a way to combine a fire right now and it's about how you do and I think this guy's got a good shot pretty good at it too and I think I take a different approach. There is a reason. I'm called Mr Wonderful. You know that what is that. Reason is truth in advertising. Hi Barbara My name's general and I'm from Chesapeake and I have this reoccurring problem my friendships. But it's kind of getting in the way of me like making in keeping funds. I'm a pretty ambitious person but when I feel like my ambition to other people and like how I turn a dream into reality at some point. My friend is kind of jealous and I have this one signed in particular that I'm having issues with. We've been friends since high school what we like to fight and we broke up and then we made up like a year leader and I thought she was happy for me when I finally accomplished another dream that I had. She's so jealous. And I don't really know if I should drop this friend or if I should like you know Confront her about. It hasn't been very effective in the past. If you could give me some tips on dealing with people who become jealous of you when you become successful appreciate it thank you let me say some of the Jennifer first off your high school girl. It sounds so young. The way you're expressing your problem in how you're dealing with it my advice would be to you to talk to your friend directly and say. Hey what's up? I'm going to be successful. This is what I'm doing. Is it going to be room in your life for me? What's bugging you? What's in the way? I suspect you haven't really confronted in a very direct way. And that's the only way you get communication going and keep a friendship going if you have to watch what you're doing and fearful of hurting people and they're not approving you. That's not a friendship. You got to move on and find some happy people to be around one more thing. If I was your friend listening to what you said I would think. What's in it for me this friendship? You might not have anything in the friendship for your friends. If you're successful so maybe what you Oughta do. Share your success in a different way. Not by telling them how you dream and WANNA be terrific. Get them tickets out to a restaurant. Invite them for a long weekend vacation. Let them see the benefit of having a friend. Who's doing very very well and that will sweeten it up a little bit as well. I have different advice agenda. I WanNa talk about your presentation skills. Which be affecting you in life in many ways. You should listen to this podcast a second time about what you read to us. Think about when you make a presentation like the one you just gave Barbara and I that you want to be concise. You WanNa bring your point forward quickly. I thought you could have done that better. But the constant use a word like is very high school ish very immature and yet you are bringing a very mature topic forward about the jealousy of friends and your understanding the challenges of keeping it all together the social issues involved. That's very mature but throwing like in every third word is just. I don't like it got a bad boss. Can't get a raise. WanNa Start Your own business and can't get off the block. Come on old word to business unusual. My other podcast where I give straight talking business advice. That's business unusual. Subscribe and catch up your great great interviews material there. Hi Barbara. I'm I'm a student from Kazakhstan and I studied in UK and don't have a lot of information about the US and the reason I'm interested is because my father left and Harrison's which I'm about to receive it's around Significant amount to well. Not Maybe for you but me several millions against and I'm thinking of how can I get into? Us business over the best way for me to invest to inherit that much money and by the way a two million dollars a significant when you think about the average American family the country. You're thinking about coming to it. Sounds like makes about fifty eight thousand dollars a year. You're a very wealthy person in that context. The challenge you have is your so young. You don't have the and how to invest it so what I highly recommend to you. Is You find an advisor that will protect you against yourself because what happens to young people is. They don't understand the risk inherent getting too concentrated in other words the biggest free lunch and investing is diversification into bonds into stocks into other things that produce income. But you don't know how to buy those yet in took me a long time to learn myself. Good news is most large American institutions. Banks included have advisory services that cost about point four five percent up to ninety point nine percent or one percent in some cases. So you're probably GONNA make six percent a year. If the markets are kind to you over a long period of time you're GONNA pay one percents your adviser and clear five percent of two million. That's more than ninety nine percent of people making America. My friends you recommend he does that. Come Stu American gets an adviser and let's see advisor wherever he. I don't know what the advisory businesses in Kazakhstan. I'm sure there are advisers there but I think the largest market the most liquid market on earth is right here in the United States. Sound light to me. He was interested in us. So if he's coming here I definitely put it advisor in place. I would do something. Totally opposite of that myself told by real estate. I don't think you should do a damn thing with your money. I think you'll lock it up and not lose it and I don't think should we telling people even have to invest because people will find you and you'll hear the best pitches in the world is how they're gonNa make money with your money com. Get A job. Make a living. Pretend you don't have the money two years from now you'll have a much better understanding of what you're in for what you should do for the money who you should trust because in the end when it comes to not losing the money never mind even making money but just not losing it you have to trust. And how do you make that assessment? When you're so young and leave so calm get a job get some maturity on your back and then decide how you might spend that money but I would be very careful and I would lock it up away from you and away from everybody else. Hey Rubber my name is Rafael. I'm calling from Tampa Florida. I'm twenty four and a half hour a really hard time with my finances. Pretty much to have educational for my parents have all gone. We were racing really type of it so pretty much all the money we got. We treated like we were GONNA report against so I was just wondering why advice you have. You got any keeps to save money or to invest in a better way and invested in a better way when pretty much the paycheck by paycheck. Anyway by I love WHO and I'm suits huge a mitre view. Listen at twenty four. I'll tell you what I was doing about money. I was bouncing checks. All over Manhattan. I would write checks for this and that never balanced my checking account and couldn't repeat visiting the same stores because they knew who I was. I was terrible with money. I didn't know how to manage it. And why was is terrible because I had never been exposed to it. Lucky for me I started making more money than checks. I could bounce if not that. I obviously still be bouncing checks. Of course this is not the right answer. It's not really and I'm going to. I will give Raphael. The right answer. He's come to the right place. Here's what you have to do. And I found this to be true in every country every language every job. Orphee people by too much crap. Everybody does that. You can check your crap index going into your closet and looking at all the clothes you don't wear you bought your once. You never wore again. The truth is I could save you. Ten to fifteen percent a week by just being on your shoulder saying don't buy that crap Raffaelle. Don't buy that crap every time you buy something you should ask yourself. Do I really need. This really needs to pay two dollars and eighty cents for a cup of coffee when I can make it for fifteen cents. Mike. I'M SERIOUS. I can save fifteen percent all day long. And then they take this money and they save it and it compounds at six to seven percent of your whole lifetime and if you do that you'll find even if you're only making the average income in America fifty sixty thousand dollars a year. You can retire millionaire by just saving ten to fifteen percent of your paycheck each week which is very easy now. Barbara. Maybe you couldn't do that but most people can because you to have too much crap. I've been to your place you autocratic God. I had very good advice when I was about twenty eight. That kind of turned me around even though I was still not managing your money. Well at all someone who recommended to me that. I put my credit cards aside. I couldn't get rid of them. I was living on credit card then especially in bad times but someone recommended to me that I pay cash for only one week and I paid cash everything in one week and I was shocked at where money was going. That's for me was probably the only education I ever got in managing money just seeing where my money went in one given weak and it turned me around a bit. It made me feel like I had control of my money and then I started paying off my lowest credit card balances. I until I was able to pay off all those credit card balances but I was laid to learn it. So give yourself a break. How old did you say you twenty four? And you didn't learn from your parents got plenty of time to learn. But definitely nor Kevin's advice. You won't have a good life. You won't have nice clothes to wear. You won't really say how wonderful this life was when you finally die. Forget about it. Oh that's ridiculous Notch Service Raffaelle. Come on she is the site of darkness and evil. I am the light. Remember that God. Hi This is Rhonda from Marietta California. When is it appropriate to have relations after being widowed? Okay so her husband dies yes. There has to be a period of mourning respect. I would think a ninety day period of mourning and Celibacy would be appropriate ninety days. How did you arrive at that? I just thought in terms of you know the shock of a death in the families and friends and all the people want to take you out for dinner and stuff to help you with your morning. I don't think you want to be bringing dates out. At that time. I think it would be inappropriate and maybe people would think well. This is a little crazy. She's just lost her husband a week ago and she's dating somebody. I don't think so. I think three months is reasonable. What do you think not at all? I think the minute after your husband passes away the minute you're attracted to someone raises your eyebrows and He looks interesting. You're already ready. Nell period of mourning. That's dictated by anyways. It's nonsense if you're lonely and you're tracking to someone go for it. The only way to get over loneliness is love. Let's take a step further because she said relations which obviously can mean sex right. I state you're interested. That's exciting. You've got that you for you. I think it's wonderful. But I'm a not advocating sex on the first date I'm saying say look I'm interested in you and I'd like to see you again. Let's go out maybe on Friday. Maybe this Wednesday date and then it's really passionate but we're still not ready for the big move. I like the third day for Alexio. That's what I think is appropriate action on the third date. Really that builds momentum crescendo in with a great outcome and it's the beginning of a new relationship and of course you agreeing with Barbara. That's the way to do. I'm being entertained. Biljana degree I think the minute you feel like you WANNA have sex. You should just go and have sex. She's a single woman. Even though you call her a widow she has no commitment. And just make yourself happy. Life's too short. What if the next month? You'RE IN LA coughing United States. Gee shouldn't have waited. No no no. Just gotTa go on. Live Your Life. All this other stuff is nonsense but the most nonsensical part is that. You're giving love advice. I'm immensely romantic. And my advice is taken by millions of millennials. I really am very good. Study on how you should do courtship. You should listen to me. I would give you some great advice. Because I think these advice you're giving now is just Catastrophically bad you need to build momentum in a relationship you WanNa have a little something a certain genetic quals. I call it the little magic. The little something. You're waiting for that something. That the next State Allen's big third day guy. Then you know a lot about somebody. You actually got the call the pillars of building. Something special listen you know Mr Wonderful knows this is how you do it Barbara? You know you started out earlier on this podcast saying that you think that marriage after three years becomes business relationship shows okay. I'm talking about to you for a period the beginning. I'm giving you advice to really milk as much euphoria as you can get. Because don't worry reality is going to strike and the marriage is going to turn into what it really is a pillar of financial stability and that has merits too. But you know you've got to really think through you can't tell me. You have the same euphoria. After twenty years that you had the first time you met. I've met a lot of couples. I could keep that going. It's a different kind of love. It's a love built respect and financial strength. You're suggesting unhappy Romantic. I know many couples that are intensely. Romantic also deal with a Lotta friends. One of my friends have been divorced three times. And I'm giving them advice saying you should not get married again. I'm Barbara Cooley. Calling for door Delaware. Also wondering I'm a twenty two year old college student and I'll be graduating soon and going to physical therapy school and I do have amount of debt and I'm also really big on industrial. I was just wondering if I should continue investing in mutual funds stocks at young age when it's most opportune or if I should focus more on paying off by student loan debt any credit card debt I have etc. Thank you so much troy. I paid off my student loan debt when I was six years once I was working. You know what I did. I ran up credit card debt as a result of that I felt free and I just charged a lot more. I felt entitled if I had it to do over again. I would just pay that over the whatever lengthy period of time I had to pay it over and keep it because it kept me in check. Somehow I think it depends on your personality. Now I know Kevin's going to tell you pay off the student loan immediately and get your head straight. Are you GonNa say that tell you? Why student loans have actually gone to floating rate and while it's very easy to service them now as rates are low what people do is they. Don't take the opportunity to realize. Wait a second even if the student loan rates are four to five percent which is were they sort of are right now. You know hard. It is to find a fixed income security that gives you four point two percent pretty well impossible to find so the way you gotta look at. It is if you could pay that debt off faster. Get rid of it. You could then invest in things. That may be be better for you because you're actually giving somebody more than you can make in the market. Nobody can make four point two percent on a bond anymore. It's impossible as you're taking a huge risk or duration risks. I'm a big advocate. Now when you get these floating rates at four point two four point three I think I saw that was as high as six point two. Because they hadn't paid anything off in five or ten years. I'd get rid of that student. Loan particularly have money and then put it to work most things you can buy the markets giving you two point three percent dividend yield right now if you spot the SNP. I don't like that concert. We want to get out of it and this whole thing of using debt to just you know for you. Barbara put little shackles around you from spending habits and not everyone has that same discipline yes. That's the question. Does he have the discipline to pay this off and start investing for the long term? So don't give advice by saying you know. Go get credit cards chimney Barbara. This is terrible. Okay there you have very well and that's all the questions we have time for today. I hope you found the advice. Helpful think got it right then guy got it wrong. Have an idea for great guests. Come on give it to me tweet me at Barbara Corcoran using the Hashtag. Eight Barbara and keep those questions coming into the eight eight eight Barbara Hotline. You can subscribe to the show wherever you listen to podcasts. Don't be caused. Leave a review for the show at Apple podcasts. And keep the party going on. We'll see you next time eight. Barbara's produced by Sandy Small and forty ation and Lila. Man is our executive producer.

Barbara Barbara Kevin O'Leary Barbara Corcoran Dustin America Barbara My United States Brian Barbara Questions Barbara Earth Maryland Mr Wonderful Barbara Wan Diana Munich soccer husted Germany Barbara Cooley Idaho
Urdu Narration: Zakat on Gold or Silver Jewelry - Dr. Mohammad Najeeb Qasmi

The Clear Evidence

11:16 min | 1 year ago

Urdu Narration: Zakat on Gold or Silver Jewelry - Dr. Mohammad Najeeb Qasmi

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Sony Gideon Gen John Nunca Michelle Miki Nisa Zagat Nick Kia Kaha Jamaica Skis Sayaka Jonty Husted Imam Abu Hanifa Jonty Niece Rhonette Jonty Jemma NAM Nam Nam John Muslim She Niemann Saddam Yezid Pony Jamaica Maza Suid Tola K Soni John Namib Leisure Naked
115: Fireworks, Sparklers, & Soda Stores - Oh My! This Entrepreneur Doesn't Hold Back...

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

1:08:22 hr | 2 years ago

115: Fireworks, Sparklers, & Soda Stores - Oh My! This Entrepreneur Doesn't Hold Back...

"Welcome to the podcast. Well, let's get started. With the listener Email today. This Email is from Kevin he says, quote, unquote. I don't appreciate your Jan one podcast saying to not give old white men more money. My father is old in white you racist. Well, Kevin you can suck. My. And just a heads up. Kevin. I'm white Kevin after you get done with this episode. Why don't you go religion to episodes one of seven and actually try to comprehend what I said instead of taking the time to write me from? I don't know a burner Email account on a lighter note, we'll be saving our new patriot shots for the end of the episode. So stick around if you're a new member to hear your name and thank you. If you signed up to support the podcast, if you haven't had a chance to sign up, I'm jumping on one on one calls with our new members to see what we can do to help you with your business and connect you with other listeners of the podcast. So if you're interested in joining go, check out our page at millionaire dash interviews dot com for size patriot. Or scroll down to the end of the episode notes below the see who supported us so far in how you can learn more last, but not least wanna give shout out to the cast box app there featuring our podcast for the next two weeks on their homepage because of the subscriber count and our audience interaction in that. If you haven't. Download it. It's an awesome way for you to leave comments about individual episodes or about the podcast in general so consider downloading the cast box at so you can get your voice heard as well. We always appreciate kind of words of a courage men about the podcast or trolls like Kevin now time to get started with this episode. But just before warned if you're an environment with children, you should probably listen to this episode at a different time. Our guest is quite eclectic and enjoys during around the F. Without further ado, let's get this party started. The fact that my entrepreneur uncle who own for super successful businesses was mocking me that shit stung. I mean that really settled in and stone. But I'm pretty sure we're gonna lose shit that the money for doing. You don't want or Casale entice sparkles. It's been story gets really fun that make no money. And of course, everyone, you know, that makes excellent thing you needed let every enterpreneur no though. The life were I couldn't go out the money. So he debts tell people sorry. I can't go out to eat. I broke down in ball on. My wife's shoulder after it happened. I it was supposed to work. That's the only way I could get your attention. Sorry about that. While on the fucker. I know I try to get your attention. Okay. Now, it's one hundred percent recording. So we're good. Oh, you got to include the shit in the interview to our word. I drop off. Sorry. All right now. It's one hundred percent recorded. Are you ready? Do you mind if we redid this introduction? Yeah. I'm Mark Lazar teaching tech genius. I'm fifty years old just turned fifty a month ago. A Minneapolis Minnesota based on my operations out of Minnesota owns six companies. Currently I've owned four or five others in the past. And my latest venture that mostly focused on most mayor g goes into is the blue sun soda shop, which is the largest soda shop in the world. And here you're giving me a brief rundown on that. But you wanted to hit us up. You say you have six companies that you run today. Yeah. Got six different enterprises running right now, I have my fireworks company, which is a seasonal fireworks company. I have a wedding supplied company. That's online all online sale. Sales. I have the soda shop, which is the largest soda shop in the world. I have distribution company we do manufacturing a sodas and co packing for sodas as well. And I own commercial real estate in play slow more to commercial real estate a little bit. What are you spending most of your time doing now right now it's been most may time on the Soviet shop or hand the soda shop in the different aspects of the manufacturing the distribution. You don't remember pin yourself? Tell us about the third of shop. You're saying that your landlord basically wanted you to buy the building as well. Yes. So what happened was we just office in this building? This building was a five suites strip mall sort of thing. And we just least one of the spots in it for office, space landlord. Kept asked me to buy the building by building by building. I didn't want by the building kept long them off in. Finally, I just told him. I said, you know, what made me an offer. I can't say no to in via the building. And he came back and made me an offer that I couldn't say no to. So I ended up buying the building and one of the building. I thought well there's this big empty spot next door thirty five hundred square feet. I could try and get a tenant in their lend the deal with tenant or I could just open a soda shop over there. Because I've had this thing spinning around my head for years about opening a soda shop. And I thought I own the building that means don't have to worry about rent a rent late another land. I can kinda screw around with this and open this up, and it won't make any money, but it will be funded. Tha that's what you've been doing where you into making your own sodas a Homer Tump in not even a little bit. It started from a used on a software company. And the tech is always wanted to go out to the craft beer places to have meetings because everyone's into craft beer, I guess, and I don't like beer, I just never have probably never will. We've got to these craft beer places in the server would say, hey, would you like to try? This pale ale that we did three strawberries in every glass, and then swirl it, exactly. Twelve times with a cinnamon stick while showing it picture of Ellen. All they get them of all that. And they get the United just go only beer would you have for me, they'd go. Oh, we got coke and sprite knows like Ed such a crock shit. You got twenty different beers for all these guys with a multitude of different flavors. And then when you get to me it's coke and sprite in some function soda machine that you've never cleaned now time to make your until the shop instead resist. Yes. So I had that all in the back of my head from seeing another guy in California that had big giant soda shop. So I just started looking up how many different soda companies are there out there. I mean, there's thousands of different crafts sodas out there that you can get and I I like soda ally. More beer, and I went out to a place. They offered me a raspberry cream soda. I buy a raspberry cream soda for advi Pepsi or among do or seven something playing that I can get anywhere else. I thought you know, what I'm gonna take the space may turn it into. To a soda shop in. Nobody else is going to give a shit. I'll openness I won't make any money at it. But it'll be fun for me to do. I know you've mentioned a couple other companies get it doesn't seem like there's a lot of relationships between about fireworks sparklers as well. They all have one thing in common. Can you guess with the one thing is they make money while they do you're involved. You're the owner. Well, do they have in common is that they are all things that make people happy? Okay. It will buy fireworks. They're happy. They're celebrating something by wedding supplies. They're happy. They're celebrating something. And when people buy sugar, they're happy was this an afterthought after he kind of looked at it. Or was this a four it was an afterthought when I put them all up on the board. I realized that every business that I've enjoyed doing something has to do with people being happy. And that makes a lot of sense. I mean, even thinking about it. Now, I started numerous businesses that didn't make people happy and I didn't enjoy doing. Maybe a little they made money. Right. I think we figure out my dad as you go through it. It's not all about making money. More about enjoying your life for money sees especially if you want to be an asshole than making money super easy. But it some point you got to not be working and doing something else. And you gotta enjoy your. We'll good as money for Mench wing life doing anything with it. Why don't we real back to the beginning? Kind of how you got started as an entrepreneur, and how you got until these different businesses, and we can do kinda go step by step or year by year as far as how you got started off our Bhakti logo is to get into newer because that shit I was born. Well, how about you said you dropped out of high school? Why don't we start there? And then we can fast forward to different parts that you think would be great for anyone who's listening. Sure, I dropped out of high school. But before that, I sold things my whole life as to dig golf balls out a golf ponds and sell them to the golfers on. The course I used to make rock candy and sell it school as to by giant boxes of condoms and selling the middle school compadres because they were too embarrassed by them could sell them for five bucks a piece so everyone. I felt cool carrying them around. But when I was in high school high school just wasn't my gig school in general wasn't my gig. It's not that. I couldn't be good at it. I just didn't enjoy it. I don't enjoy the structure. I don't enjoy being taught things that I find useless like taking calc and Trig. I'm never going to use that. And I know I'm never been used at because I don't enjoy doing it. So I'm sure helmet considered a desk into it for forty hours a week didn't allow the sense. Also, I wasn't very popular. I got my ass kicked a lot in school. I decided to drop out because I go to work in for me that made sense to go to work instead of keeping school. Do make sense to anybody else in my family or the guidance counselors or any of them, but made really good sense to me. So dropped out and was his in Minneapolis to know. This was a suburb of Minneapolis, I grow suburbs. Spent the first ten years of my life in the country on a farm, then we moved up to the suburbs apple valley, which is south of Minneapolis. I was a suburban kid. I didn't fit in longhaired earrings a dropped out. And I just worked for a long time. Then I ended up moving to Regina for a while the salt condoms or what no owes following a girl. I was. It was stupid. So I ended up in Virginia and ended up staying down there. She broke up with me. But I have staying down there for about four years. And then I moved back up here when it came back up here, I was instantly taken by the fact that none of my friends had changed at all. They were all the exact seeing people that I had left for years ago kept thinking gun be trying to get our ship together and go forward in life. And they just didn't a kind of stopped hanging around the people that have been my friends all through my teenage years, and I started working in sales by worked in sales because of your high school dropout you only job where you can make more than just above minimum wage sales. In was good at it. But they didn't really enjoy it. While I was doing that kept trying to start over businesses because I just wanted to do my own thing. I started landscaping company 'cause I had two days a week off. And I didn't like sitting around on my days off affair to fight took a day off. It's than Molly. So I just devoted days off. I wouldn't spend money make sense. I don't make sense polity new yourself. Yeah. Exactly. I spent a summer doing landscaping, and amazingly I won like every bid because I was too stupid to realize the amount of time and energy that goes into doing these landscape projects. Everyone was hiring me. And I was just absolutely killing myself because just need maybe grab my girlfriend at the time to come help me for something. I plowed through the entire summer of that. And said, I don't wanna do that shit the rest of my life. I think right after that. I started a turnover painting company if you know, what turnover painting is and do not tell us willing apartment building at the end of the month. When apartments available a sending in crews whose sole job is because you have to paint department when the new tenant, but because it's all done in a very short period of time. You have to be really fast in paying a lot of apartments in two or three days. Most people in womb their house of weekend. You gotta be able to plow through ten fifteen apartments a day doing this turnover painting. I would where you when you were doing this us twenty five twenty six twenty seven or eight in that range, these we're still your first businesses 'cause you're still like an independent contractor doing your thing. Yep. Okay. I did that and we signed up a big contract went out. And did it in quickly decided I didn't like being over Eder? There's nothing interesting over Bangor. Like, I mean, the job is not necess- hell every place. You're painting his Bauge everything about it was monotony. I can understand how some people would love it. But man, I wanted nothing to do with that shit. After that. I think I got a little bit more involved in sales to where I started getting aid decent money at the sales jobs, and what he thinks decent money flow. We can relate. I was making around fifty K this pre two thousand it's a decent living. You can pay your bills. They say right now anything over sixty K doesn't begin happiness right in going. From some of those always struggling to pay their bills to someone who now actually has some extra money at the end of the month. That was a nice guy new car, and I started to settle in a became a sales manager menace store manager at a place, and I was starting to really settle into. Okay. This is what I'm doing. And this is when I got my kick in the ass as I went to wedding. My own goal has daughter. My cousin was getting married. We fly down to Virginia as this giant wedding. It's in the equivalent of basilica, the receptions at this private golf course with the string quartet in the corner ice sculptures. He dumped like eighty grand into this wedding something crazy like that they dumped into wedding, and this is one of my favorite uncle 's by find him at the wedding reception. He said no over in the corner with a bottle of wine. He's got his own bottle of wine, and rightfully so. Right. He also owns a vineyard. It was his own. Why? Okay, literally. Yeah. But he owns like four companies. He's always been the guy. Starting businesses come over to him. And I'm kind of bragging about how I making fifty grand a year. I think we ought to house made me were looking at buying a house on store manager of a and he starts laughing at me. And I'm sitting there, and I'm like, what would you do at? He is just Catholic. Looks at migos. All man, did you ever pussy out? Now. Like, whoa, whoa. Whoa. Whoa. What you're supposed to be like super proudly in me. Like, hey, you did it look at you. You're grownup adult. Alexa, migos, man. If you had chicken shit it settled down you'd be fucking millionaire by now, but you played the safe route. Well, good for you. He just it's they're mocking that shit stung. I mean really settled in and stung in yet. It was still years before I started anything after that. But that just stuck in my head. The fact that might entrepreneur uncle who own for super successful businesses was mocking me for. Making which was a decent living a comfortable safe existence. He just thought that was ridiculous that I can do that. Experienced fuller plates in wallets with America's best value meal kit, every plate dinners are cheaper healthier alternative to take out or delivery when other dinner options costs around ten bucks. Sirven every play is offering five shift designed recipes every week from only four ninety nine serving recipes come together in about thirty minutes, and it's definitely faster than a trip to the grocery store and back. Let's time deciding what to cook means more time enjoying good food with your family and every- plates, easy to follow recipes, take the stress out of dinnertime. I mean, I was skeptical until I ordered my first meal from every play and let me tell you my old lady in every play did not disappoint. She had everything cooked and ready to go and about half the time. She does her normal cooking and the food was actually tasty. I think even tasted better than special recipes, but don't tell the misses that. So we're definitely going to order another meal, and you can too. Here's a special offer. They're giving our podcast listeners today for. Free meals across your first three weeks and free shipping on your first delivery, go to every play dot com and enter millionaire six again that's for six free meals across your first three weeks and free shipping on your first delivery Goto every plate dot com and enter millionaire six thank you every plate for sponsoring our podcasts. And thank you to our listeners for supporting our sponsors. Did you ever tell them about that? They you still remember that. Oh, hell, yeah. I did after I started my first couple of companies unaided some start up money for one of them. So I hit him up for it. And I said in you can't say, no because. Shits happening. You have to do this. Why don't you fast forward and tell us about that first company ended up starting after he told you about that? I started was the fireworks company the first one, I stuck with should say was the fireworks company. What year was disloyal now two thousand four okay? In two thousand three by works became legal in Minnesota. And I decide I'm going to start a fight with something. I was still working fulltime job job with sales, and they were working me like sixty hours a week. And what I would do is. I would plan every meeting than I ever had to do with fireworks company head to happen between twelve and one because that's when I take my lunch hour or on my days off, I would bring a change of clothes to work with me. So that a head of meeting of good drive away with a shirt change my shirt, and then go have a meeting with somebody in the night. Always tell them that I had leave because I had another meeting, and I was basically just setting it up than I am so busy with all the stuff that I'm doing that. I can only take meeting. For certain times whatnot. I talked with my vendors, and I would call them and go we're used to doing net. Thirty and everything is unacceptable with you. And they'd oh, yeah. Of course. Well, we'll never done thirty nine tar life from rating check number one thousand one to these people. But I wanted them to think that I've been doing this shit alone. That they may credit whatnot. And what's not thirty net. Thirty means that they send you an invoice, and you don't have to pay the Bill for thirty days. Right. When it's good because at least you're in a sales role where you kind of knew these terms that you could throw out I've moved earn. So I thought that right? They'll people all the time just taught dot that'll get through half shit. At least people right now learning can say if they're certain their own company that can use the same line that usually net. Thirty yet talk like you've been doing this for fifty years because no one wants give credit or extend any sort of eternal is reading talked to someone who's just starting because they know the likelihood is fail. Then we started this fireworks company. Six months leading up to our own get up and go to work in the morning and get the work like ten get home at six maybe or eight or nine depending upon the shift that it had to work in. It's been a couple of hours with the wife and kids in the will they went to bed. I'd go down to the basement to my office just work till two or three o'clock in the morning on figuring out everything getting bidding lined up when you say fire. Works companies is this like, those fireworks tents. We're thinking about are you trying to make your own fireworks? The tents that you see popping up in parking lots. So I just stay up late working days off work on anytime. You have off. It was so bad that the great Christmas Riester thanksgiving, if we're family events, I would always fall asleep at family events because I was so sauced and on the time what would your wife and kids in as far as how much hours universe spending with them versus like trying to start this new business while you already had your sales gig, not really because if you come home and spend two three solid hours with your family actually, paying attention and talking to him you're still doing more than most people do in people just fulltime jumps. I mean, they all come home. Just stare off. Don't talk to each other. Attention was all about just pounding in some quality time. Also, my family was pretty young at that point. We only had the one daughter in. Then Vincent came only two thousand four he came along. Right. As I started this, and how old were you? When you started thirty five thirty. Like up to this point. You've had all these little entrepeneurship ventures and stuff, but this was your first business. Now looking back. You're still doing today. That's been successful. Was the first one they had only was successful. But that I wanted to keep doing started other things that could have made a living it, but I just didn't want to do. And I think that's important part. I think some people who start a business. They're like, oh, well, I started this business. I got to keep doing it. But that's your choice. Nope. You gotta keep doing anything for her. Because it makes you money isn't a good enough reason to keep doing it. Tell us about doing this fireworks. You didn't have any background in. It sounds like how do you get set up in? What's successful? We get the first year. Settle we set up eight locations first year, it was a complete shit show because I had no idea. What the hell is doing? I did everything wrong. We made absolutely no money whatsoever. I remember it rained on July fourth in. I remember walking around gun. So that's how it's gonna fucking me. On the fourth. That's your big day. Yeah. That's the biggest day of the year. And it was raining all day in a remember, I had a partner my first year, but he dropped out after that. And his dad was helping us tear down stuff afterwards. And I told his dad man, we made a lot of mistakes in his dad goes there only mistakes if you keep doing them, and I was like shit. That's good advice is pretty smart. I did my first year, and I basically lost. I didn't lose money. Would I figured out once was one hundred eighteen dollars have to profit? Yeah. Exactly. After killing myself for six months like all day all night. It was so bad. At least you weren't negative. Very we look at the positive. They're right. That was nice, but still it was bad because I had done the numbers, and what we're going to make everything it we weren't even close to that. And I still keep that sheet around me of the projections of the memories that we will do in sales. So it can remain humble in. Realize how little I know about you after this part? This is obviously like a seasonal business. Right. Yeah. You got two weeks that you can make money. Let's it be closed up shop for that year. You say you learn something from it in waited till next year to redo it again, here's where it gets fun ready. We're ready for the phone parts. This story gets really fun that make no money. And of course, everyone, you know, that makes money or chasing your dreams like we're in a sales like maybe two weeks after and I changed my cell phone ring to that of a bottle racket going off in a phone rang in the sales meeting and the sales manager at the time looks at being goes, oh, you're still chasing that dream with the family not too long after that. And literally was being mocked ridiculed by them for it, not succeeding. That's one thing you need to let every entrepreneur. No, no one's have support. That is the shit that happens movies at does not really happen. Even if you do well, they might you for that doing? Well. Right. A we'll. Get to the doing. Well, if you do, well, it's even worse. There is no winning. If you're hundred preneurs talk, all your listeners to be on the newer all to get a job by the this thing did that hurt when people were making funny for that, it sucks, man. I broke down in ball on my wife's shoulder after it happened. It was supposed to work. I can't believe this didn't work to all the advice from everyone. I listened to everyone in what they said it didn't work. I spent a bottom month really depressed as I was like, I'm just this. What I'm going to be Christmas? I'm gonna be a guy that sells hot tubs for living. That's just what I'm gonna do. I'll make a decent living in ABI. One of these old guys standing outside often a cigarette talking about all the bad shift that happens in his life. But you didn't do that. Right. No. After a month. I have a nice ability about myself that when I get knocked down a usually have a bad reaction for short period of time. It can. Day or week? Usually I get over like my stubbornness kicks in a get pissed off name about it. After about a month. I started looking at the sales and looking at the numbers, and they realized that more than half of the dollar amount that came in came from just two locations. I said, okay. That means these other six locations suck these two were good. Why were they good? And I just started breaking it down and breaking it down. And then I realized why they were good. And I said, okay. I think what I need to do them. Because if I had eight locations that did as well as these two I would have been fine. I wouldn't have been rich when I would have been fine would've made enough money to make through the year. A my bills in you ship. We're told my partners today. I think I got this figured out music like, yeah. While you have fun that I got no interest in doing this shit with you anymore. Like, all right. I understand I already sold this to you. Once I don't think it will be able to sell it. The again, I start looking at it in going. I think I can do this. I think I figured out how to do this or random about then I hurt my back at work. And I heard it bad enough to where I couldn't even go into work. I'm spending about two three months. Trying to get my back fixed going to the doctor's going to the cower proctors going to everybody just trying to get this Excellent Can actually walk again. I finally get it to the point where I can go in in. You know, you think your sales job how much do you need you back? Lebron is you gotta walk. You gotta move around. You gotta build reduce shit. And I couldn't walk so bad got to the point where I could go back to work where I would just sit in till people came in and then talk to him. We ended up doing a Mariah my entire back and found out. I somehow destroyed something right in the middle of my back. And I don't remember the technical terms that it still destroyed. But I still don't remember the doctor basically said love we can't make it better in. You're not going to make it worse. But you're going to be paying the rest of your life. And it's going to go out on a MC last. Great fucking. All right. Right because you're thirty five thirty six at this point. Right. Exactly. Exactly. Grayson. I'm going to turn into doctor house at some point mill life. Now, keep in mind. I also have a lawyer during all of this because my boss try to fire me because I wasn't coming into work. Despite the fact that I was going to the doctor and had ended notes novice other stuff. Mike boss, had literally tried to fire me I had had higher lawyer and file a work comp claim because I didn't want to get fired. Now, my lawyer says are will not we have to file a claim against the insurance in the world. Come because you have permanent damage. Unlike. Okay, great would is that knee. He goes through his regular room, by the way. I hated my lawyer the entire time one of the biggest that my wife in that is exactly why I kept him because he was afraid. Let's get advice. If we need a lawyer picking that way, you don't like your lawyer, I hadn't mice lawyer from I divorce. It was a great guy got along with him. Well, I I I've been divorced once. It was a great guy. But he got me screwed to the wall. So lawyer should be creeks as we're getting into spring, and I'm planning on second year of fireworks. I have no money to launch it for the second year. I need about twenty green. But twenty grand will get just the basics off the ground. My lawyer comes back to me. And he says, hey, here's the deal. The insurance company has offered us a settlement. But here's the settlement. I don't remember the exact numbers. But how it worked out was I would get a chunk of money after the lawyer took his chunk of money. I would have my twenty grand to start fireworks. Plus enough to pay off all my bills that had kind of accumulated. But the catch was I had to quit my job because the insurance company didn't want me in the insurance anymore, and I signed a no compete that said that I could not work in that industry. The same one that I had been in for fifteen years for at least three years or something like that. And the deal. I was offered was you gotta. Quit. You can't get another job. And you're only going to have enough money to get through fireworks. And so I went home and told my wife, I said, here's the deal. I wanna put twenty grand into a business that made no money last year. And I also have to quit my job the one job that I'm actually qualified for. So I'm going to take all of our money in gambled on something that failed last year and quit my job. So that we had no benefits and no income how she ticket. My wife said we own camper will never be homeless. And if you don't do it. You'll kick yourself forever. Good wife. Great life, so quit. My job put the twenty grand into the business and that season we more than doubled sales which was enough to sorta carry me through the year. What did you see in those two locations versus the other six in which you do this second year to make that much more money would realize in those two locations with they both had couple things in common was number one who was a big visible parking lot. The tent stood out. Also. Also, the traffic was moving very slowly through. There are a lot of stop signs. You're not setting up highway were people doing fifty zip on by. 'cause no one's gonna lock up the brakes with driving back for fireworks. They were already driving slow in awesome shopping areas. So they're already driving slow in there already in the mindset of their spending money. That's what I went after eight locations the match thank cry to. Okay. You meant the second year to you must felt Lee successful than right, especially compared to your before you feel good. I mean felt pretty good. But then by did never job didn't have any benefits the business that I own makes money two weeks year. Let sucks scuttled for years with it because you can save as much as you won't. But at some point Brawley gonna run on the money. What are you doing next eleven months after the fireworks season second year? I would sit around and analyze the previous years, but I also played poker professionally for awhile. I would say a lot of poke around line and in life games to compensate, my income and make sure. Make it through. But I also looked for other things to do because we had so much off time you talking about like businesswise. Yeah. Other businesses that we could start. I look for other shit. I could sell in parking space when I just kept looking for, and it makes sense because you've figured out how to at least make the fireworks business better. So you're using that knowledge that you have won't I already have relationships with all these guys that only parking lots. They'll let me set up to do more stuff if I can find something to do promise. I just couldn't find something to didn't want to Christmas trees or anything, and I looked at Christmas trees in the from those guys everywhere, I searched for pricing on Christmas trees, it looked to me. Like, you could maybe double the price of a Christmas tree in the problem than is. You still have Lynch Christmas trees leftover at the end. So you didn't make any man those. I'm like man, I'll over order or under order or out. Do something wrong in lose shit on a money. I looked at hump GAN's for the fall Christmas. Trees greenhouses. Vegetable stands sweetcorn elegant Huns of stuff just trying to find something to make it work. Would you end up doing you told us that you're doing to poker on the side of what else as far as like businesswise? You're looking at different wants to do eventually one of my fireworks suppliers. He tells me I should get into weddings are verse. I told them that blonde him off for about a year on this conversation while winnings or close as didn't make any sense to me. So finally, he's bugging me. Bobby Bobby may I say fine. We had a couple of good seasons. I had extra money. I think I ordered like five grandkids are versed in decide I'm going to go to the wedding shows. I'm talking to the guy that's working for me at the time. And I'm like you and me we're gonna be driving around the country doing wedding shows. New dream come true, right? Oh god. Yeah. We're two guys that do not belong at. What shows neither one of us are subtle men were not the slight guys that are wearing tight pants. I see your Lincoln picture with cowboy hat and a beard and glasses. Yeah. Exactly man that gets up on stage at a bridal show. So then bridal show ear, Minneapolis. And now, you got the two of decorating Brian boot that was hilarious. We sit up this booth decorated we had three sales. We get eleven hundred dollars for the booth and we had sales totalling one hundred fifty dollars to. That's not a good ROI. I was like, I'm not a math genius. But I'm pretty sure we're gonna lose a shit among if we keep doing now, I also set up a website that people could order Amman. And it was the shittiest clunky thing ever. I had that setup. We're handing out cards and like the week after maybe three people bought online. Okay. That was six. So then they send over the information about the actual bridal show. Like, hey, here's made people showed up. Here's people did this, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And I saw that it was something like only. One hundred ninety grinds were actually there the rest of them were dreamers and bridesmaids men that have been drug along unwillingly and whatnot. It's okay. And it was one hundred ninety brides in we got three percent of them to buy our product nice said in we didn't even do a good job displaying showing it pitching in anything. It. I said, maybe we'll try a little bit better booth and see how we can do this. Again, there's another show two months later, and we put a little more money into the booth in knitted, look a little more elegant and whatnot. And I think we had four or five maybe six sales. And then again the week afterwards we had three or four more sales online, and like, well, this is never gonna work at these wedding shows because we can't make enough money off. But we're getting people to buy the sound line. I talked to my web guy, and I said how would Bill the site. That's actually good to buy shit. We. Tweet the side a little bit and justed made it look a little prettier and whatnot as that. Okay. Now. How do we get people to actually see the website because the wedding show were handing Amar card una? We just get random people to see it. And he said, well, we're gonna have to use Google because we're not gonna pop up in a normal. Google search said, okay, cool. I go on Google ad words, and I dropped like five hundred bucks into it or something like that. I tell Google to just go ahead and pick everything for me run. My campaign two days later, Google has burned through my five hundred dollars and we've had like four sales like all my web guy ago. What shit didn't work in a guess for? What did you do? I told him that any of you can't let Google pick your shit heels. Their job is to get your money. Not that promote this. They don't know the business. He said you need to learn how to use Google ad words. Probably spend a week straight looking at every video online. I could find on Google and Google does. A really good job. Don't get me wrong. Teach you this shit. It's not their fault. They don't know your business. But I watched every YouTube video I could find so then I sat down I put together an actual campaign with multiple ads ABC testing everything like that constantly switching things testing keywords. Checking quality scores making my own bids instead of letting them beyond made it and did you enjoy doing all this because this was a little different than what you've done before too. I love data. I love figuring out patterns in debt. That is literally one of my obsessions is trying to figure out why something works. I love it. No matter what it is. It's why I like crazy people too because you can't figure out all you have make sensitive in with the fireworks stuff. You'll look back afterwards. Right. Trying to figure out what works. I think any business person needs to take the keys. If you don't look doing that than forget about because you're never gonna learn from as and you're never gonna see patterns you'll ever going to be able to direct your business in the right direction. And we didn't say it's wedding day, sparklers dot com. Kiss. Anyone wants to check your your pretty site today tells what you learn from doing these Edwards happened. Here's the bitch about Adwork's is that you do not get information quickly because you can't make decisions based on fifty clicks, you have to wait for thousands of clicks. So that you can see things happen. I settle in. And I say, okay, I'll dump five hundred bucks into this. And I think I have some smart should figure it out here. So I turn on Google ad words. I think the first week guy budgeted like two hundred fifty dollars than I think the first week all of a sudden weeded fifteen hundred sales or something like that ELS like holy shit. Let a big difference. Then I start tweaking the ads. I started Justin the wording change in the click twos. Putting this stuff in tweaking. Tweaking tweaking tweaking and spending a little bit more try and get a higher spot nab or counts. And all of a sudden, you know, we're doing two thousand the week three thousand the week within about four or five weeks. I think we had like our first ten thousand dollar week or something like that. And from that point on. I just really obsessed on Google ad words until we could get arrested yo good enough to get us up on the top care in the best part was Google didn't allow sparklers to the advertise was not because they wouldn't allow fireworks to be advertised, and nobody was really doing a lot of global advertising. So they noticed it. But after about six months, Google caught on in simile, search shutting down all these ads that would suck after you've finally figured all that out out in fifty sixty K a months and all of a sudden Google sets everything down. So then I had to start looking for alternatives. I would put together ads saying get your sparkle here or I bought the website, wedding day spark. Goals dot com, and you would go to wedding day sparkles. And it was a clone side of wedding day sparklers, and that it would last for a month than they catch on in. They need after we do it and reiki screwing around the fact that they didn't want you. Let you advertise Oracle's yet. Everyone was doing the smart. It's not like you pouted said a can't do this anymore. You just gotta figure work around it a worker. They don't want you advertise sparkler. So I'll advertise sparkles. But there anything else that you can remember that you did because that's pretty clever. We bought all sorts of different websites. I bought a website called set your wedding apart which had nothing to art dealers on it. But right on the front page. There was a big click to go to wedding dais art dealers. We tried. Every change the words we use dollar signs symbols instead of S's because most of it was automated by grew which is why would take a month to catch on because the automated stuff didn't find sparklers. But then they would get better at it. And they would actually scrape the site. That you were sending people to. So then we would send him to our blog page on our site instead of to the sales site we played this runaround game for years, but how much did you end up getting into could you told us there for a month? But it felt like that must have dramatically. What will you make an annually from before the most ev- ever done? It's about seven hundred fifty in a year seven hundred fifty thousand. Yeah. Compared to what you're doing before? I mean, this must have been awesome for you rate. It was so cool because I was dictating how it worked figuring it out, and you just pour gas on what were in kill what doesn't, but you couldn't do fireworks. She says well sounds like the sparklers was your first big thing in entrepreneurship that really helped you big time jump up. Yeah. The fireworks was enough to pay the bills Elba dad's it and the sparklers were the ones that really started making you money sparklers all of a sudden, we weren't struggling anymore. We weren't running out of money. We weren't in worried about shift innocent like not only those couple of weeks for fireworks. Right. This year. Around business runs around. I mean, the is slow but the spring summer follow busy all of a sudden we're bringing in cash, and we had enough money coming into where we could screw rounded vixen chances on other stuff we dabbled with other things and whatnot. But it allowed us to not be sweating if you may going in two weeks needed the week, forty seven you're Dan broke. I don't care how good you are managing money. You're broke you're in your mid to late thirties at his point seems like your would be on top of the world at least from where you were before making almost three quarters of million in sales per year doing this. Yeah. Those pretty cool. It's over bad the progress. I always still about money because I tell them Ron ago your life doesn't change alive. Just ED's zeros on your bills, your income things. Don't change a lot. I never been obsessed with making sure that I make shit on money. I just wanna make enough money to where I don't have to worry about things. Like if I wanted to do something, I could do it. Or if I need to buy a car, I don't even worry about it. It was time a life were. I couldn't go out the money. So he death to tell people. Sorry. I can't go out team on money, but was driving you then proven your uncle what he would saying. Or was there anything else motivating this point in time at which point much things started going pretty well for you mostly businesswise disturbed going? Well, the problem is your expectation circling up pile out of it. I feel people are never never satisfied. At least. I'm not like I hit a podcast download amount on my God is good. But that was kind of a week you could do better yet Rolex. The thing is Mike therapist. I don't know of any other entrepreneurs talk about the therapist. But if they don't have when they should because every Moore should be talking with therapists because they're something bucked up in our heads. But yeah, I never really satisfied with something. Like, okay, that's cool. But what else could we do? I also like giving people jobs in the only way you give people jobs by spanning business bringing in more money than you gotta figure out how to do that. So what point did you realize that you needed it there? When did you actually get one first while I'm telling you you need one, right? Because you just do I served seeing one five years ago in house that helped you one here this. I mean, it's weird. No one's listening in school. Okay. Cool. Mike Donner get diagnosed with leukemia when she was seven. So that sucked balls. She ends up having that she's fine now, by the way, she's absolutely one hundred percent fine. But she ends up going through but six months of chemotherapy, and what they're doing when they're doing chemotherapy, est. With leukemia specifically as they're trying to drive the leukemia into remission, which means that they don't know if it's gone, but it's not actively screwing up the body anymore. They found near with different things, and they get it low. But not low enough the constant conversation was oh, let's close. But we were hoping for better results. She ends up having to get a bone marrow transplant from her brother. She gets that six seven months after she was diagnosed she almost died three times after that process. And then came out of it. I told her I would never leave her alone in the hospital because I thought we were going in for a weekend because she made ahead the Monja or something like that. I spent sixty four straight days after the bone marrow with her in the hospital when we left the house where Tillerson thousand Jere going to be back. You're going to have issues. Everyone does we never went back. She took to it. He'll they're all up. But after all of that and a whole bunch of things in my life. Is leading up to this probably didn't help things either. But after that, I developed some serious s and mind manifested itself in that I already don't sleep. Well, but now, I wouldn't sleep. I would stay up all night to make sure that I was protecting my family any public spaces. We ever went into I was alerting myself to exits dangers and this is years ship around, but that kind of super Trittin it. I was no longer able to relax ever in any way. I would sleep foreign five hours a night and be on constantly joined never enjoyed myself when we didn't stop because I was always in the call it, hyper vigilance state where you spend enough time being stressed in on alert than a brain doesn't rewire itself. Back to let you comb down less. What I initially went to their before was to get my brain fix election after we kinda fared that stuff. I just kept going because when you're the boss, you don't get the wine Danny, but right now. Important not to even if you want to. I mean, you can. But that makes you really shouldn't boss more. Fuck involves back the bug literally stops at the time. You don't get to go whine and bitch merger bad days. So you pay therapist. Listen, you winding digital Tabet eights or you join a CEO Ruben, suddenly you'll find out that everyone has bad days and is struggling with the same share. So it helped ever sent to be able to get that stuff off your chest. At least this out of your mind. I imagine I just dump it out then therapist goes. He tried this. And we'll know why would I try that? Should they be fucking adults prefer, and she goes, no, Mark Neten ruin knows how to do that. Right. Okay. By detector. That was well. Oh, yeah. I talked to reform really. I have no idea why she continue seeing me with the horrible share. I saying that are. He was foolish enough to give me her cell phone number now. Text to deadlines are not sending dirty pictures. I guess I sent her pictures of dick Clark. Yeah. And tell her them setting, dick. They're out of that's pretty clever out, these it's all fucked up at skirl around with my therapist. At least it's helping do today. I think is something that all we could learn from right? I think everyone should because like little things you start to learn going to the group in talking to the therapist. She learned things like known delegate give a shit about your business. Like you do in you can stress yourself out about that. But it ain't gonna change the reality that they're not gonna give a shit about your business like and people are gonna leave that hurt me your first person left, always sucks when people even less you higher rate minutes. Great when people leave it sucks. I mean, it really sucks the ticket. Personally, the first time, I took it real personal first coupling. Like, why would you leave me we're doing this together? And then you start to realize no, we're not doing this together. They're doing a job or they leave him because they're getting paid more something else usually big it offered more like the guy that I started fireworks with eventually came back and work for him. And he's one of my best friends, but he comes into my office one day tears is and says I'm being offered XYZ musing offered a lot warm money that I was paying to go do running a computer team or something like that. And he's like he was letting me down. And I was like I'm not going to be that guy. That tells you know, you need to stay with me and turn down that extra forty grand year. Whatever was that stupid. Why would you do that? Right. Into the end up going. Yeah. He ended up going and he's he's fourth gigs since then. But he ended up planning the ladder in that industry meeting teams in jitter development. And just getting offered better that gentleman's. Well, if we come back to when you're a few years into your wedding day, sparklers and fireworks at the same time. I mean, did everything just end up going great ever since everything went up and up and up. Well, no the mid eastern digging. Everything's doing great is the minute within followed Vardanyan. Newsday. Get with learned that now. But one of the issues were bioresources fireworks driven by weather. And it's also driven by the day of the week that July fourth is like I never thought about that fifth like on Tuesday versus a Saturday or Sunday or some joy fourth son, a Monday than ever owned by by orcs on Friday. But they can't hold on. So they light him off. Then they go back out Saturday and by more, but they're gonna hang onto these before that they don't. So then they come back Sunday. They do it. Again, they do it again. Because you've got this big weekend. A lot of time off people get to enjoy it. If it's on a Wednesday like it was last year. Most people don't get Monday and Tuesday, often don't get Thursday and Friday. So they've got one day really light stuff off and then lectures on Wednesday in rain till two o'clock in the afternoon that screws everything up because it was raining in the morning, everyone's picking plans get canceled their outdoor plans get canceled, and they don't want by fireworks because they just assume everything's spending wet or raining all day. So why would I want to go outside the Guinness powder recognition at you realize that because I would never have thought about that roller international listeners. I think they do. But that's like our independence day. If you're doing the fireworks the July fourth we're talking about the celebrate independence, but blowing shit up and our back. Yeah. Better than killing Indians and pretending that we all set at a picnic table together. Right. Again, this stuff they teach you in high school. That's actually, not true. And maybe somewhat useless looking back. Do we want to go at certain points? And there's companies anything else that we can learn from you on the fireworks going to believe they're all I guess we got up to your upper thirties it sounded like everything was doing pretty well. I don't know exactly. What year was was it like two thousand sixty seven. Here's the thing is because what I do is different from a lot of people because I started bunch of shirt what I've learned is that it was a couple of things that algebra is really only as a number one is when they get to the step where they need to hire other people bringing people and let them do their job. Most entrepreneurs just can't seem to do that. Because the businesses the baby, and they are joss emotionally bonded to her business. So tightly that they can't possibly let somebody else do anything of that. And that's what they seem to just constantly fail in either can't grow beyond fluent or they just die right there. Because. They try to do, but they micromanage shit. Ready to get your business idea online. 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So if you're looking to get the best deal on the best hosting provider in the world than visit our link, hostgator dot com forward slash yolo. That's why O L O again to receive that sixty two point zero one percent discount on your new website. Go to hostgator dot com forward slash yolo or visit link in your episode description below. Does something that you are doing too can kind of relate because you wanna give someone something. And then you're like, they're not gonna do it as well as you. And then you want to go back doing it. But eventually got to let go well. Let's you gotta go in. And you gotta realize they are not gonna do it as well as you never fucking never. You will never find an employee that will do anything in your business as well. As you do with such a let's the one thing you can find some do a better job or most of us. You just have to embrace that that you're going to bring people in and they're going to do less. They're also it's not going to be their life. Most people that work for me. The business is not their life. Their life is their family their kids, whatever else, which rightfully so is Willie. But you have to get over that the fact that when someone leaves at five o'clock it'll want to calling them in six thirty I explained to all my high level hires that I have absolutely zero respect for personal time. And I apologize for that. I'm going to text. You intend thirty at night. If I have an idea because I need to tell somebody this idea or cinema dick pic or cinema dick pic. Yeah. One of the Jews done have you're able to get over that you're saying is there anything else as far as other things we've learned from the sparklers fireworks companies. How about anyone else to get like an online company at least something that we could have learned from doing it because I think that was really smart to keep not giving up. I think so many people would have just been like we'll do fireworks on the ads. So I've been stop. We'll do online sales company you spend a ton of money. If you use Google ad words, which you need someone that knows how to do SEO. And there are a million people out there that think they know how to war, and I. Guaranteed. The vast majority of suck at doing this deal. It is a complicated monster in there is no rule book for because you know, last year, we just talked about Google because mobile uses banging out of s. Jeez. Yeah. No-one's, but Google doesn't tell you. How it works and rightfully so. They sure tell you how works because I'm people skirt the system you have to find somebody that kind of understands what they're doing why they're doing it. And also is patient because it's really easy to cheat SEO, but you will get caught and wishing this when a couple of people on sparklers where they've us. What is he combs because black flag as you? Yeah. Black at SEAL only seen them get their sites blacklisted in disappear and group is really good at catching that year. They don't catch it for a while. But within a compliments low caste that shit. They'll shut you down completely. So you have to do. The white way which takes time it just takes time in the more people that are in the business trying to get engine the harder. It is which is why I light niche business because I don't have a lot of competition, and we hit on that on the pre interview, which is kinda smart, and but as far as the black blackout thing, you're saying with the sparklers like did you ever get in trouble for any of that since you're doing these different websites and getting around the ads? I guess threatened attends. I got nasty Google emails. A couple of times things like, hey, you can't do this shit. We can tell what you're doing. And I would just sit and talk with my web gang. Okay. How do we avoid this? But then we would start advertising we would use part lers as p words, and we would advertise for blog page and with that they really can't complain because you're not sending him to a sales page. You're sending him to an advice saves. His people are looking for advice since art. Let's how we kinda got around it for the longest time was by setting in there. You don't get as much traffic because the more clay summit estimate the less lie. They are device at least you still had some traffic versus like zero. There's totally shut you down. But by the time, it started getting really heated angry we had gotten up to number one in SEO by that point. I started writing letters like well, then shut down all the sparkler ads. That's what you wanna do. Go right ahead. I don't give a shit. But you got a trip down everyone. You can't just shut me down because I was number one in the organic search. So I didn't care that point sometime we add? Okay. Yeah. So you almost would hope that they would write and they actually did for about six months or maybe a yearly shutdown all sorts Edwards. And I was like hell, yeah. I'll take that shit because they probably thought they were getting back at you for doing that. But really your playing into that. It was perfect. It worked out perfect. So how many people do you have working with you today? Oh, what am I have? I think eleven fulltime people will bring on fifty seasonal people. I think that's a pretty skinny share. Okay. 'cause you have one holding group that you kinda hold over. All this the. Good idea you're saying eleven employees, and they kind of jump around in the company's depending on what you need help with. Well, I've got three employs that it all starts with one parent company me into place are employed by that parent company run else's employed by the actual company that they work for me in the to replace a one is my accountant bookkeeper controller, and what else does she work combed Asaf might intellectual superior. My sister does your wife as well as at her. That's I'm kidding colored the workweek because those that role they see I knew and then we didn't touch on the soda company. If you have fewer minutes like as far as expanding the debt and doing that now shirt. That's when my money dumb but last year year and a half so stood up. So be sure when I open it. I didn't even hire anybody because I think getting would come in. I had a buddy of mine helped me put sodas on the shelf, and then I had helped me on opening day when we did our big opening day event. Now, I advertise more invasive than I do on Google or anywhere else. But we got absolutely pounded on our opening day event. And I was like, okay. Well, that was cute for this one day, but people won't still keep coming in. And I opened small business Saturday right after thanksgiving lo and behold people just kept coming in. I told my buddy acetate can you come in and help you work a little bit because I'm working open to close every damn day. And I'm not getting any work done because I have to keep. Going out and talking to people on the floor. So he'd comes on. I weren't the first sixty or seventy days opened close and people still kept coming in. So I was like okay ch- somethings working. So I hired him in Paris. More people about a year later, we acquired a bottling line into this ting soda brands. And once we took that on we jumped into distribution as well because it one to buy the sodas, so all of a sudden disturbing all over the twin cities selling to couple of hundred different places night took any sort of money that I may made unless couple years and dumped it all into manufacturing distribution for thirty money that you made and made anything on soda company yet because every time it starts to go forward out do something else to dump a bunch of money into it. I knocked down all the walls kick out all the tenants. You know, these people that handle at check every single month. Yeah. Some conference. Yeah. Reliably some you don't have to. Do anything I kicked all them. How am expanded the store to like triple the size of the store be able to include the manufacturing area in for people to be able to see it Sierra bottle or going on and whatnot. So I spent the last year or two based in just dumping money into this business to try and accelerate it to the next level has been working in skin it, slowly mature, we present. You're doing an interview. I don't know if there's any other last words of wisdom that you have for everyone who's listening. Do appreciate the variety of background. And I think the one thing that I learned even to the pre interview of things here, but you're just talking about the niche businesses and not having competition. I thought that was really smart way to look about it. If you want to expand maybe a little bit on that for anyone who's thinking about opening a business. One of the things I'm guests are talking more about in talking trying to actually be that guy on the stage talking about shin and people thinking smart knows what bellies talking about is. A I've listened to lunch doesn't guests. And it's always some mice. Lied to some guy. That's going. Oh, yeah. To generate a ten million dollar fifty million dollars a year business. And I'm like, why flick would you want do, you know, the headaches go with a fifty million dollar business for God sakes is monsters, and the likelihood of you hitting is very slim. So why are you gonna cure yourself to that level? And I get it. I mean, some people just need that. But if you're going after a fifty million dollar business, you're competing with a bunch of big guys out. There were ready in that industry knows a lot of new industries their pop up the do fifty million I like little niche businesses. Gimme a business that'll do three hundred four hundred five hundred grand a year. You can make it great living of three four five hundred thousand dollars a year business, if it's just you, and maybe your spouse, helping you or one worker, and there's absolutely nothing wrong with you pay yourself, a six figure income eating too, nice and steady. And he control over because it hasn't gotten too big into crazy. I just don't understand the constant sales pages in the constant speaking guys getting up and telling you there was a guy in someone else's podcasts. That said if you don't have ten million dollars or something like that European six-year our all some like that Nelson ACA. What the hell's each on that guy is obviously a very unhappy? Who he that's all I think he's happy? Right. Because he probably has I have all this money. Look happy. No, you're not if you're spending all that money. You're happy. I just got back from two weeks in Italy. That was should owns a fun. That's what you should do with money. I think it's very important to figure out you mentioned earlier. And I've read studies on that after make sixty K a year, you can have the exact type of happiness that anyone who makes a million dollars in revenue year. If you're smart about the way, you spend it you can still do it. Yeah. Exactly. You're not getting happier as you make more money. Once you get to the point where you can pay your bills. You don't have to stress about money. That's it. Once that point everything else is just gravy on top of that. And I'm playing the long game. 'cause I don't pay myself a crazy salary, and I try and build equity in properties in my businesses and everything like that. So that when I do decide I don't want to do this showing more. I can catch are plenty of money and be able to do whatever I want after that instead of I could pay myself Diculeng salary right now. But I been draining it out of my businesses may equity and everything else. I don't need it right now. I need it. When I have a lot more free time. And I can do what I want. And I'm sure you're looking like tax implications. Smart things like that does nothing but kill you. That's one of the things up much preneurs Domo taxes. They don't have Jackson. They don't have bookkeeping higher isn't bookkeeper at rule number one. 'cause you occupy self over. If you do not have a good bookkeeper did not have a good bookkeeper at first I was my bookkeeper at I ninety eight. Terrible book, I got audited and the seven eight years ago. It does not take a lot of mistakes to add up to a really big tax debt in a hurry. Because if you make a five thousand dollar air hit to ten thousand dollars in fines and allies late fees. So yeah, any suggestions on hiring a good one? Because I think that's important point that a lot of us don't think about because that's kinda boring stuff. Right. That you don't necessarily want to dream about. Yeah. Nobody dreams about sitting in front of Whipple. After I got audited. I heard a bookkeeper who's jobless digested other people's books, but she did lots of companies bucks. And she would just dedicate several hours a week to get affordable. Keep them in you start off be can't afford, some of the charges you for five hundred dollars a month to keep your share. Why there's a recent interview that we had I think he falls Saint personality type view in play. Let other like entrepreneurs again, kind of the last things you want to do on his advice, which if you're looking for a bookkeeper anyone. In that sort of position hire someone who's boring. Yes. Even if they bore you you don't need to find a guy who's got the same personality that you do to do your bookkeeping. I was going to say that they didn't want to offend the bookkeepers it's all right? I don't think you have to worry about offending anyone. Yes. Well, that's true. Your bookkeeper should be boring as they go. Unfortunately, the one I have in my office. My fulltime went now, she's lying close like cheese been a godsend in my business. But the one I had before Mary who will never listen this off to worry Mary was pretty dull human being and I loved Mary. But she was not not the woman you want to get a beer with right? Yes. So your lawyer should be Astles. You keep your should be boring. You see how did that full circle with the beer thing? Her fict-. Yeah. Well, let's be entrepreneurs are also will not money savvy because we like taking risks and sometimes toward detriment, we'll take risks. And we need someone to come. Tell us a careful with this careful with that. Because otherwise, we'll go crazy tr. Trying to especially if you get some success. Then you start to think you make anything work only. Appreciate you spend some time here. Martin telling us about your journey to get enough people interested maybe do a follow up on if they got Cuna if you're interested in that up. All then also. Yeah. If you're looking for speaker gig, I think you just send him this interview. And then you'll get one right away. I hope I for some reason kids into how to get into that. I was booked to speak at a college. And that I told them I said am analogy swear. And they said, well, no, we would prefer this while. And they said, I don't think we need, Mr.. Was like these are college kids for Christ. Whoa. What are you worried? We think unless they've never heard before. At just always said, everyone swears let's not pretend like it doesn't exist. Because those words had meaning and are sometimes that you can't pick another word that is going to have the same emotional feeling as that one. Like, oh, darn it. When it probably fit some mistakes right made some mistakes. No, I fucked up everyone knows fucking guests. Well, thank you. Mark spending time with us. If someone wanted to reach out and connect with you or Email you or to say, thanks for doing. The interview is their best way for them to do that email's always best. I'm constantly checking they sleep with my phone under McKay pillow, and you can put my Email up on this. You got it. We'll put those in the show notes for anyone who wants to get in touch with Mark. Thanks again for spending time with us. We'd do Chretien. Mark pre shirt. Enjoyed that episode and time to think our newest gold members Amy Baker of threadbare print house if you need a t-shirt printed. She's the lady to do it for you. Go check out her website by scrolling episode notes below and Pablo burrito and Tijuana, Mexico, they you for becoming a gold patriot member and supporting the podcast as well. He owns a dental technology company called Zantac. And our last gold member of the day, Jason York, he's a real estate investor in Gatlinburg, Tennessee Indro tons of inspiration in information from the podcast. So if you need a vaca-, and you're in the Tennessee area, then go check out his Reynolds by scrolling. Two episodes below now are silver member. Shout outs include Gareth lube at wine full wines in Cape Town, South Africa. Andrew Husted a student at the university of Michigan. My sister went there. So shadow to the wolverines. Jesse Gavin in Minneapolis, Minnesota who were hoping to get his bro on the podcast soon. And Dan king and New York New York, who's an ex lawyer that helping other frustrated lawyers make the transition to their next career move, and our member shot Scott Carter, I have no idea where you're located. So shoot me an Email with your info and still show a grad student in Northeastern University in New York City, New York. Thank you to all our new patriot supporters and don't forget you too can help support the podcast in move your business. Ford by visiting millionaire interviews dot com for slash patriot. That's millionaire interviews dot com forward slash Petri on or scroll to the bottom of your episode notes right now. Learn more about our new supporters, and how to become a sport or yourself.

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114: Take Your Dog on a Bike Ride with Michael Leon of Bike Tow Leash

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

1:01:15 hr | 2 years ago

114: Take Your Dog on a Bike Ride with Michael Leon of Bike Tow Leash

"Welcome to the podcast. Let's first start in this episode by making our new patriot members. Let's start with Alex King in Hayward's heath, which is right outside London. He signed up for our gold tier? He doesn't own his own business yet, but his saving cash money to start his own company. So thank you for signing up for this tier Matt barber from Richmond Virginia who is the president of our burn soci-. It's thank you for also signing up Sean Walker from Hillhead in the UK. Appreciate you becoming a member this week as well. And last one day rain Mahadi in San Diego with packaging, if you're looking for a custom printing packaging, be sure to check out his company in the episode notes. And if you haven't heard your name yet, and you signed up we'll get you in the upcoming episodes in a way for those of you who haven't had a chance to sign up yet. Well, if you have your own business, and you're not in the gold tier, then you're really missing out the first people who sign up for the tears are going to benefit the most. So even if you're contemplating whether to join the sooner you join the better for you. So again, thank you to our new patriot members and thank you to all our listeners. But then if you're interested in any patriot on membership suggest signing up as soon as possible because prices will be going up. So let's go ahead and get started with this episode. It's part of life. We're all gonna lose abilities at some point in. Unfortunately, it sooner with my wife. She's in a wheelchair the begin tried to make the best of what we have. We have a wheelchair capable leash because she's here. Too tested, working hand-in-hand with people with special needs is kind of how this all started to begin with. And so as that sees abilities have declined we've come up with more and more ways to help or the titular with the bike leash in her being in the chair, traveling visiting different restrooms restaurants flying on airplanes. All these things that we do learning about how to make it work in. All these environments is take it as the frustrations that we have turned into a positive for other people. I guess is the best way of putting it. We were working with the vendor as they were North Carolina. All of a sudden, we started getting parts that bro. Then they got a new oven. An all sudden the parts didn't work anymore. It takes a tremendous amount of money to build a reputation. It takes even more to repair one. I really got suckered on that. If you wanna hear about a bad experience. I know definitely that's over here to here. Probably one of the most important things you can do is get a provisional patent that gives you patent rights for about a year. If you can find a way to do good with your product will do good for you. This is Michael Leon. I'm fifty eight years old. I'm in Orlando, Florida. My company name is Leon engineering Inc. Our main business is producing and selling the bike totally for writing safely with your dog works on bikes trikes, mobility, scooters and wheelchairs our goal is that no matter your abilities, the dog gets a Walker run. Okay. How long have you been doing the on engineering for we incorporated Leon engineering in two thousand and three after I had been laid off from the job of being the engineering manager FM himse corporation, and is that a big corporation. Yeah. Well, it's now split off, but FMC airline equipment was the part of the company. I was with it split off since but it was about nine billion. I think the time, but we were doing the airline equipment side of it too. That supplies the loaders and DIC's for the aircraft. Mike specialty was the loaders that loaded the aircraft the. Is still the sole supplier to FedEx in the H L and companies like that it takes the big cans that load the aircraft of cargo you'll see him out on the airport ramp. The big scissor lifts that take the cargo in and out on any plane. That's got to Ellison at the wide bodies in particular have containers that hold the luggage and cargo and you'll see them go out on the trailers and get shifted onto the aircraft. That was my area dealing with aircraft. And you said it was nine billion dollar company the whole corporation, the loader airline portion of it was just a small portion of that. It's been split off since nounce John being corporation, which is named after the original founder of the company is a how about the size of your company today. Nine billion my company today. No kidding. It sounds like you're doing stuff at aircrafts in engineering. And and then now you're saying that basically your company it's product is something called the bike, totally. Yeah. It's a complete reinvention of myself completely away from. Airline equipments in the pets industry, which is continually growing the slashed year the industry size is about seventy billion in the United States alone in the pet industry yet. 'cause I think people spend more money on their dogs, even in their kids or something. I don't know if you've heard that before that's very common. Most people don't have insurance on their animals. So you're not just paying a copay. You're paying the full Bill. We just had our cat in for tooth cleaning in that was over two hundred dollars. Understood and I haven't gone the dentist a couple of years. They care of your cat than I do myself. Tell us a little bit more about this bike totally obviously people hearing audio only tell us what made you wanna start this entails a little bit more about this device that you made love for those people listening in you can take a look at pictures of it at by totally dot com. That's B. I K E T O W L E A S H dot com. Basically, I developed this just before being laid off from FM corporation was kind of an offshoot of the nine eleven attacks. Everybody was. Cancelling orders that caused a lot of layoffs. I thought I was going to retire with that company, but little shortened on that, but we had started raising service dogs back in two thousand one probably in the fall, I think it was. But in the summer, I have been hit by a car while riding my bike with the kids to school. I'd already dropped them off. And that was on my way to work and got hit by card in intersection. When nine eleven happened. I was out on disability that probably preserved my position for the following year. Because I wasn't there be laid off. It's hard to lay somebody off on this ability, and you had been at a company for would fifteen sixteen years. So you just thought you're gonna be a company employee till you're ready to retire. I had been there at that time sixteen years when that was laid off is over seventeen. It was a good and a bad thing. Ultimately, I feel like it turned into a good thing for us. Just make lemonade lemons. I had about with the idea of the bike tow leash because while I was still on disability laid up my wife and two girls had gone to the grocery store publics. And run into a lady with a little black lab wearing a Cape. She was a puppy raiser. She was answering questions from fielded by Betsy in the two girls to just absolutely enamored by the idea of having a dog with you at all times kind of thing, and they came home after tying Cindy was lady's name held her up for about an hour in the grocery store came home and announced we're gonna start raising service dogs. They said, you know, if we can put up with your being laid off in recovery and stuff like that for years. The only raise the dogs for a year. And then you give them back. It's not a permanent relationship. Do not keep the dog through their lifespan. It's a temporary thing and you can do much because you were injured anyway. So you have a choice. Right. They do it. I choice in at that time. I wasn't that off. I was still doing a lot of therapies such part of the therapy was riding the bike with my girls school to rehab might need that had been damaged badly. And I just had a third Nehapi ration- at that time. So moving on the pedals was better than walking the idea of. Raising the service dog wasn't that bad. I did resist a little bit because I didn't feel like we would be home enough. But also, I'm home all the time. So anyway, the first dog's name was tribute our way of giving back to those loss kind of thing and tribute was along leg black lab with lots of energy, and she was very tall for a lab. She could put her head on the table if desired to the big part of raising the service dogs is that you have to take him everywhere with you to socialize them. You're getting them used to the environment. So they don't react badly in any situation. Greet people properly in all that stuff. And you've got a list of commands to train them at the same time. The idea was that's he was gonna take tribute to work, but a six month old or less labrador has a tremendous amount of energy. And the idea is to have the dog go with her to work sleep onto her desk until lunchtime than take a walk and come back asleep under the desk the rest of the day. That's a tall order for a hung puppy. Betsy would tell me you need to scrub the energy off this dog before I take her to work, and she's got a. Either by seven AM, and I got the idea since I was already riding the bike. And that's one of my favorite things to do to ride the bike with a dog. And I scoured the internet for safe equipment to make that possible. Because I certainly understand physics and ability for the dog to knock us down found some other out there. There was a couple of other prevalent items at the time, but all had the same design issues where the dog had power over you and wasn't safe for the dog or the rider, and the raising organization would not accept us writing with that equipment that was the push for me to come up with a safe way to do it. So this was about two thousand one two thousand two this was two thousand one. Yeah. Okay. And then how old were you at this point in time younger than I am now. Guess about sixteen years ago or so. Yeah, my girls were very young girls are now one's a senior in college in the other ones teaching high school already. So it's a journey. They live the whole thing. Yeah. So you around forty Jonas. Yeah. Okay. Midlife reinvention. No understood. And I totally understand because I actually have a dog that we have to do the same thing where I had to get at least because he so wound up that is like okay walking wasn't doing enough actually ride the bike to get all that energy out of. And my wife, I won't even let her try to take the dog on the leash while we're doing it. Because I understand like, luckily, I'm strong enough. I'm feel like I'm one of the few people that are Mike if this dog really wanted to pull you hard. You can't you could easily fall to bike and she's not even going to touch him. 'cause then she'd be dragged over in a second. Anyone has a dog or tried to do that while in the bike? I think they can understand depend on the size of dog. Even if like a mid sized dog or bigger if they see something and they wanna take off while you're holding that leash on the bike. Then good luck. Yeah. We actually have on our brochures that kind of. The physics of it. When you're holding the leash how many pounds of forces like one hundred eighty three pounds of tipping force, if the dog just pulls with fifty pounds while it's proven that a dog can lunge away from your by up to three times their bodyweight. It means it's absolutely impossible. No matter your size or strength to hold a dog back if you're biking, right while you're engineers. So we can tell that you looked into all this stuff, though, the numbers here. Oh, yes. When you're using the bike, tow leash you hardly, even though the dog is attached when they lunch sideways. It puts the forces down below the center of gravity of the bike. If you let go of the bike if you got off and let go, but the bike would follow away from the dog. It's all designed around safety. Your product is basically instead of me being able to do that Megyn leash. It'd be much safer and easier if I had a dog that pretend I had no leash at all. And he was following me right next to my bike the whole time. This is what your product does is that the dog can be right next to you as you ride your bike. And then you have way less worry of injury or injury to the dog great. It's actually much safer than that. Even because. A dog that's free next to you is potentially definitely will get in your way at some point. Right. This prevents them from getting into your wheels or in front of you in it's actually training, but he'll position or side position. Depending on which side you have the bike Toby mounted and has a resilient masked barrier that is designed to be adjusted to touch the dog right in the rib area where their tender. They get touched. They know exactly where the bike is. They'll be telling you along typically if you're on a narrow trail, you can use it on single track trails if there's a tree that's too close to the side of the trail and the dog senses that they can't get around it, then they just slow down in their automatically placed behind the bike. And then this a gentle nudge from the leash to push them back into position beside you where you can see them where their visible, so you can tell how they're doing if they're dropping backs net position for any reason. You know, the slowdown the dog has to set the pace though, the one with the feet on the ground. Okay. Not only good for sixty. But you're saying even if you want to train your dog to be walking side-by-side next year. Versus some dog owners might understand if the dogs polling somebody over and over you really want them to be next to you and train them properly. At least it helps you with that as well. Not just with the safety. Absolutely. You have the ability to steer the dog exactly where you're going there. A sport called bike joining where you put the dog all the way out front. They might be on six or eight foot lead in front of you, which has all sorts of safety issues. People get injured a lot they have to pretty much go in a straight line. And the dogs have to know high g on by and all these other commands and be one hundred percent on them, or they'll pull you off trail into something or you have to release them revenge. Pulling you off trail with the bike totally you've got control over where they go. You can teach them the commands all this stuff. But even if they don't know the commands you're gonna go where you need to go ready for a new sponsor for a podcast will don't worry because MAC Walden is here to the rescue see McMullan, please and smart design premium fabrics and simple shopping. In fact, it's so simple, a podcast listener can do it. She. Ecuador will be the most comfortable underwear socks shirts. Undershirts. Hoodies were sweatpants that you'll ever wear. They even have a line of silver underwear and shirts that naturally eliminate odor. They want you to be comfortable. So if you like your first pair, we can just keep it, and they will still refund. You know questions asked him. Well, not only does macwoods. It's underwear socks and shirts. Look good. They perform while to it's good for working out going to work going out on dates, just the everyday life. Like listening to a podcast. I ended up ordering a few pairs of their active shorts. The first time. I wore them out was a few days ago. And of course, I ended up spilling some sauce on them. But the material the shorts actually kept the food from staining them, and this is for real. I mean it actually just rolled off. The shores so needless to say this was my favorite part of these shorts remark Walden. Well, how ordering ordering these shorts with just as easy as putting them on? Just like I'm doing right now. See I've been doing this entire ad read, bottomless and speaking a bottomless if you wanna bottom low price when ordering off of MacWorld dot com, then be sure to enter promo code millionaire at checkout, again, this is for twenty percent off your first order go. Visit MAC Weldon dot com and enter the promo code millionaire a checkout. Basically you had the dog back home. You wanted to get the energy out of your new dog? So tell us what you ended up doing until about the beginning phases of making this product, my head kind of awkward moment. Kind of thing is like I've got him out at down low on the bike. I've got to put it near the rear. Axle. So the dog doesn't have any -bility to steer the bike. If it's anything Ford of the rear, axle. And it's too far rear of the rear. Axle stereo, if it's high up on the bike, they can tip you it kind of led me to wear we have to attach the bike. Unfortunately, it's an area of the bike that there's lots of different configurations out. They're coming up with a universal. Clamping mechanism was easier on the left hand side in made more sense because dogs are trained predominantly to heal on the left hand side, but more and more and more. There's needs to put him on the right hand side is trails get busier digested areas, all sorts of reasons we have additional stuff that I've developed in the last couple of years, I think the last ones hat and pending still for attaching to the other side of the. Bike. There was a long process of actually getting it attached to the bike and getting amassed in there. Many many prototypes, I made the original in foldable in all sorts of things and put that out in front of a few industry buyers in his all, that's way, too complicated. They're absolutely learned a lot along the way, I'm a mechanical near it's not too complicated for me to put on but for the average person. Yeah. You were. So it's been a lot of simplifying the product as we go. The some good insight for making a product. Can you give us a little bit more detail because you're saying, yeah, it was way too complicated. I even though it didn't seem to you gotta make it as simple as possible, right? Yeah. If somebody pulled up our original patents. It's a much more complicated anymore pieces. Involve I felt like it needed to become packed in the Zaire was to ship it in a much smaller box ultimately as well and be portable. But once you've attached to the bite most people will tach the bike and leave it there unless they've got a real high end bike. They used for other things and stuff. They'll just leave it on the bike and clip the back of the seat, and they're done having all this other mechanism in there to make it smaller as a big waste certainly harder to manufacture as well. But no, the original one had it was I three piece mast to where it could fold up. I could put a little bag. It was about the size of two fists to fold it up that you had to push the pieces together there's little spring button. But the last piece on there there was velcro and a internal. Bungee cord set up that would if there was a hard coal that have that deploy. So it would reduce the shock on the dog was purpose. And what I found over time was that the dog would deploy that too easily that caused others safety situations rather than have a fixed length by increasing the mass links than changing the flexibility of what we call the coupler, which sort of access your shoulder. The holy shit self is like a prosthetic arm. There's a bent part like your elbow. There's the Cupper the black artists like your shoulder. So it can be beside the by Zeph thing. You would do your arm if you mounted it right at the axle holding the dog right beside your bike down low making the arm longer. So if the dog had to stop to relieve themselves or something it gave the full length that armed have been straight to rotate all the way back it gives a very large stopping distance with resistance. So that you can see and feel the dog coming out of position and slow the bike down in absorb that shock. So it doesn't hurt the dog or the rider know, the first thing, you know, the told you simpler, Ray. Because it means even though it's not like you're making a shovel. But it's not like you're making a phone either. Even though it might sound somewhat simplistic just hearing. Okay, bike totally really all these little mechanisms especially with your using on the animal. So you can't really talk to the animal and get great feedback. What other nuances did you figure out as far as actually making product 'cause you done that before you're the nine to five engineer before. But now you're trying to put together a product when you have no background in that right ahead. Industrial product development in my belt from working for FNC was a wonderful opportunity to learn everything I needed to not do this where I was doing engineering I was doing machine designed, but for products that the end users were the airlines. So it wasn't the everyday consumers that part was very very different learning. That was important. I did have the opportunity to work with people in purchasing and manufacturing manufacture the product right there, which was very unique for engineering experience. The literally put it in the CAD system in walkout and see the part made saying. Day. Well, a lot of stress when it had to be done the same day. Of course that the customers would come in and kick the tires test things, and we will get that feedback. And I did work with vendors worldwide in that process as well. I was well rounded to start my own business like this manufacture the product. But I was not working with the everyday consumer what my first experience really with learning about preferences, particularly in the pet industry. I went to early trade show that has now become huge that barely fits in our convention center here in Orlando was in a hotel down the street and there was a tiny little booth. And there was this guy with us little red round thing with a hole in it called Kong. And I spoke with the inventor of the Kong has come a long way with that whole product. Everybody's got at least one chew toy made by Kong in their dogs possession at this point in time that he gave me one piece of advice e said actually showing off something else I was working on. But he has made a real point to me this. I had the dog on the leash was one of our service dogs leading around. He says see. That dog you any pockets as he says, that's what you gotta remember that dog will drink out of any water bowl. But the owners can buy the pink one. Oh, yeah. I got you. That's why our bike totally comes in three colors. Not because I wanted to have to manufacture three different things in stock and worry about inventory, and all that is because that's what the industry is going to demand. Well, how about making your the confidence in ability to make it or think about how to make it? But how about you actually going to find your own suppliers or putty got the parts together to actually put this thing together? Well, the prototypes, I consider myself very fortunate Ursa, I look at things and see different ways used them things. And there's a excess store in Orlando code sky craft which has all sorts of surplus any company that's going out of business or has something that time is expiring on things and stuff like that ends up in a place like that to where you can go and just walk around and just see different things in way. Mine mind works, I see those in. It's just another project. Wait to happen. I was working on the bike. Totally. I had stuff. In my garage, leftover from win the kids were in their little bike seats. So there's low clamps here in their clamp on the bike and different springs and all sorts of things to try but going to sky craft I found even more parts and stuff. So for making the prototypes, I kind of did that locally sourced bending drilling all sorts of machine work to make the original prototypes. Take me days to put together as the design more solidified as we got more prototypes out there and people love him and stuff. That's when we started looking at law got abilities environment can't build these this way. So I started looking at stamping houses and stuff like that locally in how to source the right materials that could work in all weather conditions here, nor Landau Florida. Plastic parts and stuff remained supple. In bandwidth you need to don't get brittle. We had to come up with the channels that we're going to work in Canada in the winter, for instance. Well, you said stamping houses. What is a that's a basically a factory little take a flat steel in flat, aluminum and. And create shaped parts with holes in them. They'll create a tooling that will set in a press in press down real hard on the particular meddle in it'll cut in form that flat piece into a functional part this first year. You're still laid off you're making this product tell us about going back to work because it sounds like you're kind of making this as a side product or side business in you have the ability to go back to work tells about getting laid off in way to deal with that. While I was fortunate. I've been with the company for seventeen years at the time. So I got a severance package which allowed us to pay off our house. When thing we've been very fortunate. It's never living beyond. Our means. My wife is still working. She was electrical engineer from Georgia Tech where we met a mechanical. So we cross pollinated under said, she was still working up through two thousand nine we did have a paycheck coming in that way. And we'd reduced our overhead with house being paid off that allowed us to still have about. Twenty thousand dollars to invest in the business. So when we started the company in two thousand three put twenty thousand company account in two thousand five we paid ourselves back that money will before he jumped two thousand five can we just go over 'cause if people are in a similar situation. I mean, it must have been a shock when you got laid off or was it not. Well, there was a big layoff in two thousand one right after the nine eleven attacks about a month later, I think it was not Tober. I remember I was literally on my way for Nacer Chery. I got a call from one of my friends at work. They were laying people off at anx to my surgery date award about my position. So I had plenty of time have angst in worry about that. That was the lowest point my life is left a career where every breath was thinking about how to improve what I was doing at FMC. I was are indeed manager responsibility. Developing new products for them that continue to be the leader in the industry. They had eighty percent of the loader market in the world. It was real shock. And most of like, you said you had nine to five all the way up to. That point in mistakes that you found out when you're going into surgery, personally, you must have been having a decent sized paycheck coming home, just your annual salary versus all of a sudden is gone. I mean, eagerly got severance, but the bike totally show you'd made on the side was just getting started. Right. No. We didn't have any revenue from the bike tow leash ultimately as far as my paycheck until two thousand nine the rope push was that's he had to quit work, and she's disabled she had to stop working. So I needed a paycheck of that time. That's when we started our website is started actually selling in two thousand nine two thousand eight my daughter, actually, my younger daughter helped me was one trade show where we sold our first few at the trade show in the convention so actually shared a booth with another company swimming, five by ten feet. We just had literally prototype ones that we had at that time sold. I think ten or twelve leashes I think we sold ten there and two more. They came in picked up because we didn't have them anymore. Just cash sales kind of thing and then in two thousand nine we went from a. Couple hundred two hundred eight to over a thousand in two thousand nine so that was a big push. I guess there's like five or six years in between you could say that you're kind of working on it. But it was just kind of a side project. If you will it was a side project. I was trying to go further with it. I needed some income to pay for the intellectual property. I got a very good deal on it. Because if other stepmother, they have a patent agency in Atlanta, they helped me with the patents or patent since I got that at very very low cost. I'm very fortunate to have that family support can that be expensive? It's very expensive. If you hire a patent attorney in try to get a patent. You've gotta bring the attorney up to speed as to what the technology is than they've got a translate that into Pat ease hold other language than just about impossible for anybody else to read write and make sure that it's not stepping on anybody else's patent rights, and all this fat searches. It's a long long process. I was just very fortunate that again had that connection with your family to be able to help connection. I had a lot of knowledge about patents prior to that not only from my family side. But it FMC I was the patent coordinator a job that kind of fell in my lap. Because I was the engineer in the groups that had the most patents there at FM Sierra line equipments it became hijab to coordinate the budget what patents we kept in where we Pat into different items. How much would it cost? If we didn't have the hook up like you because I don't think I've discussed that with any other guests as far as how much Mike pause for a consumer product patent in how long it takes to get one. Typically takes a year or two depending on how fast things move, a patent attorney can charge you hundreds of dollars an hour for our efforts, depending on the complexity, and that sort of thing, you could spend thousands of dollars very quickly this being a side business where you're just you know, it's not like you've got back people to help you with for the money. It's your personal money. You're making it as a side business. So I could understand why especially if you're getting started. That's why I guess people. Don't get patents started. Yeah. And it's very important patent laws very complicated. But it's very important to get patent protection. There is a shortcut patent that can protect you very temporarily that is probably one of the most important things you can do is get a provisional patent that gives you patent rights for about a year and it's much less expensive. But it's very temporary, but it sort of the equivalent of a nondisclosure agreement. I truly recommend that you do both. If you're talking to people about your technology before you have your patent in place, but it's very important that shoe apply for a patent within a certain timeframe of starting to sell a product, depending on what countries you're dealing with. And that sort of thing is that you can lose your ability to patent. If you don't do it soon enough. Somebody can actually get the patent office. Head of you, take your rights away, or it just expires is there usually a certain timeframe because. One thing. I've noticed for instance, notice a lot of roomba knockoffs here, recently I s right? It sounds like, you know, a lot about this patent stuff. How long does that last or could you give us a little bit more inside information as far as what we could learn about doing a pet in with a consumer product the timeframe typically if there's a time out feature for getting a US patent as it's like you have to apply for the patent before you started to sell the product. Or there's a time limit of a year for a lot of other countries either you have to patent for each country. You want to be protected in that's worth expenses. Really get big certainly in the US you'd better get US patent. But you also got to consider what's your markets are or where the product may be produced. It gets very pricey. What I did to finance that was did product forensics, which is the wave of being a expert witness for product litigation cases. I would inspect products that caused the loss or injury than report my findings. These were you're kind of. Businesses. Even though we're mainly talking about the product business. I think more people can learn about it and everything I guess the main thing that you were saying the reason those years inbetween, you were still working from home, but you had your own service based business where you're looking at these things and to have a background in it that was kind of helping you pay the bills. But really while you're waiting for all these patents and everything and the product to get going even though it took a few years. This is what you did in between while you're doing that. Yeah. That allowed me to raise about sixty thousand a year to go straight into the business. So we sell finance because of that ability to thousand nine two thousand ten of one skip ahead. You're saying you're finally starting to sell the products. Just tell us what you're learning at this point in time and believe you also said something about your wife having to come home. So you have to start making sure you make even more money now. Yeah, she had to stop working because she could do her cost analysis stuff. She was working for the government for the army. She had twenty six year career with them. But then had to come home and needed more and more care here. The fact that I'm working at home now became in. It was good to be here for the kids at my previous employment with FM. See I was traveling all over the globe. And I certainly couldn't do that. At this point. We're working from home. We're learning about how to manage that. Then let people know that I have a real job. I have to get these things done. And so we're skipping ahead. Two thousand nine two thousand ten we really started to actually make money when a little bit advertising happens. We got an ad in pet business magazine. I understanding is that the first couple of other websites picked us up because they saw us there. You gave us credibility that gave us enough funds to start doing the trade shows that we're doing the global pet expo here in Orlando is the big one we do and just a few other small ones, we started our own website, which was two thousand nine not everybody had bought anything on the web at that point. And I certainly didn't head, but as near as many things as I have today my experience on what websites required stuff where a lot less than they are now, but we still have our two thousand nine website. Unfortunately were trying to get a new one it has its limitations that takes time to make the transaction. You can go on Amazon or if you go in the app on your phone. You've bought something before you realized it it's fast because all your credentials are already end. You could does off and buy a whole bunch of. Thanks. In our case, you've got good in all your personal information. Put your credit card in stellar or go to a house much quicker. We do that our goal now is to reduce that purchase friction. They call. It all that. You're next up all of us when we're making a business will have specialties that were good at and maybe more making the product in trying to understand that and getting a patent for some people went. But maybe there's other listeners who are really good websites and stuff even though maybe that party or business is ready to be updated in you're working on it today. Then that's fine. But I mean, it was good enough to get you to where you are today yet still working. It's amazing. What were some big jumps when you're selling this product that we can learn from like to think that you're smart enough. And you said this earlier on which I think is really important is keeping your overhead low, you are working from home and the ability to do that. But as far as making revenue what else did you learn that we can learn from in those early years, let's very important to not get ahead of yourself. Be very careful with your inventory. We started out buying product carts for the product at five hundred pieces. Time because we just couldn't go out any further a certainly that affects your cost in. So you haven't hit the economic order quantity at that level. You have to entice the suppliers you're trying to work with them know that this is just a start order work with us. And I think the most important thing to control your costs when you're working with any vendor. They have their capabilities their specialties, we talked about stamping houses is that you've got a design you got picture of your part on a nice piece of paper. And you take it in there, and you have a beating with them. And they tell you we'll this. It'll take this much money to make this and you say, well, I really wanna hit this number which is of course, lower and you say, well, what would you do? What would make this easier for you to make? So that we can get to that number and simple things like a rounded corner squared off corner versus around corner that has absolutely no change at all. In your functionality is a tremendous difference in costs for a particular stamping house to make that part. It changes the process. In the time involved and the link of the number of parts that could be made from that piece of tooling before it wears out there so many factors that come in or simple. Thank change a whole size. Is this a standard punch size? Or is this one that's going to be made special? Is you put this dimension on their own? This tolerance does that have to be that close or does it make sense to make that whole bigger? So that you're not worried about it getting too small. If the punch wears out. At least little things definitely hope working with your vendors on the details is very very important. Having a good relationship with them and understanding what can happen. What to expect simple things that you have to be prepared for an example is that we've got this part. It's a fancy alloy with special heat treating to get to the strengths that we need. That's where they've been make the part. And then they add heat to it to make the material stronger in that form we were working with a vendor. I think they were North Carolina Ola sudden, we started getting parts that broke. And very fortunately, there's two lessons learned here. One is that we didn't make any design change. But the vendor got new oven. They put pallets and pallets of this product into a huge oven. They shut the doors and the heated up and hold it at temperature cooled off in a certain manner to give you the properties of ritual that you need and we didn't make a change. We didn't change the specifications on what we had. We were getting what we wanted at the time. But then. They got a new oven on all sudden the parts didn't work anymore having to analyze that literally work hand in hand with their QC manager figure out the root cause was so important, and we solved it in the time. We have to test the hardness of everyone on that came in huge huge expense in time consuming than just frustrating. But to figure out the root cause and how to make sure it never happens. Again, we actually had to change our specification because they weren't really making what we were calling it. Right. So in their oven changed. It was now making what we'd actually specify that's fine. What had worked? And it's thinks because that's like out of your hands because you wouldn't even know right? When you figuring this out, and what really stinks to if you have a consumer product. Let's say half of them, you send out breaking and you had no control at you. Didn't know they switched ovens. And then now that's kinda tarnished your reputation, right? It takes a tremendous amount of money to build a reputation. It takes even more to repair one. And you may never repair it. It was important for us to not only fix these and make it right? But to make the customers realize that we taken care of them or even better, not no we ever had to do it. There was a lot of stuff that was in route that we turned around you can call it Federal Express and reroute your package is back to you better derive late than broken does good that you're able to figure out even know you could do that same. So we're learning ton about making products. Here you've found that out right away. It must have just broke on one person. And then you kind of figured it out with all these other ones that you're shipping. Yeah. Just one breaks huge alarms. Go off in one's gonna break. They're not doing something. So different. Than anybody else. You always got to be on your toes to be react in for that, very reason. Especially with consumer products is that you have to keep very good records of what you're shipping out to each customer. You also gotta be able to know what vendor product they got what shipment. They got. So we heat very good records in so doing you don't recall stuff that didn't need fixing you just pull back what you need to certainly when you're on a budget or anytime name of the bigger, you get the worst problem would be that's not a faction. If one's bad hundreds or bad new set of reputation. I've heard yet can take years to build a reputation, but it takes one instant for you to lose it all after all those years and years the same. I don't even know if you can get it back. Let's say they started breaking on the dogs or hurt the dogs or something then you're screwed. Yeah. Okay. So we figured that out about the product. So you're saying if we want to get the pricing down we need to just keep going back to the manufacturer just ask them. What are things that? We can do to bring it down to a certain price point is that the best way to get our product costs down for trying to make one yet. You've got to work with each individual. Part that you're putting into it and see how you could make that part do more. If you can combine functionality of two parts into one part eliminate waste to put it together wrong. We've got a stamp heart. Ultimately, it's supposed to be bent with the holes and stuff oriented one direction. But if they've been at the wrong direction now the parts, no good. If you can make a part to where they can't make it wrong. They punch the holes in Bendit. It's right either way than that reduced costs because you can't screw it up. And you don't have to take the time. Manually loading it into a hopper that sends it through vending machine. If one gets oriented wrong than snow big deal. It's still usable parts of you could make things interchangeable where you can't do it wrong. That's better. It's called design for assembly is the term the furor way. Something could be screwed up. The better. It makes sense. I mean, I'm just even picturing or thinking like, okay, if you have a PVC pipe in I have a drill. And I just wanna put a hole in it is circular. So no matter what you're saying. There's less ways them screwing up versus if it was. An elbow bent PVC pipe in. I put a hole if I had to symbol. It was something it can only really go one way. There's more chances of screwing it up versus what you're saying. Just making it simple using the hype for instances as an example, if you're already in the machine that can punch a hole, and you have to pay for the tooling the punch the whole maybe it's cheaper to punch a hole each in the when you've been at. It's right every time. Okay. Yeah. No. These are little things like so how many parts do you have with your bike to Elision? Maybe can walk us through or tells kind of how many you had in the beginning. And how you simplified it. So we can think of ideas of how we could do that. Yeah. There's about twelve parts in it now. And how about in the beginning in the beginning was more like twenty. Yeah. Okay. Twenty or twenty five somewhere in that range. There was springs, and if you count every faster there was probably thirty your engineers. So you wanted to do the show off, right? Oh, yeah. They interfered. It was very neat. It's like a Swiss army knife. And you don't need all those all I wanna do is cut something. I did need a saw and scissors to do it just to play knife is all I need it. We have all the ex. Pieces. We had the secondary Leafs. It would deploy. And all that stuff. It just wasn't necessary. From my experiences with product development in certainly with the forensics that I did made me very paranoid about different failure modes in forensics. You wouldn't get called in. If something just cut themselves on a piece of paper, you get called in because somebody got cut on everything from food processors to cranes food processor came apart cut this lady in hand for instance, made her hand not as usable as before the permanent injury. And the simple cause was that. They could have just changed the rotation direction of the threads that held it together or the rotation of the cutter because the rotation would loosen the fastening mechanism to where the thing went flying up in the air. Let's say you look to reduce different ways things can fail. The fewer parts. You have the fewer failure modes. There are you're bringing that story of just because that's what you're doing on the side. So you saw these consumer products where they've done something silly. Or at least yours is more simplified than like, maybe food. Processor. Thank goodness that come off in slice somebody. Right. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. No our chromosomes is there's not gonna be any injuries caused by the vitalise to the dog or the writer so much. So this paranoia that period from two thousand and two through two thousand three when we started the company through two thousand nine we were testing prototypes all over the place with lots of dogs bikes riders and without a scratch before we went out with. There was plenty of scratches on prior prototypes earthly. Ready to get your business idea online. Well, that's where our sponsor hostgator can help. So how much does it cost? Will you can launch your brand new website on hostgator for as little as two dollars and sixty four cents a month? That's a sixty two point zero one percent discount. They're providing our listeners with and it's the best deal on hosting anywhere. 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Go to hostgator dot com forward slash yolo or visit link in your episode description below. So I'm looking at and said website kind of looks like two thousand nine, but I did like bring up Amazon because it seems like all these of you doing this. At least you kept thinking about how to improve and stuff before you try to maybe try to make a and you just send it out the next year without testing it enough. But it seems like you can tell that you took this much time. It's because you got a lot of great reviews on Amazon with it too. I could see like how that would people can tell that you took the time to try to figure this out sells about selling on Amazon versus on your website. And if you want to just walk us through that. 'cause I imagined your sales have to come from now. Right. Yeah. Amazon is a huge market lace for our bike. Totally says we have over a dozen resellers that sell our product on Amazon. Currently it started with just one lady Brinda. I better not say her last name. We'll discover Brenda Brenda. She had I think three boxers, which is one of the highest energy breeds. You don't really think that way, but they're very high energy dogs, and she got the bike totally. She was so enamored. With it. She decided she wanted to put on Amazon she was the first and see was put it on. Amazon all sudden other people are asking to put it on Amazon, and that's a good in a bad thing. Right. You tell us about it. Because I've heard both. It was a bad thing for Brenda for me to add more resellers, she had gone through the work and got the hosting up there and all that and then adding more and more and more becomes parasitic. They're not adding more content to make it more sellable. They're not doing all those things, and there's things called map pricing where you have been advertised price policy to preserve your intellectual property value. It's so much more important for Rick and mortar stores it competing with online with the overhead is much less. You don't want that price arose in to occur because then they can't afford to put it in a brick and mortar store, which is where I want it the most because we're at the price point where people would like to have their hands on it. Yeah. Great reviews are one thing having your hands on and experiencing it at our another. The combination of the two are wonderful. And we're four. Have that? But for a lot of people they really want to have their hands on it before they buy it. No, you gave us a little bit of detail in there by what's going on. Amazon was beneficial for you revenue is oh, yes. I can't say enough about the reviews being a big help. And there's also a Wicky links video that's out there that spin for at least since two thousand fifteen I don't remember if it was before that. But we've been ranked the number one dog biking attachment. They list the top five for the top seven dependent on what year we're looking at. And then there's a couple of other video reviews like that that other companies have done, but we've been listed as number one for those years, which is very handy because one of the very important things about trying to maintain your marketing budget, which will rival your product costs budgets. If you're not careful is finding out where your marketing dollars or best spent and I try to ask any customer that. I ended up talking to which is about maybe one percent or less. How did you first hear about us? The vast majority will say I typed in best dog. Ugh. Bike attached than our best bike leash. Ultimately, find us that way, or it was word of mouth or they were searching on Amazon. It's always. Yeah. And I think is important because I do the exact same thing for the podcast if you're out there, and you have your own product or company that's really important because you don't know in. It's definitely less than one percent. Even the people. I talked to who listened to the podcast. It's like, okay. Maybe it's one a month or maybe a few more. But I'll always ask that because you want to know how they found you. And if they found you a certain way, you wanna put the money towards they're not use it somewhere else where you don't need it. Yeah. I've been very fortunate that I think the best advertising is stuff that I haven't spent any money on and the WikiLeaks is an offshoot of being on Amazon, Amazon, I think is paying for that they pay people to product review in Sint people because when you look at their video at sends people to the Amazon listing not to our website, of course. But the other fortunate things is like lease was actually bought on Amazon by Brandon McMillan with the CBS lucky dog the popular dog training show where he rescues. Dogs that are about ready to euthanize, and he trains them to help families in stuff like that. I met him. I actually say an article about him in one of our pet trade show magazines, and like a centerfold than I open it up. And I remember reading I said I need to meet this guy like the planets aligned when I said that our next global pet expo Betsy nice kind of stumbled into his press conference. We tried to go into the after show beaten Greek kind of thing where they have orders out in. It's all elbow to elbow. Well, Betsy is in a wheelchair. And we've got right. Her service dog attached with the bite totally just very cumbersome in everybody's taller than her. She's elbowed in the face is like this get out of there down a hallway trying to get back to the parking lot gift to our car and go home and eat saw some people just a few people wandering around kinda followed to see what was going on in the area. And there was a couple of girls at the door kind of controlling the door is what is this? Oh, it's Brandon Mellon. These got a press conference here. I'll listen. There was hardly anybody in there. There was like three people waiting on. On people for everyone in there. And they said well once you come on it I so I'd love to meet him. And so we'll come on in and were beaten treated like royalty instead of let cattle up in the lobby than Brandon, Illinois walks up, and he sees the bike Toby attached to the chair with Betsy and the dog there. And he says I've used that on my show, which the CBS television. This is something that I couldn't afford to buy it's every Saturday morning 'cause I looking at a picture now because I've seen it on when I've had on TV. He's on there on Saturday mornings around ten or eleven or something like that. And he says, oh, I've used that on my show. And so I went home and set my DVR to find it it had played yet. It was the episode Sawyer which is the yellow lab that he rescued that the family was a big Viking family. They wanted to bike with adopt. So he went on Amazon and got her leash in sits in issues that on wheelchairs and forgot that are overweight as well. Again. This comes back to importance of the quality that you put into the product. And then my next thing is everything you said, I've been googling in his truth. If you're the top websites about biking with a dog. How to do it whatever? So again, even though your sales might not show it on your home website, all these other avenues that you're selling on Amazon or through these other ones. I imagine that's where the majority of the revenues come in. But my next question is where I heard this. I don't know if the patent helps you I'm surprised I still have not seen anything super similar diggers your product just why have been googling what you've been talking. It's always been your product. But I haven't seen any knockoffs. Like, sometimes I would see if I'm googling about like, I dunno some type of charger for my phone or some way to hold it. There's always different knockoffs. But I don't see that with your. So have you had an issue with it for Paul in several countries and stuff, we've not had an issue. There's this as we protect ourselves in marking our individual parts each lease has a serial number on it and code that track. It back to all the contents again. But also, there's this other things built into that to a no if it came from us or not, okay. So you haven't seen it. That's one issue that I could see maybe eventually run into because it's not against super complicated. But I mean, I know you put a lot of time into it. But. Seems like someone from China or something could easily knock it off and try to make one that looked like it, maybe didn't work as well as yours. Nothing. Like that has happened yet at this point goodness. If we run across something that looks kind of funny, we go ahead and purchase it and see especially we enforce our policy and stuff. Somebody's break in the map will purchase it to verify where it's coming from. If we can't do it by whatever name, it's Dan sold under. Okay. So what's meant policy? That's the manufacturer's price policy in ATP. It's minimum advertised price is what it is Google all these tools are very powerful. If I don't happen to run across it, one of our resellers will is they all are held to that. And I certainly thank them for finding it if they've got it like a Siddiqui is purchased anything like that. Again. I'm just thinking about risk mitigation for anybody. Who's gonna run into these types of things? If you're seeing it for less than all the other ones than it's an anomaly in it may not be authorized seller from that. I'm trying to think so after he got on the was just two thousand nine two thousand ten ever since damage to steadily increase, or is there anything else that we can learn from your story low in two thousand nine there was really only I think three other items on the market at all and the patents have run out on those. Whether it's now whole bunch of other people selling those as well, there's more players in the market, which dilutes the share and stuff. So it's been pretty steady for whatever reason two thousand fourteen was a little bit better year than we've had since then, but it's been pretty steady. It hasn't taken off astronomically. But I more feel that that's from the way I'm marketing, I'm not marketing physical presence out west, for instance, where there's early adoption I'm looking for more distribution in those areas that sort of thing if anybody's listening, that's important. That's part of the reason. I have the guest on here because again all of us have specialties, and hopefully anyone who's listening if they can help certain guests whose on there. You don't have every specialty. So anyone has anything where you're saying with dinner with the marketing, and is what you need more help with it. What else would mean because we jump back to two thousand nine two thousand ten so you've been working from home ever since. And is there anything else about running a company that we can learn from you before we get off the call? Let's very interesting again, keep your overhead low so that you have flexibility if certain if you're ever thinking about starting a business, you don't wanna be over extended in any way, you need to be able to have credit if you need it. Hopefully, you have the funds to move forward. We're still assembling shipping from our home for the reason I need to be here. And the other reason is I don't want to increase that overhead allows me to work with young students and stuff which is lower overhead. We work it as an intern ship. They're learning a lot some of Mexico to participate in some forensics. That's where thing hire people that are interested in areas that you have weakness, though, hire people that are just like you because then you just can have the same. Weaknesses. I think this important kit when we talked on the pre interview, I thought your store is kind of interesting, you're not maybe one of the guys that we've had on this generating millions of dollars or revenue year, but maybe more of a lifestyle where you have the ability to work from home and take care of your wife, and keeping your overhead low and being able to you said, I guess you work with students as well. To try to help you assemble everything together at your house before you send them off. But these little things that give you the freedom. I think that's important more than just how much money you make your way. Yeah. No. It's not at all about the money at this point. It's about being able to do what I wanna do. Go biking day a week be here. Six days a week take care of my wife and getting better part of the day off with my friends to go by get my physical exercise able to take Betsy to her doctors and stuff earlier in the day. And then from two o'clock to six o'clock, we work in back to the home life. Could you tell us a little bit more about having to deal with that with your wife? I mentioned that had become a devastating into a little bit to that. I mean when you're making your own company and having to deal with this with a life partner. It's. It's part of life. We're all gonna lose abilities at some point in. Unfortunately, it sooner with my wife. She's in a wheelchair the begin try to make the best. What we have. We have a wheelchair capable leash because she's here. Too tested. I actually had a customer in the UK. The got the first wheelchair link leash. We sent him one. It was too long. You're on both sides of the hallway you've got issues with how far the dog get away and stuff, and you need it as long as the wheelbase, and you're not going as fast, you don't need that shock absorption, working hand-in-hand with people with special needs is kind of how this all started to begin with raising the service dogs. We raise him with this leash as a tool, and so as Betsy his abilities have declined we've come up with warm more ways to help her particular with the bike tow leash in her being in the chair, traveling visiting different restrooms restaurants flying on airplanes. All these things that we do learning about how to make it work in. All these environments is take it as the frustrations that we have turned into a positive for other. People. I guess is the best way of putting. So what do you see for the future of your company? This is a case where we say you wanna make a product greatest possible. It seems like you've got that down. But maybe you'd mentioned something to do with marketing because you also have to do that. I think too many people get stuck on one thing or the other versus case in point like, maybe I'll work on my product first, and then I'll work marketing or vice versa. But yet eventually do both of them in order to grow your business. You can't be successful without successful marketing plan, you've got to continually figure out where you're spending the money wisely way. You are. It's you get inundated by people that want to sell you an ad in a magazine or try to sell you a TV commercial. I really got suckered on that. If you want to hear about a bad experience. I know definitely that's over here. So yeah, tell us about that yet. I get approached by somebody almost monthly or less. We wanna put you on TV show. We wanna do all this. And then they want seventeen thousand dollars to do it. Then there's a lot better ways to spend your money. Leave me in our case. I certainly learned a couple of things one if some. Race filming your product in use. You'd better be hands on don't be absent. Because they're gonna film it in ways that you don't want it to be shown and once that happens. It's absolutely useless to you that drug out the process, and another was that they were going to take some product in do this thing where they take care of the phones and all this stuff and sell them that way, they never sold all the product that the problem is that we have a very active lifestyle type product. It's not for people that spend their time in front of the television looking commercials. Few people take the time to watch commercials anyway in you pay for that airtime, whether people are looking at it or not it also has to do with time of year time of the day day of the week. What channel it's on. There's so many variables that can lead you away from that media. It's too expensive for any startup company. If you got on QVC channel or something like that where it wasn't costing you up front, maybe depending on the product, but not for a product where you're expecting where people are going outside. If it's for use outside people are inside watching the television. That's not where they're going to be. It's people that are more active in that and certainly active enough to push the fast forward, but that's more. Now, maybe you weren't thinking about that at a time when you bought these commercial commercial, they're very good at selling commercials. Yeah. So that makes a lot of sense since yours is for active lifestyle type of person demographic if you were like in a store, and you had a poster there showing that or actual product there than it makes more sense 'cause they're looking for those things versus someone who's watching late night TV, and they see it on their exactly. So you'd say stay weary of those commercials commercials. Magazines are getting read less and less. Lot of ads can be very very expensive gonna buy at you'd better be affordable. Sometimes it's better to get a magazine. That's just starting up. You can have an ad all year in it for less than for one issue of some other magazine may never open to that page. But a brand new magazine, maybe people are gonna peruse a little bit more. And maybe if you're in more pages of it more times, you're more likely to be seen that makes more sense than like you were saying when you get learned about the TV commercials if you can ever give away your Prada. To somebody. That's going to use it and talk about it in any kind of media. That's where to spend your time. If you can give it to an organization that's going to value in cherish it. They're gonna market you adoption agencies dog trainers, people that new video blogs. I've got people that post on Facebook. They'll talk about us pipe in. If there's an Instagram post or something like that. So did you end up doing that, Mike? Yes, I've sold in given away to different adoption agencies. And they've put us on their Facebook page on Instagram people that have reviewed us for the privilege of getting a leash far aways in France. So that's break. Good photographer. Using a lot of those pictures in different parts of our marketing, the smart instead of doing TV commercials. Like, you said to any generic person if you're getting it to a dog shelter. I mean, how many people are looking for dogs in see that maybe wanna use that that something that you learned overtime. Oh, yeah. There's dog adoption agencies that I've actually given a bike toll each with a bike people throw out bikes just because it's easier than taking. Into Salvation Army or something like that. Now pump up the tires. Put a bike leash on it. And give it to an adoption agency or something like that. Now, they're exercising their dogs, and they're grateful for it. They'll give him a stack of brochures, and they'll put one of our brochures in every one of the bags. They get when option goes through there's all sorts of paperwork in treats and stuff that get donated for those adoption agencies, and we're just part of that. But I think about that seventeen thousand dollars. It makes me ill to think about how many leashes I could given away with that money. Right. 'cause it's a win win. What you're saying now to versus give it to shelter. You just got to think that way where are your alternate consumer's gonna be like, you're helping to dog shelter out. But also those people are going to be there. And those are the exact same customers, it sucks because we've all been suckered in about some things, but you're saying that seventeen thousand dollar commercial like where you could send it to how many different dog shelters instead in probably gotten away obviously way better return than you could sit at one hundred fifteen dog shelters is basically what I'm looking at. Right. Just did the math on that in his. Like, so we'd be weary of commercials. I sounds like at least. Yeah. Now, if you can do some good, especially stuff that makes you feel good about it. People are going to feel good about you. Because you don't feel good about that TV commercial, obviously. No, I would never. Not going to recommend them ever. If you can find a way to do good with your product, people will do good for you. Appreciate you doing the interview especially anyone who's interested in product making one here in. I think we've learned a lot a little steps along the way I think that was pretty good way you left it off there. But is there anything else that you wanna leave with anyone who's listening here on what they can learn from your story just go in at one day at a time. I certainly many times through this process. I have wondered what my exit strategy would be if this isn't going to work out, and you've got to jump in with both feet and believe in yourself, if you don't believe in your product one hundred percent than step back and get some other opinions about it. And maybe there's ways to make it what you want it to be. Well, thank you for joining us in. If anyone who wanted to reach out to you to say, thank you for the interview. Or if they wanted to reach out in some ideas on how you could maybe market the product little bit better. What's the best way for them to reach you? They can reach me on my Email at info advice, totally dot com or they can dial eight five seven bike dog. All right. While we appreciate you. Do the interview here. Mike, thank you so much for the opportunity. Hey, there millionaire interview listener thank you again. For tuned into this episode. If you enjoyed it and want to show us a little sport. We'd really appreciate a five serve you. It helps other listeners find the show. So they can enjoy just like you. And if you're looking for more episodes that are in the product niche episode eleven with bottle breeder founder you like rain or episode thirteen with Sammy of black socks dot com. Troy episode eighteen with yet gear founder Bill ackman as always thanks again for tuning in and have a great day.

Amazon Orlando engineer Mike specialty United States North Carolina product development Walden Matt barber Alex King Sean Walker FedEx Florida Hayward UK London Leon engineering Inc FMC Michael Leon
The Germond Family Murders

Murder Minute

26:11 min | 6 months ago

The Germond Family Murders

"Welcome to murder minute on. Today's episode the german family murders. But i your true crime. Headlines in fort myers florida. A teen facing charges in connection with the death of a new jersey man was arrested again in florida after a driver told authorities that he was assaulted by him troopers arrested eighteen year. Old zachary thomas latham saturday evening. After a driver requesting assistance in fort meyers waved down a trooper and said someone in a nissan. Infiniti confronted him and brandished a gun. The florida highway patrol said in a statement letham. They said also had attempted to intentionally rammed the victim's car troopers found the teen in the nissan and discovered a bb gun that resembled an ak forty seven. They said he was booked into county jail on two counts of aggravated assault and released monday. On forty thousand dollar bond. At his court appearance that day late them was ordered to have no contact with the victim to be fitted with a gps monitor and surrender all of his weapons. The recent arrest adds to the charges laid them is already facing new jersey in may. He was charged with manslaughter. For the death. Of william durham senior. One of his neighbors while he lived with his grandparents violent about forty miles south of philadelphia. The new york times reported that there were ongoing tensions between durham's family and leith them over the teens driving after a confrontation between leith Durham and their wives on may fourth durham's to sunset age. Seventeen and twenty one went to late. Them's house prompting another confrontation on leith Driveway that's when a thorny say late them stabbed durham a corrections officer multiple times with a knife the victim's wife catherine durham and her sons were also charged with assault and trespass in connection with the incident. Prosecutors did not say who started the fight. Latham's attorney nathan. Perry says that his client in self defense. But attorneys representing the durham family claimed letham and his wife lured the family into the fight for social media fame. they allege that late them's wife. Sarah recorded the brawl so that they could quote become tiktok famous another confrontation between latham. And catherine durham had garnered three million tiktok views. Latham's trial date in. Florida has been scheduled. For february twenty-second detectives have aside investigation into the death of an infant who was found near management facility in paris california last week and are searching for the owner of a backpack left nearby deputies responding to reports of a dead body found the infant left in the trash at cr and our environmental services a waste and recycling collection company. The black box pack was discovered near where the child was found. The bag was decorated with what appeared to be a white or gray hand drawn design resembling a moon and a son homicide. Investigators became involved with the case after an autopsy determined that the baby was alive at birth rather than stillborn according to riverside county sheriff's officials. They are working to identify and locate the mother of the child. On tuesday mexican authorities announced the arrest of a suspect. In the slayings of to san diego retirees whose bodies were found dumped in a well in baja california last summer. Seventy eight year. Old ian her. Sean and seventy three year old kathy harvey were stabbed to death likely in late august while asleep in bed at her shawn's longtime vacation home in l. rio a tiny beach town about one hundred and thirty miles south events nada. The family reported the couple missing on september second and investigators discovered their bodies. September fifth. Investigators from the baja california attorney. General's office arrested. The suspected killer left week he was identified only by his first name and one initial emmanuel n as is customary in mexican criminal cases. Prosecutors said that the killer stabbed the victims inside the home loaded their bodies into her shawn's toyota land cruiser and drove about four miles to the well to discard her. Shawn's daughter identified the suspect as a member of the family that owned a ranch near where her father's vacation home was located. She said that her father knew the family well. Including the suspected killer authorities arrested a suspect wednesday in connection to an apartment fire in early january. That left a california woman dead on january sixth sacramento fire department crews battled a fire at an apartment complex on summer park drive. Firefighters were called to the complex just after four pm according to sacramento fire. Captain keith wade. Flames were coming from a unit on the first floor and the apartment above the fire was extinguished just before five pm as they searched the downstairs apartment. Firefighters found victim who was later pronounced dead at the scene. The sacramento police department announced wednesday. That the victim was a woman and her death has been ruled. a homicide. the name of the woman who died has not been reported. Detectives said the identified. Thirty one year old harold fowler as a suspect and believed the victim fowler prior to her death fowler has been booked at the sacramento county main jail on homicide and arson charges. Those your true crime headlines up the germont family murders but first a quick break. My cat is my best friend. And these days we've been spending a lot more time at home together and as much as i love my cat. I'm not fond of the stink bombs that she leaves in her litterbox everything from cleaning to covering up. The smell is a constant battle. That's why i use pretty litter. Pretty litter is kitty litter. Reinvented unlike traditional litter. Pretty litter superlight crystals trap odor and released moisture resulting in dry low maintenance litter. That doesn't smell and pretty litter is virtually dust free because it's manufactured with a specialized de dusting process. Less dust. no fuss pretty. Litter arrives safely at the door in a small lightweight bag that lasts up to a month. Perfect while we are social distancing. Now that i get litter bags auto shipped. I don't have to deal with last minute. Trips to the store and shopping is free but above all else. There's one reason that pretty litter is this pet parents hero. It's a health indicator. Pretty litter monitors my for babies health by changing colors when it detects a potential health issue. You won't find that kind of innovation in conventional litter. Get the world's smartest litter without leaving home by visiting pretty litter dot com and use the promo code murder minute for twenty percent off your first order. That's pretty litter dot com promo code murder minute for twenty percent off. What are you waiting for. Get it right. Meow at pretty litter dot com promo code. Birdman it keeping your body in shape is important but it's also important to keep your mind sharp. I've been leveling up my focus with word. Forest word forest is my new favorite game. It's a word puzzle. App made for word search addicts. Like me and it's free word. Forced has over two thousand levels so you never get bored. Connect letters in any direction to form hidden. Word matches find as many words as possible to honest coins and uncover hidden words. The game starts easy but gets more challenging as you get better word. Forced is a fun way to keep your mind sharp and grow your vocabulary. Put yourself to the test in this fun. And addicting bring game right now. Word forced is offering you twenty five hundred coins and five hundred gems when you download and play so the next time you find yourself. Mindlessly scrolling through social media download word forest instead. Just go to the apple or google store and search for word forest download word forest for free today and get ready to flex your brain muscles. Welcome back to murder minute on wednesday november twenty seventh nineteen thirty the day before thanksgiving eighteen-year-old bernice germont stepped off the bus at her family's dairy farm near stanford ville new york bernice was coming home for the holiday from poughkeepsie where she was attending school by the time she exited the bus set. Five twenty pm. The sun had gone down. Bernice wished the driver a happy thanksgiving and as she left remarked that her parents house looked dark. As if no one was home it was the last. She was seen alive on thanksgiving day. Bernice his father. James husted jerry and failed to make his milk delivery to the borden dairy company. At first they thought husted was finally taking a holiday but when friday came and he again failed to deliver employees at the creamery began to worry. The superintendent decided to send someone out to check on things. So willard coons aboard in employee went out to the farm when coons arrived just after nine. Am the farm was quiet. Save for the sound of humming milk machines. Hello he called out as he walked around the farm. No reply in the barn. He found the cows with swollen others in need of milking but no jomaa on then coons walked toward the wagon. Shed and saw the family's truck parked nearby. Hello still no answer. As he swung open the wagon shed door. He saw them inside lay forty seven year. Old james husted. Germont and his ten-year-old son raymond they had been stabbed to death coons quickly drove to paul germans farm shouting husted's been murdered husted. It's been murdered as they ran out. Coons shouted raymond to what about the girls. Mabel and bernice. Paul's father in law. George rogers asked coons said he didn't see them. I shouted when i got there but everything was quiet just inside the door of the house. They found the body of forty seven year. Old mabel laying in front of the stove in a pool of frozen blood nearby under the kitchen table lay eighteen year old bernice. They too had been stabbed to death altogether. The germans had been stabbed twenty three times. The poughkeepsie eagle called it quote. Dutchess county's most brutal crime. Before long the quiet dairy farm was swarming with reporters police and neighbors compromising the crime scene for an all ready. Inexperienced local police force who were already short of clues reconstructing. The scene police believed that the killer had. I knocked at the kitchen door and attacked mabel. Then they attacked bernice who attempted to take cover under the table. One defensive stab wound went through her wrist. Her watch stopped at six twenty. Pm then may believed. The assailant went outside and found germont. Who had just returned from his brother's farm with a truckload of feed along with his son raymond. They wouldn't have heard the screams in the kitchen because the milk machines were running germont was killed in front of the wagon. Shed then raymond near maggie says he tried to run away. The killer then took germans wallet from his pocket and dragged the bodies inside the wagon shed to conceal them. Police are without a clue to the assailant and unable to establish a motive for the murders wrote the associated press. The time of the killings was fixed by authorities as late afternoon or evening wednesday. Each of the four had been stabbed over the heart with the blade. Apparently an inch broad the blade. A large butcher knife wouldn't be found until sunday when some reporters stumbled upon it by fence on the farm. unfortunately it produced no fingerprints. Investigators traced the knife to shop where it had been purchased in poughkeepsie. But the shopkeeper was unable to trace the person bought it. Investigators were left stabbing in the dark. The germont family were well established and respected in duchess county. James husted draymond was born there in eighteen. Eighty four and married mabel in nineteen o. Nine bernice came along in one thousand nine hundred twelve raymond in nineteen twenty. The germans were a decent hard-working church going family with no known enemies. The only motive. I can think of is robbery. Pulled germont said but that doesn't seem likely when you think that husted had only about one hundred dollars on him and whoever took that money didn't bother to take his good watch or his silver change. You know husted wasn't a man of means. I don't think his whole estate amounts to more than five thousand dollars in most of that goes to mother. There's no friction or anything like that among our arkin. Everyone's on friendly terms with all the others. Some locals pointed the finger at an outsider. A foreigner who had passed through town and was allegedly seen near the dairy farm. A man called florentine chase or florentine for mendy. The man hired a car and then took a train to new york city. The night of the murder where police later picked him up in a brooklyn pool hall. Florentine was dragged backup state to duchess county but released after none of the witnesses who claimed to see him near the farm. Could pick him out of a lineup. The germans neighbor arthur curry. Who was a barber as well as a farmer suggested his own theory about bernice when i cut her hair a few days ago said curry. She told me she had a boyfriend. She hoped to land over at that business. School curry suggested that the murderer might be someone who was jealous. But school authorities told investigators that bernice was shy and reserved. They had seen no evidence of a boyfriend or that she had shown romantic interest. In any of the male students other leads that went nowhere included. Disgruntled who had been fined. After being caught hunting near the farm a man who rode the bus with bernice and spanish laborers doing roadwork nearby. All of them dead ends two weeks. After the killings germans wallet was found discarded in a covert. The motive had to be robbery. Said fred. Close special investigator with the sheriff's department to the poughkeepsie journal. The killer new germont had money on him. He had cashed a check given to him by the and payment for milk from his dairy cows about ninety dollars would have been left of one hundred and fifty. He got the money and made some purchases a day or two before he died when his wallet was recovered. The money was out of it. Never found in december. The dumont family was laid to rest their case had made headlines across the country but authorities were no to charging a suspect. The duchess county board of supervisors offered a twenty thousand dollar reward for information leading to the arrest of the killer but the case was going cold the following year then governor and future president franklin d roosevelt stepped in. He called for a new investigation into the germont. Murderers at the behest of several prominent local residents who were dissatisfied with the handling of the case. Roosevelt ordered the state's attorney general. Take over the investigation. Duchess county district. Attorney john schwartz. A republican running for reelection charged. That roosevelt's move was quote political insignificance. The chairman of the county republicans called roosevelt's decision quote mean and pick a yun politics and merely a move to get votes shorts was reelected. It wasn't until february of nineteen thirty-three more than two years after the murders that a new suspect with to light the germans neighbor fifty-six-year-old arthur curry sheriff oakley cooking him learned. The curry had a violent history. Curry had once served time for salt and was possibly a small time bootlegger. Rumor had it that there had been disagreements between the two neighbours then. Investigators learned that on the day of the murders curry had told his wife that he was going to see husted about some money. He was owed thirty dollars. Annual rental. poor pasture land. That germond had leased from him at the time. Curry told investigators that he returned home around six thirty pm within the timeframe of when the murders took place he later told his wife that he'd seen husted just before he was killed but hadn't been able to collect what he was owed. Adding quote and now will probably have to wait until after. The draymond state is settled on february fifteenth. Nineteen thirty three. Mr and mrs curry and their nine year old daughter. Betty more brought in for questioning three days later. Curry was arrested. And on march ninth nineteen thirty-three. He was charged with murder on april third curry and his lawyer. Paul rosen appeared before supreme. Court justice william f. bleakly for a hearing on a writ of habeas corpus. Did you form any opinion. As to motive the justice asked sheriff cooking cooking. Him told the judge that he believed. The incident began with coral over hunting rights. Our investigation shows that the murders were the acts of a quick tempered man. In argument he replied. The case was weak. And circumstantial the pokipsy keeper. Whose store was the source of the murder. Weapon has defied that he was positive that he hadn't sold the knife to any member of the curry family. Curry's defense lawyer requested dismissal of the case for lack of evidence. The judge agreed. This case is lacking not only motive but proof. He admonished. there are none of the attendant circumstances that usually occur in this type of crime. There are no admissions. On the part of the defendant. Even if there were a confession. There is nothing to corroborate it. A lot of men would not be safe if we could go on evidence such as this. The judge dismissed the charges and ordered curry released from various things. I have heard district attorney schwartz commented. I am convinced that the explanation for the mystery is in the girl's life. I am led to believe that she went around with young men unknown to her parents. And i think of we could reconstruct the history of her life. We might get to a solution to this crime. They did not know other arrests were ever made or curry. Died in nineteen fifty faulk and the case remains unsolved today in two thousand thirteen. A forensics analyst named vincent p cooking him reexamined the evidence in the case and while he disagreed with much of the interpretation of the evidence at the time he concluded that curry was the most likely culprit quote. It is my professional view. But the strongest of circumstantial and even forensic evidence indicates that mr curry was the most probable assailant. He also had proximity to avoid detection with blood that must have covered large parts of his clothing hands and shoes. I believe that share of cooking hems. Instincts were accurate. But he was far too hasty. There was not enough to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. The judge was right to dismiss the charges. I don't want to sound unfair to law enforcement at the time but this was one of the worst handled cases that i've ever looked into it did get somewhat better in nineteen thirty three when sheriff cooking him took over but he was not professional fault. I guess it takes one cooking them to evaluate another cooking up. This has been murder minute for true crime anytime. Download the murder minute app or follow us on instagram facebook and stare rio at bert minute.

catherine durham tiktok bernice coons durham zachary thomas latham fort meyers raymond Latham william durham leith Durham letham Old ian kathy harvey nissan emmanuel n land cruiser sacramento fire department
Khatam. Part 2. Purnima Devi. IINK Podcasts. Episode 59

IINK Podcasts HI

05:55 min | 4 months ago

Khatam. Part 2. Purnima Devi. IINK Podcasts. Episode 59

"Hello everyone this. Will i think Lil on the nascent. Police deals and please support for that. Also year nine hundred children hato a poetry. Hagia mountain issue to say at up could relate karpenko title heke coppee who actually many scar clear-cut identities hard linemen and gallard dada audra. Masol started to sony. Orders investigating kick up my loom cubby. Malu puna that'd be. That'd be kapika. Decided by loom hokey ups. A day to the loom cheops a paddle to sa of which allow john. You meet me des global. He goes idea global desire cardini piquancy and desire be we got into sirkka. Take it lum. How ondra style wizard. Who has vessels copy reich hazard who honeyed keep a. He has auto beneath moody. Who are able. But pods the ink pod Nicky ricky rubio. We're who that the back. That's up north and south. Do be hogar the bachelor new buick. Yuppie who mugabe biki. Johnny did not safe kabushiki on johnny. Need hull tugay up now. Mess with headcount komo state. How good disney com oc- see the hawker thin here got half a million rows her government to talk to. Then there has rose copy husted has failed to copy has stay say he wrote. The hutomo tahoe. To who has neighbor media. Commit baena giac. Hey asaba coppee. Methyl has our logo save. Malacca d home has a hoodie whom the the hogar good arcus stepney galil. Dr who gone to namie bid on the fade out to harris may be john. The beat up the pvc party ought to be handled the or acetone over taiji by the study s to put own nicole taghi hum data or data game though is shallow is abuse your heave around the hand. Kelly capita severely media. Kalina calcutta alpa vide media lesnar. They call me jonah. Abi she kaya. Na na the committee jonah to chicago donkin now get them up now. I'll now get them up now. Kayak or tell you a cia. How marquis de l. without a pk eighty career. Elba to me upi. He did so. Thank you guys for listening. My boy dri. I hope gap looked related. By whom he say that up late yoga to a challenge applicant pool jordan by poetry. So thank you. Thank you for listening.

Hagia mountain karpenko heke coppee dada audra Masol Malu puna Nicky ricky rubio mugabe biki kabushiki baena giac Lil namie pvc party sony john Kelly capita Johnny Malacca Kalina calcutta johnny
120: The Business of Luxury Estate Sales - Michael Fry of Brown Button

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

1:09:42 hr | 2 years ago

120: The Business of Luxury Estate Sales - Michael Fry of Brown Button

"Do you consider yourself a helpful person? If so would you be willing to help support me and my team on patron? So we can keep bringing you this awesome podcast. Every little penny will help if you are willing to help to millionaire. Dash interviews dot com forward slash patriae. That's P A T R E N or check the link in your episode notes below one of the many perks supporting us on patron is that you can instantly schedule a call with me help you with your current or future business. If you check out the beginning of episode one nineteen you can get a glimpse of what you're in store for so to sign up for this awesome opportunity to millionaire dash interviews dot com for slash patriot on and to our newest patriot members will be reserving the shadow outs until the end of this episode. So thank you to our newest supporters. And now, let's get on with the show. It's a cool thing to have your business. And I'm all about it. I've had three I love it. An entrepreneurs who I am. But I just don't wanna gos- over like the pain of starting something. It's kind of like a farmer who has the new field. And he has the get the rocks ended up deal, and he has to break up the soil, and he has to plow that field and pull the weeds and the first day. He does that he gets nothing in the second day. He does that he gets nothing. It's maybe months later before the harvest is there. So if anyone's buying a business out there, you probably want to get. We offer a thousand dollars to the table and said okay for grab we're going to get this business started in those first three years. We almost close twice. We said, hey, if we don't turn a corner with this. We're going to have to close down, and I found out that my business partner had. There's nothing that'll sink your ship faster than a partner who's not operating with integrity in. So one of the things I'll say is that you learn and you grow the most not when you're succeeding, but when you're failing. My name is Michael fry. I'm the co founder and CEO of Astra brands and under Astra brands with two companies Brown button estate sales and circle auction and our companies serve high net worth individuals as they move or downsides. We handle MLB all-stars CEO's for major corporations. And when they're ready to move we sell all their stuff. Do you just deal with real sater's more than that? Because you're saying there's two different companies here that you're part of. Yeah. And actually, we don't deal with real estate at all we deal with personal property, but it's all the contents inside their house from the basic things that everyone has up two vehicles and sports memorabilia and everything in between. Okay. Yes. Because this wanted to make sure because I know it's all state, but I'm like, maybe some people do real estate as well, you're saying you just deal with their actual items that they're trying to sell your in Kansas City creek. Yeah. Based out of Kansas City and born here grew up here. Interesting thing about the estate cell industry. Is that the average estate sale is a garage sale in house did someone just gets a little cashbox on the table by the front door and average estate sell nationally grosses a little over eleven thousand dollars our company with the clients that we work with with the systems that we do our average is just short of forty thousand per sale that we run then we've done sales over one hundred over two hundred thousand I was bringing up the Kansas City. His you said you deal with high net worth individuals. Are we talking like a new guy Kansas City Chiefs, which NFL team Kansas City Royals MLB team? Is there any other sports team? Or are you working with these types of clients, if there'll be moving cities or you said maybe downsizing moving somewhere else right from sports players to CEO's end just high net worth individuals. Specifically one county in Kansas. It is the southwest county of the Kansas City. Metro's Johnson county that often falls on the list of high income counties nationwide where our company was birthed out of its allowed us to really create a niche in the Ma. Marketplace in a state sales offering a different kind of service than you see most places. So how old are you thirty six and the current company is the third company that I've been apart? And can you tell us how many people work in the company, and generally the of revenues or net income Daigle into making? Yeah. In the height of the summer this year, we're up to twenty eight people and or companies placed on the Inc. Five thousand list, the last two years this last year two thousand eighteen we came revenue just short it's three million and really honed our system in Kansas City with what we're doing. And we're about to launch a new market in Saint Louis. We have a five year plan of an additional twenty markets mostly focused on the midwest. And the season where we're replicating the same things that we're doing in Kansas City, isn't Missouri and Kansas run through the city. So you're actually in two states the city there. Yeah. It can be one of the challenges that Kansas Kansas City, Missouri. There's a state line road that literally runs right down the middle of the city. And so we do work. On both sides. Our offices are in Missouri. I live in Kansas, and we do sales on both states. Is there a reason for that? As far as like, the state run it through because I went there couple years ago and had no idea that the city was literally almost divided in half. It's not like you can tell her anything. But it's just interesting that I've never seen a major city like this where state line literally runs right through the middle of it. That's a great question. I should be further brushed up on history here. I actually don't remember exactly why something back in the eighteen hundreds and everything. But yeah, exactly why. I can't remember. Yeah. Okay. So I guess it's not that significant those is going to bring up because we have a federal tax right for the nation. But I didn't know if there's different state taxes air to where it might be like worth your business moving over a different state line. If that was a the city, you know, it it does cause us some additional challenges actually the city of Kansas City, Missouri has a local city tax. So we actually have to track all the work. That's done inside Kansas City, Missouri proper versus the other cities to there is some additional tax challenges involved with. Across state lines. But for us to serve the Kansas City metro that's part of what being in business here looks like we navigate those challenges in it's worth dealing with even though it's a hassle. Kansas City Kansas a little bit more business friendly if they're not doing little tax there that you have to do with the Missouri part. Right, right. Yeah. I mean, there's actually one percent tax one percent tax on all income generated in the city. So even if you look at professional ball players if a team from out of town to for example, bit colts came to town and play the chiefs, they have to figure the portion of the colts earnings from that gain and pay a one percent tax on it, which I can just imagine the nightmare for them so much simpler for me. But like I said still a little bit of a tax talent that worth it to serve our metro. If you didn't do it. I don't know if it'd be like half your income's gone. This is a little minute thing is just kind of interesting to maybe people remember Kansas City because of this now this is the state line running through their hold your thirties. Yeah. So thirty six and this is the third business that I started. So I'm a third generation entrepreneur. Ou're? My grandfather started a Napa store franchise in south west Texas in nineteen forty eight. So that's a little bit of heritage grew up working with my father. My dad had a business called painless didn't repair use hand tools, and you take hail damage out of vehicles as a twelve year old kid, I work with my dad and to access the roof of a vehicle you have to drop that inside layers called the headliner. So twelve years old on taking sun visors out of cars and dropping the headliner one of things I realized working for my dad is that I got paid by the headliner. So the faster that I work the more diligent that I work the more money that I made. And I think one of the things that instilled in me from a young age that entrepreneurial sense, it's not just punching the clock and putting in your time, your work generates your income. My dad is a kid talked a lot one of his famous sayings was are I which is resourcefulness and initiative, so the more resources, so you are and the more initiative that you take the more money, you get paid and. So I think coming from that heritage in my life dinning to stand on that foundation. Played a huge role in the success that I have today so working for my dad, I went to school, and I just went to junior college. It's close by our house. It's a big one has thirty thousand students, but villa junior college I was planning on getting an associate's degree there. And then jumping over to state school k you for a business degree and got the associate's degree was looking at moving to the state school. And my dad read the book rich, dad, poor dad, so probably a lot of listeners familiar with that if the good book, it's just a mindset are your person who's concerned about punching the clock and working the job or you a person that's concerned about building wealth overtime source separating from your hours. So out of that book. He went out and bought fourteen rental units in about sixty days, which is a terrible idea. I would I would not have any back on and real estate to go. Okay. No background whatsoever. Read the book got. Inspired went out and bought fourteen rental units. Most of them were a bad idea because he didn't have the background in the industry. So my dad's looking around for a property manager. Again, me just getting an associate's degree. I'm looking around for a job. And I was like I'll manage your property can't be that hard. So neither of us had any experience. I take my dad's rentals, I basically make all my mistakes on his properties, which is great because he was pretty forgiving started the understand the game of real estate management and ended up getting a number of other properties and turned it into a business. Can I you there because you said your grandpa was started the Napa franchisor was a franchisee in Texas. Yeah. But were you born and raised in Kansas City. Yes. Okay. So my father had moved to Kansas City twenty years before I was born maybe and yes grew up in Kansas City. I live ten minutes from the house. I grew up in and was you were just living with your dad or your mom to know. Great family. I. Four brothers. And one of my brothers helped me start the company business partner mind. Good close friends. So we have a close knit family. And that's again, most people are not a success in a vacuum. Malcolm. Glad well has a book that talks about so much of who you are is born of where you came from. And I think that's really true in my circumstance is that had really great family and attentional parents who sowed into us and spoke to us about money entrepreneurial things, and then of course, getting into business with my dad at a young age helped me get started. So you were twenty basically because you've finished your societas degree. You're working on your rentals with your dad, and then do you want to jump in back there? I guess it sound like you started finally maybe making these profitable the whole concept for step or two it just getting that reoccurring income, right? But again, maybe going out and buying fourteen units with you have no background in real estate. He had the idea the concept. Correct. But you'd probably wanted to lease study it a little bit more before you go by that many units. We're not just talking about like one. Condo or one house. If you're going to fourteen is this kind of ridiculous if they're sixty days. Yeah. No. It's a terrible idea. And no one should do it. If you're interested in getting into the real estate game, you need to go out and buy one unit, and you need to work with that unit for a year and understand it. And then you'll start to get your rental legs under you move on. Not a good idea for my dad, but probably good for me. It gave me a very intensive school to really understand real estate and get into it. So one of my dad's friends, actually became my business mentor. He met with me early on. He had counselled my dad on getting into real estate and this gentleman had dozens of properties and his property manager flaked out property management. Historically has not been a really good industry. People kind of jump in and jump out of it. Realtors. Do it on the side sometimes and that was the case or my mentor and his realtor was not known a good job anymore. So he essentially put all his real estate undermine management, and then told all his rich friends to do the same. So suddenly found myself. In business from the time that I started I grew it to one hundred seventy five units under management, and this is houses and duplexes spread out across three counties in the Kansas City metro. I think I grew to maybe seven employees are the time. I sold it timeframe was a great question. So four to eight the bigger linked to. So that's what you're saying with your property management was for years air. So but real quick before you talked about what you learn from this management company. So did you make it like an executive decision yourself to not go to college? When you were finished your degree. I can either help my dad with these run on units or I can go to Kansas university pay a bunch in tuition and decided that it's just better to work with your dad. Yeah. Really good question. I was planning on going back that was the plan all along. I started doing this on the side. I think I took a few more classes at the local junior college planning on going back and the thing just steamrolled. It took off probably about that time. I mentor could all his properties under management and. Suddenly, I was very busy had a successful business thing is probably engaged at the time. All of those things are factor. Education is phenomenal. The American educational system is tremendous and were affecting technology around the world because of the educational system of the US. But I also firmly believe that you do not have to have a degree or even an advanced degree in order to succeed in business. And otherwise again, having started three businesses I have never sat down with a client and had them say. Hey, Michael before I hire you. I'd like to know where you went to school, and what your degrees never come up. I'm a voracious reader and one of my childhood authors is Rhode dull one of the things that he's famous for saying is if you're ever going to get anywhere in life. You have to read a lot of books, and so I don't have a degree beyond in associates, but that doesn't stop me from being a lifelong learner where I started the property management company. I knew nothing about property management. I literally ring. To Barnes and noble and bought property management for dummies and read that book cover to cover among a number of others. Some of the rich dad books on real estate, and that's how I succeeded without a degree without the background. I got a number of books I learned from other people's mistakes. And I was willing just jump in and make it happen. Want to see some cash on your next car rental, then consider using our newest sponsor auto slash dot com. It's free and completely easy to use to be honest after I I visited auto slash dot com. I was a bit skeptical about their promise to save you more than any other car rental site, but they really did deliver. For instance, oughta slash put a weakened car rental in my area for ninety nine dollars. I been checked out the other, quote, unquote, major Carbondale sites and the exact same parental on the other sites were quoting between one hundred and fifty and two hundred dollars. I'd rather pay ninety nine dollars then two hundred dollars for the exact same thing. How about you? So how does oughta slush do it while they searched for every coupon code you're eligible for and they're huge database, and then they apply that coupon to your car rental. 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Where they automatically slashed the prices on your auto rentals. And if we're just looking at this from a financial perspective, the first two years community college usually cheaper than going to the state school right away. And then tuition wise. Let's say I don't know if in ten to twenty K a year, or whatever it would have been. Let's say a say twenty or we can even say ten if you want to go there for two years, get your business degree that's twenty K that you had to pay for it that business agree. But for probably a hundred dollars, you went to Barnes and noble got a couple of books that now you're learning about this niche, and you read died in maybe a week or even less, maybe some a couple of these books. Let's just say two weeks, and you learn more in that probably a hundred dollars worth of investment, and maybe twenty thousand dollars investment. Yeah. Absolutely. So I'm not knocking education. I mean, if I'm gonna go to the doctor I want that guy to have a degree. I'm not interested in junior college doctor, but for so many things in the business world, a degree is not a prerequisite. You can go out you can find a niche you can find an area that's not being served. Well, you can start a business and it can succeed aside from education. But again, you have to be a lifelong learner degree or no degree. You still have to be a lifelong learn. But don't you tell us what you learned to the management company as you worked at for four years. And then you sold it sounded like maybe before the bust and the. Real estate or maybe right at that time. I sold it a week before the market crash. Look at August. Two thousand eight. Yeah. I know you're close. Yeah. So couple of things that I think are important takeaways from that property management companies. You know, already mentioned I didn't have a background in it and was able to make success. I just encourage people that you don't have to have it all figured out to get something started. So one of the things that I did have in my favor is a really incredible mentor who understood the real estate gain in depth and had been playing for. I don't know probably a decade. This gentleman was willing to meet with me. I take them out for breakfast. Probably every other month once a quarter and just sit down, and I tell them what I'm dealing with and problems that I'm facing he would speak into my business since speech in my life and incredible incredible role in making that first business successful with finding someone who'd walk the path in front of me and was willing to share some of that success with me I'd say that that's pretty critical. Everyone should find a mentor someone that they can look up to and respect. Who's had some success in business, and is willing to share some things with them one of the fun stories about that time that my younger brother who's now my business partner he actually worked for me in that season. He was seventeen and had the attitude of a typical seventeen year old, and we actually did a staff white needing one day, and we're rolling out some new policy, and he interrupted in the middle of the staff meeting was like, hey, I just wanna go on record saying this is dumb is a stupid policy. This is my younger brother here, and my management supervisor who ran my management department. He took me aside soon after that. And just said, hey, I know he's your brother, but he has to go. He's affecting the business, and he doesn't have the greatest attitude. So I did I fired my brother, and that's a funny story in the context of now, he's my business partner in one of my best friends and critical to the Kurt success that we've had today. But it's how it goes. You learn a lot some of those early businesses over four years you've got up till one hundred eighty something properties. Yeah. Hundred seventy five unit. Under management, housing duplexes spread across three counties. I think at the right voice sold it. We're up to seven employees. It was a good little business. Frankly, it was a lifestyle business. We did. Well, but I owned my job in the summer months when everyone's moving in and moving out, it wouldn't be uncommon for me to work eighty hours a week and the business had my name on it is called fry property management. And so the business wasn't he I simply own my job. It was hard for me to take vacation. I couldn't really get away from it. I was newly married, and my wife, and I that's all we did our whole relationship was working together in the business. She ran the office. I ran the field. It was tough. We did. Well, but at the end of the day, we just owned our job you said it was lifestyle business. But I guess most people when they think that they think, oh, I can just work maybe ten or twenty hours in you're making good money. You're right. It wasn't even a lifestyle business. It was a job. We had a job that was the demanding they go. Yeah. How much were you making this kind of interesting that your wife was working for you too? So there's a lot of risk there for both y'all. Working in the same company. What would be your take home for working all those hours become where you make it on a annual basis? So what have been over a hundred depending on the year this event afford? Oh, eight it was good for us. Especially for a kid with an associates degree. I was pretty happy with what we built absolutely especially like, again, you'd have to go into debt to go to school to do all this and said you actually made money starting your own company and learning a lot more than probably just go into school and getting a business degree you got up to seven people almost one hundred eighty properties. And then you decided it was time to sell because you were just working too hard. Or did you see that? There might be something with the real estate market crushing. Soon did not foresee the real estate market actually just had some personal hardship mon- mom passed away from cancer. And then eleven months later, my wife sixteen year old little sister passed away in a four wheeling accident win business is based on you win. It's just me and my wife that we worked all the time. And we carried the business owner shoulder so to speak and going through those eleven months of losing. To people very close to us. We were kind of emotionally bankrupt. We didn't have the energy in the fight to get up every day and to do all the things necessary to keep the business moving forward. And we even considered closing it down. We were that done at that time we were heading into a summer. So we were about the really really ramp up. And we just kind of looked at each other and said we can't do this right now our hearts a little bit broken. What do you have a business, and you have employees and you're working hard? It seems like that's the most important thing in the world. It seems like having an awesome reviewed company with a great reputation. That's making money. Nothing's more important than that. But then you lose some people that you love very much, and it really changes your priorities. It makes you look up and say, hey, there's things in this world that are more important than making money in running a business. I remember I think it was the week. My mom died some rinsed and get the positive on a timely basis for one of our clients. And the client was like, hey, I'm sorry that happened to you. But business goes on. If that was a really challenging statement for me, and whatever it takes day incurred some penalties. I would happy to pay their penalties. But just like the insensitivity of that comment and everything I've done since I've had the benefit of that life experience where I realized hey, I want to be successful in life. But I'm not going to be successful at life to the loss of like, my family or connection with those that I love and that that's still going to have to be the highest priority was just kind of like a reflection period where like you were saying, maybe some weeks, you were working up to eighty hours, and you're just realizing how much you're working, and maybe put all this time into the business. Maybe shouldn't be doing that necessarily is kind of the reflection period that you're having because the loved ones post with. Yeah. Definitely a healthy dose of that looking back and saying what our priorities but also just kind of being emotionally bankrupt. Just losing people that close to you within that short timeframe, you really need to take some time and work on yourself and go through the grief process. And when you're. You're running like a steam train. It's very hard to do that. So I was really blessed in the season a guy that I went to high school with had started a property management company completely separate from me. We actually didn't even know until later that we both started property management companies. So I approached him, and I just said, hey, we're looking to transition I'm interested in selling. We went through the valuation process and ended up selling in the mid six figures. So that's after four years of work actually running out of our house, even we were able to walk away in a very successful place. Did you get all that money up front because sometimes when you're selling business, maybe just walk us through? This is a perfect size business that I think maybe some of the people listening might have a business around the size. Yup. Maybe five to seven employees. So where it's different from. If you have one or two person company, I don't think you can really necessarily sell it. Right. Maybe if there's two company that has a couple of hundred people does the different process, right? Just walk us through how you're able to do that and come to terms as far as getting paid. Maybe if you did it over time. Period and real estate market crash. Then that's an issue. But if you're able to get that money up front, and you got alone. Then obviously that helps you more. Yes. So I was ready to walk away. Just emotionally my mom passed away in I think June, and then the next may my wife's sister passed away. So now, we're heading into the summer months. So we were able to affect that sale fairly quickly, and we sold in late August of two thousand eight I didn't go through a book valuation, a book valuation can cost around ten thousand dollars to literally get a business appraiser to come in and review, everything and goes through the process it actually takes a long time. We did that in our current business, and we'll get to that later. But it just takes a ton of time. And and I was interested in moving fairly quickly. So I just got some smart people some people who had success in business to come around me. Look at my books. Look at what we were doing. It helped me come up with a price. I sat down with a competitor. And I just said, hey, here's my price. I was expecting some negotiation and probably willing. Seducing the Goshi nation. And he said, right? I'll take it. I said, okay. So we have an attorney drafted up. He was buying the assets of the business without the name. And so with that we had to really document everything that was in the business, the inventory vehicles, all the tools inven- document all the clients. So he got all my client base. The deal was if any of those clans walked away in the first sixty days that that would affect the selling price, but actually caused a deduction so I got one hundred thousand dollars at closing in a check. And then the rest of the purchase was out over some multiple years three or four years. I can't remember exactly as you mentioned. I mean, literally the next week the housing crash, it it really changed the value of rentals. But it actually prevented a lot of people from being able to buy in that season that did push plenty of people toward the rental market the business that I told to continue to grow continue to add properties under management. I gotta healthy check each month for three or four years. After property management. No matter of his down or up time. It's not based on the valuation of actual probably like a real estate agent screwed. If there's not any movement and helping in a market, they only get paid when something news for since y'all are monthly income streaming. Yeah, they still Durant's that number of clients that you have with properties in the number of rinse that are coming in. It's usually percentage of those rates, and so again in that crash it actually prevented a lot of people from being able to buy a house that credit tightened up dramatically some people who would have been buyers or not winters. I think there was some effect with rent collection. Just that was a tough time for a lot of people so -ffected slightly, but sill over long-term telling like everything into working out as far as the same price in the terms. He always pay it did. Yeah. Yeah. Everything worked out when you were talking to him about it did he know the standpoint you were coming from. Let's say if I want to sell to a competitor. I'm just wondering if you would even know your personal situation to you're sitting you're emotionally bankrupt. You sound like you just brought a price him one day. And he's like, hey, okay. But how do you work through that any sugge-? Questions on if we wanted to sell business maybe around the size like what to do? Yes. Certainly keep cards close to the chest. I mean, I didn't come to him and say, hey, man, if you don't buy this. I may just shut this down or walk away. From it never said that I was fortunate in my connection with him in that hid lost his father to cancer some years earlier, I did share that it was a tough season that my wife was in a hard place having just lost. Her sister. Neil losing my mom to year before we did talk through that. But I certainly didn't say, hey were done anytime. I'm going to sell something my whole business right now is selling things you do have to be careful that you again, hold the cards close to the chest. And you don't have to tell the buyer everything you have to be truthful. I was truthful about where my company was about the success that we'd had, but I didn't share all my motivation method. Anyone understands it from any negotiation point. But I think people understand that you don't want to say everything that you're doing with. But after you sold it, you say, you're emotionally Bakr up. Yeah. But you just planning on just like. Relaxing for a little bit. I'm trying to walk through. What would happen? Fortunately enough. I haven't had anyone super close to me pass away. So what was your plan after you sold it? Yeah, we definitely but first of all I had to work for his business in the transition. I can't remember three or four months, perhaps my wife was able to stop working immediately. She had just lost her sister. So she was quite hard place. In me. I went to work for his business. I did his sales work for a season and just help keep all the clients in the fold help keep them happy in the midst of that transition, and that's pretty typical in a business sale. Is that the previous owner assuming that they're operational in the business will actually work for the new business? He later told me if he was doing it over the guy who bought my business told me if he was doing it over he would have made that a much longer period. He said rea- four months wasn't long enough. And that he would have liked me to maybe do a year or eighteen months. So if anyone's buying a business out there, you probably want to get the current operator to have a long time. Name in the business. Putting bows on things and wrapping things up well three or four months in that transition. He actually let me be a commission salesperson for him after that he paid me pretty well. So even after my contract was up with the business sale to work for him. If I went out generated business for him on the side. He paid me my wife, and I after we wrapped everything up we traveled a little bit. We haven't done that before just around the country. Nothing crazy. And then we bought some rental properties. I bought a is again was the bottom of the market and anyone who had cash in that season could pick up some pretty incredible deals. I picked up a house in that timeframe that was just recently appraised at four times the price that I paid for it again, that's the very volume of the market that's pretty dramatic. So several rental properties. I rehabbed them in that timeframe. But we did slowdown life pretty dramatically in that timeframe and focused on the inner stuff for a season. So that we could be in healthy place. I don't want to make it like, oh, it was white. Went home was depressed every day for a year. Or like that you were now going to not be quote, unquote, the boss, and you're working for this guy for a couple of years it just sound like instead of working those hours you wanted to work less hours. Right. And obviously probably gonna get paid less than there's less stress. If you're coming from what you're doing now, and especially your wife, there's more relaxed Asian versus grinding all the time for those four years. You built the company, of course, we had that large healthy check every month. The finances weren't that concerned in that season. I wanted to take that money and invest it. I wanted this opportunity with the real estate market with being as low as it was to go out and pick up some houses, we definitely didn't work. Like, we did when we own the business, but we weren't just sitting around. You're still at least working forty hours a week for what you're doing right now. Maybe you're just doing two additional stuff. I don't want to sound like a Bill humbug kind of just go home and check out altogether. Because of the obviously too difficult situations that you're doing with right? Yeah. We didn't check out all together. But we did focus on some intentional work in our. Elves it one of the things that I would just say to anyone out there is that when you're the CEO of a company when you have employees under you, you bring your life to work, and so do they so for you to be an effective, boss? A good leader. A great communicator unique to be healthy inside you need to do the work to be a successful person. Not just don't be outside. But on the inside and sounds a little mercy sometimes, but there's truth in that. Would you have these big life experiences that affect you in a dramatic way? You have to take the time to work through into beat place where you can step up and lead again with it work. Do you have to do on yourself? It sound like everything was fine to me other than these two. Obviously that incidents was there. Something else that you're dealing with the saying you have to work on yourself before you go back into starting your own business again. No. I mean, it's really the grief of losing to people you loved dearly and grief, the real thing. And a lot of people just when I kinda stopped put in a box and say, we're not going to deal with that. So we read a lot of books. We went to some grief seminars. I mean. We just had literally the one two punch in less than a year. We sold the business in August. And I would say it was probably the next February before especially my wife really started to find happiness again. So yeah, it's just in Grayson grief. That's really what the work was embracing agreed saying, hey, it's ok and we're going to learn to find a new normal. We're not going to quote get over this. We're gonna learn to find a new normal, and that was the process as you're being bought out. And now you're getting the check the topping with the income that you were making before would you decide to do from there? Yeah. So invested in some real estate did some rehabs on the side. And I mentioned earlier that I grew up with my dad doing hail damage repair. And he had a friend who was actually one of the pioneers in the industry. So again, a car gets hail hits the car. It puts Ditz in the car and used to what they do is still it with a putty, and then repaint the car, and then actually affects the resell in the vehicle this highly skilled technical work, you take tools, and you massage. Gosh, the out from the bottom. It's very difficult to learn. But when you learn it guys can make really incredible money. In the midst of a large hail storm guys can make three to five thousand dollars a day with this process with my dad's friend, he knew that I sold the business and was looking to do something new. So we decided that we were going to build a national traveling Hilton. We were going to open up a training school. And then we're actually going to sell franchise. Territories. So someone would develop a city, for example. Oklahoma City gets hit with hail almost every single year. So someone would own Yokohama city market, they would have relationships and all the body shops. So that when a big hailstorm came we as the national franchisor would bring a whole Hilton into their city support the franchisee in the body shop's doing the work the body shops make money the franchisee makes money and us as the franchise or make money. We got that up and started to start a technical school. The state of kids us there was actually process we had to get certified and being certified allowed us to get government. Guns for people to go to school. So we did that process. We started trade people and how to do it. We put together a group of subcontractors to do are traveling Hazeltine. And did we were working with franchise company a company who helps put together franchises? And I came to that business. Feeling good about myself for years in my property management company. I had done well and walked away with a lot of money. And I was probably a little confident in myself wasn't careful at all about choosing our business partner. This guy was a deep expert in the industry. He knew the industry inside and out and the business model, I think was incredibly solid got very excited about the business model and invested a lot of money in this new direction. So I didn't take a salary for eighteen months overtime. I invested fifty five thousand dollars in the company over that eighteen month period, and again, an no salary. So I'm having to support myself at home out of the proceeds of my previous business sale while at the same time supporting the business and investing in. Future. Again, wasn't careful at all choosing the business partner. I remember we were five thousand dollars into the business very early in the investing. We had a pretty caustic meeting with the business partner kinda weird and went sideways and my dad, and I were talking afterwards. My dad said, hey, should we walk away from this? And I said as a quote, I have too much money into this to walk away so five gram so instead of paying attention to that warning sign right, Ben I went on to spend another year and a half and another fifty thousand dollars trying to get that company off the ground. We were actually succeeding it was moving forward. We got our certification to be technical school. We started training people. We ran a very large hail storm in Oklahoma City and another one in South Carolina. And again, we were almost done with our FD getting ready to launch the franchise, and I found out that my business partner had cashed a business checks person. There's nothing that'll sink your ship fast. Mr. than a partner who's not operating with integrity when you get a business partner. You get married you're committing to each other to build this thing together, and as goes your business partner. So goes your business at the further in that we got into this business that was the nail in the coffin win the day. I found out that he had cash thousands and thousands of dollars of business checks in his personal county. It's up EDA and cash would you wanna do them after you figured that out? By that time, we had had enough butting of heads leading up to that. I was just kinda done. It's not like he's losing money. Marketing, right. Do use literally doing the worst thing. I feel like you could do as a business partner. And you're saying obviously, there's things leading up to it right now. I wanted to be quiet for a while. While you said this. But it's just like it would be like what meant it was a complete kick in the teeth. That has a hurt the most like you were saying get married, you could say you put almost two hundred k into it at least because you're saying at least if you're making a hundred K yourself from the old job, and you work eighteen months free. So let's just say a hundred and fifty plus you put the other fifty K in actual money in. Yeah. So invested so much in that time frame. I had had my first boy came along in that time frame, and I I took a little time off, but I was working hard. If you think about it. I could've taken that eighteen months, my wife, and I could have liked traveled around the world. You know what I'm saying? I mean, we're just gonna done anything in that timeframe with fifty five thousand dollars just had a lot of fun. And I poured my. Heart and soul into this company. And then for him to do this. So huge huge kick in the teeth. We talked about a lawsuit. But one of the reasons why this guy was in a position that he was cashing, Texas because his personal finances were in a tough place. And we just said, hey, it's not worth racking up a whole bunch of legal bills on our side. Just to have a judgment against him that we're not gonna clicked on collect. Yeah. We just need to learn from this and choose to not be bitter and set of look backward. We're gonna choose to look forward. So I'm looking at your Lincoln to seems like this is obviously business number two business. One was fry management business to you this is called flex ident. Yup. Am business is looks like you only took like four months quote unquote off from your other job. So you started this literally right after you got done with your obligation at fry management rate. Yeah. I think that's right. So finished up with the guys spot. My business we traveled a little bit. And I think we started working on the business part time for a handful of months, and then it really got rolling. I think we started early in two thousand nine I think it really got rolling this summer. Of two thousand nine we did jump in pretty quick. He must have sold you on this thing to jump totally different industry. And you're taking all the money you made from real estate and then at the same time Brill's states crashing and you're saying you did buy some rentals because you knew so much about it yet at that point in time. But even if you stuck just in real estate and being able to do that versus putting all this money, and that would just ramp up my anger with Pele. Wasn't completely new because I grown up with my dad in this industry. Okay. And so the I remember you said that earlier it makes sense. It was something that we were very familiar with not just helping my dad and taking out headliners and cars, but I had travelled around with him to body shops as a kid, and I kind of knew the ins and outs of what this industry did. Even though I didn't have the skill myself. I understood the industry so one of the things I'll say is that you learn and you grow the most not when you're succeeding, but when you're failing that cements lessons in your mind in a way that nothing else ever does. When my oldest son was a baby he placed his hands on a fireplace screen burned his hands and got a blister. And I tell you what if you ever said the word hot around that kid again, he would take like five steps back. Winston Churchill says success consist of going from failure to failure without a loss of enthusiasm. I would suggest that almost every entrepreneurial who's been very successful out there. Has had some pretty tremendous failure in his past. Because it changes your perspective, you do things differently financially. You do things differently. When you look for business partner, just everything you approach it from a different perspective when you've touched that fireplace screen and burns your hand on it real bad here. I am removed from that season by nine years or so, and I can look back and be really grateful for that time really grateful for the lessons that I learned coming out of it at the time it was very hard. And if I thought about the money, I put into it and lost. And I thought about my foregone salary. I could go a little crazy. I was still in a great place financially because my first business sale. And so I just had to say again, I'm not gonna look backward. Look forward. I'm a success. Even though this situation wasn't what can I learn from it? What can I do next? You are pissed off at the time though, you had to be somebody about the second found out like how did you exactly know, he was doing this? He had met someone to collect some checks in. He and I had. About that. So that was the plan and I kept asking him about. Hey, I need to get those checks and put them in the Bank. I handled all the banking relationship. I was the signer on all the checks and everything hid stiff arm me. A couple times owned still supposed to meet with him, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, baby. A couple of weeks went by. And I was just like, hey, this guy hasn't paid. I'm gonna go call him. And he's like, oh, actually he did pay. He paid me directly. And I wouldn't put it in the Bank. I had to do it because of my personal finances. I didn't have a choice. That's what he told me that made it easy read when you figure that out. He acted like that wasn't a big deal. I'm just saying if we have a partner, so we can look out for this. Is there any way to keep this from happening or any suggestions on it? I mean, really if you pick a bad partner, they're gonna find out a way to kind of screw you somehow anyways, see, but any other suggestions on how someone listening could handle this or keep from that happening or even trying to find a good co founder or partner. Yeah. One of these I would say is don't have a fifty fifty partnership. That's a big thing. If you have an idea if you have a passion, if you have something that you're starting don't have a fifty fifty partnership, sometimes you'll need to bring in partners from financial standpoint or skill sets standpoint that if it's your thing owned that thing you're the leader you've signed the checks at the end of the day, build some sacred trust people, but then build safeguards in as well there were warning signs. We'd never should have been in partnership with the sky. You don't maybe we should have hired him. He had deep deep knowledge and deep connections in the industry, if we had hired him or had him consultant a business, I think that could have been successful. But to have him as a partner was a bad mistake, and I should. Have seen that early on? And then you gave the tip because you're coming from aspect where you own one hundred percent of your first business. Yes, I'm yeah. And then now you literally fifty fifty you and your debt with the guy. What was the partnership split? Honestly. I can't quite remember. Right. But regardless you, don't own the majority. I think that's correct. Yeah. Because my dad wasn't owner. And this guy was nerve. So yeah, I certainly didn't own the majority. Honestly, I just can't remember it's been so long and some of these things that's like if I dwell on it. It's gonna drive me. Crazy don't do element. We got the concept of it. When you're one hundred percent in control of your other company versus you make the decisions you call the financial shots when you win or lose because the guy in the mirror not because someone else set off a trap door underneath you not because someone else went out and made a really poor decision. Partnerships are hard. So I'll give you a little preemptive glance curtness this. I have a partner we're going to talk about that. It's like brother the same brother that I hired before is now my partner in this business and not successful in a different way. But in general. 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And thank you to our listeners for sporting, our sponsors seems like it makes sense if something's your idea, and you need the funds for it timing that person that minority partner versus you're saying if you have two guys who are fifty fifty you could blame the other person all the time if there's something not going right versus taking ownership of what you're saying you decide to get out of this and into twenty ten you finally decided you wanted to stop funding. This guy's personal finances. Yes. So what do you do from there from flexible we're talking about we're going to be going into business three the Brown button? This outsail state sales. I'm not a person who just sits around staring at the wall. So I was looking for something new to do having broached the world of franchise. Sizes in that second business. I thought about buying a franchise I look around at some different things and one week in my wife, and I went to an estate sale just for fun. We are just poking around. So for those who don't know in a state sale is a sale of personal property inside a residential home. But it's kind of like a garage sale on steroids because you walk into house, and literally everything in the house is for sale every closet stuff in the kitchen. Maybe even the car in the garage is for sale. So my wife, and I went to one of these just for fun just poking around in. It was the most unprofessional Horley Rudd situation I'd ever seen. It was kind of amazing. It was dirty in the house. The employees were yelling at each other across the house like a bunny, something it was unbelievable. We happen show up near closing time. Didn't even know it and the gal at the front checkout said, hey, if you Ainun line in five minutes, I'm gonna charge a double. I just looked around flabbergasted, the that was the level of customer service that. They had will there's not a bad business model for her. Right. Enjoy. For me as a customer. I just wanted. You just hear it. I just couldn't believe that. That's how a business is run. These people have been in business for twenty years. Well, this is crazy. This can't be normal. So my wife, and I went to a state sales all around town. And we found out that that's wore normal the knots that this eight cell industry is junkie garage sales in house more often than not there's some good players. But as a general rule, it's a poorly run industry, and if you couple that with the senior demographics. It's crazy. I mean the opportunity that's coming in this industry. The number of Americans who are turning sixty five or older projected to more than double by twenty sixty. So the number of retirees now to two thousand sixty will double there are ten thousand baby boomers day, retiring, it's just crazy. This tidal wave of need that's coming and the way be industry set up to serve them. I never knew the estate sale I thought it was always someone dying. So when you're talking about the garage sale versus a state so different through. Saint estate sales or in house in honestly, if you think about it anyone I could see a house automatically kind of dirtier because at least garage sale they had to put effort to bring it outside. Put it on the table, maybe organize it some versus. I could see what you're saying. With the estate sale does the state have anything to do with the actual death there. They state sales sorry or no. Usually when people die. They just have it because they have everything inside. And they make it easier because you just brought up the whole demographic thing yet. But the way I always thought of it. So can you tell the differences? Yes. The one thing to know is that you don't have to be dead to doing a state sale. Right. I learned that in this podcast interview. That is certainly a group of clients that we serve or families who've recently lost a loved one. And I think coming out of my personal experience. I understand those families in a different way, and I can express care for them in a different way because I've personally gone through this process. What we found is that the majority of clients that we serve are actually baby boomers who are choosing to downsize that have the four of the five bedroom home, the kids are grown and gone. And they know long. After just need the big space in all the stuff, and they want to go to something dramatically smaller, you know, in Kansas. We can have some pretty severe winter weather. We had about ten inches of snow this last weekend. So what we find is a lot of high net worth individuals as they reach those retirement ages. They're moving to erase Zona. They're moving to Florida. Maybe they already have a furnished house that they've been using us a vacation home in the states. And so they just say, hey, sell everything let it all go. I would say getting to that point was a process we started the business, and we were pretty naive. What we said is. Hey, no one's doing this very professionally that we could see we're going to do this. We're gonna take this to the mass of professionalism will the problem is the average estate fill is eleven thousand dollars. If you bring the height of professionalism to an eleven thousand dollar sale, you can't make any money 'cause that's the gross sales. And then the client gets a portion of that if they feel company gets a portion, and if you put turns and tons of money into advertising into really good sign. And all these different things into labor costs. There's no money left at the end of the day profit. I would think you'd have to put a considerable amount of time into getting this already before you just start talking about the year one. And what you're able to accomplish. Did you decide right after that first estate sale? You said you started going to once right afterwards. Did your business idea come up like literally as you're leaving that very first one? Hey, maybe I've been looking for business ideas. This is an opportunity. Yes. Okay. I walked out there saying this is crazy if this is normal. We can do this better. Yeah. In your wife. Agreed. She did. Yeah. Then the very next week or whatever you just started going to lot of them to try to still see if that made sense. Yeah. Went to sales around town. And again, there are certainly better players, but the industry average is broken. It's poorly run. It's non-professional. So would you start doing to get this thing started? Did you hire a brother readily, tell us about how much money you had to put into business to get this going because obviously just come off two years of at least your personal work income, you weren't making money. But at least you got money coming in from your first business. Would you do to get this thing started? So we went through the state fails around town realized that this was normal. We sat down and said how can we do this completely differently? So one of the aspects of an estate sale is you typically will do a well run state till anyways is you'll stage the home meticulously turn it into a stored side the house, and then you have to literally price everything in the house. So having the business background. I was in. I knew how to bring best business practices to this endeavor. But not so much about pricing. My younger brother, James, the one I fired had been on EBay since he was twelve had a deep knowledge of stuff and pricing. And so really an obvious choice. For me. I went to my mentor. The same guy who helped me get started with my first business. And I said, hey, I have this crazy idea. And he said great. I also have a crazy idea that I wanna tell you about you, go first, I said a state sales. He said, no way, my crazy ideas estate sales. I don't know how he got to that. I can't remember. But essentially we sat down at the same. In meeting with the same idea to launch a business. The business started with four people myself, my brother, my mentor, and then one other guy who was involved early on. He had a social media background. We all brought a thousand dollars to the table and said, okay for four grabs we're gonna get this business started, which there's not many industries that you could start a business for only four thousand dollars. But that's what we did Jane's put together a website. And we just jumped in we found someone who had spent twenty years in the industry, and she gave us a whole afternoon and just talked about the business the ins and out. I think I filled the complete legal pad with notes in meeting with this lady once again came into an industry, I knew nothing about but said we're going to find the resources we're gonna learn how we can get this thing up and running. Well, it's kind of funny to you didn't know anything about real estate. I ended up doing well, you didn't know anything about this estate sales. Or whatever seems like he's obviously doing well today because we talked about it yet. But the thing that you thought you knew you got screwed on right? Yeah. No. I've never looked at it that way. But I think yeah, there's a lot of truth in that. Now that you weren't open minded with the other company, but when you're going into something, you don't have should have. Oh, you have to be as open minded as held like when you're talking to this woman, or whatever you have to die deep you have to get into it. And learn it in and you can't just make assumptions is your assumptions because you don't even know what to assume. With this one was she actually competitor. She was just getting out of business and was willing to tell you all this stuff. Yes. She kinda got out of the business. She had moved from doing a state sales to being a personal property appraiser. So if someone has a state, and they needed a praise for tax purposes, she steps in. So she just gave us her time. She actually referred us. Our very first sale in the first sale was a glorified garage sale. It was sublets garage in back basement. It brought in four thousand five hundred dollars. And I think we've probably spent a month for people spent most of a month working on it. So have you believe the economics don't work on that first one yet? So what's the percentage of getting because you're saying the sales were let. At five thirty five percent because you have the majority is assumed back to the owner. Right. Is there actual stuff that they're selling? So we walked away from that first sale with twelve hundred dollars. Nice her months worth of work for poor people. You gotta start somewhere. I agree. Yeah. That's the thing. That's why I thank you for bringing up the first sale. It always takes time. We can't just snap fingers and have this happen overnight. So it might seem minute and suck at the beginning. But you gotta start somewhere. You know, one of the things in our culture. Now is starting a business or having an invention. If kind of sexy for shark tank to just like up, culture and podcast. It's a cool thing to have your business. And I'm all about it. I've had three I love it. And entrepreneurs who I am. But I just don't want to gos- over like the pain of starting something like there is a season. It's kind of like a farmer who has the new field, and he has the get the rocks ended up field, and he has to break up the soil, and he has to plow that field and pull the weeds and the first day. He does that he gets nothing in the second day. He does that he gets nothing. It's maybe months later before the harvest is there, and it's just like that. When you start a business. The cost is upfront is one of trying to say is interesting. I recently read the book shoe dog. By Phil Knight. Ms the guy started Nike, and like he's crazy. I mean, it has like thirty billion dollars in sales. Now is nuts. It's all over the world. But here's the thing. He had struggles for eighteen years of starting the business. He got kicked out of both banks. I mean like, I think four different times in the first eighteen years. They're thinking about going out of business. It can fourteen million dollars in revenue one year. I thought they were going out of business. Don't underestimate. There is a season of cost a season of pain when you start a business, but the harvest the win the freedom comes on the other side of paying that price. We've been talking about this four for someone in the think about because we're obviously just hitting highlights over several years right of your story right now in some highlights in some Luddites, whatever. But what you're not seeing obviously is the amount of hours that yes, put in to get to where you got. It's just like if you're in the gym you see the guy who's pretty jets. And maybe you just started hitting the gym. Well, there's a reason he's jacked you didn't see how many times how many hours in years. He's put in to get in his muscles. Where the? It's like, oh, well, maybe five worked out for two or three weeks. And then I'm not looking like that you quit. Well, again, there's a reason he's at where he's at first where you're at right now. Same principles apply the gym as you do in business to me. Yeah. That's exactly right. Those first couple years we're kind of like lifting weights and not seeing any result. It was hard. We were trying to do something completely different. We are trying to bring this high level of professionalism. We weren't running up profit and loss statement on every sale. And it wasn't until later that we realized that some of these sales. We are putting in more labor in than the price. We got out that seems obvious in hindsight. But you're just in the trenches making stuff happen. And sometimes you don't stick your head up and realize where you are. We were pretty naive thinking we could do something completely different. And we were running sales. Just like everyone else. It was a couple years into the business year three or maybe close to your four win somewhat by happenstance. We got a sales call in a two point five million dollar house. So two point five million on the coast may not be. Of a house getting Kansas City. That's pretty significant is probably about twelve thousand square foot house five car garage. I mean, beautiful beautiful house in a very exclusive neighborhood. It was an eighty thousand dollar a state sale that we ran that next week. And sort of a light bulb went on is there is a group of people that needs our service, and they need this Uber professionalism. This social media, focus this ability to do things differently and they're willing to pay for it. And when you're making forty percents of eighty thousand that's very different than making thirty five or forty percent of eleven thousand for two weeks worth of work were you just running net neutral for the first couple years of the business. Yes, I actually went backwards financially for the first three years of this business. I had less every month at the end of the month than when I started the Hearst because the first four years demanded significant money, right? It seem like then the next seven years, basically, you're saying to plus three five. Yeah. Though, say five six years, you're like going backwards financial. And once he sold that first company, you probably didn't envision that. You'd be at this point. Right. I did not. I certainly didn't. And again, there's a cost of starting something and making it successful plan for that be willing to put it that cost in those first three years. We almost close twice. We certainly talked about it. We said, hey, if we don't turn a corner with this. We're going to have to close down, and we had an event where we did something a little bit different. We actually worked for business. We liquidated a couple warehouses. It was a huge project. We spent over a month on it, it generated maybe fifty thousand foot by the time we had done all the moving costs. We had rented a giant space for the sale. We put the labor we actually lost twenty grand on the project got hurt. Oh, yeah. So blessing in disguise because we went to one side told you we started with four partners. It kind of looked like we're gonna shut down at that time. And we went to one of the partners. And I was able to buy out his share for five grand. What that shares worth today is multiple manages the tremendous amount. What a blessing in disguise to go through that hardship. It was tenuous. We might close. And I said, hey, man about your share. He walked away from the business. So it's just myself, my brother, and my mentor at that time again pretty soon after we land this giant sail in an exclusive neighborhood and the light bulb came on. And we said this business can be successful. If we direct all of our attention to high net worth individuals who are choosing to downsize, they need something different than what's done out there. Most high net worth individuals don't even consider an estate sale when they're going to move because interstate sales junkie garage sale on house run by Bubba in his truck boubons, boys. Yeah. Exactly. And so that was turning point in our business that. That sale. Probably kept us a business those literally right up to the sale that almost put you out of business rate. And I don't believe the partner wanted to get out because sometimes like after that couple years, you're just like, dude. I cannot keep doing this. Right. Exactly. Yeah. And I think he went on to be the social media director for sonic the drive in. Yeah. He's very successful. So he did some social media stuff for early on inmates. And he wasn't operational. Most stays with where the business stood it made sense for him to go into different directions, very thankful for that today painful at the time, but in hindsight thankful, so Switzer whole business model we focused on the high end, and we got really good at serving high net worth individuals and doing things completely differently than are down in our industry. One of the things that we learned not time we read a book called the centralism in talks about what are the essential things that make all the difference. Also called the eighty twenty rule, and we eighty twenty our entire company we found out that we make eighty percent of our prophets on seven percent of. Of what we sell in someone's house, so much of what we sell the volume of what we deal with accounts for a very small percentage of our profits. We had to radically shift how we operated the company that just made us much better over time. What were the things that we're making you money versus things that weren't? I would never have thought of the eighty twenty rule in a state sale. And I thought you already figured that out just by finding the market that would be that much. But now you're saying there's actual stuff inside. I'm just curious. Yes. The market itself is eighty twenty. I mean, the fact that we're focusing on the upper end of the marketplace. But then even in a house, I mean, everyone has a bunch of junk in their house or whether that's stuff in the garage or their attic or just low value stuff in their kitchen, and it stuff that to run a successful high end estate sale you have to organize and it has to be displayed in it has to be individually priced, but it's cheap stuff. Sixty seven percent of the volume of what we sell sells for under a buck sexy. And so you just have to move really really quickly with that stuff. If you spend time and put everything in perfect neat rows. Then you're gonna lose money on it. Whereas the things that make a lot of money is that Henry, Don, dining room, set with inlaid, mahogany that they bought for twelve grand. And you price it in fifteen minutes. It sells at an estate sale used price for four thousand dollars. So you're saying the high end stuff, again, even when in the house, it's kind of like, you you find your clientele now, you're working at the high end clientele. But when you get inside if they had just a lot of regular silverware all that stuff. You don't need to spend any time on you just need to find the really super nice stuff. And that's the one that makes you eighty percent of your money is these high in like, maybe PNO's and stuff like that. Exactly. Yeah. That's kind of -application for my specific business. Every business has eighty twenty read the book eighty twenty sales and marketing read the book eighty twenty manager throughout anyone's businesses. There are certain levers that when you poll they make all the difference. A little bit of action makes tremendous results in when you apply that framework to your business. Your business will get more profitable. It'll run more efficiently. And the people inside are going to be happy. Tell us when you're less few minutes here. What you've grown today. Maybe if there's anything else we could learn what's happened over the last couple of years what exact year did that switch happen. Yeah. Somewhere year three to four late year three year four somewhere in there. Okay. So you've ruined it for almost eight years. So the last five years or so if you want to tell us what happened from there? Yeah. So we started to build our name for our selves as a company I mentioned again placing on the Inc. Five thousand the last two years with our growth, we won a number of wards in Kansas City, the fastest fifty companies to Kansas City, and we won an award for our culture. And that's probably the thing. I want to make sure and cover before I go is one of the things I learned out of those couple of businesses that I owned before. And even people that I worked for prior to going into business for myself in high school in college is the environment of the business matters tremendously as looking up some stats recently, hand, AAC magazine, said of a hundred million Americans who hold fulltime jobs. Seventy percent are not inspired by their work or by. Their managers in essence seventy percent of those fulltime job hate their Joe. Which is kind of staggering. And that's why we have. Oh, God, it's Monday. Thank god. It's Friday because of that mentality in my previous business in property management. You know, it wasn't a bad boss. But I wasn't a good boss either. I didn't care about my people. I didn't intentionally instill things then and help them grow. I was just trying to get stuff done every day. And then the second Xidan it was rough. I mean that guy was there's a lot of controlling going on. And it just wasn't a good environment for me. So I said with this third business. I have chance to do something different. I have to work here every day. So I might as well make it a dang good place to work we've been incredibly intentional about that. We have six core values that are very specific to our company and that when it's in-depth in our hiring process. It's a part of how we review our staff its potential someone could get fired over these things to work in this company. You have to follow these core values in all run through real quick six core values. People matter always blow people away experience. Good soil. The quote, I am responsible eighty twenty rule and visual excellence. So we'd made this a place where people get a come. It'd be themselves and it safe and they bring their best self to work every single day in. Honestly, I believe that. That's the number one factor for our success in this business in the way that customers get to experience our company in the way, our clients get experience, our company in easy way to say, it is that we're Chick-fil-A not McDonalds and people feel that in the atmosphere when they come into your business, and you care about serving them you have to see that makes sense because if you want to compare Chick-fil-A they're fast food to let's say Burger King McDonald's Wendy's if anyone does know in the US is definitely a different feel and you're an industry, that's kinda Hickey. You get that sense based on what you want with the estate sales. So I could see what your allergy is there. Yeah. So we just we really serve people all my staff. We see a lot of regulars who ten sale after sale. Our staff is instructed to get to know in memorize as many red. As possible will use first names when they walk in the door our staff loads furniture out into their vehicles, again, it's just very customer focused in that led to a lot of our success. We have the largest market share of luxury estate sales in Kansas City this last year out of cash flow. We were able to launch a sister company that's an auction house. The top one to three percents of what we find in a state Phil goes to the auction house because we make more money for the client. So we sold a pair of Asian antique chairs for fifty thousand dollars to a collector in California. We sold a four carat diamond ring to a dealer in New York City. We sold them talion oil painting to a Byron Israel out of the success of the first company we were able to open the second company the plan is twenty additional estate sale markets over the next five years and just coming full circle. So five years ago, we had three all seem like you're almost gonna shut down, and again, what size are you at today as far as employee count revenue. Yes, it will fluctuate in our busy season. We're the mid twenties gets. Up to the high twenties. And that's our Kansas City market when we opened Saint Louis later this year will start off with eight people there, and that'll Grover time then additional markets as well. We'll appreciate you coming on sharing your story. It seems like you already kind of left us off with those last points that we can consider growing our business there any last words Elizabeth, and you wanna leave with anybody here care about people at the end of the day. Your people is what makes your business work your customers who show up your clients who hire you and you're in business because the people so be in business for people when you care about people your business will take care of itself. We'll take you for coming on Michael in if someone wanted to reach out and say, thank you for doing podcasts. Where should they reach a, oh, you can always connect with us. See what we're doing on Instagram at Brown underscore button. Or you welcome to connect with me personally on Lincoln. And I guess could be named Michael fry Michael h fry thanks so much for having me. I appreciate it. Thank you for listening to this episode. Let's get started with our patriot shoutouts. You can find more about each members business by checking our episode notes below as well. So our first newest patriot member kosh of Luggy leap. He's in Mesa. Arizona if you need app developed for you. He's your man go, visit Luggy leap dot com. That's L O G, I L dot com, tuna Osmond and Ontario Canada. Who's in the process of starting his own company Benke for becoming a member Walker peak of residential acoustics in Tampa, Florida. Thank you, brother. If you need some Tom proof curtains, go check them out at residential dash acoustics dot com where you can hear more about his story by tuning into episode six next member is Mr. better God knows where he's located seems like he wants to stay anonymous. But still cruciate the donation Doug Smith is also located somewhere in Florida thing. Thank you for also becoming a new patriarch member. And our last newest hatred member is Ryan more out of Portland, Oregon who's going to be featured in an upcoming episode. Thank you to you all and if you're listening to this point have you gotten any value from listening to the podcast if so we'd certainly appreciate your support via patriot on with a small one dollar pledge per episode. You can help keep us on the air. If you're willing to help us, then please visit millionaire. Dash interviews dot com slash Katri on or check your episode notes below again, that's millionaire. Dash interviews dot com slash patriot. One.

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117: Reshaping the Education System through Software with Peter Kraft of EvoLabs

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

1:19:42 hr | 2 years ago

117: Reshaping the Education System through Software with Peter Kraft of EvoLabs

"This program teens strong linkage. And so we had Spence -is that were now part of our life that we couldn't easily get out of we were burning through cash. You can sell your kids. We try. It was awful. And how we kept going while that dark cloud was over our lives for years is a sheer miracle. And I think probably the biggest key to our success is. People of always thought it was weird or stupid or silly. But fuck them. Here's how crazy we were. We would go to sleep at six PM, and we would set alarms for midnight. And we would wake up in the drive through the night arrive at a school at eight AM in a meeting in Ohio or wherever it was. And we would pull into a McDonalds parking lot wash up, but our suits on and walk into that meeting likely on the. My name is Peter craft believe it or not in fact, I don't think I can believe it. I'm fifty three years old, although I really act like a nineteen year old and I'm based in New Jersey, I live in Frenchtown, New Jersey our offices in Morristown, New Jersey got on New Yorker through and through and our current businesses called evolution labs and super excited to take you on our journey and how we got to this point. Why didn't tell us a little bit about evolution land? I share evolution labs is a education technology company. We work in K twelve with schools districts around the country and also on IRA and our core products in K, twelve our web and mobile programs around what's full of social emotional learning. I think the best way to describe social emotional learning were SEAL is it's really all the non academic stuff that factors into student success. And a lot of it is centered around mental health and wellbeing. Research demonstrates that kids that are better equipped socially emotionally, perform better academically than than the other program in K twelve we have is for students in suspension and detention would amazing is that over the years really not much as changed in the world of detention suspension. Students are actually just sitting there. Doing busy work getting further and further behind in class so today on a student commission infraction. They now have to sit and go through a lesson or a module all web and mobile based related to their fraction mimets really helping drive. What's called restorative Justice for students and in higher? Ed. We also have social emotional learning programs for college students to help them be more successful again that's tied to their performance. And what's really interesting is that in the role of higher read most college students that leave were drop out. They're not doing it for academic reasons. They're doing it for social emotional reasons. We're really focusing on that to help students be more successful. And then on the recruiting side in high read, we help colleges recruit students create basically these web and mobile marketing programs that allow perspective students to better connect with the school. We as a feature ical virtual masters, which let perspective students shadow and follow real students at the school, which drives connection, and ultimately drives. And that makes sense to me what you're talking about. Let's say college with the social emotional reasons for going, I know for me like I had a difficulty switching from high school to college. 'cause during that point in college is kind of funny, I thought in a big making more friends, but it definitely made way less because that was right at the same time that online education started going to all of our classes were online people go to class anymore. And I'm like, I didn't realize that the point in time. But realized kind of looking back Mike me, and I didn't get the meat nearly as many people as I thought I would Bush high school. It seems like I had tons of friends because I was forced to go to. Class b next people that maybe I wouldn't normally have known. Yeah. H seriously a totally different dynamic than when you were in school. And certainly when I was in school. There's a lot of online learning as you said kids are not socializing in the same way that we used to which really I think speaks to jarash ins e this audience that has grown up in this digital world. Let's remember many of them are engaging in dialogues and really full blown relationships truly behind the device. So the dynamics of social engagement have really changed. It's different world is what do you mean when you're saying social emotional learning that you help with this for for the K through twelve 'cause I'm looking at your website. Basically, you have two parts you said the higher education part in the K through twelve part. But at the first thing that I noticed I don't think I heard the term before was the social emotional learning that you're talking about. Yes. So social emotional learning really is think of it as character development. It's all the issues around things like respect. Mental health and wellbeing test taking eighty study skills, racial tolerance absenteeism in tardiness, all of these factors really effective student's ability to be a good learner and for schools in teachers to teach students when students or disruptive or distracted. It's hard to teach them and students that are better equipped social an emotionally or easier to teach are more likely to consume content and information that they're being taught, and that's not really just the case in K, twelve frankly or programs were born in higher at that's where we really started. And the reason we brought our programs into the K twelve world because our higher Ed clients would tell us that really by the time students are arriving on campus are often not prepared for success. And they're not just for furring academic preparedness when they said that they're frankly, more so referring to social. Emotional preparedness colleges in courage, just to take this SEO programming social unemotional earlier into the educational life cycle. So that students are better prepared for success. When they arrive on college campus who are your clients accused pain you like how do you make money today it our current business schools school districts and colleges and universities or our clients? We work with only public and private schools in school districts colleges and universities. We don't work for for profit. They're all not for profit. And frankly, there aren't many for profits left, but the school or the school district or the college our clients, and they're really hiring us to deliver content in the higher Ed world to prospective students and current students and then in K twelve or programs are built for students. Parents and school staff, parents is a whole other issue and discussion that we can get into about their influence, and frankly, better equipping them, simply speaking. To have smart conversations that their kids about these issues. Oftentimes, parents don't know what to say, they don't know how to handle issues around mental health and wellbeing when a school whether it's a k twelve school or college or university can provide service face content to parents, they can be better equipped to be the schools ally in have smart conversations with their kids. We've got about five hundred clients today. It's growing rapidly. We probably saw five ten new schools were districts every week and we've got about fifteen people on payroll right now. So that gives an idealised payroll size you're coming because even though it sounds like five hundred clients might sound like a lot. But if you're dealing with universities and colleges actually doing with these students, and their parents didn't even know how much of a reach you have their total. Well, what's interesting is? And I think this is one of the things were so excited about with our business from a revenue standpoint. And from a scale ability standpoint in from a value standpoint because. Ultimately, this will be acquire which sold to prior businesses on similar models. But which really excited about our businesses that are programs are typically built into things that the school is doing they're built into in cage. Well, they're built into a health and wellness curriculum. It's required for students to go through our programs because again schools are starting to understand that relationship between social emotional wellness in academic performance and in higher. Ed, there's really two parts of our higher this on the recruiting side colleges. And universities are uploading. Lists of names. You probably know that when you apply to colleges you would get mail and Email from perspective schools interested in you, while the purchasing names of students that had taken the SAT or the ACT. Our clients are uploading those lists of purchase names oftentimes, it's a hundred thousand names or more into our programs and our programs. Get basically. White labeled or skinned to look and feel like it's coming from that school. Whether it's UCF were Lynn or Florida, poly. I'm just naming some in Florida since you based in there. And then the program is delivering outreach. It's really a campaign that looks and feels like it's coming from the school to encourage perspective students to check them out and the leverage we used to do that is these virtual embassador says I mentioned oftentimes today for perspective students. They're really more interested in hearing, what real students have to say about a school, then they are enduring with the school as to say about the school said a different way, they want more authenticity. They hear over and over again from the school from the admissions counselors, how great the school is why the school is probably a great fit for them. But the reality is that they want to hear that from a student's perspective, a real students perspective, that's where they're getting this authenticity. And we do that through a process called virtual embassador since basically a video series. Of student ambassadors at the school students that have been vetted by the school to represent the school. Well, and they're shooting series of videos on their phones. Another kind of shit in the way, perspective students are engaging the schools. He is days is that they're not into professional video quality anymore. They wanna see a typical day in the life of a student at the school as shot on their phones. They should these videos on their phones. They upload them to our program. We standardize them in. Then we use those videos as leverage to communicate perspective students. These are non for profit. Now, we are a four profit we work with non for profit schools. Are why was confused by because I know you said that I wanted to come back to that. Because he said he sold two of these other companies over similar, right, correct? Our last business was only in higher Ed at business cold gold quest geo AL to you ES day. And there we worked with thousands of colleges and universities around the country. And we sold that this has that. Our big win. If you will. And how much of yourself for we sold that for about fourteen million. Okay. Well, yeah. So you said you sold one for four two million. How long ago was a gnat only sold in two thousand eight. Okay. And there's one before that you also sold that was somewhere. Correct. The one before that was called link, and that was a national college magazine we had over three million readers. We sold that one two company called college television network just as many years ago in the early two thousands and college television network, it was basically music videos and a partnership with CNN news, actually news delivered to college students. We would put satellite dishes on college campuses and being videos in news to them, and that ultimately after they acquired us or whole company was acquired by Viacom and our program became MTV you on college campuses. Okay. And how much do you end up selling that one for well that was her first business we sold that for about two million? So you've had some exit in it seems like you've always kind of. Been in this education space, we have. Yeah. What's interesting is had goal quest. The decec- in higher. Ed actually didn't start out in higher. Ed started out in a different business than name goal. Quests? We chose that. Mandy, the original concept of the business was personal goal achievement. Believe it or not we ended up in the world of higher. I believe you. So now, I think we got overhead picture of kind of where you are today. Maybe we can dive in more to your company today to understand it. But now kind of understood what you sold as companies for do you want to take it back to when you first started off as an entrepreneur. I don't know if we should start off that first company, maybe we'll dive in more detail about what we can learn or what you can teach the people who are listening about your entrepreneurial journey. Absolutely. I'm excited to do that with anxious say is that I grew up with entrepreneurial dad. My father was a second generation business owner, Mike grandfather started a business it's called medal finishing basically they put protective coatings on metal parts mainly for military in aerospace. My dad ran at this for fifty years might grandfather ran it for twenty or thirty years before him. I always was exposed to this kind of entrepreneurial ethos and energy the ops in the downs. And it was really exciting for me as a kid when I went away to college. I went to Ithaca college in upstate New York. I always ran away with this mindset that eventually I'm going into the family business because I love I got it. I always admired him. So I didn't pay attention in school. I thought I already know what I'm doing. Whereas most of my friends didn't know what the heck they were going to do after college. But I knew I was going into the family business. College was more of a time for fun for me. But I did get to kind of experienced some of my entrepreneurial ethos. If you will the most exciting things, we did my roommates in Iran a casino in our college part, which was fun and scary at times that we did that with regal. No, of course. But it was super exciting. This was before cell phones, of course, before social media as well. So we had walkie talkies and one of my cousins was this huge bodybuilder. So he was the bouncer and he would radio up to us as people were coming up. It was so exciting. We had the best time we need thousands and thousands of dollars not a huge amount of money, but for a college student, it was a lot of money. And then ultimately, we shut the place down because we got wiped out by big winner. And I'll never forget his name is Dido federal cheese. And he liked us out in blackjack, and you know, we'd better shut this place down before the death of us after college. As predicted I worked for my dad right out of college. And he was really the world's biggest ball BUSTER. I mean, he was a bastard to work for. However, I did learn entrepreneurship, and I learn how to manage cash flow and had a run of this. And I worked there for a few years. And he as I said was a ball BUSTER. I was dacas. I don't know twenty something who figured I knew it all beside already run a casino invite apartment in college. And we butted heads too many times. And after he said fuck you you're fired. I sent fuck you. I quit depending on how you look at it. We parted ways, and we actually didn't speak for almost a year. It was a really difficult time for us, and for my mom and for our family, and I didn't know what the hell I was gonna do. Because as I told you I went into college thinking, I'm going into the family this. My life is set for me. I struggled for some time to try and find out what I was gonna do. And actually just got a job. I worked at a lighting manufacturer in a factory that was like middle-management like a supervisor. But I hate it just sort of a holding pattern for me until I can figure out what life was meant for me to do and for me to accomplish. And I can remember starting our first business linked magazine, I was working for this manufacturing company. And I. Had a magazine that I picked up in arms and noble, and it was like a home business magazine. And I read an article about a couple that started a subscription newsletter and had like twelve thousand subscribers and I thought what the hat. How are they getting twelve thousand subscribers on a newsletter around pets or whatever the hell it was remember right now? And I thought about what could I create where I could get thousands of subscribers, and I thought back on my college years, and the fun that I had at college, and I thought, wow, it would be amazing. If there was this magazine where college students could see what was happening at other schools around the country, not just socially speaking. But news was and I build a business plan. I built a prototype and link magazine was born. I fortunately had a college buddy who had an inheritance, and he put money into the business with that money came the experience of working with him. He was a serious. Stonier? We ran the this has out of his department on seventy ninth street, and I'm trying to build this business because again, I had this entrepeneurship spirit, and especially after parting with with my dad, I've probably had this kind of this energy and commitment to prove to him that I was capable of making it on my own in some ways being more successful than he was. I started building this magazine with my business partner. I would come into his apartment in the morning in he'd be sleeping and heat. Wake up and do Bong hits and Bong water was spilling on our media kids than I was trying to get out to advertisers. Eva snapping also known as wasted on the couch during the day as I was trying to make things happen. But ultimately, we built this magazine, and we had major advertisers yet AT and T leeann United Airlines yet g m major major advertisers for spending like thirty thousand dollars in issue that us, and we ran that business. Good that you understood his role though, right? Totally. You had the money and it's important in a partnership. Maybe you didn't talk about it. Right then. But you figured it out. Without that guy. You can't even start doing it. Right. Totally. But let me tell you something else. Even though his role was money. He was also extremely charismatic because he lives carefree, and frankly didn't have a care in the world. Everyone loves him. He was funny. He was exciting to be around. He was always optimistic. So that kind of energy also became infectious, not just for me. But when we would go out and visit potential advertisers. Despite my initial inclination, which is does know am taking you to that fucking meeting clients loved it. And because he was so exciting and funny and that really helped us as well. It wasn't just the money. It really had this great charisma that. Israel payroll and benefits are hard especially for small businesses. You don't have the time to be an expert and things like taxes and regulations in old school payroll providers just aren't built for the way you work today. Gusto is here to change all that. They're making payroll benefits and HR easy for small businesses. In fact, nine out of ten customers. Say gusto is easier us then other payroll solutions. Guests to also saves you time seventy two percent of customers spend less than five minutes to run payroll. Don't believe all the good things. You're hearing about gusto. We'll just Google them. People love gusto, and how often do you actually hear someone say they love their payroll provider. So to help support the show to gusto dot com forward slash millionaire. They're offering our listeners in exclusive limited time deal. You'll get three months free. Once you do your first payroll, and again, the link is gusto dot com forward slash millionaire. Those are things that maybe people don't think about either. The extra stuff that may be financially obviously helped them, but it's like if you have someone who is a boring business partner that you almost didn't really like in the beginning. But they had money it probably wouldn't have worked total. You kind of jumped to. Hey, you started. This magazine went over to his place in the morning. Can you talk to us a more detailed how long it took you to actually get this thing started, and then get advertisers. You're saying thirty thousand bucks a issue, but it's kind of just happened overnight. Now. Let's hear about it yet. It was deep. We struggled for a long time. I didn't know anything about publishing had never been a publisher before. But here I was the publisher of a magazine granted was magazine week created Battiston air, but we just started networking, we found people who knew people who knew people that were either in the publishing business and believe me as I'm sure, you know, Austin, so many people said don't do it magazines have a higher failure rate than restaurants. Never work. Everyone was fire hosing the idea and one of the benefits of being young and stupid is that you're just focused on your dream on your vision, despite everyone's urging to not do it you get it. And we wrote the Ueli really get it with the magazine is created a media kit. We created a mock issue of the magazine, and we went out to advertisers him. We got them excited about what it meant to market to college students, and that they were influencers and that they were purchasers. And that you may think that they can't afford a car now. But guess what they're going to afford a car in the next few years when they graduate and planting that seed now was a great way to build that brand affinity, and so we signed an account, and then we saw in other again, we saw another account. And then when we built our first issue a lot of the ads in the first issue were unpaid we put them in there. Trying create the image of magazine that was real sugar. We had a couple of paid advertisers in there. But we had a lot of advertisers in there that we just ran the reds for free. And that actually created as new advertisers. Saw that the impression that this was a thriving nagazine readership in the magazine. Readership got audited? It was super super exciting. We ran that business for like six years. We have thirty employees. We had offices in Manhattan. Then again, as I mentioned, we sold that business to college television network. So you did it from basically ninety three to ninety eight is what I'm seeing here. Iraqi. Or even fucking bored yet, awesome bordering five. But I'm really curious like how long did it take you to get this thing started? Because this is super interesting to me if anyone who was younger and has a similar thing. How did you get these advertisers? Did you start doing the magazine? I did you have to get writers. And I think that was smart what you also said with advertisers at I put in free wants to make it look like at least you are legit. Here's it then we had to produce issues because we did have some paid advertisers. Are thanking was will if we have to produce a real magazine because we paid advertisers. We might as well make that issue. Look is great as we could. So we went to the other advertisers that we were trying to get into the publication and offered them ads for free, and that created this image that this was a really exciting new magazine and from that point forward, other advertisers started signing on even advertisers that we gained weight you for free in that early issue. Or maybe we get it twice. They would start paying. Because even they felt the energy and excitement of the magazine or bidders different. That's what I'm curious as well. What made the eggs in different competitors. I didn't know that you said magazines have a higher failure rate restaurants have nuclear with that. I didn't know that either. So somebody told me to try and talk me out of it. Right. And they were probably right. But what made ours different? Well, you have to remember at the time that weren't national college magazines, there were time and Newsweek and life magazine, whatever the hell, it was that were newspapers certainly college newspapers. But there really wasn't anything to tie college students together recrossed the country where a teed gone the university of Alabama could see what was happening at university of Miami or UCLA or where a kid get like Neo. And if it college could read about exciting things that kids were doing it other schools, and that was the model again, the spark was me reading about this couple that started that subscription newsletter about pets. And that's what triggered this. That's what got me thinking there's gotta be a bigger audience out there or audience as big as at owners that wanna connect with each other that want to learn from each other. And my Fundus memory at that point was college. But I always I went to college. It was a small school. I always can remember thinking I wonder if I made the right choice. I wonder if I should've gone to university in Alabama who are I should have gone to university of Miami. Or whatever the hell was and I thought that the very least would love to know what it would be like there that was really the motivation for building this. And so we hired freelance writers to start writing articles for us. We would interview students they were primarily the editors of the school newspapers at schools because they wanna talk a lot. They wanna right. They wanna get their name in national publication. Amazingly. We had a million circulation in three million years the knives. Aim as thousands of campuses around the country that got us to the point where we were attractive to other businesses and college television network reached out to us. And said we've got the TD we're trying to build a media company. Here we want the magazine and our audience is college students and thin in college. Issue number. So they acquired us that was a super exciting time. We were able to take some money out. We certainly had a pay my partner back in his family. And then I worked there for a few years, and let me tell you. I don't know if you've got this experience as well. But when you're running your own business, and then ultimately, you're working for somebody else. It's a whole different worlds. And there are some people that are comfortable with that. There are some people who frankly prefer that. And I found out that I was not one of those people I need to call my own shots at needed to control. My own destiny was very difficult time for me working for them. And ultimately, I sort of navigated my way out of that this onto the next one. So how long did you work for them about two years? I had a non compete when you're selling this typically the owners had a non compete just as that was ending negotiated. My way out high Mets, Tracy might Tracy how my wife in current business partner. Actually, I met her while. Oh, running my magazine. She worked for our rep firm in Detroit in the midwest. She handled all the automotive business for us. I met her on sales holes, and after I left college television network she and I got together when we started our next business school. Would you join the college television network, did you get any equity or you just pay street salary from what you've been doing before when you sold your business to them. We got cash we got equity big salaries a holiday television network. I was probably making two hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year in salary. We had already gotten cash from the acquisition, and they had equity in the business. The phones like a very big win at your late twenties at this point yet this late twenties. It was you're right. It was a very big win. It was super exciting for us. But nothing I think could suppress the entrepreneur inside me, which again, I think trickled down from my dad, what was really fascinating. And you know as get to talking about my own kids. It's amazing when you see. A parrot go through the highs and lows of building running a business, and somehow as Kate you're equally intrigued by the lows as you are the highs, and that's kind of an amazing thing to think about and yet I still wanted to be an entrepreneur. And yet many of my kids I have four many of them still want to be entrepreneurs. But they're seeing it not just from my perspective. But for my wife's perspective is did you felt like you had made it as far as you said, you kind of driven to prove you're dead wrong or show them that hey, you can make your own company. Did you have that feeling once you sold by did? And branded I was in my late twenties. In a sense. I was still a kid. It certainly wasn't enough money for us to retire on or for meter retire on I was a single any lived in New York at an exactly I lifted New York, but I thought to myself this can't possibly be the end. This is just the beginning of my journey for better or worse. Fortunately, it ended up being for better. Although there were a lot of bad experiences along the way. Many which I'll share with you. But Tracy, and I when we started working together at the magazine, she was at the rep firm, she didn't really work for the magazine, but we spent a lot of time together. And I found her to be as entrepreneurial as I was her dad was entrepeneurship as well. We really clicked in more ways than one just romantically because we're married now. But also as business partners after I left college television network, she and I developed ideas for different businesses that we want to start and the next business was full of us, and that was super super exciting. That's the one that really put us on the map. Did you have the idea for go close like totally figured out before you left because I think that's something people can learn from did you just quit in? Let's brainstorm or you had something ready to go. And you're just ready to do it. Right after you got out of college hill, visit network. Let me just make a point here of clarifying. We didn't have V idea for goal question. We had an idea for goal quest in turn out to not be what goal crystals. Became Tracy, and I had this cockamamie idea of a website for personal goal achievement and the name goal quest. And the idea was that there would be all of these goal coaches all these virtual goal coaches with different personas. I can remember this because we created we had sergeant miles stone aka sergeant milestone who was like his drill sergeant that would like pound your goals into your head. If that's the kind of motivation that you need in order to be successful. We had mistress achieva who is like this dominator, motivates you if that was your method of motivation, we had either Rosen west the old Jewish ran mother who would motivate you tell you'll be successful. We had Christie Brinkley aka Christie Brinkley who was this like hot, supermodel that would motivate you to be successful. And we thought it was the most brilliant idea in the world we tried to get funding. This was a B to see this. We couldn't go out and sell the service the products that we had built to companies this was selling it to consumers, and ultimately the only way to build that business really was with a capital was bringing investment, and we tried for a year or more to bring in VC's to bring in industrial in the business. We could never get the business funded, and ultimately after I left college television network shirt, we had some money and Tracy Niagara living in the city together. Again, living in the city is expensive. And we were trying to build goal quests. We were basically living on our savings trying to get that business off the ground. And we spent as I said a year plus trying to get it funded. Couldn't get it funded at burnt through whatever savings we had. And I can remember we were sitting in this tiny Italian cafe on fifty fifth street Manhattan, and Tracy and are looking at each other like what the fuck away gonna do were virtually broke we live in New York City. It was bad. And Tracy said, let's go back to our roots. Let's go back to this concept of college marketing because link magazine was so successful. And we knew that space intimately menu college market. And so we did we basically pivoted if you will the idea of goal quest into a completely different this. So that nothing to do with goal achievements. We built a business around helping colleges recruit enroll and retain students and goal quest was born in the world of higher read it all came back to connections. I can remember one of the gas writers we had in link magazine was a guy by the name of John Gardner, and he was the ru on student success and wellness. It's amazing, frankly, how twenty years later it's all coming back to student success wellness, but he wrote articles for us in link magazine that he was the national guru, and he would write about what it takes to success. Awful in college, Tracy suggested as sitting in that little cafe down to our last probably hundred bucks in the dying or whatever it was. We talked to John chief easy any ideas on how this concept of goal achievement can be used in higher. Ed help students these successful and after explaining the idea to him goal quest. Which of course, he had no interesting. He taught us about what's called enrollment e and we had no idea. What enrollment Ilga alternately that was really that. The crux of what goal quest was it business services that need provided. So enrollment yield in case, you don't know is the percentage of accepted students that ultimately enroll at the school a school might have a thousand accepted students, but if only two hundred of them enroll as their freshman class, they yield twenty percents we knew nothing about the role of enrollment ills we didn't know who we were supposed to market the program to gold quest in its new iterations. Ration- and John Gardner said. Yep. You wanna go to the enrollment? So we started cold calling DV's of enrollment. We started re positioning what gold quest was. It's tool that is gonna help drive in roll -ment. If you're ill is only twenty percent, we're gonna get into twenty three percent or twenty four percents by engaging admitted students and getting them excited to go to your school. And you have to remember this was maybe fifteen or so years ago and the world of enrollment yield was very very unscientific. It was not digital getting back to the discussion you and I had earlier coal centers. It was students in pole centers calling admitted students and saying, hey, Austin, what do you think you've been accepted to UCF for you planning on going? And at the time, you could get people on the phones at now, you can't that model was antiquated. And we brought that whole model of enrollment ILD into the digital world. And then we found that enrollment yield is only one piece of the enrollment. Process I their search with her buying names of respective students to generating worse, then there's the inquiry to application conversion stage, whether trying to get inquiries to actually apply and then after students are accepted than there's this world of enrollment yield. And then after enrollment yield when students enroll at a school. There is the world of retention after you get students keeping them. So instead of selling that product to VP enrollments, we started selling that product DP of student affairs. We would sell accounts over and over and over yet. I remember our first client was Dickinson college in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and they spend fifteen thousand dollars with us. And then maybe two months later, we signed Ken state university for a hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year, and we were like holy shit. A really is something here, and we just started signing account after account after account and I'm simplify. Buying is. There was a lot involved in selling those accounts. The subtleties behind the scenes are just frankly, they're fascinating for me to think back on some of the shit that we did. It's like, wow, I can't even believe we did some of these things I'll share some of them with you since as I told you we were virtually broke because we add it pivot goal quest into a new this and sure we were starting to sign accounts. But we also were we had a higher programmers. We add higher developers. We had a higher content developers. Because the is this goal quests in higher. Ed, we had a developer original funds it for colleges and universities. We had higher designers. And so we were burning through much of the cash that we were bringing in from sunny on its we were still struggling, and we had no money by policy there because I know you're trying to get their conversion higher right to have more people come in. But what exactly was was just like a website or something to help them yet? Think of. Them as like goal quest was these white labelled micro sites. Sure UCF all use them again as an example has a website. But this became a micro site where our team was custom rating contents of the school to get perspective students excited about them. We were creating a community. It was a social community. We call the UPS which still exists today in our new programs, you here's was a closed social community where students can meet their prospective future classmates. And what we found was that those connections were actually driving for schools because perspective students wanted to feel like they knew other kids that were going there that became infectious in it all sorted Dr excitement in induce Yasim about the school help drive enrollment. And what's interesting to me is that you went back to you're trying to do the B two C thing. And I know I cut you off in your story, we can get back on in a minute. But it's like how much harder must. Have been trying to go beat ac- versus before you're on speed to when you're doing working with these colleges. Right. When you're in the magazines on there. And then you went back to that sort of model to actually find out where the money is versus like having to gain. I don't know tens of thousands of consumers on your regional idea for opus. Exactly. It was the hidden me of we went from one business idea. That was as you said beat ac- back to this concept of beat avai- what we were instead of trying to sell to individuals personal goal achievement. We were selling to colleges and universities products. That would help drive their role in retention their goal treatment. If you will. So exactly. Yeah. Well, set man. Hey, think that some of the crazy things that we did we would travel the country mostly by car, hundreds of thousands of miles. We had computer servers in our kitchen in our apartment under the kitchen table until we moved them to Colo facilities since we had so little money. We couldn't really fly. And I remember I. Told you we signed Kent state university. We were based in New Jersey and New York time anywhere that was in. Let's call it a twelve hour driving radius of New York New jersey, we wouldn't fly because it was too expensive. Here's how crazy we were. We would go to sleep at sixty m and we would set alarms for midnight. And we would wake up in the drive through the night arrive at a school at eight AM in a meeting in Ohio or wherever it was. We did this over and over and over again, and we would pull into a McDonalds parking lot wash up put our suits on walk into that meeting like we own them. And that was I think an example of the things that we would do that really helps build our business. I mean said another way we basically faked it into we made it, and when we walk into those meetings. They thought we were a real business. We had business suits on. And we spoke eloquently we had an incredible presentation 'em. We would go from meeting to meeting to meeting we go from Ken. State to accurate and then Dayton or wherever it was. And the amazing thing was we spent so much time in the car that the corps became our thinking. We were in office we were out in the field. And so as we drove for meeting needing to meeting, we would find tune our presentation, we'd sit in the car with our laptop. And we'd say did you see the way they raise their eyebrows? When they saw that slog where did you see the way they shrug their shoulders when they saw that slot, and we would get feedback from perspective schools for clients along the way about how to make our presentation veteran at own, and that's what we did meeting after meeting after meeting, we'd probably visited thousands of schools around the country again, mostly by car, and at least in the early years, you said you did multiple things whether giving these students together to meet each other and all this other stuff. But in the very beginning was the only thing you were making these websites to put more engagement because you said you had like servers at home and stuff like that. I didn't even know you at needle. The drive. These websites was for security reasons or something low. We were building micro sites for colleges universities. But why did you need your own servers? You kind of just go online like again today. Now back in the day. There was no cloud. Everything was hosted on our servers and remember colleges for hiring us to communicate with perspective. Students in many cases, they in hundreds of thousands of them we had schools that would upload a half million perspective students were purchased names at our job was to try and get a pulse. From those perspective students or suspects convert them into increase, and they get those inquiries to apply and get those accepted students to yield clients would pay us in different phases or stages of the enrollment cycle. I think the smartest thing we did. Is we recognize that colleges? Have this enrollment cycle. And that there are different phase is in the cycle, and that they don't necessarily need help in all of those stages. So a college might say we. Nothing queries. And we get enough applications. Our enrollment yield is too low. We need to increase that. Instead of forcing them to buy the whole shooting. They could only if they choose to buy you'll program and these programs were thirty to forty thousand dollars a year a piece can state four of our programs, and it was like a hundred fifteen one hundred twenty thousand dollar account for us. How do you know what the prices simply put we guest as we were feeling out the market. We tried to get a sense of what the market would bear. We did some sort of reverse analytics what a product like this would be worth. For example. We looked at a college. And we said, okay, if third annual tuition is twenty five thousand dollars a year remember this ten or fifteen years ago, and we can get them. Ten more students that's gonna generate X amount in revenue. What would it be worth for them to get ten more students while ten percent of that costs twenty five thirty thousand dollars? We've been priced the programs. Based on kind of reverse engineering the mass based on the impact in enrollment. We build our programs to generate super smart 'cause I don't think a lot of people would necessarily things like that. But you have to go. And frankly, we do the same thing in our current business. That's how we figured out how to price programs but then at goal quiz. We did something even more amazing again all of the ideas in goal quest came from feedback from clients in schools that were meeting with clients and school said what you're doing for perspective students. Could you do it for parents because they are real influencers? And so our parent programs were bored. Because of course, we said sure we could do that instead of writing content for perspective students to get them excited about a school. We would write content for parents of perspective students and the key. There was as I said equipping parents to have smart conversations with kits and oftentimes parents, especially parents of first generation college students, they don't know. What to say, they don't know how to guide their sundered were to the right college. We were building these programs in no other schools other than our clients were doing this. So it had a tremendous impact on driving enrolment for the school because the parents would get excited. The parents would feel like you're not just trying to sell me. But you're providing these service, and it drove affinity for their school about the pricing kind of goes. But you back ended it so is educated guess, but you have any competition at a time. Did you? I don't think we really did you tell you the shirts, pricing wise. Sometimes that's how you figure it out. But if you don't have any the smart way of you looking at it is just back ending like how much do you think would be worth to them? Some people might not even do that. Simple math that you're talking about and say five thousand bucks per year. You knew how much it cost to have these developers and everything for you. So I mean, what was your profit margin like on these huge we made so much money on those programs. It's a different world today because we're back in that this. It's a completely. Different world, partly because there's so many things that respect. You're right back in the day. It was hardly anyone doing what we were doing. And listen, man. It was not all fun. Sure. We had a ton of fun on the road. We live on the road visiting schools. We work out. We always made sure we were physically fit. We would work out in college centers after the meeting. We would esta the enrollment. He could give us a pass to go into the college center, we would work out there. But we also had many years many fights many struggles. But we never quit. We always felt that our fastest route to success was to keep pushing forward not turning around and getting jobs. I can remember we had a borrow six hundred dollars. We were stuck in Michigan visiting colleges because we had driven there from New York. And I could remember Tracy's dad who lived in Michigan. We had a borrow money from him we needed gas money. And he was like what are you doing? This is the end and she said to him dad, we are closer to making it turning back and getting jobs, and he lent. Us that money, and we paid him back, and we signed in count on our way home another maybe fifty or sixty thousand dollar account. I can remember being poor. Even as the business was growing. Remember, everything that we were spending money on was to keep the business moving forward. It was hiring people was buying and back in the day. It was no clout you had a by twenty thousand dollar Dell. Servers in order to do this sort of be economics of this is like this have completely changed, but Tracy, and I had a court mmg in our refrigerator. I can remember Tracy wanting to go out for pizza and a movie at me telling her we can't do both. We can only do one. I can remember technical problems. I can remember servers going down. I could remember editorial errors human errors that almost classes Orbis in one case our program sent acceptance letters to thousands of students for one of our clients, and they were not accepted students. I thought holy shit were fucking debt. We are. Dead the businesses done. And somehow we got through it to get through that. Because I would think so too. Fuck FIT fight. Oh, man. I honestly don't remember how we got through that one. Especially the kid. He's so excited that's dream school. And then you're like, oops. Money, and you occasionally occasionally when you're reading news, you'll hear about these horror stories, right? That do that sort of thing we run of the first to do it. But we never did it sense. Which is great. We've had millions millions of students in our program. According to learn from your mistakes, I think we can all learn something from that. Can I go back to this carton eggs? And when you barely had any money was still the early years ago cost who is in maybe the first or second year of the business where surely reciting accounts, but we also had a higher, again, programmers and content developers and designers, and by and Tracy, and I put ourselves last in every case we had a pay people. We had a pay the Colocation facility to keep our servers up unsure they had been shut down on occasion. And we would tell our clients we shut down for maintenance. I mean, it was forced maintenance. Exactly. But all of these situations, we somehow found a way to navigate ourselves and came out on the other side. It seems to me the first year of go. Plus might have been the hardest thing because you're trying to do the business to consumer. That's not working any finally pivot. And then you're like, you're seeing the potential of all this you're saying you're making good profit margin. But sounds like the problem is the actually said this one of our we have a questionnaire for everyone to fill out. The problem is like the cash flow because you have to go by these twenty thousand dollars or hire someone. So even though you might be making a good profit sounds like on a first couple deals, you're still having to keep invest for the future. Is that what's happening? It is that there's another issue related to cash flow or business was in the education space, and unfortunately in the education space there on July when fiscal's they don't typically pay until the summer when they get their new fiscal dollars, in may cases, if we were signing accounts, we'd have to basically bankroll we would say, yes, sure, you can pay us in July. But we would have to incur the costs of building those vets so come July. We would have millions and millions of dollars receivable reflecting but up to that point. We were struggling we were starving. We were trying to figure out how we were going to make payroll year after year after year on you know, what the problem got worse as the company grew because as we got bigger as the signs bore accounts as or revenue Rupe? We live be bankrolling these higher education clients until the summer. Sure, we had a windfall of cash in the summer. And that's when everyone was happy. But in the rest of the year, we basically hibernated we we lived on a very very tight budget. So Eun if you signed someone like August, would you have to wait a whole like eleven months to get paid not usually in August, I would say that come December through the summer. So it's six or seven months as we were signing accounts during those periods in most cases clients could not pay us until the summer. We had. To say it's fine because we needed to sign that this. And we knew that those receivables were going to be good. And it was like four savings for us. We knew we would ultimately see that money. So we hunkered down, and we hibernated and we starved through the winter. And then come the summer we had a win Volta cash. And then we go through it again, the next year, I could see from your perspective to this from the college education system. So that money is locked up if you have a contract, and you're good to go versus if you were doing these for random clients. I don't think people would do that. Because you're like what happens if they're gonna go out of business or something like that versus having a government guarantee that you're gonna get exactly that's exactly right? There was virtually no bad debt. These were all public or private institutions that had a ton of money. It was just to your point. It was in issue when we were signing them. And when they were able to pay us that cash flow management, and I'll tell you a lot of it goes back to when I learned from my debt learning how to husband dollars. Learning how to find a way to make payroll. So you're not spooking, your employees. And if it meant you're not taking payroll yourself as founders in that's Richard doing in. Frankly, we did that a ton. And I can remember thinking to myself Tracy was thinking we can't go on this way. We've got shut the business there. We can't live without getting paid. And then we'd signed another two hundred thousand dollar account and another hundred thousand dollar account, and that it would just keep going and we keep seeing these signs. We look down the road in all we see or green lights. It was just an issue of getting they're having enough gas in the engine to get there and to get to go through all those green lights, and we did. But there were a lot of pep talks. Tracy who didn't he wasn't the founder of Lincoln Agassi? And she worked for rep firm as I mentioned goal question was ver I entre preneurs endeavor. I had already been through it by went through the highs and the lows but for her. She would be crying hysterically looking for a glimmer of hope to hang on and to persevere and we did. And we we will require we sole goal quests with over a thousand clients to a private equity firm. And then the next chapter was written. We worked for that acquirer for almost two years ready for a new sponsor for podcasts will don't worry because MAC Weldon is here to the rescue see modem, please and smart design premium fabrics and simple shopping. In fact, it's so simple, a podcast listener can do it. See Mekonnen will be the most comfortable underwear socks shirts. Undershirts. Hoodies were sweatpants that you'll ever wear. They even have a line of silver underwear and church that naturally eliminate odor. They want you to be comfortable. 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And I'm not as smart as I thought it was businesswise lump it, we're lay even though we weren't taking salaries even though we were starving even that we didn't have food know oftentimes gas money, we knew we were building something of we knew that eventually this company is going to be acquired. We knew because of the revenue that we were bringing in even though there were cashflow challenges revenues resonant to bigger company to a private equity firm. They don't care so much when McLean saying they just wanna see the revenue, and we knew that this company ultimately was gonna be value. To someone or even if it was never required that the revenue in the cash flow would normalize to a point where we learn in east Ashley troughs year after year after year, even though we burn through all of our savings. And even though we had no money to live up. We banked on the facts that there was going to be an exit. So when you do two hundred your father in law feel my dad has always been proud of us. My dad has always wanted me. And in this case, Tracy to be successful. And he was and he still is he super super proud of us. And he's always been there for us. Like, I told you that year or so that we didn't talk was super super tough year for us. So we sold goal quest. We sold it for about fourteen million dollars Roca get how about you're saying, the father malted was he ever worried about your kids. He was the one who had balloon you like six hundred bucks one time as well. It was more of a worrier. And then my dad was. Yeah. Because you're dead. Understood. How this thing goes maybe because it was his daughter. That's what I thought. It would be funny. Actually hear what he thought once. Oh, man. We would get talking to from. We would probably drive to Michigan ten tons here. Because we had a lot of clients in Michigan, Ohio. And it was also a way for Tracy to see her dad because he lived in Michigan. And he would give us a talking to over and over and over again, what are you guys doing? If you have to borrow gas money for me, obviously, this is not working. I mean, he meant while. He really did. He just didn't wanna see a struggle the way we were struggle. We were like fuck it or in Sochi. Kanter NBA, any at a free place to stay. If you went to his place if that that we stayed at her grandmother's apartment, we stated our cousins were plenty family members in Michigan. So you sold and he started working for this company. How old were you? When you started working for the new company shit. I'm looking probably about forty forty two. We sold gold question. Two thousand eight I don't know twenty. Yeah. Yeah. Whatever. Mazing we worked for them. But this was a different situation. Strays after who are in blood, sweat and tears into building goal quest for seven or eight years. We sold that business a lot of money in our pockets. Now, it was equally painful working for other people even with money tonight. We just couldn't like at that point. She had become an entrepreneur. She didn't know anything different goal question was her baby. It was the only she knew had thank was to think like an entrepreneur. And we couldn't work for a big company that was owned by banks and watch all the shit that they get to not build businesses. The way that we felt that they should be built would do that. You have done does curious 'cause this is probably the hardest part of it sound like seeing why you're doing it as way, but you don't have the getting you a couple of easy examples, they felt it was unreasonable for us to drive outside of a floor hour radius. So anything outside of before our radius. We had a flaw that drastically increased our expenses. They. Also felt that it wasn't appropriate for Tracy United zero a room. Hey, we were romantically involved. At that point. We were married or maybe we were married yet. I can't remember. And they felt that we needed to be in separate rooms when we travel with other people if we had a guy in the car with a travel with us that guy was Chevra room with me and trace you get another wrote, but they were not about sharing rooms they had more expensive office space where on like did we really need this? We were in this loft on thirty eighth street or thirty ninth street. And then ultimately, we moved down to SoHo which was exciting for us. We got a great deal on a space, and then they moved into this super expensive space like quadrupled our rent. They felt like hiring all of these kind of industry. Bigwigs would drive the business forward in. It was the right way to go. But it openly didn't work out. They actually that Bank that private equity firm acquired floor education companies at the same time, and they wrap us all up into one and. Ultimately, all of the four CEO's left, the company a refiners. I was fired also tells about the firing I just, but it hits I kept fighting with them that that's not the way to do it that you going about it wrong that we tried that model at it didn't work, and they just didn't listen to us. And even though they had paid us for goal quest. And we were millionaires. I couldn't let go I couldn't watch them destroy what we had built. And yet, ultimately that's what they did. And they did that with the other companies as well. And it was a sad. Sad thing to go through especially when you have to think back about all the time, you were driving everywhere going to Donald's changing not even about the money. Like, you said think about all the time that you put into build it to that in just keep running up the expenses. And that would get to me too. Exactly. But in terms of becoming a millionaire after we sold goal quests. We lived our life because we had spent eight years working our asses off shriveling driving hundreds of thousands of mine. We bought a big house on a form. We put on a multi million dollar addition. We've put it a pool we built a bar a writing rain early horses like an eleven thousand square foot house, we spent two hundred fifty thousand dollars on horses. We bought another form in Palm Beach, Florida. We lived in Florida every year for three months we bought Maserati, we at range Rovers on element. It was out of control because I guess we felt like we had starved for so long that we were entitled to live life after having put in everything that we did we had Rolex watches in jewelry, and we would travel to the south of France and our kids were in private schools, and we were charitable also we help friends, we help family made many donations. But you know, what man much of what I just mentioned we burn through to start are less viscous and our current business. Evolution lamps. It. Didn't just go to. Laps. We still even though I thought we'd be so much smarter. This time around we went through to other business ideas and burn through millions of dollars trying to get these business off the ground and they both failed and till we got to Evelyn laps which is a winner. That's the one that were will plan selling that one in three to five years, and we learned a shitload of stuff throughout these experiences. I've got a whole list of these things. And frankly, I'm writing a book at all this stuff, which I'm really excited about the out soon. I mean, I don't know if it's a good time to plug in our now hold on. Let me just share some of these things with your. I think it's super interesting. So the first thing we learned is perseverance. It's like the secret ingredient, we've pushed when most others would have quit. And that really made the difference in everything we did. We also did things that others would need in consider doing like driving through the night. Notifications working twenty four seven Tracy like she closed business deals from the hospital bed after delivering our firm. Sheils as she would go to investor meeting four days after she had a C section perseverance. The first thing the second thing we did. And that we learned was that volume is key. We did more meetings made more calls than normal, quote, unquote, normal, and that also converted to more business. For us grew our business, faster bigger. We learned about the pros and cons of hiring friends mostly cons. We made that mistake many times over we were torn between hiring people that we could trust versus those with experience, and I'll just from our experience never higher friends. Even if you love them to death, even if they need a job, let me tell you. It is a lot easier firi- strangers than firing friends who are unfortunately now are extras because of that experience 'cause nigger going on kind of Elissa with appreciate your might be one of those prepared people that I've had on which I definitely appreciate your right down. All these topics you want hit on, but you might give. One of these experiences firing the friend 'cause I think it's important that people remember like how much this must have hurt you. So when they think about hiring, a friend, they'll come back to this story. Remember it? It did goal quests. We hired a friend who ultimately ended up suing us Lieber wrapped up in a lawsuit for years while we were trying to build our business that motherfucker that motherfucker ultimately got a check for millions of dollars after we ended up selling the business, and we made amends, you know, he's not someone who's in our life right now. But he did you ever hear of slice him seminar? The go-to to reflect on your life while he apparently gone through that and so called me in Tracy to make amends, and you know, we don't hold grudges, but he put us through fucking hell, and frankly, even in our current business. We hired a great friend, and we have firemen, and we lost that friendship him his wife. They keys this guy is like his the godfather two of my children, and we destroyed that relationship because we had a fire. Even with the lawsuit. You're saying before even if it's again, not about the money, but it's the draining of the energy. Oh, imagine while you're trying to build a thing. Like having think about that. You're so right. And it was awful and how he kept going while that dark cloud was over our lives for years is a sheer verbal, and he's lucky that we kept going because he elderly became a millionaire from that another point putting the company employees. I as I told you before everyone pay before we get we skip payroll over and over again, just weaken pay everyone else that we had money to travel usually gas money for driving. I talked to you about the importance of pivoting. Remember with goal quests and each of our businesses we pivoted multiple taunts. We learned not to be afraid or even a shame of veering from original ideas, but to embrace what we call the racetrack. When we view the business as a racetrack with lots of curves and S's we learn to enjoy the ride and. Lean in, which of course, is now a popular phrase. We also learned that the fastest and easiest way to bring money into a business is by generating revenue it's not by capital raising at because generating revenue also has other critical benefits like product market validation. Everyone thinks need new investors to start rutta business. We think that's bowl shit. We think that revenue is the fastest way to bring money into your business because revenue solves problems and ultimately got our company sold. I told you faking it till you make it I mentioned us driving through the night to get to morning meetings. There was this sense that we were completely buttoned up business. When in fact, we weren't our servers were in our kitchen under a table. And we had just changed a half an hour earlier at the McDonalds of the street from your school go I was going to come back to what you're talking about revenue, maybe raising money. Well, I guess maybe the first one you had a little bit of money from the guy that you worked with but the other two sound like you really had any money this affiliate at least tons of money. To go ahead and start the businesses. So you prove that right there. Let's say at least in the last year businesses to win out that revenue without us generating revenue. None of this would be here you did that and you pivoted with goal quiz because there was no revenue or else you cut doing it. So if forced you to find something that would find revenue. Yes, -portant point exactly n speaking revenue said, different ways sales escape and passion is infectious. In even though we gave the steam presentation thousands of times, we get it each time. Like, it was the first, and we also had this benefit of having to sales angles myself, and Tracy I was the quote unquote showman. She was the sensible negotiator, whoever that at one in the gravitate towards we didn't care. Some of them said I never want that guy coming to our school. Again, another said, he's the God we wanna work with reading care, whoever they wanna work with. We also put ourselves out there as founders we sold most of the business. I think it always meant a lot that perspective clients got to need. With us and not just a sales person. We ran a lean staff, even though in gold quest we probably had sixty employees at some point payroll sucks, especially when cash lower site, we try to run as lean as possible of which forever Lucien laps because you said you ran through all this money, your company that you're working on now today, did you have a least some money saved up before you actually started ablation. Let's seem like you're kind of fallen in the same trip that you might have before where you ran out of money before starting volition labs, we get because after I got fired from glow quests we experimented with other businesses. That didn't work we spent a lot of money not only on trying to make those businesses work. But on linen. Remember at this point. We're living in an eleven thousand square foot house we had kids in private school. We had horses. We had nineteen worse as we had a daycare of feed our horses. Eat a lot. And so we had Spencer's that were now part of our life that we couldn't easily get out of we were burning through cash. You can sell your kids. We try. But you know, what we're know failures no regrets. We had winds. We had losses and we experienced every single one. There were poor decisions. We made like hiring friends and great decisions like deciding to make that ten hour drive for that one meeting which ended up being a two hundred thousand dollar account for us, but for us. There was no magic bullet every success came from blood, sweat, and tears. It really did. And today. Evolution labs is a thriving and growing triple digit percentages each year, we have hundreds of clients already. And yet we need some of the same states like Iran friends. But the only thing I can tell you about that is that that's unique issue. I ring friends because it's got this strong emotional that's hard to veer away from do the right thing, which is not higher. France. We have investors company Tracy, and again, we'd poured everything we have into our business. But our reward is gonna be the sale of the business. We get cold by VC's in private equity firms, but we're not ready to take institutional investment. And we're certainly not rated solar business yet. And we still work twenty four seven, but we don't know any other way. But today with a laptop a phone web. We could be anywhere could be watching my kids tennis lesson or Ganz lesson wall on my laptop or on a call. And it really doesn't matter. How much you work if you're enjoying it? It's coming through. It seems like you're enjoying it again versus maybe when you're working for those other companies. Did you feel your energy with probably lower even though I guess you had made those companies I don't know if you had the same work ethic or excitement that maybe you had when for instance, you're starting Aleutian labs over so let me just the end of your from Florida. She might not appreciate the visual about to give you, but when Lee sold all quests, we were in this kick ass loft in SoHo and it was the greatest place in the world who work when they acquired us. They moved us to Hoboken news. It was the death of us, Tracy. And I it was the. Abolish staff and the worst part was that this office, and look it was a spectacular office as I told you rent was linked quadruples, but the office it had huge windows reluctant Manhattan enshrined seat. I would just stare out the window. And we'd be like why why did we do this? Why did we sell? Why do we fucking Hoboken could you jersey? So our goal forever. Lucien lamps was one hundred million in revenue we hope to sell this for five hundred million or more. And personally, I meditate every morning because for me it sets the stage in the pace for the day. I do hot yoga three to four times. A we played golf. I play tennis. I've got motivational quotes on my bathroom mirror in my office. One of them looking up right now on my wall. One of my favorite quotes. Is it always seems impossible until it's done. Also just mentioned that the horses even though they're expensive the horse world has really been instrumental for us like we met some amazing people. Our investors we met through the worst. It's helped us be successful along the way because it's an expensive sport. Which means there are many successful people floating around worships, we met a lot of people that need connections for us both in terms of driving revenue and in terms of driving financing for our business. Good business expense too, but horse once we're able while I don't know if it's ever good business expense. I would recommend you just go. Hang around bore shows that you don't actually buy worse. Right. Okay. This act like you're gonna buy when you're just looking around. Exact I like what you said about having the close on the mirrors or whatever. I mean, have you always done that do people look at you weird. If you had that in your office and stuff because I do similar things where to cut pictures of people that are successful stuff. And I have right here. When I'm looking at if I at least see those people that I might if they got to where they are. Then I'm gonna at least give there is something you always done. It is people always thought it was Lear stupid or silly fucking right. Where you versus. They are. It's my memory. And if I wanna put up inspirational quotes are gonna motivate N reminder that perseverance is what it takes an act win others quitting on still going. Then that's what I wanna do in my life. If they have other things that motivate them, let them, but I think as import could even that little thing that you're saying the power behind that something that's free. Anyone can do right now. He's listening -actly something very, very simple. I've realized I'm like I need to have that especially where we are today. I mean, I just feel everything's on the computer you get so distracted easily. If I just have something that's always there. And that I'm able to see whether it's cut out quotes or pictures of people or whatever I think that's important that any listener can do for free and then also good as some horse racing. It's not racing. It's jumping horsejumping clarified. I guess if future is you plan on selling solution labs for a hundred million. Plus we plan on selling evolution ledge for five hundred. Plus, we're gonna get to a hundred million in revenue, and this is a spectacular business. It's not only a spectacular. Business from a revenue standpoint. But I'll tell you something then it's amazing when you do something, and you feel like you're making a difference. Like, I really feel like we're helping kids navigate the challenges of being a kid these days like bullying, cyberbullying digital citizenship. I mean think about the stresses and pressures that kid you're going through today, which are frankly, many will say are more severe and more significant to them than the pressures that their parents are going through. I feel like we're making a difference in. It's super exciting for me, and for Tracy were all soap passionate about what we're doing this because I was gonna ask what still drives you on sounds like you've found it, especially what you're saying is at least the bowling before. Maybe when you're younger if you went to school, you could go home and then not deal with it anymore. But with social media excetera L around much harder to escape. Yeah. Totally. So I mentioned I'm working on a book. I'm actually working writing to right at one science fiction novel the other. Of book about our journey of building selling this census on pulling it build sell Bill the life of the serial entrepreneur and those hopefully will both be at two thousand nineteen I love mentoring in coaching young entrepreneurs. In fact, my son mcallen, he asked. He's named after the scotch. In fact, it was the scotch his mother, and I were drinking the night he was conceived. He's quite the entrepreneur already. So that's really exciting. And I think probably the biggest key to our success is that Tracy and I were in our an amazing team. Like, some how we learned to work with each other to be married, and we have an amazing marriage. She's my soul mate. She's my business partner. She's the mother of my four children. And yet it took a lot of offs to regulate are. Okay. Mostly mine mood swings. But those meds played an instrumental role in our success will how about you're saying that but with or anything else that you do when he came home with you. Turn off working or sounds like you were just always I don't know if you are always necessarily talking about worker thinking worker, do you have any suggestions on anyone else? Who's trying to work with loved one or a partner? It's tough. It really is. Maybe were present. We do a lot with our kids. I was just told by someone that I'm a great dad. I feel like I am. But this business is this is life. And I think for any entrepreneur the business is your life. It's not a job. It is not only your livelihood. But it is your retirement, it is, you know, alternately if you end up reading build sell Bill, it is this idea that you're building something of value that not only clients by value in but that a potential acquirer will find value, and we burn through our savings. We burn through our retirement to build our businesses. And that's the way we operate. An it's not for everyone. And it's particularly risky. You know when both houses are tied to the saints. That's a tough one, man. It really is only present you coming on insuring her story, especially. We're having all the points at the end. I think after listening helps rap everyone's head around. What we've learned today? I mean is there anything else last words of wisdom that you wanna leave us with alma tell you that the most impactful books that I've ever read I think I filled this out a my cut a little pre questionnaire that you sent me. But if you've never read Harry Miller, the rosy crucifixion trilogy. It is fucking amazing cotton nothing to do with business. But it's like I described it as like literary poured than words and the way that he wrote an he's folk in his books is so eloquent it made me appreciate why. Which and how you can convey with conviction your excitement in your enthusiasm about anything. So that book like really feel like it changed my life. I don't know, man. I would say the final advice to get for anyone on my vice is she just push, this perseverance this. This idea of pushing through whatever those obstacles were barriers or when all those other motherfuckers are just quit, and they're gonna give and we'll put in visit show notes Erling to these books that you're talking about. And you have to believe all my profanity, right? We'll keep that there for you. Another great book is principles by Ray Dalia. I thought that was awesome. And right now, I'm reading a book called traction by Gino Wittman. We've definitely had a one of our guests come on. I think he actually worked with him personally knows, gene. Or right Gene-o. That's so cool. We appreciate you coming on. And you said you mentor, or I mean is there a good way for anyone to get in touch with you. If they want to say, thank you for doing the interview or maybe wanna learn more about you. Yeah. I use late. Dana lot anyone that wants to reach out to me get in touch late Dan untwisting at craft heater KRA AFC PG. Our contact information in the hull of the as you can tell us and people look. Lincoln. You have the same kind of user name on Peter on the Lincoln as well. Again. We appreciate you coming on. And thanks again for sharing your story. Peter, my pleasure that was really fun. Thanks for the opportunity. Thank you for listening to this episode. It's been made available for free by our podcast sponsors and or patriot members. So thank you, both especially our newest and oldest patriot members for paying for this episode, you guys and gals. We wouldn't be here. So if you made it this foreign to that would you be willing to pay for someone else to listen for free after all this episode one? It'd be available without our current members. Helping us cover some of the costs for you to listen for free. If you are willing to help support us and get some awesome. Patriot's perks along the way, then go to Austin's big p dot com to become a patron member today. That's Austin's big p dot com. Oh, and by the way, Austin's big p stands for Austin's big podcast. So again, if you're willing to pay it forward and allow someone else listen to this episode for free. Like, you just did then go to Austin's big p dot com.

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119: Fixing the Parking Industry through Technology - Juan Rodriguez of FlashParking

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

1:13:06 hr | 2 years ago

119: Fixing the Parking Industry through Technology - Juan Rodriguez of FlashParking

"I wonder what you're missing out on by not being patriotic member. Here's a few clips from my conversations with our patriot members. I love you even more now that we've got a chance to chat 'cause you are who I thought you were you so much is really nice of you to take the time or pressure. You're listening donating like, you said that really does mean a lot to me and sorry, if I give you too much homework. But I really think if anything at least last ten years of stuff that I spent like probably the best stuff that I have right there for you. So now, that's awesome. I'm excited automatically raise your price. Probably three x of what you could charge locally. So how each oxidizing both? Honestly, Facebook groups just start with that show. You I lo- all this points. And the tool that he suggested that's what I'm saying. I don't necessarily know all the answers. But I think I can point you in all the right directions. Or at least we can kind of brainstorm. You know? Yeah. Sure. This is really useful. Because it's new for me. But you know, that you save this. I was like, oh, you know, now, I should be focusing on this as well. So. This is great. Thank you. So should what is your endgame Austin? Where do you want to be with this? Once you've got three hundred episodes. What happens? My in game does help you grow your current or future business via these interviews in order to bring you these interviews we need your financial support. So if you enjoy the show, would you take a minute to support us by going to millionaire? Dash interviews dot com forward slash patriotic. What's in it for you by donating well after signing up on patriot. You'll instantly receive an Email to schedule call with a really cool guy that I help you with your business. Plus, you'll feel really good about yourself knowing that because you donated you kept the host of this cool podcast off the streets in off drugs. What you just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things. I've ever heard at no point in your rambling incoherent response where you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you know, points and may God have mercy on your soul. A couple of mornings when I saw the sun come up five fifty AM or six AM, whatever it was and a couple of days. I just had tears coming out of my eyes. I'm like, what am I doing? Why he stuff out working yet on my losing my mind, maybe I should go back to my job, etc. Etc. There's a lot of times where you're going to want to give up. So you gotta find things that are at least you're good at. So it's not that difficult whenever you want to give up, and we kept you going when you're at those points because I think all of us riches, breaking points and starting a business. I just refused to fail. Really? We'll six figure salaries and all of a sudden now were eating Rahman and bread and whatnot. I in parking garages. Everything went smoothly or anything. Go wrong. Your funny guy. So the first garage was. Do you know the first ten garages, I will support guy. We didn't even have a support person to support the product. I couldn't even hire somebody and train them or something because I didn't even know what to tell them to do because I didn't know what challenger. We're gonna pay. My name is Juan Rodriguez. And I am thirty seven years old. I'm based out of Austin, Texas, and the name of my company with my co founders is called flash parking flash parking think about it kind of like a cash register and access control for anybody that has a parking asset that is looking to make money out of it. So if you have a valet stand if you have a garage, if you have an event space, you have contract parkers paid your monthly fee. We have software and hardware to help you manage that parking asset was it a dream of yours to create parking software or hardware when you were growing up. It was not I never thought I would be doing this. I don't think I know anybody has grown up and said, hey, I want to be in the parking industry. Maybe we're born into a parking family or something. But no, I don't that was not our goal. I had a business in a pass with one of my co founders in this business, and we sold it to a company here in awesome. That's what we ended up in Austin. And after four and a. Half years with that company. We decided we want to get out of corporate America and go back and try to build something else and his wife brought up the idea to us to get into the parking business. She was selling services to hotels in c- had to valet park roughly about ten to fifteen times a day, we will have dinner and whatnot. And she'll say, hey, listen. You guys are doing financial services in mobile payment in your jobs, how big problem with my job. Which is I'm valeting every day, so many times and Afghade. I'll problem where I have to carry cash to I can pay in tip Ravelli. This is back into dozen eleven and I also have to wait outside a lot of times in the he is south Florida or in the rain waiting for the valets to retrieve my car. So she's saying to us. Why don't you just use? What you guys? Learn your job to create a solution that I can use my phone to request my car from valet STAN pay and tip. And we're like, well, we don't know anything about parking. You know is really a big business. And whatnot. But we started kind of looking into it. We'll find out is thirty four billion dollar market in the US of people paying for parking fees, and we kinda started getting into a little more. And we would explain this idea to multiple people. Most people could relate to this problem that we didn't know it was really a problem. So we went and build a system that would allow that to happen. But then we couldn't sell enough of it because it wasn't solving the parking operators real pain points harken operators, especially in the Valais side. They didn't have any infrastructure typically, they have a key box that they roll out to the middle of the street and how sign and they have tickets, and then they collect cash they've been doing that for many many years, but we showed him disillusioned. They thought it was cute, but they had bigger problems. They didn't know how many keys they had. They couldn't do calculated raids. They couldn't accelerate credit card transactions. So we pivoted quickly and ended up building a mobile point of sale system or tiny earpieces. For the valley space, and then we started selling and started growing, and then those same clients also operate other types of parking facility, like automated garages and outta made it surface lots and so on. So they asked us to expand our from Chanel, easy, and to take our cloud based infrastructure and move it over to that space. That's how we ended up pivoting again and involving the product sets that we provide today. I you just kind of did one thing and focusing on the valet, and then you've expanded you said your services, but it's all kind of similar in a way, obviously with the parking. But how we talk a little bit more about the beginning of your company and at first product that you ended up making. So we can totally understand how you actually started making money in the beginning. And how he started validating the idea walk. All right when I have to start crying here. So it's three co founders in what you're just make sure we own pitch and two thousand eleven okay. Yes. So the three of us had this idea we want to create a company. We had five different ideas in again with chose the parking want for those reasons we would go and pitch his five ideas to multiple people. And they're like, I think you have your best bet on the parking wine. They couldn't understand pretty much the other ones, we strapped. It will two of us had saved up a little bit of money. So we use that money to kind of take care of our kids in pair mortgage, and that kind of stuff and didn't get a salary for almost a year, Arthur partner didn't have that much money. So we ended up using some of our savings to cover their bones. Minimum. I don't even know fifty thousand dollars six thousand dollars to obey foreign apartment with two bedrooms in the second bedroom was actually our office for a long time. That's where all the magic started happening with type of magic business magic or sexual. It was mainly development magic. That's where a lot of the initial set of code was written. And then I would go to the bathroom. So I can take some calls locking myself up in the bathroom like if that was my office. That's how we got star. Is pretty typical bootstrap kind of story. We would iron out the workflow of how the software should work in ride code until three or four o'clock in the morning. Many tested on the fly. And then tried the next day. We did that or a lot of days mean it took maybe more than six months until we had a first MVP a minimum viable product. You're in Austin, Texas, this whole time. Yes. This is all in Austin, Texas. Okay. So this was kind of cool. I haven't heard about that as far as you've third cofounder instead of maybe necessarily giving them money, maybe give him some money for groceries and stuff too. But basically you paid for an apartment for him. And then y'all would use his spare bedroom as a place that you'll meet in the living room that was basically like your office. I yeah, it was the bathroom. It was the second room and the living room. Okay. We actually had some investors come to the living room, and we pitched them there was that awkward for the middle at that point. It was happening. It was common and they were from the west coast. There's a lot of houses in San Francisco, Paolo, Alto, whatever they kind of do that. That's not typical here in Austin. But yeah, it was okay. With a game. We went to the refrigerator and gotten some drinks, and we just sat down on the coffee table chat. We'll so was this like an apartment or was it like was it a complex it was an apartment complex. Okay. Cool. All right. Yeah. Just wanted to make sure that totally understood that would you've gotten in trouble. If they found out that you were doing a business out of there are no that y'all are like coming there versus the other guy who actually lived there. We didn't have a lot of people coming right? The three of us would meet their pretty much every day. I mean, it wasn't like we were manufacturing anything there. We're just kinda using a computer on the foul. I don't think we really would have got into trouble. And the number of times we had visitors from business sample with small. So I doubt it. Yeah. I agree. I just didn't know how many people you're coming in and out. It's pitching and stuff like that. 'cause y'all thought maybe you'd gone somewhere else. But as far as maybe getting all that together. The three of y'all working together was easy for the guy living there because he said sometimes you're working there till like three or four in the morning. I mean, if he wanted to get his own free time to bed does that really when you argh determined to make a start up successful. Well, you kind of put your life on pause for lack of better terms for the first couple of years. We couldn't even go break bread anywhere or go anywhere that we weren't talking about the business. I mean, we've been Indus more than seven years in. It's still the same the same intensity. The first couple of years. That's all we did. This is really difficult to build a business. And you gotta give it all you got. And it was three of y'all you're saying did y'all have any personal like family or anything or relationships that you had at the same time where any of your married or anything two of us were married with a kid each. And then the third one did not have any family. So the one that lives in the apartment. Luckily, he didn't have a family. We were in disturbing his personal life too much. Are you still using old outdated software work, if you're still using software and your business that's more than a few years old, then I hate to break it to you. But you're falling behind your competition. And I mean way behind don't you think it'd be worth at few minutes of your time till these compare your current software to what's available on the market. Well, capterra dot com is here to the rescue. Capterra is the leading free online resource to help you find the best software solution for your business with over seven hundred thousand reviews of products from real users. Discover everything you need to make an informed decision. Search more than seven hundred categories of software everything from project management to CRM's to Email marketing to yoga studio and intimate software. Well, just basically any category, you can think of they have covered I used to capterra to check the top audio editing software and web conferencing software to make sure we're using the best products for editing and recording this podcast. Last. So no matter what kind of software your business needs. Capterra makes it easy to discover the right solution best. Join the millions of people who's kept here each month to find the right tools for their business. Visit capterra dot com forward slash millionaire. Again, their service is free. So take a few minutes of your time. Just to check it out. That's capterra dot com slash millionaire. Capterra that's spelled C A P T E R A dot com forward slash millionaire. Or simply check the link in your episode notes below. Where your wives, okay? With as much as the over working in the beginning. Because obviously, I think a lot of people know, especially in the beginning how much you have to work to do all this, and you're not making any money, especially so you were working hard and not making money was your family at all worried about that. I'm speaking for milder, co-founders wife, and for mine, there were very supportive to the process to give in when I I talked to my wife than about starting a business. She was pregnant with my first child I talked to her. And I said listen once a kid is five years old. It will be difficult for me to try to do something. Then I think we have an opportunity to do it now because he free live in a shack. And he's writing on the walls. He'll be probably here. She would be really happy. So we kinda said look worst case scenario if it doesn't work out we have all degrees and whatnot. We can always get a job we succeeded in corporate America. So we can always go back there. I kind of felt we had this opportunity where we had to take, Dan. And luckily, Bo. Both of our wives were very supportive in Arthur co-founder didn't have a relationship. So that was easy for them. But it was really hard on that a lot of times. We miss a lot of family stuff where we couldn't go on a trip or we all had six figures salaries and all of a sudden now we're eating Rahman and Brad and whatnot. That's a big snow change. How old were you? When you actually started flash parking here in twenty eleven thirty. I get a twenty nine to go from like being successful in that type of business rate in the financial services to downgrading your life. So you can see a future of building your own business. A lot of people feel like after you get stuck making that money that you wouldn't want to do that. So it was your drive to want to start this company with your co founders. Well, I gotta tell you another story then stationed in the Pentagon for a few years, I was in the US army. And then when I got out I worked for government contractor in one of my mentors in that company. I was an oracle database administrator in this guy was like a super senior one. He made a big mistake one day and truncated some data. By just hitting one Gena keyboard in his life. Got turned upside down. We ended up getting fire. He ended up getting divorced. Then he was having a hard time getting other jobs. It was complicated. I wanted to get to what I call being financially independent if I ever go back to corporate America, and I get fired for something that I did or didn't do or get laid off that my family and myself I wouldn't suffer since then I'd kind of be thinking. Okay. I gotta do my own thing that I can control it and be financially independent and able to weather the storm when things go sour that's really my motivation in probably at least one of the other co founders also it's uncertain out there, and obviously Luna start of is really difficult a week thought that we had a really good idea. And we had a pretty good team. We felt the three of us brought different things to the equation is like, okay, if somebody can do it we can do this. I think everything align, and it was a good time to get this started. And I think this important even when it happened. That situation that you're talking about where the guy got fired for pressing the delete key by accident his whole life like you said turned upside down. It's funny. The little things that will happen in our lives that we remember to make us wanna start our own companies or do something like that to be financially free. Oh, yeah. I remember the day that that happened. I remember him being walked out of the office. And I remember the command that he hit he's basically logged into a terminal remotely in oracle database, and he's switching back from production to QA or to one of the user Shepton testing. He's truncating some data handed up doing it in the wrong one. And then he had an issue with the backups and the backups would restore from tape. This is back in the day. We had the store stuff on tape. And it was just a frigging this Astrum company lost the money. He just made one little tiny mistake that kind of motivated me to do my own thing. You're doing your own thing with your co founders there the first couple of months, at least you're saying, maybe even six months or year. Did you make any money? Oh, now me personally or the company let's say both because obviously you wanted to do. This. So you can be personally financially free as well. Everyone's excited about starting the company in the beginning. Right. But then after you get into it after so many months, and you're not making money. I could see that maybe get frustrating or hiring. Or like what hurdles that you have to go through in this first few months. I don't think I have enough time to cover all the hurdle. There is a lot of ups and downs. We're talking about the where lot more down than up. But I think in the first twelve months we made a total of revenue navy three thousand dollars, right? The latch paid revenue. None of that went twenty of us have because they're not even covering anything. Right. No. You're not even covering maybe two months of rent for your guy. That's about it. Exactly. It was nothing we spend. Most of our time learning from customers doing a lot of trial and error in myself. I spent probably forty to fifty percent of my time trying to raise money from investors Bank for funds and things like that or soup angels. That's what my role was doing the product side of the house determine. What we should build just fundraising. And it was a fulltime job. Just trying to get these people to listen to what I had to say. Did you ever get any fundraising? We did we started in June. And we close our first round in April of twenty off. So we raise about a million in a quarter back down different tranches. They took me what it was like nine months or something to be able to closest round people wanted to see more traction. They wanted to see all kinds of stuff the other thing that was kind of difficult as nobody knew anything about parking. You can't go and buy a list of places that have valet parking, for example. Right. That list us an it doesn't even exist today most cities required to register business. And if you look at even Austin, there's probably I don't know twenty valet stands at our register. And there's hundreds of LA stands alot, the city investors wanna know market size. And they wanna do about stuff in this industry. That data is not as rarely available as there is for other industries. That's an interesting. Yeah. Because I wouldn't have thought about that. Because that's even let's say how many dog stands are there in Austin, Texas. You can maybe having estimating. But you don't really know because that's not something that people would put on the internet, necessarily, right? That's why what thing we ended up doing. We ended up hiring some folks out of the Philippines, really, cheap or bucks an hour or something to go and scrape yelp back then and find out which restaurants or venues had valet stance or didn't have LA this smart. So that's how we kinda build up over ten thousand locations because he investors wanted to say, hey, how big is this market? And we're like, well, we don't know because this data doesn't exist. I mean, we talked to the national park in association in all his other. There's a bunch of different parking associations were calling him saying, hey, we're trying to get this data militia once you find it let me know because we really interested in data as well in first year where you just working with the valet parking. Why don't we just expand year-by-year here? As far as what your company did. Because we know at least the first year you obviously didn't make too much money. But I mean, it must have been exciting. At least raising funds. So you're new you're on the right track the first year, whereas where we try just selling division of allowing people to use their phones to requested their car in paying tip and not a lot of traction happening. We could quickly pivoted and started doing the mobile point of sale for valet. And in that started getting a little bit more traction. We can show that people were willing to pay couple hundred bucks a month for the service and things like that. So we started kind of showing that to investors, and then they feel more comfortable with the idea of making that investment. That's what we did on the first year on the second year. It was fueling product development. We knew that there was a market that we knew the people had a pain point, and that we had their aspirin that can solve their headache week started needing law with different parking operators and understanding what this thing needed to do. And then we just started use the money that we got to hire a couple more people to help in the development cycle. So that we can code over stuff that people wanted and then sale started coming in on your two. And again, the pain point is can you just? Reemphasize what their pain point was what you found out. What actually worked for these people? Yeah. So think about it valet parking Vall from I think it was in Boston. I can't remember the story. I told the story before people used to leave their horses like you go to the pub, you would leave your horse there and somebody will give you a ticket back in the eighteen hundreds and you will use the ticket to get your horseback, depending like a busy place. So it's kinda like valeting your horse, and that's been going on from eighteen hundreds into two thousands. This is very inefficient. You don't have real time visibility on how many cars your parking. You. Don't know how many hours your employees are working in real time. You cannot process credit cards. You couldn't do what we call calculator rates. If you come in. And I'm going to charge you ten dollars per hour. Somebody had to kind of look at their watch and write down when you arrive and put in. Okay. What's the time right now? It's three pm. Let me write three pm when you're leaving. You could be leaving a four thirty nine. Nine and then I got a manually conch late all that stuff and figure out. Okay. How much is that? Is that two hours? Okay. That's twenty bucks. All of those things were paying point the owners of the parking operator. They did not have the ability to be at every valet. Stan all the time making sure that those cash transactions didn't end up on the attendance audit. That's also big issue for them is whenever you doing things with cash cash disappear sometimes and some of the attendance would say, okay. Well, I'm going to do ten cars, and I'm gonna take nine cars, and I'm going to give it to the owner. And then I'm gonna take one car for me. I mean, not everybody, but we did run into some situations where that was the case all of these things are pain points for the parking acid operator. Another big issue is you'll come in with your car, and it has a big scratch in the back. They would try to write that down on the take. This is all yeah. This car was scratched. So we brought in the ability to take pictures of that. So that you can dispute it he other thing is tracking keys, and when you lose a key, of course, as a four hundred dollar Keith. So. Misplace Ezekiel loses a key that also is a big expense. So we provided tools to manage all these little things that are problematic for LA operation. I think that makes much more clearer. What you're the pain that you're talking about right now, especially I have heard in the past what you were saying about the parking attendant? Yeah. If the owners not there, and they're paying someone ten bucks an hour to do random lot that they own. They have no idea how many cars actually came in or out like let's say it's for game day parking like an NFL game and they have fifty spots, but they could NFL game might be easier. If you know, you're going to always get fifty. But if it's a random Friday or Saturday night, they could say only like thirty cars came in when actually forty cars came in. And then that guys holding tin cars worth of cash. The owner who is at lot would have no idea unless he's actually there. That's right. So we provided them the ability to track. All this stuff is still not impossible. So you can still do it. But it's a lot harder to cheat. Now, right with all this technology. And that's the idea you're never gonna make it one hundred percent more effective, but the harder you make it the less likely something like. That's going to happen, especially with all the other scenarios that you're talking about like lost keys, and then trying to figure out if they could actually end up getting more free parking space. You're saying that your software could actually do that. Yeah. I mean think about it this way just wouldn't be hourly based collation if I'm doing this manually, let's say that you come in one fifteen. Okay. And then at two o'clock, it atomatic jumps twenty bucks. What would happen when you doing this manually is that the parking attendant will feel bad for the person that is paying and would give him the cheaper rate because there's only one minute apart with our system you scan that ticket and the rate is the rate, and you cannot edit it, you can't change it. So the revenue uplift was just crazy. We almost guaranteed a fifty percent revenue uplift by just installing the obligation. Because of what we were seeing. Okay. This makes them a lot more Cincinnati. You're saying because you're saying that I it which it's a headache and you wanted to pain pill for them, and you got of that. But then you're telling them how much extra revenue they can see like the. Light at the end of the tunnel from doing that. And that makes a lot more sense because. Yeah, if you're the one sitting in that booth letting cars in or out, they really don't care at the end of the day like how much money the owners making as long as they still have their job. But if you can increase that to the owner, then that person could get more money to he's actually working the lot. Yeah. That's the return on investment. So we were able to prove that really really quickly. Okay. Was your first application of this product ready to go right away. Was it easy to kind of figure? This thing out and make it happen. Not at all, my friend. I kinda sound simple at first you like was just parking spots. But tell us about the hurdles that you'd have to go through to get into software going. The interesting part is that we didn't have somebody who cop rate think about Facebook. Right. Everybody knows Facebook a super successful. But they kinda had my space to kind of understand what worked what didn't work. We didn't have something that we can be like, okay. How can we do this? We spend a lot of time. Understanding what's the fastest way? That I can get a vehicle to do what I need to do to capture the revenue provided good customer experience, really really fast. What should the user interface? Look like should we make him take picture? I should we make them scan does barcode. I we scan the VIN number. I so this is a lot of time that we had to spend out on the field. And then we have to deal with people that have bigger fingers than others, and we have older people that might not feel comfortable using an iphone all of these things on the user interface or what the program should look like. The what we call the you oughta user interface came challenging and also the process in the most challenging part is that you think oh, man. It's gotta be easy. Right reporting cars, the thing that people don't understand is that every parking operator likes to do things different. But we have to build the system with a lot of different flags, and we can say, okay, whenever we're talking to parking operator, a Wigan a make the user flow like this when we're talking to parking operator be we're going to reverse this one into this when I and whatnot. So there's a lot of things there that we found to be challenging which is to try to please a lot of different clientele. So did you just try to please one at first after he figured that out? Yeah. Again, I could see different operators just like anyone who might own multifamily property, or whatever they all look at it differently, or they might believe in upgrading certain units versus not. So there's all these little differences that maybe you wouldn't even thought of right? When you started your parking lot software here. Then good thing for us is we approach is us consultants. We're like, okay, we have no business. Getting into the parking business. We don't even know anything about it. We were just like a huge sponge. We would just listened to a lot of people in the beginning anybody that would give us a time of day. We would go and try to make them happy later on we understood that okay? As we started getting some fraction. Then we just started listening to a set of people that we met into industry that are well known and that are respectable industry by their peers. So we kind of build a little tiny community of folks that we will say, hey, here's going to be a roadmap for the next six months. What do you think this is make sense, I build this which by would you pay extra for this? We did a lot of that. But at the beginning anybody that would say hi to us. We would go and talk to them take some of their approach on how this should be built. So you started building it. And when we go ahead and move onto your too because you're one at least it sounds like you got that funding. And you're ready to expand a little bit more. Why don't we talk about middle twenty twelve as far as your to? Yes. Funding came in around April. We recruited a few folks we dedicated adding tied to development. But now one of my co founders is in charge of sales. He actually started booking deal. So people are buying this angle. We had an actual product that people were willing to pay money for I guess one of the mistakes. We did is that we focus everything on the product at the beginning and very little like on marketing and sales. It was basically word of mouth. He would go to shows and he would drive around every city and knock on every valet. Stan say, hey, let me show you this a lot of them just laughed at him because they're like we can't manage my revenue with an iphone and you got to remember an iphone back. Dan was a cool phone that not everybody had nobody thought of it as a business tool. Ruber runs. I don't know how many billions of dollars a day through mobile apps, but going back in two thousand and eleven and twelve that was not normal for any business application, like square, dating exist. None of these things existed. Roy shouldn't say probably wearing their infancy. It was a normal back. Then we got a lot of pushback people wanted a computer with a scanner. Or an infrastructure, and we're like, no you've seen an iphone and a credit card reader. You don't need any other stuff. So that's what we were doing on your to just getting the word out and developing the product will just sounded like you'd have to move the apartment, if you hire people because now you had money from that investment money to hire people and make more money for all of you. You know, what we did is we work remote? And then we would meet a couple of days in one of our investors office, we did that. And at the end of twelve we ended up moving into one of the investors to offices to they gave us two little tiny offices in. That's where we would go and do our business out of there. I think on your three or earlier three we ended up getting a little I think it was like twelve hundred square foot little tiny office looking back at least in this first couple years to was there anything else that you would do differently that people listening to learn from well, you gotta have a minimum viable product. But I would focus a ton more on getting the word out this excess in thinking about how to sell it. And a lot of this is my. Fault because I'm more of a product person knows the CEO van and I'm still today. I wanted to just have the best product out there. And I figure if I got the best product and people eventually by what I failed to acknowledges that. But if we got the best product, nobody knows it exists it just worthless. But I would have invested a lot more time on determining who had this pain. And how can I target those people, and how can I get them to see what we have? And we've probably would have grown a lot quicker. I'm pretty proud of the product and whatnot. But it doesn't really matter. You got a great product people know about it. So that's one thing. What's one of the mean things I think that it should have done different? The other thing. I would have done differently is believed in ourselves a little bit more. We were trying to please the clients too much instead of thinking strategically where should we be expanding our time think about a five year old soccer team? We were running around crazy kicking the ball with no strategy or anything like that. If I had to do it again, I would work on the strategy a lot more than I did. In the passionate pass. It was straight up trial and error. Oh is this going to work? I'm going to try something else. But I think we should've trusted ourselves that if we built this. They will come and marketed properly and just run it more strategically than trial and air, your background was in the software space rate, not necessarily in the parking space because there wasn't any competitor's it sounded like at least what we had some competitors that had computers straight up a big computer with a scanner and credit card readers, just like a traditional point of sale system. You'll see at a restaurant that product was only viable if you had a booth now if you were rolling out a little cart that holds your keys in the middle of the road that product will never work there. So we did have some competitors from that standpoint. Okay. So you mean like valet stand narrows around versus a actual booth that someone sits in it's up and down with the arm. Yes. If you go to all the major hotels, they have a valet cashier station. And it's got air conditioned has got internet. And it's got everything you need. And you put us big computer in that we were at the beginning targeting. The wants a rollout that car to the middle of the road. Those guys don't have power. They don't have internet and so on so they couldn't put that computer out their kids. It keeps niching down as far as who your. We're looking for at least in the beginning. It was good that you understood that when you're talking to people as far as your exact cardio. It's I you might just think parking. But then you keep breaking it down, more and more and more to make sure you find your rate customer. That's right in the beginning. We were focusing mainly on people that we roll that card out to the middle of the road from there as we're going into your three in before we go there. I think that was really important what you said that I was trying to decide that seemed like your background was in product design or something like wanting to make this product is perfect as you could. Because that's what you understood. But if you never market anything, even if I'm talking about this podcast or any other business that you're talking about let's say you have the best pizza in the whole world doesn't necessarily mean. Everyone knows about it. So spending the time to do that marketing. Like, you're saying I think it's something that maybe people especially if they don't have back on it over. Look that if they just build a perfect thing it's going to happen, but not necessarily. Absolutely. I couldn't agree with you more. I think I could have gone back in time and hire a marketing resource to help us. Just get the word out think about a big loud speaker just letting the know what slash was. And in a way that the consumer would understand we should've shot a video really early on the says, hey, this is your world today. This is all the headaches that you have this could be your world tomorrow. This is how this solution fixes all these problems. We should have done that before we wrote a line of code. So that we could determine if we had a market there. If he would say, all I love this a lot of companies now, they just explained high level what it is. And they put this little thing. Learn more give me your Email address. I'll give you updates. We could have done a lot of things differently. And I think one of the mistakes was not hiring a marketing person or even a part time marketing person to help that effort. We'll seems like you only see become successful today. So why don't we move onto year three as far as we're you were a company size and. Where you're actually making more revenue at this point in time. Yeah. So you're three we were almost cash flow positive back. Then I can't remember the number employs reportedly had eight or ten and years three years three. We would go and meet with key Klein's every quarter. And we would say, hey, this is what we're planning to build for the next six months, or whatever I wanna make sure that this is the line with your business goals in his it's going to be useful for you. And we would do that with our six top kinds back, then we would go in so our roadmap, and they'll be like, well, let's great, and it wouldn't pay much attention to the road map. And instead, they would focus their attention to complain about the parks provider and parks is an acronym parking access revenue control system. That's what the animated garages. That's what the hardware that is sold to manage that. It's called park system. We go Q one we meet with them. And then they start talking about all day. She said they have tickets getting cut in the machine and jamming credit cards being eating. However. Expensive. It was to get a two hundred dollar technician to service said and take him a couple of days when into service unit, and they just kept uncomplaining complaining and complaining we said, hey, we listen our time reality will leave when we come back next water in the same really kept on playing again. It's like, okay. Yeah. The rope is great. Thank you for building the features. Everybody's happy. Let me tell you about the problems that I'm having on the other side in the third quarter. I was like, well, maybe this is the sign that we should be looking into that. So I met with one guy and I said to him. Hey, come on, tell me the truth. What are the things that I need to fix on the park side of the house in order for you to byproduct from us, and we created a list, I think it was eight or ten things and he says, look if you saw this plan points really would buy stuff from you. So I went back and talk to our team and said, hey, listen, it's kinda easy. Can we do this? We locked up. What it will look like how we would price it functionality. That would have how would solve. Paint point. So we went back to the guy and say, hey, man, look, this is what you would cause his how would look blah. Are you serious about it? He's like, oh, I love this. They sold all his pain points. I like the approach you're taking and if you build this. We would buy the good thing about that is now had an anchor climb that is willing to spend money on a product if we build it took me a while to convince my investors they're like, hey, wait a second. You finally now are making money on the other business. Why are you going to distract yourself doing something else that you'd have no clue getting into this is a different animal United providing an app to a person because if the app doesn't work worst-case scenario, they can just give you a ticket like they did for a hundred years the risk. There wasn't a high the risks on automated negative is is a different story because you can lock people up in a garage, if the thing doesn't work it's a lot different. And then we didn't have resources nationwide to be able to support the system all of our competitors. They sold to distribution, and there was always a local distributor that could handle any issues. Come up. We were at a significant disadvantage. But from the get-go, we built a product to be self surf with USB components. We came up with the idea. I remember I was at the restaurant in Miami Beach talking to this client, and he's like, well how you gonna support it. And I didn't have a good answer. And I said, look let me get back to you. Let me go to the bathroom. And I kid you not. There was an emergency box in the restroom like if you need a bandaids in whatever you can kinda buy them because it's on the beach and sunscreen and whatnot, and I came out of there. And I said, hey, oh, yeah. We've got a solution for that as well. We call it the emergency kits and emergency kid is going to have all the critical components, and we're going to sell you that. So if you have ten machines, we're going sell, you one of these emergency goods, and if something breaks you're going to be able to solve that problem yourself, and he loved that a lot because he was paying two hundred three hundred dollars an hour to have a specialized ignition to come over and fix the machine. The way that we like to pitch it is kinda think about going. To best buy buying a printer. And you bring up you. Go home, you connected to that computer. And all of a sudden you put ink in there. You put paper in your printing. We ended up designing the system to kind of cover those basic needs that anybody can remove a force crews in a USB cable and be back up and running the best analogy again because you like the warranty coverage, I would think that's what your emergency boxes, or I don't know if you wanna use that analogy again or some other ones that make sure we're on the same page here. Let me see if I can pain it in a different way. Think about that machine. When you go into the airport, and you press a button in spits out a ticket today. Ninety nine percent of the garages the United States run. What we call a legacy system which requires a ton of servers men, a bunch of complicated stuff to make us gauge go up in now and the technicians that can actually open that machine and service it there's only a handful around a city probably here in Austin. It's probably five people that can service one of these machines from one. These vendors because you have to be a certified technician to be able to work in that machine. Will you open that machine you see a bunch of green boards with dots? In a lotta Cable's going from one side to the other and literally you would gladly pay two to three hundred bucks an hour for somebody to come veal without because his too complicated. Well, we ended up doing is. We ended up taking a rugged dies military grade windows, powered tablet that runs similar operating system to windows, ten is called windows, embedded or windows, not right now. Anyway, so this is just a regular computer that most people are comfortable with and the connections are made with USB cables. So people are very comfortable knowing what of us cable looks like. So in essence, that's what we did we build it to be USB peripheral all the credit card readers USB, the scanners USB approach readers us, be all of these components. Are you as d devices? So whenever something goes down. Down you can remove screws take a USB device and put it back in and connected to the USB hub. And now, you're up and running. So we made it itself serve. And that's why I was using the analogy of the printer because you don't need Xerox or HP to come to your house to put toner into the printer. Only best buy to send the geek squad. Always to connect the printer to the computer, you can do that yourself so before or I should say our competitors. You're required to have one of the specialized ignition touch those machine. Let's did you have a whole new machine that you made. And then your USB thing that you have to make it work, again, if something happens or what's the difference between your software or whatever application or hardware that you're making for the gated parking system versus the valet parking system. Oh, that's a great question. So we took the back end, although valet system, which had already all the basic things that we needed for the. A garage system for the participants to work, and we were able to utilize the majority of the back end north of eighty percent of it was already there. So then we build a aluminum box, and we put the computer inside with a touchscreen, and we put the credit card reader the scanner. And all these things that we had a local company here in Austin built up for us and the software from the back and sent going was the majority of the build, and then we'd just wrote. I mean, we've been writing a lot more throughout the years. But at the beginning, we only took maybe three months to write the front end software that would run inside the kiosks think about it kind of like a kiosk when you go to an airline to check in basically took the same approach and mated rugged is to withstand the rain and the snow another that stuff outside. Want to see some cash on your next car rental, then consider using our newest sponsor auto slash dot com. 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If you will or something like that, we can imagine like you said the airport kiosks makes the most sense, I could see how everything that you made. Because the hardest part you already went through was trying to figure out the hourly rates and all this other stuff versus now, you're just making a bigger box on the front end for someone to actually press it everything. Yeah. To think about it like this like the IOS app, you had a human which is valid attendant pressing buttons and doing transactions for a valet parking customer on this kiosk. We basically took a lot of that code that did that and just made it self serve. Just like you do when you go check in when you're selling it sued these gated parking garages. It seems at least you have a warm lead. Because some of these guys had their own valets, Dan, this how that happened for? You sounds like because they felt comfortable with quote unquote, new technologies since they had been using you provide parking. Yeah. So that helped a lot the fact that we were ready in the Valais business, and we had a new product we had built credibility with some of these folks. And let me tell you the first ten garages. They were really really scare because they trusted us on the valet side. Will you had to be scared to because I agree with what you said someone could get locked in there or something, you know, like you're saying if you didn't have a unquote like emergency kit. But yeah, it seems like way more risk like you were saying versus the valet parking. Oh in these are unattended barking garages. I mean, there's nobody there. So when something goes wrong. It can't go wrong. Put it that way. This gates up to go up and down all the time. You got people trying to get into work or trying to go home much five. It's a different animal. So yeah, it's total beast. There's I in parking garages did everything run smoothly or anything. Go wrong. You're funny guy. So the first garage was here in Austin. It was a garage called Perry Brooks, and let me tell you that I spend personally inside the old booth because it used to have a booth before we. Four we automated it I spend about sixty percent of my time inside this booth for about eight weeks trying to understand how we needed to change things. So I can go back to the development team to, hey, we need to tweak this as some of the challenges that we're having the systems having this problem team there, we're having internet problems because we're a cloud based platform, and we don't have infrastructure on side. So we had a lot of challenges making this thing fast, while the data was on the cloud is so many frigging things that you can never imagine how difficult it was to get that first one to roll out. We finally got that one stable, and then what we learned is that most of the garages, they don't look alike all the things that we made work on this one it work a little differently on the second one. Because now you're doing with three D multiple levels to versus one flat live in a lot of different things that people don't think about you have this nested areas that only certain people can get. Into and you have all these different rules. And you have a lot of people trying to cheat the system, and you gotta find ways, but I'm not too and you have different gates that you need to connect with. And you got to connect to different what we call atomatic vehicle identification systems. These are like the toll tax system or licenced play recognition cameras at the list got more complex on all these different things that the system needed to do. So was your head spinning after you started realizing how much more complicated. It seemed like it was then maybe your original thought, or at least my original thought around the six month. Mark I got to a point where I was questioning to just end this nightmare and back to while we had because it got to the point where it's like this is insane. I never knew one that we try to bring up it had more challenges. It took a while where we have hundreds of arises today every time we had to bring one up for me not to sleep after we got to the forty fifth or so. So then I kinda come down a little bit. But the first forty or so were terrible. And I mean, terrible everyday. I wanted to call my oh, boss if I can get my job back. Yes. Sometimes we minimize how much not necessarily the risk. But I guess it's just like the pain that you have to think of if you're thinking about this thing night and day someone not being able to get out of Raj or these extra headaches. If you had a nine to five that maybe you wanna have to think of you know, the first ten garages, I will support guy. We didn't even have a support person to support the product. I couldn't even hire somebody and train them or something because I didn't even know what to tell them to do because I didn't know what challenger. We're gonna face. My wife is freaking out. My phone is going off at two o'clock in the morning, and I'm like going to the other room. And she's like what you waking up the kid. So I ended up taking the cost in the frigging car. It was terrible as you can imagine. We're this first pints were they paying you right away. Because this was new software sound like you had good relationships with them from before with the valet. But like right when he started off doing were they paying Reddaway 'cause I could see maybe some of them might get frustrated and just in foreign you if you couldn't get it, right? Because it's your first time trying this to tell us about how that if anything like, luckily, they did pay. We did have to give a lot of money back, especially because we're charging a monthly fee. So every time we had a major Strobe. We would give them like the month to say the pain as a thousand dollars a month. We would give them that doesn't dollars back. We had to do that. And the first forty garages, we probably have to do that ten times or fifteen times when it was so bad. We're like, okay. Or the clients were great. And the thing that helped us is that d status quo on the park system is so bad that they really wanted us to succeed because they wanted this vision that we were selling them. So they were willing to deal with the headaches with us. We were very lucky with partners that helped us at the beginning. Would you say a hundred percent of the people that you're working with before work valley clients, as well, I think if you went with just a cold customer as far as who had a parking garage if one hundred percent understand your vision, but it kind of thought about it. And then if there's scripts that they might just be like, I'm done with this. But if they saw what you were able to do again with the valet parking. It seems like they'd be willing to hold on much longer. If they understood how much you help them. They're seventy percent over client. Tell today came from those relationships on the valet sock for sure that was a huge huge win for us being able to utilize that customer base. And when we cherry-picked even those firsthand we picked what we call the very innovators and work with them. And explain some of the risks in some of the things that we had fixed some of the things that we still trying to fix in again our competitors. In the legacy providers. They had such a bad reputation that they just needed something to disrupt this face, and they were willing to help because they just felt like there were fat and happy I need somebody to kind of punch him in the nose. So that's why they stuck around and help us get through this. Tell us about this. We understood it gets financially. At least I do from developing stuff that you're doing how much it helped him. But you're saying it unlike like these other guys were greedy that you were coming in when you're switching the at parking management. Can you tell us the difference between you and them? I mean, you told us about the mechanic that would come and fix their machine if they had to, but why was their pain so devastating when they wanted to fix their gated parking system to. He let me hit a field on one of the main ones is are you familiar with the payment card industry, data security standard PC idea? So heard a lot now. So wondering tell us we all pitch. So basically anybody that accepts credit cards like if you sell a software that handles credit card payments, physical credit card payments in online and whatnot. There's regulation that you gotta get certified and VPI comply. What happens a lot with the legacy systems? Is that everytime? Something moves. These guy will try to sell you new software or hardware to maintain C I compliance, and if you're not PC, I you can't accept credit card. So you can't make any money. So these guys were people might disagree with this common that I'm about to make which is it might have been taking advantage of some clients who force them to upgrade and charge them a forty five thousand dollar upgrade fee. So they can continue to be PCI complying, which maybe that wouldn't have cost the company that much money or they can get away with it. Because there's no. Alternative? So what am I going to do if I don't wanna take a boat or some rain, and I want to go to Europe? I gotta probably take a fine. I mean, there are many hot air balloons. I can take over there things like died where coming up and also their fees were getting really high. They would go in and sell to distribution in one distributor in Florida might charge a hundred thousand dollars for a system and the other one for the same system for the same number of equipment might charge one hundred and fifty thousand dollars in North Carolina. The dealership motto I can go buy a Ford F one fifty and pay X here in Austin and pay y in San Diego, and these guys are national players that wanted to have kind of like the same price of over the place. But because these other guys are starting to distribution they didn't have that. We ended up changing the model where we sell direct. We installed direct. We support direct. Not only do we create better technology and moved it all to the cloud with didn't have to have any servers onsite and have to deal with a lot of the security in the. PCI and the patches and the maintenance and what not, but what we did also is from the business model standpoint. Instead of me selling you, a quarter of a million dollar system in saying, hey, here you go. Go lock in by the way, every time that thing break, call me, and I'm going to charge you two to three hundred bucks an hour to send somebody to fix it. We took a different approach. And we said, listen, we're going to charge you X amount of front per machine. And then we're going to charge you a monthly fee, and guess what? If the system doesn't work. You're not going to pay me the monthly fee. I'm going to be on your side. And if something breaks I'm going to try to help you as much as I can to fix it. Because I wanna make my money. He said of me having to invest this quarter million dollar fry. I'm gonna spend maybe fifty thousand dollars a front, and then right monthly checks. If the system is still doing what is supposed to oh, in by the way, when something breaks you're going to have an emergency kit that you're going to be able to bring the system back up on your own without having to wait for a certified technicians. Oh, come over. So your downtime is going to go down significantly the combination of all this really what started giving us some success on the deployment of these machines. That makes a lot of sense, not even just economical sense. But I guess there'd be built up resentment. If they were constantly like you were saying, it was out of your control, maybe even out of your budget when they forcing you to upgrade using their software, and you don't have any choice. Those guys just got tired of dealing with that. And they sell that your heart was that you were trying to get this thing done. And I would imagine that yet you reimbursing them back the money if the month, and it seemed like it worked out. Well, if you didn't do that. I don't know if there might be resentment built up where you're like, screw these guys whatever, but sounds like they have been wronged enough like you were saying from the old gated parking systems. Exactly, that's the key. I mean, they fell so bad with their compromiser. Like, look anything that they could do to change the landscape of the industry that we're willing to do it not all of them. But a feel the innovators for all these early clients. They're all in Austin, Texas. I wish that would have made it a lot easier. Right. They're all over the news. Nations so this parking operators. They have a contract and Key West Florida and San Diego in San Francisco, Dallas and Chicago lost and all over the place. Luckily, the first garage wasn't awesome. Our second one was in Houston. I third one was in San Diego. We can get to awesome. It was like two miles from the office. That wasn't a huge problem. The one in Houston I had to make a lot of trips that one and then I spent a ton of time in San Diego after because that's about a two hour drive right to us soon. That's right versus two minutes and then San Diego. Imagine you fly. That's right there. I know the Subaru well and a lot of stuff in San Diego. Tell us about like your three to your four said you've expanded into this gated parking system. Sound like you were making profit sorry in your four where we took a lot of money starting vesting it on the other side of the business. So we were still not making a profit. We were kind of running the break even sampling. But things were looking good because we. Had two successful products. The market was adopting it we have more innovators catching on and so on the certainly really really helped. We were able to hire more people in our support team. We started having more of a real startup at that point because we had validated products. We had a market we knew how to sell it when you install it out of supported things like that. So what other points in the business were there any other turning points from about twenty thirteen twenty fourteen till today that we can learn from in those years were sticking to our knitting. They're listening to clients doing a lot of development we at that point. Dan, started doing actually marketing started going to the parking shows and Kelly more people lauded making a lot of videos and pushing it to social media things like that. So the marketing engine started kicking it from progress standpoint, it was trying to get a city so one installation of this automated garage in one city was actually the key. And it was really really difficult people. Didn't want to hear that it was working fine in Austin that wasn't good enough for that. Because they felt that in the traditional system they needed a local person to come fix it all the time. So they were really scared with our model of not having a local support. We started teaching them about the emergency kit and teaching them that we support all the stuff from the cloud. It was just very very difficult to get one operator or one acid owner to put it in a new city, we had to do different marketing strategies and incentives and whatnot to get these people to roll out the first one so that was quite complicated to get into the first city. So awesome. Obviously were local it wasn't that terrible. Houston was sandiego was Miami was Boston. I mean, every other city was terrible even Dallas which we weren't even that far. We didn't get to Dallas until we had another five eight cities already the head of writing stalled the cool thing. Was that the minute that somebody can drive by and see them the city, then they're like, oh, well, if it works for them, it's going to work for me at made it a lot easier to sell but getting the first city was really really challenging to be. I would almost think if I were you. Well, maybe I'll just pay some dude a thousand bucks a month and make him quote, unquote. My operator maybe paying five hundred bucks a month. Whatever where he doesn't do anything other than come over there with the USB thing and plug it in himself because that's what they're used to. I guess you know, what I'm saying? Even though they don't necessarily need it. But I guess you just kept wanting try to educate them until they understood it could understand that they use as someone being operated. But after you're in a couple of different cities, especially if they're far away from Austin, Texas. You would think that they would understand that. Hey, how's it different from San Diego versus if you're in Boston or something like that it evolved industry moved quicker? I probably wouldn't be having this conversation with you. But it moves so slow and we couldn't afford to have technicians in a city that law. Doe is very expensive. Think about tesla. Tesla. Good assault cars through your tradition. Dealers, and they chose not to because they felt that the dealers would be able to sell it properly and educate the clients properly, we weren't necessarily following Tusla. We ended up doing what they do out of necessity not out of strategy. That makes sense. No it does. I mean, I was saying let's say you have different people who work with you right now are cross the US rate as far as may be personnel or employees in house or is everyone there in Austin, Texas. We have about eighty two boys now, and the majority are in Austin, we have one in Atlanta now one in south Florida and two in San Francisco in one in a lay and one in Denver. I was just saying that maybe the guy in Atlanta's just a developer for you. Right. He knows nothing about the parking. I can quote unquote, just make him. Maybe they feel comfortable enough that I'm like, hey, you're a special parking guy too. Because this is what they're asked to even though you don't need to be it just like if this is going to get over the hurdle, then maybe that'll work, but we had about twelve employees back then in all of them were in Austin. Okay. Oh, yeah. You can link that do that yet. Now, the majority were gross from unemploy standpoint happened in the end of sixteen seventeenth eighteenth. Yeah. So I guess he understood what I'm saying court trying to make these people feel comfortable, even if it doesn't make sense I can give anyone at title. If it makes you feel better. Tell us about the last couple years of growth, if you will before we wrap up here as far as what's occurred, and what we can learn at the end of sixteen I race another round of funding in was able to raise the money mainly on the parks because we created a park system, and the business model was pretty good that we were able to go get other investors that were really interested in this model on twenty seventeen alone we hire like thirty people. Hey, and on eighteen we hire like another twenty four people the significant amount of growth for us has been in the last two years to give you an idea we just completed in twenty eighteen the largest pay parking facility in North America. But just the Texas medical center camp. Office in Houston, Texas medical center is actually the largest medical center. Humps in the world. We go from having an infant product that we had built a couple years earlier to running the largest paid parking facility in North America. That can kind of give you an idea think about it. Like this like everybody was comfortable going to blockbuster paying for over price, candy, late fees, and all that stuff. And then Netflix comes over and kind of destroys them. We are in the process of disruption, the Texas medical center product that we stand most of the world isn't even know that we're finishing that we run that project. So we're gonna start making a lot of noise in twenty nineteen to kinda let everybody know this is, hey, maybe the flash park system, it's only for small venues, but it can't run anything large. So we'll be able to continue to grow. Now that we have that under our belt. Now, a lot of people are now becoming more comfortable with the cloud. That's another thing that is very different about us as there's no service on side and whatnot. And now we go from the innovators. The early about and to the early majority. I think in the next year or so we might be able to go into that early majority. More people feel more comfortable not to have to deal with patches and security things and antivirus and all that stuff, and let us manage all that on their behalf. Did you do anything to celebrate not last contract? With a test is medical center, we celebrated in the office in our company meeting. We haven't done just like a new champagne-popping or anything else. Actually did pop Abbado and everybody had a zapped. It was great as a big accompaniment for us. Not only because we were able to do it with such a young product. But we did the installation of over two hundred lanes in about a forty five working days, and nobody in the industry can believe it. I think out of work competitors. We should they were going to do it in like four months, and our closest competitor was going to do like in seven or eight months or something like that. And we were able to do it in forty five working days. We're super proud of our operations team for you know, with the liver was not your made it moment. Or was there something else as far as you feel? Uncountable about the company making especially when you're talking about data gated parking management almost wanted to give up having all those headaches at least in the beginning as been a moment along the ride that you found like, okay, I made the right choice. We're gonna make it and we're going to keep growing. I think what we hit like the one hundred garage. And we were kind of getting a rhythm. And we were doing things like the Miami Heat arena the Toyota center in Dallas and other major facilities around the US things were just like, okay, we can deploy this one. We don't have to write any code or nothing is really breaking if oh pretty good. We have to do a much better job at celebrating things. In value reminded me, it just made a note of that. We just had a Christmas party. We celebrate a little bit. But I think we need to do that more often twelve year. The reason I bring it up on the exact same way. And I think somebody entrepreneurs are like that way because you have to get used to the roller coaster ride. I'd ever think too high or at least I try not to try to get too low, especially like high achievers, I barely celebrate anything. It's like I did what I supposed to. And I just heard this brought up and I think. Years ago that you need to take the time to just even celebrate for an hour or two or something like that. 'cause then reenergize you. But even though like then you're ready to jump back on it again. But I just find that a lot of high achievers can have the same issue as I do as actually hey, be excited about something. We've done because you only live once. Yeah. No. And I think it's also mainly for the rest of the staff, right, right? Keep them motivated in one night. And they appreciate that. They like that. So I guess looking back on your soya. I don't know if we touch too much on the personal side. I mean, you did a great job tone your business side. And I really appreciate all the analogies. Because I think that helped clarify a bunch of stuff, but as an entrepreneur in your growth over these last several years with the company is there anything like last points that you wanna leave for the audience as far as them if they're wanting to grow their business, or maybe they're in their first few years of growing a business. What suggestions do you have for them? You know, what a lot of people are like, hey, go, follow your passion. And you'll find something you're passionate about and I kind of disagree with that. I think you should go try to things that you are good at and that doesn't mean that you're going to be passionate about it. Because this is freaking hard, and I could be passionate about I remember being emitted school in high school. I was really passionate about playing basketball. But I wasn't as good to make it to the NBA. Right. So this is really really difficult. There's a chart that I keep in my desktop, and I'm actually opening it up right now. And this is a study. We use scaling up from how we run the business familiar scanning up. Now, tell us about it Barnharn sh is the author of this book called scaling up in his basically, if you don't know anything about business, and you wanna run a very successful business. It kind of gives you a recipe on what to do how to plan how to manage people had to come up with a strategy. How to execute strategists? Pretty good book in one of those books. There's a page and they did a study in twenty. I think back then was like twenty eight million farms, and it shows how many businesses in the world out of this twenty million firms make more than a million dollars are from zero to a million dollars a year. And that is ninety six percent make less than a million. Okay. More than a million. It's four percent of all the businesses in more than ten million is zero point four percent and north of fifty million this only seventeen thousand businesses in the world out of the research that make more than fifty million. This is challenging. Wow. This is really really difficult. So you shouldn't hate what you're doing. You should just be good at it. And you should think about it as a job, and hopefully kind of like the eighty twenty rule with you only hated twenty percent of the time and you can tolerate it for eighty percent. And you're good at it. Because it's really hard. That's something that you've got to find something that you're good at that. You could have a vision for and deliver on that the other thing, I would say is you gotta be able to know when you have to pivot, and you gotta keep your ears open to pain points. I use the words pain points. But if I have a headache. How can I get the headache to go away? Maybe Abby pros span or Tylenol or something if you're able to find a problem in any market that you win, and you have a solid solution that makes financial sense. So if you buy something for five blocks, and you can sell it for ten dollars. There's a market for that. Then go after that if you can kind of determine what those pain points are and you have a pretty good solution. And you're good at that not necessarily don't have to be passionate. Oh, just got to be good at it. Or you can surround yourself with people that could be good at that. Then I think you should try but consider this. This is really really difficult. You got to be mentally strong to weather the storm. I remember that. I it is a couple of mornings when I saw the sun come up five fifty AM or six AM, whatever it was and a couple of days, I had tears coming out of my eyes. I'm like, what am I doing? Why he stuff out working yet? I'm my losing my mind, maybe I should go back to my job, etc. Etc. There's a lot of times where you're gonna want to give up. So you gotta find things that are at least you're good at. So it's not that difficult whenever you want to give up and we kept you going when you're at those points. I think all of us reaches breaking points in starting a business. I just refused to fail. I didn't wanna be that guy that gave up and did it. So I wanted to give it all a hat and Albert Einstein used to say that he wasn't smart. He used to say if I'm quoting this, right? He used to say that he stuck with problems. Longer than most people and ended up eventually solving them. So that kind of like, my philosophies, I look I might not have all the answers today. If this is logical, and there's a return on investment at the end of the tunnel. Let's see how long we can go at it for give up. An now, I think that's really important again for anyone who's listening when you reach those points, and you feel like you can't do is like what are you going to give up again at the same mentality of Mike. I'm not I'm just gonna keep going until it figured out. There's a way to figure it out. I'm like if someone in the past was able to figure this out I can figure this out, even though it might be different industry, or whatever, especially your two points here that you said at the end, I'm normally I don't plug it episodes, but I'm going to here because they're exactly these two points that you covered when he's talking about Verne Harnish on episode Eighty-eight. We have Trevor hill, and he has a huge Verne Harnish fan, and I think kind of funds at the same category as youth. He's clinical a water entrepeneurship and gets into the water industry as far as going into different governments, helping them fix their water supplies, and then reselling it. But it's the same type of thing you're saying, it's not he. -sarily had a passion of that right away. Maybe like you do the parking. But he was saying how much she was a believer in the Verne Harnish with it. So I've feel like you'd relate to him a lot of anyone who's listening and want to learn a little bit more about and Harnish. The second thing that you were talking about was having a pain pill finding debt something that someone needs in episode ninety seven we have surgery who talked about basically, his construction company where he was trying to find that pain pill that someone needed like you do for your product. I think those two points that you said we're very important in a here throughout our other interviews like people find these commonalities of these things that you were saying that make them successful. So if people can learn from him learn from you on what you're saying here. Yeah. That would be wonderful. I think one of the ways that I talked to other people about this. When I opened the refrigerator, it might be some meek that might be some eggs, and that might be other things like ice cream and catch up if you have the ability to find the meat on the eggs, the necessities of businesses are consumers versus the ice fan. I mean, the told me. A lot of companies that are very much success on the ice cream side of the house, but sticking back to the analogy this core things the water the meat and the eggs, and you can disrupt that in some way, more naked cheaper or faster or better or whatever. That's what I would focus on things that are less flashy and have a clear return on investment, you know. So I guess there's definitely some burn Harnish stuff because I can remember the quotes from that episode hill emphasizing that in. Yeah. Hopefully, everyone just make sure you keep your eyes cream in the freezer all to skin a mill probably get it. Yeah. Because I mean, again, if you can fundamentally change it seems like it taken us longer to do this business. I having people change over, but long term, I could see obviously, the financial reward and the ability for your company to grow pure using that method. Absolutely. That's exactly what it is. We're lucky enough. Now that this product is very sticky in to make a successful in. Once this equipment is bolted down in. It's not giving anybody problems he board dealing with. Other things within their lives and not do I need to go buy another parking equipment. Right. Absolutely. We'll thank you again for doing the interview here want if people wanted to reach you and say, thank you for doing the interview. Is there a best way for them to reach is like emailing ten or something like that? Yeah. I'm definitely Lincoln. Let me see if I can remember what handle all. Yeah. There's probably a lot of one wherever he gets his and linked to. Yeah. But I want to say thank you because I know from time to time, and I really do appreciate when anyone reaches out to me thinking me for doing the interview. I mean, I do the easy stuff which is interview of Italy. But I think that really motivates and drives me to keep doing the podcast. But for them to maybe say, thank you to you. Personally is right. If they've maybe Email you, of course. Yeah. It's Hawn at flashback dot com will think again for doing the interview, and we really appreciate at one thousand good. How would take thanks for having. Thank you for listening to this episode. It's been made available for free by our podcast sponsors and or patriot members. So thank you to you, both especially our newest and oldest patriot members for paying for this episode thought, you guys and gals. We wouldn't be here. So would you be willing to pay for someone else to listen for free after all this episode? Wouldn't it be available without our current members? Helping us cover some of the costs for you to listen for free. If you are willing to help support us and get some awesome. Patriot's perks along the way, then go to Austin's big p dot com to become a patron member today. That's Austin's big p dot com. Oh, and by the way, Austin's big P stands for Austin's big podcast. So again, if you're willing to pay it forward and allow someone else listen to this episode for free, then go to Austin's big p dot com.

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122: Brides of Beverly Hills takes on Destination Weddings - Rene Strauss of Wedaways

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

1:07:36 hr | 2 years ago

122: Brides of Beverly Hills takes on Destination Weddings - Rene Strauss of Wedaways

"Are you tired of building your business alone? If so I'm putting together mastermind groups with our listeners, so we can help each other grow our businesses. How do you join well first off yet to stop being cheap s can you do that by joining our patriotic membership, but you can do by going to millionaire interviews dot com for slash patriarch. So what are you gonna learn in these mastermind groups, well, you're going to come to the table with issues you're having in your business in you're going to get real feedback from other business owners about white can do to fix those problems? And only got a few more spots open for these mastermind groups. So if you're tired of growing, your business alone hand, you want feedback on how to improve your business while this is a group for you said it become part of this group. I you have to be a patriot member and you do that by going to millionaire. Dash interviews dot com forward slash patriarch. That's P R E N, and again spots are going to be limited. So. So don't miss out on this opportunity. Good stuff. Austin really, really appreciate the chat and Voss. Voss made this whole off of me. I always looked around and said, I can do more than what these four walls limited. I never say no say, no problem. I always said, I'm not an opportunist, but I will always keep my eyes open for opportunity, and that's why I say in life, you need more luck than brains sometimes because. Lo and behold, I got beyond the four walls of my businesses in a way that I never dreamed up. My name is Renee Strauss by companies wed ways, it is a platform for properties that cater to the wedding and honeymoon romantic travel market that are looking for greater exposure, specifically to the demographics of engaged couples around the world travel agents that typically focus on corporate, but will get a personal request, and they will send that request over to us and wedding planners around the world that are seeking to expand their portfolios, but need the ground support in the regions that their clients are asking for and they turn to weta ways for that support and referral base. And our head office is in Beverly Hills, California, we've been based for all of our businesses for almost thirty five years, and we have an office in cork Ireland to support the European. In market and in Rhode Island, Bristol, Rhode Island to support the east coast is this, and it sounds like you're quite the traveler because I know we're doing this interview pretty quick utilize did the pre interview, and you said you're going to be traveling next week. So I figured let's go ahead and get it in here now. So predate you doing that is that what made you kind of get into this space because the traveling aspects kind of cool to be able to look at your website and see all these different places that you could have your wedding. Yes. Well, I was in luxury retail in Beverly Hills in bridal specifically for many many years, and I loved the customer service aspect of it. I loved when people from all over the world came into my store, and I was able to make them not only feel at home in the environment. But actually follow through enclose a sale at the same time. And I always felt like if I wasn't in luxury retail. I'd probably want to be a tour guide. I guess I threw that message out into the universe and it morphed over the years, and although I'm not a tour guide. We are in. In the travel business now, and it was sort of a natural process. Should you think the hardest aspect of doing in Beverly Hills? The retail part is the actual closing of the sale. No, actually, I think the hardest part of retail is having the merchandise that your consumer base will want to purchase the prophets is in the by not in the sell your background. Are you in the Beverly Hills? Are you from there you're talking about your companies have been there for about thirty plus years? Okay. So you go I'm from Chicago. And I came to California as a sixteen year old I sort of left home in wander out on my own and ended up in San Diego, California ended up living there for about six years where I had a job in a bridal salon in the soccer team. And I was always in this great wonder of how somebody could spend a thousand dollars on a garment that they would wear just once and even though I had several jobs along the way. Way until I got into the bridal business that always struck me as incredible. And so I pursued that as I got older you're just naturally drawn your whole experience has been in this brutal area. Then right. Well, it's been in weddings. But I think the real love of business for me is the customer service aspect in any form of business where we can have a product that will be well received by our demographic. And that we're able to cater to them in the way in which I personally want to be catered to when I'm a consumer is the real thrill that we're able to really satisfy that need and follow through on it. Why don't we go to the first business that you started? Do you wanna do it from there? And we'll just kind of go chronologically on how you got to what aways today, sir. I came to California as a sixteen year old I dropped out of school in eighth grade. And I didn't continue any education. But when I got to California, I got a job in a bridal salon. And I really. I love that. Because I was being of service and fast forward, I ended up in Los Angeles. And there was an opportunity to go into a menswear business on skid row on Los Angeles street, and I took that plunge in went into that business. I actually made a deal in bought the business, and we were selling to a very low end demographic belts for a dollar ninety five underwear for three ninety five suits for fifty nine ninety five. But I really was doing very well. And it was a great business. But when I would get to work in I'd have to step over bodies to get to the front door. I knew that it wasn't going to be a future. So I decided I would try and go into another upscale retail situation. So I thought bridal would be something that I had experienced from years before and I really loved it. And so I started to look for a location to open a bridal salon. And as good fortune would have it luck and timing is much more important than brains. Most of the time I was. Speaking with a real estate agent who was dating a woman that had a bribe Bill Salonen Beverly Hills for about thirty years and she had never married. This was her baby, but she was ill and really wanted to take the last few years of her life and just spend it the way she found enjoyable, so she was willing to sell the business. You know, I can tell that story in thirty seconds. But the fact was that it took about two years to close the deal because we went to New York on a buying trip. When I was supposed to actually buy the store, and then she reneged, and it was greatly disappointing and went back to Los Angeles and ended up closing the deal, but she never allowed me in the actual store until escrow close. I used to go in front of the store at night when the store was closed in count the light bulbs that were burned out and look at the rip carpeting and the old inventory, but Newing that the business had been there for thirty years, and it was pretty much the only game in town. I could really feel that I could make successive in turn it around. And just to let you know. By this time, I was married and had. Two kids small children, and it was the early eighties escrow close. I went in the store, and I had to revamp the entire place high knew that being in Beverly Hills. The biggest best thing about it was that I could capitalize on that location. And it was a big expensive deal for me. And it was pretty scary. But I hired somebody to mean light for me and helped me revamp my store windows that was my very first investment. Even before I bought new inventory because I knew that your windows are your business card if you're a retail. So revamped the store windows and one thing at a time lo and behold because I was on the main boulevard in Beverly Hills. The most traffic street in the city producers directors in Hollywood would pass to and from work every day, and when they were working on any kind of wedding scene in a commercial print or movie or TV production. They would come into my store and look for merchandise. To use for the shooting of whatever project they were working on. And in that way. I was able to start studio services out of my store, which is when you either sell merchandise off the rack to a studio production or you rent the garment to them. And the rental was really great money for me because I could rent it for the full ticket price that consumer would buy it for get it back into my inventory and still make money off of that one sample or we could really push inventory that wasn't moving to these productions and turn over inventory, get eight right away. It was a great business for me in a lot led to the fact that when I was doing these movie and television in commercial print productions the producers directors and actors started wanting to have our company do the wardrobe for their personal, weddings. And over time. I've been going to New York and buying merchandise. Filling up my store with gorgeous things and overtime was more money came in. I would. And ways to enhance the business. I was very excited about doing that business and being a retailer in a specific market. Like, we were bridal. We would be what we call the first feeders to the market. So every photographer videographer caterer Baker anybody that was in any aspect of weddings would come to us to my store to try and feed off of our clientele. So they would give us for sure business cards mind, you this was in the days before retail and having worked so hard to procure my client base, I wasn't going to just pass these people's business cards out after I worked so hard to get the client like I said, but I would keep the information and slowly. But surely, I built a roster of various vendors in the industry as I became more and more integrated into the TV motion picture and commercial production industry people in those industries, including the actors wanted me to actually do their entire weddings rather than just the wardrobe because I had a full roster of international. Little businesses that catered to the industry, I found it very easy to say. Yes. But because I was in Beverly Hills. I e Los Angeles, I couldn't take the local wedding business because it would kill my referral base from wedding planners all in the Southland region. Only weddings. I could take were destination, weddings. So I started to do destination. Weddings? My business grew from being a bridal retailer to wardrobing movies, TV and commercial productions Hollywood, including young and the restless in General Hospital for fifteen years and doing major motion pictures, like father of the bride, which is one of the biggest Disney productions, which not only I did the wardrobe for in consulted on the set, but I'm actually in the movie itself by business really morphed over time that wedding umbrella encompassed so many different areas of revenue streams that I really never said. No to any of those opportunities. As I just said, no problem. Let's go for it. And over time I was able to grow the business. Appreciate a summary. So I think even just all within their even if we start the interview. Now, we could understand how you got to where you are today as far as your business what aways today, but do you mind if we jump back to you buying your first business and kind of figure out what you actually learn? So maybe if we're opening a retail shopper retail business that we can learn from your experiences here. I don't think Austin that you'd have to or that a listener would have to just pigeonhole it to retail. I think business in general when you want to go after something either open a business or by business from somebody else and improve upon it. The relationship is the core value if you're able to establish a relationship with the person with whom you are engaging. It will make the entire difference. Because when I bought my first business, which was menswear downtown, Los Angeles I had zero money, but I was able to escape. Publish enough of a relationship with the owner of the company that they knew that I would be responsible enough that they would carry the paper. Meaning that I didn't have to go to the Bank for a loan. They would actually hold that loan and let me paid back over time. And I was able to engage enough with them that they have the trust that I was going to follow through on. I commitment which I did. And I use the same relationship building skills in acumen and sincerity when I bought the bridal salon, and I bought that bridal salon from Curson. Who was like I mentioned earlier was not in the best of health, but she didn't mind payoff over time. And she carried the paper, and as my business grew and I- outgrew that physical location and inevitably paid off the loan to buy that business. I had to expand into a larger location, and I shopped for a store and found a building in Beverley hills on Wilshire. Boulevard on the main drag close to my original store. But this store didn't have any windows, and when you're in a retail business like mine a luxury retail business. Your windows are your business card at how I grew my first business, but I took a chance anyway. And I spoke with the owner, and I had given him my whole history of buying businesses up until that point and the future of the business that I had currently at that time which was doing very well. And he carried the paper as well. So I was able to buy my third opportunity which was that building. And again, he carried the paper and those relationship the core of the relationships that I was able to develop were what gave me the opportunities that I had in my career. When it's time to make a higher for your small business naturally. You wanna find the best person for the job odds, are that person is on linked in see linking jobs makes it easy to get matched. With quality candidates who make the most sense for your role Lincoln jobs uses knowledge of both hard skills and soft skills to match you with the people who fit your role the best people come to Lincoln every day to learn in advance their careers. So Lincoln understands what they're interested in in looking for which means when you use Lincoln jobs to hire someone you're matches or based on so much more than just a resume, your Lincoln job matches are based on skills and background. Sure. But also an interest activities in passions matching lets you quickly. Get a group of the most relevant qualified candidates for your role that way, you can focus on the candidates. You want to spend time talking to make a quality higher cure excited about customers rate Lincoln. The jobs number one into levering quality hires. So go post a job today at Lincoln dot com slash millionaire and get fifty dollars off your first job post. That's Lincoln dot com slash millionaire to go get fifty dollars off your first job post. Terms and conditions apply. So were you're the one making suggestion on them carrying a paper. Because this pretty interesting again, we can learn lots of different things from your story. Right. It does have to be necessarily in the high luxury retail industry. But I just find it kind of fascinating. Like how you even bring that up and are able to get them to believe in new of they're carrying the paper instead of you going to the Bank, especially when you had zero dollars for that first business, Wes. It was me that brought it up because one thing that I did learn in this is not necessarily true. If you grow large large business, but in my case, I was always my own best Representative, and I like to carry on my own conversations and make my own appearances and make my own meetings and get to the bottom line by understanding what their goals were and understanding what the nature of their specific business or piece of real estate was what you cannot put a square peg into a round hole or vice versa. Things have to be able to line up. There has to be that synergy. And the match has to be right. When you understand what the other person is looking for the specific type of either business or piece of real estate that they're selling is. And it really matches up with what you're looking for. And what you see as your future is under those circumstances that you can really engage in a heart to heart head to head conversation to make it with. Win all around for these three businesses because there's three different businesses that you're talking about that you went to the owner of the business and had them carry the paper, quote, unquote, like your first one was midst cheap retail, right? Then it was your wedding store. And then third one was when you're moving locations into a bigger warehouse into a building into an actual luxury building. So with these three instances how many people did you have to go through our either different businesses or properties. Did you have to go through because it sounds like you just went to each one of these three and boom it worked out. But I would think that maybe you'd have to go through dozens to try to get this deal to actually work. That's very fair question. The first run around when I bought the menswear store it was sort of an organic situation because while I was living in San Diego. I was what we call jobbing. So I was buying men's wear like jeans. I was an in between her I would buy from a manufacturer. And that I would sell to a store that didn't necessarily have the credit to buy from the manufacturer directly. And I used to go up to us Angeles in order to sell the goods this is way back in the beginning of time. When jobbers were very very well known in the industry, they still sort of exist. But not in the same way that they did in those days. And when I would do that I would be up and down on the main street in Los Angeles. I would feel a lot of businesses, and it was through those relationships that I found that opportunity of a store owner that really wanted to retire a lot of pounding the pavement not necessarily having that in my mind. Like I wanted to open my own business. But it just happened that that person was in front of me. I always said, I'm not an opportunist, but I will always keep my eyes open for opportunity and this opportunity arose when I was doing these transactions with these business owners, and there's one particular business owner like I said really wanted to retire. We just talk because we had a relationship going, and I was always friendly. I've always had a lot of. Curiosity. I've always been a person who's asked questions not invasive -ly, but just out of genuine interest. And when I have conversations a lot of things come out in the open opportunities arise. That's how the first one happened. And then when I decided I wanted to go into luxury bridal and leave that low end menswear, which was a cash cow in those days behind an have a better lifestyle for myself and for my family. It was easy to find the opportunity because it was a knee Schmidt business. There wasn't a lot of competition. There was almost no competition in those days. But I got lucky in that. I found a retailer who was dating somebody who owns the only one in town that was a stroke of luck. And that's why I say in life, you need more luck than brains sometimes because when these things happen is like the universe just lines. And it's Qismat but to actually close back deal. It was very difficult. It took like I said two years. I traveled with her. She wouldn't allow me to even go in the store or look at the books until escrow close head. I sort of did it with my gut, which I wouldn't necessarily say is the best way to do it in this day and age, but in that time it worked out for me. But it was an uphill climb. And then when I made the plunge into the building because I needed a larger place, and I decided at that point in my career. I wanted to invest in my building I thought it was completely out of reach. And I just thought all this is just a long shot. If a dream it'll never happen. So I started looking at buildings in Beverly Hills. And there was this one building that was stunning just gorgeous all travertine marble exterior, but no windows. So I wasn't even thinking of going in to even consider it even though I knew it was for sale. But the reason I did was because it had a parking lot and the parking in Beverly Hills is so valuable because they're just is such a limited amount of parking that that's what in. Courage me to actually reach out and talk to the owner had bypassed the real estate agent. I told a real estate agent whatever deal you have with the owner of the building keep your commission, but I wanna talk to them in person. I was able to reach that person. And it took a few months to work it out. But it was because I really went after it. I call it. My ears were up at the starting gate, and I just had one goal in mind to find out if I could make that deal. I went after it, and I did it and it wasn't easy and it was very expensive. But I did it, and what you're was at deal when you moved into the building I bought the building in nineteen eighty nine as I was working on the film father of the bride by the end of nineteen ninety we moved into the Golding, and it was exactly at the time when the entire bridal market, totally crash because there was a bridal designer that came onto the scene that is one of the only bridal designers in the entire world that even men have heard of and. Her name is VERA Wang and her father bankrolled her business with about eight million dollars, and she gobbled up the bridal industry and only sold to specific places and everybody in the industry scrambled for about two years to figure out where their footing is what consumers were buying and it was at that pivotal time in my career that I said I'm going to start to go to Europe an import wedding gowns. And it was at that critical point that there was no internet in those days. I had no way of finding out designers in Europe. I actually went to the library. I looked in magazines and telephone votes, and I found bridal designers in London, and I took a chance and I flew to London, and I got a conference room in a hotel, and I stayed there for three weeks. And I asked the concierge to help me find every bridal designer that could come to see me at my hotel from the UK area. And they did invest what I start. Importing wedding gowns. And it's saved by business. The great bridal crush of ninety one right that we call. It was nineteen nine hundred ninety one. It was it shook up the entire industry. So when you went to Europe to get these bridal gowns, what was the thinking where they cheaper or are they different? Like, what was you said it saved her business of tesla? Bit more about this in any business that you're in whether it's a retail location or online platform like we are currently in. You are at the mercy of your demographic in your consumer. Of course, you have to capitalize on whatever that consumer is looking for in our case we were in Beverly Hills. Beverly Hills is an international hub. We have some of the top most luxurious hotels in the world in a three square mile radius. I knew all the concierge is in catering managers in hotel GM's, and they all sent business to me. So I had to capitalize on the fact that not only did we have a luxury demographic by virtue of the residents in the city but by virtue. Chew of the fact that we have such an influx from international markets. So my goal was to create an inventory that catered to an international market and a market that the consumer base that was looking for really the best of the best. So I went to Europe, and I founded the pavement, and I thought out designers that created gorgeous and unique merchandise, and I brought it into the US. And I ended up importing from the UK Spain Italy in France, and it took me some time a couple of years to really build out my contact bases. But I became a guest of the trade commissions of those four markets in that they would actually pay for my travel to go to the international exhibitions where the designers would show their new merchandise, and they would pay for my hotel rooms to encourage me to bring merchandise into the US. They underwrote my trips for over twenty years, and it was a huge access. For me to get to know the wedding communities in those four countries and beyond in it, really laid the platform or a lot of a wariness of I company overseas. It really grew by international brand when you were going over there and getting those new wedding dresses. What was the difference? Between miss wings was her like cheaper than you're trying to find something that was different immortal. Juris is there like a little bit more details on how you were smart enough to figure out to go over there, and what the actual market would want. I wouldn't say that it was really so smart until in retrospect, it was genius. But at that time, it was absolute survival because I had just bought a building. And I didn't have the proper inventory that was catering to the demographic. Because what happened was VERA Wang had been personally in ice skater, and she designed the ice skating costume for the Olympic medalist Nancy Kerrigan who they have just recently in the last couple of years made a movie about what happened to her. Forgive. Me, you might know the name of the movie better than I. But it's a great movie, and it starring Margaret Roby who is now in very Queen of Scots as the star. I think her name is AMI A forgotten her name I wanted to rest. But anyway, so VERA Wang designed a wedding gown very similar to the costume that she designed for Nancy carrying it. And it was the rage. It was a trend, and it was a hard trend that penetrated the market for almost two years and everything is trend based when it really becomes the hot ticket from miniskirts the sixties to assume womanish, I feel feeling adorable dumb things are trend driven and she just started hottest trend. And so we needed to find something that would be unique and different in cater to a market that wasn't necessarily a trend. Consumer a trendy consumers somebody that they're not the wealthiest of the marketplace. They just want to sort of keep up. I wanna use. Is the word like sort of wannabes a little bit nouveau riche, but a consumer that's a little bit more educated. Very well traveled is used to buying a handbag for three thousand dollars or a pair of shoes for eight hundred dollars. They will be more apt to look for quality and style over trend. And that was ruling the consumer that I was catering to and I think the movies called. I Tanya is ever is Tonya Harding. That's it. Yes. Google actually has pretty good rating here too so much that excellent moody that's how they're weighing got her start. She was catering in those wedding dresses flooded the market you're saying everyone wanted those. Then you realize you had to do something in order to keep your business alive. Right. Exactly to feed my family by now, I had four children, and they were all under five years old. It was sink or swim. At that point. Did you have all this Beckmann as well all my gosh. Austin? I am catatonic today. I had so much energy. I could run circles around everybody. Now. I have you're talking to me. No, you're. Darling. Wonderful a great interviewer. But compared to what I used to be. I'm like running on a quarter tank. I don't have the energy I used to. But I still can probably outrun a lot of people know sounds like I think you can outrun me. So you had four kids under five at this point in time when you had to go it was the early nineties when you went to Europe to make this change in your business. Yeah. And I was one of those cases where they say working women have it all working women don't necessarily will. They dig in my gay didn't necessarily have it all I would have to go to Europe for three weeks at a time. And then I'd go back to back with a New York bridal market. So I would be away for six weeks at a time sometimes, and it was extremely difficult for me as a mom. It was difficult for my kids as a family, and it was difficult in my marriage. I did not have a great marriage, and I ended up leaving that marriage, and it was very very very challenging. Thank God today. My kids are between twenty nine and thirty five years old. And I for the most part have fabulous relationships with them. And my youngest who is my only daughter is my business partner, which I'm so. It for for. And so things they work out in the answer. Did you do their, weddings? Of course, I've done to weddings of my kids, so far got two more to go. And it's the best thing. I can imagine you're back to if you don't mind the turning point in your business, you realizing you having to get different inventory to stand out and make your clientele happy. One other part was you brought this up, and I think it was really important that you didn't wanna leave money on the table by having all these brides come into your actual bridal store. All you wanted a piece of it the contacts, and you realize you can't go into the L A market in deal with that that you'd have to do that outsource. Can you talk a little bit more about that? Because I think that was important because he even asked me on the pre interview is like how do I monetize podcast right now? I only do it through advertisers. But you were talking about being able to have relationships with other people and find out ways to monetize at yourself after you've done all the heavy lifting and having all these clients come in here. Yes. Absolutely relationships are the key to the launching pad of any. I'm going to say. Success and or failure. But relationships are everything relationships come from base of sincerity in interest in real concern and discovery acidy in you can build on that in all aspects of personal and professional life for me. I started something free internet that was called a referral booklet. And as all these people would come to me and give me their business cards of precursors down asked to penetrate. Our client base to get referrals. I gathered them up, and I'm sort of like a Amana type a personality necessarily, maybe sort of. But I'm very organized in the way, I think I'm not always the way I do. But very much in the way, I think so I gathered all of these various business contacts, I categorize them and I reached back out to them. And I said we can create what we call a referral booklet, and we can pass it out to all of our clients in a book, they book you, but they've got a resource list and people went forward in in those days. I started the booklet in. Eighties. And at that time, I was charging five hundred dollars a year to be part of it. And we had a referral because of over one hundred pages it was very successful. And people to this day told me that I sort of started the internet listings on paper and over time as I was asked to do the actual weddings that I couldn't take the local weddings because I didn't want to kill my client referral base. I took destination weddings, and one of the destination. Weddings that I said yes to was a family that had already purchased a wedding gown for one of their daughters. They came in and they purchased a wedding on for their second daughter. And they asked me to do they're winning. And I said, well, where's the wedding going to be? And they said, well, we want to do it in Italy. I said oh Italy. I love Italy. I'd be going to Italy for years and importing wedding where in Italy. And they said, oh, we want to do it in Rome because that's where we're from. And I said Romo I love Rome. It's so gorgeous where in Rome, you have in mind, and they said a Vatican at is said, yes, I am a Jewish girl from Chicago in Beverly Hills selling wedding gown. I would love to do your wedding at the Vatican two years later, we had a magnificent wedding for that again with the most magnificent reception at one of the most glorious villas on one of the hilltops of Rome, and I attended the wedding and sat next to the owner of trader Joe's and one of the intercontinental hotel owners, and it was the most incredible experience. And Andrea Bocelli did a whole performance for them. It was just an amazing experience. I never say, no, I say, no problem. I am open doors that have been just incredible. Because there's not the very first one you did. Right. Think very smart did not say noted anything like this. But I don't if you wanna walk us through the very first one you did like that. Or maybe you can watch more detail on that experience where you just gonna take X amount of dollars that they were gonna pay you. And then you were going to divvy it out like a contractor would house if you will or were you helping getting even more involved or you can take more of the wedding planner role. Just tells it like how you knew how to do this at first it just seemed like you're worried about the retail shop. Shopping selling gallons rate instead of this part of the business. So tell us how you're able to expand it to that learned that well because they wanted to get married at the Vatican. It wasn't going to be the type of situation where we're engaged we want to get married and sits Matz, it was going to be a very long process. I knew that. And that's why I was able to say, yes. Because I could figure it out along the way there's that old saying Bill the seven forty seven as you fly which a lot of entrepreneurs say you should do when you're going to business. I don't necessarily go by that adage, although I can understand it in certain circumstances. But in this case, it was the very first wedding. Anybody asked me to do. Well, that's quite a wedding to I start off the business on. Yeah. But you know, by the time the wedding happened. It wasn't my first because it was two years down the road. But the thing is it's like I said several times already you never say. No, you say, no problem. You learn as you go, and you are of service. And when you have that mindset that you wanna be of service, you already have contacts like in my case, I had been to Italy so many times because I'd been importing. Wedding gowns. And so I had so many contacts had hotels and with wedding industry professionals. So for me, it wasn't that difficult to make some phone calls and divide out who to call in because it was already in Italy in Rome that I had these contacts that was very fortuitous on my part. Plus the fact that this family were Italian immigrants. They even had a house in Rome. They already had a lot of access, and they were very wealthy. It sort of comes back to capitalizing on your location, and your demographic, they had the million dollars to donate to the Vatican in order to open access, and I took over the organizational role of making sure that the villa would be able to handle the group and make sure the catering was taken care of in the transportation was taken care of high did all of the logistical operational things as well as during the wardrobe for all the females in the family, and then when I went and we were in the largest Capella in Saint Peter's basilica for the actual ceremony. That was a fishy aided by the secretary of state of the Vatican. When they kneel down for the sacraments Iran down in fixture, wedding out. I did all the hands on stuff. And it was pretty amazing in remarkable. And it was a great lesson. Every time I have a public speaking an opportunity, and we have anything to do with one of the topics that I speak on his your network is your net worth. This is one of the occasions that I bring up in my speeches in my speaking because it really made the difference. I had already done a wedding for the family. They already trusted me. And they believed in me, and I was able to gain their confidence in was able to do it. But it wasn't what I always wanted to do. I didn't want to be a wedding planner necessarily. It was a natural. And organic transition in another revenue stream direction that I didn't want to turn down. And so I did it. But it wasn't my first love, but it opened a lot of opportunities because from that from doing destination, weddings. And learning about different markets and experiencing different countries. And the luxurious properties that they had to offer it really expanded my network, and eventually I got my own television show because I had done a wedding for. I think it was the right hand person of Ryan Seacrest for ten years, and she came into my store to buy a wedding gown, and she was a producer for him. And she said to me this was when everybody had their own television show like in around two thousand ten two thousand eleven two thousand twelve and she said Rene, you really need your own show, and she ended up sending producer in to me, and it didn't work out with that producer. But inevitably another producer came in that actually was from Canada and pitched the idea, and they were scouting for a location scouting for a store owner. I ended up landing my own television show, and that really changed my life. And also all the time that I retained all the time all the years from day one that I got into my first luxury retail. Title song. I always looked around and said I can do more than what these four walls. Limit me too. High can do more do more when I started at referral booklet, I got out beyond the walls, and I let people know about various vendors. And then when I shot a gala wine commercial up in Napa Valley and the producer called action. And I saw everybody raised their glass and idea dawned on me, oh my gosh. I should bottle my own champagne and use it as a trademark which I did for thirty years. And all of these ideas that I had branding before branding was considered. What it is today? I had these ideas that I wanna do more do more and be bigger and have a greater reach. So when I was importing wedding gowns. I felt like I got out from behind the walls. But I always felt like I could do more. And then as I said, it was his mantra that I put out in the universe. I got my own television show and lo and behold, I got beyond the four walls of my businesses in a way that I never dreamed up. I couldn't let it stop there. I had to. To continue that momentum. Because I wasn't ready to give it all up and do the next entrepreneurial dive that I could. And that's how weta ways actually begin wanna say some cash on your next car rental, then consider using our newest sponsor auto slash dot com. It's free incompletely easy to use to be honest after I I visited auto slash dot com. I was a bit skeptical about their promise to save you more than any other car rental site, but they really did deliver. For instance, oughta slash put a weakened car rental in my area for ninety nine dollars. I then checked out the other, quote, unquote, major carbon till sites and the exact same parental on the other sites were quoting between one hundred and fifty and two hundred dollars. I'd rather pay ninety nine dollars then two hundred dollars for the exact same thing. How about you? So how does this lush do it? All they searched for every coupon code you're eligible for and they're huge database, and then they apply that coupon to your car rental. 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Where they automatically slash the prices on your auto rentals. We're talking about having all synergy and be able to do all these things we can tell just even your voice. And I think that's what drives a lot entrepreneurs is like you feel like you can keep doing things get a little success. It's not good enough. I can take it to another level, etc. But was there ever time where you ended up getting burnt out from doing all this stuff because it sounds like you were just pushing as many hours as you can within a week during these years, you know, it's true. And until this day, I probably only sleep about four or five hours every third night, if I lucky, but aside from being able to run on empty, I had so many pitfalls aside from the personal pitfall of leaving my marriage and leaving four kids behind in order for me to be able to save the business that was feeding my kids to dealing with employees where I had labor issues because management wasn't operating to their fullest potential. And I was so busy doing the other parts of the business that I felt needed pursuing that I had talented I neglect. Other aspects of business which led to labor lawsuits, which were devastating to me and the love of my life that I ended up marrying who was our family dentists who I married eventually and almost lost him to cancer twice on a personal level. It was devastating to my husband. My husband is Michael losing his only son in a car accident almost ten years ago, all of these pitfalls that we had personally professionally that brought us at one time the highest highs and at many times the lowest of lows, I just never thought it was the end. I don't know what it is about me. I've had so many things that I've tried and I hope that I would win the jackpot method jackpot in terms of like striking rich because I never went after Justice strike, it rich, I was lucky in that. I made a lot of money, but I've always done it for the satisfaction of being able to achieve. I have had so many times things that I've tried that just didn't. Come to fruition. It's been painful, but I never let it stop me. Even as bad as things could get I just never stopped and said had finished. It's over I can't do anymore. I always felt like if something that's going to happen. The page is going to turn. It is not the end of the book. That's how I've always felt you're talking about what ways kind of hell if formed so do you want us bring us into that? I guess he started that a little bit of her three years ago or so did you stop doing everything else or tells us about Disney watch venereal journey? Well, I got the television show called brides of Beverly Hills on TLC ended had international distribution, the producers really encouraged me to make a lot of appearances. So I did I traveled for the show for publicity. It was exciting. Great. And we actually moved into another location to film second season. Because the story of the building that I haven't Beverly Hills. I ended up selling that building and not realizing that I was going to get second season. And then five days after we close escrow building high found out, I got that confusing. So TLC funded a second store for the show. Thanks le-. And that was like neurotic ruined everything. They'll show. Yeah. Well, so they really believed in me. And it just happened that a lot of the bigwigs in the discovery network their wives bought running outs from even once lived in Maryland people had confidence that I could do what I said, I could do we got another location. It was very beautiful, and I was able to stock it with a million dollars of inventory and all on consignment from different manufacturers around the world. And it was really great, but business it was in two thousand twelve it was very difficult at at time retail was really being hammered by the internet. And I just didn't see that. I wanted to stay in this forever. And we probably would have done season. Three have the building that we releasing from not gotten a ten year long term tenant, which really. Change, the dynamics and we had to exit the building and TLC didn't wanna go into third place. And frankly, I was sort of burned out by that at the end of two thousand twelve I took a small place for about three months just to see test the waters little bit. And I realized my heart wasn't in it. But the last guest that I had on my show were a Broadway. Couple that actually got engaged on a season finale of America's got talent, Diana Degar, garment ACO, and while we were filming the episode of our show, we spent a lot of time together. And they asked me if I would do their wedding as well. So I accepted it. It was several months after I was out of retail completely. But e entertainment did about six episodes special on the process of their wedding because these are like hot young stars on Broadway. Really sweet. And it got me an opportunity to get a job for two years as an ambassador for one of the hotel groups. In Los Angeles to be a wedding destination of acid or for them in a weapon ambassador and in that role. I have to do a couple of B to C events for them in a two year period. So the contract was decent. And I was making money, and I was reached out to a lot of vendors, and I did it, and it's sort of occupied my time for two years. And in the meantime, I did Diana's wedding. Which was wonderful ace was the only group of all the weddings. I've ever done who actually gave me a kiss right as he walked up the aisle. They are the most lovely couple I've ever worked with and I did it. But my heart wasn't given it. So I do that for a couple of years now fast forward, it's two thousand fourteen and I really didn't know what I was going to do. My husband is a successful dentist in Beverly Hills. I've known him for over thirty years. He and I have a really romantic love story. He wanted me to just stop. He said you've hit the Mark and every plateau you've been at the top of. Your game in retail. You have your own television show. How many people can say that? Why don't you just stop now in enjoy your life? And I just have that entrepreneurial issue that I wanted to do another project and lo and behold, I got very lucky the trade commission of Italy with whom I had worked with for twenty five years importing, wedding gowns. They contacted me. And they asked me if they could give my credentials to the Italian tourism board because my television show was really popular in Italy was one of the top shows, and it was still playing reruns and the Italian tourism board and some of the shows that are produced in that country for tourism. They were looking to get some more visibility to their market. So I said, yes, give them my credentials, and we engage in conversation. And I ended up signing a contract with them to bring wedding planners to Italy to tour luxury properties and to increase the visibility of their wedding market to the North American market. And I did it because. I was first of all I always love to travel, and I still wanted to continue that and they really took care of me. They booked all of I travel business class, and I was at the most luxurious properties. And they took care of me. Like, I was a Queen. Anne, every where I went even though I brought very well known North American wedding planners because my TV show is so popular nobody there at the hotels or anywhere else. Be wanted to talk to anybody about meat. They wanted pitchers with me autographs and people would flood me at train stations. And I was very very popular. And I said, wow, this is really interesting had bringing all of these people that everybody knows in North America. It got really great businesses. But when I get here. Nobody cares about them. They only care about me. And they want to know what we can do together. So maybe I should consider doing something different than I've ever done before. And my youngest child who's my only daughter, I've got four kids. My three sons in a Princess as I always say she was living in the Middle East. She had gotten her masters degree and was worth. Working in international sales had was considering moving back to London where she went for undergrad. We talk all the time. And I said to her why don't you meet me in Italy for one of these fabrics. He's fan trips are familiar relationships that properties and destinations sponsor for professionals in an industry to go and see what the landscape is for whatever specific business. It is. So if it's a tourism board, it's to see the lay of the land of the destination they represent if it's a property group. It's to give travel professionals Vallejo. The land of what their properties have to offer in specific destinations. So these were four familiarization trips for wedding planners to get to know, the lay of the land of the wedding industry in Italy. So I said to Pamela, which is my daughter's name, I said, Pamela, meet me in Italy. Let's spend some time here. Let's see what's going on. And she did she came in. We rented a car you spent five weeks in Italy. We drove north south east west, we even put our current affair and went to Sicily. And we went to about one hundred and fifty. Properties we interviewed about one hundred wedding planners, and we came up with this idea of weta ways. I woke up in the middle of the night. And then I said that's the name wetter ways, we trademarked it in twenty seven countries. And we found about thirty properties at the end of that five week trip that were interested in doing something that we could create some kind of a platform with me as the figurehead that would bring more awareness to their market. And when we finally came back to the US, that's when we founded developer. And that's when we built the website. And that's when we started weta ways three years later, it's morphed we're in version two point oh of our website, and it's growing, and it's an amazing project. And I've always in all of the businesses. I've ever had have always felt that if I had a fabulous business partner. I could do so much more because I'm limited to what I can do. And I just can't believe that my daughter is the best business partner. I could ever dream of she's talented and smart. Art, and she has great equilibrium, and is a really hard worker. So I think the best is yet to come and disagree. It looks from her mother used seem so Kear. Nobody knows what I look like, I don't know about it today 'cause on your outreach. It said this is audio only you can sit there without underwear. Although I'm not sitting without under not wearing make ministered onto your linked profile that I'm looking here. So what a ways you work with at least assist here. Only one hundred thirty seven international properties in nineteen countries. Yes, we do and it's expanding. And at first we were focused on just marketing properties to consumers, but we have grow to service, not only engaged couples. But families even that are going on trips. Together, we have incorporated full-service virtuoso travel agency into our business at first week sort of fought tooth and nail. We didn't wanna book travel who just wanted to be a referral base for properties. But we couldn't say no, he couldn't leave money on the table. So we had to start our. Own travel agency, and we cater to wedding planners. That are looking to expand their networks need ground support and travel agents who don't like the wedding business, but they've got the corporate clients that are asking for it on a personal survey look to us for all of our expertise international. So it's grown in Morphing wizard. Just you in your daughter right now that kind of run that or with your staff like now dealing with this in how much of your time. Does it take up compared to businesses that you've worked with in the past? Well, this is an internet based business. So this is really twenty four seven inter- international as well the time zones. I imagined the it's probably the hardest because it's so different than anything. I've ever done before. When you have a retail store, you open you close, and that's basically at you gotta go on buying trips and your who's on the ground here. It's like you said it's twenty four seven international, and we cater to different types of clientele. They are spinning place all over the place. I have a PR marketing division of the company where one person does all the SEO stuff. Off and social media stuff and another person who really gets us a lot of media attention on the PR side. And we have a developer that works in our office. And we have two people that were under Pamela and the travel division. And so there's about seven of us. We've talked about your growth along the way and these different businesses and things that we've learned, but I'm just curious were you ever in financial trouble other than when you went to Europe to get the wedding? You're just dealing with a high end clientele. And I found that most of the entrepreneurs I've interviewed sometimes after they finally have some success. They might go buy some curious things and realize they got into their head where you always like, smart wise or personally like with your finances during this whole thing because I was in retail myself luxury retail. I never really found it very entertaining or satisfied to go shopping. So I've never been a big shopper. I don't really know very much about cars. I don't know anything about cars, actually. But my husband does. So he has beautiful cars, but it never really made a difference to me. And thankfully, I lived in Beverly Hills in my business has always been. Everley hill. So I've been walking to work for about fourteen years. I've never even really cared about a car. So I've never done that travel has always been our biggest expense. But because I traveled in the past for either the trade commission or for the tourism boards. A lot of my travel has been underwritten, and it continues to be today because I go to international luxury travel markets, and I'm hosted buyer meaning that they pay for all of my trips. So the answer is on a personal level. I've always been very good with my finances. My businesses however, suffered over the years in one way or another my first business that I had the menswear store downtown. I brought my brother into the business and he unfortunately had a very bad downfall. He got into some trouble with drugs, and unfortunately, almost bankrupt that business and my bridal salon. I had grown to about sixty five employees, and I had different. Divisions of the company, and I had management teams, and I did not oversee one specific department, and I got into a very bad labor situation over that that depleted almost all of my finances because of legal battles, and that was pretty devastating. But thank God recovered. You're talking about because you mentioned a couple of times about curious on the control of what happened here with a. Yes, what happened was I do believe that you have to delegate in order to grow your business. I think that that is a very key part of the equation, but in that delegation. You cannot take your eyes off of the department. You know, I'm not speaking for a fortune five hundred company, but for small business where we have like I said sixty five employees three different departments. It wasn't so a manageable. But I was so focused on the sales the buying and the selling that I didn't watch the alterations department, and it sorted had took out a life of its own. And it. Actually was a convoluted circumstance in that. We were a store full of women, and it turned out that the four lady for my alterations department had a crush on my store manager, which was not reciprocated, and it turned out to be a very devastating circumstance where she was rebuked and she took vengeance out. And it's very dramatic. But it all came out in the trial because we ended up going to trial and at the end of the day, I lost labor suit because they sued me for not getting lunch breaks and different breaks during the day, and it just really got ugly. Like, I said, I was very adamant I didn't want to settle. They wanted me to settle for an ridiculous amount of money in the six figures, a very high six figures close to seven years, I thought it and the legal fees to fight it were hideous and hundreds of thousands of dollars. I ended up losing. And in the end, I paid a settlement. It was that a standing and the lesson learned is like. Said you want to grow your business, you need to grow your business. You have to delegate responsibility. But you at the end of the day have to keep your eye on the ball. And if you don't you lose sight of it, and you can really suffer. Devastating losses. So had I not been married and had a husband who would take care of me during this. I don't know what would have happened. I can't project, and I don't like to think about that. But it was during this time. Austin bet it all came to fruition that I almost lost my business, and I got the television show at the brink of losing the business and the building and everything and it was at that time that television show kept me afloat overstated group of the happened at the same point in time. Because I'm thinking everything happens for a reason sounds like you're into power like you don't even want to think about what could have happened in negatively. But that maybe you're in the realm of like the power of positive thinking, am I read into that? Right. Yeah. You are. And I really believe that it's critic. Title to your psyche and your success and your personal growth that I go by the motto the best is yet to come. And it's my sign off on my signature on my emails. And it's my motto one hundred percent, and my other favorite saying is Michelangelo. He said I saw the angel in the marble, and I carved until I set him free. And I remember I was a guest host on the talk show here called Business Rockstars, and I guessed hosted many times on that show. And when they asked me for my favorite, quote, and I told it to them the host looked at me and said what what does that mean? And what it means is that, you know, it's there, you know, that something is there you just have to get to it. And it's that motivation that drives the winter if you still today seems like you've had a success rate and appreciate you. Walk miss down memory lane and think that we could have learned from. But I guess the president now in the future. What's going to drive you on what do you see for your future? Weta ways has great potential to serve the. The marketplace. And we are really trying to get our bearings on making sure that the website, which is our selling tool provides what our consumers are looking for. And it's been a learning curve because I bought strapped the business, and we have not sought investment. But I think about it or I think about partnerships where people would love the industry and really wanna grow the business, but it's a challenge. And therefore, I don't leave any stone unturned in terms of conversations and outreach and opportunities to get the fires really burning under the weta ways engine and make it a very very strong business. It's on its way. But there's a lot of work yet to do. And I see myself the next three or four years really pumping as hard as I can to give it really good foundational business that my daughter can really run with and. And take over. So that drives me, and that's what I see. And it provides a lot of opportunity for travel, which I love, and I love being with people meeting people. I love public speaking. I love sharing the pitfalls and the successes, and it just gives me a platform to do all the things I love as well as it feeds the need to work hard because I am a workaholic and very little. I mean, how do you keep up that energy? You said you've only four hours every other day or something like that. But realistically is there a routine that you have to getting all these things accomplished that you want to get done. I do sort of follow a routine. I am a pretty early riser. I do not sleep very much every third night. I might get a decent night's sleep. But typically, it's sorta five hours waking up three or four times during that time. Sometimes I'll run to my desk into my computer and answer emails, sometimes I'll just read news online or just look at pictures of. My two gorgeous grandchildren that live in Canada. I'm driven. I'm really driven. So I like to be progressive. There are days where I don't move from. I guess can I'm all day long answering correspondents in taking calls or doing interviews. Like, I'm doing now with you or podcast. And then there are days that I'm out and about with meetings all day, and I'll just walk all around the city because I don't drive in the city if I can help it for not guard at all, and I'll just be out and about or I'll be on the road traveling about probably at least twenty five weeks year on the road. So I'm a busy person. And I believe like that commercial says Abbadi that's in motion stays in motion naturally, really? Like, why am on very progressive in everything? I do go to the weekend through still working this much or do you like relax at all during the weekends? Or is it just Monday through Friday. What is because I mean, you say your travel so imagined occurs on the weekends as well. Yes. I travel over time periods. I don't fly on the Jewish Sabbath from sundown Friday till sundown Saturday. Night. So wherever I am. I'm typically gone over a weekend because I restrict that I won't travel years ago about seventeen almost eighteen years ago. My husband, Michael, and I purchased a home at the beach in Orange County, which is about seventy five miles south of LA. And we try to go there every weekend that we possibly can when I'm in town. And when I'm not in town, he goes there, and when we go we have our four mile walk that we hike. We've got our five hundred fifty stairs that we go up because we're both very much into physical fitness. We cook together, and we just enjoy and I'm a binge watcher of all kinds of historical dramas. So at every waking moment that I'm not working and not enjoying time with my husband or my kids. I'm binge-watching a series on Netflix or prime video or something. I just feel every minute of the day with doing something. And when I settled down for a few minutes. I don't know what I'm doing. I can sit for two or three minutes. And then I know. That there's something that I could be doing that's progressive. Even if it's doing cleaning jar in my house, whatever it is. I'm very active person. That's me when you're waking up this earlier, you setting like, what time would you wake up? Are you just waking up with energy to do your business right away? Or you set your alarm clock. Just tell how that normally goes because I've been in a flow before where I used to just wake up super early even without alarm clock. Because I was so excited about work. I don't know if you're the same way or or if it's more routine based at least when you're waking up well because I do a lot of business overseas up late because I like to hit them first thing in the morning, but on the other hand, my husband is a very early riser. He's typically out of bed at six o'clock. He starts seeing patients at eight sometimes even seven thirty. So he wakes up I sort of there. I'm sort of waking up. Sometimes the alarm will go off. Sometimes I'll already be up because I'll have been on my phone looking at things it really depends. I don't have a specific routine that the alarm rings? And I jump out of bed and I ride to the gym. I really don't do that. I'm sort of plus. In. I'm always sort of on the brink of being awake. Even when I'm sleeping, obviously, you might be the most troubled person, I know at least just based on everything that you've been discussing is there some favorite spots that someone's listening in there a nomad entrepreneur one visit spots. What are your favorites? It really depends on the kind of traveler you are and what you're looking for. There are so many spectacular destinations in the world that have he's pristine beaches and these crystal turquoise waters that in the Maldives that are amazing are even Kabo or encamp Coon at the Riviera Maya or in the Caribbean. Or if you love ancient history or art Europe has the most magnificent things to offer Harris, of course, Rome Tuscany, if you love the countryside. If you love amazing food in your gourmet. India has incredible food is just really depends on the kind of travel. You are I personally am not the kind of traveler that can go and sit on. On the beach. I'd never been like. Yeah. This is not me. Plus, I'm a redhead. So I don't like to go. My skin is pretty fair. I don't like to lay in the sun. So I like to go where there's museums in lots of places to walk and stuff like that good like this year. I went to France for few times, I went to Ireland with my husband that was one of his favorite places. I was in Italy eight times this year, we have a full production company, where we film, weddings, all over the world as well as we have a blog that we're launching in January called romantic wedding and honeymoon venues of the world. So with our full service production company called weta ways life event films. They have their own page on our website. We travel the world, and we go to the most magnificent properties to film, all of the wonderful features that they have to offer. So that gives us a lot of opportunity to travel and in twenty nineteen we plan to do that in Germany, romantic castles of Germany. I have Istanbul on the list. I'm going back to France to Marseille taking my husband to Barcelona. And I'm going to kick council Africa. I just booked at trip this morning. So there's a lot of stuff going on think you for coming on in sharing your story. If you wanted to leave a less word or anything else with the people are listening are starting their own businesses. Or maybe they already have are trying to expand. It do. You have any other last thoughts that you want to leave with him? I would always love to share the fact that being genuinely interested in not only your own personal success, but the success in welfare of people around you success, breeds, success, and kindness, breeds kindness. Hopefully to me kindnesses much more important than intelligence in high. Just strive every gay to be the best person that I can be an I think in life. There are givers and takers, and if you can surround yourself with givers, and you're a giver yourself than the sky's the limit in terms of what you can accomplish again personally and professionally whatever success means to the individual. But to me, it's the end it's the perfect season for it. Austin no matter when you play this podcast or when anybody listen. To it throughout the year. Tis the season to be giving all year round having. I thank you very much. For last words, if anyone wanted to connect with you is there a best way for them to do that. I don't know if it's like through linked to Twitter or some other way for them to maybe message. You take thank you for doing the interview. Well, thank you so much linked in is my great platform to share all of our business, accomplishments and my Email addresses Rene at lead ways dot com. And I'm always ready willing to connect right? We'll thank you very much again. Renee. Thank you Austin, continued success to you. Kulich brother female, entrepreneurs we've interviewed. Then here you go episode five with Sarah shell of Sarah Shaw consulting episode, twelve with Dory. Clark of reinventing you Pacific v. Episode fifteen which Ilian Hellman of realty mogul episode thirty three with DNA corn Benoy of sonic, boom, wellness or episode forty eight with Chevron Moran of energetic solutions. Guess what? I'm going to say next, please share the podcast if you wanna keep hearing more episodes of millionaire interviews, then please take the time to share it with somebody else.

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121: Taking Over a Family Business & Leading it to New Heights (Matthew Nix of The Nix Companies)

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

57:06 min | 2 years ago

121: Taking Over a Family Business & Leading it to New Heights (Matthew Nix of The Nix Companies)

"As soon as she said, he was setting up atrium knows this slight. Yeah. Hell the sky cycle of value from simple as that. Do you consider yourself a helpful person? If so would you be willing to help support me and my team on patron? So we can keep bringing you this awesome podcast. Every little penny will help if you are willing to help go to millionaire. Dash interviews dot com for slash hatred on that's PAT R E N or check the link in your episode notes below one of the many perks supporting us on patron is that you can instantly schedule a call with me help you with your current or future business. If you check out the beginning of episode one nineteen you can get a glimpse of what you're in store for so to sign up for this. Awesome opera. Trinity Goto millionaire. Dash interviews dot com for slash patriot. On. Wasn't well established enough on my own to go to borrow the money from the Bank. Brought on a private investor to help us do that. He put up all the money to start this division. So we're often running really exciting time. Here we are about a year into it. And we're losing money. That was terrifying. A lot of understand that I ain't got to be profitable. And then next thing you gotta do have cash and profitability doesn't always equal cash. Double the size of silly doubled. Our people double our revenue doubled our problems for sure. Yeah. It was a little bit of everything. We liked to joke. If you had a pulse, and you could weld, we'd hire you. Just had to be hustling all the time. And there's a lot of years of just grinding it out just tiny incremental progress. My name's Matthew Knicks on thirty three years old my role here at Knicks companies is president we're located in Posey Ville, Indiana, which is a small town right in the heart of the midwest about two thousand people in our town, and we recently became the largest employer in the town. So that's kind of neat. And also a sense of responsibility. And how many people work at your company as of today, sixty four full-time? Okay. Where you born and raised in Posey Ville, Indiana. I was been here. My whole life up around the business, which can lead to something that sort of interesting. I guess when I tell people in part of a family business, which my brother, and I are the fifth generation ear. They automatically assume that we just sort of walked into a company savage somewhat to the degree that it is today. But that's really not the an fact how was it all when I joined the business. It was just my dad. My grandfather in my a it didn't have any team members outside the family by brother. And I have grown the business quite a bit Scott. Some interesting dynamics on one hand say long time legacy family business that was well established for reputation, and which we certainly built upon it wouldn't be where route without that. But on the other hand, there's a lot of ways it feels like a startup. We've went from not members outside the family to sixty plus in a matter of seven or eight years pretty rapid growth at least in our industry sector, not Trevor growth in any industry sector because honestly, if you grow too fast as well people have issues with that, even though with been a family business like you were saying, there's basically three people and they're all the family members. Now, you're sixty plus people. That's right. Yeah. When you actually joint did you always have this vision to wanting to grow this company have been handed down through the family, or what was the deal with you wanting to expand it. Yeah. I think I always did. I don't remember the moment where I was really like, okay, we're going to do this. But I was always a little bit entrepreneurial story about that. My grandma would pay us. I think. She paid us ten dollars to clean the gutters. And I remember convincing my younger cousin that I would pay him five dollars to do it. And then I would just take the other five as my cut. So I think that was the first time looking back recall an entrepreneurial spirit that I had. But anyways. Yeah, I grew up in the business and worked through high school, and I went to trade school for one year came back and joined the business, and I just saw an opportunity there. I thought could be a lot more just really from the beginning. People ask me all the time where we're at now, did you ever envision it being where it is today? And they're really shocked. I tell absolutely yes, I did. But then what I also say kinda tongue-in-cheek is right here. Today's about the limit of what I visioned originally. So I don't know where the hell we go from here, right one. We talk a little bit more about the company first. And then we'll talk about you starting off in the company too. So we're on the same page. So what exactly is the Knicks companies Knicks companies, we call ourselves diversified metal solutions provider, and you're probably wondering what the hell that is we specialize in industrial prod. Sales that revolves around mainly safety in the rural handling products, we do manufacturing services, which ranged from fabrication dust coatings. And then we also do industrial maintenance field services. A lot of the work. We do revolves around manufacturing companies, heavy industrial companies do some work for the agony stry and also for the government. That's an abroad scope what we do. What are your like your customers, especially even before you even started working there? How did y'all actually make money like who would call y'all and you delivered to make money for a great question? And that's changed to some degree over the years. We started as a blacksmith shop. My great great grandfather founded nineteen to here in Posey bills. A blacksmith essentially is customer base was almost exclusively. Farmers local agriculture were in a very predominantly agricultural area here from nineteen o to really even today. A good base of our customers is agriculture related, but in the nineties, my dad's started shifting into commercial fabrication a little. Bit. And that's where we've really grown the businesses in the commercial industrial side. So those customers would look like automotive manufacturers, there's a lot of plastics industry in this area, plastics manufacturing power, plants oil, refineries steel, mills things of that nature when they're calling you are they saying they need certain piece of metal cut out. You'll cut it out and give it to or cause I don't have much of manufacturing background. I imagine most of the people right listening. Probably don't understand all the intricacies involved in doing this. Yeah. What we do largely revolves around, safety and efficiencies within their facilities. For example. They've got a big piece of equipment that they need to have safe access to do maintenance on it. They would call us up and say, hey, I've got this problem needs to come in and help me solve it. We've got engineers on staff. We'll help design that solution. And then we'll fabricate that powder. Coated? We've got a team that would install it on site. Let's good example of what we might do. But then there's also things where they'll just send us drawings say of a Bill. Ding expansion. We'll fabricate the structural steel. From those drawings anything involved with this kind of steel like people, would what would you say the majority of just to make it as easy as we can? And then we can go kinda year by year. How you grew it and what you have spent into. But that seems like that makes a lot of sense what you're talking about. Maybe with the warehouse and having to do the welding or they're calling you about the steel pieces. Is there anything else that people are calling you about net, you're helping them with? Yeah. We do sandblasting painting powder coating, and we do that in our shop as well. As on site for customers. The onsite work would revolve around a lot of industrial maintenance where we're coming in possibly saying blasting old parts that are rested or need to be cleaned. And applying new coding to them on onsite. We do that a lot of heavy industrial applications power plants oil refineries things like that. And then basically when you have taken over in the nineties, y'all were doing all this are before you actually took over. But your dad for instance, he was doing all this. But on a smaller scale, we really wasn't doing hardly any of that. They were still what we'd call welding shop. People bringing in equipment that was broken. And we're welding enough and fixing that was the core part of our business. He did a little bit of what I was considered commercial fabrication where you're designing building a platform or set of stairs. But that was a very small part of our business in that was if there was no coatings, there's no on-site work by brother, and I of expanded in all those areas since taking over. This sounds good. I think we've got kind of understanding understand some of the stuff that y'all do. But why don't we go ahead and real evac to win? You actually got in within the company when he graduated high school because. Yeah, you didn't go to college. Probably take year-by-year on what you did with the company that kind of get it to where it is today. Right. I graduated high school in two thousand three our school has a program that I think we need a lot more of today in that was where I worked half day went to school half day. I got my core curriculum Don was able to do that for any young people that are thinking about getting into a trade. There's a huge need for that was a great opportunity. I was able to work. In my family business, half day. My senior year in I'd been working there growing up through the summer, but was able to really take it to the next level. And so I did that the next year. I went to a local trade school for two year program. I ended up doing the welding program in a year and decided to come back and join the business in two thousand four joined the business full time and worked alongside my dad and grandpa learning the business and had a lot of harebrained ideas. And fortunately, they didn't let me pursue all of them. I like to joke that I was really frustrated with my dad, I had all these ambitions and things as I've gotten older, maybe a little bit more mature, I've learned that. It was probably a good balance because he was sort of like a rubber band and I still moving forward but had not been hold me back. I may have ran out so far and so fast and fallen so hard. I couldn't get back up. And he certainly let me make mistakes and fail on the way that kind of kept me from fallen so hard that I couldn't get back up and tried some things some things work some things didn't work. There was four. Five years there where I didn't from making any progress. I think that's one point. I want to try to make to the listeners. I even talked to some of our young leaders about that we're in a society where we want everything right now. And it can get frustrating stagnated. And you feel like you work at work in there's no progress, but you're planting those seeds you're paying your dues, and it's almost like a law of gravity. I mean, you just can't parachute into success. I mean, you gotta pay your dues. They if you don't you're not gonna stay there long. At least so four or five years of nothing happening felt like anyways. But looking back, I know that I was really planting those seeds, and we got an opportunity, but gentleman came to me and wanted to build a custom yacht out of steel here. We are a little mama pop welding shop that works on farm equipment in this guy wants us to build him yacht in the middle of a cornfield ought to say, I didn't think you're near any water. I was looking at a map oppose Avila. Yacht stuff around. Yes. We're about twenty five miles from the Ohio river. Okay. You can imagine fast forward. We ended up building the thing. And it was very. Noteworthy got a lot of publicity. We were on every news channel and got newspaper articles magazine articles. I tell people that really wasn't a big moneymaker for us. But it was a hell of a publicity opportunity. We made our normal wages on the job. But we saw like we were getting rich golden the Shah it ended up being about a million dollar yacht. When it was all said done, of course are piece of that was smaller percentage of that. 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And as you y'all didn't really have an experience with no, we didn't have any experience. There's some yachts are made of fiberglass and some are aluminum summer. Steal the connection with. Us. This gentleman was from the area originally he had moved away and traveled around the world and had done. Well, financially came back to the area later in life and his dad had done business with my grandfather. So there was a long relationship there. He was just looking for someone that would really work with him to build a custom yacht. The way he wanted and he wanted to be very hands on the process he came to us and by grandma likes to say, I was just young enough and dumb enough to take it on. And so there we were let's about five years in your saying that maybe you finally got some publicity for the company, but to that point yet still been doing everything that your dad grandpa had originally done that. Right. That's right. Yeah. Up into that point. Not a lot had changed. I mean, I was there. We were welding fixing farm equipment doing the occasional commercial fabrication project. Nothing's early changed for the most part. Right, dad and grandpa were supported me in building that because they took care core business while I spent two years building this custom masterpiece. Really and from that bliss ity also. Oh, the confidence that I gained in that project taking off I can build this. I think I can do about anything and just catapulted from that coming right out of that one. Our first big commercial project about right as that project was coming to an end and this commercial project that we want doubled our business overnight the one project we took on was as much revenues what we were doing on entire annual basis at the time literally doubled us instantly we had to scramble and higher. The first team members expand the team to get the work done. We had to buy a quick -ment. And that's really what started the real growth trajectory of the company, we'll dive into that in second. But I don't wanna brush over the kind of like the first five years where it might much wasn't getting done. I mean as far as maybe your role. I don't know if you wanting to expand the company was frustrations with your family as far as with because I know some people maybe just want to leave the company could feel like I can't do my own thing. I'm gonna start my own just tell us about the frustrations dealing with debt in case anyone's listening in NFL business, maybe the younger guy who wants to try. To help expand it, but the way to actually do it. Yeah. Absolutely. That's a hell of a topic right there. You can have a whole podcast devoted to that. Yeah. Lots of frustration. You're in your early twenties. And you think you know, everything and berry and bishops audacious you mix with a hundred year family business. That's pretty set in its ways in it was a boiling pot. Yeah. I had my disagreements with my dad, and my grandpa, my all individually, and there is certainly moments where I thought about leaving doing my own thing thought seriously about it. I remember one specific instance, where I was sitting with my she's now, my wife, but was my girlfriend or fiance's at the time was just in tears. I was so upset and was telling her I think I'm gonna go out on my own. The just felt like I couldn't get anywhere with them. Fortunately, we press through those things by even pressured, but I- Vince, my dad to sell me half the company at a very young age because I was entrepreneurial I wanted to forge my own path. I think there is some real intuition air my dad's part. To do that. Because but ended up working out really great for him to for both of us. I was better off staying with the company. I certainly know that but had he not got me in on it. I may have left. I probably would have done some things on my own probably not to the scale of what we've been able to accomplish. But it was better for everybody stayed there. Why don't we jump back to win? You were saying you got that first big contract because I seems like the first stepping stone of after you made the steel yacht for two years. Would you say that's the first major stepping-stone of you, cutting helping build this company to work out today. Yeah. I think it was it was a huge watershed moment for us. We took on this contract that doubled our business overnight. And we didn't have enough people to do the work. We didn't have enough equipment to do the work. Here's my brother, and I try to figure out how we're gonna get all this work done. And the one thing about the growth is we never leaned on our dad to bail us out. I mean, he was supportive. He did his thing. He let us go. But we also didn't lean on hip. We did it on our own. He did continue to do the work. He had been doing. We just had to figure out a way to get this work done. We decided to work two shifts. We hired three or four people. We didn't have enough to do it all one shift. So we would do the farm equipment in the core business during the day, and we would build these commercial buildings that were for mining applications at night, my brother, and I took turns working the night shift. We worked for tens on nights on Mondays. I would work double shift on Tuesdays. He would work double shift. We were running the night crew. They basically there's a supervisor in a working supervisors that was always one of us there every night tell us about this contract because he told us to get big contract. I think kind of understood a little bit what it is. But would this contract involved? It was building some modular Queant enclosures for coal mines. So they were modular steel buildings that house electrical controls. Did you get that contract because you put out forbid because it sound like all never done anything like this before like, how are you able to get that business that we hadn't that anything like that? We were doing some smaller projects for contact. I had in the industry in. He was happy with our work. I. I just kept looking for more opportunities was quizzing him on other things that other opportunities that might be. He said, well, I'm getting ready to award this big contract to build all these buildings. You wouldn't be interested in that would you and he had sort of overlooked even always happy with I work as he didn't think we're big enough to handle it. We said absolutely give us a shot. So I put in the bid we won the project we delivered for him. And we made money at it. So he was happy. We were happy. Yeah. That's good. Because I'd imagine it your first time doing this that you might not make money on it. But if it's your first big contract like this. You said you'd worked smaller one performed wise it 'cause you could figure it out be my only worry that. Maybe finally got the contract you're looking to grow the business. But at the same point in time, you'd better deliver MC money doing it. Right. Yeah. It was a little nerve racking. I was actually going on vacation in December that year, I was on the airplane figure in my bid, and I came back and turned it in and just remember thinking kind of like rolling the dice. The biggest gamble I've ever taken. It was a half a million dollar job. At the time. We were only doing half a million in annual sales. So be it was a little bit of a gamble. But it was calculated. Yeah. I imagine that you just keep recalculating to make sure if you're gonna base late double your business set. You're right. Yup. You said your brother several times. So why don't you tell us? How old is he helping you do in the company at this time? He's thirty one. He's a couple years younger than me. And he runs one of our operating division. So we have five core operating divisions that all operate independently. Let's like their own company, they're all subsidiaries of our parent company. So my brother were UN's one of those we have the unfortunate situation of I'm his boss where co owners, but we do have a very defined or jar here. Every family does it different. But it works out. Good for me. And I appreciate his role so much and he does a wonderful job leading that division in east. Hold me. Many times Matthew I don't want your job the dynamic works for us. He's happy to be number two. And he likes knowing that when the hard decisions after be made that I've got it make him. I certainly solicit his feedback. And we have a lot of conversations where we're trying to. Figure out where we go next. But he's happy with tell you the back seat. Sometimes sure sounds like your brother had kind of the same thought process was he the guy that you talk to about business to that around your age because I imagine around Posey villa didn't seem like there might be a lotta other entrepreneurs for you to bounce ideas off especially in your age range. I guess yes. Funny said that there's not a lot I stumbled into group fellow entrepreneur was putting together a local group here. It's several communities in the area. Not just our little town. But several small towns there seven of us that were in this group in we started meeting once a month for dinner having some beers together. Talking business we've been doing that. Now regimented Lee for five years every single month. I meet with this group, they've add up huge impact on the in our business, and we've grown very close. But that gives me an outlet to get around like nine at people once a month and share ideas and share challenges spent a really powerful thing. And I think this is really important because before that was your brother, the only person you could talk to I guess you could. To your family about business per se. But was there anybody else before you had this group kinda come together five years ago? No, not really even within the family. I mean, I didn't talk about the vision. Right. They might say. No, right. Well, they thought it was great frigging nuts. I'd like to joke with my dad. I said you can be crazy Ambi, right? They knew that I had ideas. But I didn't voice into the stent that I could were this business group at my brother, and I were talked more candidly about it, it one of the reasons he joined the business I had been working in the business. Several years starting to grow at when he joined he got out of college in that period that oh eight oh nine period where there was no jobs. He graduated with one of those really awesome marketing or management about five million. Other people have there was no wonderful jobs out there. And he thought well this fairly business. They might not be such bad idea. He was open to the growth when he joined we had to grow. And we'll tell us about this group 'cause I think some people are missing from time to time. And I think that's why they listen to podcasts like these to try to like get around like minded people. Even though they're not necessarily talking to you. Hopefully, I'm asking the questions that they're thinking. But just tell some of the things that y'all are able to talk about and how that groups helped you. So maybe we're inspired to join a group like that. Or maybe even create our own because it's hard to talk about business your regular. I'm sure you got other friends that own their businesses, and they're not even interested in talking about this type of stuff. Sure. It's so important to get around other like minded people like that share ideas. First thing I'll say it's diversified group. We're all in different businesses, which is part of the value in it. I'm involved. Now, some other organizations where I'm around similar businesses that has value tube. From a true entrepreneurial or self improvement sampling, the diversity in the group is really valuable. We can all bring a different perspective to the group, and we talk we try to go around the table every month and share some big wins. And then also share some challenges or maybe it's just one challenge that way, we're getting feedback on those things we've all hosted multiple times at our facilities to share. Best practices or get input feedback on different things. Now, there's been meetings over solely devoted to one person in the group of working through a difficult challenge. We helped one of our group members worked through buying out his partner that was significant. They've certainly helped me with some major decisions along the way. What major decision have they helped you with? So we can get more in detail. What we could ask our group if we created one to help us to the buying out, the partner was a good example. Is there something else? That's a good example that you could ask your friends who are in business here. Yeah. Probably rather not talk about the situation. They helped may through pick another one at immigrant that someone. We don't know. But junior ideas of how these people can help other than the buyout thing. That's a good thing to have these groups of business friends for so what else can we work with them on another member of the group is in the retail business was working through whether to scale the business via e commerce were storefronts everyone in the groups contributed. I think into that ultimately helped him come to realize -ation that. He had been fighting ecommerce thank for years and years and he seeing some growth through that. But ultimately candidate decision that he could just continue to do. What is doing? Well, just do more of it. He decided to open a second location. He credits the group for helping them work through that. And I think that's important. What you brought up to whatever industry, you're businesses in like, you're saying you have some industry groups that you have framed or network within but actually talking to people who aren't in your industry, you can actually learn a lot more because people are more open 'cause they're not worried that you're gonna steal their exact idea or something like that. But they're coming with the different perspective where you're like, oh, I never even thought about that. Because you're not in that industry where maybe someone in the industry, everyone uses those like marketing techniques, for example, or something like that. Right. That's why I think is really powerful. And why we have different entrepreneurs on because you might say one thing here, and I'm like, okay, I'm not into steel industry or even in that part of the United States. But I could use some principles of what you're saying. Or some thoughts that you have to my industry or whatever company that I have right? But I also say they. They asked the dumb questions that sometimes aren't so dumb. But it's like if you're closer to the business, you wouldn't even think to ask the questions that other people might ask. And then you scratch your head and go. Oh, wow. Never thought of it that way. Absolutely sounds like that groups at least over the last couple of years, but when we come back to this story right after that big contract where you got five hundred K in revenue from it. Yeah. We'll year we in. Now, are you considered a partner that point in time or what's your role in the company? Yeah, I was a partner with my dad at that time, and we're going to say about seven years or so. Yeah. Corrup- five years, you won't work in two years. You were doing the yachts. Yeah. That would have been about two thousand twelve. Okay. Tickets from there. I don't know if there's any big institute of growth along the way or anything else that we can learn about your journey from twenty twelve till today. Yeah. So two thousand twelve when it really started to take off from four to twelve or from four to eleven we just sort of bumping along very incremental growth. And then at twelve took off I think we're up to like fifteen employees that time there was four of us. For five or six years. And then we went to five, and then we went to six, and then we went from six to like fifteen that next year explosive growth in terms of people. We doubled the size of facility in purchasing facility across the street from us in order to facilitate the growth. Fortunately, there was a vacant property there. They rival to acquire double the size of silly doubled. Our people double our revenue doubled our problems for sure. By brother. I'll never forget. I was sitting in my office. It wasn't really much of an office. But an area where I worked one evening at that time, I was still working in the shop during the day and the trying to do office work tonight. That was sitting there probably kinda slumped down in my chair. My brother walked in said what the hell's wrong with you? So I started venting to him. And we were having some challenges with team members that time never forget this conversation. We had it was a huge watershed moment for us. I said to him something the stand up, I guess, we're just gonna have to tolerate certain amount of bullshit or never gonna have any people. And he looked right at me. Like only a brother can't he said absolutely not no way or not going to lower our standards, just because you're pissed off in your frustrated, and he held me accountable. If we would have taken that turn I would've gave in and that moment, right then and there, I didn't know it at the time looking back. I mean, we ju- line in the sand. And we said okay for going to grow. We're only gonna do it with good people that probably will forever. Be. The most powerful decision that we've made because we were just named. I don't fast forward here. We were just named one of the best places to work in Indiana fast forward several years to sixty plus employees in terrific recognition that we got there all goes back to that decision. We may because mediocrity breeds mediocrity half ass breeds more half. Assing? We just made a decision. We're gonna have good people. And not every decision said that's been perfect or not every hires perfect. But the overwhelming majority of our people are great team members. And they believe in our culture, they believe in what we do it in that just weeds out the ones that don't fit after a conversation. It's good that you remember this because I think there's a lot of us. We don't realize the moment right there. But then when you look back several years later, you can see like, okay, I still remember that conversation like it was yesterday. And I didn't realize this would be watershed moment. But it sounds like it was at least from what you're saying. Did you have to go back in there and fire some people or what? Because it sounds like this you when you're hiring that much especially from like six people to fifteen dish. You sounds like. It was bad hires. Whoever you're hiring. Maybe they have bad work ethic, or they're slacking off in you feel like you have to stay on top of them twenty four seven obviously, I'd get frustrating and sounds like maybe that's what was happening. Yeah. It was a little bit everything. We liked to joke. If you had a pulse, and you could well, we would hire you. But was low standards. But it was also a lot of it was our own doing. I mean, we were tolerating things should be tolerating. We'd had no structure accountability. I mean, if you're late it is what it is those kinds of things just slopping were new to this management thing that you start out as a welder and the next thing, you know, you got three or four people weld than your welding and managing them. Then you've got a guy that's managing the guys as well. And then you're managing him. And you don't really know what the hell you're doing you just learn as you go. And then you wake up one day, and you go man, I've got a big ass mess on the hands. So that we just decided, okay? So Salt Lake we went out and fired. Tint people started over we stop tolerating some things at some people had to leave. And so people didn't what we're thinking. Stop tolerating get into late to work because at least specifics really helped because again, maybe other people are dealing with that right now, they're letting employees keep coming in late, and they realize they shouldn't. So what other things did you have to the gosh looking back. It's hard. Even remember what the specifics were. I think that's as important as aid to say that like none of them were monumental. But it's all the little. Things that add up. So yeah. Could be late. It could be not following safety procedures or at a too bad attitude. Tolerating those things it's all the little things that up we just slowly started making the decisions that we were going to do things right way. Tighten it up tightened up our hiring. Now, what was funny as when you talk about that people would think gosh, I bet they have all these rules. They're hard asses. But when you get to where we're at now, it's actually the opposite of that. Because we have a great group of people. It all care all wanna win and that bought into our culture our vision, we don't even have to have that many rules. It'll just know that this is the way we do things will what was your personal work life balance at this point in time. It could sounds pretty hectic fight, especially different roles that you're taking on between you were welding, then you're managing the welders. And you're managing the manager of the Wilders. It felt like you are still welding sometimes too. So personally, did you have any type of work life balance? No, there's no such thing as that didn't have any kids. I was just were. But I was having fun. That's right word thing. I had fun on the weekends. But five or six days a week. It was head down working. Like, I said that one year we were working two shifts to student what we had to do was there anything motivating you. I'm just trying to put myself in your situation, you're in the middle Indiana in your younger, dude, like blessing. You're trying to grow the company, and you had no one else at least at that point in time. It sounded like to talk to maybe other than your brother. What just kept motivating you? I don't know. I kind of have wanted that sometimes too. I mean today I have definite motivation that we could talk about later, but back there a lot of it's probably just ego. Try to prove people wrong proved to myself. I could do it proved other people that I could do it. Status quo is not good enough. You just keep pushing forward than you want more of it. You wanna go further his never the money. Never still don't I didn't think about that still donate. It's a scoreboard is all at is the revenue or the net profit you gotta have survived. If you don't measure that you don't know pay attention to Nejat, you're you're not gonna last for long. But other than that. That's all it means to me is just measure stick. Scoreboard to make sure we're healthy in doing the right things. But it's never been motivation probably early on. It was just trying to prove people wrong prove myself. I could do it yet. Did you have anyone that you remember who didn't believe in you or someone that like you specifically wanted prove wrong because I know that's happened to me in the past. But about for you is there any moment where you had to prove all these people on whether I dunno fitness -sarily was quote, unquote. Like even your dad maybe wanted to prove him right by giving percentage. Yeah. That probably is much as anything. I've proven wrong. It's probably not the right word, but proven to my dad, my grandpa. I think that no, hey, I k do this. Right. That was big. I mean, most people I think if you have any kind of a decent relationship with your parents or grandparents you seek their validation men, really secret father's validation migrant father too. So that was more to me than anything at one to prove to them. I could do this. There are some doubters around some Mason. Here's that you would hear about and that always field may too. But definitely fuels me today as well. I think any of the go getters that we listen to on the podcast. Vest to take that energy that negative energy that you hear about. And you're just like, okay. I'll remember that. And then use that to drive you if you're gonna use it for negatively or anything else. It's not gonna help you at all. I always like appreciate when someone says, I can't do something. I'm like, okay, good. I got one more tally against me. That'll drive me to go ahead and keep growing my own business. After twenty twelve you had this kind of talk with your brother about you weren't gonna tolerate these types of things what kind of happened from there. The next few years. We're slower steady growth again. I think we're like at fifteen at that time the next year we were around nineteen twenty thirteen and then the next year, we built our coatings division. But that time we were just metal fabrication company. We weren't in the sandblasting painting powder coating we started that division. That was the first time we'd ever launched a new division from the ground up and added several more team members for that. Then there's another levels complexity there because had add our first nanager the me had a working form at that time. My brother was also working Inkatha working for Monroe. Well, I was really the only manager. So now, we've got this coatings facility ended up bringing on investor to help us start facility that was something different for our business at that point. We had grown enough that my dad was kind of looking more toward his exit and he wasn't interested in going further into debt. He said, hey, you know, if you wanna do this, that's fine. But you're gonna have to do it on your own. I wasn't well established enough on my own to go to borrow the money from the Bank brought on private vested. Help us do that. He put up all the money to start this division. So we're often running really exciting time. Here we are about a year into it in. We're losing money. That was a terrifying time a lot learning experience there. I'm trying to manage both divisions at this point time, and what are the two divisions. Just we know this point time, we just had the fabrication side, we have now launched our coatings division towards sandblasting painting powder coating and my brothers working with my dad. Do it. The farm equipment. I'm trying to do the commercial fabrication and manage Cody shop. I remember. We were about a year end of this new business or losing money inside. I remember calling up the gentleman who is our investor at the time, and he's a close friend and mentor mind now and called him in the said, hey, I think we need higher manager to run this. And so I really swallow my pride and here we are losing money. And I'm going to him saying I can't handle it. I think on top losing money. We need to go put some more money in it higher abandoned your to manage it. I didn't even have a lot of good math to back it up. I just have got feeling. That's what we needed to do. And he never missed a be in said if that's what you think we need to do. That's what we're gonna do. And he didn't judge me. He didn't say what the hell why can't you do this on your own? Now, you won't spend more money. We went out we hired a manager. And I think within six or seven months we had it turned around headed in the right direction. And really Suarez that division. The rest is history. I mean, it's grown many many times is a very profitable part of our company today, but it almost failed before we got it off the ground. Payroll and benefits are hard especially for small businesses. You don't have the time to be an expert and things like taxes and regulations in old school payroll providers just aren't built for the way you work today. Gusto is here to change all that. They're making payroll benefits NHRA easy for small businesses. In fact, nine out of ten customers say gusto is easier use than other payroll solutions to also saves. You time seventy two percent of customers spend less than five minutes to run payroll. Don't believe all the good things. You're hearing about gusto. Well, just Google them. People love gusto, and how often do you actually hear someone say they love their payroll provider. So to help support the show Goto, gusto dot com forward slash millionaire. They're offering our listeners in exclusive limited time deal. You'll get three months free. Once you do your first payroll, and again, the link is gusto dot com forward slash millionaire. How did you know you did at manager in case again where at this point in our company where find the reins over and let someone else do it because mostly it sounds like you've been spread pretty thin this whole time as far as you're doing? 'cause sounds like you've been doing everything almost all time. Yeah. And you just get a plight. Where you start dropping the ball. You can't be everywhere wants you don't feel like you're moving the needle like you need to be in. I think what helped me make decision. I had someone in mind that I thought could really do the job. Well, and I just felt like if I got him in here. I didn't know how I didn't know the math by. But if I get him in here, I know we can get the single in the right direction. Yeah. That's what we did. So you got the guy that you wanted. I did it took awhile was a friend of mine. The guy that I knew from high school is a friend of my brother's to he was working at a fortune five hundred company in their operations program. Just a really sought operational guy. Just the kind of person you wanna have involved. He's now a partner today. Many years later, he still important made a partner in the company, but. It took some convincing to get into leave this big corporation where he's got pretty sweet gig and come back. Join this small family business that in many ways like a startup but going back to what we talked about earlier had we not made that decision to have good people. I don't think we would've attracted someone like Brian when I talked him about joining our Kevin he was already seeing the wheels in motion for what we were buildings Saul the team that we put in place those things all start to build on each other. What year was this? When you hired him would have been two thousand thirteen I think two thousand thirteen to fourteen just keeping track. So he stay on track with the business growth, but up to this point. It sounds like everything keeps growing is. There something that you were doing personally to get all this growth in all this new business because I feel like maybe we're missing something on you keep hiring these people on keep getting these contracts, but kind of started with yacht contract. But it's not like you just kept getting lucky getting random contracts. He must have been doing something drive. All this new business to you that ever stopped selling still don't today if you wanna grow. You're the chief sales off you gotta be whether you're selling your business potential team members that you want to come to work or just trying to sell yourself on opportunities to work for other companies. But every opportunity I had I was trying to find ways to bring a new business. So what were you doing was there like a daily routine of something where you're sending out so many emails to specific companies where you've trying to find these contracts? What are the little things that are really driving this growth? I don't think we've hit on that. If you were just at your desk. Managing people not having the contracts come in your company, would it's still probably be the same size as it was when you started. I don't know specifically. I just know I was I mean all the above it was emails. It was using social media to our advantage. It was a lot of face to face. It was making cold calls. It was social events. Anytime. I saw someone that I knew was a potential prospect is making sure I got in front of him educated on on what we do in how we can help them decide to be hustling all the time. And there's a lot of years of descrined out just tiny incremental. Progress? Again, like you said something at the beginning. Everyone wants to win right now versus doing all these little things. But I didn't know if there's one thing in particular that kept you doing if there's a certain days of the week where you were out hustling, or if like there's different ways that we make sure that we're organizing try to target these customers. I didn't know if you have in your mind away of thinking about it. Hey, I need to target these people in order to drive the business and who you're saying through multiple channels. But it was a one specific thing that we can grab onto that really helped you drive the growth the whole time. I have those things now I'm more organized than more professional probably 'cause I've brought a lot of great people in around me helped me grow in that way. I've not naturally organized a naturally disciplined like that. I'm your stereotypical entrepreneur. The start something doesn't finish it and goes also serial entrepreneur, but back, then I didn't have any systems. I didn't have any process for that. I just was grinding us on all the time and slowly. But surely started to grow on top of each other. But today, I try to dedicate a half a day or one. Day week to be out in the field. Trying to get in front of customers. We've got a customer relationship management software called pipe drive that we use helps me keep track of follow ups. I need to make the phone or Email or in person. I think pipedreams great actually use it for the interview for the podcast 'cause it's very very simple. Yup. 'cause I've tried tons with my backing I had a CRM and try to keep track of clients that I talked to our haven't talked to. Yup. I just find out that certain people have good systems that we could all use. Maybe that sounds like a good one, very simplistic. The problem is somebody get overly complex, and once it gets overly complex than you're not using it at all. Yeah. Pipe drives. So intuitive user friendly, the least techy person here. I mean, they make fun of all the time. I could partly do anything what I started. But I can use five drive. So I'm sort of always the litmus test for that if I can use it anybody can use. Now. It sounds like you're organized by having those contacts in CRM like you're saying, but even just back in the day. Hopefully, if you had to do it over again at maybe use a CRM and try to be a little. More organized with it. Because that's the issue. I had when I was like in sales if what you could start off. You're just kind of reaching out to everyone. But then I'm like shit. I forget who I've talked to about this or that or whatever and keep driving the business growth, which it sounds like you were the main guy doing it. I don't know if it was anyone else doing it up to this point not up to this point. It helps you stay a little bit more organized to make sure you reach out to those people at a certain time or whenever you can. All right. So why don't we jump back in kinda hit these last few years of FARs where the next companies has gone, and what we can learn from you the next big step. So this point we've hired the first managers in the codes civility next big step was hired our first sales marketing person, and he's still with us today as part of the executive team and is soon to be a partner in the company as well. So these one in two I two salary boys we ever hired it. He came into do sales for us. Like, you said at this point. I'm the only one doing sales. I wanted to support to help grow the business even further so bring him end do sales marketing, he quickly involved in sales marketing, high t administer. Gratien bay char- you name it. He was my right hand mad at this point. My brother Adam Bryant, our partner are the boots on the ground guys in the shop every day on the field being Adam running the inside out of Schmidt, whose our business felt in the guy. We're running the inside office administrative side of things who continue to grow it. Also, right in that timeframe, my wife was working fulltime for a local company in the accounting department. And she comes over in joins us from the accounting standpoint helps us to make sure that our numbers are good too. Got my brother Bryan out in the field got me out of cell and taking care of administration. And then my wife panel county, finance so we had a good little team together. They're kept chipping away in two thousand fifteen. We had opportunity to our first acquisition. There's a local business. Here was hag tricon equipment was in agribusiness that we acquired they sold farm equipment in trailers they had a shop. But a parts department. We've bought that company in two thousand fifteen in really Consol. Related. It got rid of some of the pieces that did make sense for our business. That was a big step forward for us. I think we're up to about twenty seventeen members at that time that's been a work in progress ever since we took over, but really happy with where we've got that business today that eventually became the business unit that my brothers managing now. He's off on his own managing this separate business unit. Can you tell us a little bit like how do you buy business? This company was actually process going out of business. We got involved with the ownership and put a plan together to instead of them peace at all out. We put a deal to go to the by the whole thing it tax. So we bought the real estate bought the assets, we bought the rights to the customer base, and then made a deal with the team members that we wanted to retain to come on with it. So that's how that particular deal went out several years later last year, we did another deal that was a little different. We'll get to that minute. So when you're selling off, the different parts, are you just closing down different parts of the company that you're quired, but he kept like the majority of it because this could be very interesting on if we wanna buy a company in. High you know, which parts of the shutdown or not use any more details. Little bit more about that. Well, every deals different. You just have to look at what makes it. So for this specific deal. It happened to be in the same town. We were in so operationally at this point, we're about out of room where we're at loose was a major piece of real estate in our town that was opportunity for us to grow our fallback plan was no matter what we were going to pick up a significant piece of real estate to grow our core business. So that was the core piece that we thought everything around that we would just figure out a way to help cash flow. This new vestment we bought it in try to keep it as intact as we could in the beginning to sorta let the dust settle. And then over the course of two or three years, we exited parts of the business some of the lines. They were selling the eggs that some of those lines didn't make sense we tried to back fill it with other revenue. Streams that were more core to our business. Our goal is to over a three year period. We never grew the top line, but we held steady while we were simultaneously removing things that didn't make sense when you got to the end of the plan. The business was to say sizes what it was. But it was full of revenue that was more core to what we did that was approach retook took was not without challenges. But it worked out those about twenty fifteen you're saying, yeah, we acquired that in January one of twenty fifteen was strategic. You see January one twenty fifteen with the reason like exactly on January one with the deal was coming together late in the year. And then of course, if you're approaching the year, you want to start fresh e our fiscal year was January one anyway, so K made sense from an accounting Sandpoint to start clean, January one. Now that makes sense because I agree with you on their certain reasons to make it very simple versus if you've got halfway through the year or something like that. And you have your counting being different or I didn't if there's tax implications of particular reason, why you did on that date or whatever. So you grew that it seems like everything's stabilize on worked out with that deal. And you want to jump to closer to where you are today in the neck was yes. So that was twenty fifteen the next year twenty sixteen kind of cool milestone, there that was the first year we broke five million revenue labs, really exciting. We. Had went from a few hundred thousand up to five million in annual revenue worry about thirty two team members at that point at sixteen seventeen or somewhat businesses usual where were still kind of organic growth were trying to figure this new acquisition out get it where we want it. That was really the market sixteen seventeen thousand eighteen we felt like we had the previous acquisition sort of where we wanted to be the business was stabilized. We had brought on two more members to the executive team to round out our complete team now that was a director operations and our vice president of finance so at that point by wife decided to step down from finance and we brought on a CPA. We thought could all help us go to the next level and handle the complexities of the business and give my wife a little more flexibility. We have two young kids. Now, it was a lot for her. She started out as the bookkeeper of a small family business in ended up sort of as the CFO of a multimillion dollar company with different operating. Visions a lot of complexities. And so it was time for her. She didn't wonderful job of transitioning that to our VP of finance. We felt like at that point. We were ready to make the next step kind of had the team built we had the business stabilized in January of this year. We made our second major acquisition we acquired a structural fabrication company that was about an hour away from us. So that was the next big step stepping out. Geographically got physical location in our away. We're just wrapping up our first year there. It's been a tremendous year. We've been very very blessed with there has been no surprises again, not without challenges. But no big surprises. So we've got a dozen team members at that facility working we do structural fabrication. There were you worried about this a little bit different new citizen. Our waiver everything else has been really pretty close. Right. All the other acquisitions, that's right. We were intitial about that. I mean, we felt like we had sort of bumping up against the law of diminishing returns here locally. So in one way from an employment standpoint. In the business where in our location doesn't matter that much for customer base. It matters if you're in California here, but in terms of our that's irrelevant. So what does matter is access to talented team. That was one of the thoughts for us looking at it at the centralized growth plan in our business that just allows us if we have many smaller operations around the midwest allows us to just expand our opportunity for employment bullet looking back. Was there anything else that we miss this far as the most difficult part about you grow in your company to where it is today. There were some times I'd say in the two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen timeframe will be on our first acquisition we've grown significantly at that point. There's a handful of managers in quite a bit of complexity we were dealing with cash flow challenges of that growth in new business model that had different cash flow cycles, there were some really stressful times from a financial standpoint. Even though we're growing like crazy or not saying the cash in the Bank. That's a lie. Of business. Oh, gender stand. That. I mean, I gotta do is be profitable. And then next thing you gotta do have cash and profitability doesn't always equal cash dependent on different things that are happening within the business. So there was a really really stressful times there, and we got through those I learned a lot of lessons. That fortunately, we kept her head above water and got through that a lot of companies. They don't make it through those times. And we just wanna make sure that we learn from those lessons in continue to do things the right way moving forward. So that we don't ever go back there. Again, what you learn. So we can learn from as far as hopefully that challenge isn't pop up again, obviously it will at some point. I imagine. But what have you learned to keep that from happening again in the future will there's a couple of things that happened? There was the same year. We did the acquisition. We saw first downturn in our core business. We were doing a lot in coal oil in that year. That was a big pullback in those two markets simultaneously to do a big investment. We had a pullback in our core business. So that strap this right away. The lesson that we've learned air is to really make sure the word versa fide, and that we're not so dependent on one industry, which were really conscientious about doing that constantly analyzing how much revenue doing each market sector. And then the other big lesson. There was to be more proactive in terms of financial management. So I don't think we had a much of a line of credit if anything we just been so conservative, and we just didn't give ourselves any cushion. So then when you're playing defense on that you're scrambling it just compounds. Everything had you can't make smart decisions. If you're strapped for cash since that time, we've been much more proactive we've learned ways to better manage your cashflow. And we've got a lot of cushion now, even if you don't need our line of credit, we make sure we have a significant line of credit. It's their the case we do a large customer that doesn't pay on time. Or we do short term pullback in the market. It helps you sleep a lot better night. This is smart because I probably would have thought about it up to that point. I mean, have you thought about it up to that point about all your clients? Being in those two industries in heavy expanded to like another industry as well. To try to diversify this risk. Yeah. Something we have to continually manage EMMY. Now, we feel like we're too heavy in the automative sector. So we have strategic initiatives going into twenty nineteen about how we wanna push more into some other market sectors in we still do call an oil work. We try to grow in other areas. Just something you have to continue to keep your eye on. How'd you literally thought about that beforehand? 'cause I probably wouldn't have now understand what you're saying. After that happens to you want. You're like, okay, just make sure I don't have all my clients in these two buckets, right? Yeah. Probably hadn't thought about any. We were just growing going where the work was you have not done that acquisition the same year probably wouldn't have been as tough. But when you have two or three things hit all at once. It can be really challenging the other thing. We learned we have to remember is there's a thing called the normalcy. Bias, you tend to the things are going, really? Well, and you think you can't do anything wrong. You think everything you do is going to be as good as the last one in all said, you get hip twin the is and. Realize? Okay. Let's not all going to be. We start the coatings division at it works. Really great. We do this next thing and it works. Really great. So we just didn't acquisition this year. I mentioned it went really really, well, we'd just very blessed with that. But we have to remember as we look at other opportunities that we can't get toxic aided by that normalcy bias and think it's all going to be this easy yet to keep your guard up. Absolutely. We appreciate you coming on sharing your story like anything else that you want to entrepreneurs who are listening just for you being able to grow the family business from three or four people to sixty plus people today's been pretty amazing. Thank you for taking us long journey, but any last words of wisdom for everyone who's listening. I think is positive energy in forward momentum is so powerful. I think that something that we don't talk about enough in the business where people talk about time management all the time. But I talked to our team sometime about how energy management so much more important than time management, or at least if you're in a role where you contribute with your mind for sure it's more important. So just power of positive energy forward momentum. So he can't let yourself get bogged down by negativity and things that are pulling you you gotta get away from that. And just continue to move forward. I love the saying rising tide lifts all ships. I think it's so true. And if you keep that forward momentum role in good things will happen. No. I think that's really important because I get tired of all the time management bullshit to sometimes. I'll be like, okay. I'm trying to be as a fishing as I can. Right. I think all of us has business people are. But then I kinda get down when I'm like, oh, well, I wasn't as fishing as could have been the last couple of hours, then your energy can just even be drained from that. But yeah, the power of positive thinking and having positive energy. I've never heard anyone calling like energy management, or whatever you were saying earlier that makes a huge difference. If you're going to go into room and be positive versus someone who's negative all the time of I'll just walk the other way. If I like see him on the street and know that they're like negative person. Just gonna come to complain to me about something. Right. Right. That energy of stinking positively the positive definitely rains off in. I think it's really important. What kind of what you emphasize? There. Yup. We appreciate you doing the interview if someone want to reach out and contact you and say, thank you for doing the interview. What's the best way for them to reach all lengthy? Of course, we've got our website next companies dot com on Facebook. Yeah. It's Matthew snicks weapons if they've wanted send your personal emails outta. Yeah. That'd be fine. It's M Knicks. So m NIS at Knicks companies dot com coup. All right. Matthew. Thanks again for doing the interview when we really appreciate it. We have thanks for having me. It was fun story. Someone who would be an awesome guests to have on the show. If you do then send us an Email at Austin at millionaire, dash interviews dot com. We're always looking for smart, beautiful entrepreneurs who are willing to share their story in other news. If you wanna leave us feedback about the show, give us a call or Texas on our new hotline. Simply dial one three oh five nine eight five thirty four sixty nine the best comments questions or feedback will be shared on a future episode. So don't be scared to get creative. Thank you for listening to this episode. It's been made available for free by our podcast sponsors and or patriot members. So thank you to you, both especially our newest and oldest patriot members for paying for this episode. So would you be willing to pay for someone else to listen for free? If you are willing to help support us and get some awesome patriot's perks along the way, then go to Austin's big p. Dot com. 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