35 Burst results for "Hurst"

A Global Shot in the Arm With Dr. Fauci

Why It Matters

04:26 min | 7 months ago

A Global Shot in the Arm With Dr. Fauci

"It's march and it's been nearly a year since covid nineteen was declared a pandemic. There's no two ways about it. It's a bitter anniversary but it's also a time to think about how far we've come. There was so much confusion at the start about how to protect ourselves now year leader. We've learned a lot about how to stay safe and we've developed highly effective vaccines in record time. We're starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel but there is at least one more hurdle that threatens to undo our progress all around the world wealthy countries are hoarding vaccine. Sp leaving huge swaths of the global population without access global health officials. Say that this could be a lethal mistake. For rich and poor countries alike. I'm gabrielle sierra. And this is why it matters today. Why a global pandemic needs a global response. It was almost a year ago but the country began shutting down from covert and for the first time. There seems to be a real reason. Have cautious optimism gets the vaccine when or not only serious questions that us but also around the globe in the global fight against covid nineteen is mutations good approving the next great challenge so we have a lot of really important stuff to talk about but i feel like one of those important things is that both you and i are south brooklyn children and i feel like it was really important to just get that out of the way Where were you. Where were you in south brooklyn. I'm from manhattan beach. You are from vincent hurst. i know. Wow you need no introduction but also start the way we always start which is what is your name and what do you do. My name is dr anthony fauci. And i'm the director of the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases at the national institutes of health. All right so let's say that a majority of americans were vaccinated tomorrow. Would we be fully in the clear. So if we got let's say seventy to eighty five percent of the people in the country vaccinated then we would be very much better off than we are now. But there's a real catch to your question. Because even if we got the overwhelming majority of the population vaccinated there is a big wide world out there and that's the global pandemic so if the rest of the world did not get covid nineteen or saws covy to under control. There would always be a looming threat over us that the virus would be mutating would be changing and we would get new variants that even if we felt ourselves protected in this country sooner or later of variant or mutation could come here and essentially circumvent protection of the vaccine. So i think when you think in terms of a pandemic you have to remember it is global and it requires a global response not just a single country response in the old days when we used to get on airplanes. You remember that what we can all travel one of the first things you get. Is this disembodied voice that would say in the event of a loss of cabin pressure. Oxygen masks will come down from the overhead. This is richard haass president of the council on foreign relations former director of policy planning for the state department adviser to presidents and my boss structured by this to put it on yourself and then only after you yourself and taking care of then you turn to your children your neighbors and others and that's our instinct year we've got to jettison that instinct unless the rest of the world get vaccinated. It doesn't just threaten their lives. It threatens hours to gossip. We don't take care of others. Variants will continue to break out and variants breakout over there. They will figure out a way to come here so then we end up in a race. That never quite ends that we'd never quite win to stay ahead of the curve. We have to understand variance and in order to understand variance. We have to understand mutations and in order to understand mutations we went to the country's medical explainer chief so what is a mutation. Where do they tend to come from. Why do we need to worry about them when viruses replicate which they do very very rapidly particularly when you have literally one hundred million people infected which is what we have right now in the world with over two point four million deaths when you have that amount of replication. as the virus replicates. It makes mistakes in reproducing itself. That's called a mutation

Gabrielle Sierra Vincent Hurst Dr Anthony Fauci South Brooklyn National Institute Of Allergy Manhattan Beach Confusion National Institutes Of Health Brooklyn Richard Haass Council On Foreign Relations State Department
The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

Haunted Places

04:47 min | 7 months ago

The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

"The eastern pennsylvania institution for the feeble minded and epileptic later called pinehurst asylum was originally established as a facility for the disabled opened in nineteen o eight. The property contained in array of buildings all scattered around large tracts of farmland in chester county. Thirty miles outside of philadelphia though it might sound like it was designed for care and comfort. The reality was anything. But the institute was first created to house intellectually and developmentally disabled people alongside those who suffered from epilepsy but this strategy was unwise as such patients had very different needs. What's worse is that. Many of the institutions goals were based on the nineteenth century eugenics movement proponents of the movement believed that the human gene pool should be protected and anyone deemed. Genetically inferior. Should be prevented from reproducing by forced sterilization or segregation from the rest of society. For this reason. People with certain kinds of disabilities whose families could not care for them were sent to penn hearst. Most of them came as infants or children. Girls and boys are separated into different buildings. So there wouldn't be any sexual mixing in the decades since the institution closed a slew of modern day rumors claim that penn hurst carried out forced sterilizations on its patients. But while sterilization did occur at similar institutions in the united states. There was actually no record of it at pinehurst. Rumors of the institute's horrific procedures ran rampant. The last perhaps this is because the hospital was shrouded in an era of mystery it operated almost completely independently of the outside world. It had its own power plant and produced its own. Food and supplies were brought in by a special rail. Line pen hurts was designed so that no one from the outside could get in but more importantly so that no one on the inside could ever get out. Georgie was carrying a stack of folded sheets toward the finish piles. When he noticed a girl arguing with an orderly. George stopped in his tracks. She had long shiny hair and was pointing a finger directly at him confidently shouting and screaming. He was instantly captivated and continued to watch her but eventually to more orderlies came over to give her a shot. And take away georgie side. Good things never lasted. Long at penn harris georgia's mother had left him there when he was only three. He never knew why not what he done or where she'd gone he'd been stuck in this place for twelve years and he knew it like the back of his hand. He knew that when the girl got taken away it was the last he'd see of her or so he thought The next day georgy walked into the laundry building at his heart nearly stopped there. She was if he someone else. He could've tapped on her shoulder and introduced himself but as it was he could barely manage breathing and walking at the same time. Georgie said down in front of his pile of sheets and started cursing himself for being so shy and that was when someone tapped him on the shoulder turned. The girl was standing behind him. A fitted sheet in her hand. She has georgie how to fold it. Her name was kerry. No one was happy to be. A pen harassed. But carrie was indignant about it. She said she didn't belong there. That was why she'd been fighting with the orderly. There was no way she was going to spend the day slaving over an ironing board if she wasn't getting paid the orderly at said that barbital injection might change her mind but it obviously didn't soon george bush love. He used to find laundry duty tedious. But now it was the only thing. He looked forward to because laundry. Duty meant seeing carry a few weeks. After they first met george carey was sitting on a low stone wall outside the laundry carried. Turn to him with a frown. She asked to launch. She was a burden after her parents died. Her guardianship went to her uncle.

Eastern Pennsylvania Instituti Penn Hearst Penn Hurst Chester County Georgie Epilepsy Penn Harris Philadelphia Georgy United States George Georgia Kerry Carrie George Carey George Bush
"hurst" Discussed on Mindful Productivity Podcast?

Mindful Productivity Podcast?

07:51 min | 7 months ago

"hurst" Discussed on Mindful Productivity Podcast?

"Tiny home. I like still to this day. Thank him because he's like six four and the smallest guy and we had this tiny space dog and a cat. So point being out in nature and so i spent a lot of time out in nature. And there's a great book remember the authors but the title of the book is called your brain on nature and they go into the science behind. How even being like next to trees or in nature can help with your person. Pathetic nervous system. I mean there's the japanese practice of shivnarine yoku which is very similar. So i decided to surround myself with as much nature as i could and i found that got me to a state that allowed me to have some clarity with thoughts and kinda decipher like. What's the depression you know. And what's me and so that was helpful. Journaling was helpful. Also working to eat more nutritious foods. You know. Even to this day i can like if i eat and it's been hard with the pandemic. I think a lot of us want like stockpile potato chips and down. But i find that i am more mindful of eating lots of fruits and vegetables and stuff. That helps do so. Those are some of the first steps. I took and then you know eventually got to a place where i was more open to talking with with someone to help me. And then you know steps from there but i think it's. It's hard when you have a bunch of people telling you what they think you should do without kind of asking you like. what do you need. Yeah such it's such a great point to the the just listening before before making suggestions or or trying to fix things I think he's a great a great point. You also mentioned mindfulness there a couple of times you mentioned just being mindful of waiting and and being self aware of it you you also mentioned it in relation to e masters program that you are doing there so i love to maybe understand a little bit more context of you know what. What was your first introduction to to mindfulness and and how that manifests whether it was you know you mentioned the journaling so meditation or other practice would that look like for you. yeah Well i i got my masters in health and wellness and part of the curriculum was developing your own kind of meditation and mindfulness practice. So while i that those kind of components have been had been a part of my life for a while. That was the first time that i actually kinda looked at it from a more scientific standpoint and looked at it as like integrating it into a routine and a practice in my life so a lot of that involved actual you know meditation like what you think when you think of meditating and i also so from that point i kind of adapted it to sometimes an even to this day sometimes meditation for me literally looks like me just laying down on my office floor closing my eyes and just trying to be with my thoughts for twenty minutes mother times you know. I think because. I think it's important to point out that met even meditation in itself is really just concentrated. Focused like a fo focus on our thoughts or attention and that meditations can happen. When you're cooking they can happen when you're on a walk. So there's the typical meditation we think of and then there's these other practices so a lot of those meditation or mindfulness practices. Were just kind of in stillness being. There's a lot of time. I spent out on our deck with bulldog just looking at the trees just kind of sitting there and being an observer to everything going on my mind audit got. I love that. I think that there's the kind of people think the sitting down prosecuted even chanting or something like that but in reality. There's there's so many different types of meditation. We actually have a really interesting guests coming on in a few weeks. Specializes in guided imagery meditation for children. Actually so she's. She's traded this business that she calls the imagine meditation cards and they have a small stories and then images on these cards. That kids read as as kind of meditation prompt. So i thought that that was just another another great example of like you said different ways to Kobe stillness and and attention. So i love that. And one thing that comes to mind when you describe that your website mindful productivity there seems to maybe at from from a surface level to somebody. That doesn't necessarily understand what you're that the understanding. It could be a bit of a conflict there so to speak right because productivity is often often thought of as go or getting lots of things done whereas mindfulness is often thought of as as as stillness and relaxation so so to speak. So how do you get from a masters in health and wellness in ankle. fading A meditation practice to then at some point. Kind of looping in the the left brain productivity aspects of yeah. I love this question so much. So one thing. I found in going through. My master's program was just like the sheer volume of work. That you have to do. I mean not only learning reading lessons Dialogues with your students. All of that but then also the actual output work that you have to create an. I found myself in this conflict because a lot of the work i was doing was in actually meditating. Actually doing all these things with the same time. I actually had to do them right and schedule them into my day and make sure i was getting all of these things done. So i kind of over this Experience was like you know how can i. How can i get more things done. Get the right things done. That feels good that feels aligned with honoring my energy and my mental energy my mental health but still allows me to actually get things done. Because you know there's there's one thing about being in the flow state quote unquote and feeling good and feeling great in your body and everything but then if you're not achieving your goals than you feel kind of like lackluster. So i was like okay. How do i integrate. The two and one thing. I always found really interesting. Is if you look up. The actual definition of productivity in terms of agriculture and like planting fruit for example in harvesting it part of productivity has to do with the capacity for a given plant or whatever to produce fruit and i thought that was really fascinating because when we look at productivity we often think of machines we think of constant output constant goals gets consistent. It never it's never. It's never flawed and but when you look at humans i mean we. We aren't machines. And so i like that definition. Because if you think about productivity in terms of your capacity as a human being in terms of your energy level in terms of what you're able to especially if you are creative right like you can't tap into that creative brain if if you're feeling malnourished or if you're don't if you don't have enough sleep so basically my info productivity is this core essence of really tapping into honoring your capacity and doing what you can take care of yourself so that you can produce a capacity that makes sense for your goals so that's kind of how that started and then from there it's just kind of taken off into. I wouldn't say that. Like i flat out reject the hustle culture that we see. I think sometimes there can be moments. Where hustling and doing all that and putting an extra hours can be really beneficial. But if you're constantly flirting with burnout and you're not aware of how much work especially creative work and how much it burns you out mentally. Then that's when you can get into a dangerous place. 'cause i've definitely had burnt in my business where i i can't create anymore. And that's the core.

twenty minutes six one first time first steps two first introduction one thing japanese Kobe four
"hurst" Discussed on Daily Grace

Daily Grace

07:07 min | 8 months ago

"hurst" Discussed on Daily Grace

"To another episode of daily grace. This is joanna kimbrel here. And i actually don't have my co host stephanie. With me today. But i do have a very special guest that i'm very excited to introduce you all to her. Name is crystal hearst. She is a writer and a speaker. And just a wonderful person. As i've already gotten to notice for a couple little minutes here before we started But crystal we are so excited to have you here. Thank you so much for joining us pleasure. Thanks for having me. Would you mind just for our listeners. Telling us a little bit about yourself. Sure well i am a daughter mother a wife. I have been married for twenty years. We have five children in a blended family. The daughter of a pastor and a sister of a few people that you might know dad. Is tony oven. So it got ministry family. Priscilla's shires mr while knew her and I'm really good at making peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. But a few years ago. I had the opportunity to co. Write a book kingdom with my dad and when you put your name on the front of book people think you have something to say. The last Really eight years. Or so i have Forayed into being an author and speaker And also developed some other some other fun things. But i'm still making peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Still enjoy that at eleven. What i've added a few things to the mix. Okay i have to ask you. Are you a classic grape jelly person. 'cause i'm all about strawberry strawberry great either way even peach but my thing is i'm more of a jam than jelly preserve. How k all right. I've never had peach on. pbs jay. But now i'm going to have to try that jillian whole thing. It's a how james or it's like water are you a dishonesty of those aren't gonna you know that. Yeah yup i totally get it. I will have to say a new discovery. A new kind of favorite thing. I guess is a piece of toasted sour dough bread With apricot preserves on it very good required it with hawaiian brian. That'll take it to the level. Who are now all kinds of ideas here. You're making me hungry. Oh man while you just recently came out with a new book called the twenty eight day prayer journey. We're really excited to get to talk with you today. About prayer specifically about what it looks like to have raw honest authentic prayer in difficult seasons seasons that are hard and so we would love for you to just to kind of start out by telling us a little bit about your book the twenty eight day prayer journey and the heart behind them and so being administered fenway. I know about prayer. They don't have a problem talking to you. Got a lot of people. Say they don't know what to say. That's never been my challenge. My challenge has been saying something consistently not coming to him when there's a need a problem or feel guilty. It's been awhile since i've prayed. Using the opportunity that we have to talk to god Without ceasing in principle meaning ongoingly involved in communication and connection with him and to do that with consistency so that i'm enjoying the fellowship consistently as well so because i was in that situation where i wanted to do a better job of doing that i said because this is what you say when you wanna do something better hey internet. This is what i'm gonna do. But how many days i'm gonna pray consistently multiple times a day and i'll share this request with you because if i'm sharing it with you built in accountability and so this was from you know it's not like a mcbrayer warrior who wrote a prayer but it's more of like i struggle with doing it and so i'm i wrote my way through that struggle. Not giving the right of but just as iron to encourage other people to do the same as i was doing it and then four years later five years later it became Man it's so cool. How the internet can be such a tool for accountability and for growth. When used properly. And i love that that developed over the years into this book and you know it makes me wonder. Is this something prayers. Something that's always been a part of your life and if it has how has it changed over the years and specifically how has it changed in response to this twenty eight day prayer. Challenge that you gave yourself well. I think that Prayer for me has always been thing to do. And i'm conscious of the components of prayer. I should say thank you. I should say. I'm sorry. I should ask for what i need. Or what i want. International say your will be done and so trying in some ways to make. Sure i'm hitting all of those things. I'm aware of that but i think for the majority of my adult life. My prayers have been more like psalms where. I'm conscious of who i'm talking to. I'm aware of money to be grateful into remember what he's done. It's good but it's also been very guttural If i'm in pain to express that to ask him to help to fix or here are if i am confused to let him know that into ask him and show guide and direct I have realized that most of my prayers are born at a seasons in desperation. You know but people say that when you come to new one hundred dark place you know better than you would have known him in the light So i definitely had that as a part of my prayers to just are really really need you here. I think the thing that has always characterized. My prayer is always felt free to talk to him. All smoke free to do it without pretense. I was free to do it without having to get it right however i would say in the last twenty years. It's been with life with kids with a things in with the fast pace. That life often takes when you're busy working involving wiping churches and all those things you get into the doing an uber getting about the being in so what. I'm trying to get back to better. Less years is being with god just like he would be with somebody you love to you enjoyed fellowship with in well having something to talk about is a good thing you can be with the person you love. Without having a thing it can just be conversation. And that's where i'm at right now and that's great and that's such a gift to hear that you haven't been worried about getting it wrong and i think that a lot of us do about that you know we worry about coming before god and saying the wrong things or not knowing what to say. And that's just such a sweet thing to hear that over the years you've known that you can come to him you know flaws and all and you know you mentioned that. These seasons of difficulty can draw closer to god can bring us to him in prayer. But you know. I think for some of ice. It can actually feel even more difficult in those seasons in those seasons of suffering or difficulty..

joanna kimbrel Priscilla twenty years five children jillian today james eight years four years later eleven crystal one hundred mcbrayer warrior stephanie five years later twenty twenty eight day prayer eight few years ago hawaiian
Miami-Dade schools may require students to get vaccinated for COVID-19

Sean Hannity

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Miami-Dade schools may require students to get vaccinated for COVID-19

"10th the Madonna vaccine on December 17th and we could be just a couple of weeks away from the first round of shots being given. But will you be required to get one given Iran to Santa says stated there will be no statewide mandate. But if you work in the private sector, labor and employment law professor Geoff Hurst says Your boss likely has the power to fire you if you don't get it. Their rejection to evacuation is not protected in most cases. Now, if you're a public employee, or you covered by a union contract, then you may have more protections. Miami Dade schools is considering requiring the vaccine for students returning to campus is next school year. Air. Cried Regus news radio 6 10 Wi OD.

Madonna Geoff Hurst Iran Santa Miami Dade Schools
Boston - Patriots Practice Squad DT Bill Murray Becomes Second Player On COVID-19 Reserve List

NFL Live

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Boston - Patriots Practice Squad DT Bill Murray Becomes Second Player On COVID-19 Reserve List

"Teams closely linked to covy nineteen, the new, England Patriots and the Las Vegas Raiders. Well, moments ago the Patriots placed a practice squad player Bill Murray on the Reserve Cove in one, thousand, nine hundred and the Las Vegas. Raiders did the same for their defensive tackle Maurice Hurst both players. Now go on the covert nineteen list, and again you hope that they're OK and that they're safe and well. But the bigger thing is you wonder about the rest of the organizations. The Raiders of course, find all that money yesterday for players participating in Dr Waller's charity event last week in the New England patriots going through the scare that they did this weekend where Cam Newton tested positive. There have been nobody else that tested positive on the Patriots Organization no other tested comeback positive clearly this practice squad players some time today this afternoon develop some symptoms, and he now becomes the first Patriots since Cam Newton to be placed on the reserve cove in nineteen list.

Las Vegas Raiders England Patriots Reserve Cove Patriots Organization Cam Newton Las Vegas Maurice Hurst Bill Murray New England Dr Waller
Houston sampling wastewater to track spread of COVID-19

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Houston sampling wastewater to track spread of COVID-19

"City of Houston, working with researchers in the Texas Medical Center to attract the Koven 19 pandemic through wastewater City Health Department, Dr David Hurst claims that they can trace the Corona virus at a faster rate than traditional test methods. If we find it in whatever neighborhood that the numbers are going up, we will be able to get our teams to go door to door start informing people that what's going on in their community encouraged them to get tested, researchers say. Testing wastewater is not new of Baylor College of medicine, Dr used the same method back in the 19 sixties to find Houston's polio pandemic.

Dr David Hurst Houston Baylor College Of Medicine City Health Department Texas Medical Center Polio
Gov. Baker says Phase 2 in Massachusetts will begin Monday

WBZ Midday News

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Gov. Baker says Phase 2 in Massachusetts will begin Monday

"Happening governor Charlie Baker preparing to announce the Baystate faced you re opening plan that will include a local shops here's a preview from WBZ's Kevin Coleman there's been a significant decrease in people hospitalized with Corbett nineteen and today governor Baker will announce phase two of Massachusetts re opening Jon Hurst president of the retailers association of Massachusetts says this will include clothing stores which won't have fitting rooms open right away if you're going to go buy some clothing and you don't know your size you're probably going to buy and take it home and try on it and if it doesn't fit properly then returning customers will see clothing on sale it will be deals to be had for consumers because frankly a lot of the inventory that has been in close stores really is data directly a clothing store Kevin Gorman WBZ Boston news news radio also the public health department moving the number of covert nineteen hospitalizations and a positive trend status for the first time yesterday

Baystate Kevin Coleman Corbett Massachusetts Charlie Baker Governor Baker Jon Hurst President Trump Kevin Gorman Boston
Mark Zuckerberg Takes Steps to Calm Facebook Employees

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Mark Zuckerberg Takes Steps to Calm Facebook Employees

"Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg admits is decision not to act on president trump's posts about controlling looters and George Floyd protesters Hurst public perception of the company in a tense meeting with employees yesterday he said concerns would be addressed through better communication on how internal policy decisions are made more diverse voices on policy teams and he promised to consider new labels for distasteful content that falls short of violating content

Donald Trump Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg President Trump George Floyd
Falcons could field an offense with 11 first-round draft picks

Golic & Wingo

06:14 min | 1 year ago

Falcons could field an offense with 11 first-round draft picks

"So we had a truck a couple of signings by the Atlanta Falcons over the weekend right to pick up tight end Hayden Hurst from the Baltimore Ravens and they also acquired look Kwan Treadwell a former number one pick for the Minnesota Vikings yeah as the Atlanta falcons roster currently stands right now on offense alone just on offense they have a Levin former first round picks all of these former first round picks quarterback Matt Ryan first round pick Todd Gurley who sign when he was released first round pick Julio Jones first round pick Calvin Ridley first round pick the Quantrill first round pick Hayden Hurst first round pick left tackle Jake Matthews first round pick left guard James carpenter first round pick center Alex Mack former first round pick Chris Lindstrom the right guard former first round pick and right tackle Caleb McGary also that he first started his first round eleven is incredible let them all eleven of them a former first round pick I mean there's no way that's ever happened before right I can't believe that what ever but here's the real question if you had to redraft everyone of these players how many would be former first rounder this okay because I think this is fair Lidstrom McGarry and carpenter I've always been really what one or two years no it's been really since two thousand eleven okay yeah so let's remind me Gerry I think you were taken off or taken them out yeah okay so all of the other nine how many would be redrafted as a first round what's what's going on it's not right absolutely no question that runs for Todd Gurley no yeah I I would say no I would sit well I would say no one quite frankly his a conversation about the value of the position in general could also affect the new with him that was the thing coming out of college yes I look he has fifty eight rushing touchdowns over his first whatever seasons and all the other ones are either in the hall of Famer going let me just say six are we saying first rounder today or go back to the beginning again it would re drawing back to the beginning again because I'm currently the way Todd Gurley came out I mean would you not still take him in the first one that's the question now right are you going to pay for that kind of production from a running back anymore we saw Christian McCaffrey Leonard for net like there's been plenty examples of even a legal or not re signing a big second contract drafting a great one of the first round can still benefit you a lot okay I'm just trying to get to it you know is that what they've done in their right career does that mean where are the first roll worthy to me the girly thing is to your point he had a knee injury coming out of college and right when they signed with the red sign that long term deal with they're trying they got out of now then he was going to be chronic so to me the top group member he was the first one that airports reset the market for running backs and it turned out no he just re establish the old line of thinking but that first three years of production would you that would you spend a first round pick on that because we saw that rand's office how much in common now it always goes like this with the running game but in combination with an offense of line that did really well what you brought into what worth over would you pay for that as the foundation of your off I'm beginning to go the Melkite around here that I'm not sure running back as well because Melvin Gordon was in that same draft and Melvin Gordon is on his team I got an extreme I think that's the biggest conversation we could take out of this is the running back position record number mellow one point eighty never take a running back in the first Rana I wonder for we're slowly but surely going back to it I mean there was a contract a couple years ago with the first running back off the board was late second round out of Tennessee and I think we're going back to that after a bevy running backs being taken so we were definitely in on Matt Ryan yes we're out on Todd Gurley a legit is amazing looking back at Todd Gurley's draft class there's not a lot of got like if you're talking about reworking the top ten Todd Gurley might be the most wealthy in that group maybe outside of Amari Cooper yeah we can we can have that discussion later because that's in it read graphic I think is always fast and you have to wait a certain amount of time Julio Jones know quite well right Calvin Ridley first round too early again I think it's too early last year what he had sixty three receptions okay just under nine hundred okay seven touchdowns I would mean he also can't account for how bad that team ask me yes or no right now I'd say yes but I still think it might be too early Hayden Hurst no not because look they they took marketers later in the draft in the third round he clearly became the tight end of Baltimore which made Hayden Hurst by the way has taken in the first row before Lamar Jackson R. Jackson for Lamar starting you know tight on that team right now marketers you said right Hayden Hurst also dealt with some injuries and stuff there too that's okay in perfect sample size and when you have a guy come on like marquetry who could predict that the way that offense ended up of what he was the Mackey award winner a what he was coming home with one truck will no no Jake Matthews yes I think so I think so I think so do not I meet yeah yeah I mean yes he's been there he's been there is a second contract I also wrote a like doesn't miss a lot of games he's he's dependable yeah I think that's what it our printer are probably not I mean he's he's been a guy that's been in the league for nine years now dependable guy but we're talking about first round right you know I mean when you're twenty four we'll talk about for sure we're talking about top ten picks like a lot yeah yeah yeah I I'd probably lean toward no on that as well yeah yeah Alex Mack yeah absolutely yeah yeah and then the other than what we remember and I think Lidstrom would be headed in that direction yeah kill the guy who's more reach last year get killed the one I have questions about obviously we know the health concerns that existed before the draft earning a hard issue that he had had to deal with early in this time oxygen so there's a lot to hash out with those two but just I mean blows off the page when you just read that number the every single hundred dinners with that crew yeah what eleven Ryan still got its still on that ride to reach for the paycheck first but everyone else has to at least go for their wallets and act like there's also a common I do with you know with my dad so you got rid you got Ridley help you got got this R. Ridley Hearst links from a Gerry all still on their rookie deals you know wrecked yeah everybody else is is all for them yeah if I'm looking at yes correct so yeah they're all fascinating eleven a former first rounders on

Atlanta Falcons Hayden Hurst Baltimore Ravens Kwan Treadwell Minnesota Vikings
Cousins, Vikings agree to 2-year, $66M contract extension

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Cousins, Vikings agree to 2-year, $66M contract extension

"The the deals Minnesota don't Vikings become in official quarterback Kirk until cousins Wednesday agreed on but Monday people to with a knowledge two year of sixty them tell six the Associated million dollar Press contract some big extension names are changing cousins uniforms was entering the final season the Texans of are the sending fully four guaranteed time pro three bowler year eighty de Andre four million Hopkins dollar contract and he a fourth signed round as a free pick agent to the cardinals in twenty eighteen for two draft selections this year he and was running scheduled back to come David thirty Johnson one million dollars against the falcons the salary will cap give up second but this new fifth deal round will picks reduce in exchange the team's for charge Baltimore by ten tight million end Hayden dollars Hurst according and to a a fourth person round with selection knowledge of the deal and the cousins colts had a in career their best first season round in pick twenty to nineteen the forty Niners as he led to the Vikings say goodbye to a wild to standout card win defensive in the playoffs tackle over the deforest saints Buckner Kevin fall most I'm Tom Minneapolis McCabe

Minnesota Cardinals Falcons Baltimore Hurst Colts Vikings Buckner Kevin Official Kirk De Andre Hopkins David Johnson Tom Minneapolis
The Latest: AP source: Onyemata will re-sign with Saints

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: AP source: Onyemata will re-sign with Saints

"The deals don't become official until Wednesday but people with knowledge of them tell the Associated Press some big names are changing uniforms the Texans are sending four time pro bowler de Andre Hopkins and a fourth round pick to the cardinals for two draft selections and running back David Johnson the falcons will give up second fifth round picks in exchange for Baltimore tight end Hayden Hurst and a fourth round selection and the colts in their first round pick to the forty Niners to say goodbye to standout defensive tackle deforest Buckner I'm Tom McCabe

Associated Press Andre Hopkins Cardinals David Johnson Falcons Hayden Hurst Colts Tom Mccabe Official Baltimore
"hurst" Discussed on F**ks Given

F**ks Given

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"hurst" Discussed on F**ks Given

"Careful. Well unfortunately is time for us to fuck off. Thank you so much ban. Sorry to make you fuck off now but it's been absolutely pleasure. Thank you okay. Yeah so we're curious. Focus find you then you can find me on all social media at the Real Ben. Hurst also check out the goodlad initiative on social media at Geel initiative or at Goodlatte initiative. And everyone should check out your tedtalk needed because it's actually. Oh you should. You might enjoy it. Let me know what you think into Ben. Hasta on Youtube comes up now look at the images AIDS so we're talking about Ben. Hit Him in the news today. Oh yeah because yeah exist. I've already sold on the congressional chocolate checking. Donald checking the Google so everyone remember to rate subscribe to all poker's lever a lovely review. Yes please share and if you WANNA find if you WANNA fancied if you fancy following us on instagram personal ones. I'm reading X. and Florence's Lawrence Bark and follow com curious as well if you're not already then you're fucked. Yeah I mean you should definitely point. Yeah we should do a beginning with anything. Go and follow instagram. You really should actually stealing time anyway. If you want to send us in a sex question or a sex story please. Email us at F K s given podcast at G. L. DOT COM. And you'll hear US next week. We're going to be hitting nearly a million listens millionaire. Please share us and you know pushed us up to that million mark with love. Love you forever. Yeah Goodbye I..

Goodlatte initiative instagram AIDS Lawrence Bark Geel Hurst Google Donald Florence
"hurst" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"hurst" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Turned out the Craig's wife don't Animal rescue they got into conversation about their love of animals. And everybody. So we did the if you're in about two days. After the appears Ryan was so impressed with their huge place. I don't know if you've ever been to it. But they just actually merged with their other places. Now it's like twice as I think it's like an old Sam's Club bikes in there. Yeah they do so. Ryan was very impressed with the inventory so a couple of days later he said Oh. Do you think they would loan me a bike for the summer while I'm in Atlanta shooting walking dead? Why wouldn't they so? It's like all the pregnant. I was like hey you know. Would you guys be willing to loan them a bike that when he's down Atlanta he's like yeah? Yeah you know maybe what we can do is is. I ride the bike and at the end of summer we could auction it off and donate the money and so I kinda I kinda was thinking about that you know. I love auctions but the problem with auctions is there's a lot of things that have to come together for them to be successful a has to be good weather. People have to show up and they have to have money because if you're trying to auction off a bike obviously there is a certain price range that it's going to go to. Schroeder fifty to ten dollars in walk with like. Hey you know so takes one to win so I kind of took the idea and ran with it. I kind of told Ryan and I told the motor city. I was like you know. Just give me a little bit to work on this so over. The course of a year actually put together. It's really awesome thing I brought in this company. That my buddy Jo castellet in New York runs called the giving projects and they do a lot of philanthropic campaigns And then actually contacted aspca corporate in New York City Wind up talking to this guy met Carol over there. They were on board instantly. They love the idea then. We have to charities ones actually here in Detroit almost thome animal rescue and then the other one is is one that Ryan works with an La called. Canine Use Lines. And they actually re- rehabilitate dogs to work with kids with special needs kids that otherwise have issues that it actually helps rehabilitate them. Yeah it's not cheap. I mean we did a fundraiser. For a young lady who needed a dog? She had like several season massive seizures and she was like way on on the spectrum and so she was nine very minimally communicative and so. The dog helped her immensely. But it was like it was like five ten grand for this dog and his dog to be trained to be able to help break her fall if she was going into seizure and then to alert somebody that she was having a seizure. Took a lot of training to train the dog so it was like five ten grand dog and so yeah and we were lucky. We had some extraordinarily generous friends at that. They'll donate it and we were able to get the dog so this bike you guys. What do you have a goal for how much you WANNA raise? This sort of thing was that after I came back to them I said guys. Why don't we do Sweepstakes where we basically guys be willing to build Ryan a bike and let him design it. Let's make it a one of a kind. Ooh quote quote Ryan Hurst addition Harley so they actually took a catalog down to Atlanta will. He saw me walking dead. He picked out every part of the bike. Like I said most people you know they. They know the character. They don't realize that in real life Ryan is one of the trainers at this place. He you know. He believes in positive reinforcement. He just he loves it. And it's actually genuinely something that does it's not a stunt hobby that turned into a lifestyle for him so that they built on this bike is it's a custom road king. He picked out every single part of the bike. All the way down to the spokes took about Motor City Customs. Which is an offshoot the border city Harley? Yeah took him. Probably about six seven months. Because some of the parts you six Ryan six-foot-seven they had built a custom built some of the parts for him. You show me some of these pictures of this like it's it's amazing amazing for Mike. These will post up some photos absolutely of it. There's going to be events going on all summer long in La Right now And you know so. Basically we're the deal is is that you just open to. Us residents so I got the three charities involves so motor city Harley donated the bike to him and we're going to give it away at the end of the summer and it's it's basically you donate proceeds are evenly split between the three charities and at the end of summer. He's going to randomly pick a winner in Detroit. Then yeah that'd be great. That would be awesome. I'm open to somebody. That actually appreciates bikes. But we'RE GONNA fly under Detroit Ryan's GonNa personally present them with the bike at his sign. It for them You know we're making plans right now to try to bring it to Sturgis. Because we saw that so as there'll be a few events where Ryan in the biker. There people could come. It'll be in different parts of the country a couple of different times. Where can people follow to find out? Should they follow Ryan on Twitter Instagram? The instagram which is Rambo Donkey Kong. Which can you repeat that one more time Rambo Donkey Kong which is Kinda funny because it fits hot often like he's built like you know he's huge. He's massive man. He's a teddy bear. He yeah gentle giant. But if you if you want to enter donate like I said the more you donate more entries you get is giving project dot com okay. So his links on his instagram. But it's also if you go to giving project DOT com. There's a thing win Ryan Ryan her sorely and there's all the rules and regulations and the eighteen plus. Us resident said anyone can win. It will link that down and have links to that and the show description and then on on the facebook and website as well and you have a. You have a dog at home. You have a dog. That's a rescue. And I want to get that story bandages. A second but are do you have any. Do you have any pets? Yeah what are you an animal lover? We had I grew up on a farm in Iran. Okay so many pets. I've had many pets many many many big pets but right now I have. I have a Husky. They MR or who's turning turning three this this year we we. We actually rescue on Valentine's Day for a year. Now we have a hobbies name Puck We have a cat named Selam. We as my sister. Two days ago decided to get a A couple of days ago anyways Gerbil or something a long tail long tail and like we alligators in the backyard. I'm where I'm where I'm at right now so I don't think that hopefully it'll get out big amber lovers I mean I had a dog. I live nineteen years on Scotty. Name Pearl and animals animals or special their unique. They take they really. They keep us honest. They keep us responsible. And you know they change perspectives They'll love matter why unconditionally you know it. Changes People's lives. And it's something I worked with equestrian centers I've seen the effects on. And you know it's it's really remarkable. What a animal could do it for someone especially Well trained one. Yeah so when you're when you're at a con- like this you're gone for a long weekend or you know your off working on an acting. Gig In your out. Who's taking care of the critters while you're away so either mom and my sister stay home. Ra We We hire someone. Yeah Yeah we we get someone to stay with them are we. They usually come with us. Those are we do a lot of driving with the Husky. It's hard you know it's hard more or less for me than for everyone in my family because they stay home. I travel sixty two months out of the year. So it's it's one of those things where I'm gone and and it's nice to come back to your friend and so what what. What projects are you working on now? What's Is there something on the horizon anything you can tell us about a few projects coming up? I mean I mean always working together so we're always collaborating during that. I have movie called standing up for Sonny right now. based on what we're doing some screening soon in the states hoping to get things on itunes right now another one carol of the bells this one unique could we focused on this one judge of. Alta who has scores for individuals with disabilities. All over the all over California a few in the few outside of California's well we take the The best intrum each of those which have disabilities and we put them on in a position on film. Wow so he shot our first feature which had seventy five percent Seventy percent disabled cast and crew in front and behind the camera and we shot full feature and fourteen days how. Abc to people really like it. I am actually. I'm heading out today. I'm going to go shoot a movie in Los Angeles. This coming this coming week very excited can't talk too much about that. You're working so let's get. It always works awesome. So ben you rescue dog. She had just a heartbreak and start when you founder and but she's got a trick that I want to hear about. Well you already told me share with our listeners. So the dog you were out driving and it was late and you're out and about and you came across his dog. And what condition was she in my daughter and I were driving back from somewhere. Like one o'clock in the morning New York City based but I have a house North Carolina also. Yes I was down there with my kid and we were driving back from somewhere and I. I normally wouldn't be out driving in some country road and happen to be coming around the corner and I ran over to the dog. She was basically kind of stumbling across the street at Black Dog..

Ryan six-foot-seven Detroit Atlanta New York City Ryan Hurst Los Angeles Black Dog Craig Motor City Customs facebook Schroeder Harley founder California Sonny Twitter Jo castellet North Carolina Mike Sturgis
"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

Messengers

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

"Raider <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> telling the story <Speech_Music_Male> of Gustav An <Speech_Male> Alice Bergstrom mm-hmm <Speech_Male> Missionary Evangelist <Speech_Male> Randy. <Speech_Male> Hurst has been telling <Speech_Music_Male> the story <SpeakerChange> of his wife's <Music> parents <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> and most people <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> think of missionaries <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> year. <Speech_Music_Male> At home <Speech_Music_Male> they're furlough. It's <Speech_Music_Male> called <Speech_Male> and then think <Speech_Male> vacation. No they <Speech_Male> have to go round <Speech_Male> and visit <Speech_Male> the Churches Report. <Speech_Male> What they've done and everything <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> to one step further <Speech_Male> he would live <Speech_Male> in Kenosha <Speech_Male> and he <Speech_Male> would go door to door for <Speech_Male> during the week between <Speech_Male> the Sundays <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> he he <Speech_Male> acquired these <Speech_Male> Pentecostal evangelist. <Speech_Male> That were the overruns. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So the evanger <Speech_Male> would give them to them. They'd <Speech_Male> ship them to <Speech_Male> him and he <Speech_Male> personally delivered <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> an Evangelina <Speech_Male> Gospel tract and he. <Speech_Male> He had a rubber <Speech_Male> stamp made <Speech_Male> six. I still remember <Speech_Male> because of the rubber-stamp. Oh <Speech_Male> Six oh nine <Speech_Male> pershing boulevard. <Speech_Male> When I told <Speech_Male> this story <Speech_Male> Once <Speech_Male> in first assembling <Speech_Male> Kenosha the pastor <Speech_Male> time told <Speech_Male> me he said <Speech_Male> we have people in our congregation agregation <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> who came to the Lord <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> this missionary <Speech_Male> took <Speech_Male> a witness <Speech_Male> to their door. <Speech_Male> He went to every <Speech_Male> single <Speech_Male> home in Kenosha <SpeakerChange> Wisconsin Johnson. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Gustov <Speech_Male> turn down <Speech_Male> twice for official <Silence> appointment. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Well <Speech_Male> I'M GONNA say this <Speech_Music_Male> makes up for it <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you see in <Speech_Male> two thousand. Nineteen <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> story was told <Speech_Male> by world. <Speech_Male> Missions Executive <Speech_Male> Director <Speech_Male> Greg Mundus <Speech_Male> at the largest <Speech_Male> gathering <Speech_Male> of missionaries stories <Speech_Male> can assemblies <Speech_Male> of <SpeakerChange> God history <Speech_Male> fifty <Speech_Male> five years of <Speech_Male> ministry in Brazil <Speech_Male> Gustaf Planet <Speech_Male> more than two hundred <Speech_Male> in two hundred cities <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and towns <Silence> two hundred churches inches. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Nine thousand nine hundred ninety seven <Speech_Male> and went to be with <Speech_Male> the Lord at Marinette that <Speech_Male> eighty nine years <Speech_Male> of age <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Gusta <Speech_Male> Y.. If you saw <Speech_Male> him he he <Speech_Male> he would. <Speech_Male> Hardly look you in the eye. <Speech_Male> He never got over <Speech_Male> his poor self <Speech_Male> image as a child <Speech_Male> being rejected. <Speech_Male> He just <Speech_Male> fell in love with Jesus <Speech_Male> and he <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> talked about working for. Oh <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> God just working <Speech_Music_Male> for God you know <Speech_Music_Male> everyone can work <Speech_Music_Male> for God. <Speech_Music_Male> Everyone can do <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you know. God a multi. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You know the seats <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> planet <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and N.. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jesus said when Atlanta <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> good <SpeakerChange> ground thirty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sixty <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> everyone can work <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for God <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> randy hearst. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> for encouraging us <Speech_Music_Male> with the story of the <Speech_Music_Male> late. Gustaf <Speech_Music_Male> Bergstrom. <Speech_Music_Male> We appreciate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you randy and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ruth so very much much <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from Creek Assembly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of God. This <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is messengers <Speech_Music_Male> reports from missionaries. <Speech_Music_Male> Who bring the message <Speech_Music_Male> of hope around <Speech_Music_Male> the world. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm mission's Pastor <Speech_Music_Male> Tom. Murray <Speech_Music_Male> we're a church near <Speech_Male> Milwaukee Wisconsin <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mission to reach <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our world for Christ <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as we lead people <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to discover and become <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who God created <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> them to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> find us at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Oak Creek AG AG <Speech_Music_Male> dot. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Org <Speech_Music_Male> Pray gift <Speech_Music_Male> and go <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> pray <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> passionately <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for the spiritually <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lost to find Christ <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> give <Speech_Music_Male> generously to missions <Speech_Music_Male> through your <Speech_Music_Male> local church. <Speech_Male> Go <Speech_Music_Male> when God calls you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to go. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> Listen to <Speech_Male> what you missed. Listen again <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> a friend or <Speech_Male> give more messengers <Speech_Male> reports from <Speech_Male> around the world just <Speech_Male> ask Alexa <Speech_Female> Alexa. <Speech_Female> Play Messengers <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> podcast. <Speech_Female> Here's messengers <Speech_Female> from apple <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> or Use your phone <Speech_Male> to find <Speech_Male> messengers wherever <Speech_Male> you get your podcasts. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Messengers <Speech_Male> is great for <Speech_Male> first time podcast <Silence> listeners. <SpeakerChange> <Silence>

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

Messengers

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

"I'm Tom Murray mission's pastor. Oh Creek Assembly of God. This is messengers reports from missionaries. Who bring the message of hope around the the world in this report Randy hearst on Gustav Bergstrom the Unofficial Missionary Randy. Hurst has no shortage of missionary stories. Randy was raised in Africa in a missionary family. He's traveled the world is an evangelist brandy served as assemblies of God World Missions Communications Director for nearly two decades so when I asked Randy to share the story of his choice here in messengers he wanted to tell you about Gustav Bergstrom starts in Europe. Way Back more than a century ago. There was a young Swedish boy is father. Lowther was an alcoholic abandoned. His wife and seven children little gust of was one of the youngest. He wasn't the very youngest August. He was seven And this of course took place in Sweden so the mother couldn't care for seven kids so she kept the oldest and the youngest and the other five put into foster care in the Swedish foster care system did Gustav liked to tell his story. Did you have to draw. Draw it out on me. Wouldn't talk about it. Gust of would go out in the woods behind the farmhouse and cry. You know because he felt totally rejected because his his father left and his mother turn them over the foster care system so he had a very poor self image while his mother did. I love him and and she worked her way to America as a cook on a merchant marine ship. Her oldest son John Kent went with her and the youngest child and and They got jobs she would send for the other children One at a time or two at a time it took until Gusta was I was sixteen. I was nine years before he was reunited. You know because They were just really poor. Came to the United States. Where where did he move in northeast based in in Connecticut he wandered into a Little Baptist church in it was in Hartford Connecticut and he heard the Gospel for the first time he'd been raised a nominal. Lutheran you know but they didn't attend Church and hear the Gospel and received Jesus.

Gustav Bergstrom Randy hearst Gusta Little Baptist church Hurst Randy Tom Murray Lowther John Kent United States Sweden Connecticut Africa Hartford Connecticut Communications Director Europe America
"hurst" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"hurst" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm joining Hurst several people lost their jobs at the White House today lieutenant colonel colonel Alexander vin meant the national security the aide who testified in president trump's impeachment trial was fired from his job at the National Security Council his lawyer David precedence has been men's twin lieutenant colonel Yevgeny than men an Iraq war veteran a senior lawyer an ethics official on that same council was also escorted out of the White House today and fired meanwhile trump is also recalling US ambassador to the European Union gardens on land ambassador sama and delivered damaging testimony during the impeachment inquiry seven of the top democratic contenders will face off on national television tonight the last presidential debate in New Hampshire service starts at eight PM eastern and launches the last weekend of campaigning there and your Sam bring less has more from Manchester with the shock waves from Monday's Iowa caucuses still rippling through the democratic field several candidates have been sharpening their tax here in New Hampshire this week former vice president Joe Biden's campaign had been setting low expectations in Iowa and finished fourth seeking a reset in New Hampshire Biden has been emphasizing potential liabilities of his rivals knocking former south bend mayor people to judge for having not held national office and senator Bernie Sanders saying hell have to Kerry the democratic socialist label through November expect those teams to play out on tonight's debate stage sending glass NPR news Manchester the death toll in China from the corona virus went up again today to seven hundred twenty two and the number of confirmed cases is now approaching thirty five thousand the state department says it's prepared to spend up to one hundred million dollars to help China and other countries contain and combat the epidemic as appears Michele Kelemen reports the department has already delivered medical supplies and evacuated hundreds of Americans deputy secretary of state Steve begin because it an all hands on deck approach he says the state department has sent several charter flights to Wuhan China and has evacuated more than eight hundred Americans the state department working closely with our partners in China has loaded the holds of those arriving seven forty sevens with eighteen tons of privately donated medical supplies and humanitarian assistance for the Chinese people begin says those private donations included respirators as well as masks and other needed materials the deputy secretary says the U. S. government will provide aid to up to a hundred million dollars Michele Kelemen NPR news Washington all three lower by the close sing bell the Dow down two hundred seventy seven points to end the day at twenty nine thousand one hundred two that's down nearly one percent the nasdaq was down fifty one points to close at ninety five twenty the S. and P. five hundred down eighteen points to end at thirty three twenty seven for the S. and P. and the nasdaq that's both on more than half percent this is NPR man this is KCRW on Larry Perella Freddie for every seven three good evening to you here's what's happening at five oh four and Ellie federal judge today has ruled against secure communities that's the practice of issuing arrest request based solely on electronic databases the program has allowed immigrations and customs enforcement to make requests to local police to detain people it suspects of being in the country illegally the class action case been working making its way through the courts since twenty thirteen the decision is a win for immigration activists to have long held that a large portion of ice arrest or based on unreliable databases secure communities is said to be responsible for about seventy percent of all ice rest the judge's decision formalizes previous rulings that had begun to stop the use of these so called the trainers White House press to care of press secretary stated that the ruling undermines the pillars of immigration enforcement next conference regarding on the case schedule for March sixth another parent in the college admissions scandal has been sentenced today Douglas Hodge got nine months in prison this case your W. Killy wells reports that's the longest term of any of the fourteen parents convicted so far Hodges the former CEO of investment management firm pimco he paid eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars to get his four kids into college to went to Georgetown to went to USC all as phony athletic recruits on top of the nine months in prison hard will pay a seven hundred fifty thousand dollar fine and serve five hundred hours of community service with four kids involved prosecutors say he's the most egregious offender so far AJ said in a statement that he regrets he gave his kids an unfair advantage he rescinded his not guilty plea back in October making him one of for parents to change their minds this brings the two to twenty one parents who have pled guilty or say they plan to do so fifteen parents maintain their innocence and are going on trial that is K. C. R. W.'s kill the wells and sea world that putting an end to so called adult and serving in pita surfing and pizza is taking credit.

Washington Hurst NPR
North Texas Music Teacher Arrested, Charged With Indecency With A Child

Ernie Brown

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

North Texas Music Teacher Arrested, Charged With Indecency With A Child

"Some music teacher itself you will sell a mentoring schools been charged with indecency with a child the charge against fifty five year old Jeffrey Brooks stems from two thousand five and involves a then eight year old girl a grapevine faith Christian school Brooks turned himself in he's been placed released on bail the Hurst Euless Bedford school district is placed Brooks on paid leave the fourteen year old charge against him as a second degree felony was brought late last year by the alleged victim who was of course now an adult she says she and Brooks were alone in the classroom when the molestation

Jeffrey Brooks Hurst Euless Bedford School Di
"hurst" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

Talkhouse Podcast

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"hurst" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

"The talk house podcast. This week join me from across the couch addict. Nick Dawson editor. In chief of talk there is not a huge chasm between us either in our longstanding friendship or just physically. It almost seems like we need to figure out how to share an arm. I hear you know. Have we ever flown together. We've never flown together. It's a yet. It's a yet for us. Nick Yeah but you did fly out to make this show happen. This is our second second and final episode from La Comecon and Features Juliana Harkabi and Ryan Hurst. That was such a smooth transition. I've literally profession so impressed. Oh you yeah. This is an awesome conversation and I have to say I was a little trepidation before an ad I feel like I should explain why because l. e. comic con is this massive kind of overwhelming. I mean I don't know how many rooms it takes up I. It's just it's huge. I mean there's tens of thousands of people there people there so many rooms and so many events going on simultaneously and the people there are just like going from one thing to another to another. You mean both on the fan and artists side. I'm talking particularly about the art. Okay Yeah and so we had this plan to get Ryan Juliana together add. Everybody was signed on but we got final confirmation like five minutes before it was supposed to buy God God five minutes after which I went and physically retrieved Ryan Payne Hall unlike painfully walked like. It's it's so far to get you to this room that we're recording and then and this is a small thing. It came to my attention that Ryan thought. He was appearing on Giuliani's podcast. Okay she doesn't we'll have a podcast Juliana so she was appearing on Ryan's partner. Nick this is twenty nineteen when you recorded this twenty twenty okay. Everyone's got a podcast a podcast. Your cat has a podcast. My casually does have our guests but yeah cat so basically really what you have here and I. I was standing there next to our superstar L. A. Engineer Ali Nico shots and I was just going. I actually don't know what's GonNa Happen at what I saw. Unfolding for me was just like to incredibly cool generous people adapting in this amazing way and connecting for this conversation nation which is kind of wonderful to behold or to be held with the ears. What is what is the oral version of behold? I don't know listen. Hear hear hear the tune. I'll take it. I have to say this is truly a testament to these two being seasoned pros. They sit down and no matter. WHO's podcasts yes? They thought they were on. They rocked this conversation. It was so fun to listen to and I actually laughed out loud at one point. Yeah it's funny and sweet and they found these points of connection committee for for people who don't know who these guys are and it's possible let's back up if you've missed the walking dead if you've missed sons of anarchy if you've missed Arrow let us inform you. That really shows she watched the Juliana Dinah Drake Aka Black Canary on Arrow currently the CW show and the cool. It'll hinge was that she and Ryan are both walking dead alum. She was on for a couple of episodes Few seasons back and he is a current cast member and as you mentioned she before he played opie Winston on Anneke he's being in based Metalli. He's also bosh at the moment he's comes from an acting family and he's one of those guys really. Oh yeah him that guy. I like that guy. Hey guys good. So they had this great conversation and there was a beautiful moment like literally like a minute into the podcast West where they discovered that they both love dogs. I mean it's not an unusual thing necessarily but they both have like a deep love of this is an extreme version of that and it is it is indeed add. If you listened very carefully you can hear me audibly sigh with relief aboard that I'd you this is going to be okay. I love it. Well they get into so much more in this conversation. We hear all about the bliss of skydiving which Ryan has done about a thousand times such amazing and has some great stories about it it. It was also fun to hear some behind the scenes walking dead stories some nice details they share about life in Atlanta shooting that show lunch with zombies Who Knew Yeah something? I'd never considered. Nick is what the experience of having a body cast taken is like they are essential. If you're a surveyor bearer like Juliana and there is an amazing story within that segment about Marlon Brando business where. I laughed out loud that that story is legitimately worth. The price of admission is free. But Still God damn it. That's a good story. We're here a little bit about Giuliani's mooted shall we say a move into a singing in career which I'd be very excited about and Ryan's early break into acting via spam to run the date. Let's run that tape rolling. Yes okay okay okay. Well I'm Juliana. Hi I'm Ryan shaking hands. Were shaking Yeah I'm I'm right now on Arrow so I'm here at the convention just smeaton fans and We also have the walking dead and common. Yeah Yeah so when did you start Arrow I started. Let's go back. Let's go back and then you can tell me what to do. Okay so where do you live. I live in Vancouver right now. That's where we shoot the show. Oh I love Vancouver spend a Lotta time shot a few shows up there. It's great I love it. It's it's been nice to have a break from La So we've been there for four years years almost and and just come back here as often as I can for sunshine but okay yeah do you live in La we are. You have kids. I do not have kids. I have have dogs Through wasn't just passed away. So you know but it's nice because Vancouver is It's just a nice quiet spot where you can have you know family Yeah like a nice little homes quiet beautiful twelve dogs honestly where how Ya don't tell I'm not telling anybody because it's totally illegal. No but I'm I'M A. I'm a professional dog trainer. Also all positive reinforcement just treat based compassionate for three Doctoring I've been doing that for quite a long time. One of my passions that in controlling yoga skydiving. Those are my big freely. Dog Training is. That's my heart. That's what hurt right there so much and you do foster dogs. That's beautiful and you are. You is it just you. Do you have a family Just wife that's my wife. My wife Molly shot in Vancouver quite a bit and it was funny. Maybe on this maybe fifteen years ago or so. I did a mini series up there and spent nine months all in. What's the what's the one hotel? I'm I was there for nine months and drove me. Crazy was terrible it was emmy. It's a great place for nine months and then I went up there to do another show and And they're like where do you wanna stay like anywhere but the sudden so lucky. I got so lucky I got this little old man. Rented rented me his cabin on water in deep cove. Oh my gosh and it was like you know. Deep Cove is like one of the most sought after real estate places on the planet. There's like you know four hundred Million Dollar House on one side twenty five million dollar house on the other and this tiny little cabinet was all in the water and for whatever reason he only decided to rent it to me black and so I've rented it for one show and then I came back for another three or four seasons up on his show called Bates Motel and I just kept coming back there and he was this old man I kept going like. Where does this guy go the go like because he would just live there and then he would rent it to me but it was literally gorgeous? It was just a wall of windows. Overlooking deep. Cove was heaven I loved it worked while you were in deep cove you worked in Vancouver. I love that there is nothing I mean. I liked the hotel when I I I stayed there for six months and at first it was so beautiful and then by the time you leave the stripes on the wallpaper. It looked like a prison far true true true. We don't really know you're in downtown. So it's a little gray you don't realize that deep cove is not that far away yeah so cool..

Ryan Juliana Ryan Vancouver Nick Yeah Deep Cove Nick Giuliani Ryan Hurst Ryan Payne Hall Juliana Dinah Drake Juliana Harkabi Nick Dawson La Comecon editor L. A. Engineer Ali Nico Cove La Atlanta l. e. Bates Motel
Insurify raises $23M Series A to add new coverage varietals, boost its marketing efforts

Equity

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Insurify raises $23M Series A to add new coverage varietals, boost its marketing efforts

"Quickly talk about some short stuff. I WanNa riff on insurer. Fai which raised a little. It raised a little bit urine. Talk About Product Board so all the boards But starting up with ensure five which is online marketplace that helps people find Better depressing Sheri- products and the reason why is because rays at twenty three million dollars series. A and here's the thing. It only raised six point six million up to this point. It raised a large multiple of the capital. That had before and Jenny when a company raises that much more than its preceding total capital rates. What does that tell you about the company? Hopefully the other numbers are their rights to either. I it's a couple of revenue goals or internal milestone. Sometimes it just got really exciting. Market is really heated up because of an exit or frankly the powdered infantries. Well the first time around and they're getting a lot better at that skill set on the way. I don't think the last is things that case I think instead are pretty interesting. Run ensure if I raise a twenty three million dollars series a led by immtech capital in veal fintech. I'm not Voila. There's no accent so these. The Ola mass mutual adventures was in this nationwide took part in Hurst ventures also was in the round scooting onto around this pretty interesting work board a company that I've covered before and this week. They announced they raise a thirty million dollars series. See and I don't cover a lot the series at thirty million series but this company Danny. I grabbed because they've tripled in size again in twenty nineteen after three and a half exiting era in two thousand eighteen gene. And if you don't know why that matters the short justice that everyone wants to grow as fast as possible and more than tripling air for multiple years in a row shows that you're really hitting scale hill and also injuries and popped into the round and they raised nine months after their series beat so a lot of momentum there. It's cool company. The really smart and I couldn't help myself also ahead touch on

Immtech Capital Hurst Ventures Jenny Danny
Ex-Baltimore mayor pleads guilty to fraud and tax evasion

Mark Levin

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Ex-Baltimore mayor pleads guilty to fraud and tax evasion

"Years former Baltimore mayor Catherine Pugh pleads guilty today to wire fraud and other charges related to her children's books scandal you pleaded guilty in federal court in Baltimore this afternoon to four of the eleven criminal charges against her including conspiracy and tax evasion the charges are related to the sale of her healthy Holly children's book series to non profits and businesses that did business with the state and city U. S. attorney for the district of Maryland Robert Hurst says Baltimore city faces many challenges and we need

Catherine Pugh Baltimore Attorney Robert Hurst Wire Fraud Holly U. S. Maryland
An Interview With Academy Award Winning Editor: Paul Hirsch

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

09:44 min | 2 years ago

An Interview With Academy Award Winning Editor: Paul Hirsch

"Next guest is an Academy Award winning editor his book a long long time ago and cutting room far far away. My fifty years of editing in Hollywood hits Star Wars Kerry Buehler's Day off mission impossible so many more I can go on ray planes trains and we'll deals. Please welcome Paul Hurst. I Paul thanks for coming on the podcast today. Hope Your Day as well my pleasure so I mean there's the history you have. It's amazing. I mean I'm going through some of the people. Oh you've worked for John Hughes. Brian Depalma George Lucas. Is it fair to say that Brian Depalma is your mentor. I mean I've heard you say on occasion is is that a fair as a statement to make absolutely yes. Yeah and and there's so much here Chris I don't want to jump too far ahead of myself but you know just going through your filmography and you know there's tons that I've mentioned but there's also work that you've had I haven't heard it interviews but you've I think you've contributor on like World War Z.. The Great Gatsby life of Pi. How does that work? Paul you just have a little bit of an influence. You do some work in that film and you're not like the leading editor. Hugs that work. Why why aren't you credited for the same way you weren't some of your other works right? Well h film is an individual case so but usually it's. It's a picture that the studio for whatever reason has some concerns about and They they say would you mind either looking at it and giving US notes and would you mind coming in for a few weeks or it's phrased you know differently but there comes a point where frequently that's On a picture even working for many months at the director and the editor and maybe even the studio executives the producers sort of what I call snow. Snow blind no not sure what they're looking at anymore because it's been working on it so long. They don't have objected to take on. What's there and any light to bring it? Excuse me like bring in what they called fresh eyes and sometimes just watching picture giving notes and sometimes sometimes it's actually sitting down and doing a version So that's how you know And then I find that Not taking credit is a way to make my suggestions more tolerable eligible that. I'm not trying to hog credit from someone yet. It makes sense to me. Yeah you know so that. The suggestions go down uneasily could easily because they're often as genuine efforts to help. I have a question down the road that steps on this topic. But I'll ask you now because it's just it's it's appropriate at this point. Do you find that studio executives as time goes by our. I don't WanNa say the word meddling because that's has a negative connotation to it but you find that their involvement is more were. The work should probably be left to those in the creative process. Director writer editor is is it. Is it more intrusive as time goes by Paul Well I'll say this that the most successful films that I've worked on. I've been the product of my collaboration with the director. Essentially just the two of us Making decisions incisions about the cat. Now that's well said and and you know I wanNA talk a little bit about your early life so you grew up in Paris. How many years were you in Paris for Paul? I was in Paris as a child for about four years. Now are you do you still can you. Are you fluent in French. Can you still speak it as something. You influence fluence. My accent is very good. I'm fluid to the degree washing. Sam Fluent I. I always impress french-speakers but equality. My accent hurry I hasten to tell them that might calculator is very small and and I don't have a real facility. Use it sound them. But I'm sure if I went over there and spent two or three Munson Johnson total immersion. I'd I'd get back to where I had been. You know when I was eight years old so I have the vocabulary of an eight year old child but you know I think I think if I stayed there pick it up you know. Yeah that's certainly flew in my book and then you were at your dad's a painter and I have to believe you get some of his his eye for things in art history major. You're the second art history major I've had and I think what two weeks which ages which is telling because I feel history major. Paul she was. She's a costume designer urine editor. I feel like history majoring in history. GIVES YOU LA. This supreme I for details. Is that kind of going overboard or do you think there's something to that. I really don't know One way or the other. I'm an art. I was an art history. Major not major distinction there right as she the average she she was also an art history major so it was like yeah she go ahead. I'm sorry but in my case as an art history major you spend a lot of times looking and yet projected images in dark rooms and critiquing them so I was sort of being prepared for a lifetime of work. Doing just that although I wound up doing moving images instead of still ones but I think my background is was useful in terms of developing an aesthetic about the elements of life of a style in visual arts. And there are many qualities that you you know you you try to achieve whether it's you know Symmetry your balance or a brace or certain a set of qualities that he strived for that are not necessarily only in visual arts. To 'cause I majored in music in high school I went to High School of Music and art and so my work in film. I find that very closely tied to my feelings about music for for me. Music is an essential elements of my work in terms of making presentations whether it's to the director to the public or whatever music than essential ingredient in what I'm doing yes well said you know. People that are listening to this. podcast cast many see editors and they think they know what it editor's job is but many times it's a teen involvement many times. You're working claburn as you mentioned with a director. How would you? What's your cliff notes? Version of what editor is for those listening in probably aren't sure exactly what it is. How would you define an editor's job? Well I can read to you from the introduction to my book which is essentially a chapter devoted to answering exactly that question but No I I have to say I have ordered on Amazon and I did read an excerpt I think it was on entertainment magazine. Entertainment Weekly Weekly. It was a really beautiful excerpt they printed and people said some really nice things anymore. Campbell talkie movies are made in the editing room and so much of your book I want to get into. It's really an amazing. It's an amazing story. Your life is there's been so much to it you are our consensually. What the editor is doing is putting together? The experience that the audience is GonNa have and everything that's done on a film the writers the actors cinematographers the production designers. The costume designers the makeup people. Here people everything the all their work is Toward one end an s to provide the editor with raw materials. Everything they do do is in service of the cut and the editor takes everything that they have done and uses it to bill. It'll be experienced the audiences. Yeah and do you find as you because you've been so effective for so long. I mean that's a testament to your abilities. Do you find that much of your. Your work is is is with the directors. You find that a lot of it is I know George had faith in you clearly Brian has yes. I had faith you clearly. Do you find that typical or is it. Not Typical of of the job varies as much as human beings very Taylor. Is there ever a time. Where director says you know what I completely trust? You have at it and and do what you have to do or as a director always kind of in some way have to monitor the process like I said everyone's different Are Comfortable having having any drive in some of the likely take the real themselves you know so it varies from person to

Editor Paul Hurst Director Brian Depalma George Lucas Brian Depalma Academy Award John Hughes Paris Kerry Buehler Hollywood United States High School Of Music Chris Entertainment Weekly Weekly Munson Johnson SAM Taylor French Amazon
Deep Reinforcement Learning for Logistics at Instadeep with Karim Beguir

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:26 min | 2 years ago

Deep Reinforcement Learning for Logistics at Instadeep with Karim Beguir

"Mark welcome to the A. I. Podcast. Thanks them. It's great to be here. Also let's get started by talking a little bit about your background and in particular deep learning with structure data that is a topic that you know folks just starting to talk about and in fact via the meet up group in association with The podcast we have affirmative a fair amount of experience exploring this through the fast. Ai Steady groups that we do that's a big part of one of the lessons in in that course but I'd love to get a sense for you know how you came to be interested in this particular topic enough to write a book about it sure sure Sam so my my Akademik background is from artificial intelligence a couple of winters ago so I studied studied at ut with Graham Hurst back in the late eighties and it was all symbolic back then and there were some interesting use cases but you know it to alert extended to it didn't work work and I went to work for IBM had a had a great career there learned a great deal spend a lot of time in DB two relational database product from IBM and about two thousand sixteen became evident to me that Arthur's intelligence was starting to work there were things that were actually working became general general knowledge and dot re ignited the spark in me so I did Andrew intro course and the fast. Ai Course so we'd had Adam introduction to deep learning and I was very interested in deep learning and the promise of that and one of the things I found a little bit frustrating as a lot of the cases particularly outside of the context of the fest fast fast. Ai Course were to do with images or or audio they weren't structured data and what I was looking for is. Can I find a way to use this in my Mike day-to-day work because this was it'll be very useful and I wanted to learn more about it and the best way to learn about it is to use data sets that you're familiar with so when I did the the fast day I carson this would have been version. One of the core so has been through a couple of duration since then and there's the section on doing deep learning with with structured data and that really really sparked my curiosity. I thought wow this is this is really cool so they'd look around for some code to have a starter kit to get to get going and it wasn't wasn't easy to find but there was some cagle competitions people who've been working on structured data sets and applying it to deep learning some very elegant. Little Zainal's that Rothman stores resin and the like exactly exactly and I was really impressed by some of the work that I saw there is very elegant very very straightforward and good for me at the stage was at the end to get started to start doing some coding and at the time I was responsible for the Support Organization for Gabby too so there were there's tons of data there hundreds of tickets coming in every day lots and lots of data and I thought it'd be good if we could apply deep learning to to sort of see we can do some predictions that are useful so I built up a prototype model to predict how long a ticket take to get closed and that's you know seemed it worked reasonably well and then did another projects taking what I've learned to predict duty manager calls so those are cases is where a client beaches appointed frustration says I'm done. I'M GONNA pick pick up the phone and get something happening with this particular problem so applying what I've seen from some of the colonel's in Cagle and using the data that was available credit these prototypes and I've learned a lot doing that and they were I think they turned out fairly well but one of the problems with with those prototypes was that the data was obviously proprietary couldn't share that in there's a very strong ethic. Is You know in machine learning data science to share results so I started to look for a more general data set that I could use to apply deep learning to structure data and wrote. I've written a few blog posts on medium about my experience with the the predicting time to resolution and predicting duty manager calls and Manning got in touch with me and said. Would you like to write a book kind of pull this together and that's dot. That sounds interesting sure it's it has been a lot of work. It's and I've certainly I've certainly learned a lot in the course of doing that and one one of the things I've done is create a sort of a full end to end example using an open data set which is to do with the streetcars in Toronto Tron US my my hometown now and it has a very extensive Streetcar Network. Are Light Rail system that runs on regular roads and yeah. They're great. They're efficient. They're relatively cheap to run their cheap to create much cheaper than subways. The problem is because they share the roads with irregular traffic. If they break down there's a delay it really exacerbates gridlock so the city of Toronto publishes a data set that describes all of the delays that have happened for the for the last five years and I thought well I'm going to brought my sleeves and try to create a simple learning model to analyze this data and see even come come up with predictions to predict where they're going to be strict guard delays and hopefully be able to prevent them so that was kind of the the the path I took and that's how how that was the genesis for the book and so should I assume that that that worked that you were able to come up with a model that predicted did the Streetcar Delays or Predict Streetcar Delays with that data yeah. It does a decent job. It's not a huge data set their boat ninety thousand records Kurds right now okay so you know there's some some limitations but certainly for the purposes of of helping somebody who's going to be taking a trip. It's you know the the accuracy is is is good enough to be to be useful but more importantly for the in terms of learning exercise. I think it's it's it's useful useful because it's an open data set. It's big but not so big. You have to deal with the problems of of big data it. It's very messy so there's a lot of work to be onto prepare. The data which I think is a is a good learning experience and it has various different kinds of text data. There's categorical data. There's some continuous this data so it has a lot of it's it's big enough to be interesting but not so bigger overwhelming and I think it's you know it kind of makes a decent end to end example to to go through the go through the topic awesome awesome jumping back to the couple of projects that you worked on when you're at IBM in particular this looking at how long it took to close tickets when I think of a trouble ticket use case and when I think of that trouble ticket use case I think of you know not just structure data is being useful but also the content of the ticket itself so textual all data more like the application of NLP Did you use only meditate about the tickets to predict the close time or did you also use. Is that content. That's a great question so I did use the content. There's all the tickets had a description description could sometimes be two lines like you suck talk a little bit more elaborate than that sometimes it would be a paragraph of of lots of detail but that description was really essential because that's kind of the initial customers sense of it's now what what they found and that was a simple the model included a simple recurrent neural network to to deal with that data so it's the the the text field token is used in beddings and then there was a layer are a layer that was applied in the overall model to take that that text into account and it was interesting the the difference they did some experiments including. I'm not as a feature and then excluding it because it was it was fairly expensive. It added some some links to the time it took to train the model and it made a reasonable difference like it was between three and four percent the accuracy if this if this field is included and that really exciting that's really something and the other thing is that these parents all said that particular field is the description field so all of the text of the ticket it no. It's just the description. The text of the ticket was wasn't available to me at that time so it wasn't oh sometimes that there there could be the equivalent of a one hundred pages of text so all always dealing with textwise was. Vp was the description so it could be up to five hundred five hundred six hundred characters altogether got so that's typically the the textual show description of the issue either has provided by the initial customer. Who's WHO's admitting the ticket or whoever the a support rep is that is taking their call you would always be the customer and that was okay who is intentional to say that was part of the whole idea of the model was to only take data that was available when a ticket. I hit our system. Okay so description would be there. There are other things obviously like whether the ticket had change in severity. They wouldn't be available when the ticket was first opened. Because that's you know it's kind of a data leakage problem you start to take over and say oh that looks use use data that you don't actually have available to you when you're making the prediction but the textual description of the problem coming from the client was always there in the ticket was open and that was the that was one of the features that was fed into the model okay and so you said that the importance of this feature is this features presence gave you an additional three percents increase in accuracy that is relative to what without it how how much of an impact did it have so that was the indy in terms terms of the absolute accuracy so I think at that time it was probably going from seventy three to seventy six percent accuracy leaving taking that economic field out or leaving it in

IBM Toronto A. I. Podcast Mark Light Rail SAM Cagle Streetcar Network Graham Hurst Adam Arthur Andrew Manning Rothman Support Organization VP Gabby
Deep Learning With Structured Data

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:09 min | 2 years ago

Deep Learning With Structured Data

"I am on the line with Mark Ryan. Mark is the author of deep learning with structure data a book that is currently an early access with manning and due for publication in the Spring of two thousand twenty mark welcome to the podcast cast. Thank them it's great to be here. Also let's get started by talking a little bit about your background and in particular deep learning with structure the data that is a topic that you know folks are starting to talk about and in fact via the meet up group in Association Association with The podcast we have a fair amount of experience exploring this through the fast. Ai Steady groups that we do that's a a big part of one of the lessons in in that course but I love to get a sense for you know how you came to be interested in this particular topic enough to write a book about it sure sure sample. My academic background is from artificial intelligence a couple of winters ago so I studied studied at U. T. With Graham Hurst back in the late eighties and it was all symbolic. Ai Back then and there were some interesting use cases. This is but you know I it it to alert extent it. it didn't work and I went to work for IBM had a had a great career there learned a great deal spent a lot out of time in DB two relational database product from IBM and about two thousand sixteen became evident to me that Arthur's intelligence was starting to work there were things that were actually working became general general knowledge and that reignited the spark in me so I did the Android intro tro course and the fast. Ai Course so would had introduction to to deep learning and I was very interested in deep learning in the promise of that and one of the things I found a little a bit frustrating as a lot of the use cases particularly outside of the context of the fest fast. Ai Course where to do with images or or audio they they weren't structured data and what I was looking for is can I find a way to use this in my my day to day work because this looks like it'll be very useful and I wanted to learn more about it and the best way to learn about it is to use data sets that you're familiar with so when I did the fast. Ai Carson this would have been version one of course who has been through a couple of iterations since then and and there's the section on doing deep learning with with structured data and not really sparked my curiosity. I thought wow this is this is really cool so they got to look around for some code to have starter kit to get to get going and it wasn't easy to find but there were some. Kaga competitions people had been working on structured data sets. Let's not applying it to deep learning and some very elegant Little Zainal's that Rothman stores and the like exactly exactly and I was really impressed by some of the work that I saw they're very elegant very very straightforward and good for me at the stage then to get started start doing some coding and at the time I was responsible both for the support organization for DB two so there were there's tons of data there hundreds of tickets coming in every day lots and lots of data and and I thought you know it'd be good if we could apply deep learning to this to sort of see can do some predictions that are useful so I built up a prototype model to to predict how long a ticket would take to get closed and that's you know seem reasonably well and then did another projects taking what I've learned to predict duty manager calls so those cases were a client reaches a point of frustration and says I'm done. I'm going to pick up the phone and get get something happening with this particular problem so applying what I'd seen from some of the colonel's in cable and using the data that was available credit these prototypes and I've learned a lot doing that and they were they out fairly well but one of the problems with with those prototypes was that the data was obviously proprietary couldn't share that in there's a very strong ethic. Is You know in in machine learning data science to share results so I started to look for more general data set that I could use to apply deploying structured data and I Britain a few blog posts on medium about my experience with the the predicting time to resolution and predicting duty manager calls and Manning got in touch with me and said. Would you like to write a book kind of pulled us together and I know that sounds interesting sure it's it has been a lot of work. It's and certainly certainly learned a lot in the course of doing that and one of the things done is create a the sort of a full end to end example using an open data site which is to do with the streetcars in Toronto Toronto's might my hometown now and it has a very extensive streetcar network. These are a light rail system that runs on regular roads and they're great. They're efficient. They're readily cheap to run their cheap to create much cheaper than subways. The problem is because they share the roads with regular traffic if they break down and there's a delay it really exacerbates gridlock so so the city of Toronto publishes a data set that describes all of the delays that have happened for the last five years and I thought well I'm going to roll my sleeves and to try to create a simple deep learning model to analyze this data and see even come up with predictions too. I know predict where they're going to be straight guard delays and hopefully be able to prevent them so that was kind of the the path I took and that's how that was the genesis for the book and so should I assume that that that worked that you were able to come up with a model that predicted Streetcar Delays or predict the Streetcar Delays with that data set yeah it does it does a decent job. It's not a huge data set there about ninety thousand records right now okay so there's some limitations but certainly for the purposes of of helping somebody who's going to be taking a trip. It's you know the the accuracy is is is good enough to be to be useful but more importantly for the in in terms of as a learning exercise. I think it's it's it's useful because it's an open data set. It's big but not so big. You have to deal with the problems of a of big data it. It's very messy so there's a lot of work to be done to prepare. The data. Which I think is a is a is a good learning experience and it. has there's different kinds of data text data. There's categorical data. There's some continuous data so it has a lot of the it's it's big enough to be interesting but not so big. It's overwhelming. Wyoming and I think it's you know it kind of makes a decent end to end example to go through the go through the topic awesome awesome jumping back to do the couple of projects that you worked on when you're at IBM in particular this looking how long it took to close tickets when I think think of a trouble ticket use case and when I think of that trouble ticket use case I think of you know not just a structure data is being useful but also the content of the ticket itself so textual data more like the application of NLP. Did you use only Meta data about tickets to predict the close time or did you also use that content. That's a great question so I did use the content. There's all the tickets had had a description description could sometimes be two lines like you suck a little more elaborate than that. Sometimes it'd be a paragraph of of lots of detail but that description was really essential because that's the initial customers sense of what what they found and that was had a simple pull the the model included a simple recurrent neural network to deal with that data so it's the that that text field this this was token is used embedding and then there was a layer in Arnhem layer that was applied in the overall model to to take that that text into account account and it was interesting the the difference they did some experiments including not as a feature and then excluding it because it was it was fairly expensive it it added some some links to the the time to train the model and it made a reasonable difference like it was you know between free and four percent the accuracy if this if this field is included and the really exciting. I thought that's that's really something the other thing. Is that these enhancements so that particular field is the description field so all of the text of the ticket. It always just description. The text of the ticket was wasn't available to me at that time so it wasn't worth sometimes that there there could be the equivalent you want to have a hundred pages taxed so all always dealing with textwise was the was the description so it could be up to five hundred five hundred six hundred characters altogether got any so that's typically the the textual description of the issue either has provided by the initial customer. Who's WHO's omitting the ticket or whoever the support rep is that is taking their call it would always be the customer and that that was an okay wait is intentional to say and I was part of the whole idea of the model was only take data that was available when a ticket I hit our system okay so and not description would be there. There are other things obviously like whether the ticket had changed and severity that wouldn't be available when the ticket was first opened because that's kind of a data leakage problem you start to takeover and say oh that looks use data that you don't actually have available to you when you're making a prediction but the textual description of the problem coming from the client was always there in the ticket was open and that that was the that was one of the features that was fed into the model

Toronto IBM Manning Mark Ryan Association Association Ai Carson Rothman Textwise Graham Hurst Wyoming Britain U. T. Arthur Four Percent
Texas executes man convicted of murdering 89-year-old woman and her elderly daughter

Mark Levin

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Texas executes man convicted of murdering 89-year-old woman and her elderly daughter

"One our top story the man who murdered two elderly women is the fifth Texan executed this year sixty four year old Billy Jack quite singer receive lethal injection tonight in Huntsville. the stabbing to death eighty nine year old. and her seventy one year old daughter Patricia siren in the whole world home in two thousand three TDCJ spokesman Robert Hurst says crunching or did not apologize during his brief final statement US Supreme Court denied his final appeal less than an hour before he went to the death

Huntsville. Patricia Siren Robert Hurst Supreme Court Billy Jack Tdcj United States Eighty Nine Year Seventy One Year Sixty Four Year
For the second time in a week, a Parkland student has died in an apparent suicide

KDWN Programming

07:24 min | 2 years ago

For the second time in a week, a Parkland student has died in an apparent suicide

"The hour in the park land community is appealing to parents of Marjory stoneman Douglas high to address the threat of suicide after last year's deadly shooting a week ago. Former student Sydney ILO who survived the massacre died by suicide her mom said she suffered from survivor's guilt and had PTSD then on Saturday a second student died in what police are calling an apparent suicide. Let's bring in Rhonda Martin. She's a regular guest. You can find out more at expert news, analysts dot com, highlighting the intersection of today's top news in the field of psychology. Rhonda good, Monday morning. Good morning. Matt. I know this hits home in in your. I know you're in the Florida area, I know this hits. And this just continues to. I mean, this story continues and continues. Now, we have the one girl that committed suicide we should say the second one on Saturdays and apparent suicide. What? Do we know about the second one? Rhonda, what are you hearing? And what's going on here? Well, it hasn't been substantiated. Whether it was a suicide related to the incident your ago, or even if it was a suicide, but certainly there are a lot of suggestions initially that having had this terrible terrible situation on fourteenth of last year. And knowing that the entire community is still struggling, and Matt you, and I know that our society as a whole we lack mental health care, and there are a couple extra resources that have been put in place in that community because of that shooting. But I think the most important thing to remember is each case of PTSD, and we know that the first of these these two situations, she spoke odd, Sydney areola, a Hurst west PTSD, we know that each case of PTSD, it's very pronounced. It's very severe especially in a situation of following a shooting like this. And when you're talking about hundreds of teenagers that have. Varying levels of PTSD and trauma from this is a very serious situation. So we need more mental health resources that are strong and specialties in PTSD to help. And I know that there is, you know, there's an emergency management director that's been assigned to handle this from the state, and like I mentioned Eric couple extra resources that have been put in place, but the gravity of the situation like this with PTSD even just one piece of it. It's very difficult to trade, and it's usually very severe. We've talked about all ages on this show and kids are resilient especially younger kids when they're when they go through tragedy. But this age group is fourteen to eighteen or whatever it is thirteen to eighteen. What about that age? I guess are are they as resilient as younger kids. Does it is it likely to stick with them longer? I mean is there still time for them to really work through this? Well, children are resilient except when you're when we're talking about PTSD it matters. How much are they going to be encountering future triggers? And when we look at the first of these two hundred rituals with Sydney, her family mentioned that just being in a college classroom and the trigger says just being a classroom school. I gaily overwhelmed care so children can be very resilient yet with PTSD except for when there's such a severe incidents, such as this were continued triggers, and especially I mean, look at the the hundreds of kids that were close to the situation lack Valentine's Day and parkland, and they they could be best friends with those that were killed her. Injured in it. And that's too close to severe for them to really be expected to be. Forbid at this point with the triggers. So again, I really think we're just under under resource down there right now. And that there's a way to find the right people to get there. But there's definitely improvements that we can make are we still fighting the stigma the stigma of getting help the stigma of mental health. You know, I I've heard a little bit about that. But like, I said you, and I talk about it on a constant basis. I don't know why there would be one. But is there still a little bit of that in the area? Well, I think that in a case like this most people in bipartisan. I mean, they'll everyone will look at it and say, let's get help for these people. This is really a severe situation. So in these kind of situations, I don't know that there's that much stigma attached to to just agreed that this is too. Let's do something it's that we don't have the resources to really send down there. And without a, you know, a state that because the top person in the field of psychology baffled. Sandercock? I think about him he's up in the northeast region. He has his conferences that he pulled. I was in one of those two weeks ago, and I just looked around the room. And boy there were so cute people throughout the country that really are experts, and he continued to speak about that over and over about the lack of research and just that lack of experts in this field. So I think that I don't know that we would even happy vailable resources to get to those individuals. And so it comes down to how family and friends and teachers and administrators know if there are other kids that they need to look at this week and get them to some kind of urgent care and with that it's it's looking at who can fall asleep when they lay down at night being able to stay asleep being able to wake up for school. So the teacher notices that a child is teenagers on their third day of being tardy that week something to look at. And then in this age group, we really have to watch for alcohol and drug. Used a lot of individuals that are struggling with PTSD will try marijuana. And they'll use it recreationally. I also alcohol abuse happens with those that are trying to treat with PTSD and anger and any kind of logical agitation. So it's gonna come down to the only friend making certain teachers looking for these things and the kids, and then if they see them don't just to that community to go get the mental health help look around the state and look in other states, even if they need to go into other regions, which they very well may need to do to find the experts in this field. And I think above all the most important predictor for who is going to end up with a real severe situation and PTSD is gonna go doctor sent family mental health history. Matt so we need to look at mom. Dad sister, brother and uncle, and if there is any history of PTSD or anxiety or depression in the family. Those are the kids that we really need to keep our I on for these other symptoms that were looking for and as just community members. I think right now that is the most powerful thing that community can do at this time for those children. Yeah. Keep an eye on your neighbors there in that community. Just our our hearts go out to that community in parkland is unbelievable. Go through that. And now they're going through the loss of more of their

Ptsd Matt Rhonda Martin Marjory Stoneman Douglas Sydney Areola Florida Sydney Director Eric Valentine Marijuana Two Weeks
"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

Messengers

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

"They make an appeal whatever they want to if a free gift or whatever like help or however they choose to do it and then just say think a minute is brought to you by this thinking that is brought to you take a minute is making a difference in these many nations so let's talk about how it all started it goes back to a change in direction that Jan and the IRS did not see coming yes this is a report about how this radio segment went global in all these languages and formats it's also just as much about listening and pursuing God in those moments in those seasons when our heavenly father wants to change our course change our life course and unexpect- the change in direction at the most well known missionary of all time. Paul he experienced this as well Paul wrote most of what we now call all the New Testament and Paul is the one who I hated Christians and then became a Christian through an encounter with Jesus after the resurrection on the road the Damascus Paul preached the message of Christ and started churches in the Roman Empire and beyond and in this pulse plan was to go to Asia but Act Sixteen six tells us Paul and his team were forbidden to speak the word in Asia not by the government but by the Holy Spirit and then Paul was redirected this is axe sixteen nine and a vision appeared to Paul in the night a man of Macedonia I was standing there urging him and saying come over to Macedonia and help us so instead of Asia Paul went toward Europe it's an event that we so as the Macedonian Call God's still redirects changes the chorus we think we're on for Jannine Iris that changed indirection came when they were denied visa-renewal back in the nineties the government of that country essentially said you can't live here anymore that was it so so we figured well God's in control and and we moved on and gaining and keeping permission to live in a foreign country this is a challenge for so many of our workers and partners living in four nations it's relatively easy to visit most countries for a few days weeks even months it's like if you want to go as a tourist but if you want to stay if you wanna live there there are a lot more questions more forms more paperwork so for Janet Iris if not where they had been in Southeast Asia how about Fiji Island Nation in the south Pacific before they even got there Jan felt this tug toward radio and this went down of all times during bedtime with kids what happened was the largest spoke to me in my heart one night I was putting boys down to bed and I knew if it was loaded onto pass so the week we arrived in Fiji again we had no experience or anything I was asked to do a radio program there was a brand new Christian radio station fledgling radio station was trying to make a go of it and I it was taking off and so I don't know why me or why us but some like well evidently the Lord this may be the Lord so I just started driving in and doing it live every Sunday morning just it was a ten minute program it was also still very third world you could hear the roosters crowing and the Times I can sometimes yeah great and then other times you like oh my goodness jen had been teaching at the Bible College in Fiji but this radio thing really started to take off Mary Loma Loma who was probably the lead television anchor in Fiji and she was a new Christian I baptized we were just in Fiji a year and a half before they transferred us and yet in that year and a half the favor God gave us with the the media community and so she then got behind it and she knew all these station managers in the Pacific so she would just you know back in those days facts them this is how old and and they'd be yeah let's let's put it on and see see if it's any good you know and then so that was the very beginning days Samoa another island nation one of the I countries of expansion iris was born and raised in Samoa her family is there well we met in some way actually jen graduated from Evangelist University came over to work with his brother Randy and at the time I was going to school here in America I had a government scholarship and studying at a university in Texas and I had just given my life to the Lord the summer before that come home and so I met John the next year when he came from the states and so we just we became friends almost immediately and then when I came back the following summer things just seemed to click and I never never expected to marry somebody okay who wasn't from my own home country and I know that he did neither let alone Mary missionary so yeah it's been it's been a great life yeah it's been a it was hot it was very hot leaving home my family wasn't saved and that spin beautiful how faithful God has been every time we've gone home after that almost every time one of my family members came to the Lord got saved and so now all but one of my sisters the thing is we try to stay anonymous and so a lot of people when we first started airing on someone didn't know who is doing and we wanted it away there was one time when we stopped at a grocery store on the way to the way somewhere and Jan into by coke and all he said go to the cashier and Xi Mu should look to them and she's just on that she did recognize his voice so yeah he does have a very distinct voice we received a letter from the principle of a heist cool in an island called Kitty bus in the Pacific and he thanked us for think a minute he said that they began every day the high school country Guy his name I'll just say his name was veto which is David in Psalm one very very talented very charismatic in all would host television programs and beauty pageants and talent shows all this but he worked at the radio station the name of the radio station that we started on there was a magic FM and about three quarters of the nation listen to that one station so we had an amazing audience and and so the program just became very popular number one within a couple of weeks and he listened every day to be to did and after about five months on the Lord completely just set him free and it was it was through through thinking about it and through the messages and programs and he was just totally changed and transformed married has three children and that's almost twenty years ago and so you know just amazing lasting fruit so eh or the radio it's it's the Gospel it's the truth is is taken by the technology and broadcasted that the spirits speaks when they hear that human voice and they make that connection the spirit's voice just like industrial preaching you know whether it's behind a pulpit or a Mike I think a minutes it could change everything.

Paul IRS three quarters twenty years five months ten minute
"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

Messengers

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

"Bipolar hiking through all the classrooms link a minute so that they started their day that way and our calls yet else he said you buys a giving answers to these kids that they're not even getting in the churches in complementary and appreciate it in her people sometimes wonder well how can you know what what kind of impact can radio program or this thing and of course that's not the issue it's it's not the technology your phone or a radio you know you have access to these lives every day they meet you at the breakfast table or riding in the car to work or at the market or on the bus.

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

Messengers

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

"Think a minute during a football game I'm of Augsburg University in America Augsburg was losing but late in the game defensive tackle David Stevens came off the bench and sparked a comeback in his teammates he made two important tackles and recovered a fumble to get the ball back for his team. The crowd cheered and roared as he held the ball up high to inspire his team David Stevens was born to a woman who had taken an anti nausea drug for pregnant women in the early nineteen sixties but the drug ended up causing terrible birth defects so David was born with no legs David's mother then abandoning making his tragic young life even worse but then David was adopted bill and be Stevens David new father and mother loved him very much they supported and encouraged him as well as challenged him to do his very best to reach his full potential even though he had no legs they made him learn to do things for himself and they never put him in a wheelchair instead when David was three years old they had special artificial legs made for him in school David became a student leader made good grades and had many friends in fact he not only played football also basketball baseball and hockey he even became a champion wrestler when he started driving a car the license bureau offered him handicapped license plates but he politely refused saying those are for people who really need them I'm not disabled you see from the time he was young David was taught never to think of himself as disadvantaged or a cripple instead he learned to discipline and train himself so he was able to do so much more than anyone ever thought he could and whatever problem or obstacle might be facing youtube can discipline yourself to either rise above it or push right through it to achieve your life goals and dreams so today why not ask Jesus give you free wrong attitudes and way of living than ask him to take control of your heart and character so no matter what difficulties you face he'll help you with his power to start disciplining in training yourself to reach your full potential and fulfill all the great plans he has for you just think a minute thank him in it short to the point thought provoking and memorable this came on the radio in the morning while I was on the way into the office I can see myself turning up the volume a little leaning in then when I get to the office saying hey did you hear about that football player I'm thinking today in radio seconds count ten seconds for the intro then Jan talked for about two minutes ten seconds been an invitation to their worship services or pointless interest to a website then they do their own tagline the end why people's church crafting a two messages usually quite a bit more challenging than writing a thirty minute message it's like every word has to count and we know how many signs it can be and yeah so it is it is it is tough I mean you can put in a lot than intro with humor with illustrations with points with a closing all in two minutes the Gettysburg address was two minutes long and considered probably the most the greatest and most effective speech in American history by any means we're going to get to where this all started but now today thinking is global it's used by local churches to connect with nonbelievers through radio also other formats like tv daily newspaper columns and English teaching outreach I think a minute has a presence at least thirty eight countries thirty eight let me just give you a few on the list the Philippines Thailand Japan Uganda Ethiopia Germany Croatia Spain Argentina Mexico and Sri Lanka Dijon Wickramaratne E radio on five stations three times a day top FM stations and about two million people listening it's become very very popular in the capital of and they have about one hundred thousand people getting the messages by text SMS text.

David Stevens America Augsburg Augsburg University football two minutes ten seconds thirty minute three years
"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

Messengers

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on Messengers

"This is messengers the plan was to stay to serve in this country for lifetime well you know in actuality we weren't per se kicked out but what happened was we were at the end of our term in South East Asia Nineteen Ninety five all my teaching I was teaching in a Bible school or Seminary you know advance theology and all that in in the language so we'd worked really hard at learning the language I can't just brush by the commitment that was made here to learn this foreign language it's difficult it's it's a big deal and Jan tells me they went all in after five months it's not that long John reached a point where he could preach simple sermon in eighteen months a year and a half John had reached a fluency where he could teach theology in this in this foreign language Jen told me it was meant a long days and nights of study and anyone who's learn a foreign language and try to use that language before you know that there's these embarrassing mistakes along the way after all that after all that work the door closed to use that foreign language and it was really a surprise to everyone but just toward the end of our term we would get an annual renewal and got the letter and it said this would be your very last renewal we and so I showed it to Rotherham Kenny and boy his face just dropped and knew immediately and so it was just a crazy random seemingly thing but none of the other missionaries had happened to them so it was very very hard to understand because we were ready to come back in our second term just hit the ground running you know the foundation of Adelaide relationships language all of that yeah no there's no appeal whatsoever you know and and there's no reason they don't have to give a reason it's it's purely Arbitrary Creek Assembly of God world impact this is messengers reports from people who bring the message of hope around the world. I'm Tom Murray the mission's Pastor at Oak Creek we're thankful for the many great churches with a heart to reach the lost plant churches train the next generation of leaders and serve the poor and suffering with compassion. It's our hearts share these reports because Psalm Ninety six three says publish his glorious deeds among the nation's tell everyone about the amazing things he does post the new report the second Tuesday of every month if you're new to messengers this is a great time to go ahead and click subscribe be sure to stay to the end of this report she's going to be sharing some of you comments and then update from a missionary who's just getting started in Europe this is report number three think a minute the Janet Iris Produce a daily Radio Segment called think a minute iris came up with the name while we wanted to have something minute in there and so we just kind of bounced back and forth and just arrived at that the idea when you hear the income on sure I'll give you a minute even though it's not actually one minute it is three minutes so as my brother says that's false thinking minutes it could change.

John South East Asia Psalm Ninety Jen Oak Creek Jan Tom Murray Janet Iris Adelaide relationships Kenny Europe eighteen months three minutes five months one minute
"hurst" Discussed on Ross Tucker Football Podcast

Ross Tucker Football Podcast

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on Ross Tucker Football Podcast

"Well these are both important topics they think to dive into so from race hearst i guess there's pros and cons of this right i mean the pro is a significant pro which is that they found that he had a heart condition and they found it before something really bad or scary happened now i don't know what the condition is or what the implications are there have been some talk that it's a nick fairly type thing but man i mean we've all seen in sports some really awful awful tragic things happen so if you're maurice hurst i'm just so thankful if i'm him on some level that they found this out he can get multiple opinions he can find out what is options are and really go from there and it may not include ever playing football again but while thankfully they found this before something awful happened the couns are here yet i think he's gonna be a first round pick may be high second rail pick the best interior rusher in the draft and now his stock has definitely suffered as a result and might might really go down right i mean a might really be in a bad spot for him at this point based on based on this new so there's different ways to look at it but that certainly the pros and cons of it for maurice hurst is that may have got this bad heart condition that he might never be all play football again he made of missed out on a bunch of money that it those in a get but you'd still obviously rather no that the now i i'm just always amazed when every year at the combine they discover at least one or two of these things right every year and it's just so scary to me that they never diagnosis and college i mean he should have a preseason physical every year in college but.

football maurice hurst
"hurst" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Great to be with you thank you michael tacket his national political writer with the new york times we reached him in washington dc and other big winner in last night's elections in virginia was chris hurst mr hurst decided to run after his girlfriend journalist alison parker was shot and killed on live television in 2015 last february as it happens guest host helen man spoke to chris hurst here's part of that conversation from our archives uh i bill if like people because they like done and i'm not outraged that allison was murder because she was shot and killed i'm outraged because she was murdered so i think that there are things that we can do in the united states and at the state level in virginia to reduce the amount of people who are dying from a gun and uh i think that we really need to have an extended focused on the vast majority of people who guy with a gun which is from suicide it your proposals though are different from a lot of the conventional a gun control advocate policies what would you specifically like to see done i think anything that we can do to identify interesting if the level at which someone becomes a threat to them soffer someone else and then have appropriate due process and law enforcement protocols to remove any type of dangerous tool that might be at their disposal to help them complete their act from our archives that was as it happens guest host helen man in conversation with chris hurst last february mr hurst won his race for the district virginia's house of delegates last night he ran after his girlfriend alison parker was shot and killed while conducting a live television interview in 2015.

writer new york times virginia mr hurst alison parker helen man allison murder united states law enforcement michael washington chris hurst
"hurst" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"We haven't okay so there's babacar to go across the stage loops knocks down the microphone who catches it stevie wonder now how did he do that how did he do watched there is indeed knocked down what the reaches out and catches it is hand how did the blind man no that the mike stand was falling down and how did he know where to put his hand to reach out and catch and you can say while he's reaching out after the microphone hits this chest no no no he's reaching out before the mighty or floor is to he has no absolutely prior to the microphone was anywhere near him really he reaches out catches it stevie wonder isn't blind but that you're pipe and smoke covered yes triple eight nine hundred thirty three 93 cosmo hurts kids dot com is on a mission and its mission i believe in cosmo hurts kids founders victoria hurst part of the hurst family and the hearse corporation publishes cosmopolitan magazine known as cozma now she's she just believes tasma has pornography in it you might agree with that you may not if you don't that's fine but if you think did it does and that pornography is harmful to children all she's trying to do is to have states material harmful to minors laws applied cosmopolitan magazine and then that way it can't be sold to anyone under the age of eighteen just protects the kids from what's in it and you know i mean the there's the articles there's the pictures there's all kinds of stuff in cosmo and it's just not good for kids.

tasma victoria hurst
"hurst" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"He loved that were actually love the books lama talking but my singing that it's matumla this heart muscle laugh we go to euro soda find out how your impacting your child's healthy brain development go to first five california dr kaunda first five california doc hey leaning enjoy the rest of your weekend there you go after news marcellus and kelvin hanging out here eric davis is here as well children's hospital of late rubio that's the best part of me all wrong it's friday we keep reading on on friday as went dibo hit felicia you could be hidden hurst are not police was we'd be along we always get it wrong i every targeted socialism would you guys can look at it just really cool piece here uh adam razingar did for esb that khamis he called it all aboard the boat in and i'll just read the little subtitler how likely as a banana boat were union the 2018 we take you step by step through the ways the broad nilo cb 3d d way could all come together for france should encounter bananas before they bring a bunch so low but as a cool to a piece about this so well done it is very well to the houston scenario he talks about how they could end up in houston but i wanna go to the city we resign and that is los angeles scenario so again is marcellus there's no there's a banana boat it's a little animation going on here gaps of electric colors they talk about the clippers right i can tell you what is next summer rolls around and it turns out cb 3s rockets fail to launch an and the point guard decides he wants to explore his options remember because he still can do that one of these options will have him returning to la as a laker this time and this time there be nothing david stern could do about it so this is our how it can happen.

eric davis rubio hurst adam razingar france marcellus clippers david stern california houston los angeles point guard
"hurst" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"hurst" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"And then that like shevchenko even knew that she was like i knew how much weight she wanted to keep on and input back on to get an advantage she play that game so she she mess it up on herself and now she can away valentina all their work their team buttering got semi jesus she when a dark and she's gonna fight now in edmonton so made muzzy fans unpicking about like i imagine all the fans i came over and then she she could have made a decision she got cleared but hurst's her thing was bothering her a lot has had a athlete of for magnitude in her level it ban if if it's that big deal you've got a trust especially of you for level that that it's astronaut beer or now this is the problem also she doesn't owe the fans shale i know you're you guys aren't the one who are going to pay her bills if she gets punched in the face in as you fuxin crew up permanently like it's so you cannot base off guy hope out on upset shevchenko's families falker above the only reason santa's because she decided to do that way cut that way like if she added war and she said that's a chronic thing that she has the i've never heard of it before but i'm guessing if she true out really your body look at people who have have had it before like more ronel otto tweeted out he in some serious shipment is legit you know i get bottom line we should we should we owe it to a champion like amana nunez to take her word for the fact that she couldn't fight.

shevchenko edmonton hurst santa otto amana nunez