35 Burst results for "Hurricane. Michael"

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Of hiccup on then, Of course, those that stayed really did a great job of protecting them. And you're right. You know, we unfortunately did have think of it as many as four or five people who perished in the storm mostly comes Trees falling on their residences, but But you know, it could have been. It could have been a lot worse. In fact, the predictions of the storm surge. Thankfully, what did not transfer are in no way am I Mad at the meteorologist missing at Mork. I'm kind of glad, attractive every time it bigness. It'd be better if you know a rather be over prepared. Not. And so that was. That was very good. How bad was it? In the end? How much storm surge was? How high was it? Athena? The sponsors didn't get bad. I got 2.5. Ft. It was really remarkable. Wow, that's a miracle. That's an answer to prayer right there, My man. All amazing. Our prayer. But why tell you the wind damage was unbelievable. It reminded me a lot of Hurricane Michael that inflicted the Panhandle of Florida A couple of years ago. I going out there and went to help folks out in that area to recover, and it just reminded me a lot of that very Small, powerful storm that inflicted a tremendous amount of wind damage. Look up. Maybe George, I'll get our Khan spoke to send you some of the pictures that we took more won't put him up on your Web site really is devastation. He is..

Khan Hurricane Michael George Florida
'Extremely dangerous' Hurricane Laura slams into Louisiana as Category 4

All Things Considered

00:59 min | 1 year ago

'Extremely dangerous' Hurricane Laura slams into Louisiana as Category 4

"John Bell, Edwards says Hurricane Laura left a path of destruction along the U. S Gulf Coast or has since week into a tropical storm but slammed into southern Louisiana is a powerful Category four hurricane really today with sustained winds of 150 MPH, NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports. It's the third storm since 2017 to hit land with such Catastrophic power. Hurricane Laura got its power from the hot water in the Gulf of Mexico. The water on the surface of the Gulf is about 4 F warmer than the historical average. Climate. Scientists say that was enough to help Laura intensify really quickly in 24 hours before the storm hit the coast. It's maximum wind speeds nearly doubled. That's similar to what happened to Hurricane Harvey in 2017 before it hit the Texas Coast and Hurricane Michael in 2018 when it hit the Florida Panhandle. Climate change is causing sea surface temperatures around the world to rise. Which makes dangerous storms. More common. Rebecca Hirscher NPR news while winded

Hurricane Laura U. S Gulf Coast Gulf Hurricane Harvey Hurricane Michael Rebecca Hirscher Rebecca Herschel NPR Texas Coast John Bell Louisiana Mexico Edwards Florida Panhandle
Tropical Storm Nestor eyes the Gulf Coast

Garden Talk

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Tropical Storm Nestor eyes the Gulf Coast

"The Gulf coast in panhandler paying especially close attention to tropical storm Nestor business owner Machel results says that when you live and work on the coast there are no small storms we have taken out a lot of things from the store at least waist high we are expecting cents were right over the water to get a little bit of water in the store so we're protecting everything we know needs protecting and many residents are still dealing with the remnants of hurricane Michael from a year ago WC TV reporter Jacob Murphy is in Marianna Florida about an hour west of Tallahassee Maryland dimming her property still littered with debris now she fears Nestor could finish what Michael started and this fight some of our trees this was hasn't completely

Panhandler Jacob Murphy Marianna Florida Maryland Nestor Michael Gulf Business Owner Machel Hurricane Michael Reporter Tallahassee
Georgia Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Hurricane Dorian

Fresh Air

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Georgia Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Hurricane Dorian

"Georges Georges Georges Georges governors governors governors governors declaring declaring declaring declaring a a a a state state state state of of of of emergency emergency emergency emergency for for for for twelve twelve twelve twelve counties counties counties counties in in in in the the the the southern southern southern southern part part part part of of of of the the the the state state state state as as as as a a a a male male male male Moffett Moffett Moffett Moffett from from from from member member member member station station station station W. W. W. W. A. A. A. A. B. E. in Atlanta reports heavy rain and damaging winds are expected from hurricane Goran the storm is projected to make landfall somewhere along the Florida coast on Monday but forecasters say the hurricane could also bring flooding and gusty winds to parts of Georgia the storm's arrival also also coincides coincides with with Labor Labor Day Day weekend weekend Georgia Georgia governor governor Brian Brian camp camp says says that that may may cause cause pro pro long long traffic traffic delays delays that's that's something something else else I I think think as as citizens citizens need need to to be be thinking thinking about about if if we we get get a a big big traffic flow from Florida is going to disrupt traffic for our Jordan's they're traveling over the holiday weekend the potential impact from Dorian comes just eleven months after George's farming industry suffered major damage from hurricane Michael for NPR news I'm a meal Moffett in Atlanta

Moffett Moffett Moffett Moffet W. W. W. W. A. A. A. A. B. E. Hurricane Goran Georgia Florida Jordan Dorian George Atlanta Georges Georges Georges George Brian Brian Hurricane Michael NPR Eleven Months
Storm could bring heavy rain, flooding to Florida's Gulf Coast

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Storm could bring heavy rain, flooding to Florida's Gulf Coast

"Much of Florida's west coast are preparing for the possibility of heavy rain and flooding from a potential tropical depression in Tallahassee they're filling sandbags Dennis feltgen with the national hurricane center in Miami says there's an eighty percent chance a low over Georgia will become a tropical depression later this week dropping lots of rain in the northeast Gulf apple certainly include the western coast of Florida as well as the panhandle region National Weather Service forecasters say Panama City still recovering from hurricane Michael could get six to eight inches of rain over the next seven

Florida Tallahassee Dennis Feltgen Miami Georgia Panama City Northeast Gulf National Weather Service Hurricane Michael Eighty Percent Eight Inches
House passes long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill

Atlanta's Morning News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

House passes long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill

"Senator David Perdue calls it beyond embarrassing. WSB's Bill Caiaccio reports congress has finally approved a disaster aid package. Jim RCN it comes after months of political fighting typical Washington fashion. Congress kick the can down the road. Georgia's senators David producer, Johnny Isakson, expressed their frustration throughout the process is not right. It's not fair for the two hundred and thirty days after hurricane Michael ravaged South, Georgia. The nineteen billion dollar aid package is finally approved by the house. And now headed to President Trump. It also includes money for local blueberry growers whose crops were destroyed by a deep freeze in two thousand seventeen and victims of recent tornados

Senator David Perdue Congress Jim Rcn WSB Georgia President Trump Bill Caiaccio David Producer Hurricane Michael Johnny Isakson Washington Nineteen Billion Dollar Thirty Days
Puerto Rico, Congress And Trump discussed on Mike McConnell

Mike McConnell

02:06 min | 2 years ago

Puerto Rico, Congress And Trump discussed on Mike McConnell

"It's like congress finally sending the nineteen billion beat this be nineteen billion dollar disaster aid Bill to Trump, a rare bipartisan achievement that we don't see these days. Yes. So congress is officially passed in nineteen point. One billion dollar disaster relief aid. It is a massive package in the most sweeping disaster aid measure that congress has ever considered and really when you look at it this package delivers aid to nearly every corner of the country. It's addresses natural disasters that have happened over the last three years. We're talking hurricane Maria that a really impacted Puerto Rico, you have hurricanes, Michael, and Florence, those devastating wildfires in California, all the way to Utah. Volcanic eruptions in Hawaii really a lot of a lot of disasters that we saw over the last three years, they overcame months of, I guess, infighting misjudgment, a feud between Trump and congressional Democrats is expected to sign us. So the president did tweet about it on. He called it great so that signals that he is on board and will likely sign it this. It's it's important to note though, that, while congress was going back and forth, amongst, you know, Democrats and Republicans and also with the White House. Millions of Americans have been left in limbo in the last six months. You know, we talk about hurricane Maria, the happened back in two thousand seventeen Puerto Rico, their Puerto Rico's, excuse me, their food stamp program was set to run out of funds. And so, essentially what the argument was over was funding for Puerto Rico, the president said that Puerto Rico received enough aid initially, and that the local government mismanaged those funds, and he didn't believe that any more money should be going towards the island to put it in context for you. This disaster relief aid provides six hundred million for their food stamp program, and other three hundred million for recovery efforts, that's a total of nine hundred thirty one million out of nineteen point billion. You said it with a B so in, you know, in context, that's not a

Puerto Rico Congress Donald Trump Hurricane Maria President Trump Bill Hawaii White House California Florence Utah Michael Three Years Nineteen Billion Dollar One Billion Dollar Six Months
Hurricane Michael, Hurricane Center And Hurricane Andrew discussed on Barsky Radio

Barsky Radio

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Hurricane Michael, Hurricane Center And Hurricane Andrew discussed on Barsky Radio

"The word hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida panhandle last year has been upgraded. Eight fifty F T Elle's. Karen Curtis has. Has details. Hurricane Center has reassessed the data regarding hurricane Michael and upgraded. The storm from a category four to five with one hundred and sixty mile per hour sustained winds scientists say hurricane Michael is the first hurricane to make landfall as a category. Five storm since Hurricane Andrew in one thousand nine hundred and only the fourth on record hurricane season two thousand nineteen

Hurricane Michael Hurricane Center Hurricane Andrew Karen Curtis Florida
600-acre Florida wildfire fueled by Hurricane Michael debris

America Trends

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

600-acre Florida wildfire fueled by Hurricane Michael debris

"A wildfire or the Florida panhandle now about forty percent contained a little more than a day. After it started. A forest service spokesman says it's burning east of Panama City for us officials say the fire started Saturday night, and it's threatening at least three dozen buildings.

Panama City Florida Forty Percent
Expert: White House shouldn't ignore security threats from climate

Climate Cast

04:39 min | 2 years ago

Expert: White House shouldn't ignore security threats from climate

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. Is climate change already costing the US military billions. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter. This is climate cast national security experts have identified threats from climate change for more than a decade. There are threats to US military facilities from rising season. Rivers. Just this month. Much of off at air force base near Omaha was underwater early damage estimates. There are in the tens of millions and a climate change in Hansard hurricane Michael destroyed or damaged up to seventeen f twenty two fighters at Florida's Tyndall air base. Last fall that damage price tag likely runs into the billions this month. Fifty eight former military and national security officials sent a letter to President Trump. The letter objects to the idea of a White House panel that disputes military and intelligence analysis of climate threats. John Connor is the director of the center for climate and security. You ask your sign. Scientists and your national security officials to provide their best judgment whether it's their best scientific judgment or their best military judgement or their best intelligence analysis. So that you can make a as a leader the best decision possible to skew that information is to ensure that you're going to make an ill informed decision. You've been on the inside of this John. I'm curious about how this process works in. What ways does the national security community assess climate change as a threat to national security one way is the threat to infrastructure as we deal with sea-level rises, we deal with wildfires as we deal with flooding as we deal with extreme weather resilience and readiness are things that we should incorporate into our basis into our infrastructure. Let's talk about the current catastrophe in Mozambique and think a little more globally. We've got hundreds of dead more than one hundred thousand displaced in Mozambique. Bekes Bob, way and Malawi. This is a massive humanitarian crisis, and I'm not trying to be callous in asking this. But how does acuity analysts assess these events as security threats in the future each of these things causes displacements that will drive instability. They will make it more likely to have populations suffering makes it more likely that there will be displaced peoples who might be available for recruitment to extremist organizations, each of these pieces of the puzzle have security implications, and that is part of a larger fabric that has to be analyzed. John conger director of the center for climate and security great discussion today. Thanks for your insight. Happy to be here. My name is Melanie chevelle Stora. I'm faculty member at university of Minnesota in the college of design, and I do teaching research and service in energy shoes in the built environment. There's few ways in which we can impact building energy use one is if it's a new building, you know, we design it right to begin second. Is we're going into a retrofit system. There's different ways to think about it. There's the building skin or the exterior walls, you can impact that you can impact the behavior of the people, and you can impact the systems within that retrofit situation by systems. I mean mechanical systems that do heating and cooling and ventilation. One of my research. Areas is we are trying to figure out ways of doing retrofits inexpensively. So what we're trying to do is can you code buildings with a modulating layer that changes the environment of the building itself. So that idea is suddenly you're from being a Minnesota weather. You're maybe say, a central US weather is what you're seeing around the ability. So that to far out idea, but practically there's lots of things that people. Can do right now. A very easy way to reduce energy, use changing your light bulbs. Right LED bulbs. If you just change everything you can even Chandler Lear bulbs as LED. An reassure people that everybody can do this. It doesn't have to be expensive. It doesn't have to be very time consuming. Really everyone into it. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter.

United States Chief Meteorologist NPR Mozambique Paul Hunter Bank Of America Director Fdic Melanie Chevelle Stora John Connor President Trump Omaha Tyndall Air Base John Conger White House
Baseball coach and wife fatally electrocuted at school's field

Drew Garabo Live

02:18 min | 2 years ago

Baseball coach and wife fatally electrocuted at school's field

"Sunday thirty people liberty county, Florida, right? Thirty frigging people are on the baseball field. And they're putting up a new scoreboard hurricane Michael took the last one down. So this is what's going to be a wonderful event. People are celebrating. They had ordered a new scoreboard. It comes in. Now. You might call an electrician I might call tradition. This baseball team. Clearly didn't think that they either need an electrician or did not have the funds tiring electricity. So they get a new scoreboard coach some players some parents. They're out there working on it. This dude who coached the team a high school coach gets on a lift, you know, an electrical lift. And he gets into the electrical lied and it hits him. Oh, he he bumped into a power line, right? And so he's he's got the current running through his body. He's electrocuting himself. His wife. Shane Crump who's a health aid for the liberty county school district who certainly should have known that if someone has been electrocuted. The last thing in the world, you wanna do is try to grab him. So is he up on the lift at this point? And then brought back down says he's on some kind of lift any got into an electrical line. So I can only assume that she climbed up the left or or even touched the left at that point. Right and tried to help him the minute. She touched him. She was killed. Jeez. Along with him their son chase Crom who was on the team tried to come to his parents aid, zapped but survived. Jesus. Coach himself. According to liberty county sheriff Eddie Joe white. Which is of course, you're going to be sheriff. If your name is Eddie, Joe white, the coach himself was running a piece of equipment it impacted a high power line in the piece of equipment. He was running became electrified. He was electrocuted. A white female. That's his wife who was there tried to render assistance. She was lecture cupid an actual member of the team came up to help. That's his son. He was also electrified but knocked away from the

Shane Crump Eddie Joe White Liberty County School District Baseball Liberty County Florida Chase Crom Michael Joe White Eddie
For Georgia Farmer, The Trade Tariffs Are Personal

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:47 min | 2 years ago

For Georgia Farmer, The Trade Tariffs Are Personal

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast, the ongoing trade dispute between the US and China is clearly having an economic economic impact on both countries. But tariffs can also affect people on an individual level. Nowhere is that more apparent than in America's agricultural communities. Stacey van expense and Cardiff Garcia hosts of the podcast, the indicator from planet. Money spoke with one farmer whose livelihood is now on the frontlines of a trade war, David Reid farms, more than two thousand acres of peanuts and cotton here in Pinehurst, Georgia and his crop started coming in last year. He says it was glorious. Oh, yeah. We had this crop. We ever had in a few years. And then starting over the summer a couple of things happened. I a trade war broke out the US impose tariffs on Chinese goods and China retaliated with import taxes of its own among the US goods, it China started taxing were peanut butter and cotton, basically, everything they grow in this part of Georgia. Then a couple of months later this happened. Hi there. I'm Brooke Baldwin live here in Destin, Florida where we are covering the official landfall of hurricane Michael feel Ross. Sorry. I walked any. Any? Category with in prisons ethic. David lost about a third of his cotton crop and a couple of fields of peanuts to the peanuts grand there. That's what was last left after the storm peanuts grow underground like potatoes. And this field has peanuts all over the dirt. David picked a couple of. But they were rotten from all the water from the storm show was kind of soft Tim apart in his hands. See that was a good peanut when it came to just some we didn't get picked at the storm. He the peanuts and cotton that did survive walk straight out of a storm and into a trade war, China's peanut butter and cotton orders from the US collapsed overnight and the price that David was getting for his peanuts and cotton both fell by about thirty percent. And what had been shaping up to be one of the best years in David's entire farming career turned into one of the worst years Pete ever seen. You know, we we planned to make a lot of money this year, but lower see it. But hopefully, we don't break even break. Even and David says, he is one of the lucky ones, there's some foam foams just worried, you know, I've heard him help in say, I don't know if I most of I've this or not, you know, it's heartbreaking David says that the economic effects of the storm and the tariffs haven't just hit the farmers. They've hit the whole area is hurting a whole community and equipment dealer in the guy down. Treat the hardware store in everybody suffers in spite of everything though, David actually supports the terrace at that. Well, that's not good for the former now. But I think it's the right thing to do, you know, and I think President Trump doesn't right? Thank in mafia union. I think he did a good thing. David thinks the macro economic issues between the US and China are important enough that the sacrifice feels worth it to him. Now, the government is providing millions of dollars in aid to cotton farmers and supplementing a lot of the peanut losses. It doesn't make up for everything doesn't make up for all the losses. But David says he is not going to switch to another crop. Neither is anybody. He knows they're going to continue growing cotton. And peanuts just like always. Why is that is Sydney blood? You know, what they've always done. Stacey Vanik Smith Cardiff Garcia NPR news.

David Reid Farms United States China Comcast President Trump Georgia America Pete Stacey Vanik Smith Stacey Van Brooke Baldwin Pinehurst Cardiff Garcia NPR TIM Sydney Hurricane Michael Florida Destin Official
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Perspective

Perspective

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Perspective

"Pete combs, traveled through the Florida, panhandle speaker survivors of hurricane Michael this week he'd wrote for the Carolinas ach into the folks there who are recovering from hurricane. Florence begins. A low pressure wave off the coast of Africa, slowly spinning together and gathering strength by the time. It had crossed the Atlantic its power earned it a name Florence and soon a reputation killer. Florence was the third hurricane of twenty eighteen. It was deceptive slowing down as it approached the Carolina coast its strength waxed and waned category. One to category four and then back by the time. It took a beat on rights Ville beach, the state line between north and South Carolina. Florence was again a category. One hurricane two days before making landfall with a mandatory evacuation order that stretched from Charleston north to the barrier islands of North Carolina people. I Chris bond were tired of hearing about the storm, and we're determined to stay now Chris's, my friend. I've known him for more than a decade. I worried about Chris and his family because you've got the governor saying this is deadly storm get out while you can FEMA saying, you're the president saying it, but they're saying it to what three states or one of them get okay, great, my friend. Chris wasn't alone a hundred seventy miles to the north in new Bern. Carolina j Schreiber and his wife nestled into their second storey condo near the beach. Intent on staying in spite of the dire warnings issued by government officials. Refrigerator and good. We also have a lot of candles and batteries for the Shriver's..

Florence South Carolina hurricane Michael Chris bond Carolina Ville beach Pete combs Africa Shriver Charleston panhandle Bern FEMA Florida president j Schreiber two days
U.S. Prepares More Payments to Trade-Hit Farmers

Orlando's Morning News

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. Prepares More Payments to Trade-Hit Farmers

"Partial government shutdown the shutdown would cut off farmers access to both small business and agricultural department. Funding. A cotton harvester makes short work at one of the few southwest. Georgia fields to survive hurricane Michael. For most cotton farmers. There is no harvest this year for the second year in a row. Hurricane Irma took much of the two thousand seventeen crop is ruined. My customers is ruined bidder. State bridge Acura businessman. Tommy daughter says Georgia, cotton farmers are close. Close to panic a situation made much worse. He says by the prospect of a partial government shutdown. We need prayer. Pete combs, ABC, news fame bridge, Georgia. Good morning at five twenty six now on Orlando's morning news. Cool

Georgia Hurricane Irma Tommy Daughter Hurricane Michael Pete Combs Acura Orlando ABC
Vice President Pence speaks at Tyndall Air Force base on rebuilding Florida

Investor's Edge

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

Vice President Pence speaks at Tyndall Air Force base on rebuilding Florida

"Vice President Mike Pence down south yesterday in Florida as we hear from USA radio's Robin woolen ski vice President Mike Pence visiting Panama City, Florida talking to people about rebuilding their homes and businesses in the aftermath of hurricane Michael. We're with you. We're going to stay with all of the families of this region impacted by hurricane Michael, the we rebuild bigger and better than ever before and working very closely with governor Scott

Mike Pence Hurricane Michael Vice President Florida Panama City Governor Scott Usa Radio
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Off your next podcast commercial. Are we going to see more intense hurricanes? Are we saying trend towards that? I think is the conversation. We know that there's higher sea-level rise and we know the physics suggests that are stronger, more intense sea surface temperatures, warmer sea surface temperatures. There's something going on with a loop current I recently were read about in the Gulf of Mexico. So I think we've got a scientifically probe that, but I think it's naive to ignore that possibility for sure. I wanna get your final thoughts from each of you as you sort of put a bow on your experience with the hurricane Michael Jin. Any final thoughts about both Florence and with Michael? I do think our communication was great, but I'm always looking for ways to improve it. And I think one making sure people know sort of the the range of impacts what is the worst. Case scenario, right. What is the forecast and then could it be worse? Right. And so talking about that in our communication beforehand and also wear to evacuate to and especially in Florence more than Michael, I saw people evacuating into areas that later flooded. And so I think that in the future we can add that into our pre storm communication. Agree with general this stuff, but I also just want to say like, they're going to rebuild, you know, it's, we saw that we see in the Andrews. We've seen the Katrina, they're all rebuilt. And so I just try to tell people there. I know it's so hard. You get hopeless. You get depressed like seriously depressed it. It's it's gonna get better though. I know they can't see that right now. I understand that and I don't blame them for that, but I will. I promise you, you will get better. Of Greensburg, Kansas. When they got destroyed tornado and they came back and built a whole green city. I see potential like that for place like Mexico beach and we, you know, I, I got to go to Mississippi Gulf Coast and you can barely tell hurricane hit given after all. They went through Katrina, but they are building homes, stronger thirty. I saw that house that was like, I think thirty five forty feet on stilts. It was unreal, very resilient home. I thought, oh, unreal end, you know, I can see Mexico beach kind of doing the same because people want to live where there's disasters is like no one, no one's going to not move back to Mexico beach is beautiful coastal. Absolutely sure. So, yeah. So the the lessons learned in terms of how we plan for future storms, the resiliency of the homes. I think another issue that really concerned me with Michael is that had been awhile since that part of Florida. Seeing this. Ever seen a cat. So you've got a lot of people have moved in there some and even people have been. There hadn't seen a cat. So I I think the experiences that were gained from the rain that area to feel like majority of the storms air like Panama City to Pensacola, right? Yeah, yeah. Oh, we made it through. I'm like, but that didn't go through Saint Joe. You know what I mean? Like a lot of people people compare and I know you can't compare, but a lot of people were comparing this to what Nate was last year ways that some had some similar similarity. But I think your point is valid and I think you can't compare storms. They all have their own personalities, but each one we can learn for. But more importantly, I think the coverage and information that you are providing, I think, has been official. We want everyone to be safe in covering. These are professionals always keep that in mind when you see them out there and don't try to mimic it. That's where we're going to have to end today. I love the deep dive welcome back anytime because can really deep dive on some of these conversations on the spot test. Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And this was against..

Michael Jin Mexico beach Florence Katrina Mexico Greensburg hurricane Mississippi Gulf Coast Marshall shepherd Nate official Kansas university of Georgia Florida Saint Joe Panama City Pensacola thirty five forty feet
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"But what I will say is I always come back with guilt, and I've felt this on all these big storms like this where I come back and I can take a warm shower, I can eat warm food, which makes a huge difference. You know, we're eating peanut butter and bread. A warm meal can get an comfortable bed. In my own surroundings, and I have Gillan I'm I said, Jan even yesterday feel to, you know, like we all do better. Will I? There's nothing you can do mother nature's gonna, wipe it out, but what could we do to help more people? And sometimes the answer is this mother nature's gonna take their homes like I just feel terrible about that. And obviously there were some deaths and you know, we were all discussing this earlier. I mean, we messaged as best we can, but I always want to do better something. The time that we're recording this podcast around thirty thirty one tallies which unfortunately, they're, they're still assessing fatality and damaged. I wouldn't be surprised if that number creeps up some. But if you look at the magnitude of the destruction year, I think the logic community did what it can do over the guilt of these people. I, I don't know how you start over a lot of can't afford it. We left our palette of water. We asked you guys want our food like you leave anything you can and then you know you still it's just I always feel guilt when I get. Sometimes. I think this one girl I met the night before the hurricane. Her name was Karen. She came up to us and we're out late now is like, are you going to leave? She said she had a one, three home right on the beach. And she was like, well, my family's in Birmingham haven't decided yet. Now's like, look, you have a one story home on the beach. It's not safe to be here, especially that can be major hurricane. And I was like, if the search comes, you get on your roof, you'll be blown away like you need to leave and. She said her family didn't care if she lived or died. And so I gave her hug and she started crying while started crying and I think, you know, yeah, their house may be taken away, but sometimes game the chance to talk to these people I think is the most lasting impact. I've gotten to talk so many people before and then after the. Did you see her after. I had no service. I had no way to even the big thing. People that you connected with on some level. Bill relationships, you interact with people. And then in a situation like this, you have no cell phone coverage coverage, likely? No service. And so you kind of in this black hole, and that's one of the things I emphasize why it's important to evacuate early because I mean, I know that gas supply I was talking to for in Tallahassee that was saying. Running out of gas. So it is important to gas early and also not do the whole top off thing because that's what was happening. People who needed to get out of town couldn't get gas because everyone's topping filling up the, they've just not ready for that kind of need and supply, and we bring in our own gas struck around to all of our crews. Yeah, put it on my Instagram then showed them fuelling us up and they go around. They drive around constantly to all of our crews filling us up because you know, we drive for hours..

Karen Gillan Birmingham Tallahassee
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Coastline, and we had a cat five out there and I was going to Daytona Beach and the remember the RPM model had making a landfall right at us, and I called my producers the night before I said, I don't know if we should stay here. I think we should go cross the bridge and this was going to be my first hurricane. Actually, I haven't done a lot of hurricane cover. It is mostly had been tropical storms from other yield from the field. I've done this kind studio eighteen years twenty or yeah, yeah, right there staring down a cat four or five storm headed toward you. That's the threat is very different experience. And you know, we talked about it and we decided to stay given the chances that it was going to just parallel the coast, but it was awful close night before. Now the morning I woke up and started our live coverage in realize, you know, we were going to get the western. I will if that and that was a bit easier to take, but it's in is important. It's an important step said decision to make because it's. Not just you, it's your team. It's your crew and you're an and people watch what's happening, right? We are on live TV and so people watch to see where you want, how you're handling it, Nubian this kind of situation. I mean, I didn't when I first got down there and Sunday didn't see this coming Monday. Of course, everything changed. I felt safe having all the meteorologists at my San Antonio, and then the fact that Stephanie came over on Wednesday morning just before landfall. I was like, okay, I feel feel pretty good. We got Jim cantore we got Steph, we got the whole crew and everybody else they're right, right. Back to the weather geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd and we have a round table discussion about coverage of hurricane, Michael with Chris Bruin. Stephanie Abrams. Jenker fag. No, these they were out in the field. These are degreed meteorologist and at least one of you actually, I believe you actually what two of you actually have spent time in that region Florida you, you grew up in Florida. You went to Florida state act. Hurt to. She doesn't like to. That was coming, but vacation there every summer. Area? Well, yeah, you've covered storms in that area as well. So all very experienced what goes on. Are there any lessons learned from your particular coverage of the storm? Either meteorologically or in terms of how you would message the storm in general, or are there things as we reflect back? I want to say from my experience, just getting out there, especially on Tuesday. I remember going to the beaches of thirty ages. The sunset was unreal right before hurricane, Michael. I wanted to take advantage of the nice weather and I just one day can get a scene for how many people left because there are those Tory evacuations and with given how quick of a notice. I mean, Monday was business as usual, Tuesday, everything shut down, Wednesday hit. Okay. I was at Rosemary beach, Alice speech, and those beaches there, and it looked like a ghost town. It look. It looks like everyone just literally packed their bags and left bicycles were still parked out front of their home, and there was nobody on the streets. Nobody on the road. Will say they got the people, especially the out. Florida say, well, I'll stay either one-two-three, but after that people left, I mean, people. I agree with that. And that's why I pushed back a little bit on this notion. Oh, this was people were caught off guard. There was plenty of time. I think people responded. I actually had some friends who their whole family was vacationing there in Panama City. And I was saying, look, they might wanna leave and they finally did Lee, but there is initial discussion about, well, we'll wait and see, but I wanted to ask all of you because you've been there on the ground. Is it real that their situations where there's this point of where it's too late leave? There's not gassed traffic on like it was coming towards us. We had to go right then and there we were not gonna that drive over. It was wet. I mean, we couldn't barely see, you know and that, but I thought that was what we should do better than being in the potential category four..

Stephanie Abrams Florida Michael Daytona Beach Panama City San Antonio Jim cantore Dr Marshall shepherd Rosemary beach Lee Chris Bruin Steph Alice eighteen years one day
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"But I did see a couple of cases where I saw some irresponsible chasing going on with this particular storm. And so I guess the question that I worry about is you Stephanie, you started discussion your professionals, you know what we're doing, but I see people out there doing something. They aren't professionals even some of the reporters that are covering this aren't meteorologist, so they may not know some things about sort of somebody the turbulent flow or some things that might be happening on a corner building that you all feel. Uncomfortable going to a war zone. So I'm not going to go to over because I don't know how to act or what you're supposed to do in these situations. Again, been at the Weather Channel chasing storms for fifteen years. You know, I have a lot of experience, and so I am as comfortable as it can be and when I'm not comfortable, like I wasn't this storm, then I left to go to a safer place. So you know, my big issue with this criticism is if you don't want to be in the storm, you don't have to go in the storm taking full responsibility for myself and my crew by the way, which is a lot of pressure, which is another reason I left if these storm chasers want to go in. I mean, you know, what can I do point though? Again, Chris, you all have been doing a bit longer. I think you're of the new. Roundtable here. Talk to me about what your I mean. Once this thing came through and now we're kind of and what you saw. No, he had, you know, it was tough for you. Never seen anything. Going, I wanted to know someone a sing, something, this level of destruction from storm. What were your initial thoughts and impressions? You know, growing up? I remember seeing the coverage of Hurricane Katrina. I was too young to remember Andrew, but I, you know, seem images certainly. And I thought I remember doing a spring tornado coverage in Arkansas. And I saw f two damage that hit maybe five structures, and I was just amazed what it did to shed. I mean, no one got hurt, and I was just amazed at the power of the pine trees shaved at the base. And then you go to the aftermath of hurricane Michael, and we actually drove down to Panama City and then go to Mexico beach and just driving, you couldn't drive a block without having to avoid an obstacle of some sort, whether it be power lines, whether it be trees. I can't tell you how you know the. They have huge acreage is a pine forest pine lung force. And I would say about. Eighty percent of it is gone. Every single tree was bent over. It's the only way to describe after Katrina specifically with the stuff we saw after Katrina cantor now were sitting there and I was like, Katori. I feel like I'm gonna movie because there's no way way else to describe what has happened. Like it's that I hate using the word unbelievable, but is that unbelievable, you're seeing that you have to be in a movie because there's no way this could have happened. I felt the same way when we landed on the ground there, Mexico beach. And I had seen the pictures literally just hours before I've been looking at some of the aerial surveys, but then when I saw it with my eyes on the ground for the first time, like this can't be real, this is it is. It was just so devastated shocking to see how much you see tornado damage in a very small area. But this was like that the whole Nile. The toll drive from Panama City all the way to Mexico beach. And I can imagine we can get any further by commissioned a port Saint Joe in even apple. It looked like that for ninety mile stretch, and that was actually a question I wanted to ask all of you particularly YouTube because you were closer to the coast at the event because we knew going into this event that this particular part of Florida's already vulnerable to storm surge because of the shape of the coastline and also the continental shelf in the way account of slopes off from your perspective, wasn't the wind damage or the star storm surge damage that that's damaged that Mexico beach really took more ahead of or both..

Mexico beach Hurricane Katrina Chris Panama City Stephanie Katrina cantor YouTube hurricane Michael Katori apple Andrew Arkansas Florida Eighty percent fifteen years
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And welcome back to the weather geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia, and I'm joined by my colleagues. Gencor bag knows Stephanie Abrams and Chris Bruin, and we're talking about their experiences covering hurricane Michael in the midst of the store. Now I wanna go a place that's going to be a little tricky, but there's criticism of this type of coverage when you're on site, covering their people at a writing about it, tweeting about it. I want to get your thoughts. I mean, you know, reporters, go in the war zones and cover wars, and it's it's important. It's journalistic integrity. But what do you say to someone says, well, why Stephanie out their wives, Jim, Chris out there, Stephanie? What are you saying? We're meteorologists. We are degreed meteorologists. We all have bachelor's of science, at least in meteorology. So we know the weather and I remember back in there was a reporter and they were standing up there trying to discuss the weather. I'm like, no, that's wrong. Like I know what's going to happen. I know that this is gonna flood or that side's gonna flood because I know the weather. So I'm knowledgeable that I know to leave because it's irresponsible to be in a category for I will, you know? So I know the weather when they're gets too much debris outside, I go inside, you know, there was several hurricanes where the debris starts flying, and I say, I'm out in the Weather Channel access, one hundred percent on any of that. So there's no pressure at all. Backpacking. One hundred percent safety. I one hundred percent is a absolutely, and so I have the knowledge of what's going to happen. And the reality is, we know the chances we take and we know what we're doing, and that's that's what we decide. And if that's not right for you, that's fine. And if you don't wanna watch it because you think it's your response, whatever. That's fine. You don't have to watch it, and that's it, right. I mean, you have the right not to go in there and you have the right not to watch it. The point is, I think in other situations that aren't weather related, journalists, go into dangerous Soames to get the story. And that's just the full of a lot of times. The people who are watching are people who live there and have evacuated. They wanted to know what's going on in their city. And usually the first outlook is like the Weather Channel. They can see images right during the storm instead of waiting two days later when the pictures come out, like you know, back in the fifties when we didn't have you know. But I think you're, I think your comparison of going into war zone is is it is a good one because it's it's showing people what's happening during the heat of the battle or they, you know the worst of the storm and it gets people's attention to from a warning standpoint. If you think about even before the storm hits when we go to a city, people take notice. And I think a lot of times it helps people take make preparations evacuate if they need to. And so it raises that awareness, there's that importance. And then during the storm people have this inherent curiosity about the worst of mother nature, and if we can show it to them safely. Because again, this. Jeff said we are. We're not taking a lot of risks. Honestly, we are as shelters can be. Our cameras have to be sheltered. So there's that too, right? So we're making sure that we can keep a signal on the air and then afterwards were there. We wouldn't necessarily be able to get back into show what happened if we weren't already there and and you know people here at headquarters are trying to get as much information as possible, but there's nothing like a firsthand report and account of what's happening and can be there for that. Actually, a really good point about this notion of being there. So because the post story is just as important as to what's going on, perhaps even more so because you're in a sort of a recovery in a life saving mode at that point..

Stephanie Abrams reporter Chris Bruin Dr Marshall shepherd university of Georgia hurricane Michael Backpacking Soames Jeff Jim one hundred percent One hundred percent two days
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Brush my teeth in the morning, but you know, we drove all the way down there with all of our food and water because it's just like an, I think that it makes me always said this, and I'm sure they'll agree. I have become a much better meteorologist over all these years because I've experienced the fires, the floods, the hurricanes tornadoes. So I know what the people are going through. It could be more compassionate and also know what they need and what they don't need type of thing. I want to say not a better meteorologist bit better communicator to how it's going to how it's gonna play out. What I decide of vacuuming based on the storm in a lot of people are driven to the curiosity. And yeah, it's exciting to witness, you know, a power like a hurricane, but it's also dangerous in your lives. And I don't think people understand every time people ask me especially because there were so many vacationers rows down there like hid, shy leave, and I was telling him, look, this is going to be dangerous. And if you leave, they felt safe. They were on the high floor light Lissa there on the twentieth floor of a condo. I was like, look, do you realize you're going to go up and down those stairs? You're gonna have power your, nothing's going to be open. You may not have water, and and then of course we lost all the cell service. So it was, you know, pure understand how long that can go on. They think excuse me a day. Every time the sun down it was. So you could see the Milky Way city. No light, no light certainly are our fellow citizens down in Puerto Rico, certainly know that for months of being without power, how how often do people ask you guys? Should I really leave? So we we go in and most of the time we're in an evacuation zone, and so you should leave because you're evacuation zone. People say they sort of wink at me. They said, but should I really leave? And I, yes, there's a mandatory evacuation. Yes..

Lissa hurricanes Puerto Rico
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Have experienced covering these storms? You grew up or spent quite a time, Lord, south Florida, Hurricane Andrew is actually one of the reasons I went into meteorology, you know, as a kid and it came ashore, and I saw the damage after and I thought how in the world did wind and rain caused this. So I saw it first hand, Andrew, I was a kid and then just being here for fifteen years. The damage from even I thought back to Florence. I was like those account one. I could barely stand up at times with some of the gusts no way. Am I going to be on highway ninety? Eight? I think it's irresponsible to do that. It's not worth the risk is not. Any other thoughts from you in terms of just your initial experiences Chris being in the storm? It was a brand new. Tell Stephanie ended up coming. It was like, you know, a huge solid. So how many Weather Channel we your is we're right in. Good, twenty twenty because not a lot of cities you see in between Panama City even over towards Appalachia coal, you have to go farther than that. So that was kind of the nearest big city with sturdy structures that we all felt comfortable in and remember, I mean, we're in the eye Walpole problem. We report Morrison outer, I will where we had maybe hundred power guests at the worst of it. But even the sliding glass doors at the lobby were shaking, you're probably during that by remember we all just kind of hunkering down and you would see that you know, new fences that all got panels that got blown out. I mean, if you got hit by that, you're looking at. Of the hotel. Next to us started to tear away. You know, some of the other high rises loss windows. I mean, we ended up not having much as away of structural damage, but all the rooms on the opposite of the ocean all had water damage, inches, any water inside the hotel rooms. That was actually not even in the eye wall, and I want to actually kind of pivot at a gym because you were in Tallahassee, Florida. And I spent a lot of time in Tallahassee Florida's well, innocence. Tallahassee was on the eastern fringe of the spared, the worst, the worst, but still significant damage, power outages, trees all over. I've seen some of the the pictures, ninety percent of the town was without power the next day you know it. It doesn't take even a cat one hurricane to cause. You can have strong tropical storm winds for an extended period of time which we hadn't Alhaji to 'cause all the trees to come down and causes widespread power outages. Here we went to talahassee because we wanted to focus on the inland impacts. And we know when we show up in a city people notice right, the Weather Channel is there. So things could be, you know, could go be bad. We also knew that there was a chance Tallahassee would be on those, you know, eastern fringes of it, but there was what four hundred thousand power outages. Overall, we had about one hundred twenty thousand of them. So a big population were affected. In Tallahassee now they're able to get their power back on much quicker. Not like cities like Marianna, which it's going to take. The month city in the panhandle, but even kind of illustrates the point, Florida State University, Florida am state government closed down days before that I wall, it was still a cat. Three wasn't into Georgia. Could've gotten that took that track had a little. The right, and that's what we have to watch out for and there's no meteorologists that can tell you exactly where that's going to happen. So we try to cover a wide area. And the other thing was a lot of people evacuated to Tallahassee. So we went vacuum. Eight usually leave for the surge, right? And you leave to get out of that core of the strongest of the winds, but you don't usually have to go that far away. So it's not like you have to leave Panama City beach of Mexico beach and go, hi o, right. You just go inland. And so a lot of people have accurate..

Tallahassee Florida Panama City Hurricane Andrew Stephanie Florence Florida State University Chris Morrison Mexico beach twenty twenty Alhaji Appalachia Marianna Georgia ninety percent fifteen years
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"So I didn't bring any of this few typically bring as meteorologists in the field for you know, major hurric- like propane fuel, canisters. I am a big camper. So a lot of times, if you're a camper, you can really be on the the better half when you do power because you can cook meals with, you know, boils and a little camping stoves and things like that's typically, I always bring that advance of if we lose power, lose water, and I probably would have drove down there to get all that stuff down there. If I thought it was going to be a strong, that's we ended up doing Florence, but you know, I didn't think that was gonna happen. And obviously, if you fly, you can't bring those things. So it was very limited. Honestly, I got down there and I didn't even think I was going to have to worry about getting water. Or any of that, you know, I thought it was just going to be. I had my thought businesses. We're gonna primarily see open for the most part. We are close enough to other areas where we could get food so that in the back of mine didn't really think twice about that. And I remember my producer is like, oh, maybe you should go get some water that night. I went to Publix, and I remember being on the phone and that was when everyone started getting the word that there was a potential tropical. I think everyone on the flight was like, oh, wait till tomorrow. See what happens. Could check in the morning, and then we'll decide to see what we do. That's a lot of people were saying a lot of people that were on vacation for the weekend that were going back home to Panama City. They're all kind of thinking along this. So four meteorologist sitting around the table talking right now in we just mentioned at that point Sunday cat one cat to sorta on the radars. But I would say still, if your cat one, you need all that stuff. Exactly. But what we're wanted to go with this and I want all your thoughts on this, what are your thoughts on the messaging because they're all of these sort of post analysis now compared to Florence. And we talked earlier on an episode of AM HQ about this with Florence. There was all this lead up time, so discussion, but there was enough time for people to make decisions with Michael too. I think some people feel like they were caught off guard short amount of time. This is the case with Tober hurricanes is that you have less time because most often they form close to home, and so that's just inherent, you know, there's, there's there's less days in place for the track for it to move in. We do know that with every hurricane, it's an volving situation. You can't look at the forecast and then come back five days later and expected to not have changed its going to update us. We get new information. We learn more things about the atmosphere. In this case, we were watching very closely, the amount of sheer in the Gulf of Mexico. And the question was, was there going to be a window without any sheer? And it turned out that there was a large window but on Sunday and even a month. Day, there were still that question and there were plenty of warm water. Say I get. I get frustrated because any science whether it's talking about, you know, when you go into your doctor, when you're talking about meteorology, when you're talking about, you know, astronomy it, none of it is perfected and people. All of a sudden, for some reason, feel like, oh, they said the cone, the strength, this is what it's going to be. That is not how science works. So I would like to dispel that and get into you have to pay attention when there's a storm, whether it's a hurricane or another storm, it's just not perfect..

Florence Publix Mexico producer Panama City Michael five days
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Hurricane Michael stormed ashore in the Florida panhandle. Earlier this month lives were up ended and changed forever millions, watch the full furry of the hurricane unfold live on their screens. And today we are joined by three of the field reporters in meteorologist at covered the storm, the Weather Channel meteorologist, Stephanie Abrams Gencor fag no. And Chris Bruin we hear the stories that they take us through the before during an after live coverage of a category, four hurricane. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia, and this is the weather geeks podcast. Thank you for joining us. So you know, it's a good discussion. This was a storm that really has impacted lives from Florida Georgia, and you're all in the midst of it. So I guess perhaps start with what happens in terms of once you get dispatched to to go out and cover the storm. What happens. Lasko. How do you know who gets sent? Who gets since I who get since where a lot of is just scheduling, you know, depending on what show you're on, who's in town, that's kind of how it starts. And we're looking at the cone. We're looking at putting people in the in the point potentially of landfall, but also some of those outer reaching effects too. So we go outside of the cone sometimes because we know the impacts go outside of the cone. There is sort of a strategy to help people or place based on where the mainland as well right for our show. For instance, depending on we were when we were all in town, Jim was at the coast, Jen was inland. I was on a different shoot. So they had to wait for me to get back, did a show and then went in. I think it was last actually really to get in there in Chris talking about hurricane Michael. I know we're were you sent for this particular coverage? I was in Panama City beach. It's interesting because when they're going through that process in my mind, I'm always thinking, okay. Where some pots that they may send me. But a lot of times it's never what I think. I'm gonna go this time and end up being tortured, Panama City beach in the track forecast, at least. The location of where they thought the center was was pretty spot on. I tweeted something the other day showing that track versus projections. But one of the interesting things I understand is when you were sent down the Panama, say at the time that you were sort of dispatched. Yeah, we're thinking this was a cat one storm or he. I remember seeing the national weather service's official track on Sunday. I was in church and I remember getting the text and saying that we need to go down. Checking your. Originally, I thought it was going to cover what I was expecting to go to Montana. Church responsible, but yeah, yeah, I'm going to have to. You'll have to cover that with a higher power. Why just glance down. Right? I saw that they wanted me live on Monday morning, so I like booked my flight edit. Lana wanted to get down at decent time since we had morning, live shots in Panama City beach. And at that point, you know, I thought it was going to be at strong tropical storm may be cat one, maybe Kat too, but I was kind of on the higher end..

Chris Bruin Panama City Hurricane Michael Weather Channel Stephanie Abrams Dr Marshall shepherd Panama Florida university of Georgia Florida Georgia Jen Lana Kat Jim official Montana
Verizon apologizes to Floridians for service interruption during Hurricane Michael

First Light

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Verizon apologizes to Floridians for service interruption during Hurricane Michael

"Horizon, issuing an apology. Some compensation to customers in Florida who are still without service after hurricane. Michael USA radio's Chris Barnes now with details. Executive vice president Tammy Irwin says fiber lines that connect phone towers were knocked down by hurricane Michael prompting the loss of service and the company now intends to bury those lines as it rebuilds the system. Irwin says customers will receive three months of free service in nine north northwest Florida counties to compensate for the extended lack of service, the company has restored about seventy percent of its customers in the affected, Florida counties. The Panama City area has about more than half of it. Cell service restored

Tammy Irwin Florida Hurricane Michael Executive Vice President Michael Usa Panama City Chris Barnes Seventy Percent Three Months
US teen is new Tetris world champion

AM Tampa Bay

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

US teen is new Tetris world champion

"Apparently just shot from a car going by boom, boom. And killed a couple of people there. That's incredible. And you wonder what kind of neighborhood is that stadium in? I've been in that stadium before I didn't realize that anyway, six fifteen on AM Tampa Bay, and let's go to the newsroom now and Chris strengthen Andrew gillum believes how he handled hurricane Michael shows. What kind of governor he would be the democratic nominee and Republican? Rhonda Santa's debated in Tampa on CNN Gillam said as Tallahassee is mayor. He put politics aside and worked well with Republican governor Rick Scott before and after the storm to Santa's called Gillam a failed mayor who had raised taxes as governor and destroy the economy. The Trump administration is reportedly looking to end legal recognition of transgender individuals. New York Times reports that the department of health and human services is mounting an effort to legally define a person's gender is either male or female as determined at birth hurricane Michael left, untold devastation in Florida's panhandle earlier this month, but it's turning up evidence of a much earlier destructive storm ships grounded on Franklin county's dog island during the eighteen ninety-nine Carabello hurricane have resurfaced. After Michaels storm surge it's not certain how many have been revealed on the barrier island, but several are now clearly visible on Chris Reichman, NewsRadio nine seventy WFL. A now, let's run the six twenty WD sportscenter on their Jacobson the day ended in redemption. For buccaneers kicker Chandler cotton zero after missing a field goal at the in. That would have given his team the win canton zero nailed a fifty nine yard. Field goal. The longest ever in overtime to give the buccaneers at twenty six to twenty three win over the Cleveland Browns up next. The bucks are at Cincinnati. Next sunday. The Tampa Bay Lightning beat up on the Blackhawks in Chicago for

Hurricane Michael Tallahassee Rhonda Santa Tampa Bay Lightning Tampa Bay Chris Reichman Buccaneers Tampa Andrew Gillum Rick Scott CNN New York Times Blackhawks Cleveland Browns Franklin County Cincinnati Jacobson Chicago Florida
Texas and Florida battle to recover from latest storms

Vegas Never Sleeps

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Texas and Florida battle to recover from latest storms

"In Texas, people dealing with flooding and in Florida, the cleanup continues in the aftermath of hurricane. Michael USA radio's Wendy king now with the latest on both areas. Governor Greg Abbott says he expanded state disaster declaration from eighteen to fifty four counties this weekend rain will be focused over del Texas and that early to mid next week. Another more organized round rain is expected to move through the states with heavy rain potential as well as few strong storms. Meantime, the death toll from hurricane Michael stands at thirty five. And most of those deaths are in Florida. The worst of the storm hit in Panama City, and the two major hospitals. There are still not admitting patients only services are available at either facility deputies in bay county have arrested at least ten people suspected of looting in the area in Callaway. Aaron Guthrie had her. These things taken and Victoria Smith said someone took her purse from her hands while she was sleeping.

Governor Greg Abbott Wendy King Florida Texas Hurricane Michael Michael Usa Aaron Guthrie Victoria Smith Panama City Callaway Bay County
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"It was horrible. I don't remember. I mean, I've seen I've seen the title. I don't know that I've it looks say that I don't know that I've seen the the whole thing, but it seems because it's one of those things like you said, if you leave it there and then you know, yeah. It was dubbed by g. q. as a show that is quote one of the most truly chilling of all time unquote. Yeah. So. People tweeted about it after watching it. I'm watching the haunting of hill house and jump scare actually got me to scream like mostly, I just yell 'oh s or. But it was a genuine scream this time out of me. I'll not sleep for weeks. One tweet after at other like that looks pretty interesting looking for a scare unless you wanna watch it does. I've got another great. We've talked heard you talking a little bit yesterday about the storm and hurricane Michael in the damage that's happened on specifically Mexico beach, but for sure the tire, you know, Florida coast and inland for my Andre miles. And I saw this report by Justin, Michael, who is a Weather Channel report, and he showed something that I had not seen before. Fascinating. What the storm did. Allowed back in today to come back to their homes and over the last couple of days on the Weather Channel, you've seen images this piles of mangled, wood and trees ripped out of out of the absolute devastation. Let me show you something you haven't seen yet, and we haven't seen this. The wind and water were so powerful coming on shore during the hundred and fifty five mile per hour. Hurricane Michael literally flip this house on its side. You see the air conditioning unit still hanging off the house..

Hurricane Michael Michael Mexico beach Florida Justin
Hurricane Michael Death Toll Rises to 35

The WB Show

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Hurricane Michael Death Toll Rises to 35

"The death toll from hurricane. Michael is up to thirty five. The latest body found yesterday in Gulf county a man who was killed while clearing debris and a tree fell on his tractor.

Gulf County Michael
A week after Hurricane Michael hit, more misery

The Ray Lucia Show

00:53 sec | 3 years ago

A week after Hurricane Michael hit, more misery

"On the aftermath of hurricane. Michael USA radio's Wendy king on her cousin Aaron Guthrie whose home destroyed near Tyndall air force base in Florida when the storm hit Erin her husband and two young kids went to stay in Tallahassee with their mom, Mandy. She tells me after the storm the to see their home and found people had looted their things. Yes. They were looted people's stole their television. There's a lot of looting going on there. Most of the town is destroyed. Roy. She says even the babies things are taken and they have to start from scratch the kids. My grandchildren are two years old and four months old. They have lost their homes. They lost a lot of their possessions right now, the four of them are crammed into my living almond just on enough space to help Erin and her family. You can go to the Facebook fundraiser for Amanda sparks Smith in Tallahassee for USA

Erin Tallahassee Mandy Amanda Sparks Smith Aaron Guthrie Tyndall Michael Usa Facebook Wendy King Florida ROY Four Months Two Years
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on State of the Union with Jake Tapper

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on State of the Union with Jake Tapper

"We gotta get to them too, and I hope that that's going to be the one area I really really focus on because I think that's where the dire need is also there and they're going to be the hardest people to identify and fine. We still don't have an accurate assessment of how many people we have cut off from everybody else. You say that it's your job to make sure that everything gets to the areas that need it. Is there anything that you're trying to tell either Tallahassee or Washington that they need to act on that they are not acting on now? So the state government is in the lead. And what I said is our job is to make sure of the state is asking the federal government for something that the federal government provides it. The state government is in charge of this response. And so far I have not seen any state requests that has not been met by FEMA and the federal government. There are additional federal assets out there. There could be used like the department of defense, and I could very well come back tomorrow when I go into some of those rural counties and argue that there's more than aids to be done, but I'm not. Right now to tell you that there's a need that's not being met by the state government that the federal government can do that hasn't been asked for, and I usually try to stay out of the way the experts who trained for this. But if I find something I'll jump all over it. And I believe the federal government is ready to provide any assistance that the state ask for speaking experts. We can't specifically say that hurricane Michael was so strong, so devastating because of climate change. But there is scientific consensus that warmer waters due to climate change or making storm such as Michael even more devastating, a new report from the UN outlined dire global forecast within the next twenty years. The union of concerned scientists said, Florida could lose more than one million homes by the end of the century due to rising sea levels because of climate change, which they say is man made. What do you say to constituents who say, who who ask? Why are you not one of the leaders in congress on this issue? I would say that's not true. We are. We, for example that we've funded the study and congress that I've pushed for to better understand exactly what you've just said. Primarily on the Atlantic side seal. Level rise and changes in the climate. Those are measurable. I don't think there's a debate about whether that is happening because you can measure that. The secondary aspect is how much of that is due to human activity and from a policymaker the question is, what policies can we change to deal with that human activity? That's where the debate really has been. So I confronted two ways the sea level is rising. We know that I mean, you can measure that. That's not something anyone's debating, and that's why I pushed for mitigation and mitigation standards and things that we need to be doing primarily because the insurance marketplace is going to start. Mark is going to start pricing this in. So we'd better have answers on places like Miami Beach here in south Florida. And the like the second question about how much is human activity contributing towards that, what percentage of that is due to human activity? And the third question, what laws can we change? That's the more complicated one, especially the third one because some of the things that are asking for is already happening. If you look at US today, we're cleaner than we used to be natural gas is a clean source. Nuclear energy is very clean, but you have to fight the same people to. Prove that do you believe is made? What's that do you believe it's at least in part manmade. Scientists are saying the humanity and its behaviour is contributing towards that. I can't tell you what percentage of that is due to human activity. And I think many scientists would debate the percentage of what is the tributary to man versus normal fluctuations, but that there's actually a rise in sea level that temperatures are warmer in the water than they were fifty eighty one hundred years ago. That's a measurable. There's no. I don't think there is a honest debate about that, but in twenty years. This is what can we do about it? Yeah..

federal government congress hurricane Michael US Tallahassee Washington UN Florida department of defense FEMA Miami Beach south Florida Mark twenty years fifty eighty one hundred years
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Of our entire nation to everyone in the of hurricane Michael, especially in the Florida panhandle, it's a big one. One of the biggest we've ever seen, I'll be traveling to Florida, very, very shortly. So we just want to wish them all the best and. Godspeed godspeed God bless you all. Exactly twenty four hours ago in this very studio. Our meteorologist Bill Karen's warned us. This would come ashore as a category, four. He was right, and he hasn't left and he's back with us tonight. Hey, Bill, just before I get to the new update from the National Hurricane Center that just came out. We do have a tornado warning in effect now for the Hilton Head area and the Beaufort, South Carolina area. So that's just one of the hazards that we have here we do have this tornado watch is going to go through the night, and that's what this little storm cells coming in here just in the north of savannah. So again, it hasn't produced a tornado, but it could. I'm sure a lot of people have their little alerts on their phones going off in that area near Hilton Head in the Beaufort area. So here's the new update from the Hurricane Center. We're at seventy five miles per hour. So we're at the league, the weakest we possibly can be for a category, one hurricane. And after this it will drop down to a tropical storm. It's still exceleron into the northeast at twenty miles per hour and is now getting very close to the Macon area in eventually by tomorrow morning to be near Augusta. And it's still very big, large rain shield with this, and here's the new forecast path. Again, we're not expecting a lot of damage from here on out, so it doesn't really matter exactly where the center goes over..

National Hurricane Center Bill Karen hurricane Michael Hilton Head Florida Beaufort savannah Augusta Macon South Carolina twenty four hours
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Thus vulnerable to a big storm like this, right? Yes, it is an area that has low lying coastal communities, and also the waters off of the coast are shallow. And so there is really no place for that water to go as it gets pushed by hurricane other than inland, which is why the flooding projections are as high as fourteen feet. In some areas, it is an area that has beachfront tourist spots with hotels and high-rises. There are fishing villages. The area of Appalachia cola is a spot for that. There are also areas of state parks, nature reserves. So it's kind of a a mixed geography. Now, you mentioned fourteen feet, as is the case with many big hurricanes. The storm surge is a big worry, isn't it? Absolutely. As has been repeatedly pointed out by the head of the National Hurricane Center as much as half or more of fatalities associated with these types of storms do come from storm search. It is sometimes easier to weather. The wind affects of the storm than it is the surge because that water is just inescapable, what is hurricane Michael's projected track and how much rain could the affected areas get? Some areas could get a foot of rain, and this is falling on some regions that are already quite saturated, which creates a problem because that water can't be absorbed as easily have more flooding and the loosening avert. So the trees can collapse as for the path. It is projected to go over the Florida panhandle into Georgia still as as a hurricane and then into the Carolinas, which as you noted were very hard hit by hurricane Florence last month. So that's another big concern because. That area is still recovering and it's about to get doused again. So the projected path is basically the Florida panhandle into Alabama into Georgia and up into the Carolinas. Absolutely Ari on this storm is happening fairly late in the season. What's the read on that from climate scientists? It's actually not considered to be late in the season. This is actually peak hurricane season, September and October are the busiest months. So it's actually like right in the peak period and considering Florida's history with very expensive storms. What is the financial impact projected to be early estimates for the damage of hurricane? Michael, are that it could reach thirteen point four billion dollars in reconstruction, cost value, and that fifty. Seven thousand homes could be at risk from storm surge, damage, Wall Street Journal, reporter, Iran, Campo flourish joining us from Tallahassee, Florida. Thanks Ari on my pleasure. Thank you. And that's what's news. I'm. Charlie Turner for the Wall Street Journal.

Florida National Hurricane Center hurricane Michael Wall Street Journal Georgia Ari Appalachia Charlie Turner Michael Tallahassee Florence reporter Iran Campo Alabama fourteen feet four billion dollars
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Hurricane, Michael is a massive storm one that weather forecasters are calling unprecedented for the Florida panhandle region, and it comes after hurricane Florence, devastated north and South Carolina last month with extreme winds and flooding. Let's get some details about the strength of hurricane Michael, as well as how people have prepared for the storm from the Wall Street Journal's Arjan Campo Flores who joins us via Skype Ari on first of all, where are you? I am in Tallahassee in the state capital of Florida, which is in the projected path of Michael from what I've heard Michael developed into a major hurricane very quickly. Yeah, that's quite a contrast to what Florida went through last year with Cain, arma, which took a long time to make its way to the state and gave residents and officials plenty of time to prepare for it. This one escalated very rapidly just in a matter of few days going from a tropical depression to a category, four storm. And so. The concern among some officials in the state is that some residents and localities of not had sufficient time to get prepared or to evacuate. If that's what they think is best, how many counties in the Florida panhandle were issued evacuation orders. So there were twenty two counties in Florida. The God evacuation orders that covered roughly three hundred seventy five thousand residents. Now, based on what you've seen and heard, have residents hated the warnings to leave the area. I think it's a mixed bag. The most vulnerable most exposed areas I think has most of the people there have cleared out and of heated the the, the warnings, but there are always hold outs and there are always people who insist on staying in their homes either because they feel like they're secure. They're or they have become sort of numb to previous rounds of evacuations that proved not to be necessary. So that's a big concern for officials because obviously those. Folks will be cut off from emergency services if they can't reach them. Now, when we think of Florida, obviously, we think of the beaches tug about the affected area in the panhandle. It's obviously low, lying and.

Florida hurricane Michael Hurricane Michael hurricane Florence Arjan Campo Flores Wall Street Journal Skype South Carolina Tallahassee Cain
"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane. michael" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Further spooked investors. The profit margins could narrow sparking one of the heaviest sell-offs of the year among shares of fast growing companies that have benefited from a decade of near zero interest rates, shares of technology companies in the s. and p. five hundred tumbled Wednesday in what is shaping up to be the sectors most bruising month in. Three years. Other bastions of growth stocks in the markets, including the consumer discretionary and communication sectors also fell sharply FBI director. Christopher Wray said Wednesday that the bureau's background investigation into sexual assault allegations against supreme court Justice. Brett Kavanagh had been limited in scope, but he added that it was consistent with previous such checks testifying before a Senate committee. Mr. Ray distinguished a background check conducted by the FBI from a criminal inquiry and said that the bureau's only thirty to investigate Justice cavenaugh came at the direction of the White House. The FBI conducted routine initial background check of Justice Cavanaugh after he was nominated in July for the supreme court. The background check was reopened. After Christine Blasi Ford came forward on September sixteenth to allege the Justice Cavanaugh had sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers, which he categorically denied Justice department, antitrust enforcers, conditionally cleared, CVS health's purchase of. Anna, it came after the company's took steps to ease regulators concerns, moving the nearly seventy billion dollar deal. A major step closer. The Wall Street Journal had earlier reported that federal anti-trust officials were preparing to give the deal a green light, but the overlap in the two companies, Medicare drug businesses had to be addressed at a late September, announced it planned to sell its Medicare drug business too well care health plans in announcing its approval. The Justice department said that the well-cared deal would fully resolve the department's competition concerns the.

Justice Cavanaugh Justice department FBI supreme court Justice cavenaugh Brett Kavanagh Christine Blasi Ford Christopher Wray Senate committee assault director White House Mr. Ray Anna The Wall Street Journal seventy billion dollar Three years