35 Burst results for "Hurricane Michael"

"hurricane michael" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 5 months ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Not far from Panama City more than a thousand homes have been evacuated officials say dead trees from hurricane Michael in 2018 are fueling the flames Vice president Harris was among those in Selma Alabama yesterday to mark 57 years since the historic march for voting rights across the Edmund pettus bridge Kyle gassett with Troy public radio says Harris highlighted President Biden's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court in her remarks At the foot of the Pettis bridge Harris spoke of Biden's history making nomination of judge katangi Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court If confirmed Jackson would become the first African American woman on the high court But Harris also spoke of the failure to get voting rights legislation through the Senate We know that honoring the legacy of those who marched then demands that we continue to push Congress to pass federal voting rights legislation Harris then called the filibuster an arcane rule that is denying Americans the sacred right to vote NPR news on Kyle gassett in Selma Alabama Triple-A says the price of regular gas in the U.S. has risen 45 cents a gallon in the past week It's now averaging $4 6 cents a gallon nationwide In California regular averages $5 34 cents a gallon I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news in Washington This is WNYC in New York It's 5 33 good morning I'm David first 65° in Central Park with a high around 70 today Police say a 26 year old woman and a 6 year old girl were found dead with stab wounds in The Bronx over the weekend The NYPD says officers responding to a wellness check on Monticello avenue just before midnight on Saturday found the victims unconscious and unresponsive Emergency responders pronounced them dead at the scene Authorities say the suspect wanted in connection with the stabbings has also died information regarding the cause of death was not immediately available an investigation is ongoing Vaccine mandates come to an end today for New York City restaurants gyms and other cultural institutions mayor Adams says masks will also become optional for most places including public schools 65° now a high around 70 today mostly cloudy breezy showers are likely late this afternoon and we're expecting showers and thunderstorms tonight It's 5 34 This is WNYC Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Heather stirred haga and Paul G Hager supporting African wildlife foundation working to ensure the future of Africa's wildlife and wildlands learn more at AWF dot org.

Kyle gassett hurricane Michael Vice president Harris Harris President Biden Pettis bridge Harris Selma judge katangi Brown Jackson Supreme Court NPR news Alabama Dave Mattingly Panama City Biden Troy
"hurricane michael" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Sustained winds way lost power for eight days. One time It was very cold and here it was dark. We were scared. We had an ice storm and the power was off for several days. The basement was flooded The damage Total bill at the end of the day was $155,000. Went four days without power. Had water had eyes had coffee. I had air conditioner. I was able to stay here because of general. You don't realize how much you need your power do you don't have power, but the general you can depend on having power. Unless drought and I'll survivor man. I've been to the harshest of most remote regions on the planet alone and always at the mercy of the elements. Back in civilization. Everybody's warm and protected. The power is on all is well having power is something that we all take for granted because it's always there at the flip of a switch. What happens when it's not? What happens from the electric grid goes down. The number of power outages continues to increase and their lasting longer. It's no longer a question of if When they'll head how long they'll last and how much of that going to cost? When I got one question for you. Are you prepared? You are when you have a general home standby generator When the grid goes down your general generator powers up your air conditioning or he keeps running your refrigerator and freezer stays cold. You don't even miss a minute of that big game. Of course. All that assumes that you have a generator home standby generator generate generator is what saved our belongings and ultimately saved us is a family. There was Utter chaos and destruction outside, But my home was air conditioned, and I had power. It's a lot more than just having lights on having a generator. It's food water having a general act. It's definitely peace of mind. Self reliance means assessing any situation and taking control on the wilderness. That might mean I need to find food. Stay warm or cool as the case may be, But either way, I've got to make plans to deal With whatever comes at me, It's no different when it comes to preparing your home for severe weather events and natural disasters that can cause massive power outage is one of the most important things you could do is ensure that you have an uninterrupted supply of power to your home. And for that, more and more people eight out of 10, in fact, are choosing a Generac home standby generator. The general wasn't definitely the best investment we ever made. You learn that after going through the storm after Hurricane Michael, there wasn't a normal that was the peace of mind. As far as having the general for the air conditioning. It ran our refrigerator. Your house is still a home. When you have it interact..

Generac Hurricane Michael
"hurricane michael" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Years since Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle governor to Santa says Florida has been spared this year. But Louisiana hasn't really feel for the Louisiana folks. Have to deal with this storm anyways. But then the fact that they had already had the recover from something I think wasn't even two months ago that that storm came by Hurricane Delta is making landfall is a major Category two system the annual Atlantic hurricane season runs through November. 30th, CEO of Carnival Cruise Line says they're on track to resume sailings before the end of the year. Arnold Donald is telling CNBC they've already started to cruise again in Europe and Asia. So far, so good there have been people have tested positive and so on, but the protocols are in place. The MiG a spread. Tto handle cases when they come up. Donald says there's pent up demand by cruise passengers who are eager to return carnivals expected to first resume operations at Portmiami in Port Canaveral. Bay Area counties. Allowing new homes to be built in flood prone areas in Ellis County is the most densely populated in Florida, and that leaves little room for new development. The ST Petersburg City Council voted to ease the rules that limit building in high risk flooding areas, saying the city needs new housing to offset skyrocketing prices. But to help prevent disaster from storms and sea level rise, the council's requiring more robust construction like elevation. Chris Trunk Man news radio Wofl. A one person is dead after a fire in a mobile home and adjacent shed in Bartow. Polk County Fire Rescue says the shed was fully involved when they arrived just before 11 p.m. last night. Man who lived in the shed was killed. A woman in the mobile home was pulled to safety by neighbors all or nothing for the raise Tonight Tablet last now we'll start on just two days. Rest is the Rays meet the New York Yankees. The winner moves on to the American League Championship Series against the Houston Astros. All the action on 95.3 and 6 20. W th e I'm Reid Shepherd news radio wf This is a Bloomberg money minutes. Stimulus talks dictated the action on Wall Street and stocks were higher amid signs of progress as we head for the closing bell, the Dow is up 130 points, nearly half a percent. The S and P is up three quarters of a percent. The NASDAQ's up 1.2%. Head of the nation's biggest bank doesn't see life returning to normal until the middle of next year, Jamie Diamond of JP Morgan Chase, telling a conference that zoom meetings air likely here to stay, and some bank employees could work from home permanently. Microsoft, which has 150,000 employees, has reportedly sent a memo to staffers offering them the option of working from home permanently. Some customers of Robin Hood, the popular no fee stock brokerage, APP say their accounts have been looted and their stock has disappeared. Robin Hood insists that hackers did not breach their system, but rather certain customers were targeted by criminals. Through their email accounts. Robin Hood says it's no investigating the fraudulent activity. Mona Rivera Bloomberg Radio. With the new iPhone SC for less than 100 bucks at Metro, You rule. It's the most affordable iPhone.

Robin Hood Arnold Donald Florida ST Petersburg City Council Houston Astros Carnival Cruise Line Louisiana Hurricane Delta Hurricane Michael Bartow Bay Area Polk County Fire Rescue CEO Mona Rivera Rays Chris Trunk Port Canaveral Ellis County Santa
"hurricane michael" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Of hiccup on then, Of course, those that stayed really did a great job of protecting them. And you're right. You know, we unfortunately did have think of it as many as four or five people who perished in the storm mostly comes Trees falling on their residences, but But you know, it could have been. It could have been a lot worse. In fact, the predictions of the storm surge. Thankfully, what did not transfer are in no way am I Mad at the meteorologist missing at Mork. I'm kind of glad, attractive every time it bigness. It'd be better if you know a rather be over prepared. Not. And so that was. That was very good. How bad was it? In the end? How much storm surge was? How high was it? Athena? The sponsors didn't get bad. I got 2.5. Ft. It was really remarkable. Wow, that's a miracle. That's an answer to prayer right there, My man. All amazing. Our prayer. But why tell you the wind damage was unbelievable. It reminded me a lot of Hurricane Michael that inflicted the Panhandle of Florida A couple of years ago. I going out there and went to help folks out in that area to recover, and it just reminded me a lot of that very Small, powerful storm that inflicted a tremendous amount of wind damage. Look up. Maybe George, I'll get our Khan spoke to send you some of the pictures that we took more won't put him up on your Web site really is devastation. He is..

Khan Hurricane Michael George Florida
'Extremely dangerous' Hurricane Laura slams into Louisiana as Category 4

All Things Considered

00:59 min | 2 years ago

'Extremely dangerous' Hurricane Laura slams into Louisiana as Category 4

"John Bell, Edwards says Hurricane Laura left a path of destruction along the U. S Gulf Coast or has since week into a tropical storm but slammed into southern Louisiana is a powerful Category four hurricane really today with sustained winds of 150 MPH, NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports. It's the third storm since 2017 to hit land with such Catastrophic power. Hurricane Laura got its power from the hot water in the Gulf of Mexico. The water on the surface of the Gulf is about 4 F warmer than the historical average. Climate. Scientists say that was enough to help Laura intensify really quickly in 24 hours before the storm hit the coast. It's maximum wind speeds nearly doubled. That's similar to what happened to Hurricane Harvey in 2017 before it hit the Texas Coast and Hurricane Michael in 2018 when it hit the Florida Panhandle. Climate change is causing sea surface temperatures around the world to rise. Which makes dangerous storms. More common. Rebecca Hirscher NPR news while winded

Hurricane Laura U. S Gulf Coast Gulf Hurricane Harvey Hurricane Michael Rebecca Hirscher Rebecca Herschel NPR Texas Coast John Bell Louisiana Mexico Edwards Florida Panhandle
"hurricane michael" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on KCRW

"Chester Davis drove six hours to family in Atlanta when Hurricane Michael headed towards their home on Florida's Panhandle two years ago. But the couple say they don't have the budget for a trip like that now. If they have to evacuate. They'll go to a local shelter, despite concerns about the Corona virus. Well, a lot of people don't understand how really staying in and I am a diabetic. Sure, the Davises both in their sixties. Say they'd bring their own masks and sheets and stay inside for his little time as possible. We won't make sure that we're on Lee there during the time of stone. After that, we want to get out. This hurricane season safely sheltering people is, in part a math problem. Many coastal states have longstanding shelter shortages, and that's being worsened by American Red Cross and CDC recommendations to give evacuees upto three times more personal space. So mathematically my number drops dramatically. Bill Johnson is the emergency management director for Palm Beach County, Florida. He says strictly following Social distancing recommendations cuts his shelter capacity from 55,000 people to 16,000 to gain back space. He says he'll cluster family members and use classrooms and school hallways as well as hotel rooms, a solution. Federal agencies air pushing. The CDC calls hotels ideal because they have private bathrooms, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency has offered to cover most of the cost. Florida seems to have made the most progress with more than 500 hotels so far expressing interest in participating, But emergency managers, including Johnson, have run into barriers. For starters, hotels often quickly fill up with evacuees who can afford rooms on their own. And Johnson says many hotels reside along the shoreline, which is, of course, you know, in evacuation zones, and we're not going to use those hotels for sheltering well, any additional space is welcome. Johnson says hotels won't go far towards solving his capacity problem. And despite Florida's progress, details like how many rooms will actually be available and who will get them? Remain unresolved. Other at risk coastal communities, including Houston and counties in southern Alabama, are hesitant to enlist hotels, partly because of concerns over the limits of FEMA's financial help. They're going to have to make these spending decisions. In advance of being guaranteed that they'll get the money back. Brian Kun is the former director at the Florida Division of Emergency Management and vice president of an emergency management consulting firm. He says the way FEMA's reimbursement programs work. Local governments have a right to be concerned. And Kun says. While FEMA's financial support is a plus, it's not enough. Given the unprecedented challenges local governments face this year, he says FEMA should be doing more to help with the planning effort. Normally, we say every disaster is local, and they'd come up with a rope plans and that's terrific guests. But we you know, could have benefited from More collaborative effort to make sure that we're not leaving people behind In this situation. In many scenarios, emergency managers could rely on traditional congregate shelters. Along with social distancing. CDC recommends shelters, conduct health screenings and temperature checks, provide face coverings and isolate people with symptoms. Public health experts agree these steps will reduce risk. But Dr Emily Landon on infectious disease specialist at the University of Chicago Medicine, Says Going to a shelter is still something of a gamble. Maybe the eating area isn't quite taken after you end up having to eat too close to other people, and they don't have their masks on and you don't have your masks on because you're eating and they're spread. This year's hurricane season could see large evacuations. Climate change has made powerful storms more likely, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has predicted a more active season. It's difficult to anticipate how that could translate into shelter demand. With the economic crisis, some worry more people than ever could depend on public shelters. Abby Wendell NPR news And make sure to tune in to all things considered later this afternoon for a look at how shelters for people with disabilities are being affected by this pandemic. Now we want to tell you about a remarkable young man named Ron Stayton. He's someone who knows a lot about getting knocked down and then getting right back up again. It's just like whenever I'm about to get over the gate, something stylized, really either unavoidable war unforeseeable. When he was eight, He Hans mother abandoned the family, leaving his father to raise two boys alone. The family face years of financial hardship, even though his father work multiple jobs. In school. His grades slipped and when he said, his sights on becoming a professional athlete, well, injury ultimately ended that dream. After graduation, Ron attended a buoy State university before transferring to the University of Maryland. My bad end up working $3 when I transfer in the University of Maryland to help that transition. And once he had suffered a stroke. I just said OK, well, now with my crime to step up to the plate. So he went to work for the Bates trucking and trash removal sanitation company a job that meant waking up before the sunrise. I went and decide that work full time as sanitation, something Well, being a four time Stuart and I maintain all my leadership positions in all of that, however, again, like I just said, is my time stuff in my dad down and this is where we want to do continue to sacrifice. Rihan worked that job while also staying committed to his degree. He says his colleagues at the trash removal company gave him the inspiration he needed to keep going. There was the people who are at the bottom of the social hierarchy. Such as people who are formally incarcerated and those for you know, working sanitation does all throughout four people always you know you teachers always tell you don't be one of those guys, but it was certainly those types of individual in the back of the truck. Who really took my life to another level. Johan, who's now 24 years old, graduated from underground in 2018 and has now been accepted to Harvard Law School. And while he doesn't yet know exactly where this new road is going to take him, moron says he does know He wants to keep supporting his family. I just wanted to make sure no one ever loved could not get the help. They need it just because we lack the necessary resources or just money to get them to help three Han statement who will begin his studies online at Harvard Law School this fall..

Federal Emergency Management A Florida CDC Bill Johnson Ron Stayton director Florida Division of Emergency Harvard Law School Brian Kun Hurricane Michael University of Maryland Chester Davis National Oceanic and Atmospher American Red Cross Atlanta Lee University of Chicago Medicine Dr Emily Landon Abby Wendell Bates trucking
Tropical Storm Nestor eyes the Gulf Coast

Garden Talk

00:43 sec | 3 years ago

Tropical Storm Nestor eyes the Gulf Coast

"The Gulf coast in panhandler paying especially close attention to tropical storm Nestor business owner Machel results says that when you live and work on the coast there are no small storms we have taken out a lot of things from the store at least waist high we are expecting cents were right over the water to get a little bit of water in the store so we're protecting everything we know needs protecting and many residents are still dealing with the remnants of hurricane Michael from a year ago WC TV reporter Jacob Murphy is in Marianna Florida about an hour west of Tallahassee Maryland dimming her property still littered with debris now she fears Nestor could finish what Michael started and this fight some of our trees this was hasn't completely

Panhandler Jacob Murphy Marianna Florida Maryland Nestor Michael Gulf Business Owner Machel Hurricane Michael Reporter Tallahassee
"hurricane michael" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is the area's most acute need but he says there are signs of progress work is underway on several privately owned apartment complexes there were damaged and shut down after the storm most of those were insured so we're seeing that coming back on line and in fact between now and February of next year of twenty twenty we're going to see about eighty five percent of that housing stock back in inventory again while housing remains a major challenge hurricane Michael exposed another problem that needs attention in Panama City its aging infrastructure feces dirty water and bacteria enough raw sewage to fill over four thousand bath tubs now in walks in by you this is August a series of breaks and pump failures have dumped more than sixty five thousand gallons of sewage and water ways in Panama City trees uprooted in the storm and convoys of heavy debris filled trucks have cracked decades old sewer pipes officials say replacing the system will take ten years and cost at least two hundred million dollars and at this point officials in Panama City and other communities hit by the storm are struggling just to balance their budgets in Panama City hurricane Michael destroyed or damaged eighty five percent of the structures McQueen says substantially reducing their value on the tax rolls just in the historic downtown area that we're in right now the aggregate taxable values were reduced by over eighteen million dollars just in this little neighborhood that we're in right now to compensate for the decline in values Panama City raise the property tax rate an unpopular move but one of several local communities to do so the queen says the tax rate should come down over the next few years as homes are rebuilt and property values rebound he's more concerned about another consequence of the storm the area's population loss he believes eight or nine thousand people more than twenty five percent of the city's residents left the area the queen says that will hurt in April when the once in a decade census is conducted that for our name storm called hurricane Michael could have a ten year punitive affect to the recovery of the city of Panama City that's because the sense is used to determine levels of state and federal grants funding that will be vital as Panama City and other panhandle communities rebuild Greg Allen NPR news Panama City Florida Washington DC is joined hundreds of US cities in seven states and replacing Columbus day with the day to celebrate native Americans of course Christopher Columbus was Italian and his days had special resonance for Italian Americans Joseph.

"hurricane michael" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"About cell phone coverage and how long people should expect to go out those big problem at least for some providers after hurricane Michael and that's what everyone's on and want to know about how they're obviously I think and Michael the major problem and it really hindered I think the ability for for folks to be able to take protective measures after storm but we've spoken with companies like Verizon yeah they have a plan they are implementing the plan they recognize up you know the threat from the storm and and are taking action and so that's really at the end of the day you know these are private companies what we've done Jared's talked him I've talked to miss said look the state really believes that you're having a plan and being able to take action to restore any lost service as quickly as possible very important house with the recovery efforts helps with people whose livelihoods are at stake and I think they all get that and I think they they recognize some of the problems in the past I mean I would say the same with with the utilities I've met with a number of the heads of the utilities companies like Florida power and light and they are executing their plans and you're saying a lot of assets being brought to bear in Florida right now it not necessarily know for sure where those are gonna need alternately be deployed there's gonna be a capacity to do that and restoring the power I once it goes out to as many people as quickly as possible that helps jeer at me and helps general it helps with the recovery effort in the response and so were were sensitive to that and I can say that the NB utilities have plans they are they are executing those plans resources are being brought to bear and and I think that that's that's a responsible thing to do okay.

hurricane Michael Jared Florida Verizon
Georgia Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Hurricane Dorian

Fresh Air

00:50 sec | 3 years ago

Georgia Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Hurricane Dorian

"Georges Georges Georges Georges governors governors governors governors declaring declaring declaring declaring a a a a state state state state of of of of emergency emergency emergency emergency for for for for twelve twelve twelve twelve counties counties counties counties in in in in the the the the southern southern southern southern part part part part of of of of the the the the state state state state as as as as a a a a male male male male Moffett Moffett Moffett Moffett from from from from member member member member station station station station W. W. W. W. A. A. A. A. B. E. in Atlanta reports heavy rain and damaging winds are expected from hurricane Goran the storm is projected to make landfall somewhere along the Florida coast on Monday but forecasters say the hurricane could also bring flooding and gusty winds to parts of Georgia the storm's arrival also also coincides coincides with with Labor Labor Day Day weekend weekend Georgia Georgia governor governor Brian Brian camp camp says says that that may may cause cause pro pro long long traffic traffic delays delays that's that's something something else else I I think think as as citizens citizens need need to to be be thinking thinking about about if if we we get get a a big big traffic flow from Florida is going to disrupt traffic for our Jordan's they're traveling over the holiday weekend the potential impact from Dorian comes just eleven months after George's farming industry suffered major damage from hurricane Michael for NPR news I'm a meal Moffett in Atlanta

Moffett Moffett Moffett Moffet W. W. W. W. A. A. A. A. B. E. Hurricane Goran Georgia Florida Jordan Dorian George Atlanta Georges Georges Georges George Brian Brian Hurricane Michael NPR Eleven Months
Storm could bring heavy rain, flooding to Florida's Gulf Coast

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

Storm could bring heavy rain, flooding to Florida's Gulf Coast

"Much of Florida's west coast are preparing for the possibility of heavy rain and flooding from a potential tropical depression in Tallahassee they're filling sandbags Dennis feltgen with the national hurricane center in Miami says there's an eighty percent chance a low over Georgia will become a tropical depression later this week dropping lots of rain in the northeast Gulf apple certainly include the western coast of Florida as well as the panhandle region National Weather Service forecasters say Panama City still recovering from hurricane Michael could get six to eight inches of rain over the next seven

Florida Tallahassee Dennis Feltgen Miami Georgia Panama City Northeast Gulf National Weather Service Hurricane Michael Eighty Percent Eight Inches
House passes long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill

Atlanta's Morning News

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

House passes long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill

"Senator David Perdue calls it beyond embarrassing. WSB's Bill Caiaccio reports congress has finally approved a disaster aid package. Jim RCN it comes after months of political fighting typical Washington fashion. Congress kick the can down the road. Georgia's senators David producer, Johnny Isakson, expressed their frustration throughout the process is not right. It's not fair for the two hundred and thirty days after hurricane Michael ravaged South, Georgia. The nineteen billion dollar aid package is finally approved by the house. And now headed to President Trump. It also includes money for local blueberry growers whose crops were destroyed by a deep freeze in two thousand seventeen and victims of recent tornados

Senator David Perdue Congress Jim Rcn WSB Georgia President Trump Bill Caiaccio David Producer Hurricane Michael Johnny Isakson Washington Nineteen Billion Dollar Thirty Days
Puerto Rico, Congress And Trump discussed on Mike McConnell

Mike McConnell

02:06 min | 3 years ago

Puerto Rico, Congress And Trump discussed on Mike McConnell

"It's like congress finally sending the nineteen billion beat this be nineteen billion dollar disaster aid Bill to Trump, a rare bipartisan achievement that we don't see these days. Yes. So congress is officially passed in nineteen point. One billion dollar disaster relief aid. It is a massive package in the most sweeping disaster aid measure that congress has ever considered and really when you look at it this package delivers aid to nearly every corner of the country. It's addresses natural disasters that have happened over the last three years. We're talking hurricane Maria that a really impacted Puerto Rico, you have hurricanes, Michael, and Florence, those devastating wildfires in California, all the way to Utah. Volcanic eruptions in Hawaii really a lot of a lot of disasters that we saw over the last three years, they overcame months of, I guess, infighting misjudgment, a feud between Trump and congressional Democrats is expected to sign us. So the president did tweet about it on. He called it great so that signals that he is on board and will likely sign it this. It's it's important to note though, that, while congress was going back and forth, amongst, you know, Democrats and Republicans and also with the White House. Millions of Americans have been left in limbo in the last six months. You know, we talk about hurricane Maria, the happened back in two thousand seventeen Puerto Rico, their Puerto Rico's, excuse me, their food stamp program was set to run out of funds. And so, essentially what the argument was over was funding for Puerto Rico, the president said that Puerto Rico received enough aid initially, and that the local government mismanaged those funds, and he didn't believe that any more money should be going towards the island to put it in context for you. This disaster relief aid provides six hundred million for their food stamp program, and other three hundred million for recovery efforts, that's a total of nine hundred thirty one million out of nineteen point billion. You said it with a B so in, you know, in context, that's not a

Puerto Rico Congress Donald Trump Hurricane Maria President Trump Bill Hawaii White House California Florence Utah Michael Three Years Nineteen Billion Dollar One Billion Dollar Six Months
"hurricane michael" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When hurricane Michael in the Florida panhandle last year it while up to the coast today. Scientists at the National Hurricane Center said the storm was even stronger than I thought in fact, it was a rare top of the scale category. Five hurricane NPR's. Wrestle Lewis is here in the studio to discuss why the storm strength was upgraded. And how today's announcement changes how forecasters are planning for the coming hurricane season. Welcome back to the studio. Russell it's good to be here. So how did forecasters go back after the fact and decide that hurricane Michael wasn't each stronger when it hits, and I thought well, we knew this storm was going to be massive. It was going to be strong in that. It was going to do a lot of damage, and that's what it did it ended up causing some twenty five billion dollars in damage. It was directly responsible for the deaths of sixteen people. I mean, it was a big storm that targeted Panama City and Mexico beach in the Florida panhandle, but Audie every tropical system. Forecasters they go back the analyze lots of things about the storm. It's path. How big it? It was and importantly, how strong the storm was at the height of this storm. There were a lot of variables that sort of played into understanding the strength from offshore wind sensors to the hurricane hunter aircrafts that are flying in the storm to Doppler radar satellite analysis and given all of that forecasters now say that Michael reach sustained winds of one hundred sixty miles per hour, and we should say that as a category. Five storm Michael is in rare company joins Andrew which hit south Florida in nineteen Ninety-two Camille, which struck Mississippi in nineteen sixty nine and that unnamed Labor Day hurricane of nineteen thirty five but looking back why did that rapid increase of strength. Catch people off guard certainly with this storm. It went from a category two to a category. Four in just twenty four hours as we've learned now it wasn't a category for was a category. Five and it really is a very rare occurrence, but what you normally see is that a hurricane weakens as it gets closer. To land. But not with Michael kept getting stronger until it hit land and people in Florida. Probably remember hurricane Charley doing exactly that. Same thing in two thousand four before it veered unexpectedly hit southwest, Florida. What are some of the lessons here for the upcoming hurricane season? Well, I think really hurricane Michael has become a case study for meteorologists. In fact, the National Hurricane Center is holding its annual hurricane meeting next week in New Orleans, and they're going to be talking about Michael on a couple of these panels. And really I think this is a good reminder for everyone a hurricane regardless of its strength is very dangerous. We often hear from people who plan to write out the storm's because they think oh, it's just a category one hurricane, but that is still hurricane as we've seen these storms can and do become stronger than forecasters predict and really the wrong time to think about evacuating is when the storm is right off the coast. That's NPR's. Russell lewis. Russell, thanks for your reporting. You're welcome. And you're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Support for KOA comes from the.

hurricane Michael National Hurricane Center hurricane Charley Florida Russell lewis Michael NPR south Florida Panama City Mexico beach Audie Mississippi Camille Andrew New Orleans twenty five billion dollars twenty four hours
Hurricane Michael, Hurricane Center And Hurricane Andrew discussed on Barsky Radio

Barsky Radio

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

Hurricane Michael, Hurricane Center And Hurricane Andrew discussed on Barsky Radio

"The word hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida panhandle last year has been upgraded. Eight fifty F T Elle's. Karen Curtis has. Has details. Hurricane Center has reassessed the data regarding hurricane Michael and upgraded. The storm from a category four to five with one hundred and sixty mile per hour sustained winds scientists say hurricane Michael is the first hurricane to make landfall as a category. Five storm since Hurricane Andrew in one thousand nine hundred and only the fourth on record hurricane season two thousand nineteen

Hurricane Michael Hurricane Center Hurricane Andrew Karen Curtis Florida
600-acre Florida wildfire fueled by Hurricane Michael debris

America Trends

00:16 sec | 3 years ago

600-acre Florida wildfire fueled by Hurricane Michael debris

"A wildfire or the Florida panhandle now about forty percent contained a little more than a day. After it started. A forest service spokesman says it's burning east of Panama City for us officials say the fire started Saturday night, and it's threatening at least three dozen buildings.

Panama City Florida Forty Percent
Expert: White House shouldn't ignore security threats from climate

Climate Cast

04:39 min | 3 years ago

Expert: White House shouldn't ignore security threats from climate

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. Is climate change already costing the US military billions. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter. This is climate cast national security experts have identified threats from climate change for more than a decade. There are threats to US military facilities from rising season. Rivers. Just this month. Much of off at air force base near Omaha was underwater early damage estimates. There are in the tens of millions and a climate change in Hansard hurricane Michael destroyed or damaged up to seventeen f twenty two fighters at Florida's Tyndall air base. Last fall that damage price tag likely runs into the billions this month. Fifty eight former military and national security officials sent a letter to President Trump. The letter objects to the idea of a White House panel that disputes military and intelligence analysis of climate threats. John Connor is the director of the center for climate and security. You ask your sign. Scientists and your national security officials to provide their best judgment whether it's their best scientific judgment or their best military judgement or their best intelligence analysis. So that you can make a as a leader the best decision possible to skew that information is to ensure that you're going to make an ill informed decision. You've been on the inside of this John. I'm curious about how this process works in. What ways does the national security community assess climate change as a threat to national security one way is the threat to infrastructure as we deal with sea-level rises, we deal with wildfires as we deal with flooding as we deal with extreme weather resilience and readiness are things that we should incorporate into our basis into our infrastructure. Let's talk about the current catastrophe in Mozambique and think a little more globally. We've got hundreds of dead more than one hundred thousand displaced in Mozambique. Bekes Bob, way and Malawi. This is a massive humanitarian crisis, and I'm not trying to be callous in asking this. But how does acuity analysts assess these events as security threats in the future each of these things causes displacements that will drive instability. They will make it more likely to have populations suffering makes it more likely that there will be displaced peoples who might be available for recruitment to extremist organizations, each of these pieces of the puzzle have security implications, and that is part of a larger fabric that has to be analyzed. John conger director of the center for climate and security great discussion today. Thanks for your insight. Happy to be here. My name is Melanie chevelle Stora. I'm faculty member at university of Minnesota in the college of design, and I do teaching research and service in energy shoes in the built environment. There's few ways in which we can impact building energy use one is if it's a new building, you know, we design it right to begin second. Is we're going into a retrofit system. There's different ways to think about it. There's the building skin or the exterior walls, you can impact that you can impact the behavior of the people, and you can impact the systems within that retrofit situation by systems. I mean mechanical systems that do heating and cooling and ventilation. One of my research. Areas is we are trying to figure out ways of doing retrofits inexpensively. So what we're trying to do is can you code buildings with a modulating layer that changes the environment of the building itself. So that idea is suddenly you're from being a Minnesota weather. You're maybe say, a central US weather is what you're seeing around the ability. So that to far out idea, but practically there's lots of things that people. Can do right now. A very easy way to reduce energy, use changing your light bulbs. Right LED bulbs. If you just change everything you can even Chandler Lear bulbs as LED. An reassure people that everybody can do this. It doesn't have to be expensive. It doesn't have to be very time consuming. Really everyone into it. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter.

United States Chief Meteorologist NPR Mozambique Paul Hunter Bank Of America Director Fdic Melanie Chevelle Stora John Connor President Trump Omaha Tyndall Air Base John Conger White House
"hurricane michael" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"WIBC Jerry Stacy his spring break time, and that means for a lot of losers. It's a trip to Florida was just five months ago with you. Remember the hurricane Michael struck the Florida panhandle as the most powerful hurricane to hit the area in history. And joining us now from the beautiful beaches Dan row is the president and CEO of visit Panama City beach. And he's here to talk about that rebuilding effort, and what you can expect when you plan your beach vacation. Hello, dan. How are ya? I'm doing well. And it's good to be with you. I'm glad you're here. So warm up a little bit. What is the forecast today for Panama City beach? You know, we have seventy five degree temperatures today. I mean, it's not a great weekend at the beach a lot of your your snowbirds spend their winters with this. Well, we sent him back up to Indy. Now, it's time for the families to come in. And join us for so many of us in Indiana. We watched in horror as we saw the pictures of what hurricane Michael left behind in October. Because Florida really is like a second home for so many of us particularly that area where you live. So describe what those days were like immediately following hurricane. Michael hurricane Michael coming ashore. It really was a very very powerful storm. But as it was coming ashore is shifted slightly to the east emol accurately. Panama.

hurricane Michael Florida Michael hurricane Panama City president and CEO Panama Jerry Stacy Dan row Indy Indiana seventy five degree five months
Baseball coach and wife fatally electrocuted at school's field

Drew Garabo Live

02:18 min | 3 years ago

Baseball coach and wife fatally electrocuted at school's field

"Sunday thirty people liberty county, Florida, right? Thirty frigging people are on the baseball field. And they're putting up a new scoreboard hurricane Michael took the last one down. So this is what's going to be a wonderful event. People are celebrating. They had ordered a new scoreboard. It comes in. Now. You might call an electrician I might call tradition. This baseball team. Clearly didn't think that they either need an electrician or did not have the funds tiring electricity. So they get a new scoreboard coach some players some parents. They're out there working on it. This dude who coached the team a high school coach gets on a lift, you know, an electrical lift. And he gets into the electrical lied and it hits him. Oh, he he bumped into a power line, right? And so he's he's got the current running through his body. He's electrocuting himself. His wife. Shane Crump who's a health aid for the liberty county school district who certainly should have known that if someone has been electrocuted. The last thing in the world, you wanna do is try to grab him. So is he up on the lift at this point? And then brought back down says he's on some kind of lift any got into an electrical line. So I can only assume that she climbed up the left or or even touched the left at that point. Right and tried to help him the minute. She touched him. She was killed. Jeez. Along with him their son chase Crom who was on the team tried to come to his parents aid, zapped but survived. Jesus. Coach himself. According to liberty county sheriff Eddie Joe white. Which is of course, you're going to be sheriff. If your name is Eddie, Joe white, the coach himself was running a piece of equipment it impacted a high power line in the piece of equipment. He was running became electrified. He was electrocuted. A white female. That's his wife who was there tried to render assistance. She was lecture cupid an actual member of the team came up to help. That's his son. He was also electrified but knocked away from the

Shane Crump Eddie Joe White Liberty County School District Baseball Liberty County Florida Chase Crom Michael Joe White Eddie
"hurricane michael" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"For spring and summer, I'm an Carrick and this is for. Fox news. So seeing some wind advisories and high wind warnings in place. Clear skies will fall back to around thirty. And those winds may approach fifty miles per hour. Still windy on Monday with sunshine afternoon, high upper thirty s to mid forties, and we could pick up some gusts close to fifty miles per hour. Once again, Jeff from the Weather Channel for talkradio. Six eighty w when hurricane Michael struck Florida the world turned upside down, especially for children who often suffer in unimaginable ways and save the children is there to meet their unique needs. Even now save the children is in Florida making sure hurt and frightened children impacted by hurricane Michael gift to help need to care for and protect children has been the mission of save the children for nearly one hundred years. So in tragedies like hurricane Michael strike. They're prepared and they're on the ground for children and their families around the world and right here at home. When you partner with save the children, you can send love care and essentials for children and families including baby wipes, cribs toys and books. Learn more at WWW dot save the children dot org. That's WWW dot save the children dot or the WCBS studios. Have brought to you by safe retirement solutions. Call Rodber Barohi or one zero two six six eleven twenty save for retirement solutions dot com. Talkradio six eighty WCBS. What I'm doing? Totally going to start going through all the closets.

hurricane Michael Florida Carrick Fox talkradio WCBS Rodber Barohi partner Jeff one hundred years Six eighty w
For Georgia Farmer, The Trade Tariffs Are Personal

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:47 min | 3 years ago

For Georgia Farmer, The Trade Tariffs Are Personal

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast, the ongoing trade dispute between the US and China is clearly having an economic economic impact on both countries. But tariffs can also affect people on an individual level. Nowhere is that more apparent than in America's agricultural communities. Stacey van expense and Cardiff Garcia hosts of the podcast, the indicator from planet. Money spoke with one farmer whose livelihood is now on the frontlines of a trade war, David Reid farms, more than two thousand acres of peanuts and cotton here in Pinehurst, Georgia and his crop started coming in last year. He says it was glorious. Oh, yeah. We had this crop. We ever had in a few years. And then starting over the summer a couple of things happened. I a trade war broke out the US impose tariffs on Chinese goods and China retaliated with import taxes of its own among the US goods, it China started taxing were peanut butter and cotton, basically, everything they grow in this part of Georgia. Then a couple of months later this happened. Hi there. I'm Brooke Baldwin live here in Destin, Florida where we are covering the official landfall of hurricane Michael feel Ross. Sorry. I walked any. Any? Category with in prisons ethic. David lost about a third of his cotton crop and a couple of fields of peanuts to the peanuts grand there. That's what was last left after the storm peanuts grow underground like potatoes. And this field has peanuts all over the dirt. David picked a couple of. But they were rotten from all the water from the storm show was kind of soft Tim apart in his hands. See that was a good peanut when it came to just some we didn't get picked at the storm. He the peanuts and cotton that did survive walk straight out of a storm and into a trade war, China's peanut butter and cotton orders from the US collapsed overnight and the price that David was getting for his peanuts and cotton both fell by about thirty percent. And what had been shaping up to be one of the best years in David's entire farming career turned into one of the worst years Pete ever seen. You know, we we planned to make a lot of money this year, but lower see it. But hopefully, we don't break even break. Even and David says, he is one of the lucky ones, there's some foam foams just worried, you know, I've heard him help in say, I don't know if I most of I've this or not, you know, it's heartbreaking David says that the economic effects of the storm and the tariffs haven't just hit the farmers. They've hit the whole area is hurting a whole community and equipment dealer in the guy down. Treat the hardware store in everybody suffers in spite of everything though, David actually supports the terrace at that. Well, that's not good for the former now. But I think it's the right thing to do, you know, and I think President Trump doesn't right? Thank in mafia union. I think he did a good thing. David thinks the macro economic issues between the US and China are important enough that the sacrifice feels worth it to him. Now, the government is providing millions of dollars in aid to cotton farmers and supplementing a lot of the peanut losses. It doesn't make up for everything doesn't make up for all the losses. But David says he is not going to switch to another crop. Neither is anybody. He knows they're going to continue growing cotton. And peanuts just like always. Why is that is Sydney blood? You know, what they've always done. Stacey Vanik Smith Cardiff Garcia NPR news.

David Reid Farms United States China Comcast President Trump Georgia America Pete Stacey Vanik Smith Stacey Van Brooke Baldwin Pinehurst Cardiff Garcia NPR TIM Sydney Hurricane Michael Florida Destin Official
"hurricane michael" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Hurricane Michael September. Speech. Twenty nine. Happens reynolds. AM seven ninety toussaud's. Most stimulating talk. From the studio. Your local fiduciary, Trajan wealth dot com. This is. Radio station. Letter cold gripping the midwest. I'm Jack Callaghan. Fox news. Not just the coldest night of the year. But the coldest night in several years in parts of the mid west wind chills as low as minus sixty three and quite a big area of minus fifty to minus sixty meteorologists marching art at the national weather service, the actual temperature and Chicago and Milwaukee Nell fourteen below its twenty six below zero in Minneapolis, getting colder, Minneapolis police sergeant grant Snyder says they've seen an uptick in hypothermia and frostbite especially among the homeless people walking up. No gloves on wearing tennis shoes. They don't have adequate socks is Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel turning some buses into mobile warming centers. No one in need of a safer warm place to stay. We'll be turned away. No one. The national weather service warns a wind chill of minus twenty five can free skin in fifteen minutes. Four deaths are blamed on the Arctic blast and escaping. It is hard to more than seventeen hundred flights have been canceled. Amtrak calling off all of its trans through Chicago today. And the postal service says it's too cold for mail delivery and parts of five.

Chicago Hurricane Michael Rahm Emanuel Minneapolis Jack Callaghan fiduciary reynolds tennis Arctic grant Snyder Fox hypothermia Nell Milwaukee fifteen minutes
"hurricane michael" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Story today last year, we spent a lot of time talking about the effects of hurricane Michael on our fellow Floridians in the panhandle. We did a ton of special hurricane coverage for our affiliates up there. So we add first hand knowledge from residents about how badly their communities were damaged. We haven't touched on this issue. A lot recently. There's always so much to get to. But we're to give you an update on the situation up there today, we look we would. I want them to do the same thing for us. If we were the ones hit by a storm like, Michael. So it's only right that we give this story some more airtime in the new year. I'll start with governor disantle. He's going to take a second tour of the panhandle communities. Hardest hit by hurricane Michael tomorrow. He's going to be joined by FEMA administrator Brock long. Now. The visit comes a few days after President Trump floated the idea of using army corps of engineers funds earmarked for disaster recovery here in Florida to start construction on his border wall. Sanchez express some concerns over the plan. But he didn't outright reject it. Now yesterday, he said this, and I'm quoting I don't think that you should rob Peter to pay Paul with disaster funds that disaster relief money is very time sensitive. I mean, they need it now, and we need to get moving on this. It is easy to see why people would want to visit these beautiful beach communities, and they will return more vibrant than ever. So he's not doesn't sound like he's a big fan of that idea. That was floated that's kind of been backed off of over the past few days. From the White House hurricane Michael in case, you're unaware at the extent of the damage caused an estimated five billion dollars in damage to homes businesses, infrastructures and other facilities like Tyndall air force base. There was a piece from the news service of Florida that really kinda laid out some of the details in terms of the damage that was done up in the panhandle. So get this hurricane Michael hit ten panhandle counties. Ten yet it left nearly seven times the debris of hurricane Irma, which hit forty five counties. That's unbelievable. It's hard around there. I can hardly imagine what the streets and roads must look like. So so again, hurricane Michael ten panhandle counties nearly seven times the debris of hurricane Irma. Which had forty five that that shows you the strength of the storm when it hit the panhandle last year. And in the three months, Michael hit debris continues to be picked up. So it's still debris is still getting picked up to this day. Remember, how long it took after Irma? Oh, yeah. Imagine that. But way, we're right. More than a hundred thousand people have registered for assistance in sixteen counties have qualified for federal aid Senate banking and insurance chairman Doug Brockton. He's a Republican in Gulf breeze said and this is referring to the heavily rural and low income areas. Hit by hurricane Michael quote. They're going to be dealing with it for generations. And generations. This is a problem that is not going away, cotton farmers, essentially lost most of the season's crop. Aquaculture along the Gulf Coast, including oyster farming suffered eighty percent to one hundred percent losses from Michael you don't just recover from something like that overnight. With two point eight million acres of forest land, damaged timber farmer sustained more than one point three billion of the overall one point four nine billion in estimated agricultural damages that have been reported from the October tenth storm. So timber farmers just clobbered by hurricane Michael last month. A report reviewed by the Senate appropriations committee showed Florida's budgets gonna faced increased pressure from the impact of the hurricane with the tab expected to exceed the costs from Irma. So this this is an issue. That's not just affecting the panhandle. But when it comes to the budget here in the state of Florida, it's gonna affect all of us because so much is needed for that region. So coming up in a moment. We're gonna talk to spectrum news reporter Aaron Murray live from the panhandle tomorrow night bay news nine is going to be conducting townhall, you'll be able to watch it at seven PM. It's live town hall. It's called hurricane Michael Florida impact. Aaron Murray is co hosting the town hall from Mexico beach. We're going to preview the town hall and talk to her a little bit about some of the other issues that residents in the panhandle are facing due to hurricane Michael all of these months later again that is moments away here on PM Tampa Bay. Luckily for us here in the Tampa Bay area are homes have dodged a few bullets over the past few years. Unfortunately, one thing John in Dover wasn't able to dodge was the inability to sell his house. He was stuck his home had been in the market for almost two years, but back in September, Brenda Wade, entertain took over the listing for John who was a successful real estate investment. By the way, and the home was under contract by thanksgiving..

hurricane Michael hurricane Irma Florida Michael Florida Aaron Murray panhandle Sanchez Senate Tampa Bay governor disantle FEMA Paul John Doug Brockton Mexico beach President White House Brock long Gulf Coast
"hurricane michael" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Story today last year, we spent a lot of time talking about the effects of hurricane Michael on our fellow Floridians in the panhandle. We did a ton of special hurricane coverage for our affiliates up there. So we add first hand knowledge from residents about how badly their communities were damaged. We haven't touched on this issue. A lot recently there's always so much to get to. But we're to give you an update on the situation up there today. Look, we would want them to do the same thing for us. If we were the ones hit by a storm like, Michael. So it's only right that we give this story some more airtime in the new year. I'll start with governor Disentis. He's going to take a second tour of the panhandle communities. Hardest hit by hurricane Michael tomorrow. He's going to be joined by FEMA administrator Brock long. Now. The visit comes a few days after President Trump floated the idea of using army corps of engineers funds earmarked for disaster recovery here in Florida to start construction on his border wall. Desanta this express some concerns over the plan. But he didn't outright reject it. Now yesterday, he said this, and I'm quoting I don't think that you should rob Peter to pay Paul with disaster funds that disaster relief money is very time sensitive. I mean, they need it now, and we need to get moving on this. It is easy to see why people would want to visit these beautiful beach communities, and they will return more vibrant than ever. So he's not doesn't sound like he's a big fan of that idea. That was floated that's kind of been backed off of over the past few days. From the White House hurricane Michael in case, you're unaware at the extent of the damage caused an estimated five billion dollars in damage to homes businesses, infrastructures and other facilities like Tyndall air force base. There was a piece from the news service of Florida that really kind of laid out some of the details in terms of the damage that was done up in the panhandle. So get this hurricane Michael hit ten panhandle counties. Ten yet it left nearly seven times the debris of hurricane Irma, which hit forty five counties. That's unbelievable. It's hard to wrap your head around there. I can hardly imagine what the streets and roads must look like. So so again, hurricane Michael ten panhandle counties nearly seven times the debris of hurricane Irma. Which had forty five that that shows you the strength of the storm when it hit the panhandle last year. And in the three months since Michael hit debris continues to be picked up. So it's still debris is still getting picked up to remember. How long it took after Irma? Oh, yeah. Imagine that but way, we're right? More than a hundred thousand people have registered for assistance in sixteen counties have qualified for federal aid Senate banking and insurance chairman Doug Brockton. He's a Republican in Gulf breeze said and this is referring to the heavily rural and low income areas. Hit by hurricane Michael quote. They're going to be dealing with it for generations. And generations. This is a problem that is not going away cotton farmers, essentially lost most of the season's crop aquaculture along the Gulf Coast, including waster farming suffered eighty percent to one hundred percent losses from Michael you don't just recover from something like that overnight. With two point eight million acres of forest land, damaged timber farmer sustained more than one point three billion of the overall one point four nine billion in estimated agricultural damages that have been reported from the October tenth storm. So timber farmers just clobbered by hurricane Michael last month. A report reviewed by the Senate appropriations committee showed Florida's budgets gonna faced increased pressure from the impact of the hurricane with the tab expected to exceed the costs from Irma. So this this is an issue. That's not just affecting the panhandle. But when it comes to the budget here in the state of Florida, it's gonna affect all of us because so much is needed for that region. So coming up in a moment. We're gonna talk to spectrum news reporter Aaron Murray live from the panhandle tomorrow night bay news nine is going to be conducting a town hall. You'll be able to watch it at seven PM. It's alive townhall. It's called hurricane. Michael Florida impact. Aaron Murray is co hosting the town hall from Mexico beach. We're going to preview the town hall and talk to her a little bit about some of the other issues that residents in the panhandle are facing due to hurricane Michael all of these months later. So again that is moments away here on PM Tampa Bay. Luckily for us here in the Tampa Bay area are homes have dodged a few bullets over the past few years. Unfortunately, one thing John in Dover wasn't able to dodge was the inability to sell his house. He was stuck his home had been in the market for almost two years, but back in September, Brenda Wade, entertain took over the listing for John who was a successful real estate in. By the way, and the home was under contract by thanksgiving..

hurricane Michael hurricane Irma Florida Aaron Murray panhandle Michael Florida Senate Tampa Bay Paul governor Disentis FEMA John Doug Brockton Mexico beach President White House Brock long Gulf Coast rob Peter
"hurricane michael" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:13 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on KTRH

"Hurricane hurricane Michael September. Twenty. President. Twenty nine thousand nine hundred happens. Ronald NewsRadio seven forty KTAR h. News, weather and traffic. Alexa, play KTAR h on. Iheartradio. In order to fill in for Rush Limbaugh on this the network on this day open line Friday, eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two the talk now of whispers of sellouts and rumors of sellouts in Washington, DC know that if this stuff is in the press, it has been talked about behind closed doors, Republicans Democrats Lamar Alexander from Tennessee is urging Trump this according to the hill to strike a deal on so-called comprehensive immigration reform. In other words, a tiny little helping of word salad comprehensive immigration reform, meaning nothing arguing that it could be as Nixon to China moment. Bring an end to the partial government shutdown. Well, okay. That's a very nice thought. Lamar Alexander, except that the media wouldn't treat it that way. It would be that the president caved period wouldn't be statesmanship. It wouldn't be dealmaking. That's not how they would color it. And the folks who voted for the president and a lot of people got on the Trump train immediately. Because he did the one thing that we're supposed to believe is impossible. He said, hey, we're going to build a wall. Democrats have already Cade portions of walls. Alexander said, why would he not agree to such a thing? We could go small a little bigger than I'd like to see the president say, okay? We've got a new congress. We've got divided government and the president who can actually make this happen. We're talking here. Lamar Alexander about a similarity to this one of my local listeners and said, this is a lot like having a thousand bucks in your pocket and refusing to give a buddy a buck ninety five or so for a Cup of coffee. It's a ridiculous ridiculous position. They've taken and I don't wanna give into ridiculousness or kabuki theatre or high Pergola. And I wish there was unanimity on the Republican side to talk about for instance, how much money do we spend an interest? How long would it take us to spend five billion dollars? In twenty twenty three our interest payments on our national debt will be more than we pay for national defense. It's not the money. Open line Friday. Michael New Orleans, Louisiana. You are on the Rush Limbaugh show taught Herman filling in high Michael Carr. They're good to talk to you. The thing. That's the thing. That's been bugging me is. The president heavy authority as commander in chief. Simply ordered the corps of engineers on the navy CD's or whoever's among the military to start construction. And it seems like that would be a great idea because the Democrats seem to be convinced that the wall is gonna be here's read my lips. No new taxes. And if they can, you know, stop the wall they'll have him in twenty twenty. But if he can if he can simply have the military starts instruction now changes the whole paradigm. But I'm not sure he has that authority or or if there's any way they could grow monkey wrench into bad. What do you know about them? So there's varying points of view on that first of all the president would need to have the budgetary resources, and he might be able to restore those from existing budget. He has a national security department of defense, otherwise he would be coining. He'd be starting a budget, which is technically and constitutional up to congress. But I wanted to say something, Michael, you know, what? So indicative of the Republican side you've called the say could he do this is he allowed to do this? Do you think anyone on the on? The democrat side said, hey is Brock Obama allowed to send one point five billion dollars in cold hard cash on palettes too. Iran. Are we allowed to do that? This. Okay. See this is part of who we are. And I appreciate that. You ask it that way. Because we continue to care about the rule of law. Michael. Thank you for the call. I appreciate that. And could he do this? Yeah. I guess I reasonably he could say, hey, I'm gonna reapportion this budget and use it for the wall. But what you do here is. You know, the phrase the end justifies, the means if the end justifies, the means the means in of themselves, become an end, right? So this is why we need to keep our eye on and concern for the rule of law Lee in Indianapolis, Indiana, you're on the Rush Limbaugh program taught Herman filling in Hello Lee. Good afternoon. Enjoy the show today and every time you sent in tanks. Thank you. Appreciate that very much. I would like to try together. Some of the you mentioned as well as something that a previous caller Ron had brought up and your idea was on the pattern. Interrupting Ron's idea was building a wall around DC. I think to great extent DC already has sort of an ideological wall built around it. And would like to bring up is article that Victor Davis Hanson had written called rethinking geography of power that we put all these powerbrokers right there in these glitzy parsh-, comfortable cities. And he he suggested that by dispersing and breaking that up maybe putting the department of energy and Bismarck, North Dakota the department of interior in Salt Lake City. You know, the department of agriculture Washington doesn't do any agriculture. Why aren't they in Des Moines Iowa that if we would reconfigure government, which is currently set up now for their convenience instead of effective government? For us. Then that would make a world of difference in the connectivity. That we have and their responsiveness to the actual needs. Yeah. I remember that I remember that piece Victor Davis Hanson, and I was thrilled. Because I admire his intellect, and it's something it's a it's a shift on something. I'd said and Lee thanks for the call. Thanks. You listen to Russia's show. There's another step and I love the Victor, David Hamson step. We can vote now congress can vote virtually they can do deals virtually they can have Skype conversations. It can do all of that. There's a great big difference between having to face someone in a grocery store after a hard vote. This great big difference between being paid something related to the hour. You would earn in your home state versus back in DC. There's something to that. It's a cultural thing it is so hard to keep your soul when you get to DC. They give you the little lapel pin. Everybody knows you're a congress person people to you differently. It doesn't take long before you forget that you are not. At the congress of the United States. You personally do not have one point two trillion dollars that people treat you like you do. So I'd like to see congress the congress in the Senate dispersed and be not allowed in DC for long periods of time and be forced to live here in their areas. And in fact, before I have office hours like the olden days where they were sorta citizens of the country rather than our rulers. I kind of liked that idea of citizens instead of being ruled Stott Herman filling in for Rush Limbaugh on the network. You're listening to the IB network..

President Rush Limbaugh DC Lamar Alexander congress Stott Herman Michael Victor Davis Hanson Hurricane hurricane Alexa Democrats Lee Ronald NewsRadio Washington Tennessee high Pergola Brock Obama
"hurricane michael" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on WTVN

"October is normally the end of the Atlantic hurricane season things began to wind down, but not in two thousand eighteen it was October tenth when hurricane Michael came barreling ashore, it hit grown incredibly quickly slamming the coast of Florida as a category four the wind was bad. But the storm surge was even worse taking out buildings and making vehicles. Vanish we go back now to October tenth is hurricane. Michael hit the Florida, panhandle. Pete combs in Panama City, Beach, Florida where hurricane Michael is. Now, Michael the monster a category four storm bearing down on this barrier island with one hundred forty mile an hour winds more than a foot of rain the possibility of tornadoes and a storm surge that could reach thirteen feet in some places along the coast. It is a monster of a storm hurricane Michael just a few hours away from hitting the Florida, panhandle. Governor Rick Scott says the time to get out of the way is pass. The worst thing you can do is leave and put yourself and your family endanger. Already the most powerful storm ever to hit the Florida, panhandle. Hurricane Michael continues to grow even stronger. There's now a concern Michael Mike become a category. Five storm. That means. Wind speeds topping one hundred fifty miles an hour with one hundred fifty mile an hour winds. Hurricane Michael's closing in on Florida's panhandle. ABC's Pete combs is in Panama City beach power is starting to flicker here. We're starting to see a lot of debris falling out of the trees. As many of these tall. Pine trees are being bent sideways by the wind. The rain coming inside ways. Now as the wind continues to blow harder and harder with every ban. The comes through hurricane Michael has made landfall on Florida's panhandle with one hundred fifty five mile an hour winds. I just saw something I have never seen in real life. I've seen it on video, and I have seen it in a three D graphics that we made to describe storm surge. I saw an entire home taken off of it. Sunday, shin enrolled down the street that is the type of storm surge. We're talking about -nificant pieces of debris in parts of buildings now, ripping. Off of the building and flying through the air SUB's literally lifting as huge pieces of rooftops. Literally flypast the front window here is no break and these wind gusts they keep getting stronger and stronger we were out there. Not too long.

hurricane Michael Florida panhandle Michael Mike Pete combs Panama City Governor Rick Scott ABC thirteen feet
"hurricane michael" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"October is normally the end of the Atlantic hurricane season things began to wind down, but not in two thousand eighteen it was October tenth when hurricane Michael came barreling ashore it grown incredibly quickly slamming the coast of Florida as a category for the wind was bad. But the storm surge was even worse taking outbuildings making vehicles vanish, we go back now to October tenth is hurricane. Michael hit the Florida, panhandle. In Panama City Beach, Florida where hurricane Michael is. Now, Michael the monster a category. Four storm bearing down on this barrier island with one hundred forty mile an hour winds more than a foot of rain a possibility of tornadoes and a storm surge that could reach thirteen feet in some places along the coast. It is a monster storm hurricane Michael just a few hours away from hitting the Florida, panhandle. Governor Rick Scott says the time to get out of the way is passed. The worst thing you can do now is leave and put yourself and your family. Endanger already the most powerful storm ever to hit the Florida, panhandle. Hurricane Michael continues to grow even stronger. There's now a concern Michael Mike become a category. Five storm. That means. Wind speeds topping one hundred fifty miles an hour with one hundred fifty mile an hour winds. Hurricane Michael's closing in on Florida's panhandle. ABC's Pete combs is in Panama City beach power is starting to flicker here. We're starting to see a lot of debris falling out of the trees. As many of these tall. Pine trees are being. That sideways by the wind. The rain coming inside ways. Now as the wind continues to blow harder and harder with every ban that comes through hurricane Michael has made landfall on Florida's panhandle with one hundred fifty five mile an hour winds. I just saw something I have never seen in real life. I've seen it on video, and I have seen it in a three D graphics that we made to describe storm surge I saw an entire home taking off of its foundation and rolled down the street. That is the type of storm surge we're talking about significant pieces of debris in parts of buildings. Now, ripping off of the building and flying through the air SUV's were literally lifting as huge pieces of rooftops literally flypast window here is no break and these wind gusts they keep getting stronger and stronger we were out there. Not too long.

hurricane Michael Florida panhandle Michael Mike Governor Rick Scott Panama City Beach Panama City Pete combs ABC thirteen feet
"hurricane michael" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane michael" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And whether you think those effects will become even more pronounced in two thousand nineteen. Yes. So when you look at the recent reports from the IPCC on the national climate assessment, even recent report from the medical journal, the Lancet what they all essentially converge on the point is that the effects of climate change will be felt disproportionately among different populations. We saw that with hurricane Michael we saw with hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. We saw it with different disasters that while we don't know exactly if they are caused by changing climate, we do know that they are Representative of what to expect with a changing climate. They roll back the social services, they make it more expensive to fund local government because you have to spend so much on cleanup and those effects and they've already caused schools to close down and all those things essentially erode the basic fabric of of how people live their lives, which is bad for democracy. Kendra? What do you think there's one other element that I think is really important matches? We know that the way the federal government dispels aid exacerbates income inequality, drastic income inequality is bad for democracy. Like, we know that there's a vast amount of literature for that. So it's not just like in the direct social services at you reference van but also indirectly because who gets aid after hurricane varies widely. And if you're a homeowner you get eight if your rent, Gary, generally, don't get much aid, your capacity to rebuild will entrench that democracy process that you're a leading to. And then I also you're also touched on how climate change will deepen these racial disparities. Right. And that's a very similar thing to what we're talking about. We know that people of color are more likely to live in riskier places that includes being on the flood plain that includes being in more vulnerable housing. And so it's almost a double effect here. They are going to get the strongest blow from whatever disaster. There's happen. They're going to be the least likely to be resilient against disasters. Even sort of not disaster's long-term things like heat stress, and then they're not going to get the money when the recovery calms, they're not going to get the recovery funds. The not going to be the poster children of a helpful government. And they haven't been so it's almost like getting hit in the face twice with lots of these things, and they also have the lease capacity to move. So when we're talking about like climate, migrations that comes up a lot we know that most of these migrations are going to be within a country not outside of the country. Emmy often thing that they're going to happen right away. Like everyone's going to just get up and move. But that's not what's going to happen. What's going to happen? Is you're going to get hit one too many times by storm and you're going to say, hey, I don't actually have to be living uncles the North Carolina. Are you don't have to be living in this location? I'm gonna choose to move my family, but the people who can choose to make this decision to the wealthiest. And they're the ones that the resources, and generally this aren't communities of color. So there's one thing that keeps coming up a lot particularly in this most recent political cycle, and that is the. Green new deal. We've all heard about it. In two thousand eighteen we started to see grassroots movement take shape around this. How do we expect the green new deal to develop in two thousand nine hundred? I don't know if we can know how to develop, but I do know that like just came out with a poll saying that pretty much everyone across the political spectrum agrees with the green new deal, and it's a youth movement that sort of pushes for it. And so it's going to knock, oh, definitely there's going to be a lot more traction on the state and on the federal level to get the government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions renewable energy commitment. And one of the things I think is really interesting method green new deal as its focus on not just on green..

Representative IPCC hurricane Michael hurricane Puerto Rico Lancet hurricane Maria Kendra North Carolina Gary
U.S. Prepares More Payments to Trade-Hit Farmers

Orlando's Morning News

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

U.S. Prepares More Payments to Trade-Hit Farmers

"Partial government shutdown the shutdown would cut off farmers access to both small business and agricultural department. Funding. A cotton harvester makes short work at one of the few southwest. Georgia fields to survive hurricane Michael. For most cotton farmers. There is no harvest this year for the second year in a row. Hurricane Irma took much of the two thousand seventeen crop is ruined. My customers is ruined bidder. State bridge Acura businessman. Tommy daughter says Georgia, cotton farmers are close. Close to panic a situation made much worse. He says by the prospect of a partial government shutdown. We need prayer. Pete combs, ABC, news fame bridge, Georgia. Good morning at five twenty six now on Orlando's morning news. Cool

Georgia Hurricane Irma Tommy Daughter Hurricane Michael Pete Combs Acura Orlando ABC
Vice President Pence speaks at Tyndall Air Force base on rebuilding Florida

Investor's Edge

00:25 sec | 4 years ago

Vice President Pence speaks at Tyndall Air Force base on rebuilding Florida

"Vice President Mike Pence down south yesterday in Florida as we hear from USA radio's Robin woolen ski vice President Mike Pence visiting Panama City, Florida talking to people about rebuilding their homes and businesses in the aftermath of hurricane Michael. We're with you. We're going to stay with all of the families of this region impacted by hurricane Michael, the we rebuild bigger and better than ever before and working very closely with governor Scott

Mike Pence Hurricane Michael Vice President Florida Panama City Governor Scott Usa Radio
Verizon apologizes to Floridians for service interruption during Hurricane Michael

First Light

00:57 sec | 4 years ago

Verizon apologizes to Floridians for service interruption during Hurricane Michael

"Horizon, issuing an apology. Some compensation to customers in Florida who are still without service after hurricane. Michael USA radio's Chris Barnes now with details. Executive vice president Tammy Irwin says fiber lines that connect phone towers were knocked down by hurricane Michael prompting the loss of service and the company now intends to bury those lines as it rebuilds the system. Irwin says customers will receive three months of free service in nine north northwest Florida counties to compensate for the extended lack of service, the company has restored about seventy percent of its customers in the affected, Florida counties. The Panama City area has about more than half of it. Cell service restored

Tammy Irwin Florida Hurricane Michael Executive Vice President Michael Usa Panama City Chris Barnes Seventy Percent Three Months
US teen is new Tetris world champion

AM Tampa Bay

00:21 sec | 4 years ago

US teen is new Tetris world champion

"Apparently just shot from a car going by boom, boom. And killed a couple of people there. That's incredible. And you wonder what kind of neighborhood is that stadium in? I've been in that stadium before I didn't realize that anyway, six fifteen on AM Tampa Bay, and let's go to the newsroom now and Chris strengthen Andrew gillum believes how he handled hurricane Michael shows. What kind of governor he would be the democratic nominee and Republican? Rhonda Santa's debated in Tampa on CNN Gillam said as Tallahassee is mayor. He put politics aside and worked well with Republican governor Rick Scott before and after the storm to Santa's called Gillam a failed mayor who had raised taxes as governor and destroy the economy. The Trump administration is reportedly looking to end legal recognition of transgender individuals. New York Times reports that the department of health and human services is mounting an effort to legally define a person's gender is either male or female as determined at birth hurricane Michael left, untold devastation in Florida's panhandle earlier this month, but it's turning up evidence of a much earlier destructive storm ships grounded on Franklin county's dog island during the eighteen ninety-nine Carabello hurricane have resurfaced. After Michaels storm surge it's not certain how many have been revealed on the barrier island, but several are now clearly visible on Chris Reichman, NewsRadio nine seventy WFL. A now, let's run the six twenty WD sportscenter on their Jacobson the day ended in redemption. For buccaneers kicker Chandler cotton zero after missing a field goal at the in. That would have given his team the win canton zero nailed a fifty nine yard. Field goal. The longest ever in overtime to give the buccaneers at twenty six to twenty three win over the Cleveland Browns up next. The bucks are at Cincinnati. Next sunday. The Tampa Bay Lightning beat up on the Blackhawks in Chicago for

Hurricane Michael Tallahassee Rhonda Santa Tampa Bay Lightning Tampa Bay Chris Reichman Buccaneers Tampa Andrew Gillum Rick Scott CNN New York Times Blackhawks Cleveland Browns Franklin County Cincinnati Jacobson Chicago Florida
Texas and Florida battle to recover from latest storms

Vegas Never Sleeps

00:41 sec | 4 years ago

Texas and Florida battle to recover from latest storms

"In Texas, people dealing with flooding and in Florida, the cleanup continues in the aftermath of hurricane. Michael USA radio's Wendy king now with the latest on both areas. Governor Greg Abbott says he expanded state disaster declaration from eighteen to fifty four counties this weekend rain will be focused over del Texas and that early to mid next week. Another more organized round rain is expected to move through the states with heavy rain potential as well as few strong storms. Meantime, the death toll from hurricane Michael stands at thirty five. And most of those deaths are in Florida. The worst of the storm hit in Panama City, and the two major hospitals. There are still not admitting patients only services are available at either facility deputies in bay county have arrested at least ten people suspected of looting in the area in Callaway. Aaron Guthrie had her. These things taken and Victoria Smith said someone took her purse from her hands while she was sleeping.

Governor Greg Abbott Wendy King Florida Texas Hurricane Michael Michael Usa Aaron Guthrie Victoria Smith Panama City Callaway Bay County
Hurricane Michael Death Toll Rises to 35

The WB Show

00:51 sec | 4 years ago

Hurricane Michael Death Toll Rises to 35

"The death toll from hurricane. Michael is up to thirty five. The latest body found yesterday in Gulf county a man who was killed while clearing debris and a tree fell on his tractor.

Gulf County Michael
A week after Hurricane Michael hit, more misery

The Ray Lucia Show

00:53 sec | 4 years ago

A week after Hurricane Michael hit, more misery

"On the aftermath of hurricane. Michael USA radio's Wendy king on her cousin Aaron Guthrie whose home destroyed near Tyndall air force base in Florida when the storm hit Erin her husband and two young kids went to stay in Tallahassee with their mom, Mandy. She tells me after the storm the to see their home and found people had looted their things. Yes. They were looted people's stole their television. There's a lot of looting going on there. Most of the town is destroyed. Roy. She says even the babies things are taken and they have to start from scratch the kids. My grandchildren are two years old and four months old. They have lost their homes. They lost a lot of their possessions right now, the four of them are crammed into my living almond just on enough space to help Erin and her family. You can go to the Facebook fundraiser for Amanda sparks Smith in Tallahassee for USA

Erin Tallahassee Mandy Amanda Sparks Smith Aaron Guthrie Tyndall Michael Usa Facebook Wendy King Florida ROY Four Months Two Years