37 Burst results for "Hurricane Katrina"

Fresh update on "hurricane katrina" discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

00:33 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hurricane katrina" discussed on Environment: NPR

"More climate migration. Well this is interesting. And it's the right question. What do we have in place for. Climate change and i was honored to be invited to the white house. To a conversation with fema into clear this was during the obama administration right yeah specifically about our preparedness and resiliency but the fema administrator said. I understand what you're saying. But the femur regulations aren't meant for the most vulnerable communities. The disaster process of this country are meant for the middle class. Wait they're meant for the middle class if you think about it and it sounds strange right your heart like that can't be true except the truth of it is is that all of the laws in this country are meant for the middle class. At best there is a large swath of who are never included. This was an honest comment from the head of fema. This is what you realize when you recognize that the structures that are in place right now are absolutely not meant for me and so if we're going to survive this we're going to have to figure some things out for ourselves while we go through the process of saving our democracy and shifting our laws structures by the end of the next century. It's predicted that. More than hundred and eighty million people will be displaced due to climate change and in south louisiana. Those who can afford to do so are already moving. Their moving because south louisiana is losing land at one of the fastest rates on the planet must start preparing for global migration today this will cause rounds of climate gentrification climate gentrification that happens in anticipation of sea level. Rise is what we're seeing in places like miami where communities that were kept from the waterfront are now being priced out of the high ground where they were placed originally as people move away from the coast and climate migration is just one small part. But it's gonna have ripple effects in both coastal cities and cities in the interior. So what do we do. We must reframe frame our understanding of the problem. Climate change is not the problem. Climate change is the most horrible symptom of an economic system that has been built for a few to extract every precious value out of this planet and its people to survive this next phase of our human existence. We will need to restructure our social and economic systems to develop our collective resilience. Glenn i mean on a day-to-day basis. What does that look like for you. How do you keep up this energy. Yeah you know. I have over the last couple of years called into my life. I'm more spiritual approach to my work. So it's an honor now used to be a duty and now i see it as an honor. This work will make me hate the water or even fear. It and that is absolutely not who i am or where i come from. It would even make me this place right and hate people and that is also not who i'm from. We are not people who who are energized by hatred. I come from people who are energized by joy. And we're real real loud just like that swamp all those crickets and all you can. You can hear us. You can smell as you can. You can come join us anytime. That's who i come from. And i was losing it and so i have been on a spiritual journey. We're running a sacred water damage right now with black native women to heal the relationships of native black folks with each other and to heal the relationship of humanity with our water with our earth. We are literally doing a pilgrimage down the mississippi river for the next seven months to make sure that we advanced this not using legislation not even using technology using traditional ecological knowledge and cultural traditions to advance our relationships with one another and our understanding of this planet and the water that she holds which is our life the sacred waters pilgrimage. What what exactly happens on this you tell me more about it. So we pray Black and made of women into spirit boats are invited to join the pilgrimage. And we come together and we developed collective ceremony using african tradition and native traditions. We started juneteenth up the headwaters in minnesota. Interestingly enough the state where george floyd was killed. This was planned last year in july by the way a water called to that play. Wow and so the prayers that were offered when not just that we heal our relationship with this earth but it was that we humans hill our relationship with one another and that is a place full of pain. You can feel it as soon as you arrive. And so we come together we pray. We think we honor each other. We have courageous conversation about our histories with one. Another and colonizing forces had black folks do the native folks and what colonizing forces had made folks do to black folks and we ask for reconciliation and forgiveness because we know that if the the victims of the original sins of this country get together and form a united front. We can actually change this country. That's collect p sean battle. She's the executive director of the gulf coast center for law and policy in louisiana. You can see her. Full talk at ted dot com on the show. Today we're revisiting powerful conversations with black americans who have big ideas on how to confront our past and build a better future. I'm newsom roti. And you're listening to the ted radio hour from npr..

Louisiana Glenn Minnesota George Floyd Last Year South Louisiana Miami Mississippi River Today July Fema Earth More Than Hundred And Eighty M White House One Small Part African Barack Obama Black
Fresh update on "hurricane katrina" discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

01:36 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hurricane katrina" discussed on Environment: NPR

"Last fall we did an episode about our relationship with water and for some people. That relationship is with the water they drink but for others. It's the water that surrounds them. The by you is green and lush and all of the things that equal a full life but it is also watery and money. You can smell everything you can smell. When something has died you can smell. When something is newly bloomed. The swamp is very noisy. It's never quiet full of everything but if you had to live there your whole life you would have everything you needed. This is colette keyshawn battle. She was born and raised in southern louisiana and grew up in the middle of all of those smells. And sounds yeah. I grew up in by liberty. Just north of new orleans in the by you. I live in the house where my mother was born. My grandfather built. I lived on the land that has been my family for generations even before it was america. Colette is an attorney. She practiced law for years. But these days she's taken on another role. Climate activists now not a title. I would have given myself not a title. I would have preferred got. I'll take it whatever works. Chill take it because she feels like she doesn't have a choice. Rising sea levels and storms are constantly threatening. The land that collects family has lived on for generations. I work at the community level to make sure that black folks and poor folks and native folks are proud of this climate movement for let that means bringing her neighbors into the policy conversations sharing the science around global warming and making sure that they contribute their knowledge to because this community understands the ebb and flow of the water at her than anyone. Our livelihood and our life was absolutely with water every day and in the spring which most folks understand hurricane season. That is where we really had to start paying attention so you would hear people talking about how much rain they got. How far the flooding go up. But it was. It wasn't a panic. It was more information on. And i can remember as a child during hurricanes. The hurricane has three portions to it. It's the sort of outer wall. The i and then the next wall and as a kid when the i would pass so that was always when you have several hours of open clear sky clear air and you could go check on things and i remember it being so much fun to go out in the eye of the storm to go check on folks. Isn't that crazy get in. We call them p. room and a flat bottom boat. You get an a. P. role go down the street. Make sure folks will take. It was just enough time to go make sure. No one had a tree in their room for needed help. And then you would go back in and you would wait for that other band to go across. And it wasn't a terrible existence. It was just one where you had to have traditional knowledge coupled with your reality in order to survive nature was somewhat predictable but all that changed in two thousand and five when those weather patterns shifted the real moment of noticing. That change was katrina. The water became unrecognizable as the storm ripped through and then scattered. let's community. I mean they were all over and we finally got a number two folks to call in at one time we got to hear what was going on or what had happened to what folks had left and we start with our. Va with our old people. And the first words out of their mouths where the water has never been this high. That is when i started learning about the loss of our barrier islands oil and gas drilling and so the things that protected us weren't there anymore and the fee level is higher and so the drastic and dramatic changes was noticeable and evidence to everyone. In at the time you weren't home right. You had left louisiana. You were practicing law in dc but then you dropped everything and changed your career. It was a crack in the universe to come home and see the destruction of katrina and it was in that moment that i said i was never leaving home again. You see that kind of destruction and your life will change whether you want it to or not. That was my moment of career change. I was going to have to take a much different advocacy role not standing in front of a court pointing to particular pieces of of law but instead standing in front of my community and convince them of what i knew deep in my heart which was that climate change was going to come after all of us and that it was gonna take what we love. The most were were from a couple years after katrina. Colette and her community realized that hurricanes of this magnitude were here to stay and that might mean that they needed to go. She picks up the story from the ted stage. Who's about two years after. Hurricane katrina that. I i saw louisiana flood maps. These flood maps are used to show land loss in the past and loss. That is to come on this particular day at a community meeting. I volunteered to interact with the graphics. On the long and in an instant my life change for the second time in two years the graphics showed massive land loss but more specifically the graphic showed the disappearance of my community and many other communities for the end of the century i was standing there with other members of south louisiana 's communities black native poor. We thought we were just bound by temporary disaster recovery but we found that we were now bound by the impossible task of ensuring that our communities would not be raced due to climate change. I just assumed it would always be there. Land trees by us. I just assumed that it would be there. As it had been for thousands of years i was wrong. I mean it's so upsetting knowing what you know now like what happens if there is another katrina. How does it work. where do people go. There is another katrina on the way. We can't start from any other premise. The mass displacement that comes with a hurricane like katrina is unbelievable. The first wave is people. Who are i would say in the working class folks who have a car and the ability to leave. There's another wave of displacement. That comes with sort of mandatory evacuations. So whatever a city has to get the poorest people out and those folks are often given one way tickets to a place. They've never heard of and the third round of displacement is probably the most heartbreaking for me which is if you are a parent with a small child or an elderly person with condition. You now have to go somewhere safe. And you end up shifting residents now because you want to but because the structures and conditions that you need to have your life aren't here. There were no hospitals. There were no schools and so you can't fault people for leaving but when those that third group of people leave they leave for a very long time if not for good but it's not like these things aren't foreseeable right. I mean how prepared are government agencies like fema for future with more natural disasters which means.

Colette Two Years Last Fall America Five Thousands Of Years South Louisiana Two Folks Two Thousand Southern Louisiana Second Time First Wave Fema One Time First Words One Way Tickets ONE Third Round Louisiana Third Group
Big Freedia "Queen of Bounce"

Q

12:19 min | 2 months ago

Big Freedia "Queen of Bounce"

"On stage in front of a sweaty crowd of people pushed together dress their best remember? Beginning crowds of people with other sweaty people and being dressed your best and not just wearing pajamas all the time. Bounce music is party music and big Frida will she's the Queen abounds. It's a sub genre hip hop that originated in New Orleans, where big Frieda is from people lose their minds when they see big freedom perform. She wraps torques and she Wants you to both rap and torque. Big Frieda has had a busy year despite the pandemic. Last time we spoke on cue, she had just released new music. She was hosting Friday night shakedown parties and a cooking show. And now she's got a new holiday deep and her 2015 memoir, God, Save the Queen Diva. Is out in paperback. I got up with Big Frieda over Zoom, and she started off by explaining what it is that she loves that she adores about bounce music. I mean, I love my crowd. First and foremost, I love the culture of bounce music. I love the origin way comes from my love The people that love the music. The sound the base the boom, they're not, You know, I love everything about it. It's You know is what I know. It's what I grew up listening to is what I enjoy. It is my type of music. What do you think it is that the audience gets out of it. Like when? What do you think that when people watch you and your dancers go like what do you think they get out of it? Well, A lot of people have told me over and over that it's like a bounce revival. You know, like they some type of spirit comes within them. And they, you know, they let their self loose and they lay their hair down and they party and they have a good time. I'm so happy you said about survival. I want to play this. Take a listen. Please don't harm being faces. Either room killers all read in about a minute Walk, Walk, walk, walk up in the room maker maker becoming a man's globules. No one's reading you. That is my guest. Big freedom. Performing the title track offer latest Keep Louder, which came out earlier this year featuring I kind of pop. So Bounce revival you in this in the video for that there's bounce and there's gospel music, So let's just let's just get their facts straight here. You started out in the church right in church choir. Did. I started out Very young in church. Um, I later became a choir director and my church home at my high school. I had my own choir somewhere Many quiet around New Orleans traveled the world with a choir. So yes, started in gospel music, and then you had to make a decision right between bounce and gospel. Well, at some point, I'd be it. You know, One sound. I started to get heavier. And so the bounce music and things kind of started to take off for me. I kind of have to make a decision. Yeah, but that was that a hard call. Itwas. It was very hard. Um, you know, I talk to a few people. First. I talked to my mom and then I talked to a few people at the church. I talked to my godmother, Georgia who's in the book. Um, you know about the situation and about what was going on in my life in these transitions, and yeah, it was a hard call. And, you know, my mom always said no matter what, long as you keep God first and everything that you do, I think you'll be okay and that stuck with me and I made my decision right? You're right, because it's not just a matter of like, I don't have a lot of time. Like I have. I have to get me That's part of it. But it's also sort of a spiritual decision, you know? Yeah, it is. You know, I was tossing and turning, you know, while making the decision off, you know, going into over crossing over to bounce music, but I never lost my faith. And I never lost my hope. And I never lost my love for gospel music. Still listen to it all the time. I still you know, Go back and saying what the quiet when we have unions, so I'm still you know, I'm still connected. And And you know, the building is the is just the place and I still have church in. They must love to see you when you come in to sing with the choir again. Oh, yeah, it be like old times. You know, we'd be all happy to see each other, You know, And then I go back into a whole nother person. I'm not freedom. When I go to church, you know, it's like I go back to when I was growing up and where my roots come from, so It brings me back in the aisle. I love to be reminded of where I come from. Well, let's let's bring it back to what you said earlier about about survival. What similarities? You see between bounce and gospel? Well, um, I see a lot of singularities first. I see that, you know, is a gathering of people and then You know, there's something that come over them. You know when they're at abound. Show that something that comes over them when they're at church. I'm also still directing. I'm directing. When I was directing in church. I will open my hands and people will, you know, saying now one pointing my finger and people shaking ass is so it has a lot of similarities. Still, you know, I feel still like, feel kind of feel like the director when I'm on stage. Yeah, The The intention in the process is the same. The result is a tiny bit different. I get it. Yeah. Most most of the time for church, people falling on pews. And, uh, you know, when I'm at abound, shield they're they're falling out with their ass is My guest is my guest is big Frieda. Another thing that struck me in your book, and you mentioned this. Just that actually was how strong your relationship was with your mom. Um, I know I know your mom since past I'm really sorry for your loss, and I I could only imagine what it would have lost. That must be because you get the feeling that your mom just gave you unwavering support. And you tell this story. I was hoping you might tell about the principle. Call in home on you and your mom having to stick up for you know what he well, you know, I always had issues when they came to my hair. And what do you mean? I always wanted to wear my hair all type of ways and exotic and you know hi to the feeling and there's one particular time I had went to school with a foul. That was kind of high like Marge Simpson, You know that high of a style. And the principal was just not happy. When I walked in school. He was just very much not happy. He called my mom right away. He was fun family, and he, you know, cousin. And my mom went to the school and put him right in his place and said that the Children should be worried about their education and not worried about my child's here. So she told him just the two bit where to get off at, But she always defended me. No matter what. She was my queen. She was my rock. She was my biggest cheerleader. And when I told my mom at an early age that I knew that I was gay, she said that she already knew and that she loved me for who I am. So once I had the support of my mom Um, I didn't need approval from anybody else in the world. So my life really begin at that point off, starting to make my own decisions and feeling really finding out who I was and finding my truth. There. I don't need to tell you. There are parents who would not be a supportive right? Oh, yeah, Most definitely. I had friends who Mom was not supported. That wasn't having it that you know, they couldn't do the things that idea or they couldn't go to places I went or, you know they couldn't be themselves. You know, I don't with that growing up as well. A lot of my friends around me had issues at home that they were fighting. And they will come from me and my mom as the outlet. She was the cool, mama. She must be still with you, You know? She's my guarding an angel. She walks inside of me every day. She's in. She's still within me, and she helps to protect and make things happen for me. If you're just tuning in, my guess is Big Frieda. She's known as Queen of Bounce. Her memoir is out now in paperback. It's called God Save the Queen Diva. You've been talking a lot about bounce you've been talking about, you know, keeping going during some of these dark moments, and in the book, you talk about it particularly dark moment You get pretty candid about Hurricane Katrina. You were with your siblings when it struck. Your niece was with you. Who was just a little baby. Can you tell me a little bit about that story? You know, Katrina was really rough in life changing for all of us. You know, we had to be evacuated by boat. Um, you know, we have to cut a hole in the roof to try to get your rescues to even see us who kept flying over us and picking up neighbors, right? Um, next door to us. So we had some really trying times We slept on the bridge. We slept at the convention center for a few days. We went on a cargo plane and got dropped off at an army camp base. What? Then we slept. Yeah, there we slept at a warming campgrounds. Then we went to ST or then we went to the class Louisiana. Then we went. I went to Houston. Then I moved back to New Orleans. So my life was in a really Um, it was a roller coaster, and it was, um Roller coaster of emotions and moving and restructure in my life and finding out where I was going to live, you know, along with my family and I think often Katrina, though, because it gave people a chance to start their lives over, especially if your life was in shambles, or you needed a new start. But for me it also let me know that material. Things don't mean anything long as you could survive and have your life you can get through anything and all that other stuff can be brought again. But you can't buy your life again. And that was the most important for me with survival moments for me and my family to survive during those times, and a lot of times we take tragedies for for granted when we see things on on TV and on the news and on, you know, on the radio. But After experiencing country Noah. I took everything that I saw into account and I felt the pain of those people and what they went through and whatever catastrophic disaster death he had, But Katrina was definitely life changing for New Orleans. On. We're still recovering each day. I don't want to, in any way imply that it was good. I don't want to, in any way imply that it was Ah, anyway. Good thing. It was absolutely devastating thing that happened her Katrina, But like do you think That you'd be Where you are today if you hadn't survive something like that. Not at all. You know, even surviving it. You know, it also put The sound of bounce music even further because we were displaced all over the world, and people started to want to know what's that music? What type of music is that? Can you teach me the dances? You know we were. We were all over the world. They had a little New Orleans all over the world, And when those New Orleans people were displaced, they wanted to listen to their type of music. And it was New Orleans bounce so people in Houston and Atlanta and you know, everywhere we were man. What is that music, you know? Teach me that. Show me that. And I thought if the travel all over people started requesting me And when I got to the different clubs and in venues, it was like Michael Jackson or Prince had a ride because the people were screaming and holiday and like running up to me, like, Oh, my God, I can't believe you here, you know, but it was felt. Like a sense of home and I wanted to bring some joy into those people like that was going through some stuff and I was still trying to bring joy in my own life, so it felt good to go around and see people of New Orleans. And how they missed the culture and how they missed the music. So the music really started to spray it and got me even further. Are you cool with that? Are you cool? When when? When

Big Frieda New Orleans Frieda Frida Katrina Marge Simpson Georgia Hurricane Katrina Houston Louisiana ST Noah Atlanta Michael Jackson Prince
Tropical Storm Epsilon strengthens, could become hurricane

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Tropical Storm Epsilon strengthens, could become hurricane

"Storm Epsilon is formed now over the Atlantic, and forecasters say the system is slated to be at or near hurricane strength in a matter of days. Here's correspondent Jim Ryan Absalon did gather some strength overnight, but it's top sustained winds. They're still only about 45 MPH. Federal forecasters expected to continue its slow walk to the East Northeast and to be at or above Category one hurricane status when it approaches Bermuda later in the week behind Absalon anew disturbance is formed in the Caribbean. Well, it's expected to bring heavy rain to Cuba. It has only a slight chance of becoming the next tropical depression. Absalon is the 26 names storm of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, which could become even more active than 2005. That's when there were 28, including both Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricane season does not end until November 30th

Jim Ryan Absalon Hurricane Atlantic Cuba East Northeast Katrina Bermuda Caribbean
Depression, anxiety spike amid outbreak and turbulent times

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:38 min | 6 months ago

Depression, anxiety spike amid outbreak and turbulent times

"Of Americans may be experiencing symptoms of depression during the pandemic. That's a rate higher than during large scale traumas like 9 11 and Hurricane Katrina. From no more Now we're joined Live on the KCBS Ring. Central News Line. By Kathryn Dettman Study author with Boston University School of Public Health. Thanks so much for being with us this afternoon. Thank you for having me, Marty. Well, first. How did you tally these very high rates. Sure. So we found that one quarter of Americans reported depression. And as you know, this represented a threefold increase over what it was before Cove it and third that people with fewer resources were the ones who are more likely to have depression. So who are the people most impacted by depression symptoms and what are these Depression symptoms? So, for example, people with lower income were twice as likely to have depression and among people with the same income but who had left than 5000 and family savings. They were 1.5 times more likely to have depression. How is this different from 9 11 and Hurricane Katrina? These rates are higher than what we have seen in the general population after other large scale trauma like September 11, Turkey and Katrina and the Hong Kong unrest. For example, After September 11th in Manhattan, we found around a 10% prevalence of reported depression symptoms. This is much higher than what we have seen after other traumas.

Depression Hurricane Katrina Kcbs Ring Katrina Boston University School Of Pu Kathryn Dettman Hong Kong Turkey Marty Manhattan
Impact Of Climate Policy On 2020 Presidential Election

Environment: NPR

04:11 min | 6 months ago

Impact Of Climate Policy On 2020 Presidential Election

"On the most recent Pew Research Survey of top issues for voters this year climate change despite even make the top ten. But not for Varsity precaut-, she's executive director of the Environmental Justice Groups Sunrise Movement. She helped editor book called winning the Green New Deal and her organization gave, Joe. Biden's initial climate platform, an f rating but as Biden became the likely democratic. Nominee for president precaut-. Joined his climate change task force to make sure aggressive climate policy had a place on the ballot this year when we spoke earlier today, I asked her about how you seen his climate policy shift while she's been helping shape it. We have seen his client plan improve considerably over the last three months now, championing policies to decarbonised our power. Sector by twenty, thirty, five, we've seen him increase the level of investment from a one point, seven trillion dollar green jobs and infrastructure plan to a two trillion dollar plan over the next four years on the whole our core goal was to go in and increase Joe Biden's ambition and the Taiwan upon which these benchmarks are happening to decarbonised economy and ensure that. Environmental Justice and climate justice except core and at the heart of his agenda climate seems to have fallen out of the headlines Lately. That's even with record breaking heat fires hurricanes. Instead, the news is dominated by pandemic and economic collapse racial justice. What's your level of concern that climate change may not be getting sufficient political attention and and how do you get that attention? I think the key here is to understand the climate crisis is essentially connected to every single one of crises that are emerging whether it is the uprisings against white supremacy or whether it is the tens of millions of jobs that are been lost in this economic downturn in large part I believe the climate crisis is even thinking because we have racial and economic inequality in this country for example, I believe that after hurricane. Katrina. We would've had a green new deal past fifteen years ago and yet here we are. Fifteen years later, we've got a double header storm and communities engulfs out. That are still suffering We would have had green new deal following hurricane. Maria when thousands more were ricans perished but because we do not value black lives and brown lives, indigenous lives, poor lives as much as others, we have not taken the drastic unnecessary measures to prevent suffering. Do you think climate plays out in local political races as well or do voters think of it mostly as something that has to be addressed on a national issue? Now, I think it absolutely plays out at the local level. The climate crisis take so many different forms in different communities in Iowa overseeing the role that corporate agriculture and factory farming plays as being really detrimental to communities for Detroit. The level of fuel infrastructure contributing to asthma and disease for the majority black community. Earlier, we have seen the election of drama. Or Eliot Angle in New York which Jamal Boom and actively ran and champions agree new deal when his opponent refused to do. So the climate crisis is affecting people at the local and state level not chest. Politics. So, have you thought ahead to if president trump is reelected? What will you approach be to try to advance your climate goals with a presidential administration that may be less receptive Joe Biden would have been. We're still figuring that out. What I'll say is everything that has happened with the green new deal at the federal level and many of the substantive state legislative battles that have been one have been under the shadow of the trump administration, and so I do believe that there is absolutely still space to fight and contests and win, but it will be far far easier. If we have item presidency, Vaujany precaut- is Executive Director of the Sunrise Movement and her new book is called winning the green new deal partially, thanks for coming on the program. Thank you so much

Joe Biden Executive Director Environmental Justice Groups S President Precaut Vaujany Precaut Taiwan Maria Sunrise Movement Katrina Asthma Iowa Donald Trump Editor President Trump Eliot Angle New York Jamal Boom
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:53 min | 6 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Award, winning author of the Yellow House now Andy and Sarah, of course. Sarah you mentioned this earlier cannot go. We cannot escape notice that we're having this conversation as another hurricane. Has recently made landfall in the region. So let's listen to a little bit about what happened just over the past several days. When I first. Got Out of the bunker after the storm, I expected the roof damage I mean I expected to see some? Some flooding some some trees in the road we saw that we saw powerline but I didn't expect to see was there were literal literal entire buildings that had been blown apart. There were facades of brick buildings that have been around for a hundred years that were blown down. I mean I was really I was really blown away by by the devastation that some of these buildings it was pretty intense. So. That's Nick Hunter Mayor of Lake Charles. Louisiana he was on the today show recounting the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Laura. So joining us. Now from New Orleans is Jarvis to bury he's editor of the Louisiana. In two thousand five, he was on the team of the Times. Picayune. Journalists who were awarded the Pulitzer. Prize for their coverage of Katrina. Jarvis welcome to the show. Thank you for having me Magna. Appreciate it. So. First of all, tell us a little bit about. The immediate aftermath of Laura. it's pretty destructive, and then people are are really suffering last Friday. The Department of Health announced that Ten or eleven hospitals in southwest. Louisiana, it had to evacuate.

Jarvis Louisiana Hurricane Laura Sarah Yellow House powerline Department of Health Lake Charles Nick Hunter Picayune Andy New Orleans Katrina Laura.
President Trump Visits Areas Hardest Hit By Hurricane Laura

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

President Trump Visits Areas Hardest Hit By Hurricane Laura

"Trump toward parts of Louisiana and Texas cleaning up from Hurricane Laura on the 15th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina hitting southeast Louisiana President Donald Trump toward the devastation from Hurricane Laura in southwest Louisiana met some people that have been absolutely devastated. This was a tremendously powerful storm. In fact, when it came in, it was actually much bigger than Katrina. I would say Katrina being somewhat of a landmark think in terms of devastation, but this had more power. This was almost coming in at a five Katrina was a Category three when it hit Dave Cohen for CBS News New Orleans. Joe

Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Laura Katrina Donald Trump Louisiana Southwest Louisiana Dave Cohen New Orleans President Trump CBS JOE Texas
Remembering Hurricane Katrina 15 years later

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

Remembering Hurricane Katrina 15 years later

"Is Jim Crow Sula reports. Even now, 15 years later, those who experienced Katrina including Biloxi, Mississippi resident Laurie Cueva, Rosetti, our emotional as they look back. I just knew that a lot of people had died, and we could do anything. Wendell Fraser's home in New Orleans ninth Ward was inundated what a levee was. Aged. We still have vegetables as you walk through the neighborhoods and look around and see what you remember. Free Katrina Katrina claimed over 1200 lives and caused $125 billion in damage, and Louisiana and Mississippi Jim Krystle is CBS News Hurricane forecasters are watching to tropical waves, now one in the

Katrina Katrina Jim Crow Sula Mississippi Jim Krystle Laurie Cueva Wendell Fraser Rosetti Biloxi New Orleans Hurricane CBS Louisiana
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

1A

07:39 min | 6 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

"Love always win. Love always way. Post are billy porter on love race church and an emmy nomination. Listen now to the it's been a minute podcast from NPR. Let's get back to our commemoration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina joining me now is former New Orleans mayor Mich. Landrieu. He served as mayor from twenty ten to twenty eighteen. He's also author of in the shadow of statues. A White Southerner Confronts History Mayor Landry. Welcome back to one A.. Thank you so much. And also with us as actor and comedian Harry Shearer sheer is a longtime resident of new. Orleans. And Creator of the big uneasy a two thousand, ten documentary on the Fault of the Army Corps of Engineers during Hurricane Katrina Harry. Thanks for being here today. Thank you. Good to be with you. Some are landry you became mayor in two thousand ten while the city was very much still in recovery mode. What was your biggest mission going in? I was a little ten of governor to stay when Katrina hit New Orleans had a hard time getting his feet underneath it for a couple years when I took office. We had already Haiku Trina read a bike who saw the nationalist session we had just suffered the BP oil spill the city was fun version bankruptcy and not a whole lot of rebuilding actually gotten done. miraculously though I mean everybody in the city started pulling in the same direction. and we started rebuilding the city but you know the idea was not to put it back like it was. It was to try to figure out what had been broken, why it was broken, what was structurally wrong, and then trying to do a deep dive with very limited resources very limited time, very limited patience and hot structurally rebuild the city so that it can survive. For Very Long period of time you know people forget about the Trina is that it was not a a a weather problem disaster as big as that on was it was a man made engineering failure and that is one of the things that we have to continue to concentrate on as we go forward. Well, here he created a documentary the big uneasy about the Army Corp engineers responsibilities to the city of New Orleans. Do you think they've made the necessary changes to to see something like this doesn't happen again? I don't think the basic view of the Army Corps and how it views its mission has changed. No it's important to remember not one individual at the Army Corps of Engineers. Lost so much as a parking space for being involved in the near destruction of a major. American, and world. Treasure city. They just went to Congress got fourteen billion dollars and got told do it better this time? I think that what they failed to learn and I don't think they're equipped to learn is that there is another way to deal with all these problems and to engage in what they envision. As their mission a war on water. When I came to New Orleans, there were all these structures. Never saw what they were they were. The walls of these three outfall canals. The Army Corps decided to hide them from view. Normally in cities, view of water is a good thing. It adds the property values, but there they they were conducting a war and and so that was their view of that situation. Early after the the flooding. Local architect in New Orleans began conducting something called the Dutch dialogues bringing Dutch engineers and Dutch city planners to help us learn the lessons they had already learned. You can't win a war on water. You have to build a modern city to learn to live with water enjoy its features during the good times have be able to drain successfully and flood up during the bad times. There's a little test project in the Gentilly neighborhood of New Orleans, which is trying to put into practice some of those Tenants of the Dutch the new Dutch way of dealing with water and we were watching that experiment. Would that it had Taken root in more of the city than it already has by the core. followed. Age Old. Practice of trying to conduct a war and water in building the new system and their their little problems with the new system as well. I want to say though that the thing that I found most moving about the recovery was the fact that it wasn't a you know there were talks early on about big plans the former mayor mayor receded Mayor Landrieu with talking about. Building a whole new a row of of casinos in the middle of the city a what happened in fact was every single person who came back used their own resources. What few resources they could get from the government in the case of a road home payments to rebuild their their own home and rebuild our own businesses one at a time, it was a grass roots recovery. Built by the people who loved the city enough to engage in it. Merely Andrew, what's the main thing you want to see from the federal government now when it comes to disaster aid in Louisiana especially since hurricane hit the coast, a couple things First of all, you can if you just take a minute and breathe and and in this moment, that's hard to breathe in. And you take a a historical view or forty thousand foot view and you know this move not responded well to pandemic, which we should have foreseen should've been prepared for. That we knew that there was going to be a hurricane season coming. We knew when the pandemic started. We are seeing a racial reckoning that has been a long time in coming One of the things we have to do in this country is is think about the design of the country and how things got where they are a tendency is to say immediately after the storm, you know how did everybody get their? Well, the idea of building back the way it was supposed to be. Right. The first time forces you to do a very, very deep dive and to look at yourself and say, you know where mistakes now Harry who's been a great wonderful citizens advocate in New Orleans in Harry. Thank you. You work basically said that. From the New Orleans is exception and the country's desire to Worley provide economic growth and development because of this proximity to the river. Has had a philosophy of living which is to keep the water out our entire sewage and drainage water system is designed with big pumps to push the war out. The Dutch of taught us how maybe that's upside down. Maybe what you need to do is let the water in. So massive systems redesigns like that. Take a Lotta time a lot of money a lot of courage. The same thing is true about how we grow our indigenous cultures the New Orleans is in so many ways the soul of America and in off for everything to work well a when it can work well both the federal state and local governments. In partnership with community organizations and small businesses and individuals and churches have to all come together and put their resources in a focused and thoughtful way in a design that actually produces a good was all. That's the forty thousand foot view. Basically, right now, the federal government has been absent this idea that somehow. Poor cities like New Orleans and then many of us can somehow take care of themselves when a massive storm like Lori Hits is just insane it's just not so and so I..

New Orleans Mayor Landry Army Corps of Engineers Hurricane Katrina Army Corps federal government Landrieu Harry Shearer billy porter emmy NPR Army Corp Katrina Gentilly Congress Harry America Lori Hits
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:57 min | 6 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

"Now with Cologne virus. The history is happening and to comment to say that the government has failed at this point. It is premature because it's still happening. So how ever that said I do feel like this is deja Vu. because. This time because I'm married to a numbers guy and my husband numbers guy both fifteen years ago and and doing Colona virus saw these events coming and told me to pay a fifteen years ago a pack for three weeks. Put me in a great. Great. We're not great but a relatively secure place to what the disaster unfold and then watch the response. Fast forward to now, while everyone else was Mardi Gras, I was costco buying towel paper and medicine. And stocking up so I was in a relatively secure place watching the disaster on fold and then watching the government respond. But again, it's a little bit too soon to judge the government whether it's failed or not. Since it's still going on Wendy brawls still dealing with corona virus. Meanwhile, there are other disasters, natural disaster hitting several parts of the country pretty hard that wildfires in California to hurricanes and the Gulf coast this week. What do you think the trump administration has learned from the pandemic that could help us with disaster preparedness going forward. Nothing? I mean I'm. I my perspective is a little different from sandy surveys. Hundreds of thousands of people who've died preventable deaths. The economic collapse that we're in the throes of the just suffering that is endemic across the country and I just see a horrific failure that you know even if everything magic we started going right from now this would be a period of great shame and terror in the US history and you know the the part that resonates with me from what? Sandy said is that I do think that new Orleanians greet this moment with something with less surprise perhaps than others did there was a instinct in two thousand five to seek train as something that could only happen sort of out in one exceptional exotic city you know sort of on the margins of American Life But now as we go through that dystopia litany that you just offered fire pandemic floods everywhere, Katrina seems much less like an isolated incident horse some exception than you know terrifying to say kind of a harbinger for what twenty-first-century America is. My guests have been any Hurwitz. He's an assistant professor of history at Tulane University and author of Katrina History. Nineteen fifteen to twenty fifteen and Sandy Rosenthal she's the founder. Of Levies Dot. Org In her new book is called whispered in water why the levees broke in Hurricane Katrina thanks to you both. Coming up took awhile. But.

Sandy Rosenthal Hurricane Katrina Mardi Gras costco Hurwitz deja Vu. Katrina US California assistant professor of history Gulf coast Tulane University Orleanians America
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:25 min | 6 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

"Be should be made more available and I definitely do discuss that in my book in Andy Yearbook is called Katrina History Nineteen fifteen to twenty fifteen. Why does the history of Hurricane Katrina span this one hundred year period? The reason I started the book in Nineteen fifteen is that there was an enormous hurricane that made landfall. Louisiana. Then it was probably the most powerful hurricane to make landfall in Louisiana until Laura and this it arrived in Nineteen fifteen just as the city had finished construction on what was then a state of the art massive drainage system for two hundred years the city had been in existence until nineteen fifteen people generally lived on the high ground right near the Mississippi River and the rest of the city was basically uninhabitable. When the storm came in Nineteen fifteen, it did cause some flooding, some people died but basically, engineers and city planners believed that the city had passed a defining test the headline in the newspaper. The next day was the record shows that New Orleans is storm proof that it's drainage system works, and so the city began to expand into lower lying areas. If you fast forward to two thousand five and trace the outline of the flood that occurred when those levees collapsed, what's left around that tracing the city as it stood at nine, hundred and fifteen. So it wasn't as many people imagine you know exclusively black New Orleans rather than white New Orleans it wasn't poor New Orleans rather than rich New Orleans. It was twentieth century New Orleans that flooded, and that showed me that to make sense of the Katrina disaster I really had to understand the twentieth century history of New Orleans. When you think of what's happening right now I mean Hurricane Laura is still happening. And after studying Katrina for so long what potential red flags to you see In this moment that could get in the way of recovery. One of the things that Katrina history teaches that the water itself often has a much smaller impact on the long term outcomes for people in the face of a disaster. So even though the flood in two, thousand, five washed over the homes of many white people many wealthy people They disproportionately were able to return to the city while poor people and black people were not today in new. Orleans the population is down from two thousand, five around eight, thousand white people. But around ninety, two, thousand black people, and that is a result of policy decisions made after the flood then of the flood itself. So as I watched Laura I'm. Sure that while we're sort of fixated by the spectacle of the wind and rain and water, we need to be very attendant to the sort of policies that we put in place and who those policies are designed to help and who they will not reach. We'll give us an example of of a specific policy that made it more difficult for the. City's residents to rebuild. Well, a very clear one is the case of public housing in New Orleans. There were several thousand units of public housing that were inhabited in two thousand five. Those people who were almost exclusively black had to evacuate as everybody did after the flood and they were never allowed to come home even though those homes were either damaged. At all or could have been easily rehabbed the city and the federal government the Department of Housing and Urban Development use this as an opportunity to realise a long long standing plan to demolish public housing in New Orleans. So that's an example of people black people who were simply dispossessed of their homes as as part of what is called the Katrina recovery. Well Debra emails. Let's be clear. The people affected by Katrina are still suffering. It's deplorable that these people were treated like they didn't exist by country who claims to care about its people. God help them as Laura Hits them yet again, fifteen years later in any. So many of the inequities that we saw after. Hurricane. Katrina were some of the same inequities. We saw forty years prior after hurricane betsy in nineteen, sixty five. Now we have Hurricane Laura. WHA- what are you watching for you expecting to see some of the same dynamics play out today? I am expecting because contrary to what most people think Levy's not a New Orleans phenomenon sixty, two percent of the American population lives in counties that are protected by levees. That's nearly two thirds of the American population lives by levies and what happened to us could happen to them especially since they were built by people. So yes, I watched this with a lot of concern especially since the. Texas and Coastal Louisiana is our counties protected by levees. If anyone would like to see a map of those counties it, there is a map up on the home homepage of my organization's website levies. Dot Org. So yes, I'm very, very watchful. Going on right now, Ron writes on facebook I was deployed to both Katrina and Rita as a coordinator of hundreds of utility workers, restoring power to the areas the dead animals. Beer burial vaults ships in house displaced by the storm surge with something to remember, I've been deployed to many other storms, floods, tornadoes, etc across the US. But my experience in Cameron parish with Rita was the worst widespread damage I witnessed at thirty five year Disaster Response Career Ron. Thanks for that message sent President George W Bush's response to Hurricane Katrina has been widely criticised. How would you compare his handling of that disaster to the federal government is handling a disaster that affects the whole the whole country of the coronavirus pandemic. Well, that that story is still going on you know that history is happening now certainly. Fifteen years ago. As I watched the the flooding disaster unfold, I was able also to watch the failed response and unequivocally. No there was no contest. It is universally agreed upon that the response to Hurricane Katrina and respond to the flooding was inadequate. It was a failed respond now with Cologne virus. The history is happening and to comment to say that the government has failed at this point. It.

New Orleans Katrina Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Laura Laura I Hurricane Louisiana federal government Andy Yearbook Mississippi River Rita Debra US Department of Housing and Urba President George W Bush Texas Coastal Louisiana facebook Cameron parish
The Personal History Of David Copperfield Reviewed

Here & Now

04:36 min | 6 months ago

The Personal History Of David Copperfield Reviewed

"Saw Tomorrow audiences will have a chance to see a new version of Charles Dickens David Copperfield envisioned directed by or Mondo NUCCI. The personal history of David Copperfield features a diverse cast with Dev Patel as David Copperfield, but made his feature film debut in Two Thousand Eight Oscar winning slumdog millionaire. He also starred in both the best exotic marigold hotel movies and was nominated for an Oscar for the twenty sixteen movie lion now in the personal history of David Copperfield Dev Patel plays a young man trying to make his way through Victorian England despite numerous setbacks. He eventually becomes an author with a right turn out to be the hero of my story. Or that station will be held by anybody else. These moments must show. Recently Dead Patel join me via. skype to talk about his role as David Copperfield. I totally missed out on this classic growing up and I was sort of one of those kids that was false fed dickens as a child. In the curriculum and I I mean assist the shame most office I think. But you know for me in particular to be able to step into the shoes I related a lot to David. I think you know to his anxiety to his kind of imposter syndrome about a young man's johnny trying to fit in very much coming of age story and it's only when he can embrace his real truth and his past his own stories I guess that he finds triumph, and in this case, it says a great writer you know. I WANNA play a scene from the film Here your character David Meets Dora played by more fit Carter a young woman whose pet dog JIP starts a conversation with David. Let's listen speaks very well is actually I like to pretend he speaks. Some people think tick. Oh No I do it myself all the time? I I. Poultry. David Copperfield. Being the tree. I'm Dora. Okay. Perhaps, it's not surprising that spoiler alert the two of you fall in love and as we hear you as David have a lot of humor and charm in this film I WanNa ask you a little bit more about the parts of the character that really resonated with you. You said that this character was very much like you thinking about finding your way through life. Yeah I mean he's obviously You can see painfully awkward. And I definitely could key into that I mentioned. But yeah, I guess as a boy growing up in the UK you know from an immigrant family going to school and trying to figure out what part of my identity I should lead you know like. You know there's a kind of very much in Indian. Part of me in a very much a British part of me and you kind of end up role swapping to try and get through turbulent times in school. And that's kind of David he he someone that came from great wealth than lost only tried to get it back again NEC's constantly trying to change the skinny as quite a comedian in that makes him a great novelist. He's this observer that. Uses these his. Ability to impressions to kind of get these easy Lawson get in with the cool guys and not me when I was a kid I was quite the gesture in Mike's loss. Yeah. Yeah. It was kind of a way of just. Not Getting beaten up you know I was never wanted Nicole crew. So I ended up being the coal clown ally would love to see a little videos of death being class. Wow, that sounds so funny. Let's talk a little bit about your career. So you were just eighteen when you start in the Oscar winning film slumdog millionaire what has it been like to build a career after having such huge success at an early age because seventeen when I started that but it was a real blessing and I will I felt so equipped at this some kind of global stage that I was put on you know it was very overwhelming and in a way it made my career and showed even back. Then however many as it was that you know divest stories could resonate on an international scale. Fill most of Zych in another language and that was real movie stars in it and it still gonNA I don't know how many Oscars it did.

David Copperfield David Copperfield Dev Patel David David Meets Dora Oscar Charles Dickens Dev Patel Victorian England Mondo UK Writer Zych Lawson Nicole Crew Carter NEC Mike
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

1A

05:06 min | 6 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

"The climate crisis and there's a certain. Perverse irony to the fact that this storm made landfall at one of the epicenters of the American oil industry they're around Lake Charles, a place that is just full of various kinds of petrochemical refineries. That don't always have a great safety record when it comes to. Protecting the people around them from environmental toxins. So I hope that they make it through this attacked without doing any further damage say did you want to jump in here? I I did want to embellish a bit with Andy, had said What was very disturbing about Hurricane Loa was it sudden change in direction and sudden strengthening within twenty four hours that was very scary and also, but was very much a deja Vu because that is what Hurricane Katrina did fifteen years ago. There was not a single person in this city that has forgotten that we all thought Katrina was going to hit the Florida panhandle two days before it hit and then we all got. Would know all the models have shifted all of them suddenly, and now the storm was heading for New Orleans and I was actually in new. York City and had to fly home board at my house and then get back back out of town. But this sudden strengthening and shifting within twenty four hours very, very frightening. You were living in New Orleans with your husband and your fifteen year old son at the time how were your neighbors responding to the storm? Were they also trying to evacuate? Indeed, the very few people stayed our neighbors we basically, they were elderly and elderly folks can be stubborn. And we them that they needed to leave because they might not be any. Medical help in case the trees were down. But I'm glad you mentioned that because many people stayed in New Orleans to be with their pets at that time. FEMA refused to take pets for evacuation and a lot of people stayed with pets and quite horribly. Perished with their pets. So since then FEMA has changed evacuation rules and now must accommodate families with pets and this is not done for the pet but done for the safety of the families Tracy. wrote on facebook lesson. All disasters are local prepare ahead of time evacuate when advised to but andy evacuation can be complicated for people if they don't have the income to move quickly or they don't necessarily have a place to go explain that a little bit more than how it played out in Katrina. Yeah, you know the the estimate is that something on the order of one hundred, thirty, thousand people remained in New Orleans when Katrina hit in the levees collapsed, and that is roughly the same number of New Orleans who didn't have access to private transportation. So We think, about? People being. Stubborn to leave or having some sort of personal circumstance that prevents them. But it is also the case that being able to get out of town short notice having somewhere to go paying rotel paying for the gas paying for the car. We we think. We don't think often enough about how the government has subsidized a huge evacuation infrastructure for people with cards we've spent all this money to build roads but the public transportation systems are comparatively much weaker and simply failed people in advance. Of Katrina many people unable to leave. We'll. Sandy. Hurricane Katrina meaning the actual storm itself was a natural disaster but the impact of the storm, the flooding, the human suffering was man made and you uncover that in your book whispered words in water tell us about the levees. Yes I'd be happy to do that and I wanted attack on one embellishment to what Andy said about the preparation and actually the evacuation for Hurricane Katrina was the most successful rapid evacuation in the history of the country. However, way too little attention was paid to people without a car. Cards road experience and people Outta town but with real quick. Yes. I'm happy to talk about the levees The reason that I wrote my book is because after Katrina the people of this great city of New Orleans were characterized as irresponsible and a burden on the nation just for the fact that they lived in the city of New Orleans when the levees broke I, felt that it was important to write my book and put it out there that the flooding of New Orleans was caused by mistakes in the levees design and Construction mistakes in the levees that were built by the Army Corps of Engineers and if that were not enough the army corps spent millions fooling the American public and Congress on whose fault the levee breaches belong to and harassed anyone who stood up to them. So I felt that the people of this great city deserved for the real information to be out there in front of the American people and that's where I wrote my book very quickly. was there one moment during your investigation where you realized most of this could have been prevented? Well..

New Orleans Hurricane Katrina Katrina FEMA Andy Hurricane Loa Army Corps of Engineers Lake Charles York City Florida facebook army corps Congress Tracy.
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:36 min | 6 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on 1A

"Certain. It's been fifteen years since hurricane, Katrina ric havoc along the United States, government host today another Hurricane Hurricane Laura tour over the coast. The storm made landfall early this morning as a category four hurricane it was then downgraded to a category to. What we know about Laura's impact is changing fast at least one person has died for the very latest stick with your NPR station and follow updates at NPR dot. Org. As. We look back on Katrina fifteen years later and watch Laura today. What lessons have we learned for future disasters later on the show will shine a light on how far the city of New Orleans. Has Come with former mayor mich, Landrieu and actor and longtime New Orleans Resident Harry Shearer. But first, let's welcome Andy Horowitz. He's an assistant professor of history at Tulane University and author of Katrina a History Nineteen fifteen to twenty fifteen, Andy. Welcome to one A. Thank you for having me and also with us is Sandy Rosenthal. She's the founder of Levies Dot Org and her new book is called words whispered water while the Levees Broken Hurricane Katrina, Sandy, thanks for being with us today. Thank you for inviting me Andy. Can you kick us off by updating us on the latest with this new? Where is Hurricane Laura Right now? I. Last, I checked it somewhere not too far north of Lake Charles in the southwestern part of Louisiana what he things like on the ground right now are there particular areas you're really worried about? Well. You know I've only seen the news reports from Lake Charles. I'm thankfully quite far from there but I know Cameron Parish I, Know Cal cushy parish a little bit and there's just nowhere that is well equipped to stand up to a storm of this size and magnitude. So at this point I'm just hoping that there were not too many people there to see it. Has Been hyperactive hurricane season. It's the first hurricane season on record in which nine tropical storms formed before August and thirteen formed before. September. What's to account for the hyperactivity? Well you know there have always been storms. They've always been large hurricanes in the Gulf coast but the reason that there are more storms and the reason that they are stronger and accelerating much more quickly is a product of the climate crisis and there's a certain. Perverse irony to the fact that this storm made landfall at one of the epicenters of the American oil industry they're around Lake Charles, a place that is just full of various kinds of petrochemical refineries. That don't always have a great safety record when it comes to. Protecting.

Hurricane Hurricane Sandy Rosenthal hurricane Hurricane Laura Hurricane Katrina Lake Charles Andy Horowitz Katrina Laura NPR New Orleans United States Harry Shearer Gulf coast Louisiana Landrieu Tulane University assistant professor of history Cameron
Hurricane Laura Forecast To Bring 'Unsurvivable' Storm Surge

Forum

01:00 min | 6 months ago

Hurricane Laura Forecast To Bring 'Unsurvivable' Storm Surge

"Forecasters Forecasters say say the the impact impact from from Hurricane Hurricane Laura Laura will will be be severe severe when when it it makes makes landfall landfall along along the the U. U. S S Gulf Gulf Coast later tonight. The city of Lake Charles, near the Texas Louisiana border is in the direct path of what is now expected to come ashore as a catastrophic category for Hurricane Rosemary Westwood of member station WWL reports. The area is under an evacuation order. The threats to Lake Charles are multiple and extremely serious storm surge hurricane force winds and possibly days following the storm without electricity, water or sewer services, But Marinich Hunter said Not enough people are leaving ahead of the storms. Early impacts expected later today. We're pleading with them right now to stop the internal debate, stop the waffling and get out of Lake Charles. State officials are comparing the storm to Hurricane Rita. Which devastated the area in 2005, just a month after Hurricane Katrina. Hunter called this his last ditch effort to get the cities roughly 78,000 people out of town.

Hurricane Hurricane Lake Charles Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Rita Marinich Hunter U. U. S S Gulf Gulf Coast Laura Laura WWL Rosemary Westwood Texas Louisiana
Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

Toure Show

03:42 min | 6 months ago

Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

"Tell me about this movie. Why? Why? Why this movie now cutthroat city to War Katrina Shamikh it the trailer is amazing. Tell me about this movie long. Hamas. Start talking about the movie without sandbox La Brother a long time acknowledging your hairstyle. Acknowledging each other's beards. Dante Very Long. I haven't cut anything in a while you have accrediting theater while. If you want to acknowledge you the first two time guest on this show. So I appreciate that Bongbong Quantity without grades I got breaks down so That's how we doing anyway a man's treasure to. Talk to you again but this film right here. This is like our this is me really conti myself down as a filmmaker. Based in New Orleans after. Noted with aftermath, of Hurricane Katrina. You Watch. These four young men who have always asked rations in charge of desperation. And desperation. Lead. US down the rabbit hole. Was We all know? And hopefully, the goal of the for me as a filmmaker is spire. Out The desperation what could be desperation? Trauma Nation. And that's kind of you know. Kind of summarize the. Trying to do here. That's what the film is aiming to show. I know you're a student of film. So what are the films that are most inspiring your vision of this one like it did you make a mood board or at least in your mind you're like I wanna take a piece of this piece of this a piece of this and make it my own like what is what is what are the fathers of this? And it is definitely I'll. Be, honest with you small struggle with no in class struggle as young black men in our neighborhood. Movie You saw the Cina. Right I experienced things that he trauma neighborhood apart unanimity and also experienced myself in A. Good Adelaide. And a lot of not getting out and so when I got screenplay got invite the screenplay was led by my buddy all. Ready. ACCOST Hurricane Katrina was a tragic thing for. Country, you know we have to your anniversary of the right now and it thanks don't seem to change much in this country right? A sense of. How fasteners? Post the black community or the community more, it hurts other communities because see right now the fan denic, right but even if this story was set. In Flint, Michigan would water was bad or Saturday Chicago is south bothers is going through the struggles. Or set right on Staten Island Faulk, hill either either place. Is destroyers relevant but this one is set a Katrina and and these guys may turn to that desperation. It becomes. A high school, it will lead the films that kind of. Inspired like you know like feelings I'll turn to. I think John Singleton Boys Hood was a great example of somebody trying to get out. Get the situation, the neighborhood itself what the situation was under holding a man I thought John Degree Job John. Nash Story. You Go back to F Gary Gray or set it off. You know what I'm. Trying. To figure out, you know

Hurricane Katrina Katrina Hamas Trauma Nation New Orleans Dante John Singleton Gary Gray Hood Staten Island Nash A. Good Adelaide Chicago Michigan Flint
Back-to-back storms expected to hit U.S. next week

Jim Bohannon

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Back-to-back storms expected to hit U.S. next week

"People are bracing for two tropical storms forecast to to hit hit just just two two days days apart. apart. Mississippi Mississippi Governor Governor Tate Tate Reeves Reeves says says that that residents residents need need to to prepare prepare now now one one week week from from today today will will be be the the 15th 15th anniversary anniversary of of Hurricane Hurricane Katrina. Katrina. Getting Getting the the state state of of Mississippi Mississippi and and I I can can tell tell you you with with certainty. certainty. Seven Seven days days out, out, we we had had no no idea idea the the size size and and the the severity severity of of the the storm storm that was about to hit us. And meteorologists expect these storms to reach hurricane strength before they make landfall in the Gulf of Mexico.

Mississippi Mississippi Governor Tate Tate Reeves Reev Katrina Mexico
Nuns agree to turn former convent into flood-prevention project

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 6 months ago

Nuns agree to turn former convent into flood-prevention project

"When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in two thousand, five the Convent of the Sisters of Saint. With severely damaged by flooding. The nuns moved elsewhere while repairs began. The following year lightning struck the roof and started a fire. The convent could not be saved. We began to pray for some kind of insight that would enable us to use the property in a way that would minister to the people of New Orleans sister Pat Bergen architect came to the nuns with an idea converting the twenty five acres into a wetland that helps prevent flooding in nearby areas they're calling the project. The mirabeau water garden plans for the site include recreational areas, meadows that absorb storm water and retention ponds. When the city's drainage system is overwhelmed, water will be diverted to the property and held there until it can be safely released. Healing, strengthening restoring earth was a major part of our decision making and that's why this design resonated with our hearts right away. So, when the city breaks ground, it will turn what was once a major loss into a gain for the flood prone city of New

New Orleans Hurricane Katrina Convent Of The Sisters Of Sain Pat Bergen
Fox News’ Janice Dean criticizes Gov Cuomo's handling of nursing homes amid the coronavirus pandemic crisis

Sports Talk with Ron Cameron

01:48 min | 7 months ago

Fox News’ Janice Dean criticizes Gov Cuomo's handling of nursing homes amid the coronavirus pandemic crisis

"Cuomo has been doing a victory lap over the Improved numbers in New York. However, there's a piece in USA Today by Janice Dean. Janice Dean is the Fox news meteorologist. And she said Covert 19 killed my in laws after Cuomo's reckless New York nursing home policy. She said. First didn't blame anybody. This is a pandemic. Then we learn about the policy that put them in danger. She says. Then we learned that Cuomo's administration March 25 order that recovering Corona virus patient be placed into nursing homes. Mandate also borrowed nursing homes from requiring incoming patients to be tested prior to admission, readmission. She says that order state into effect for 46 days, during which time over 6000 patients with the virus replaced in these facilities, housing our most vulnerable To date, at least 6500 of our most helpless seniors have been killed by the virus. Even the governor himself said the virus could sweep through nursing homes like fire through dry grass. She said. We had no idea until it was too late. She says he can't believe it's not a bigger story. She says. It's a puff piece past puff piece. Interview with Good Morning America CBS morning. Today, Tonight show by Jimmy Fallon People magazines to have asking important questions all focused on the governor's love life. She said it was infuriating. The death toll in our senior living facilities in New York, she writes alone, with bigger than 9 11 and Hurricane Katrina combined. Where is the outrage? Cuomo is desperate for a scapegoat.

Cuomo Janice Dean New York Jimmy Fallon USA Hurricane Katrina CBS
Oakland is considering housing its homeless on cruise ship

The Trading Group Show

00:49 sec | 8 months ago

Oakland is considering housing its homeless on cruise ship

"City council of Oakland California says early next month they will consider it for postal by city council president Rebecca Kaplan she says let's bring a cruise ship into the Oakland court docket and house the homeless we could get up to one thousand homeless people very quickly on maybe the dumbest thing I've ever heard I was gonna say was the smartest thing I've ever I think it's a dumb because you get on a cruise ship how many people are going to fall over okay we're buying motels how much money is it cost him to turn on the lights in the water at these motels what's the difference city council president Rebecca Kaplan says we've done it after Katrina we had over eight thousand victims of hurricane Katrina on the cruise ships why not do it in Oakland sure hope this doesn't filter down the dragons are in the guys girls we don't have anywhere to go ahead

Rebecca Kaplan President Trump Katrina Oakland California Oakland Hurricane Katrina
Julie Towner CEO of Towner Communications

Dose of Leadership

05:45 min | 9 months ago

Julie Towner CEO of Towner Communications

"Julie Good Morning Welcome to dose of leadership. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you for having me I'm really excited. I'm excited to you know what I was doing. The research morning getting up and looking at your background and very interested in how? Someone started out in the fashion industry ended up being an entrepreneur and a CEO of a communications company. So this is going to be a fun conversation. Yeah, it's GonNa it's GonNa be weird. So, what was the dream the dream you were going to be this? Fashion designer, you got into fashion obviously for reason and spend a lot of time in it. Yeah. What was the dream? Well. It's funny because you know people, people say fashion and all that kind of stuff. It makes me sound very glamorous and I got into. Industry because I liked how things were made so my. A CLICHE My passion really wasn't fashion A. It was. It was how things remain as manufacturing production. And Apparel was just easy to get into you at the time there is a really great program at the university that I went to and I had some really outstanding opportunities to travel abroad during my education. so I was very very lucky to get the opportunity to. Become a production manager for gap INC DOWN IN MIAMI. And what I did and still I mean this is if I could go back to this in just live my entire life on a factory floor as bazaars at town. That's what I would do right. Of Your and So I was in charge of getting the designs from. New York or San Francisco? And reengineering them in costing them in sourcing the fabrics in in all of the hardware details in. Pleasing men in South America I was in charge of the Americas and Taking them from the RND stage all the way to win. They hit a distribution center. I loved it I. Love the process of how things were made. Even now I. I'm the Nerd that watches the how it's made show right? If it's anything in a factory in if it's how things are put together, I probably probably should have been some sort of engineer but I. I. Don't enjoy mass. So I had the chance to travel the world and. Most recently I. Did a lot of work in India and China, and that was a wonderful experience, not just in how things are done in factories, but culture and You know just being more worldly known experiences. I get it. I mean when I got laid off from American host telling you earlier. One of my first job was in the manufacturing company, and at one point I became they were. They started sourcing stuff from China and Mexico, and they asked me to. Start the international operations department, which sounds pretty heady, but it was just a team of one. But eventually grew, and we started going to Mexico and China and I'm with you in watching the whole process from. Coming up with you know working with our own. Design Marketing and coming up with the concept meeting with the buyers at the big box and coming up, and then finding a factory to source it in developing the relationships, and then when it when you know purchasing on on A. You kinda betting that this is going to start the manufacturing to meet the the shipping deadlines, and you still don't have anything finally approved in, so you're kinda betting on risk. You know you start producing on risk and I. Get it i. mean the whole thing is just. Amazing right and there's always every morning as unique problem. There's something that happened so I get it. It's kind of fun to watch the whole process. I guess what I'm hearing. You say and I'm kind of with you. You're kind of an operations person at heart rate I'm I'm with man I've done I? Get that completely. Yeah, yeah, and you know we used to. We used to talk about how our job was literally putting out fires. Get Out. That that's what we did, it's interesting that I am when I first moved to Kansas City I I worked for a company here for a very short time. They hired me for my production. Experience in a you know I. I tried to bring all these lessons to them in. As simple as you know how we how. We were shipping these little toys. and. I said you know they. They have to be in packages. They You can't just throw them in boxes. You know it's GonNa. Get what no, no, we've never had that happen. I said okay well. You know I lost millions of dollars worth their genes during Hurricane Katrina, but whatever you know exactly. Did and it was. It was ironic that that shipment actually the shipment of these toys actually came in, and there had been an accident. in shipping in all of the things were were wet, so nobody nobody ever listens to me. So they last several several million dollars worth of product as well. You didn't want to say I told you so.

China Mexico Julie CEO Hurricane Katrina South America Production Manager Gap Inc New York Engineer Kansas Americas Design Marketing Miami India San Francisco
Servant Mindset Equals Success

Dose of Leadership

05:45 min | 9 months ago

Servant Mindset Equals Success

"Julie Good Morning Welcome to dose of leadership. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you for having me I'm really excited. I'm excited to you know what I was doing. The research morning getting up and looking at your background and very interested in how? Someone started out in the fashion industry ended up being an entrepreneur and a CEO of a communications company. So this is going to be a fun conversation. Yeah, it's GonNa it's GonNa be weird. So, what was the dream the dream you were going to be this? Fashion designer, you got into fashion obviously for reason and spend a lot of time in it. Yeah. What was the dream? Well. It's funny because you know people, people say fashion and all that kind of stuff. It makes me sound very glamorous and I got into. Industry because I liked how things were made so my. A CLICHE My passion really wasn't fashion A. It was. It was how things remain as manufacturing production. And Apparel was just easy to get into you at the time there is a really great program at the university that I went to and I had some really outstanding opportunities to travel abroad during my education. so I was very very lucky to get the opportunity to. Become a production manager for gap INC DOWN IN MIAMI. And what I did and still I mean this is if I could go back to this in just live my entire life on a factory floor as bazaars at town. That's what I would do right. Of Your and So I was in charge of getting the designs from. New York or San Francisco? And reengineering them in costing them in sourcing the fabrics in in all of the hardware details in. Pleasing men in South America I was in charge of the Americas and Taking them from the RND stage all the way to win. They hit a distribution center. I loved it I. Love the process of how things were made. Even now I. I'm the Nerd that watches the how it's made show right? If it's anything in a factory in if it's how things are put together, I probably probably should have been some sort of engineer but I. I. Don't enjoy mass. So I had the chance to travel the world and. Most recently I. Did a lot of work in India and China, and that was a wonderful experience, not just in how things are done in factories, but culture and You know just being more worldly known experiences. I get it. I mean when I got laid off from American host telling you earlier. One of my first job was in the manufacturing company, and at one point I became they were. They started sourcing stuff from China and Mexico, and they asked me to. Start the international operations department, which sounds pretty heady, but it was just a team of one. But eventually grew, and we started going to Mexico and China and I'm with you in watching the whole process from. Coming up with you know working with our own. Design Marketing and coming up with the concept meeting with the buyers at the big box and coming up, and then finding a factory to source it in developing the relationships, and then when it when you know purchasing on on A. You kinda betting that this is going to start the manufacturing to meet the the shipping deadlines, and you still don't have anything finally approved in, so you're kinda betting on risk. You know you start producing on risk and I. Get it i. mean the whole thing is just. Amazing right and there's always every morning as unique problem. There's something that happened so I get it. It's kind of fun to watch the whole process. I guess what I'm hearing. You say and I'm kind of with you. You're kind of an operations person at heart rate I'm I'm with man I've done I? Get that completely. Yeah, yeah, and you know we used to. We used to talk about how our job was literally putting out fires. Get Out. That that's what we did, it's interesting that I am when I first moved to Kansas City I I worked for a company here for a very short time. They hired me for my production. Experience in a you know I. I tried to bring all these lessons to them in. As simple as you know how we how. We were shipping these little toys. and. I said you know they. They have to be in packages. They You can't just throw them in boxes. You know it's GonNa. Get what no, no, we've never had that happen. I said okay well. You know I lost millions of dollars worth their genes during Hurricane Katrina, but whatever you know exactly. Did and it was. It was ironic that that shipment actually the shipment of these toys actually came in, and there had been an accident. in shipping in all of the things were were wet, so nobody nobody ever listens to me. So they last several several million dollars worth of product as well. You didn't want to say I told you so.

China Mexico Julie CEO Hurricane Katrina South America Production Manager Gap Inc New York Engineer Kansas Americas Design Marketing Miami India San Francisco
One Idea: Replace Confederate Statues With Britney Spears

Dr. Wendy Walsh

00:27 sec | 9 months ago

One Idea: Replace Confederate Statues With Britney Spears

"A petition that demands Confederate monuments in Louisiana be replaced by statues of Britney spears is gaining some momentum nearly twenty three thousand people have signed up to support the move a change dot org petition says putting up statues of Britney spears would honor an actual hero who has donated to numerous hurricane Katrina relief funds and supports flood recovery programs Louisiana has almost three dozen Confederate

Louisiana Britney Spears Hurricane Katrina
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Dog Tales

Dog Tales

06:26 min | 9 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Dog Tales

"The Veterans Hospital empathized with Williams Story. They helped him scour the Internet looking for news of his beloved dog then one day. They clicked on a website best friends animal society. They had to apricot poodles. Both of which were found in Williams neighborhood both had rhinestone collars just like his dog before long. A reunion was arranged. Volunteers drove two days all the way from Mississippi to Miami to see if one of them was truly miss. Morgan Le Fay but William Morgan was nervous as he rolled up in his wheelchair. But if it wasn't his baby girl or if Miss Morgan didn't remember him over US what if? She resented him for leaving her behind as he went down. The halls William felt like his heart was beating out of his chest. His best friend could be just a few feet away. When he turned the corner he sought to a caught poodles waiting outside for him. Fallen tears held onto their leashes. But only one of them tugged. When they saw William the volunteer let go and the poodle headed straight for him snuggled into his lap and gave him a kiss. There was just one more thing that William had to do a test. He told a volunteer to tug on the dog's right ear. If it was Miss Morgan she would sit one light. Tug of the year and Miss Morgan sat right down and the test had just been a formality. William new his baby girl when he saw her and now he remembered what normalcy felt like. What a gift. Unconditional love can be. He looked into Miss Morgan's is and found hope that he thought was lost together. They had weathered a terrible stool and now the future was just a little bit. Brighter and a lot more bearable. Incredibly the one year old Miss Morgan had managed to survive twelve days alone on the rooftop. Where William Morgan left her. When rescuers from best friends animal society found her she was mostly skin and bones. They rushed her to emergency shelter and nursed her back to health. Now more than two after Katrina Miss Morgan the FE and William where together again tears streaming down the faces of everyone who watched the affection they were witnessing was essential. Tears streamed down the faces of everyone who watched the affection they were. Witnessing was essential even in a hurricane. It was a love worth saving coming up. Congress learns from Hurricane Katrina and fights to protect animals. Nationwide now back to the story. Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in August. Two thousand five in the weeks that followed the relief. Efforts were nothing short of heroic. Thousands upon thousands of animals were rescued. Many were reunited with their owners. Many more was sent to animal shelters throughout the country. But while it's important to celebrate the victories we also have to acknowledge the reality that Katrina left behind and how triumphing over the odds isn't always so cut and dry. Like William Morgan Jesse. Pollens was also separated from his beloved companion. Jj a Labrador Shepherd Mix. Jj meant the absolute world to Jesse. He was much more than pet. He'd been a life raft for Jesse in difficult times. Jesse was a recovering drug addict. Who turned his life around just as his wife passed away from cancer. Jj was there. When Jesse had nobody else to tend to. But Jesse knew he couldn't bring jj with him when the time came to evacuate so with tremendous reluctance. He left the dog behind at his home with what he hoped was enough food and water to survive he and his family headed to Baton Rouge. It took months of searching after the storm for Jesse to FIND HIS CANINE FRIEND. But when he did he realized that. Jj wasn't just alive. He was in California and he'd been adopted. A pair of sisters had taken. Jj Robin Henningsson and Kathy Franco. And they'd fallen in love with him the same way that Jesse had it took a long and heartbreaking legal dispute Jesse to finally get jj back eventually. The sisters reluctantly agreed to let him return to New Orleans. It was after all his home but the process may Jesse and JJ's reunion bittersweet. Sweet Jesse told reporters when he came out of the cage. He came straight to me. Jj is a parts of being a part of me. That was missing for a long time but jj was now a cart of Robin and Kathy. To and Jesse understood that they would justice heartbroken as he'd have been if jj was taken away from him as he said there. Were no good guys or bad guys was only a hole in his heart that needed to be filled. Of course thousands of dogs and owners didn't even get a bittersweet reunion. Most pets never saw that people again shelters around the country were overrun with animals. Many of whom would put down. When they couldn't find homes.

William Morgan Jesse Jj Robin Henningsson William Morgan William Morgan Le Fay Miss Morgan Hurricane Katrina Jj New Orleans Mississippi Williams Katrina Kathy Franco Veterans Hospital Williams Story Miami Congress Baton Rouge California
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Dog Tales

Dog Tales

07:35 min | 9 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Dog Tales

"Hurricane Katrina devastated more than ninety thousand square miles of the southern coast of the United States. It produced more than thirty three tornadoes and winds that reached one hundred and seventy miles per hour. It resulted in one hundred. Sixty one billion dollars worth of damage. Millions of people lost their homes and an estimated one thousand eight hundred and thirty. Three people died. It was a natural disaster. There was nothing anyone could do to stop the rain or the wind but there were ways of mitigating its effects at nine thirty. Am On August. Twenty eighth two thousand five. The mayor of New Orleans Ray Nagin ordered a mandatory evacuation. It was the first of its kind for the metropolitan area of one point three million people before the day's end an estimated one million left their city and their homes behind another twenty thousand or so sought shelter in the Louisiana Superdome. It was labeled a huge of last resort for those who needed it. The arena was built to withstand two hundred mile per hour winds and flooding up to thirty five feet. The National Guard had three hundred troops stationed inside but they did not accept pets. Most evacuees assumes they be returning home shortly after the hurricane passed many set up their cats and dogs with food and water gave them a hug and squeeze and told them that they'd be right back but as the Soom got closer more than one hundred thousand people still remained in the city. Some believe the house could withstand the hurricane others didn't have access to transportation or couldn't afford to leave but an estimated thirty to forty percent of people who remained stayed because they refused to abandon their pets at six ten. Am On August. Twenty ninth two thousand. Five Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana. At the time it was a category three hurricane at its peak it reached category five the highest classification that exists category. Three Hurricane Wins are one hundred eleven to one hundred twenty nine miles per hour while category five hurricane winds a one hundred fifty seven miles per hour or higher faster than most high speed trains because New Orleans sits on the coast. A system of man made walls and canals have surrounded the city since the eighteen thirties. By two thousand five they were outdated due to lack of proper upkeep by nine. Am less than three hours off. To Hurricane Katrina made landfall. The first Levy in New Orleans was breached before the storm was over. There would be at least forty nine. More water flooded into the low lying areas of the city half of which is below sea level before the end of the day. Eighty percent of the city was under as much as twenty feet of water. The one hundred thousand people still in New Orleans were running out of options. First responders acted as quickly as they could trying to save lives but emergency evacuation procedures ignored one population entirely pets in a press conference. Michael Brown the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency or FEMA explicitly told reporters that dogs and cats were not his concern. His priority was to save human lives. The Red Cross and the United States Coast Guard had similar policies organizations that did specialize in animal rescue like the Louisiana Society for the prevention of Cruelty to animals or SPCA didn't have the resources to weather the elements. There were no first responders for the biggest population. Still living in New Orleans pets and strays. It was a blind spot in evacuation procedures in dire straits. Man's best friend was deemed non-essential Labrador retrievers paste stranded on rooftops Maine. Coon cats clung branches in toxic floodwaters. Animals of all shapes and sizes were barricaded in homes waiting for the owners to return as filthy water poured into living rooms near a bus stop in Baton Rouge. A dog was found tied up on the side of the road. He had an unopened container of dog food with him and nearby notes read. Please take care of my dog. His name is chucky. Chucky was lucky enough to be found by Louisiana State Treasurer. John Kennedy who took him in but not every dog was so blessed. Some owners tried to bring their pets with them to safety. One woman cried to officials as she boarded and evacuation bus after losing her house. Her job and her car. She didn't want to lose her dog too. She had no other choice she had to let him go similarly a small fluffy white mixed breed. Dog named snowball was torn from the arms of her young owner. While waiting to board a bus the boy was so overcome with despair. He dropped to his knees and vomited. The actions weren't intended to be cruel time energy and space where all limited resources and rescuers were given strict orders. No animals but there was absolutely no way that Don at Williams was leaving behind Sebastian. His Fluffy Black Cocker Spaniel. His home had already been flooded and the two had escaped together. They survived Hell and literal highwater. Morad even located an air mattress that he could put Sebastian on to tow him. Through the sometimes neck-deep floods but even as they found elevation on interstate. Ten and a helicopter arrived. They were far from salvation. Sebastian wasn't allowed to board. Merit acted fast. He found a black trash bag and hid Sebastian inside. There was just enough airflow for the dog to breathe. Moran said a quick prayer begged. Sebastian remained quiet and bored. It the copter incredibly. Sebastian seem to understand after the flight. They made their way to a bus where there were more furry stowaways puppies kittens and birds were hidden in suitcases under blouses. Inboxes.

New Orleans Hurricane Katrina Sebastian Hurricane Louisiana Louisiana Superdome United States National Guard Ray Nagin Baton Rouge Federal Emergency Management A Maine John Kennedy Michael Brown United States Coast Guard Moran Chucky Levy Coon
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Dog Tales

Dog Tales

02:30 min | 9 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Dog Tales

"Miss Morgan the FE was right where she always was by his side. Morgan Le Fay was named after sorceress. From legends of King Arthur and like her namesake. The one year old APRECU poodle was enchanting. She won her owners heart. The instant they met together they were tracking the progress of Hurricane Katrina. The category. Five hurricane was about to make landfall in their hometown New Orleans. But they didn't know couldn't know the three levies had already burst before William. All Morgan could blink. A torrent of floodwater slammed against front door trapping them inside filthy runoff poured through cracks until William and Miss Morgan left gasping for air only inches between them and the ceiling. There was no time to panic. William dove below the surface smashed through window and pedaled hard towards sunlight. Once he'd made it out he returned for Miss Morgan. He lifted her onto the safety of their roof grabbed onto a nearby tree branch and held on for dear life for fourteen hours. They whether the elephants together rain wind currents debris hope finally arrived in the form of the United States. God William was pulled onto a boat shivering starving and dehydrated as they began to drive away Williams. Stop Them Miss Morgan. The rescuers had forgotten Miss Morgan. We're not in the business. They told him William watched as miss. Morgan ran back and forth on the roof yelping but there was nothing to do. The to friends watched each other turn into a SPEC on the horizon and then disappear William later told a reporter had I known she couldn't have come with me. I would have stayed. This episode is dedicated to the volunteers who were in the business of dogs. Like Miss Morgan. During one of the worst storms the United States has ever seen.

Miss Morgan William dove Morgan Le Fay United States Hurricane Katrina hurricane King Arthur Williams New Orleans reporter
Climate Cast: How hurricanes impact supply chains

Climate Cast

03:41 min | 10 months ago

Climate Cast: How hurricanes impact supply chains

"You probably know. The Atlantic hurricane season officially starts June first. But Did you know twenty twenty marks. The sixth consecutive year a tropical cyclone has formed before the official June. First start date this year. Tropical Storm Arthur formed on May sixteenth. The science shows climate change and warmer oceans are extending traditional hurricane seasons and turbo charging hurricane intensity but when hurricanes hit land. How can they impact supply chains to cities? Chris Sughrue is a researcher with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies Chris. Welcome to climate cast a LO. Thanks for having me. What's an example of how a past hurricane landfall has impacted the supply chain? A really interesting example comes from Hurricane Katrina following that storm there was major devastation throughout New Orleans. But we also saw the this lead to regional impacts throughout the American south on various economic sectors due to shortages of materials and subsequent changes in employment as people left New Orleans in a move to other parts of the south. So what are we learning about the kinds of things that get impacted whether it's a hurricane or a pandemic and obviously supply chain been a big topic of conversation lately with covid nineteen. What do we know about how these supply chains are impacted by these economic disaster shocks? Yeah absolutely I think these kinds of ripple effects that we're talking about with cyclones also some parallels with what's going on with nineteen for example what we've learned is that bottlenecks in the production network are responsible for creating some of the the largest cascading effects that we're really concerned about likewise what we found is that cities are differentially affected by the spread of these impacts based on how they're connected to other cities for example smaller cities that have access to fewer economic relationships. Fewer industrial suppliers are more likely to be affected by the bottleneck dynamics that I just spoke about impart because they have fewer suppliers to alternate their demand to in times of shocks and so one of the things. We're learning is that it's really not just that. These shocks emerge because cities are globalized in more interconnected. But it's actually the manner in which these cities are connected. That play a big role in shaping. How these vulnerabilities emerge in which cities are most likely to be adversely affected? We often think of as costly with negative impacts. And we know that's true in many cases but do some companies and sectors profit from disasters. Yes so this is a pretty widely debated topic but we see for example that sectors like the construction sector enjoy some boost productivity following major disasters. We see in in this work that the position of cities network also has some impact on whether the spread of secondary impacts following a disaster or are adverse or beneficial so for example some regions are situated in the network such that they are less exposed to direct effects of natural disasters but also serve as alternative suppliers in the case that a shock is activated. Chris grew with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Thanks so much for being on climate account today. Thanks for having me. That's

Chris Sughrue Yale School Of Forestry Hurricane Katrina New Orleans Official Researcher
When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:25 min | 10 months ago

When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

"Corona virus versus fiction is sponsored by express. Vpn We've heard stories. Where survivors are saying. My relationship with emotionally abusive became physically abusive last night. We've heard stories from women whose partners were coming home and coughing on them and telling them that they were acting them with the coronavirus. That was Katie. Ray Jones the head of the national domestic violence hotline for most of us. Staying at home has been the safest way to protect ourselves from the krona virus but for others home can be a dangerous place worrying experts about what is happening behind closed doors. So what do we really know? And what can we do to help those? Who may be isolated and afraid? I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction in the past we've seen increases in domestic violence during times of crisis and stress. We've seen spikes in two thousand and eight during the Economic Crisis James Goggle. Yano is a former. Fbi agent and CNN's law enforcement analyst. He says this pandemic is putting victims in particularly vulnerable situation. We've seen spikes during national disasters like say Hurricane Katrina Hurricane. Sandy and we've also seen it during times of the Super Bowl major sporting events and look correlation doesn't always equal causation here. But there's a lot of factors at play in one of is. These victims are trapped in a cohabitation situation with the abuser. As stay at home orders went into effect in March. Several cities across the United States reported a steep increase in domestic violence calls as compared to last year. Cities like Seattle Portland and Boston have all reported increases in calls to hotlines or reports or arrests related to domestic violence in April Chicago. City officials told CNN the Illinois domestic violence hotline saw the highest daily call volume in. Its twenty year history. Meanwhile in other parts of the country calls to domestic abuse hotlines and reports to law enforcement have stayed flat or even declined experts. Worry that victim stuck at home with their abusers may not know how to get help one group that is working to assist victims of domestic. Violence is safe horizon based in New York City. They're one of the largest victim service organizations in the country. We work with victims of all crimes and abuse and that includes family. Violence Domestic Violence Child Abuse Sexual assault human trafficking elder abuse and we help people to heal and rebuild their lives areas weighing is the CEO of safe horizon. I started by asking her what she had been hearing for. People who need help during this pandemic when nobody's supposed to be out and about the choice to leave a situation or leave home is definitely complicated by concerns about getting. The virus others can include. Let's say the victim is someone? That had not been economically dependent on the Abuser. But now they've lost their job Maybe that's an economic dependence. That has now begun. Are there particular signs of an abusive situation? If that person doesn't seem to have the freedom to go where and when they want seems to have to account for every dollar or every place they go seems to be separated from loving relationships that used to be important to them in the relationship. You may experience all of those things and also threats and then of course every form of physical violence that people experience. But if someone is hurting you physically choking US spitting on you. You absolutely have a right to seek help into not expect that that behavior is normal. I imagine that the problem has worsened during this pandemic of both intimate partner. Violence Child Abuse. But I wonder do we know for sure I mean the because the reporting of this I imagine is is part of the challenge as well right. The story reporting is complicated in the first month of the stay at home orders. Here New York calls to our hotline. Were DOWN. That's for a couple of reasons. One people just prioritizing their Their health but another is an assumption. That help wasn't available and that is tragic because help is available. Are Hotline is functioning. The national domestic violence hotline is functioning. Police are responding to calls were able to provide a tremendous range of services. Virtually and as the word has gotten out about that our calls have increased child abuses a different because those reports come from teachers who are mandated reporters and doctors. Those reports are down by seventy five percent over. The prior period is heartbreaking and tragic because the abuse cannot be down by seventy five percent. It means that teachers that would normally see something and be concerned about. It are not able to see that over revolt learning. Let me ask you though. Short of opening up. Are there other things that can be done to to address this issue specifically with child abuse? We've done research over. The years about Bystanders to child abuse people who may suspect that there's something abusive happening in a family and overwhelmingly members of the public. Say I wouldn't want to report that because I might be wrong. What if I'm wrong and it's really none of my business and my response to that is what if you're not wrong. What if you're right and so I would say if anyone listening to this? Podcast has a nagging suspicion. That child is not being treated right in their home. Find out where in your state you can call it in it. Just strikes me from a pragmatic sense that it might be challenging. If you're in an apartment you know with people and you're you're trying to see cal. But you're worried about stigma even within your own living situation or privacy concerns. What do you recommend for someone who who says I want to get help but you know frankly? I got someone listening in the next room. Try and get on the call or seek help. I recommend chat can be much more private and there are many mental health services available over chat. A large part of what we do with victims of domestic. Violence is safety planning. What can that particular person? Due TO BE SAFER WITH. Sheltering at home that's become much more complicated because safety plans often would include something like I can spend the night at my mother's if I see certain signs of behavior that are worrisome. That sort of thing may not be option now but options. That can still work for this time. Might be a code word that your child does that. If I say a certain word the child should call nine one one. It might be something lake a neighbor when I put the shade in the bathroom Or put a plant in the window. The neighbor knows that you're in distress and to keep an ear out and to call the police as you pointed out it's about giving people help. Yes first and foremost if you imagine or think about what it might be like or what. It must be like to be a child or to be an adult trapped in a situation where you feel. Fear every minute of the day and you could help that person. Think of what that would mean victims of domestic abuse faced significant challenges leaving before the pandemic but wants people to know that organizations like safe horizon.

CNN Dr Sanjay Gupta Katie Hurricane Katrina Ray Jones Elder Abuse FBI United States New York City Yano Illinois Sandy Seattle Chicago Partner
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

02:26 min | 11 months ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on KTOK

"Know yet but I also know no public official wants to be hurricane Katrina if you'll turn back time a little bit you remember there were two main of politicians in Louisiana that were run over by hurricane Katrina because they weren't ready one of them was the governor at the time Kathleen Babineaux Blanco and then the next one was the mayor of New Orleans ray Nagin neither one of them was ready for the magnitude of that hurricane governor Blanco was highly criticized for not invoking the National Guard soon enough to do any good ray Nagin would not unlock certain school buses to evacuate people when the Superdome's roof started to cave in so if I'm a politician I want to make sure I'm making at least look like I'm doing everything I can to protect the people because you don't want you don't want to be hurricane Katrina do you don't want to be caught in a situation where it looks like you were not prepared in the schools all the way up to the president eight four one thousand Leigh Matthews Katie okay dot com with traffic and weather this report is sponsored by express pros dot com city because he was a total traffic during heavy rains now start to move across town so folks if you don't have to be out about down the road reporting calls to tell stories in a double injury accidents north was one fiftieth may first twenty in other action itself was forty ninth in the with sixty eight then may constructing several travel including sleep over a stressful job or a bad boss it's time to get to know express employment professionals more than half a million people find work with express each year connect on the express jobs out or express pros dot com according to Mike Morgan in the four warn storm team we have got this heavy rain moving in order to get some rain and lightning and one to two inches of rain is going to be possible between now and midnight when it will move on out of here fifty seven for tonight's low that is going to warm up tomorrow and be muggy with a forty percent chance of rain and a high of seventy seven then an eighty percent chance of rain tomorrow because a cooling trend is moving and whatever you have cold air coming in on top of warm air that's when the risk for severe weather is possible we'll keep before warned as it happens tomorrow afternoon and evening sixty two for the low Thursday the rain will be standing by in the morning hours and then a high of seventy three it's fifty four right now at newsradio one thousand Katie okay we want to see we can get you approved even when no one else can upside down on your trade no problem we have a ninety nine percent approval ratio is a complete each year for the highest approval rating in the metro or get pre approved online Killiney kia dot com we want to see this message is approved a big foot the only thing scarier than what corona virus is doing to us as a society is what it's doing to our markets and your wealth I'm Leigh Matthews.

official hurricane Katrina
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Family Health

Family Health

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Family Health

"This podcast is about you. Your family your marriage and your children it will include interviews and teaching on a biblical ethic sexuality and gender. I want you to know that you're not alone. That others have walked down the same road and there is victory. Let's get into today's episode. Want to tell you a story. True story my wife and I were in our second year of marriage. No I guess it was year of marriage. Yeah I think that's right And we lived in Mississippi at the time and one day My wife was heading to work and I was off to work as well and then we heard there's a storm coming so I went to blockbuster video rented. Some movies came home earlier because my work has cancelled. I worked at a small little college there and my wife also got the news. It was Hurricane Katrina by the time she got home. Power was out so much reading the movies and we hunker down in our houses that storm hit. We were three hours north of the coast yet. I have some video of the trees. Bending in by it hit our house. It hit your fences. Torn up destroyed. We had no power I for a week or two no sewer and she's pregnant with our first Our Son Alex and I'm not okay either healthwise and it's an interesting time. It was a it was a challenge. It's funny we actually think back on that and a lot of great memories road trip. We ended up Storm was coming. We had two cars both had practically empty tanks. Had to go sit in the line where you start the car. Move up little kill it. Start the car move up a little bit. Kill it until he can finally get gas Because the the rationing and the limits there from from Hurricane Katrina So much devastation. So many people killed so many people displaced neighbors some of their family in nursing homes down towards the coast Killed in the process of trying to move so much Pain yet. Where would it lead to us for us was during that time baby on the way? Us kind of analyzing our life. We ended up making some pretty big decisions. That was I think. August ish think that's right and then we turn in my resignation at my job. put our house on the market by Christmas moved to Texas in with my mom and Dad That was a challenge I'm working on my last chapter. Dissertation was able to finish that. We had our SILEX. A healthy baby. Boy I was able to finish my degree and I sold our house and then got my first teaching position full-time on the amazing. And here's the key. I couldn't have orchestrated any of that. Every little decision was with the unknown about the next piece in the next. You know what's around the corner. It took faith. It took us a couple trusting each other and working together as a but it took faith faith in God that actually has our life in his hands and wants the best for us but it also doesn't mean he's going to protect from bad things necessarily would be careful how we unpack that And he allows those things and they challenges challenges and they grow US and I ended up having like we had so much broken stuff in and and Stuff to fix at the house What it led to find. I really enjoyed that. I so I did a lot of that so then we moved to Georgia. Bought a house winded up buying a house in eighteen hundreds because that was what was in our budget And we stayed within our budget and we bought a house that I fixed up a took a night and eighteen. Ninety three house looked abandoned and restored over seven years and it was an amazing labor of love but it was therapy as I was still navigating that some of those health issues this is marriage the unknowns risks of the leaps of faith. Because that's what it took when Kelly and I left Mississippi and moved to Texas. Neither of US had jobs. It was a completely faith house on the market. Load up a you all drive away hope. The House sells it was completely faith. Faith wet how we got to Texas put stuff in a storage unit. She had a job and then I had a job and then we worked for about six months while I finish dissertation and stuff. You don't know what's around the corner. Can you have faith and can you band together as a husband wife because that is one of the most critical things you have as a as a family? Is Use a couple? And then that builds a legacy for your children as you navigate those things together especially in those early years then you build that into your children and the risks. They'll take or won't take and how they actually view God and his faithfulness.

Hurricane Katrina Mississippi Texas SILEX Pain Alex Kelly Georgia
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"It by hurricane Katrina and it's kind of interesting to think now ten years later everything that has unfolded the difference the rebels had been won and lost since then what the faith have gone through to get to where they are now three consecutive seventy nine seasons it almost seems like a distant memory and yet it happened and the thieves had to remake their defense find a run game and now look where they are and yet they still haven't gotten back to the Superbowl no Peyton manning has since retired course retiring after his second Superbowl when what he injuries will be forever tied over the past ten years and as he was setting this touchdown mark on Monday nights we couldn't help but think back to the methods that paid recorded a year ago I tell you what I laughed so hard this entire show and if you don't remember the occasion I actually tweeted the video from fourteen months ago when it was breeze chasing manning for the all time in yardage record among quarterbacks so I believe that video on my Twitter and just three tweeted that I think you can go back and you can watch it but that one gave me chills as well and then Peyton manning made me giggle for hours passing yards ochre trust will have the touchdown record right he's actually on pace to break that to what great also let the servers the congradulations for the touchdown record because as you can see I'm very busy I'll have time to keep doing these videos for you congratulating you but in all seriousness drew congradulations on this record you've done it the right way all your hard work and dedication of paid off you and I have come a long way since this picture back in two thousand when you were in college and I was in my third year in the NFL so when you go out of you good luck the rest of the way maybe that's why we didn't see a new video after drew Brees passed his touchdown mark unless there's one out there that I haven't seen what this also serve as the congradulations for the touchdown record but my favorite part of the whole thing is what Peyton cell Peyton manning drew Brees Tom Brady and if you missed it last hour if and when Brady also passes Peyton for the first time since nineteen seventy three the top two touchdown leaders career touchdown leaders will be active at the same time hasn't happened since nineteen seventy three gosh it's amazing that sports gives us weekly and I don't just mean the NFL but weekly annually we get this the history that we can revel in the the new champions we've had over the last few years that's also been awesome and who knows if we'll ever see this kind of a run again the eagles the capital of the raptors don't tell me the eagles the capitals the raptors the blues and there are more people gonna yell at me about because I haven't remembered is that the the kind of five way that we've had the last five years of of new teams winning championships has been really off them what of course the Washington nationals the Washington mystics they're there to you what what thank you I thank you do raise the after hours with Amy lords on CBS sports radio or inside the rocket mortgage by quicken loans studio the millions of Americans find if the homes of their.

hurricane Katrina
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"What i've realized that it's a very useful in an powerful tool but you realize that it's we as humans have this tendency to believe the story structure when is presented to us so if i give you a series of true facts and we put them in an order which which which looks like a story you will tend to believe there is a cool relationship between them i that the first thing in the story calls the second thing which in turn causes that thing we have that caused this relationship in stories which is is very powerful so if you look at hurricane katrina and then klein wrote a very powerful book called shock doctrine which talks about hurricane katrina and what happened after it and she takes the point of view that the that i know widely shed the the the policies of george bush's administration and responding to hurricane katrina kind of slow and inadequate but actually deliberately designed to encourage the private sector to take over large chunks of of what happened been under public control in in in new orleans and it was a kind of way of getting the free markets you know on liberal ideas in the back door and and and that made that maybe so the events that she and the rates in in her story about hurricane katrina while they're all true it's not it's not clear coolest each other oh heck you can have to pick up the stories now for free information and to learn more operators are standing by for your call eight hundred five seven zero six six three zero eight hundred five seven zero six six three oh eight hundred five seven zero six six three.

hurricane katrina klein george bush new orleans
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

"Absolutely you look at the price increases that were put through after hurricane katrina which is a normal real normal response because we you to recover those losses and they were upwards of seventy percent or more for us catastrophe reinsurance psycho it's unlikely to be anywhere near that even though of management teams are talking about double digit increases those are going to be pretty low double digit increases and the problem here is that we have an ample supply of capital that is willing to take this risk and because of that you simply can't pass on uh the kind of steep price increases the we're passed on a decade ago with hurricane katrina because they'll be someone else willing to take that risk for less money in there has this is super important i mean this is a a huge issue because if reinsurance companies and others are not able to demand a high enough risk premium from investors from from clients who are taking out these policies than there that much more exposed i mean does this make the reinsurance companies more fragile going forward because they've got that much lower of a buffer i if there are a bigger than expected number of catastrophes it could i don't think we're at a point so far we're boos a heightened risk of eating into their capital base but i do think that there's clear we high risk of those individual companies in that industry having much lower returns and it could ultimately get to the point that you've indicated where you begin to have a more fragile industry in the more fragile capital base at the moment of we do have.

hurricane katrina seventy percent
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Are often left out of their greenbelt and processing fog in new orleans following katrina that and on rebuilding africa were taken under consideration creating the caller weren't part of discussion on housing pen current favor homeowners over ventured into her why wave fat in building city on low incomes people and people of color are aqua deeper into poverty and we fear reinforcement of equity area yearround so there's there's been some really tragic news reports the including some that haven't gotten nearly enough attention such as a slum lord's continuing to charge their tenants even though they been forced to evacuate buildings that are no longer actually habitable and even serving people of fiction notices when they don't pay their rent that i would argue and i think most people in their right mind would argue they shouldn't be forced to pay now that they've actually had to leave their building for safety reasons lots a terrible jeff going on in terms of how this is playing out now as the media coverage starts to subside i'm put your you're bringing up hurricane katrina which in many ways educated folks about the harder impact than were devastating impact and that you mentioned on lowincome communities in communities of color for the reasons that you described but as we start to think about this second disaster and how we might actually be able to prevent it with these storms what is it that we should be learning from hurricane katrina so that we don't repeat the mistakes of the past sure a hurricane katrina obviously with a wake up call for the country and i think we have to balance the need for immediate response with very thoughtful and careful planning know on my organization power few went we on did a lot of work at the time we actually set up an office in new orleans following deputy dumping profit so have learned a lot about that and we really advocate far equitable rebel opinion and send carrying beneath the community and making sure that were taken into account on the economic and social disparity that already exists throughout the region making sure that when you promote what we call triple bottom line in that that ensuring that and on your working with uh rebuilder and contractors that there's no community been financial on return and environmental sustainability within the process on and meaningful community participation that were blacked out of of the ring and katrina and as.

new orleans katrina jeff media coverage hurricane katrina africa
"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Mixed Feelings

Mixed Feelings

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"hurricane katrina" Discussed on Mixed Feelings

"But i guess it's interesting to talk to that it's interesting to think about like our ethical obligations you helping other people in in different countries that art like me under the jurisdiction of the us and i mean i guess it's not not a problem it's definitely an issue that we've come across over the years whether it's you know us nami or um hurricane katrina even though that was local but it is just a question out of what is our obligation can we do something in addition to you know donating buyers donating our own money like is there there are bunch of service trips that have happened on when natural disasters occurred but it's just it's an interesting question her because this is the kind of thing were like a lot of other countries sent um how prefer hurricane katrina lately other people contributed towards helping the us rebuild this area and in the us sends help and people on volunteers to countries that are suffering from normal levels of natural disaster when they're not going to be able to reveal themselves or be like two or be a significant hardship on to rebuild without help i think that is in a very important part of living in a global society and i i think that i mean i value that the the help that we that country's give each other in times of natural disaster like this more than for example like military intervention that gets very messy in political.

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