17 Burst results for "Huntsman Cancer Institute"

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on X96

X96

13:13 min | 11 months ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on X96

"Has song about well the now I know who he is long was a hit no no because but now I know who he is nobody knows him from what you're saying I don't know one from anything but that what do you what do you know I'm from he's Vince Fontaine from Greece yeah he was agrees really I don't see I didn't I didn't know that I don't have that in the event I haven't read the whole thing okay because it's just just popped up a second ago all right so he did he had a he had a bit of a career after seventy seven Sunset Strip but that song it's only because he was I mean girls would faint when they saw him there is an X. ninety six dot com slash lives that Vince Fontaine no no that's not how I'm gonna leave out Vince Fontaine office show me a picture of now what it does I'm so I don't think it yeah it is because I would I I don't you did already near this well anyway Vince Fontaine merry go come on come on I can't I'm in this obituary and I don't think let's see does it mention he did a few things all right all right O. yeah he was had some bit parts in some other shows it said I'd still not mentioning great there it is final know no there it is yeah dance party host Vince Fontaine yeah they wait till the very end of the obituary to mention that Gina the Salinas by the way over by the way I don't know why said by the way I thought this was interesting can you guess what the number one selling vinyl album was in the twenty in the twenty tens in the twenty ten for this decade what was the best selling vinyl album wow only one album cracked the top ten vinyl sales of the decade now I denied it states no idea abbey road by the Beatles okay that is not astonishing that they've been gone for all this time and yet now this is vinyl of course but all right The New York Times has obtained a verified video showing what Ste some are saying is a Ukrainian jetliner being hit by a missile in Iran American and allied officials said on Thursday that they had intelligence that missiles fired by Iranian military forces were responsible for the downing of Ukrainian jetliner and that the deaths of all aboard this week in Iran was most likely by accident the disclosure suggests that the deaths were a consequence of the heightened tensions between Washington and Tehran prime minister Justin Trudeau of Canada citing a preliminary review of the evidence call for a full investigation to be kind of in to be convinced beyond all doubt we recognize this may have been done accidentally Mister Trudeau said the evidence suggests very early very clearly rather a possible and probable cause for the crash that a missile did it there are some people who are questioning whether it was a missile or not and there's not going to be any way to really know given what's happening in Iran right now they're clearing the area in other words there too all the debris all of the bodies they're they're clean their cleared it all up and cleaning it all up that's not what you know yeah that's not what should happen in in the in the investigation of an airline crash they I mean it's kind of grisly but they leave everything in place to invest in to make the investigation and they're not doing that trumps resident from palm you know his business ties to Iran are things that nobody talks about these days a day after Donald trump's designate at the he designated Iran's Islamic revolutionary guards as a terrorist organization reports emerged of the trumpet organizations participation in a scheme that likely helped the Iran revolutionary guard launder money to find its interests abroad the US government made the unprecedented move to blacklist another country's military because trump said they participate in terrorism this designation imposes sanctions including freezing assets of the Iran revolutionary guard may have an U. S. jurisdictions in a ban on Americans doing business with the organization but according to a twenty seventeen report by The New Yorker the trump organization sign contracts in twenty twelve with developers to build a skyscraper in Azerbaijan that's in Iran to that appeared to be a corrupt operation engineered by old arcs tied to Iran's revolutionary guard the family the trucks partnered with on the trump tower Baku project where the mama dogs whose billionaire patriarch Z. a moment all was then Azerbaijan's transport minister minister but according to Transparency International Azerbaijan is one of the most corrupt countries on earth yet to set its country separate from Iran mon Evey Iran revolutionary guard was lit using uses all of that that cat capital to launder money so he did business with the guy that he killed well he's doing what yeah uses and doing business with yeah yeah how come we are hearing about that because there's always something to distract us that's what he done well it's it's kind of arcane too there are lots of let me add to it and and it's easy to say all right come on that's not true it's you can't be true but the trump tower Baku project at classic hallmarks of a money laundering operation including firms being paid in cash so much well which was transferred in duffel bags I mean really so the huntsman Cancer Institute is going to provide free no locks own kids good to anyone who wants them no questions asked thanks a life saving drug naloxone also notice nor can he is used to treat opioid overdose is in emergency situations Kerry by first responders the drug can be found in pharmacies in now with help from Utah no locks on an organization created to increase access to the medicine in order to combat the opioid a debt epidemic it can be found at the huntsman Cancer Institute learning center up on the you know up above the university of Utah there this circle of hope drive I think that's where that is so if if it is and it's free you just walk in and ask for it they will give it to you that's real questions at so somebody in your family maybe having a problem maybe you want to go get that and have it on it's a good idea judges sided with you the state of Utah and rejected Salt Lake city's lawsuit challenging the inland port project in a ruling was issued earlier this week the judge ruled that the state's actions in creating the inland Port Authority did not step on municipal or land use powers even though that land is all in Salt Lake city proper Salt Lake City and and the state said well we're just taking that the lawsuit was filed by former mayor Jackie was good ski challenge the project to stepping on the city's land use and taxing authority she accused the state of land grab by claiming as much as a third of the city for the project no it's privately owned land yeah they didn't take it from the city well it's but it's so it but they took the taxing authority away from there you go that's the important thing well then they should because the city needs them taxes they should make that right yeah well that's too bad the drugs so that's alright yeah the judge said sorry a poll shows the three fourths of Utahns favor the state legislature ratifying the equal rights amendment yeah let's do that three fourths of Utahns favor that according to a poll released Tuesday it's like a no brainer I hope that our legislators look at the numbers and they can now see that you've got more than half of their constituents in support of the ERA get out of the way Gayle said Serra brains one of the Utah leaders of Mormons for ERA last month representative Karen pawn of Marie we had her in the studio here introduced a joint resolution Lucien calling on you taught a vote for ratification that same day the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints which has steadfastly and publicly oppose the ERA since the seventies and eighties announced its position has not changed surprise let's change it for them yeah let's let's let's go around listen this gorgeous is this is this is not this is history yes and Utah could make history by ratifying the equal rights amendment and pushing it over the top and making it amendment an amendment to the U. S. constitution then E. R. A. needs to be ratified by thirty eight states before can be added to the US constitution as of twenty nineteen thirty seven states had it had ratified let's make Utah the thirty eighth one the one needed to actually ratify the amendment there's public will to do it three fourths of voters surveyed so be interested your take on this machine the the uterus I yeah I don't have any more but for the womb yes yes but you have been in possession of what I had owned one at one yeah it went wrong on me so I got rid of it and I know you on I know you the I know your insides got all wrong so you can so you decided to send your womb pack and I did but it's the organ for those of you who don't know where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant and sometimes certain disorders can impact the development of that organ or later in life make it go wrong it gets all dusty inside and it has to be no it was the opposite of dusty but Jennifer who found out when she was seventeen that she was born without a uterus due to a rare condition called without a uterus syndrome you know it's got a big one yeah one of the red flag she said was she never got her period so a couple of years later she met through they want to get married they want to have a baby and it couldn't do it home well she's had a baby because she has been born sure the baby was born they implanted the womb of a dead person in universal transplant into the yeah zombie wound they implanted the womb of a dead person I think was a dead woman into her body you think it was a dead will I think it must have been doesn't say here well it doesn't say here so I'm not sure that's super cool news okay so but would you ever would you have ever if you couldn't have a child would you have ever had the womb of a dead person now I didn't think so I think it's cool that they did that and they can overcome their ridiculous objections to having dead person's yet organs in their body so when it comes time for your transplant your heart transplant law your long transplant your liver transplant you're just going to go thanks but no thanks now I have dead person bone what's in my mouth you know in your mails cadaver again resumes bone in I have cadaver bone they that the doctor Carol well they rip it helps you to shore up your yeah your arms and that's I needed an implant yeah and they put so of why he has cadaver AC she has all my ACL why didn't you say no no thank you I won't go one because people stuff in because you don't have to have a child yeah you have to have teeth yeah but but I mean so if you would use old children or choice the list is a dentures come on my mother had dentures all our life you can have dentures this time you can come out that's what a lot easier if the if you're if you're going to take a stand on dead people stopping you know I'm saying I'm saying superfluous stuff I you'll need the uterus that's a that's a choice a uterus is a choice having a baby is a chore you don't need it to live your own universe it's my choice to have a uterus or not well now I'm saying it that's a we just sent a universe is choice meaning you don't need it I need my.

Vince Fontaine Greece
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on Science Friday

"To survey patients throughout the study to ensure that their quality of life is preserved it's now a mandate, the riboside clip therapy, similar to what Dr Agarwal is talking about is also incredibly, well, tolerated patients feel well on this drug and. And are generally not affected. They're able to lead productive high quality life. If, if these are drugs that are not normally prescribed for those types of cantors will medical insurance or Medicare pay for these drugs. Yes. So it's, it's a great question. The cost of these new therapies is certainly something to consider. And the therapy, I'm discussing is already FDA approved. So this is just sort of cemented in, in stone, if you will that this, the, the benefits are quite important significant, but on a global perspective, you know, and speaking with colleagues overseas drugs, like this are approved, but that doesn't mean that they'll be funded many healthcare systems will require that overall survival be demonstrated before funding will occur. So my hope is that now that survival benefit has been demonstrated that the access to this life saving medication will will be brought in a globally. And I'd also like to. Point out that, as you mentioned, you know, this drug is FDA approved for metastatic breast cancer. But it's now being evaluated in the curative setting their ongoing studies to evaluate whether or not, we can reduce the risk of recurrence for early stage disease adventure. Also of your, your drug combination duck tagger wall. Will it be reimbursed by Medicare or drug companies are insurance companies? Yes. So we are waiting for the approval of approval of this drug Appleton might, and we're really hoping that FDA will approve the apple luta might for patients with metastatic castration sensitive or advanced prostate cancer, very soon, and where can people learn more about your drug and also. Your, your drug to doctor her wits. Yes. So online, their number of resources, online and available, you know, at it just googling the right psych lib or cycling dependent kindness. Four six inhibitor is a good resource. There are a number of other online resources where you can find out information. I, I agree so much easier to find information now compared to what we used to have like ten years ago, even so APPA luta might is the name. And go going what apple luta might, I think will get a lot of answers. But a lot of good places to look for these drugs and more information, I think I would start with prostate Cancer Foundation, American Cancer Society. And so on her right? We've run out of town on a thank you, both for taking time to be with us today, Dr Sara Hurwitz Herbert's associate professor, and director of the breast cancer research program at UCLA. Dr. Neeraj Agarwal is professor of medicine, and director of the genital urinary on college program for the Huntsman Cancer Institute, the university of Utah..

FDA Dr. Neeraj Agarwal metastatic breast cancer prostate Cancer Foundation Huntsman Cancer Institute Medicare apple Dr Sara Hurwitz Herbert American Cancer Society APPA UCLA associate professor Appleton professor of medicine director university of Utah ten years
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on Science Friday

"So we already published last year similar to other studies that have been done with other seat. CD k four six inhibitors. We showed that when you add this therapy to standard into cringe therapy, it's substantially prolongs, the amount of time, a woman can live with her breast cancer without without it getting worse. Our particular trial. It was greater than ten month improvement in what we call progression free survival or the length of time, a woman can have control of her disease before the resistance develops what we presented this past week and has received a lot of attention is the fact that we were able to demonstrate that women who received this medication lived longer period, not just lived longer with the disease controlled, but their survival. Was better. So if you look at an at one landmark point at forty two months after the women had been on the study forty six percent of the patients who received anti-estrada therapy alone were still alive. But if you looked at the patients who receive this drug called right beside clip seventy percent were still alive? So that's, that's a meaningful difference. These were younger women, right? You gave it to. Yeah. They were all under the age of fifty nine there's over six hundred seventy patients enrolled in the study, and they were all pre or Peri menopausal. So they they're over his hadn't stopped functioning, yet they hadn't gone into menopause yet. Is it possible, then to find even another class of women with breast cancer, who might benefit from? Absolutely. And if you have time for a little story, I can can tell you that this class of medications actually, I it's very gratifying to be involved at this point in the story when survival is has. Demonstrated because I'm part of the laboratory at UCLA that is run, and has been funded by Dr Dennis slamming. You may know that name because slamming in the nineteen eighties discovered that her to a protein that's expressed on cancer cells is over expressed in twenty to twenty five percent of all breast cancers. That's a very poor prognosis associated cancer. He was kind of the first to say that, there are breast cancer, sub types and his sentinel findings led to the development of targeted therapy against her to known widely, as her septum, and that story led to a lot of philanthropic funding and government funding. And he pulled all that funding to develop a large laboratory, which uniquely allows all of his colleagues in cancer research, and our division. We all share the resources from the fruits of his labor, and he developed this large cancer cell line, panel six hundred differ. Cancer cell lines so that we could study, new drugs and see how they work. You know, when people say, why isn't there a cure for cancer? It's because cancer is not is not one disease. It's like why isn't there a cure for infection there many, many different subtypes? So he had fifty or so different breast cancer cell lines and we received a drug in the laboratory around two thousand eight two thousand seven from a large pharmaceutical company that blocks this pathway this cycle independent, kind as pathway, which tells the cancer cell that it can divide it can go into cell division, and the company that handed it over said, look, try it in your cell line panel treat yourself lines with it, and see if you get a signal of type of cancer, where this whole work, and so he had a very smart PHD post doc in his lab by the name of Dylan. Conklin who had tweaked, the way that we run this experiment in the laboratory, and he was able to demonstrate. Eight with his team, led by rich fen that hormone receptor positive breast cancer, the most common form of breast cancer is exquisitely sensitive to this inhibitor. And so the hut lead to a phase one study. I was relatively new. No, it's an interesting time, I want to bring on another guess researcher, who is looking to expand uses of cancer drugs, and we'll talk a little bit more about yours. I wanna bring on doctor Sarraj auger wall who joins me from Salt Lake City. He's a professor of medicine and director of genital urinary oncology program for the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the university of Utah. Welcome to science Friday dot our. You're looking at a new drug for stage for prostate cancer..

breast cancer prostate cancer Huntsman Cancer Institute Salt Lake City menopause Conklin researcher UCLA Dr Dennis university of Utah professor of medicine Dylan director twenty five percent forty six percent forty two months seventy percent ten month
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The Potomac river boat company whose to the war Georgetown waterfront national harbor and Alexandria, enjoying breathtaking views of the city and zero traffic votes depart every twenty five minutes from early morning to late night get out of the car and onto the water with atomic riverboat company. Connecting all waterfronts running through December thirty first learn more at Potomac river boat, co dot com answer happens in the first place. So someday, they can prevent it. Normally cells will divide when they need to. And then stop growing in the case of cancer, though, what happens is the cells continue to divide over and over and over again. And they've lost the ability to stop growing. That's Dr Joshua Schiffman, professor of pediatrics at the university of Utah and an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute there in eventually they become so large that they take over Norbert in the body. Sometimes they spread to different locations in the body. Eighty and if left untreated, they'll go onto almost certainly kill the patient over the course of a lifetime about forty percent of people will develop cancer. But what many people don't realize is that the first steps toward cancer are happening in our bodies all the time, but they don't get far everyday just walking down the street. We're getting hundreds of thousands if not millions of mutations, but our body is designed to actually eliminate those. So that we don't go on to develop cancer. Although even so half of all men in a third of all women will develop cancer throughout their lifetime. And as we get older our ability to fix those mutations in the accumulation of those mutations that sneak by DNA repair system begins to grow, and if you live long enough there, unfortunately is a pretty good chance that you may develop cancer, those are dying in your body all the time. So your body needs to replace those dead cells. So, you know, every time a cell dies. Replaced more or less with another healthy cell. And sometimes that process goes awry, and sell it's not quite cancer all the way, but it's pre-cancerous and your body's immune system, for example, might recognize that pre-cancerous cell as not being quite right and sort of Mount Zion response against it and kill it. Dr Vincent Lynch is assistant professor of human genetics and organism biology and anatomy at the university of Chicago. Sometimes that process doesn't happen in those cells escape, for example, that immune surveillance, and then they start to mutate in ways that makes it much harder for your body to recognize them as foreign and that allows them to escape the normal mechanisms that keep uncontrolled cell peration check, why the immune system fails to detect those mutations is the subject of a great deal of research as Shiffman says age may often have something to do with it. But obviously sometimes it doesn't why would children get cancer. Because this is really an interesting question. Right. Why would someone so young developed cancer? Such an early age. They haven't lived long enough to accumulate all those mutations that happens in time in all the environmental exposure. So we believe that there's a strong genetic component that contributes to the risk of childhood cancer. And we're trying to understand exactly what that component. If she has been says a few children have genetically weakened immune system, their DNA repair mechanisms are themselves mutated. So their rate of developing cancer is very high when cancer develops in any of us, a similar failure has occurred there over twenty two thousand different genes that we have as humans and each gene has very specific job. And. And if those genes get altered changed or This mutated clue didn't then come out the until instructions more recently. that those genes When code rare no longer behind can be read the scenes in that production Jean photos can't performance of job. the sergeant And some pepper of sessions these genes their were job released really is to only the public to protect us from cancer. in And these if photos. you start We losing discover those. Jeans. Then there you've is lost a cardboard your protection cutout for cancer. of a man Lynch holding and a Shiffman rifle, say one of the but principal this cancer image protection is obscured genes in the body by George is called Harrison p fifty three on or the t album p fifty cover, three and it's so so important we that some we people can only call see it the guardian in of the genome the when photos a cell starts that were released to recently, go awry and you can when just a cell look this up starts on the to internet. have a mutation or turned Now. into a This pre-cancer. figure has been So identified that there's a as spelling mistake Timothy and its DNA Carey who p is fifty three an American shows up on film the scene and and helps television, to fix it. actor It's almost like a big spell checker. it So was basically, taken it's hanging from out a in your nineteen cell all fifty the time six doing nothing, Stanley and Kubrick then if film your cell called the experiences killing DNA and damage, carries. it does two Character things it is starts holding to stop watch and aiming which gives a rifle. the cell time to repair the damage so normally cells are dividing and it stops the cell from dividing until the damage is repaired. The thing is it's counting is not giving the cell infinite amount of time to repair the damage if it takes too long to repair the damage, it causes the Celtic kill it self and sort of the biolog-. Article rationale there is if there's only a little bit of damage, your Celcom probably repair that without there being much of a side effect. But if there's a lot of damage Kansas are the cell isn't going to be able to repair all of that damage, very faithfully. So it can repair some of the damage correctly. But some of the damage may scape that repair. And if that's the case it's better to just kill the cell. But when those cancer protection jeans or the tumor suppressor genes when they get mutated or they don't work properly anymore. Then there's nothing protecting us from developing cancer. The cells have lost their first line of defense. Some animals, however, have a first line of defense that seems to never fail for example, only about three percent of elephants ever, get cancer and Shiffman and Lynch say that flies in the face of what you'd expect of a large animal elephants are one hundred times the size of people that means they have a hundred times as many cells, which is actually if you think about it a hundred times as many chances for randomly developing those mutations not only. That elephants live quite a long time. They live fifty sixty seventy years that many cells dividing decade after decade after decade, just by chance alone. All elephants should actually be dropping dead of cancer. But they almost never do. There's no relation between body size and the incidents of developing cancer and one level. The answer is really simple. These big things have just always to reduce their cancer risk on another level. The answer is really complicated. It's while. Okay. How are they doing that? How they're doing. That has been the subject of both Shiffman and Lynch's research examining the elephant genome. They're separate studies in the journal of the American Medical Association and the journal life show that the answer is pretty clear instead of two copies of that p fifty three gene we were talking about all humans have two copies one from their mother one from their father instead of two copies to protect them from cancer elephants had. Forty copies. So twenty times as many copies as people that could create an elephants a theoretically, nearly failsafe cancer surveillance system. One way that an organism could increase its cancer resistance is just have lots of extra copies of p fifty three. So if one of them becomes mutated and nonfunctional, there's backup redundant copies. I can take over the role of the normal copy. Lynch found extra p fifty three genes in skin cells of both Asian and African elephants from the San Diego zoo Shiffman took a similar route seeking elephant blood cells. I found myself at the local Utah, HOGAN zoo whenever blood was being drawn again for other reasons, we were able to get some of it to our lab and studying and sure enough what we learned was that these extra copies of p fifty three indeed seem to be contributing to the ability of the elephants out to rapidly remove any type of pre cancer that was occur. Shiffman put the elephants cells into a lab dish and exposed them to radiation and chemotherapy, prompting DNA damage to make them pre-cancerous. And he did the same thing with human cells to compare how they worked at what we found was that always the elephants were much more sensitive to the DNA damage. They were able to eliminate those cells with the cancer and much more quickly. And we were able to demonstrate that the way they were doing that was they were activating this p fifty three system of cell death. And so the elephants we were able to say had evolved a much more robust system for eliminating cells than have DNA damage and can go on to form cancer. And this actually makes a lot of sense. If you think about it from the perspective elephant, they're so large so many cells they can't afford to get cancer because they would go extinct that research is. One step further now with a goal of turning elephant p fifty three into something that can help people were trying to figure out is there a way that we could actually somehow deliver this elephant p fifty three to actually give to our patients to maybe treat or perhaps even one day prevent cancer. And maybe in the future who knows make a medicine that could be given to people. She hasn't been team has exposed seven different kinds of human cancer cells to elephant p fifty three with dramatic results. The cancer cells shrivel and explode killed by the elephant p fifty three similar to if you put human p fifty three into a cancer cell where able to actually use laboratory techniques to put the elephant p fifty three into it and observe the effects and some of these cancer cells, and we're able to show that some of these cancer cells in a dish are. Are actually like you said exploding undergoing as a crib a hostess from they the actually opening paragraph shrivel up of Andrew and go our into nets that death article cycle, in and paranoia then just magazine. basically turned Alastair into Crawley's little small penchant pieces for that photo finally bombing the world's disappear. greatest conspiracies So it's has been really discussed by very us in previous early, articles. but But it's in the still present case, very the analogy encouraging. can be But taken if quite extra literally p fifty three Crawley's is so protective mug is Lynch planted asks squarely why on are the elephants Beatles. Sergeant about the Pepper's only lonely animals hearts that club have band it. Elba, If this cover, is such a great arguably, answer the most to iconic image solving in pop culture the cancer problem. Why are haven't present all the focus other animals relates that to Crawley's we look back, involvement and we looked at in maybe the a Paul hundred of them. is dead Why conspiracy don't they have extra copies and of more p generally fifty three? And the the fact Beatles that they as don't a whole suggest the that Fab there might Four be some are the cornerstone trade-offs of that goes modern along day pop with having culture, extra which copies for some of fifty makes three them other inextricably studies linked that engineered with nefarious extra p workings fifty three into of mice the establishment show that the age quickly as we at shall find. least win Mr the p Crowley fifty three is has turned managed on all to the time. worm his way They didn't into the center get cancer. of this alleged But they quickly rotten got old apple, in other ways but as is that the case doesn't with happen all if things my conspiracy, syringe inured, vast so they're p go fifty flies three is between. active What only is real? in the presence. And Of DNA what is damage, indulgent fantasy but genetically of the tin engineering foil headed everyone's community immune system today? doesn't Fifty seem years to be after a likely the death strategy. hoax. Started At least not McCartney in the short run is back Shiffman on top of says the charts. the more likely His route newly released will be to album try to Egypt create station a medicine went straight using to number elephant one on DNA, the billboard two can hundred we actually and he's embarking figure out on a a worldwide way tour..

cancer Dr Vincent Lynch Shiffman Huntsman Cancer Institute DNA damage Potomac river university of Utah San Diego zoo Shiffman Dr Joshua Schiffman Elba Celcom Georgetown Beatles Alexandria Kansas professor of pediatrics university of Chicago Norbert investigator
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Have sought significantly better treatments. Doctors study cancer is vulnerability. So they can attack cancer when it happens, and they try to understand why cancer happens in the first place. So someday, they can prevent it. Normally cells will divide when they need to and then stopped growing in the case of cancer. What happens is continued to divide over and over and over again, and they've lost the ability to stop growing that sucker Joshua Schiffman, professor of pediatrics at the university of Utah and an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute there and eventually they become so large that they take over northern in the body. Sometimes they spread to different locations in the body. And if left untreated, they'll go onto almost certainly kill the patient over the course of a lifetime about forty percent of people will develop cancer. But what many people don't realize is that the first steps toward cancer are happening in our bodies all the time, but they don't get far everyday. Just. Walking down the street. We're getting hundreds of thousands if not millions of mutations, but our body is designed to actually eliminate those. So that we don't go on to develop cancer. Although even so half of all men in the third of all women will develop cancer throughout their lifetime. As we get older our ability to fix those mutations in the accumulation of those mutations that sneak by DNA repair system begins to grow, and if you live long enough, there is a pretty good chance that you may develop cancer, those are dying in your body all the time. So your body needs to replace those cells cell dies. It's replaced more or less with another healthy cell, and sometimes that process those and sell it's not quite cancer all the way, but it's pre-cancerous and your body's immune system, for example, might recognize that precancerous sell as not being quite right, and sort of mountaineering response against it and kill it. Dr Vincent Lynch is assistant professor of human genetics and organised mobile and anatomy at the university of Chicago. Sometimes that process doesn't happen in those cells escape, for example, that immune surveillance. And then they start to mutate in ways that makes it much harder for your body to recognize them as foreign and that allows him to escape the normal mechanisms that keep uncontrolled supplementation. Check why the immune system fails to detect those new -tations is the subject of a great deal of research as Shiffman says age may often have something to do with it. But obviously sometimes it doesn't why would children get cancer. Because this is really an interesting question. Right. Why would someone so young developed cancer at such an early age? They haven't lived long enough to accumulate all of those mutations that happened in time in of the environmental exposure. So we believe that there's a strong genetic component that contributes do the risk of childhood cancer. We're trying to understand exactly what that component. If she hasn't been says a few children have genetically weakened immune system, their DNA repair mechanisms are themselves mutated. So their rate of developing cancer is very high when cancer develops in any of us, a similar failure has occurred there over twenty two thousand different genes that we have as humans and each, gene. A very specific job. And if those genes get altered changed our mutated then instructions that those genes code no longer can be read in that, gene can't performance job. And some of these genes their job really is only to protect us from cancer. And if you start losing those genes, then you've lost your protection for cancer login Shiffman. Say one of the principal cancer protection genes in the body is called p fifty three or p fifty three it so important that some people call it the guardian of the genome when a cell starts to go awry when a cell starts to have a mutation or turn into a pre cancer. So that there's a spelling mistake in its DNA p fifty three shows up on the scene in helps to fix it. It's almost like a big spell checker. So basically, it's hanging out in your cell all the time. And then if your cell experiences DNA damage, it does two things it starts to stop watch. Which gives the cell time to repair the damage so normally cells are dividing and it stops the cell from dividing until the damage is repaired. The thing is it's counting is not giving this infinite amount of time to repair the damage if it takes too long to repair the damage, it causes the Celtics itself, and sort of the biological rationale. There is if there's only a little bit of damage, your can probably repair that without there being much side effects. But there's a lot of damage Kansas. Are this isn't going to be able to repair all of that debt very faithful of it can repair some of the damage correctly. But some of the damage may state that repair, and if that's the case it's better to just kill the cell. But when those cancer protection jeans or the tumor suppressor genes when they get mutated or they don't work properly anymore. Then there's nothing protecting us from developing cancer cells have lost their first line of defense. Some animals, however, have a first line of defense that seems to never fail for example, only about three percent of elephants ever, get cancer and Shiffman and Lynch say that flies in the face of what you'd expect of a large animal elephants are one hundred times the size of people that means they have one hundred times as many cells, which is actually if you think about it a hundred times as many chances for randomly developing those mutations not only that elephants live quite a long time. They live fifty sixty seventy years that many cells dividing decade after decade after decade, just by chance alone. All elephants should actually be dropping dead of cancer. But they almost never do. There's no relation. Between body size and the incidence of cancer and on one level. The answer is really simple, these big things and just evolved ways to reduce their risk on another level. The answer is really complicated. How are they doing that? How they're doing. That has been the subject of both Shiffman and Lynch's research examining the elephant, Gino, they're separate studies in the journal of the American Medical Association and the journal he life show that the answer is pretty clear instead of two p fifty three gene we were talking about all humans have two copies. One from their mother want from their father instead of two copies to protect them from cancer elephants had forty copies so twenty times as many copies as people that could create an elephants, theoretically, nearly failsafe cancer surveillance system one way that an organism could increase its Hanser resistance is lots of extra copies of. So if one of them becomes mutated and nonfunctional, there's backup redundant copies. I can take over the role of the normal. Lynch found extra fifty three genes in skin cells, both Asian and African elephants from the San Diego zoo. Shiffman. Shook a similar route seeking elephant blood cells. The local Utah HOGAN zoo whenever being drawn again for other reasons, we were able to get some of it to our lab and study it and sure enough what we learned was these extra copies of p fifty three indeed seemed to be contributing to the ability of the elephants out to rapidly remove any type of pre cancer that was occurring Shiffman. Put the elephants sales into a lab dish, and expose them to radiation and chemotherapy, prompting GNA damage to make them pre-cancerous. And he did the same thing with human cells to compare how they worked and what we found was that always the elephants sales were much more sensitive to DNA damage. They were able to eliminate those cells with the cancer in much more quickly. And we were able to demonstrate that the way they were doing that was they were activating this P fifty three system of south. And so the elephants we were able to say had evolved a much more robust system for eliminating. Cells that have DNA damage and can go on to form cancer. And this actually makes a lot of sense. If you think about it from the perspective elephant, they're so large, so many cells they can't afford to get cancer because they would go extinct that research is going one step further now with a goal of turning elephant p fifty three into something that can help people. We're trying to figure out is there a way that we could actually somehow deliver this elephant p fifty three to actually give to our patients to maybe treat or perhaps even one day prevent cancer. And maybe in the future who knows make a medicine that could be given to people. She hasn't been steam has exposed seven different kinds of human cancer cells to elephant Fifty-three with dramatic results. The cancer cells shrivel and explode killed by the elephant Fifty-three similar to if you put human p fifty three into a cancer cell where able to actually use laboratory techniques to put the elephant Fifty-three into it and observed the effects in some of. These cancer cells and were able to show that some of these cancer cells in a dish are actually like you said exploding undergoing eight to toast. They actually shrivel up and go into that death cycle, and then just basically turned into little small pieces that finally disappear. So it's really very early, but it's still very encouraging. But if extra p fifty three is so protective Lynch asks why are elephants about the only animals that have it. If this was such a great answer to solving the cancer problem. Why haven't all the other animals that we look back, and we looked at media? Why don't they have extra copies of p fifty three? And the fact that they don't suggest that there might be some trade off that goes along with having extra copies of p fifty three other studies that engineered extra fifty three into mice show that the age quickly at least win the p fifty three is turned on all the time. They didn't get cancer. But they quickly got old in other ways that doesn't happen if mice are engineered. So they're p fifty three is active only in the presence of DNA damage, but genetically engineering everyone's immune system doesn't seem to be. Likely strategy and least not in the short run Shiffman says the more likely route will be to try to create a medicine using elephant DNA, can we actually figure out a way to take this elephant fifty three and make medicine out of it to help our patients to help treat cancer that they have or maybe one day in the way future to even prevent cancer. Just like the elephants don't have cancer. We want to figure out a way. How can we make it? So that people don't have to get cancer. Again, Shiffman is hopeful, but he's also cautious. This is not a cure for cancer. He says except.

cancer Huntsman Cancer Institute Shiffman DNA damage Dr Vincent Lynch university of Utah Joshua Schiffman professor of pediatrics Kansas university of Chicago San Diego zoo investigator gene Celtics principal assistant professor journal of the American Medica
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"And at that point that was all pretty much that there was Gordon Chamberlain is right now trebek's shoes he was diagnosed a year ago. I was already stage four. And it had metastasized into my liver and lungs periodic cancer isn't normally discovered until it reaches an advanced stage. When cancer is already spread to other parts of the body. Drawbacks says his diagnosis came earlier this week. And since then it's come with messages of love and support from the likes of wheel of fortune host Pat say, Jack, I know of no one who is stronger more determined. He wrote and Dr Oz stay strong friend. He tweeted back does have a fight head of him five year survival in two thousand eighteen was about seven or eight percent. That's one of the worst survival rates for any kind of cancer. But Rebecca does have options the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah's testing out a new treatment right now. Combining pills for malaria and melanoma. It's an option Chamberlain is on right now. That's given me a lot more hope for the future and Astra Bank figures out. What's next he's asking for love? So help me keep the faith and will win and it is emphasizing here. Trebek's found out about that pancreatic cancer diagnosis just this week. Jeopardy. Shows are taped months in advance they do sometimes repeats. So there was no Mitch Nabet on the show. Derek FOX Forty-six six. Words of hope around Twitter since this went viral yesterday, Ken Jennings longtime jeopardy champion, you know, him. He said I've said this before, but Alex trebek's is in a way the last Cronkite authoritative reassert, assuring TV voice, you hear every night almost to the point of ritual. One thing I know for a fact, Alex is very aware of how much he means to millions of people and how we will be pulling for him. I hope that's a comfort. So there's a guy who has been on Jeff jeopardy so many times and knows what it is to win. A knows Alex very well Vanna white from wheel of fortune. She tweeted the clue. He has the strength and determination to beat his cancer diagnosis. The response who is Alex trebek's my family, and I are sending love and tons of healing prayers to you, Alex. And then there's Pat Sajakuk Dirk counterpart to say, Jack family, deeply saddened to hear of Alex trebek's struggle with cancer our hearts, go out to him and his family. There is no one I know who is stronger and more determined and I would never bet against him. We and the entire country are pulling for you, Alex. Seven forty two NewsTalk eleven ten ninety nine three WBZ this Thursday morning. We'll head back in the news center and Johnstone an air force veteran and US Senator talking about her past Arizona, Republican Martha mcsally was the first female air force pilot to fly in combat. She's also a survivor of sexual assault. But unlike so many brave survivors, I didn't report being sexually assaulting like. So many women and men I didn't trust the system at the time during an Armed Services Committee hearing on sexual assault MC Sally talked about being raped by a superior officer. She did not say when that assault occurred her name her attacker. An airforce spokesperson says we are appalled and deeply sorry for what Senator McCain Sally experienced in her steadfast in our commitment to eliminate this reprehensible behavior in breach of trust in our ranks on Capitol Hill, Jared Halpern, Fox News. Georgia house committees approved legislation to outlaw abortion after a fetus heartbeat can be detected committee approval means the Bill could soon move till vote before. The full house women in Georgia concurrently can abortion up to twenty weeks of pregnancy. Heartbeat generally detectable by medical professionals at around six weeks. Check of WBZ traffic.

Alex trebek cancer Gordon Chamberlain Huntsman Cancer Institute Pat Sajakuk Dirk assault Dr Oz Senator McCain Sally Jack family Mitch Nabet Twitter Derek FOX MC Sally Ken Jennings Fox News Georgia Arizona Rebecca Astra Bank Jared Halpern
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Three now as top national stories. Trump is slamming the congressional Democrats who brought investigations against his administration on Twitter today. The president says they are quote, the greatest overreach and the history of our country Senate health committee, taking a hard look at the anti vaccine movement in a hearing underway now Senator Lamar Alexander is the committee chair internet fraudsters. Who claimed that vaccines are not safe are preying on the unfounded, fears and daily struggles of parents, and they're creating a public health hazard, visit entirely preventable committee. We'll hear from a young man from Ohio who got himself vaccinated at age eighteen after his parents refused to get him any shots when he was a child new home sales jumping in December the Commerce Department now says they climbed three point seven percent their highest pace in seven months now. While sales were up prices were down the median sales price of a new home. Just over three hundred eighteen thousand dollars a drop of over seven percent compared to one year ago, I'm Cheri Preston. ABC news, seven forty four. KFB K the city of Davis could add three and a half million dollars give or take to its budget over the next few years. If it starts charging for parking Davis city staffers will recommend converting at least thirty two percent of the currently free parking downtown into pay by the hour spots. Paid parking would be enforced over a five hour time period every day with costs up to a dollar an hour for each spot. The sappers will also proposed the creation of two more parking officers who will be paid from the predicted parking income initially it'll cost the city over seven hundred thousand dollars to transform the spots. But the money has already been appropriated for in the current city annual budget, Nick DASA's, NewsRadio cave. The to California girls who are lost in the woods or telling the story of their little misadventure sisters lay and Caroline Carrico. We're playing outside on their families eighty acre property in rural Humboldt county when they followed the call for adventure. Little tiny more benefit. I want more their father put down a marker that they're not supposed to cross, but as they were playing they did calm has from Moscow, which is a fall down branch trail here. Trout. And. The marker to sense. Follow the same. On talk on wrong. Turns Elliott has others. Sunspot sisters were found by two volunteer, firefighters and rescued forty four hours later Leah said, it was amazing to be back felt so happy is crying. I'm Nikki McGaw his NewsRadio KFB K clinical trials of a new pill. That may provide a better way to treat pancreatic cancer are underway. Dr Cohn and Kinsey at the Huntsman Cancer Institute says new drug combines an FDA approved treatment for malaria with another the targets melanoma, we have treated one patient thus far. And we did have quite a remarkable response for him that patient only had weeks to live but was given the drug and then survived. Another eight months Kenzi says doctors are cautiously optimistic about the new treatment, but are waiting to see how well it works on other patients..

Commerce Department Senator Lamar Alexander Senate health committee Davis Twitter Trump ABC president Huntsman Cancer Institute Cheri Preston Humboldt county Kenzi Nikki McGaw malaria Leah Caroline Carrico Ohio Nick DASA Moscow
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Costas. When Charlie Brennan, I arrived at the voice of Saint Louis camel X, many of us gave him thirty minutes. Maybe thirty days now, all of a sudden, it's thirty years. How he did. It is a mystery to all of us. Congratulations. Charlie. He should stick to sports. He should stick to sports. That's the one thing about my job. We'll have the most articulate intelligent guy on the air. And he he has opinions that some people disagree with. So they say he should stick dashboards. Boy, they don't say how did you get the host the Olympics on for two hours? They don't say that they say he should stick to sports. Well, everyone has an opinion. And we appreciate yours at three one four four four four three thousand. That's the wine line. Another service of the voice of Saint Louis, k M O X, and man too many topics on this day. I don't even know where to begin. But a little later this morning. We're going to talk about the angel band project with Norbert, Leo Butz. Who is just a fantastic. What's door start at the olive garden, not singing and dancing, but waiting tables? And I think he's got two maybe three Tony's at this point. He was the original Fierro on Broadway in wicked. And so we'll we'll we'll touch basis with him. I did hear a story today that because we have a sister city in China. We're going to erect a statue of Chinese baseball player. And I thought well, that's fine and good. It's a little bit of a stretch my opinion gotta have a statue for the one and only Mike Shannon, holding a cold frosty. I mean, it's we waited long enough. We're gonna put up a statue of a Chinese baseball playoffs. Four Mike Shannon gets his loss. It's fake news. I heard that today on total information, that's travesty. How could that happen? I know and only cost one hundred five thousand dollars to put up a statue. And we know don't we? We know. Yes. Yes. You do. Yeah. Well, you too you. You're sitting through that we during the worst recession since the depression. We said, hey, let's build a statue with your charitable contributions, which weren't even that charitable because you you didn't get a tax break because we didn't have a five. A one c three. But now there is a statue of Chuck Berry in the loop. But back in the day, I did put up twenty-seven historical markers by selling. Charlie. Brennan's zesty barbecue sauce. But then Craig Chinook became the owner of the world's largest collection of Charlie Brennan zesty barbecue sauce, and he didn't want that. So we we don't sell that anymore. But we took the proceeds and we put up twenty-seven markers. So we could do this pretty simply to get a statue of Mike up there. I think it's time. I mean, he's been calling the game since one thousand nine hundred seventy two and it'd be outside Busch stadium. Right. It have to be there. I should think. Yeah. Where were you thinking? Seward? Definitely there are many places you could do that outside his restaurant and Edwardsville. No. But that was the first thing I thought, okay, it's nice to have an Asian statue of something. But I would put a statue up of Mike, Shannon, or at least how about lick a bust like they have of Jack Bokor TSA Elliott. I think there's a T S Eliot to bust at Euclid McPherson in the central West End is they're not what are you looking at looking for something out of your list here? Okay. Very well. Where's that again? Cole. Okay. Are you looking for the news? No. I'm looking for this thing. Hey, how'd they statue Charlie Britain? Biggies takes his hand. Speaking of that tonight tomorrow night at biggies. There is going to be a special benefit for the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah. And a portion of the proceeds from all the sales after four PM will go to cancer research. So that's a big he's restaurant tomorrow night on Watson in beautiful south Saint Louis. Pittsburgh has the best of it for nothing. Drought. Grunge says we're coming in.

Mike Shannon Charlie Brennan Charlie Tony Charlie Britain baseball Huntsman Cancer Institute Saint Louis Leo Butz Craig Chinook Chuck Berry Olympics Costas. Utah China Jack Bokor TSA Elliott Grunge Norbert Pittsburgh
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on X96

X96

06:21 min | 2 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on X96

"What forward thinking what positively and beings studying a positive attitude. Nobody's arrest me that before you said, it just means, you know, I think it's important to always approach things with a positive attitude. I can see where you're confused by this Bill. It's important to approach things with a positive attitude and always look at things with a very, you know, that the glasses half full always be always be positive and make sure that you approach things that way with good energy and make sure that your positive in life. And I said how is it? How old are you? And he said on twenty two and I said, well, why full beat that out of you? Don't worry. And he looked at me again, anywhere. What kind of the thing is that right? I'm glad he talked to you that way. What is wrong with you? I said you'll you'll see talk me again in a few years. And then we went on and did the and we had we had a pleasant time. Actually, you know, we talked about other stuff and went on. But you know, I kept. And we gave away blue October tickets to a Murray police officer that's a positive whose whose last name just happened to be all red. But no shenanigans we gotta drawing. No relief. Bill was giving them away to the Murray. Police officer was kind of cool too though. Because when when I called him to tell him he'd won the tickets, I didn't say anything, I just dialed his number, and he picked up in one Bill, and I said what how did you you have some pen special police phone that that you knew it was me my name popped up. Anyway. Yes. He said, no, no, no. I just I just kind of figured if you know, maybe I had one. So you know, it is possible to go through life and not be tainted by it. Oh, have a positive. It is it is possible not working in radio. And that's the first mistake disguising to learn working in radius is going to be just nothing but disappointed. So what was interesting to me too. As we were talking. He said he said tell me about yourself Bill. How long have you been doing radio? And I told him all about that. And he said really, I see he said, so I she's a he said, I'm not familiar with you. I don't know. I don't know anything about you. Tell me about X ninety six and radio from what is it radio from hell, I don't know about that told me all about that. Never heard of me never heard. This really had never really heard of the show. He's grown up here in Utah. Never heard of it. And but as I as we talked, and we had a really a pleasant conversation and a pleasant afternoon, we really did. And I, but as I and as we went on as we got toward the end of our time together are two hours together. I said to him, you know, I I feel kinda bad about what I said to you. You said what I said, you know, the comment about life will light obedient. Life will beat that positively out of Uni went, oh what I already forgot about that. I didn't give it a second thought because he looks. Exactly. Put that right out of my say, really 'cause I've been feeling bad about it. It's all all the time. We've been talking and he said, oh, don't worry about it. It's not a big deal. He seems like a very nice interesting. Was he was a nice guy. He was he was a very nice guy. I still believe that life will beat that out. But not life radio will radio might or. But he's, you know, he's a nice guy member of a fraternity up at the, you know, we raise money for the Huntsman Cancer Institute and nice. What are you doing with the rest of your evening? Well, I'm gonna go study. And then I'm going to go up. I leave at the fraternity house on I'm gonna finish stalling a sound system that I've done in there. And then we're having a party tonight. It's gonna fully Nick good for him. Good for him. Did you take his positivity and go on with what did you do? The rest of your day went home and got drunk. Oh, no. I went to see Neil Gaiman went out to dinner went to see Neil Gaiman. But he, but it had some did have something for me that had it had something for me, and it was had some positive effect on. Yeah. So it was pleasant speaking with. Check in with a couple of can't wait to do a remote with this kid. You're you're just beat him down. Again. Aren't you know, I didn't I really didn't beat him to see I said that yet Moore's a kind of a kind of a cynical, but you believe that to certain extent, I do. But I think it's also possible to be more positive than that. I know people that have had a lot of crappy things happen, and they still managed it's possible. I've had lots and lots and lots of crappy things happen to me. And I'm still basically mostly positive for the most part. For the most part. I give this kid six months in radio. And he changes his mind about positively Kerry. Maybe he'll change radio. I don't know. Maybe he'll be no, I don't I don't know. I don't know. If you really I don't know if he wants to be in radio is he's just doing this as a. He thought it would be interesting. He he I think he wants to develop his this BJ business, more and more. I think he's coming after the best DJ in Utah. Even if he's not pursuing a career in radio being involved with radio just long enough. Yeah. We'll do it. It can hurt. It'll get you can hurt you. I I can point to the number of bodies. Who who just were just adjacent to radio cynical broken human being? Crash. Southbound US eighty nine fourteen hundred north in Farmington crash northbound I fifteen in ks Ville, I'm this is where they car veer. Maybe we're hearing that the deer is probably probably best at crash northbound I fifteen at milepost two seventy seven in American fork. Looks like that's about it. Of course. If you see something in the road alive or dead. Let us know three three nine eight six. Thank you, very much Bill frost talking TV coming up after these standby K x arcade. Provo peered.

Bill frost officer Utah Neil Gaiman Huntsman Cancer Institute US Murray Farmington Uni Nick Moore Kerry six months two hours
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"News Radio. I'm Brian shook. Just days ahead of the crucial midterm elections. President Trump claims the US is being invaded by illegal immigrants, which is placing an enormous strain on the US illegal immigration affects the lives of all Americans illegal immigration hurts American workers burdens American taxpayers and undermines public safety speaking at the White House today. Trump said it costs America billions of dollars a year. He said no longer willa meritless appeal for asylum. A free pass for entry to the US. He said, those seeking asylum will have to present themselves lawfully at port of entry the man accused of the shooting rampage at a Pittsburgh synagogue is pleading not guilty Robert Bowers entered the plea today in federal court and requested a jury trial Bowers court appearance comes as funerals for the eleven people killed in Saturday's attack continue attorney general Jeff Sessions says the US is stepping up efforts to combat China's economic espionage sessions hosted a briefing at the department of Justice, John. Chinese economic espionage against the United States has been increasing. And it has been increasing rapidly. He said some Chinese individuals are being indicted for allegedly conspiring to steal trade secrets from a US semiconductor company. This theft is not just wrong, it poses a grave threat to our national security, and it's unlawful sessions warned that US defense and intelligence agencies are especially at risk from Chinese espionage enough is enough in Washington. I'm Terry Moore. NBC News Radio Google workers. From around the world are protesting the company's treatment of women. They're walking out of their offices in protest workers are upset that the company paid millions of dollars in exit packages to male executives who were accused of harassment and did not disclose what they did at the closing bell. The Dow Jones rose two hundred and sixty five points to twenty five three eighty you're listening to the latest from NBC News Radio Brazil's, incoming president has already drawn comparisons to president. Trump Geijer balls NRO who some have called the Trump of the tropics says he intends to move his country's embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Brazil would become only the second major country to make the move after the United States made the move last spring. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has already said balls. NRO's? Election would lead to a great friendship between the countries bills him for NBC News Radio. Jon Huntsman junior is announcing he has stage one skin cancer, the US ambassador to Russia and former governor of Utah revealed his melanoma diagnosis in a recent interview he said he decided to visit the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City after noticing a small black spot on two parts of his body. He's already had surgery to have the cancerous spots removed, and we'll continue to get monthly checkups for a year. Macy's is announcing some of the musical talent. For this year's Thanksgiving Day parade..

United States Trump NBC NRO president Jon Huntsman Huntsman Cancer Institute Jeff Sessions John Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Brian Robert Bowers Brazil Macy Terry Moore Salt Lake City Utah department of Justice
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:31 min | 2 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And at that conference. There was a statement from a member of the food and Drug administration FDA saying that it precedence is getting established for accepting the results of phase one trials. In cases of application for combination. Therapies, for example, if one. Patent is about to run out and to pharmaceutical companies are trying to get together to apply for a combination drag. Then the results from phase one would be evaluated without having for them to go through FaceTime. I found that very informative and also wanted to mention that is a comment to costs of going into combination. This is what I was implying. I agree with Ken out. Current FDA doesn't really excellent job. But there's there has to be some real transformation is not reformation of the way we actually conduct these trials the Basel we set an accelerated some of this stuff. Right. I mean Sunday in this day of big data and data analytics, maybe things will be different. But your point well taken. You know, I think in Japan you actually can get gene therapy in to approve oh after face to study. And then a provisional approval following to see what happens when you begin to apply a lot more patients. So there are creative ways of looking at this thing, Sandra. Okay. Yes. I I'm from university of Pennsylvania, and I'd like to thank the panel for taking on this short short narrowly important topic. Given the pressure is this has on our patients as well. As those hospitals and facilities that take care of envelope populations. And so that's my question. So it specifically to Senator Cassidy and deputy assistant secretary O'Brien given that the three forty drug policy and the current conversation around reform and cuts, and what that can do to these these hospital systems that can take care of all notable populations the center Cassidy, I'm originally from New Orleans and did my residency at charity hospital so safety net. Hospital is is critically important to me. So I can you give us some insight in terms of what this administration is considering as relates to reform around the three forty bay. Pricing policy as well as possibly the opportunity to apply some different rules around it. If I know Senator Cassidy you mentioned there was some concern about fraud. Thank you. I'll John talk about the administration. But I'll just say that everybody recognizes the three forty has a very important role. And and originally intended was to bring lower cost drugs to those which needed, but in some hands has become a racket. And I mean that and the benefit is not getting to the patient so much. So that there in some entities in which the patient who is uninsured will go and pay the full cash list price and not get the benefit of the three forty B pricing. And the delta goes back to the hospital and keep in mind that this is a structured on inpatient population, but has nothing to do with outpatient. So unlike charity hospital where you and I trained the patient can come in through the get treated get sent back home. But now is when they need the medicine, and they don't have follow up through that Tilleke, and I spoke earlier of evidence that there's actually less Oncologic treatment for Medicaid and uninsured. In three forty beef these relative to those which are not three forty now. I will tell you. I worked in a hospital for the uninsured in three forty be made medicines available to those who otherwise would not have show on the one hand. I see it as incredibly important lifeline. And on the other hand is something which is being exploited for profit. But not for the original purpose. And that's kind of maybe my thing throughout this whole time. Well, I don't know if I'm allowed to say the word racket without going through clearance. I will I will certainly echo the Senator statement and recognize that the program has certainly grown by leaps and bounds in recent years. And that we asked some questions about the growth of that program and whether or not. It's continuing to function the way it was intended to function when the veterans Healthcare Act was passed alternately without a conference report, which makes it difficult to understand everything about intent at that time. But what we've what we've done is. We certainly read all of the research publications about the growth of this program. The concerns about the relationship to the program and the growth in Medicare spending, and what Ned pack and others have stated about the acquisition cost of three forty drugs. And what Medicare is reimbursing for those three forty drugs for for Medicare Part B beneficiaries because a part B beneficiary pays a co insurance based on the cost of the drug or the service we propose and ultimately finalize a rule that would reimburse three forty be drugs at ESP, less twenty two and a half percent. Because med pack described much lower acquisition costs that policy, which we finalize is expected to save senior three hundred and twenty million dollars this year on out of pocket spending government spending that's out of seniors pockets, what we also propose in the president's budget was to be able to take the savings that are caused by the government spending less than those drugs. And redistributing those savings to the hospitals that are providing the greatest levels of charity care, we're continuing to to seek feedback on this topic. So that we do get the right balance between a very important program in serving low income uninsured at the institutions where that's happening, and what is being described as a significant growth beyond what congress intended. Yes. I'm director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah. From what I understand the administration now tries to put a lot of emphasis on consumer choice. And that means similar to when you buy a car, you can make decisions about pricing, and what you wonder what you don't want. Now, my understanding is in healthcare. We have a little bit of a different situation. First of all with respect to the information that needs to be made to the patient understandable and clear, so there's no Kelley blue book out there, even though people are trying to do that. And second price sensitivity is rather limited and patients because it's about own lives. It's about the lives of their family members hit cetera. So how do you see this? How likely is it that consumer choice will really have an impact because I thought that had been tried before and was not successful. And so. I obviously the drug market is not monolithic generic, there's there's there's name-brand they're small molecule their specialty. But within that you have a great deal variation consumer reports out secret shoppers as if they were uninsured paying cash for medicine. Uninsured paying cash and seven different drugs. One drug as an example, the price that consumers could pay range from forty four dollars to seven hundred and forty dollars a generic drug clearly the acquisition prices somewhere south of forty four dollars. And so we're getting charged seven hundred and forty dollars. Now, this in my mind is unconscionable. And this is where I think there needs to be you should Atkins humor choice, and you should push it out there. Not just okay. Knock on the door. I can't believe in seven hundred forty dollars. I guess that's what they charge. No. It's like when I was a kid, and the newspaper used to have a listing of everything that things cost it should be like that in that generic space where the patient should know when she goes to the pharmacy, or when she goes online she is able to comparatively shop. And other things you're right. If it's a brand new drug for which there is no alternative, you're going to need a position to guide you through. I get that. But there's a lot of savings to be a J B achieved outside of that situation. And by the way, going back to you again Gail, and I will disagree. You can look at the list price not net of rebate, but with rebate and patients who are in a six thousand dollar deductible are getting hosed getting hosed, and they're paying full price not the post rebate price. And then that of course, gets clawed back some of the PB EMS. You can argue it goes back to subsidize insurance insurance premiums. What we're saying is the sicker patient pain for the more expensive drug is subsidizing those who are better off. Right. So they're actually two issues that I hear from patients number one is the one that you talked about which is they don't get the benefit of the rebates. They don't pass through to the counter Ken Frazier of Merck. Other one is that often insurance policies require them to pay as a percentage a higher percentage of the drug costs, which is of the list price versus a percentage of in network hospitals, or in network physician so often they'll pay fifteen percent of a list price rather than three percent of a net price because that actually is in our policies, you can look at all of our policies and anthem go through our employers. We actually take it off of the negotiated price. So that he'll Boudreau policy from day one you guys stack and speak to what we do. But I'm sure there there may be other choices, but we've been very clear again because for us it is about total cost. Thanks Sarah Cassidy for his leadership on price transparency. Again, the action that we took today on proposing to require list prices to be included in ads is because most patients pay either unless price or less price itself. We're also exploring other ways to get good information. And better information out to consumers secretary strongly believes, you ought to know how much drugs going to cost and how much it costs you long before you get to the pharmacy counter or get a Bill in the mail. Thank the rebate system is another opaque system that that we need to look into and something to Gail alluded to earlier site neutrality is another important part of our transparency effort. Okay. We'll take questions Becker..

Senator Cassidy FDA Ken Frazier Gail Medicare Japan university of Pennsylvania Senator Huntsman Cancer Institute Sandra Merck New Orleans Tilleke secretary Boudreau John fraud Becker
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Big things the Genesis communications network for making the show happen was, working. The dials Vic thanks. For tuning in we really. Do appreciate it don't forget to follow, us on Twitter Facebook that. After Dali show so how do we get the no cancer gene that elephants have apparently less than five percent of elephants die? From cancer researchers think they figured out why this was a study that came from the university of Chicago and elephants. Produce zombie jeans they call it can help protect the. Animal from cancer Now where do USA today they break it down they say humans and other. Animals carry one copy of a master tumor suppressor gene So we. Have one copy of this tumor suppressor so when. We, see us a cell? Go rogue a cell. Start to kind of go AWOL we've been Ken suppressant without a gene for that Elephants oh I've twenty copies scientists. Found that gene can trigger a quote zombie gene To, come back to life with a new purpose killing cells in, damage DNA Yeah. I'm a little confused by that deal I zombie I think of Walking Dead I, guess what they're saying is If there is a cell or a. Gene that, may not be active okay. Maybe a repressed or suppressed gene It could turn it into. Something that turns around and I, guess has a new sort of mission so that that's a concept of zombies zombies. Are humans that were fine then it's coming back from the dead and then turning around and. Then a nuisance that's kind of what. They're talking about here except not a nuisance and something that we want, we want cancer cells killed so cords Vincent Lynch and assistant professor human genetics at the university of Chicago, saying this is beneficial because of accident response to genetic mistakes or errors made when the DNA is being repaired. Getting rid of that cell to prevent a subsequent cancer scientists say the gene also ops elephants enjoy long lives they believe they came to existence. Twenty. Five to thirty million years. Ago And they say there were groundhog. Sized ancestors of modern elephants I don't remember my Evelyn class same elephants, pods but they said there yeah I took an evolution class I did the credits I wasn't my favorite, class 'cause I had a real tough time balancing bible and and evolution but it was cool I'm like okay. Well you know I could see how things I see the pictures again But still. Not my favorite class so researchers want to conduct more studies to find out how exactly the. Genes of elephants kill off the cells, and damage DNA then it can help humans and if we. Can figure out how to make, our body turn, around and fight off. Cancer, better in the lead to. Obviously better strategies to. Prevent entry cancer they say seventeen percent of people worldwide die of cancer and the statistics I've. Heard is one out. Of every, two. People, get some, sort of cancer now that doesn't mean died from it But one out. Of every two people we'll have, something turn cancerous whether it's little skin. Lesion whether it's breast colon prostate that's. Assuming they live long enough passed a heart attack so according to Joshua Schiffman. Professor pediatrics at the university of Utah he's an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute he's as we can understand how these genomic changes are contributing to cancer, resistance then we can able to start, thinking about how do. We translate this to, our patients okay so you're, probably listening to this coin or. How do I for cancer I don't want cancer I don't want does ambi- Jean I just want to live my life I don't want to need medicine. Later I definitely don't want to have to deal with the after effects of that so mayo clinic has seven tips to reduce your risk of cancer and a, lot of, you guys already know this and you don't. Believe it when I when I tell you I don't smoke you gotta eat right you don't. Believe it but let me explain why Okay What we talk, about don't use. Tobacco we know smoking's leaked to larynx, cancer pancreatic, cancer and bladder, cancer lung, cancer and kidney, cancer cervical, cancer all sorts of. Stuff. Right Chewing tobacco to when. I tell you. To not use tobacco I I mean, I mean, avoided even second, even third, hand don't breathe, in something, that you don't need to If, someone's vaping near you get away from that, if someone's smoking a joint get away from that If there's a smoker in. The house tell them to, like leave quit smoking I. Can't tell you how many secondhand or, how many cancer cases or from secondhand You know you may not want to quit for, you well you know because I want to keep my. Weight, down and you know I like my habit and. I've lived a full life yeah but you got other people you're going to hurt So? Whether, you vape whether you smoke. Whether. You to keep in mind, new could, be causing cells to go rogue, so then you're, eating a healthy diet. Everybody hates to be told us, we got, eat healthier, you gotta healthier what does that mean well. Obviously, more fruits and vegetables okay and we're not talking potato you know we're, talking the green leafy vegetables the bright peppers that kind. Of, stuff they also found that the less the better But. The big thing is is the processed foods The more we eat. Processed foods parents the World Health Organization has found, we do have a slightly it a slightly. Higher increased risk of getting, certain types of cancer You know they said women who, eat a vegetarian diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil and. Mixed nuts may reduce the risk of breast cancer. We also know that the Mediterranean diet. Up the heart so, we really, need, to opt for fish over red. Leaves we need to choose healthy fats.

cancer Huntsman Cancer Institute university of Chicago Twitter Genesis communications Dali Vic university of Utah USA World Health Organization mayo clinic Ken Joshua Schiffman Vincent Lynch assistant professor Professor Jean investigator
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Things the Genesis communications network for making this you'll happen Is working the dials and Vic thanks for tuning in we really appreciate it don't forget? To follow us on Twitter and Facebook that after Dolly show so how do we get the no cancer gene that. Elephants have apparently. Less than five percent of elephants die from. Cancer researchers think they figured out why this was a, study, that came from the, university, of Chicago and elephants produce zombie jeans they call them it can help protect the animal from cancer Now are USA today they break down they say humans and. Other animals carry. One copy of a master tumor suppressor gene So we have. One copy of this tumor suppressor so. When we see us cell go rogue, a cell, start to kind of go AWOL we've been can't suppress gene for that Elephants though have twenty copies sides that. Gene can trigger a quote zombie gene To come, back to life with a new purpose killing cells in, damage DNA Yeah I'm a little confused by that too I think of Walking Dead I, guess what they're saying is If, there is a cell or gene that. May not be active okay. Maybe a repressed or suppressed gene It could turn it. Into something that turns around and, has a, new sort. Of mission say that that's a concept of zombies zombies are humans that were about you know we're fine then it's coming back from the dead and then. Turning. Around and then being a. Nuisance That's kind of what they're talking about, here except not a nuisance it's something that we want. We, want cancer cells killed Vincent Lynch and assistant professor human. Genetics at the university of Chicago say this is Ben official because it acts in response. To genetic mistakes or is made when the DNA is being repaired getting, rid of, that cell. To prevent a subsequent cancer now scientists say the gene also ops elephants enjoyed long lives They believe. They, came to existence twenty five to thirty million years ago And they say there were groundhog sized amp sisters of modern elephants, I don't remember my. Evolutionary, class Saint elephants with the. Size of groundhogs but. They said there yeah I took an evolution class I did the credits I wasn't my, favorite class because I. Had a, real. Tough, time balancing, bible and evolution but it was cool I'm like. Okay, well you know I could see how things I see the pictures again But still not my favorite class so researchers want to conduct more studies to. Find out how exactly the jeans and elephants kill off the cells damage DNA then it can help humans and. If we can figure out how to make our body turn around and, fight off cancer better. Than, the lead to obviously better. Strategies to prevent entry. Cancer they say seventeen percent of people worldwide die of cancer and the statistics I've heard, is one out of. Every two, people. Get, some sort, of cancer now that doesn't mean we die from it But one out of every two. People we'll have something turn cancerous whether. It's a little skin lesion whether it's. Breast colon prostate that's assuming they live long enough pass a heart attack so. According to Joshua Schiffman professor pediatrics at the university of Utah he's an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute these as we can understand how these Genova changes, are contributing to cancer, resistance then we, could able to start. Thinking about how do, we translate this to our, patients okay so you're probably listening. To this going or how do I predict there I don't want design be gene I just want to live my life, I don't want to need. Medicine later I definitely don't want to have to deal with the after effects of that so male clinic has seven tips to reduce your risk of cancer and, a lot, of you guys already know this and you. Don't believe it when I when I tell you I don't smoke you gotta eat right you. Don't believe it but let me explain why Okay What we talk, about don't use. Tobacco we know smoking's leaked to larynx, cancer pancreatic, cancer and ladder, cancer lung, cancer and kidney, cancer cervical, cancer all sorts of. Stuff. Right chewing tobacco to when I tell you to not use. Tobacco I I, mean I mean avoided even. Secondhand even third, hand don't breathe in something that you don't need. To If someone's vaping near you. Get away from, that if someone's smoking joint get away from that If there's a smoker in the. House tell them to, like leave quit smoking I can't say how many secondhand or, how many cancer cases or from secondhand You know you may not want to quit for you well you know because I want to keep. My, way down and I like my habit and I've. Lived a full life yeah but you got other people you're going to hurt So whether you whether? You, smoke with you to keep. In. Mind you could be causing, cells to, go rogue so then you're eating a healthy. Diet, everybody hates to be told us when you got eat healthier you gotta healthier well what does that mean well obviously. More, fruits and vegetables okay and we're not talking potato We're talking, the green leafy. Vegetables, the bright peppers that? Kind, of stuff they also found. That. The less obese the better But the big thing is is the processed foods, the more we eat processed foods apparently the. World Health, Organization has, found we do have a slightly, it a slightly higher. Increased risk of getting certain types of cancer you know they. Said women who eat a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin. Olive oil mixed nuts may reduce the risk of breast cancer. We also know that the Mediterranean diet could up. The heart so we really need to. Opt for fish over red meat, we need to, choose.

cancer Huntsman Cancer Institute Gene university of Chicago Twitter Chicago USA Genesis communications skin lesion Facebook Vic university of Utah Vincent Lynch assistant professor Joshua Schiffman Ben official professor investigator
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

06:35 min | 2 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"And Royer of ophthalmology associates You know he said for some time, you go to biggies you, meet the in crowd and it turns out. On fire, Joe west, was in there recently and with us. In the studio right now Brian price and. His nephew Dave price from biggies who are with us you know Greg Warren the comedian says, he, grew, up there Phyllis young goes in there to get steaks Andy Cohen loves your, mushroom and I think onion pizza and. Who else has been there lately Chris my he'll drop by to, get a, gift certificate now that is Oh yeah that's when the kitchen stops take time, yeah, exactly, so Dave price and Brian prices good to see you guys Now we don't have the best news today it's, terribly ironic because for years your brother. Mark was running all of these fundraisers, to, fight cancer because cancer is hit many, the staffers in the past at biggies and so he would call and say hey Charlie on Wednesday night or Thursday night twenty. Percent of the proceeds are going to either, the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Idaho or the Cancer. Institute, here, in Saint Louis and it turns out. That, he's. Battling Dave a very serious case. Of cancer at this time Yes he is for eight years now and, so Sunday is his birthday and I know a lot of people have been. Touched by his great hospitality and, food through the years you're saying if the spirit moves you how about getting a card for, the one and only Mark Price yes. So recently we got some bad news, that, the doctor told that there's nothing more, they could do for him basically he's become very weak so they can't do anymore chemo at the moment unless he gains his. Strength back so we're working hard to get, a strength back but with all those bad news You know we, thought it'd be cool, if any. Friends or even like anybody who's, crossed paths with him or knows him to. Send. Them a card with like positive thoughts if you know him. In any way you could? Send the biggies and then we'll relay the card to him we've already. Gotten a good amount of cards actually in the mail me and. My sisters have been posted. Facebook status. And, stuff like that and people are. Already delivering boy that's really nice, so we can get those over two biggies I suggest you drop them off because then you can get. A great cheeseburger on garlic cheese steak, on garlic cheese bread more you can get a draft beer but? You. Can also mail them as well correct the SP can thirty three thirty two Watson road is big he's address. What's, the zip six three one six three one three nine six three one three nine so we're gonna repeat. That address thirty three thirty two Watson road and, we're talking Mark Price the longtime Proprietor there with you Brian, and your dad Wally and now you Dave the sun third Mark Price. His birthday is fifty nine th birthday is Sunday he's battling cancer. And it'd be nice if we can cheer him up now we've ever never asked our listeners to do. This before but. I know that our listeners have many kind. Hearts out there and a nice positive thought might just be the thing that this man needs, at this time so, it's Mark. Price p. r. e. s. s., I think I spelled that correctly thirty three. Thirty. Two Watson road Saint Louis Missouri six three one three nine. Now Sunday's his birthday but? He's not gonna be able to drop by the restaurant correct he will. Not be able to do that okay so you'll you'll deliver those. As well yes we will. Yeah fantastic Well what can you say it's. Life. Is really tough isn't it at times yes. It. Is I mean you know just disguise? To, keep living. Every. Day This stuff's. Going to get thrown. Out you so this guy the author no that's absolutely true. And Brian are are you the older or the younger brother younger brother you're the. Younger brother so this is the guy who you grew up with it I I can't say how badly, I feel for. You guys and what a great the thing is you guys have always done so much for other people raising money for all these causes whatever. It was and now it's time for, those, who've, enjoyed biggies, through the years to come through and all, the rest confers a? Birthday. Card for. Mark, Price thirty three thirty two Watson Saint Louis Missouri. Six three one three? Nine, and I'll. Tweet that, addresses well, how does that sound yeah thank you On the less important, matters, you, got fried, chicken, on the menu I think today if, it's Thursday barbecue pork? Steaks. For lunch Swiss chicken soup that, Swiss chicken soup is. Not, available on any other menu that I know of it's it's. Kind, of like a. Chicken pot pie but it's, a soup, yes it's it's a. Thick soup is just. Like a chicken potpie yeah it's quite. Delicious, even on. A warm day like. This give it a. Try it's it's very popular we we use you run up. Tonight okay sounds good it's Tyrone working. Today Tyrone is, working today how long, has Tyrone been there Tyrone's on altogether he's. Been, with us over. Thirty years that's incredible thirty, six to, be exact thirty six. Years the same chef. At biggies yes well he must be. Doing, something right. I think you guys. Have the only mother. Son bartending team in the world I mean. We're all says a mom barten- with her son Farben John right all right Guys thank you very much for dropping by. Today we're sending our love and prayers to Mark Price. Who really needs. Them right now the chief cook and bottle washer over there at biggies, his birthday Sunday you can send a car, to thirty. Three thirty two Watson Saint Louis Missouri six three. One three. Nine, day price Brian price thanks so much for. Joining us again on chemo execute Charlie. Hey here's what's on tap sponsored by midwest money we've got the wine, line. On kmox Well it wasn't too long ago that we sat at our house and said you know we need? A new air conditioning system that was the bad, news, the, good news is that we had been, working with Weiss Comfort Systems and at that time and it's still true, Weiss and their manufacturer Lennox were giving? Some great rebates for new. Systems all right so we took advantage. Of that and Weiss filled out all the paperwork but then there's another angle that was. Helpful did you know that the utilities are incentivized to make all of the energy consumption in our. Area more efficient so they will actually give. You a rebate Amarin Amarin Illinois and spire formerly known as the clean they'll give, you a rebate when you get a new more efficient. System what do. They get out of it I guess more efficient system here's what you, get out of it you'll get a check, arriving in. The mail delivered by uniformed Representative of the federal. Government and. All, you do is sit back and watch those. Checks come in from the utility as As well as.

Mark Price Brian price cancer Dave price Watson Saint Louis Missouri Huntsman Cancer Institute Watson road Saint Louis Missou Saint Louis Charlie Tyrone Idaho Royer Andy Cohen Joe west Facebook Chris Weiss Amarin Amarin Illinois Greg Warren Phyllis young
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Cancers john our inherited who are genes that are predisposed genes come through our body uh through the cells are body when we're we're born and they come from our parents or grandparents greatgrandparents somewhere in our family system our family genealogy about forty percent of the cancers that are developed or that have been found on throughout the world trace back to our ancestry and we will have no matter what we do in our life those cancer cells will pop out at some time or another and and then the other sixty percent of cancers come from basically from smoking or from the sun work from environmental causes of one kind or another and i've had cancer now four times an and as i mentioned this last uh cancer was a melanoma and they took a fairly healthy chunk of my back out i was so grateful that it wasn't states three or four was only stage two and he had had seeped into by lymph nodes but i can i go through our cancer hospital huntsman cancer institute we we now have our large hospital attached to it and we have all types of what we have 1600 fulltime uh scientists and investigators clinicians and uh and and uh oncall call just and and uh and we also have four other cancer hospitals uh and the state of utah and then we have clinics in montana and wyoming cancer clinics and we're trying to develop we do such great research because research is a real key to cancer uh uh uh john because uh most people don't know that they're greatgreat grandfather or their great aunt or one of their ancestors have this disease and our center now is the largest center in the world for what we call uh pre pre determined or or or genetic cancers that his cancers that are predetermined before you're you're born lives if you inherited cells and.

cancer utah montana wyoming forty percent sixty percent
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on X96

X96

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on X96

"Seemed to prove that much during the ninety minute talking to 'brava no hall where he shared his candid off the cuff critiques of the current white house administration and his unfiltered fears on the breakdown of our political system you wasn't shanghai to say whom in the place of president trump he'd rather see in the office former utah governor john huntsman sanofi if it has to be a republican who wanted to be huntsman to be the president bush president he is a truly truly good man said joe biden a huntsman gordon the vice president during his visit to the university of utah's huntsman cancer institute back in february of last year when uh joe came out here to solve cancer for the obama administration let's see what else going to go i got let me get i got an oath story from the paper the paper a newspaper they still make that i give them a port and i saw this two two quick stories year also known for last a ben affleck has broken his silence in he says the storm of sexual harassment allegations engulfing hollywood has led him to examine his own behavior good in an interview sunday with the associated press for the film justice we athletes said he's lookie i'm looking at my own behavior addressing that and making sure i'm part of the solution which indicates he's been part of the problem after condemning harvey weinstein is action athlete was forced to defend his own conduct he apologized for groping the actress hillary burton oncamera in two thousand three athletes are two things need to happen more women need to be pushed to power once kind of a to parents kind of a sexist way to put it isn't it and i like get out of the way i need any said number two is i need to have my hands cut off north he said and sexual intercourse on sexual harassment has also has to be a men's issue where guys call out inappropriate behave and he said which is what i thought you were gonna get two hours he's going to donate any residual money he gets from harvey weinstein projects to charity to women's cherry took to s to put a nice of sav on his contract if you're an.

harvey weinstein s hillary burton university of utah bush utah shanghai white house harassment john huntsman hollywood ben affleck obama administration cancer huntsman cancer institute vice president joe biden president ninety minute two hours
"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"huntsman cancer institute" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Hey dr savage there are numerous examples of sinclair stations running were largely paid promotions masquerading as news pieces more and more patients at khuzman cancer institute our recording their life stories plug in this case were sinclair stations across the country ran these segments about the huntsman cancer institute they looked like new spots but were in fact funded by the cancer center something viewers were not told the fcc is still investigating that case in clears bid to by tribune media and thus expand its reach dramatically in the local news market has drawn plenty of criticism sinn clear says critics have it wrong they say it's about economics quote the proposed merger will advance the public interest by helping to shore up an industry buffeted by wellknown economic challenges traditionally to protect against any one company becoming too dominant congress has set certain caps on how many media outlets one corporation can own in a given market but the fcc recently changed those rules under the new leadership of trump appointee ajoute pie the fcc has now made it easier to approve sinclair's expansion all of those in favor of tom miller is the former chair of the fcc he thinks these new changes are a blow to a free and vibrant press the trump fcc is in one very short period moved to to change three basic rules that have been in place to protect the diversity of oil prices and avoid monopolization of the broadcast television market we have a society in the flow of information the coast is crucial to a democracy and win that free flow of information gets choked off.

khuzman cancer institute huntsman cancer institute fcc congress media outlets ajoute pie sinclair tom miller oil prices monopolization dr savage sinn clear