17 Burst results for "Hunt Radio"

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"You so much for being on product Hunt Radio today. It's pretty exciting in epic to have you on the show. You're one of the most prolific makers out there on the Internet. I feel like most people probably know you as levels. I O not as her name. I just checked out your twitter profile. over seventy thousand followers now and of course you are most famous for nomad lesson remote okay and just creating a narrative around making an at work ing. I remember the wired article. That kinda go you. That high profile You're like I'm going to build twelve startups twelve months at people. Like who is this guy but yes also won Golden Kitty award maker of the Air Products? The air and yes. Thank you so much being on the show for distorts forevermore super cool. Va Awesome. So I know it was probably around twin chief. Fourteen twenty fifty. You launched nomad list on product hunt and since then the remote work and you know Indi maker community has just kind of grown exponentially. What is it like to be in the position? You're in where you're kind of like there at the beginning of the journey and like now see how much it's evolved. It's super super crazy because I was talking with my parents yesterday about it Because I'm Becca Parents House. I was trying to explain to them. Like how five years ago. When we were on the Internet we were making like little start ups. It wasn't at all common to dude by yourself without funding and every was back then talking about raising funding going to San Francisco Cynical Valley. I remember I was still to these rich people in Amsterdam to try and raise funding for Australian. Do like make like Uber in in Amsterdam in the Netherlands is trying to raise money and I was talking to these these famous rich people in the Holland that had like giant companies and they were eating like Sushi and I was like in this giant Beautiful Kano House and assemble them some Kennels and we had to pitch stuff and they didn't turn out they didn't really invest at all. It was kind of like a hobby too. Damn like like only very rarely invested so I had to put so much effort into raising money and all I wanted to do was like building a little start up and then a few years later like two thousand fourteen I just started shipping. And like I said like back then. It wasn't normal at all. It was really uncommon to do. It's kind of any maker way bootstrapping. It's a growing. It's small not having like this giant goal of a giant company like D. H. Always talks about right. Yeah it was it was just. It's hard to imagine but it wasn't cool at all what we were doing. It was super not cool. It was like all you guys. Your Girls WanNa WanNa you WANNA stay. Small probably never going to be successful. That was pretty much. So it's so it's so wrong because I think you're right at that time. We were still obsessed with this narrative of like Unicorn or bust. It's like you have to build a company that gets. Vc FUNDING DOMINATES THE MARKET. And then mix everyone multimillionaires billionaires and then the thing is at five years later. We're all looking at like the facebooks and the works of the world and kind of. Oh and then me all the indy makers that were like I'm just going to knuckle down and focus on building something. Sustainable are the ones that are just silently growing and continuing to grow. I mean Dead Bar. What you just said about the the we works and stuff Desk so interesting because it showed that like. I'm not against but you have to sacrifice a lot if the sacrifice sacrificing ethics for example because you want to grow so fast and if you WANNA grow fast so big. It's it's really difficult to do that without sacrificing your moral ethics. You've seen all these examples and it's always a good example. There's those companies raise money. That are doing well so I'm not against it but I'm saying like nobody thought it was cool back then so yeah. It was super cool to be part of that like in in any way like just making things and seeing it grows super honest. It's super cool to see things change I can imagine. And how'd you feel in terms of the actual ecosystem? Because I think of how access to entrepreneurship has evolved. Just over the last five or ten years. It also feels like you know five ten years ago. There was very much this belief that you had to get outside funding in order to do at or at least that was the sensible way to do it like this is super risky. Don't just put all of your eggs in one basket spread out that risk and then it seems like as a narratives evolve and people have been like. Hey there's volume bootstrapping like John get money until you need it really. Try to focus on what you're building and whether there's a demand for making it you know amazing you just feel that there's now like more support for people that want to go down the bitch dropping route like you did. Yeah I think so because more people talk about all right. We'll talk about on twitter. Probably more people talk about it in real life too like I know oldest started events like you'll see you in London for example love start this giant startup event ecosystem. Amsterdam to us. Doing the presentations. That are happening guy. You're going to follow. What's the current big trend right? And you see more of those presentations about people just doing doing things smaller more bootstrapped and and also like you said. It's way bigger than intimates. Entrepreneurship that we think. Any makers is very small. It's a very small niche entrepreneurship as a whole is giant is a small small medium businesses giants and those people probably are having the same effects where there's less funding. There's there's there's more of a recent mortified. Leanne mindsets of not spending a lot of money. Until you're making the money right yes absolutely so I'd love to just switch gears a bit and have you tell us about the projects that you're working on now. I'm never know Melissa's kind of gone from strength to strength Tells more about and also like you know who helps you this I. You're working from all corners of the world. Are you building a team like? How does that all work? Yes so I still work alone this thing. Everybody's been telling me to hire for like the last five years. I haven't hired at least not for products I've won one my friend Daniel from UK. To He he helps with the server so stuff like keeping your engine X. Web server on your service is really difficult difficult. But you don't want to get hacked or that kind of stuff so he gets an alert when the server goes down and he goes into the server as ages and staff and does some doesn't magic but like I really like making stuff like creating a creative expression like coding and designing and stuff. So I still like doing the most and it's again. This is like a thing where I do the opposite of what everybody tells me to do. Because everybody's like Bill John Team which I'm also not against but instead of being automating everything I do like like I've talked a lot about automation. Like automating all the things you can think of noma listener motorcade have think of getting the wetter from API or getting emailing users when they're not using the website or refunding automatically that kind of stuff lot of supporters automated for example. So anyway. So I've been mostly just on purpose trying to keep working for myself alone too so I don't want to lose my skills. I don't WanNa get like irrelevance reference and if I stop coating stop making stuff and have become like some kind of CEO Executive Manager. Whatever I feel like I'm going to lose like I'M GONNA learn a new skill like management's which great skill but I'm not a business guy. I'm a more creative person so I get happy from making stuff like making something that's like a challenge to make make it in a work because people use it. I'm like Oh my God that's amazing and I don't get it from. I think management because then other people make it and then I don't happy from it and and also my goals every money so that I can probably make more money if I build a team and skill and stuff but I'm not doing that so I'm honesty. I love the honesty because I think there are a lot of makers who probably also experiences. I'm kind of like even thinking of myself like you. You start a company or create a project and you love solving all the problems and you love building everything and like making all this really fun decisions and then you get to a super fortunate position where you have a business model that works. You Got Traction. Things are kind of working. And then you're at this point where you're like okay. I can either Stella Gate more but then I'm doing less of the fun stuff and that must be so tricky fun office like do stuff so I mean I studied business so I kind of know about management right. I know what you're going to do. I was works but just doesn't seem for me personally as the most fun part then again if diff- if if there's too much work don't WanNa burn out right you don't WanNa get stressed doing too much stuff so I've like I said I've really carefully automated. Everything's so much and because we're in software it's pretty logical to automate stuff that you do and once the program works because we're making software wants to wants to suffer thing. Works Generally Kinda keeps working for Lisa Wealth or at least a few weeks or a few months until it does break things always break but in general you fix a little bit so mostly what I'm doing is bucks features. I think it's possible. Spas to build software that just keeps running and and then to cool. The Fun thing is like like product of Adam and you can make new stuff you re new features and that gives you the time. The automations you've created are giving you the time to think about the new features you want to build and giving you the time to think about your roadmap exactly. Yeah Yeah Okay. So that's another thing strategy right we call them business strategy figuring out what's the next thing in the roadmap and that's also really fun because that's the idea generation so my friend mark You know him from Beta this also got. He's been hiring one person one Nevada where he just. He still works his websites and his products but sometimes like small things small bucks whatever he puts get up as an issue and then this person goes in there and fix it and and that kind of that kind of would probably work because then you can still be creative. You can still build new fix yourself and just let other people do like bucks which are kind of boring right amazing so just realize you haven't actually describe what nomad list is. I mean I'm sure lots of the community members are listening. We'll know but for those who aren't familiar. Tell us about it. And tell us how it's evolved in the years that you've been running it normally just like a website where you can this love cities in the world where you can go and travel and work remotely. That's what I've been doing for the last five years and this can kind of lets you filter all these cities unlike the internet speed on the wetter on the safety just anything you can think of pretty much. I've collected in data and let you filter on it. So for example a lot of people would like most people probably mile to warm wetter. So you can find place in January. That are warm fast. Internet's dad have kind of like an utter remote working nomads. There so you can socialize with them..

Amsterdam twitter Bill John Team Hunt Radio Golden Kitty Becca Parents House facebooks Cynical Valley Nevada Holland San Francisco CEO Executive Manager Dead Bar D. H. Adam Beautiful Kano House UK London
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Willing and open to asking people who have more experience than me for their feedback. Their input no question too dumb no question too hard and I really don't think I would be where I am today. If it wasn't for the support the guidance and the mentorship of the people that I've been blessed enough to surround myself with including the leadership team that I work with and so I just think that that's a really important part especially for the first time founder. Ceo You don't be afraid to ask for help and surround yourself with mentors and people that genuinely care about you and have more experience than you never be afraid to steal wisdom a rank to think about myself in the wisdom theft business in the more. I can steal the smarter I feel and I think that's a great tip for any kind of young entrepreneur. Ceo that's amazing. I love that. It rhymes so that's always a winner. Amazing thank you so much so okay. This is my favorite part of the gas because being product and of course we're all obsessed with products so this is the fun part of the show where we just get to hear from you about tools or products or websites or whatever it is that you're obsessed with right now. It may be at something. That's on your home screen. Maybe something funny. Just got for your kids. I don't know but we always have to hear about cool new products so please let us know what you're playing with. These days will since the wellness thing is really big early. Head space adopter which Now I never thought I'd be a digital workout person. Ever my life I was anti like Peleton has become all consuming and use it not just to work out. They've now got like mindfulness channels and all that sort of stuff. I just downloaded I think it's blankets. Which is Kinda? It's to help accelerate the speed which I can digest books in content. It's so good. I turned my notes. Bet At at at at the first time I heard I was like. Oh wait. Am I like supportive of an APP that turns books into some areas but I realized I am because I horde nonfiction books? I every time someone recommends when I'm just like oh by it and then I never read them and now with blinking. I can actually decided if I'm GonNa read the whole book based on the summary. I wasn't early hater as well but I finally came around to adopt. And I'M NOT GONNA lie. I think I got through high school and college with cliffnote so to some extent there show up and that's one that I'm using now and then honestly like I hate to be so boring in say it. But that simple little just like nodes tab in my iphone like my runs in that thing nipple and not sophisticated all like. I literally don't think I could let day or a week without that. A few of the ones that I'm with right now amazing. That's so cool. Yeah thanks for sharing the apple INCAS Timesaver also if you're about to you often tech parties everyone's reading the same books talking about the same thing and then sometimes you just you don't know what people are talking about now with blankets. I can look informed. I could be like well. I read the blinks. Here's my take. Yeah and by the way for anybody. That's GONNA listen to podcasts. I read a book last year which is very much for growth. Companies has become one of my favorites Middle Scott Ski it would branding. That's really in kind of scaling growth mode. I'd highly recommend the read. Oh great wonderful yeah. We're always always talking about book recommendations in the community such wonderful so Ryan for folks who've been listening like okay. This is great. I'M GONNA find out more about him. I WANNA find out more about convened. Where can they go? Convene DOT COM. If you're looking for the best place to meet or to work in our six. Us cities and now soon to be London We'd love to have you be a part of our community And then you can follow me on twitter at our W seminary to keep up with all things convene and occasionally all things Ryan cemented amazing. Thank you so much for being on the show today offer. Thank you so much everyone. Thank you so much for tuning into product hunt radio. I've got a favor to ask you. Will you take a minute to review us on itunes apple podcasts? Or wherever you're listening to us right now thank you. Thanks for tuning in. We'll be back next week. But in the meantime shared the podcast your friends on twitter and tagged guests. You'd like to hear if you drop zone. See Houston..

Ryan Ceo twitter Us founder theft apple Houston
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

13:18 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Thank you so much for being on product. Hunt Radio today. I've really been looking forward to this interview for a number of reasons. First of all we are a community and we are a community of makers so it's always really exciting to have other community builders on on the show and teaching us about what they've learned But I'm also just love the fact that you are unlike many other community builders we've had on the show in that your community focuses moms of which there definitely aren't enough in the tech industry but the focus of the group. I feel like there's so much to learn from this now. Global community built which of course originally started in the US. So I guess maybe I just like to start his new. You haven't done founding mon. Your entire career might just like to start with how you ended up building communities may based on your previous experiences and then I want to dive more into founding. Mom said Yeah. Let's tell us how you got into community building in the first place. I'd love that and I am trying to sound very calm and rational while I talk. My product will for a very long time. This is really exciting. Trying to look so in two thousand five in fact. I don't have a history of building community I started doing community with the founding. Moms in twenty ten but I'll call for that. I launched my very first business. I helped to manage bands so I sent them out. I did there booking did their publicity. I tried to get artists on tour. And they're willing to be said for building community for artists when they're on the road you sort of create street teams for them. They are like communities but not at all in the same way that I'm building the MOMS and not very similar to product hunt but there is crossover so that was my first taste of it Two years after that I built a second business not community related. I sold baby jewelry On the running my first business. Yeah so I I was a crazy person running two businesses at the same time in when I became pregnant with my second baby I thought how on Earth does anybody do this. And so selfish reasons I went to meet up dot com. I launched a meet up just outside of Chicago where I lived at the time. And I said if you're a woman with a business and a baby please come have coffee with me. Tell me how you're doing it because I think I'M GONNA lose my mind. It's funny to say I got really curious. But that's not true. I really was. I was going crazy so I invited a couple of people. I thought it'd be five of us. I thought it would be a one off. Turns OUT ABOUT FIFTEEN ISH? Women walked into the room. All of our Jau. Yeah and we thought. Oh my gosh you too so I think I could call it the Youtube Movement of twenty ten so once once we realized loved it so much we thought. Let's meet up monthly in about six months in a woman came up to me and told me she hated driving. All the way to this dislocation could open up another chapter and that was pretty much my lightbulb moment where I thought the Internet I can put zip code into anywhere in the world. There is a site called meet up dot com that this was pre chapter rising. They didn't even have a term for it yet but I allow. I went bananas. I bought a ton of meat pages in different cities. I you know. I did a lot of launching at a time where everybody said to me slowdown. Hold on you've got to get it right before you keep on scaling and I didn't listen to anybody so here. We are ten years in and We're in a lot of places it's incredible. I mean you're in the UK where I live in London but Singapore Mexico South Africa Guatemala anywhere. There is a mom entrepreneur. I believe there needs to be what we call founding exchanges but our masterminds for MOMS. This is incredible so kind of going back to the early meet ups that you found it so earlier this year we hosted our first ever global meet up day and the idea behind that was to connect the community in real life in as many places as possible and on the day we had seventy three different meet. Ups happen which was incredible. And what I learned doing that experience I sort of led the project was. There are a lot of people who are very experienced in the space of organizing events organized networking events or even like lunch or coffee date and then you know you go sort of across the spectrum from very competent participants meet ups to folks who are not well-versed in them maybe. Shining Hesitant Tetra. So I guess I kinda just want to start off by getting a bit of your insight on folks who Kinda fall more on that like less experience confidence side of the spectrum. There are probably a lot of makers folks out there who have identified interest or identified. Something unique about the experience on want to connect with others who share that. Maybe they've done a bit of that online and they're kind of thinking about taking that jump to the offline space. Is there any advice that you can get because you know you just mentioned that you thought one person might show up and then suddenly fifteen people are in the room? How do you sort of deal with that CAM? Actually GonNa do it. I'M GONNA find his face. I'm GonNa put it online and then how'd you mentally prepare yourself for whatever the outcome might be on that very very first real event? Sure I think we have to eradicate the fact that networking might be a dirty word and talking to myself because the first few years of running the founding moms all I of was creating a universe of resources practical very act or for mom on preneurs because nobody pays attention to mom entrepreneurs the way they do women entrepreneurs or other anybody else so. My dream was to have a very practical organization for them educational. All of the words that a lot of entrepreneurs are glued to in any time. Somebody said to me. Well you run a networking organization. I cringed and I hated it and I thought well if networking comes out of it sure I WANNA tell everybody listening. I have come quite a long way. You can't be scared of that. And the other part I wanNA tell you. Most of the attendees of our off-line experiences are the introverts. They are the people out of trouble getting out from behind their screen but they understand. That ninety percent of interaction is non verbal. They understand that when they're at the meeting they're going to make so much progress with business that they can't no matter how many social media channels they're on or whatever they're doing online is going to happen that they even understand okay. I'm going to do a lot within the community online but at a certain point I have to leave the house or the office because it's just the most efficient way to have progress or growth as a founder. That's just there's no two ways about it. So that for years people said to me Jill you have to stop focusing on the offline arena and you have to really build up an online platform so about four years ago. We launched what we call the FM. See the founding moms community which is a paid membership site online. Only if you like to hide behind your screen you can join us. You can participate in Webinars and challenges and get all of that practical stuff. I want you to get but you know it's no one can drive me away from this offline thing because I know in my heart of hearts ten years in there is nothing that trump's meeting up in real life at all. I love that. I think you're so right. I think it's almost just taking it back to where the real impact lies right like you found that when folks met up in real life they got so much more out of it than they could online and I'm reflecting on my own experiences here. I think this is really important. When I I quit my job I had attacked in two thousand. Fifteen unequipped thought to work on this idea. I add building a community around women of color and other underrepresented people intact. You know still in junior roles or maybe mid level but aspiring for more. What I found was when I started having conversations about my idea online it was very easy for people to sort of dismiss the idea quite quickly. It wasn't maybe something that they were familiar way or doesn't have any obvious business model and what I found was that I started talking myself out of it before. I'd done anything because so many of the responses that I received online really negative and similar sort of thing when I went to run of the mill tech industry events but I think again. Meena by virtue of the problem solving because a lot of people were at the events that could kind of relate to this problem and then something really changed when I started going to meet. Upset were purely focused on women in tech and suddenly like. Penny dropped people like. Oh my God. There's such a demand for that. There's a need for that. I would love to come to these events. What kind of workshops are you GONNA run? I WANNA learn about this. Learn about that. I want to be around other women that are learning about that and I just suddenly thought. Oh My. Gosh that's incredible and I think maybe sometimes you have to appreciate that just because one person finds the Internet to be the perfect place to do. Everything doesn't mean that I'm necessarily experiencing the Internet in the same way and I don't think it's the perfect place for anything that we're talking about in terms of building here an actual community where you can say. I have fifty thousand people in a community online and everybody is helping each other every single second of the day. Wiling sure that's true the extent to which you can help each other is not possible online. I don't believe yes and we're point earlier about you. Know what do folks do if they're real if they feel very shy if they are scared that every I often get the. I often get approach until well. I don't want to join your community because you all seem to know what you're doing and we don't doing so I kind mission to tell everybody. Nobody knows what we're doing. None of us and the reason you have to come out stop hiding is because you are actually sabotaging your own success I really do feel that strongly about it. I sort of sound like an offline. I Dunno nightmare of a of a leader. But I I just you know the fact that you began this interview by saying we've never had somebody on focuses on moms and you know you don't really see that in the prototype community. I'm going to suggest that maybe there are lots of us in there but nobody talks about the fact that they are a mom entrepreneur. They're an entrepreneur. They don't like to use the word mom they don't want people to know they're distracted by kids. So that's yet another mission. I find myself having to sort of forge ahead in say is that there are tons of women with kids who are making things who are creating not just community all kinds of things and don't want to say because nobody else is. I love that I love that. I think there's so many things what you said that I relate to That idea of never feeling ready like oh. I want to join your community. But I'm not ready is something that seems to echo across the entire makers community you know this community of people making in creating and building things. There are so many times when people say oh. I want to launch on product hunt. But I'm not ready and you'll hear someone else say like. Oh you know I wanNA share my APP and I'm not ready. I WANNA show portfolio. But I'm not ready and I love that you you'd remind folks that you know you're you're never ready. An I said that all the time to you know when people are like. Oh you know. I don't know how to run a business. I say well you know near the drive is like I'm learning as I go. I mean it seems to be working but I hope on big wigs out there. You Know Jeff Baynes. He doesn't totally know what he's doing. Either I mean he's come a long way. Nobody knows and I love when you what you just said was a lot of people. Think I WANNA launch product hunt. But I'm not ready and I think if you flip that too. I want to launch product and I'm not ready that's communities for. They're going to help point out all the things that are wrong. They're going to help. You thrive and survive. I don't if you if you learn to lean on the community and become a little more vulnerable than you're used to. I can't tell you how exponentially you're going to grow and just kind of going back to the early days of of founding mums and the events. I'm curious how you thought about structure or agenda or anything like that. Was it something that you intentionally wanted to develop or was it more about creating the space for people to surface things on south? Yeah I'M GONNA be real transparent when we began. We being me myself and I ask just desperate to get people to show up because I realized it was. This was so much bigger than anything. I've ever done that more. Are you ready for this zero dollars for you to come to any meet up in any city? I I quickly realized I didn't like the the baby jewelry business that Iran so twenty. Oh my goodness what was it. Twenty eleven or twelve. I sold it and I use those funds to fund the beginning of what is now the founding moms but I would show up to.

US Hunt Radio Chicago UK Jau London trump Iran Jill Singapore Mexico South Africa Meena Penny Jeff Baynes founder
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

13:51 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Where I'm joined by the founders investors makers that are shaping the future of tech. In this episode I speak to Bilbao Ndi and Jeff Camera. The cofounders freed up all about how to improve your focus in a world of destruction. Read up up is a social reading platform away to find read and share articles and stories online powered by a global community of readers. Who believe you should read an article before commenting hang on it? I know it sounds simple. But how many of you are just like me and stop at the headlines before launching into debate in this interview we take a long hard look at the attention economy and how are online behavior. It packs are habits and the world around US enjoy bill and Jeff. Thank you so much for being here on product Hunt Radio today. This is I think the first time I'm recording with a tag team such as yourself so thank you. Yeah we're the best tag team you'll ever Vermeille. Thank you for amazing so in our community are makers at various stages of the journey. Some are many many years into their product on the market some are still formulating relaunched. But it's always incredible to have makers working in really innovative says says in trying to do really challenging things on the show to tell us a bit about how it's going and I think it was ridiculed about read up is you have this really bold mission to make people read more and and I had a conversation with our head of social media the other day. I'm sure he won't feel bad from you mentioning this but he. He talked about how he doesn't have the attention span to read and everyone kind of nodded along. And it it to me illustrated the scale of the challenge but before kind of dive into the Nitty Gritty. I thought it might be fun for you to just tell us a bit about what you do. And the origin story behind it totally. And I'm I can totally relate to do what you just described. I've had the feeling when looking at Youtube video. That's like seven minutes long. I'm just like Oh man. I don't have time to watch that whole thing. So I think yeah everyone is experiencing experiencing that the problem of feeling like you're losing your attention span but yet that's that's the problem that read up. It was built to address and it wasn't initially initially what we set out to do. But read up is now an alternative to the existing social media landscape We refer to the company Anthony as a social reading platform versus a social media platform. And the reason for that is because we're we're basically just trying to re centralize the act of reading reading with focus in with attention and everything else that you love about social media so talking to other people and connecting is basically we built on top of reading as the the central aspect of the product. Amazing Talk US through the story behind. Signed your idea to build. This was it. We're not if your own personal frustrations was a response to the trend that you saw going on at a higher level. I'd love to hear more sorry about that. Yeah donate so the first thing just zooming out a little bit. Jeff and I have been friends since we were in preschool so we have started several businesses businesses. Together we've been like hacking and doing all kinds of both technology stuff and also completely non Texas we like work on trucks and motorcycles and stuff together so we enjoy working together and I think we both have our own deep story with frustrations with social media. Just fuck every single other human being on the entire planet like this stuff feels Get accomplished as a lot for us. And it's really important to everyday life now it's like intrinsic to the human experience but also it's makes us anxious and makes the sheriff can't pay attention. It's kind of just like rife with problems albums so but there wasn't very specific singular phone call wondering which is dot short bill called me up with Sham would have been close to little opportune or two and a half years ago in the original idea. just out of the blue something that we hadn't discussed before was just sort of lamenting about the quality of comments in comment section below articles that we would read and yet the idea is what if we could just keep the people who haven't read the article fully from able to leave their comment that resonated with me I am not a huge social media. User us read it a lot and you. It's basically a attired meam at this point. Did you even read the article in the comments not corresponding to even questions that would have been answered the first couple of sentences so yeah we. We started kicking around the idea. I've been working as a software developer and so the the original idea was to build a croome extension that would be able to detect whether or not someone has read an article And then originally it was going to be like sort of disgust style comments in bed that would appear below articles and that was the original kind of Sparked this whole off definitely a frustration restauration for sure that I am and we still talk about this every day like it's just unbelievable an unwritten. No one should be allowed to comment on something they haven't read. That's that's that's not how it works in the real world. It'd be totally bizarre. If you just like walked up to a table where a couple of people were like talking. The last hour just started talking at them. Strangely like the best way to have a really productive conversation with anybody about anything is is to take some time until listen talk to me about the point where you went from having this rather brilliant idea of having a chrome extension that show show you whether or not you'd read the article or showed you are not someone else and read the article to having a new take on a community like because ultimately it's evolved into that right it's now a community where people can can surface great rates totally. And you know the thing that I'll emphasize there was that the problem with being business around a chrome extension is pretty obvious. It's a it's a growth problem. You know basically the idea. Yeah I think we both still think a great one if we can have. It adopted widely. no-one should be allowed to comment on anything. They haven't read. However if you kind of like you know think about this from an implementation perspective the idea of having to have people opt in to add a chrome extension to keep track of what they read about? Uh I guess maybe like six months into this thing. We just realized that it's a really challenging chicken and egg problem because there's just so many steps to get people to it's sort of like verify what they've read and we had several hundred users in a couple you know people were dribbling some comments and but it wasn't nearly at the scale they all that we needed it to be at so at that point. Correct me if I'm wrong. I think this was like two years ago. We just started thinking of all different kinds of applications nations. That are core. Technology is capable of you know we started with rarely just building retract. Her that had no user interface or there is is no website where he could even leave the comments or anything like that so that was sort of the core of AI product at the time and when we quite a while to build that and then when we finally had a public facing website where users could install the extension and comment on the articles. First of all we always took privacy very very seriously so you could never without explicitly indicated. You've read an article you can certainly never see what everyone's priority history but as far as surfacing the articles which you know you talked about if multiple people would read the the a given article to completion that would allow to be surfaced on the homepage of the site and But the reach of the anonymous so you can only Steve you know x amount of users invested this amount of time in reading the article and still even without the comments is sort of collisions of people re investing their time to read an article to completion yet spending the time and then having find the article being surfaced even without the comments. That's why they were great articles silverstone these things just sort of come out of the ether with the users who have opted didn't have the extension and that's where I think you know. We saw first hand that this was just sort of an emergent phenomenon of It's it's really interesting. Unique indicator of what's worth reading is what other people invested their time in to reading and there were other kind of like just weird weird moments early on when we realized just kind of like. It's a strange thing just like when you see a piece of information that you're like Oh that's interesting that's new. That's it's relevant for many a big Aha moment happened when we first started using the chrome extension on ourselves. I wasn't English major and I'm like like a big time reader. I've always identified as a reader. I love reading and got the chrome extension stalled headaches idea about cleaning up comments and fixing thank civil discourse but had like a crazy moment of clarity about you know a month after using this thing myself where I realized I don't even finish initial articles on. I look at like fifty to a hundred articles every single week. But because we brought the really profound tracking mechanism chose me crystal so clear. You only finished two of those or one of those and that was like really so this is crazy little side note in our history but for likes six months we were trying to fitbit for your online reading plug into our service. Get this data for yourself and you can actually improve improve your online reading habits by just measuring your ability to focus on your ability to pay attention and and you know hundreds of users sign sign up for that reason alone in our are still kind of using the technology in that way to you know. Keep track of how they're doing online. It comes back to that thing worse before about attention attention spans and whatnot. It's kind of nerve wracking when you see. Just how perpetually distracted we are on the Internet that's the status quo when you're online in two thousand nineteen. You're just moving our. I'm looking Jeff Computer Right. Now he's got like seventy two tabs open got stuff freaks me out and and I think part of what we're trying to do is help people to just focused focused. And just you know just do one thing at a time while you're online and right now to read like a thirty or forty minute really. BC article maybe something let's turn like Vanity Fair G. Q.. Or at the New Yorker you have to stay in thanking and what what we do now. Is We help you do that. We make reading something that you can actually focus on. Yes I love that. It's so interesting I was just kind of floating on your homepage again. As as you were talking gang and this idea of incentivising thoughtful deep reading is huge because we are so overwhelmed with content. Don't and in many ways. I feel like in addition to helping practice using that muscle strengthening that focus muscle. What's great about the community is that it also helps cut through the noise so it's also a place where like minded conscious folks are also also saying? Hey here's something that actually was really easy to focus on because it's incredibly captivating. It's really interesting. Why don't you check it out so I feel like there's and two dynamics at play one getting better up focusing and reading in to making sure that when I am applying focused reading? I'm doing it to the best content content that's been published today and I think that's really cool. I am totally guilty of reading a headline and being like got it. No that opening elbrick nine to the dinner table discussion. Every human on the planet has done that. It's hard not. The Internet is built to make us do that. That's how it functions. It's a it's a EH. You know. It's been referred to as a slot machine Wheel or whatever but the point is that's like a well established convention of Social Media Bite size pieces of information that that hit you like a you know an ongoing wave versus sitting with one individual piece of content for for a longer amount of time. Exactly exactly so I wanted to switch gears a bit. I feel. We've gone great insight into the origin story. You know hacking together this chrome extension evolving into the community which we have today surfacing the best new free content Letting folks developed the ability to focus and focus on that one thing you know reading one great piece of content. I want to hear a bit about the future of read up when you both think about the goals for the community for the company. What are some of those milestones? Look like that's an awesome question and it's it's a challenging one for us because we're just a three person team where like I mean. We had a late night last night on the most boring stuff that I won't tell you about just in details constantly But Yeah No. It's definitely really do on answer that I have an idea about what I think. We Wanna see for the world. Really Frank Equate. which is that in five or ten years? It should be easier to Sharon to talk to other people.

Jeff Camera US Bilbao Ndi Hunt Radio Youtube software developer Texas Sham Sharon Steve Anthony BC
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

14:09 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Thank. Thank you so much for being on product Hunt Radio today. It's so great to have you on the show particularly because this is a very exciting time for revolution ventures. We've had exciting announcements in the last couple of months. I thought it might be fun to kick off with you just telling us a bit about you your role and what's going on at revolution inches of an se. Thanks so much for having me. Yeah it is an exciting time for revolution. We started the firm fifteen years ago. I co-founded with each case. He was the founder of revolution. You are the founder of AOL and then we found a revolution together and at that time the idea was to hence the name revolution. Invest in big categories were billions of dollars are being spent an old fashioned way but we think that exciting entrepreneurs can use technology to transform us. So we've been doing it for a long time and Have really divided how we do that. Into three pieces we have a seat fund An early stage call it on series fund and the later stage refund And I oversee our our series fund that's called Revolution Ventures and we We recently raised in announced our our third fund revolution ventures the three and two hundred million dollar fund that sort of the right size for us. We think that were unique. A couple of dimensions. The size matters to that one something. Common among among all of the revolution companies and revolution finds his. We've built a brand and built an approach investing outside Silicon Valley. We have nothing in Silicon Valley. I've got an office in San Francisco. The reality is the kinds of companies. We back Rian courage them to look it industries in fine white space where the incumbents are not competing and. That's really exactly what we did when we started revolution. Fifteen years ago and what we continue to today we're based in Washington. DC for no other reason than that Near where a AOL was. I got to know Steve. 'cause I was running venture capital group at AOL. Time Warner overseeing that and I joined him to start revolution here and we started in DC but knew that we were not going to be in the backyard of most of the most popular tech companies at times. So we We started going where they weren't and Revolution is out pretty well alone for investing in companies outside of Silicon Valley. And we've built up. We built the consider leading meeting Brandon. That revolution benchers the thing that That I'm particularly focused on As I said as a series a investment fund and one of the things that we really love about these sort of off the beaten path geographies and I think something that probably resonates with a lot of your hustle style. listeners is in many of these companies are in geographies that don't have as established Sort of financial backing ecosystem at Surro- Their companies that have often had to bootstrap themselves find market fit without significant sort of investment capital. If had to figure out a way you to do it themselves and we've really specialized in Being the kind of investor that partners with those those kinds of entrepreneurs and what we're proud of is we. We tend to stick around in the good times and the bad which is something that I think the venture community Rodley has been criticized of not always doing we detail on that as you like that's a little bit about women revolution ventures or refund. Amazing thank you so much. There's so many things that you mentioned that I was furiously scribbling notes. About what makes your work so unique and one of the things I wanted to pick up on. Was this intentional. Aw strategy of focusing outside Silicon Valley and the reason I wanted to start with. That was because I've noticed over the last few dozens of interviews I've had with down versus whereas founders and investors or folks who are. Both of those hats does that more and more people seem to be falling on from this trend. which seems seems like you kind of started or at least have been doing for a while kind of made it your intention to do where? They're realizing that. Outside of the predictable hubs we turn to when we think of like startup. In like entrepreneurship. There is a lot of really exciting talent A lot of really great innovation happening exactly. Choose your words also beaten path and I think it's really interesting to hear you say that that's something that you've committed to for so long. It's Kinda sticking to the origins a revolution in revolution bunches. I thought it might be kind of fun to just hear a bit more about U.. Unlike what you're doing did for you started working space. I always like to ask. VC's come on the show. It was a job that they imagined themselves doing when they were at College College. Or maybe even in their first tech all is that the case for you yes. Oh that's an awesome question. The answer is no but largely because I didn't even know it was so my very first job was when I was fourteen and I beg to get it at a at what was then a computer store because they had such things. This is a long sometime ago. and I wrote some software some pretty basic softer. In in retrospect that helped that store build a community online line back then that was before there was a commercially available Internet and that really was the genesis of my interest in Tak and I got involved in sort of the the community ran me at that time So I've always had an interest in what technology can do to bring people together And built companies. That was that was early in my life I went to school. I came out of school In a recession and Took a job where I had a previous internship because I needed a job job And that was in the banking business. And I've been very fortunate in my life to have had some great mentors and for one reason or another the chairman and CEO at the bank. Sort of defy me and tapped me on the shoulder brought me under his wing as a I was very young guy at that point white and really taught me how business was done. There was a public traded company but that the chairman that company also some communications companies in media businesses. And I got exposure of those media businesses and then helped them with some investments in A. And that's where the spark really took off for me. And I knew that I wanted to do was be in the Caserta at the intersection of technology. A deal may game communications. And that that's what led to My career here and I that I got involved in a in a Fonda helped co found early on a win over desma mentioned a while when it merged with Time Warner and oversaw shaw investments not just for AOL HBO Warner Brothers Timewarner cable that was really an amazing opportunity. That's where I got to know. Steve and I partnered with us. Steve Start Revolution as I said to. Really focus not just on that sort of traditional media and communications areas to use that to transform all kinds of categories Gore's so it's been an arc as I said no better start but it's been I think like most rears one foot in front of the other and you see where it takes you. I love that. Yeah that's awesome really cool brands that you've got to work within your time. And Time Warner as well as soon as I hear. Hbo And just like all. My favorite shows has come really cool another thing. I thought you're in any position to speak about. Is I guess just tackling rolling objections. That one will face when they're trying to do something differently. And when I look at the product on community all the different makers in it and all the different parts parts of the world that they're in in all the different stages in their journey there in all of them are gonna come across some kind of barrier some kind of obstacles from the beginning with revolution. Feels like you had this plan to focus quite broadly geographically and identify great entrepreneurs governors who are outside of the main tech hubs. I'd love to hear from you about how you sold out to your first limited partners and how you continue continued to to sell that Meredith. Now I imagine there must've been times where you had some hesitation or doubt and I'd like to hear any tactics. You have around in getting connection from people when you are trying to do some friends Yar so I mean maybe I'll be specific about revolution than maybe a broader roger like most things appear to be overnight successes. Revolution was not you know. It's been a fifteen year overnight. Success I know you you talked talked about the same thing with Alex. Conrad are media sort of makes icons out of these stories and everybody feels like Oh my gosh you've just on this upward path. The reality is I haven't been smart enough or lucky enough either to be involved with firms or companies have all been just sort of on an upward path. You know there's ups and downs in everything. Revolution on this idea of investing in these off the beaten path geography's really was opportunistic As I mentioned mentioned the open We just went where we saw opportunity and we knew we were not going to be sort of competing on the same terms of the incumbents on Sandhill road. which is you know Silicon Valley's venture capital community so we just started doing things that we thought were really interesting and then when we look back that's when we realized what these companies had in common common most of the pieces of what we made money were not typical places? We realized why that was and we had a strength. We advantage of investing Initially all principal capital. So so we didn't raise from. LP's initially It was You know it was all capital from the partners primarily cases and that gave us the opportunity unity to experiment and call it bootstrap on our own kind of way business and then What we identified what our product market fit? It was which was taken a unique approach being very hands on with companies taking a concentrated position doing him in the off the beaten path ways and being their capital partners not just investors really focused on business building. That's when we went out and talked her LP's We had the good fortune of Just having story but having done it because the story came matter what we did and really strong returns and that's what motivated our first. LP's to take a risk which in any first time find is. What Mel p US US right Around for a company you know it. It implies risk. So that's the backstory and revolution. I think the analogies are pretty pretty straightforward for folks. You know whether they're starting businesses or thinking about the next step in careers or trying to start their own funds which Dr Work on product market said identify. What you'RE GONNA be willing to back away from what your bat and continue to short iterative overtime? Don't overcapitalize yourself in the meantime until you have something that you think works and then make the decision about whether or not you. You think it's prudent to take on the responsibility of other people's capital because that is a that is not revealed decision You know we we take it seriously and and any founder should take seriously taken outside capitalist. Well it's Not every not every one of them does and that shortsighted unfair. I'm I'm so that's how I think about it. We've unthinking here and I think I think there's a lot of analogies wherever you order. Yeah that's wonderful. Thank you so much for jarring Thanks for the reminder of the value of resilience perseverance. Because I know you've mentioned on previous podcasts that I feel like it's a point that has to be made time and time again. The idea of an overnight success very rarely the case and I love to bring that point up again and and remind people about it over and over again because I feel that we're always met with contradictions of this truth when we scan headlines or when read the news or you when we check out social media it's very easy to then diminish one's own during an one's own successes because it feels like someone always thought there quicker or faster faster or bigger Appreciate your honesty with. I think it's really admirable. I WANNA Focus a bit on the specific verticals goals and spaces that over these fifteen years. You've had a chance to dive deep into when I think of all the different spaces product on makers are operating trading in in the community operating in. It's extremely broad but one of the spaces that really over the last couple of years has been like heating up Is this direct active consumer space. I know that you are someone. That's worked with. Like some amazing brands like framework. For example. I kinda just WanNa hear like one like your take on D. Two C.. Right now and then like maybe here a bit more specifically about trends in this space like maybe leading into some of the a couple in your portfolio Observations there. He had a tenth grade. I love talking about this. 'CAUSE might time. There's never been a better time to be a consumer right. The opportunities and options to consume things are getting broader and broader. And you know if my kids were to go back thirty years and see how things operated and were purchased back then they would be astounded at the friction. That's in the system and I think the companies that understand understand ways to deliver the consumers what they want when they want how they want with the least amount of friction are the ones that are are finding the most success in the accumbens. Who who don't do that or the ones that have been or will be threatened so that certainly lens through which we look at the companies?.

Silicon Valley Revolution Ventures Time Warner AOL Steve Hbo Hunt Radio San Francisco Washington US Caserta Rian College College Rodley Brandon
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

12:26 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Amazing. I mean pretty. Cool that you had it ready now given the proliferation of podcast. And all that. That's so cool. So let's talk a bit about the amazing Sifi powers that Lyre Bird now brings to D- scripts suite of features. It was pretty cool to see all the different takes on this. I think it was like a wired article that was like you can fake your own voice. Now how library I get onto descript teams radar. Was it because you were already trying to think of the most. Seamless seamless way for folks to edit audio in post production. And then you kind of thought wait like what if someone actually needed to correct something that was mistaken taken and they don't have the original file or that can't speak to that guest anymore and then you're thinking of all the different ways to do it in house and then you're like wait. Someone already doing it there. I'm kind of curious about how that turned out pretty much from the first time. We Demo D- D- script to somebody and showed them how you can delete a word from the from the document and it until the from the audio people would ask us what happens when you type a word. Does it generate audio in so it was kind of the the self evident other side of the coin and so when we saw we saw labored launch. We were immediately excited. Not just about the the product and the quality of what they were doing but also the ethical approach that the team was taking to these issues and they had invested in putting some protections in place to make sure that you could only train your own voice and so you know we just kept a watch on what they were doing and at some point had an opportunity to talk to them and the more we talk the more it started to feel like there had always been. I'm a liar bird shaped hole in descript where they were building this incredible technology and we were building the receptacle for that Technology Ed. And what we're doing with this over TUB overdubbed product is is the first thing but we are excited to introduce a new class of hey. I enabled tools that make it easier for people to practice their craft. That's amazing I think also the fact that it becomes much easier for makers and creators to do the work that they do is amazing and really the people who benefit are folks like us Nina folks listening audience right because we have incredible oh quality authentically delivered in exactly the way the creators intended. So I I know I've won a super duper excited. Another thing I wanted to chat to you about is there. There's such thing as a typical day at descript for you. A lot of the people who are listening our founders themselves leaders themselves And I was. I'm just curious. I guess you're probably entering a new stage for the company. Now things with growing you'll be building out the product roadmap. I just wondered yet does a typical day. Okay for Andrew Exist and if not where your main responsibilities that you just make sure you get done. I don't know what a typical typical day is. But we're definitely eh going through a stage right now where the team including Lyre Bird is twenty five people and having just completed our series A. and launch this product. We're seeing a lot have growth and we're starting to to scale out the team and If you take the the library team is still based in Montreal in San Francisco. It's been me a designer office manager doing all the back office and a bunch of engineers. So I've been kind of the the person that does the other stuff from marketing to customer support and and and so on and now post launched. That's just not not scaling so we're trying to find ways to carve pieces of me off and create different rolls around them. And I've I've I've been through this once before before. It's it's one of the harder transitions for for founder. At least the first time I hope it'll go smoother this time. Where when you're when you're small and the a lot of what's made you successful his your ability to do things and as you start to scale you have to learn to not do things and let other people do do things at hire people to do those things and give them the space to do those things so that's kind of what we're what we're starting to do now? We just hired somebody to to run engineering for us. We didn't we didn't have any other engineering management in the company before that and now we're hiring we have somebody that's doing customer support and and I think the stuff that will stick with me for a while is hopefully talking to customers and in some of the product management stuff around the editor product. Wow Oh yeah. That's pretty cool. It's funny what you said about Beijing that stage where you're scaling and then having to really just let go and like delegate some of the things you as a founder used to control that seems to be a common theme that I see happening in a lot of the interviews that I do. And then you talk about this challenge of finding the right talent talent right like you need someone to run engineering for you. I just wonder now that you're a few companies in to being founder. Does sourcing great talent talent. Get any easier. Do you feel you've been able to either identify any strategies tactics or shortcuts. Anything really that you you feel might make you better at picking the right folks now than let's say ten years ago. Yeah I mean I sure hope so for for one thing I know what I'm what I'm looking for. Especially when it comes to hiring people in management in a lot of companies though the way that people get into management management is they'll be individual contributors who have great ideas and nobody wants to listen to their ideas because it's the people in management that gets to have those conversations so they say okay. I guess I'll become a manager. And then they become a manager for the wrong reasons not because they care about people or unlocking unlocking the the the best possible incarnation of their teams. But because they care about getting their ideas to be listened to so it's it's actually quite hard to find people who who who have got into management for the right reasons But you know when you you when you talk to them you can. You can tell pretty easily. It's just it's just a question of knowing what you're looking for after having made a bunch of mistakes made those mistakes in the past and and looking to avoid them so that's one thing but I mean we still are. I still make mistakes with hiring and it's it's just that one of the hardest things to do. Yeah that's true. I often think of it just from the perspective of the human condition it. We are so hard to read even at the best of times and sometimes even what we think we want. I'm thinking of this as like someone. Applying for a job isn't necessarily what you want because you don't know until you're doing I and I feel like that's why there's always a constant complexity around hiring and like finding the right person because there are so many unknowns until you're actually in the trenches you don't know how you respond or how you'll deliver but yeah I appreciate you sharing that. I think that's really cool. Another thing that I wanted to ask you about so in in product and the makers community in particular we start new discussions all the time and something that seems to come up a lot. Is this idea of like personal development particularly as as a leader or as a founder a lot of people want to invest in continuous learning. A lot of people want to ensure that they're doing everything in their power for to be the best leader that can be support the people that they're collaborating with. I just wondered like maybe what your regime looks like. Or what are the things that you do to invest in yourself in in case second inspire some of the folks who are listening to try them out will I perfected myself back in two thousand fourteen or so just stock to them the peak Andreessen no What do I do I mean? I'm I'm actually going to do a like intensive weekend leadership kind of seminary thing that a friend of mine recommended. It was one of those like backhanded recommendations. It's like yeah you should. You should really do this is i. Guess means there's something deeply wrong with me so I try. I try to do stuff like that. I try to read whatever whatever whatever People recommend I try to create an atmosphere in the company where it's easy for people to give me feedback and at that. How does feedback work at D- script by the way this? This is another conversation we were having recently like people were wondering how often should they catch up with their teams and what different channels should be available for folks in teams to chime into stuff. So I'd love to get a bit of insight into how that works descript at product for the record we've all got Weekly Khatib's relied manager. We use slack for everything. We don't have dedicated We don't have any like dedicated internal emails to each other or anything like that and then every Monday we have a team call which happens on Zoom 'cause we're distributed team and that's where we recap of metrics all the KPI's then folks who might be leading on a specific project project that have updates to share like feature a building or whatever. Get a chance to talk to the team about that. So that's kind of us not show curious how how you manage feedback at descript and maybe how you connect as a team hybrid so we have a similarly. We have a weekly all hands meeting where someone will give an update on a project. They're working on. We'll talk about metrics the only unusual thing we or one of the unusual things we do is we have a we have an internal podcast and every week excellent shot at that so we rotate. We have a theme and so it's an opportunity to dog food the APP but it's also an opportunity to learn about someone to coffee that. Yeah no I think I think more and more companies will do stuff like that is completely. He's setting aside my my bias in the issue. It just it just it just makes a Lotta sense other than that I look we. We don't have this figured out at our scale and it's something thing that as we're starting to scale now just now talking about what we're going to do around standardizing compensation and performance reviews news and how those things are interlinked. So we're we're actually as we started talking to firms to help us through that process. They're telling us that we're we're doing doing an earlier than a lot of companies do but I think it's good to get that foundation in place because otherwise it's too late so I do you know one on ones ends with people probably about about once a month which is which is not very much because at this point most everybody reports into me And I'm still mostly justly an individual contributor with a bunch of senior largely autonomous people on the team that's mostly worked out and and that's an opportunity to to give feedback but I think like we don't have any like software set set up or anything like that and we'll have to figure out a better way you to do all this stuff as we start to scale. Yeah that's awesome. I think it says a lot about the status quo that speaking to experts in culture and people policy telling you that you just raised series a. You're actually coming in quite early. But I hope that we will shift that status quo. I hope more our founders like yourself will reach that milestone and thank now is the time to invest in people in culture. Because of course that's what matters and that's what's key so very very Positive to hear that from you right. I know I've only got like a minute more of your time and you've just told me about all the busy things you have to do So before I let you go oh Every product on radio episode. I ask our guest to share the products that they love. They could be the APPs on your home screen. Might be some cool new device. Is You just got at home. But you know what product.

descript Lyre Bird Beijing Montreal Andrew Andreessen San Francisco Khatib
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Imagine that you'll take in sentences are pre written and through machine learning. You're basically piece in them together to make a I. I are driven reading. Oh cool record is all my favorite stuff. Okay humans plus data plus Aetna so the best firstly will take your natal chart and give your child but the way the U I is though it's not the most beautiful oh out the UI works really well so what I mean by that as a typical natal chart as I said would be sixteen page document that you would would have to organize yourself whereas what the pattern does is it breaks down into themes so I'll read your few of my theme nice of Oh. There's no signal down here but a theme like my number. One theme is dissatisfaction. Oh hyperactivity and then it will say and then you swipe through each statement but the way the statements constructed are with machine learning because it will I will read sale reach your pattern because I can put your patterning battening. I can ask text you saying where we born yeah and then I cannot you can read all about your personality nobis some sentences that are similar but a whole section so that's how it slight done is so small personal best thing is. I can connect you and me and find out how we trigger each other. Wow is this relationship going to walk. That's also GONNA be fruitful. What are the defining Godina Mix of our relationship. This is so critical for how as someone like me. I think a thing of founder has to do that. Other people don't have to do is basically change that personality to like the hundred different people they come in contact with to to get things done so we find out that somebody likes planning an organization. I conscious throw in a van on them last minute and expect them to deliver it whereas if Nice ones pass not throw it off chaos and business I might call. I can give fat person this job so that Jenga thing I mentioned earlier his constant testing tweaking pulling seeing how much you can give someone what you can take away and this APP helps me. I I told my today I was on it for three hours straight. I was best with their. I'm still obsessed with it. I check. It's my most check tap. If you point screen time yeah the most one other apps that I'm obsessed ways is notion love notion yeah apps started using notion and got the whole team on obsessed with it also obsessed with I love older astrology APPs. I use coastal on sanctuary decent true. That's a new one also amazing. I love superhuman. Oh Yeah I'm used that allow yeah. I'm still on that train. I'm it's like forty dollars a month. Isn't it thirty dollars a month which is about twenty pounds and the way I see he is is my mice Jeez. Service award would not pay for it saves. You time claims to do it. It's not it's not the time saving it's the anxiety are used to get about our Africa about this niggling feeling I had unanswered dropped balls you and now I don't get that because I know that everything's organized a beautiful beautiful you. I like you know I definitely it. Could you could go on and do this yourself but it's ugly. I obviously love beauty star Yeah. She's great took like a couple of my friends have gone up so I use a lot and I give tested back. So there's three Michela she said on Pino on constant pain. I I think so beautifully disarm so impressed by the design vojtech shouted because we sign the same off this year. I love that I love Moody. Not which is my friend. Amy's Alpi check our law like for example right now. I'm like my body of my stomach's feeling really tender. I'm a little bit irritable. I will check me your day now. I think my being like this and the media will tell you not only based on your cycle but based on all these other things like the weather the humidity where the moonies right now like why am I got in the way I'm acting and then I also check fairly which Gino lally early. AM So billy fairly I met through local Globe and you know I am quite interested in in sexual while she goes sexual wellness yeah which is what as I am also more interested. She keeps laughing at me. She's like the this optional fee. It's just a big time so yes you know. I think it's brilliant. Alien happened. I'm excited to see where it goes. I love really I'm even just their new settlers great name using it's so important to have these conversations as human beings and particularly women and I remember one of the subject lines is like how long do you like sex last four and I was like no one's ever asked me that. I'm glad that she could things recommendations. Medias were great content. I feel like we're we're entering a new era of wellbeing and identity. Thanks to your product and all these other ones that you've mentioned so. It's definitely a great time to be alive. I'm very happy for her. It's really about for me about data driven wellbeing. I know equally clinical as spiritual. I need data just as much. I trust my intuition Russian. I like facts. Yes these new APPS GIFT FOR MR for mysticism. which is what I'll because I think mysticism shoot important? The woman is the most mystical object tougher yeah so like I love mysticism. Bios so love like hardcore information so for folks who want to follow you and beauty sack. Where can they find you online so I am on instagram and twitter as at Shawmut even read and then my everything. Bt Stock which is a great challenge to get fake name there yeah great things. I wanted it to be like technical stock full beauty. They'll tell you age is to think of it. It makes stocks and he's asking peachy excellence tax. That's great. Thank you so much. Thank keys. Thanks for having me. Hey everyone thank you so much for tuning into product hunt radio. I've got a favor to ask you so you take a minute to review us on itunes apple podcasts or wherever you're listening to us right now thank you thanks for tuning in. We've back next week but in the meantime shared the podcast your friends on twitter and tagged guest here in a future episode season..

twitter Aetna founder apple Gino lally Moody Africa Pino Amy Bt Stock billy Shawmut thirty dollars forty dollars twenty pounds three hours
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

09:57 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Using the technology mind. Give me a break. We need this for our livelihood but also so I used to be clinically obese well before you knew me and and when I was clinically obese I would go on these fad diets. You know thirty days has no fast food and then of course what happened on Day thirty one right. I I I need everything because I hadn't dealt with the real reason why I was overeating. I hadn't dealt with what's called the internal triggers and so that's that is the answer that distraction starts from within and so these tools these these potential distractions outside of thus can lead us astray but only if we let them and if we learn how to prevent distraction than we can become indestructible nice they turn on near awesome awesome awesome to see the progress to and and also hooked still see tweets every now and then of people sharing photos of the book hooked in. It's still selling selling well. It seems like so awesome work funny. You should mention just today. Someone texted me are sorry I was on link Linden. They and they sent me a quick note of yeah. I saw your book. Wait is that Ryan Hoover from a product now definitely had a huge night on the book for Nice learn a lot from you. I mean a lot of the designer. Prototypes took some oh you're learnings in your blog posts and everything in so definitely. Pete's pieces of the hooked model and things like that myself awesome. That's that's the Best Calvin Open. You can give me right near. Hey everyone thank you so much for tuning into product hunt radio. I've got a favor to ask you. Will you take a minute to review us on ITUNES apple podcasts or wherever you're listening to us right now thank you everyone. I've been essay from productivity here. I'm head of maker outreach so we haven't met before Hulo. You might recognize me from the podcast product Hunt Radio and today. We're actually doing an extra special episode of product on radio. says some of you joined for. Ryan's live session few weeks ago and I'm back so I thought it'd be really cool to get all of you in the community chiming in and talking about what new product the website you are obsessed with so invite you to join the broadcast whenever you bought something to share. 'cause we'd except here from you. Thanks so much for joining. How are you today. I'm doing pretty good. I got a pretty awesome concept of cool so where the world argue right now Indiana Nice cool say tell us. What new thing have you discovered that you're obsessed with learnt John APP from you guys because I go on the website every day. I have the APP is a daily staple of mine. has been for about four years now on the APP. Opt Out about from you guys called Quad pay and basically what it does is it. I guess you could say quad. Watch quadruplets like payment of an item that you want and to force and you pay it off every two weeks. So there's something like one hundred bucks you can break it down now and pay twenty-five every two weeks. I just saw a really good APP because you know it makes things a little bit more affordable and you can do it. Extremely low rates like you could even do incite what four bucks in pair dollar heavy two weeks if you want you know but it just came on clutch and I learned about about it from you guys so I just wanted to give you props for that long yeah it's on on both hanjury and Ios so so you guys should check it out quite yet download that guys really awesome okay cool great okay joe the hello welcome to product Henry a very good. How are you great also yeah so consumer's email client as found recently so the use case is I was looking for Nina Nima biggest because are starting to switch more and more like asked we Akis emails and g mail is super slow so I just found this imma consider which I think the founder was growth person in Intercon so now waste basically. It's more like the cynical way to save like cheaper superhuman in a way but okay yeah but it's more like because there's like round is like ten dollars per months. subscriptions like ten dollars per month and it's pretty cool like you're gonNA have to wait like superhuman and it actually makes you more focus when you're dealing with email says is basically turns your inbox into dualist service and it's very simple like okay like present for an email is can be just like it's a is it a priority or deal with slater or or dispute this particular senator automated email forever ago yeah and it's pretty fast like if you have more than go to emails in to actively using you. Can Use twitchy pretty quickly. That sounds awesome. I like the idea of turning the emails house into actions in dualist. I've seen various email clients tried to do that. I remember like in the old days. Outlook could let you create tasks. GMO also more and more people are integrating features from products like boomerang where you can like snoozing email or reserve reserve is emails and I definitely think we should move more towards that direction where instead of opening inbox and thinking oh my gosh go to sift through everything everything then find out what I need to action and what is just irrelevant having inbox not can do some of that work for you is definitely appealing right here. We go got hark theory on the line coin to hear about a series shortcuts. Hello I'd love to hear more about the series shortcuts obsessed with breath that some automation stuff but you have to like you basically like US t t t aloe Ola Nice so you can like certain apps to do certain things but when they now they have like an automation future where it will automatically likely trigger like say for instance. You liked arrive at home like it'll automatically turn your lights on or Alcoho- aw you can set it to like if you go to a certain APP it will automatically like connect your air pods or you can have it bookmarked bookmark the website they are on like automatically you know connect different things with nc what all you can do but it's now on the the latest data so you can test it and if you wanna like find really really good shortcuts. There's a website called routine hub dot com. I've been going there. Thank you so much. Sharing these sites will turn Syria into your personal assistant all right. This is Great Amazon. You spend a lot of time sharing best new things on product Aktan across social channels. was another cool launch. You've seen recently yeah. Thanks for Cueing May in There's I don't know Hawaii share a lot of music APPs. Today I think lately last week was an artist like an indie electronic artists some I'm on who teamed up with the developer and made the side project called Tyco forecast and what type of forecast basically is. It's a very simple the APP that uses black sky of weather APP. Api to detect the weather around you all the the Vin conditions and everything and it uses a I to create it used to automatically generate up played this based on that weather where you're at. That's yeah it's like. Why did I think that or like you know. Why wasn't I think it might have been there before but I just this is really well-executed and that I really liked my playlist risk it was it was really hard here in the Netherlands lawsuit as like I was just looking up the makers comments and everything says like if it's too hard then the the more shootout or if it's too cold than the music might be more uplifting so you kind of like you know. I don't know get energetic and then pres body forty something like that but it was really cool. That's awesome music yeah. I wonder what happens when your weather is like. I like here in London where it rains a lot. It would just be like Brit pop or grunge simply had yeah Ramstein. That's when it's bad news outside. You're GONNA get Ramstein. It'd be interesting if it was localized as well not not like where you are in the world right like almost play like world music. You know what I mean. I'm in like the Carribean and I'm GONNA listen into like reggae. Okay folks. We are coming to the end of our broadcast now. Huge huge huge. Thanks thanks on behalf of the product teams for joining us this last hour..

Ryan Hoover Best Calvin Open Hunt Radio Indiana Quad Pete Hulo Nina Nima John slater Alcoho Amazon Syria Hawaii Intercon senator Henry
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Constraints constraints that actually like for me. It's not about g t._v. It's about the instagram stories from just a couple of people that i just find them joyful. I agree i. They have a love hate relationship with instagram. I sometimes fall down the black hole and just think where has my time gone. I probably could have done something better with that but to the point that you said they have also a facilitated these wonderful moments of delight where i can see what someone i care deeply about or whose opinion i admire very much has been up to today or it was thinking about today. Maybe on references something that's happened in the world or just what they're feeling and <hes> i cannot really get that anywhere else just yet except set for like i said the very specific content creators swallow no one on instagram that i want their opinions as the world like that is like the traffic fire of twitter and so i'll dip my toe into that occasionally but you know for me. Instagram stories are the creativity that these just a handful of the mazing storytellers that i follow like do on a daily basis and i'm really i love it like my two. Favorite accounts are even chen. She's amazing and a woman named. Mary have meant went from five mary farms who has the most amazing stories about living and working in a small small town on a ranch five hours north of the bay area with her four daughters and her husband and their zillions of breath. You know the working ranch. It's amazing and she is. She's a master of instagram stories something that if i could just i do a product hunt instance for her instagram stories. I would enforce seconds because they're amazing. They also have amazing amazing beef and allow okay. This is sponsored by the listeners. We loving contact it in fact. I doubt you'll hear this podcast but it she he's really special amazing well. Thank the listeners. We loving contact it in fact. I doubt you'll hear this podcast but it she he's really special amazing well. Thank you so much for those recommendations so for folks who are listing a now want to find out more.

instagram twitter Mary five hours
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Hunt radio where i'm joined by the founders investors and makers that are shaping the future of tech today. I'm joined by cortlandt allen. He is the founder and c._e._o. Of indie hackers i'm really happy that portland agreed to do something different different with this episode. Try something fun and focus on what not to do as a maker in hackers is a community of people who have successfully pitstop companies found sustainable growth and i thought there'd be a lot to learn from what has learned from his community so get the note pad out because we're going to cover really important topics like what not to do when validating ideas launching a product finding an audience generating generating revenue and we also talk about how to recover from setbacks. This is an episode. You don't wanna miss. It's packed with valuable advice coralline allen. Thank you so much for being on the show today. You are one of my favorite people in the tech world. What am i say founders and i feel feel like i'm speaking on behalf of all of the community when i say you're one of our faith makers really <hes> you are the founder and c._e._o. Of indie hackers which was same famously acquired by stripe just a few years ago for folks who are listening and maybe aren't familiar with india hackers because they've been living under a rock or something. Tell us about what it guess what you do well thanks for such a wonderful interwebbed as he made me feel so special. Hackers is community for makers who are interested in generating rating revenue from their side projects and things that are putting out online so contrast that a little bit from politics which is i think for all makers of any kind. Any hackers is more for entrepreneurship partnership business founder minded makers and so the site consists of a whole bunch of different parts. There's the india's podcast where i will bring makers on to talk about their businesses. Mrs and how they're making money. There are the interviews on the website where we'll interview people overtaxed and we asked everybody to share how much revenue they're making how they came up with their ideas how they got their first customers burgers how they built it etcetera and we've done about four hundred of those interviews and then we've got a community forum right on the homepage so it's full of makers asking each other questions you so. How do you market the side project or how did you find time to take time off your job to build the states that are just practical questions for people to sort of help each other out and help each other build successful fool online businesses. I think it's incredible what india hackers has been able to do one in terms of disseminating knowledge from as you say successful successful revenue generating businesses within the tech space because i know so many people that find value in the meet up in articles..

cortlandt allen india founder portland
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Found was we, we knew we wanted we needed to meet people quite quickly when we got that and just generally in the kind of start up community globally. We wanted to meet people as well. And, and just think taking that time to document share and became a really. Good way for us to, to meet people. I've also just found that I really get genuinely just a lot of fulfillment out of helping other people. So even today, I still I just met with a found a in early stage founded in boulder yesterday for coffee. I'm just I enjoy doing that. I'm trying to do that pollens of being once-a-week will once every couple of weeks all meet in person or Japan'a video coal. And just, you know chat with someone. If I can help out, it keeps me also, you know it keeps me in contact with people at a starting. The journey was eight years in, in is very different kind of situation as well. And then ultimately, I think it did become kind of transition, morphed into posh the marketing strategy as well. And it worked really well that way, we did a lot of blowing on a on the buffet blog, and eventually, we chose to have two separate blogs, which was still have today. One. We call the social blog along is the open blog, though, from blog as villi kind of opening up about how we run as a company, the ups and downs that the challenges in the successes, we've had in the social blog is much more focused on social media customers in helping them providing useful resources for them. So it's being worked really well flows. It's also just fulfilling liberating to the open open shaft, as well. Yeah. Well, I mean, in that leads to the other aspect of teeny about buffering yourself, as how opening Ben in most companies don't share salaries of, of what they paid people. They don't share their roadmap so publicly there, there's a lot of unique characteristics buffer that I think, I think, really engender, a sense of belonging, and almost like they're your consumers, the users of buffer in fans or sort of a long long for the ride, at least that's the perception, that I that I see what was heard of the thought process of being so open and building in public that way. Yeah, it's, it's interesting, you mentioned kind of being along for the ride we've had times where I remember in the early days happened fairly regularly way, would just will growing fester them, we were able to scale infrastructural, the understanding, we had full like DevOps and things like that. And so we would we would go down from time to time and, you know, understandably quite a lot of customers, even angry upset on down. It's kind of, you know, discipline that workflow but we would just try to be very responsive on social media, an Email, and things and very quickly. You contend that around I think when you are showing things transparently is while you just building up that trust with customers, and so very quickly, those situations completely turned around into this kind of allowing light support from this huge community of customers, and even non-customers just people at a kind of cheering on as a as a company as well. And yes, so. In the early days, it came from this desire to share more openly. And I think we found that, you know, by showing even meeting with another founder, that's maybe a bit further along than we were, if we trying to get the advice in. We shed all of numbers openly, nothing. We could just get much more useful feedback on vice than they ended up. Nope. Inning open sharing some of that is much more easily as well. So I think those are some of the things that were the initial you kind of need the, the initial win or that developed nation to then, do it more. But it just kind of kept building up for us, and we found while it's got all these benefits with customers, a non overtime we as we grew the team, and we got to maybe let kind of critical of ten people in. It's also really the team dynamics Matto culture starting to really become crafted and things we found that. Being really open within the company as well was just incredibly powerful..

boulder Ben founder eight years
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"You are on on the note of digital business card earlier this week. I was at I walk home. No demo day. Somebody said, hey, let's trade info. And I think I might have said, oh, we don't have bump or maybe not. But. Basically he told me about this new which I had seen launch earlier that day. And it's hi Hello. Did you see that? I did. But I didn't use it for the first time. It was it was really cool. Really? Hi. Hello. Hi, hello. Who is similar to bump were you bump cell phones? No what you do. Is. You take a photo. They open up. Hi, hello. And you take a photo of that QR code automatically send you a safari link alive web link with their contact info that you can then save. So it has everything at once from cell phone number to name title Email. Do you remember highlight yet so highlight was self by south west twenty the winner of south by southwest like twenty four teen knows earlier than that? I think twenty twelve or twenty thirteen but highly it was bold. So highlight was was an app where you turn it on in the background. It would track where you are. And then it will report to anyone in the network. You know, here's where Suzy is. Or here's a Ryan is. And so you'd kind of generally know, where people are in who's around you, and you could then, of course, kind of stock in their profile and see if you had a coffee shop, for example, you can kind of see who's on highlight in this coffee. Shop around me it'll to didn't didn't work out. But it was such a cool idea. Because it was so weird. I think is sucked everyone's battery drives kinda creepy that was part of it. Yeah. I would never I know. But creepy products kind of the compel me because the ones that are creepy. There's sometimes like a little niche of people who will grow that will adopt. It like using your real name on Facebook. For example, was actually weird for a lot of people in the beginning is like don't use my real name on the internet. Now, one of creepy people that has used four square and swarm for almost ten years, you're like a mayor or something. For I have fifty mayorships or something like that. But I know the number of check ins, and it's like in almost thirteen thousand. Yeah. It's wild. You know, it's like, you don't really count the places you go in real life. And then you do it digitally, and you're like, wow, I do of this part was all part of my strategy or how I am able to remember things because I've checked in and swarm has a feature called search your history where if I enter in if I think I know the name of the place or think about the city where it was it'll literally populate. If I if I click Los Angeles, it will populate all of my check ins in Los Angeles. And could usually go one layer deeper than that to like that weird Instagram map to they do away with that..

Los Angeles Ryan Facebook Suzy ten years
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"A product yesterday where they help cities plan for these new types of transportation, like scooters bike sharing. And I think that that's like the time is coming when all cities are going to have to change. Yeah. I mean, what was the most recent news? I think it was skip in what other company got permits for scooters. Scoot. Yeah. Yeah. Which I think was limited to very small number of scooter. So it's it used to be scooter town for while and now now it's hard to find scooters. It's unfortunate what you Michael, what? What apps products jumping to work every morning? We can. I, I'm the one toll cat about I love. Did you give it a referral code. I lost. I got a bunch. This is great. We got a, let's we should do like a mini lightning round. So the first one is an app called station. It's a station dot IO. Basically it's like a browser for work. See, basically, load up all of your work web apps for Email your calendar, your slack, your to do list your, what's up everything. And it's it basically organizes my work. And so when I when you turn this on, you're logged into off your services and their one click away and you're not like going through all of these which tattoos on God, it's a frigging knowing and so it's just like it's changed how work it's been amazing and I have to do too much time in g mail. And so like it just makes my Email time so much more Sunday. So I've I saw station launch almost a year ago. I think it was in, I believe it's been a while looked at it, but they haven't apps store kinda built into it is so they support internal y. Z. apps to, right. So if you ask them like we have a off, icy founders access to face, like an internal resource for all the way he counters that supported our internal like product the we work on it. Why see? That's all all also supported. And so it's it's just great and they released like updates every couple of days. It's been probably like the my biggest put activity hack in the last year. Yeah, I find from a strategic perspective, what I found fascinating about it is once you get to some scale now becomes distribution channel, and although distribution is king when everyone is vying for attention signed that really interesting gathering really good spot what he got cad- one from the last batch that I've been using. A lot of titan, I've been really getting into a bunch of different investing ups. So like Robin Hood, I've been in for a bit, but tight my love because what Robin Hood hood did in terms of democratizing access to in individual stocks, tie. Titan is doing for investing in amend portfolio. But what I really like about them really beautifully designed is that it's like they communicate really well..

Robin Hood Titan Michael
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"He eventually turned that into his career which he is now, a videographer in travels around his was gonna to why until they had some storms to film. And then you know, create essentially stock video for this company and he loves what he's doing. He's found his passion and I hope more people can find their passion and then hopefully turn that passion into their career. 'cause I was tweeting someone earlier today. It's like if you and this is a riff off someone else's quote. But like if if you love what you're doing, another were ever Dane. In your life in a? Yeah, I think a lot of people, unfortunately just don't get to find that. And I think the key is do not treat anything like a kind of infinite Aventure. You have to decide your life's passion. I have to decide your life's work. Everything is like, you know, these are. These are kind of feedback loops that you step into the seem really small dumb. You know, it seems like sending an Email to someone when you're twelve or it seems like starting in Email us the turns into leadership position at angel list. And so I've encouraged people to not really think big picture and to just take that small idea, they had in the shower a little bit further experiment. Baronet will things coming over. This is fun. Thank you. Thank you for having us. Yeah, toxin. Now's the part of the show where we hear from you listeners we asked the product community. What's your favorite home screen app that few people know about here are a few of the responses on your message after the town he was Ryan might be after eight. Now he picked talk formally known as newsweekly and it is the beloved vying. If binding dies, everything that vine wise, but a progression of it all the content is here in Euch. So everything that he made is included. Carson content. I just liked the reading down of that unique and Cussing content even here in San Francisco, if you'd like to share your favorite

Ryan Aventure San Francisco Carson Euch
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"If you put an effort to rephrase, it takes two minutes to do, and it's I think, much more effective than highlighting something on kindle early, you, Laura. You can go buy a Natta poor sequencer online as consumer without a lab for thousand dollars, and this piece of harbor arrives. It's the size of your phone, and it's amazing the sequencer in you can sequence one hundred thousand continuous base pairs. And so I think I think, you know, probably listen of podcast or very excited technology. And I, I think if you're gonna look back and think about like what? What would be the equivalent of ordering like a computer sort of board in the nineteen eighties, I guess, or like earlier it would have been. I think getting sequencer and just understanding that the technologies coming in the fact that I can do that it's consumer. Now, today's mazing. Yeah. I mean, it is wild. How how much more accessible to Collier general has become, you know, before it was not only did you need to buy an expensive machine or have access to a desktop computer, but also the information the internet now is access to basically anything. YouTube alone is just like filled with everything. And this tying back to pioneered xlt. Now there there's, they're certainly still a disconnect though with access. I think mentorship yet what is, let's let's fast forward through three or four or five years, whereas pioneer look like, what is what's the alternate win for you? Well, I've a very clear grasp on the tenure vision. The ten year vision is that when you think of the the time, one hundred list, I want the largest fraction possible of people on that list to be pioneers and I think is very cheerful, and I think the way to get there maybe three or four years from now is to find ourselves in a world where we built a community, tight knit community or people are willing to be vulnerable in intimate with each other online. Just because they're part of the same network, if that makes sense. Just because they're part of the same tribe because that means we'll have built something real. Something were people feel like they're part of movement, and that means the help each other in ways that aren't immediately kind of gainful in the same way that you know if you meet someone else that an alumni of university kind of feel like you relate to them or why combinator or Zane a great job of that building chameleon and creating a brand just like Stanford or Harvard, I think that's right. And I think we'll want a scale that to thousands more people who will be tremendously impactful in domains outside of company entrepeneurship because I think the largest enemy that were fighting that with with pioneer is this kind of subtle enemy of self editing. It's that people who are really great, not quite sure if they should do that idea that they had in the shower, you know, and for listening to this podcast, you should basically that's the main message of pioneer. Is we're not telling people what to do. In fact, you have to have a project to apply. We're not giving people start up ideas, incubating things, or just telling people to chase their own dreams. And so five years from now, if we have something that feels like, you know fortnight in terms of the amount of activity on it. But instead of uselessly playing a game, these people are being productive in their own domain, I think will will feel like we're on our way to making a dent in the world or you mentioned part of your, I guess, trajectory in your career was was based on getting a response from an Email and it's feels like sometimes people just need like a tipping point is like one thing that leads to a series of things. And yeah, I think the the other funny thing, and I only told dynasty kind of like really recently, but only recently was when I was considering the decision to start the fund leave at kinetic career MIT, which was a really, it's probably the biggest made in my life. One of the things that I read was an article about his journey on sort of joy. Going from Israel to. I see in this the he made there and I think reading about somebody else and is having inspiration of like knowing that you could do this was almost the the trick to not sell out of that journey..

kindle YouTube Laura Collier Israel Zane Harvard Stanford five years thousand dollars two minutes four years ten year
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"And we so far we seem to be seeing all of them. How'd you mobile? So I think when I first heard the idea, it just really resonated because. You know, growing up in New Zealand, you don't really have a good sense for what the world is like on a broader scale. I think if you're very talented individual like a younger New Zealand and you want to be scientists, like how on earth do you do that? Like what university will take you? And I was insanely lucky in that I had a dad who is super excited about science and we just talk about it nonstop. And so I knew from a young age, that is something that was wonderful to work on, but I also the first Email ever sent. I replied that same day inviting you to come work, sort of you talk to that person in at a university in California. I think I mean, how? What is the likelihood of that rightly their hundred versions of that sent that same Email and never got a response? And so how many girls are out there who just, you know, never got the chance to to kind of common and kind of explore science and growing that way. And so I think one of the super Chinese about pioneers like, wow, you could literally like hundred number of excited young scientists doing real work and early age. Feeler. Fascinating fact is one of the seminal papers longevity. Since two author nature paper in the nineteen nineties was a fifteen year old girl. We're gonna project with nobody else in lobbied work on. And so people can do great work, but I think it's really underappreciated accent, which it's a real phenomenon. Yeah, yes. So we kind of relevant to this conversation a bit is the product team is attributed team and we have teammates in Paris, Bulgaria, Belgium, all over the world, India. And if you look at the resumes of some of these people are, of course not going to see the traditional like x. Facebook or hover graduate. In fact, I don't know of Ratto for example, on our team, one of those talented engineers I worked with, I don't even know if he went to school and I don't really care, but I've seen going back to your point about the directory like I've seen in worked with him now over the years, and I can connect these these these dots to make lines of kind of how he as progresses an individual as a product person engineer and so on. And right now, so hard to valuate people based on a resume and based on like a data point with with pioneer, how do you avoid gaming? Like if people are sort of self. Reporting. If I understand correctly, how do you ensure that someone isn't self reporting something? It's false look, every system that relies on crowd sourcing at the volume that we're gonna parade at Hoste tolerate some level of fraud sap, you know, with credit cards every day. The question is headed, keep the fraud to kind of tolerable level, and this isn't our first rodeo spent many years reading thousands of ICS application, some unfamiliar with kind of the nature of the system. The good news is, you know, we're we're kind of centralized and in control of our platform, which affords us the ability to remove out any and tease out any bad actors. And I think this is gonna be one of those situations where we're just gonna. You know, if people seem to be defrauding us and not saying the truth, we'll take them out now in time will of course build very obvious interesting things to kind of validate people's claims. For example, the ability to plug in your Google analytics account. Are you really getting that many page views on your site? Are you really getting that. Much revenue on stripe, so we could come up with different ways to kind of validate people's claims. And I think that will just remove doctors in time like any other system does. Yeah. I mean, I guess the same risk is true for any seed sage company..

New Zealand fraud Facebook California Hoste Ratto engineer India Paris Bulgaria Belgium fifteen year
"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"hunt radio" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Accessibility to start a career started company in technology space in pioneer CB focusing purely on that at the earliest stages, but mitt. Yeah. Tell us more about what painters and and how you're thinking about it. Yes. The high level goal is basically a an experiment to try and find thousands, maybe one day even millions of people who will become the kind of next Albert Einstein's Marie Curie Nealon Musk's that are scattered throughout the United States. In importantly, the world and we try to do is we try to find these people in a way that's never really been done before where we almost turned the process of kind of filling out an application and applying for a grant inch. To video game. No one's really brought kind of the power of software to this problem of finding the lost Einstein's. And I think it's really important to bring software and kind of internet scale to this problem because I believe that you know, for every Ryan Hoover and forever. Elon Musk in the world are thousands more that never really become the fully realized version of themselves. And I'm very unsatisfied by things like, you know, the Pell grant or the MacArthur fellowship that seemed to try to find these people through the same techniques that the Ivy league uses where you have five or six people reading thousands of applications. There's no way that that's going to find the kind of underrated gyms out there in the world. And so what we what we've done is we built a kind of software platform for this where anyone can apply and unlike kind of a static moment in time that these traditional application programs have resubmit one application, talk a little bit about yourself. The game of applying to pioneer takes place over thirty days..

Marie Curie Nealon Musk Albert Einstein CB Ryan Hoover Ivy league United States MacArthur thirty days one day