36 Burst results for "Hungary"

Fresh update on "hungary" discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

08:12 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hungary" discussed on This Day in History Class

"Hey history enthusiast you get not one but two events in history today heads up that you also might hear two different hosts, me and Trey Fyvie Wilson with that said on this show. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot Com and from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy e Wilson and it's September twenty seventh. Suan the great lay siege to begin a on the stay in fifteen twenty, nine Sulaiman was the tenth Sultan of the Ottoman Empire the major political power stretching all the way from the Balkans to North Africa and mind was extremely well educated. He was a poet and a Goldsmith in addition to being the head of state he became Sultan after the death of his father in. Fifteen twenty when he was about twenty six. So the Mon- immediately proved himself as a capable military leader after becoming sultan in a series of ongoing campaigns against the neighboring Christian powers in the Mediterranean area, and in Central Europe is included taking the island of Rhodes something the Ottoman Empire. Had tried and failed to do back and fourteen, eighty and August fifteen, twenty, six, his forces moved. Into, south central Hungary, and in the ensuing battle Hungarian King Louis the second was killed two different men lay claim to the Hungarian throne after this, there was the archduke of Austria Ferdinand the first of the house of Habsburg there was also Janos is Apoyo also known as Lord John of Transylvania soon on John Referred Nand and he recognised John as the ruler of Hungary although essentially As his vassal, and then because of his opposition to Ferdinand and the house of Habsburg, he invaded Vienna and fifteen twenty nine was the capital of the Habsburg Austrian Empire unlike. So many of his earlier campaigns though this one was not at immediate success, a hundred and fifty thousand Turks left Ottoman Bulgaria and started moving toward Vienna but they ran into so many difficulties along the way. Some of the routes were completely impassable because of flooding the camels that were being used as pack animals weren't adapted to this kind of weather. A lot of them got sick and died people got sick and died too disease was just rampant through his military force. Their gunpowder became soaked. There are tillery became waterlogged and there were ongoing floods which threatens to just wash them and their equipment away and which destroyed the available crops. Their reports of the men's spending the nights in trees to try to weather all of this. The people of Vienna News that an attack was coming they were terrified already before the Ottoman. Army. Got There and when the Ottoman army did arrive at the outskirts of Vienna in late September, their attack was horrifying. They beheaded the men they captured and enslaved the women and children as more troops arrived Suliman sent enslaved messengers into Vienna to make it citizens and offer if they converted to Islam and surrendered no, one would be harmed. But without surrender, there would be a bloodbath as the Ottoman army began the siege they use the canons that they had been able to salvage from all the wet weather when they started digging trenches plans to use to position explosives that were meant to destroy the city walls. And Beginnings Accounts Describe the actions of the Ottoman army as just brutal but on September twenty eighth a cold front moved in bringing yet more endless rain and frigid weather. In. Early October Vienna deployed troops to attack the toddlers who are still trying to work their way under the city walls to plant explosives. They took the Ottoman army by surprise and did manage to stop that tunneling, but it was at a cost of many many lives after having been thwarted by the weather in thwarted in the tunneling plan. The Ottoman army plan one final last ditch assault on Vienna on October twelfth. And their attempt to storm the city completely failed. At this point, the Ottoman army was almost out of food and over the next two nights killed all of their prisoners of war at their camps outside of be Anna before turning around to March back home. And their retreat was deadly as well with more and more of them dying along the way although silly bond failed to take Vienna. He did cause enough problems for the Habsburgs that he was able to keep John of Transylvania as his vassal king and Hungary. You could learn more about this in the July. Seventh Twenty, fourteen episode of Stuffy missed in history class, and you can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast, Google podcast and wherever else get your podcasts. Tomorrow we have an unconventional woman and an aircraft that may fly or it may not. Today's episode is brought to you by quip. So already have equipped electric toothbrush and I love it but I'm excited to upgrade to quips new smart electric toothbrush quips smart electric toothbrush is brand new and it rewards you and your mouth. The Smart Brush for adults and kids connects to the quip at with Bluetooth. You can try when and how well you brush. You can get tips and you can get coaching to improve your habits beyond the brush has everything you need to build a complete routine. There's amid or watermelon toothpaste with anti cavity ingredients for strong healthy teeth, and there's an eco-friendly solar battery charger to power your quip with sunshine plus. You can get brush head toothpaste and floss refills delivered from five dollars. Shipping is free start getting rewards for brushing your teeth today and go to get quip dot com slash class right now to get your first refill free that's your first refill free at get quip dot com slash class that spelled G. E. T. Q. Ip dot com slash class quip better oral health made simple and rewarding. Hey Miles it's Jack How's it going man good man you know just taking in new car smell as much as I can help us open my lungs a bit cooped I'm feeling cooped up man I gotta get I gotTa get out of the House. You don't see. That's probably not cooped up. You need to get see you vida crossover utility vehicle up. So truth be told at the beginning of this I was driving around in a Mazda C x nine, twenty twenty. They were miles. We love what you're doing. Please try this car out and let us know what you think. I'm driving in this thing it is the handling I gotta say is so smooth. Fans of your driving period they. You out there on the roads and they were like we gotta get this guy behind the wheel of the new seeks it can do anything it intuitively response to me as a driver. So like you know how you oversteer like if you're like going down straight away, maybe you you you start doing these adjustments with the steering wheel, it's actively trying to make sure you're being. As efficient as possible with your steering wheel the exterior design. That is so sleek yet aggressive a pull up they say, oh my gosh this man is probably a one percenter and they go you know what? No, he's probably sensible, and that's why I believe this car really was built for me why yes I'm a black person who like styling who likes efficiency who likes minimal. Minimal flexing if you'd like to say but still enjoys a bit of elegance. They truly design it like there's an art to help designer. It's not just a science in cars is an art and it's for people like me I like to drive. No I'm not someone out here who needs to be doing three hundred miles an hour but I liked the handling of a good vehicle and I love great bow sound system which these cu vs can come equipped with. So if you want more information on the Mazda C, UV lineup including the first ever see thirty go to Mazda USA dot com.

Ottoman Army Vienna Ottoman Empire Mazda Hungary Lord John Ottoman Bulgaria Vienna News Trey Fyvie Wilson Tracy E Wilson Army Goldsmith Habsburg Austrian Empire Suan Sulaiman Central Europe North Africa Suliman Assault
Divided Europe seeks to overhaul defunct migration policies

BBC Newshour

01:01 min | 4 d ago

Divided Europe seeks to overhaul defunct migration policies

"Commission has proposed a new system for managing the divisive issue of migration and asylum in which all member states will be obliged to show sold Garrity solidarity with frontline states. Member states would be expected either to relocate numbers of successful asylum seekers or sponsored the return of those whose applications air rejected. It also aims to improve screening, speed up the processing of claims, strengthen external borders and reinforce partnerships with countries of origin and transit. Countries such as Poland and Hungary have fiercely opposed the concept of compulsory real occassions. In the past, the head of the European Commission, or SEL, F. Underline, said Europe had to move away from what she said had Bean an ad hoc approach to migration. The commission's package on migration and asylum. Offers a fresh start. We want to live up to our values and at the same time face the challenges of a globalized world.

European Commission Garrity Hungary Europe Bean Poland
Europe migration: EU to reveal mandatory rules on migration

BBC World Service

00:48 sec | 4 d ago

Europe migration: EU to reveal mandatory rules on migration

"Commission is to publish new proposals later today for dealing with migration and claims for asylum. It's expected to revive the idea of the compulsory relocation of migrants from the countries in which they first land, predominantly Greece and Italy to other EU member states. Kevin Conley reports from Brussels. Whole of problems that beset the European Union. None is more chronic or more corrosive than migration. Thie used Latest answer seems likely to involve another attempt at mandatory burden sharing. Sweden by cash payments to member governments for every migrant they accept. Poland and Hungary have resolutely resisted such plans in the past. It's unlikely that money or you plans for quicker processing of asylum claims will change their views.

European Union Kevin Conley Brussels Greece Poland Sweden Hungary Italy
Why pet pigs are more like wolves than dogs

60-Second Science

03:39 min | Last week

Why pet pigs are more like wolves than dogs

"Starring John that Timmy and of course, laughing. It's a classic television trope. Timmy is fallen down a well lassie save him herself. So she runs defined help. Actually. Timmy never did fall down a well in the entire run of the TV show. But the idea that a dog could seek help from a human does have a solid basis in science in what's known as the unsolvable task experiment. A dog I learns how to open a puzzle box with a tasty treat inside. The puzzle is secretly switched for another that's impossible to solve. After becoming frustrated dogs, shift their attention away from the puzzle and onto a nearby human than back to the puzzle. The dog attempts to shift the humans attention to the puzzle as request for help human infants do the same thing. Such efforts are called Referential Communication. So of dogs behave this way, you might expect the same from their close relatives wolves. But when researchers tested wolves raised by humans, the animals just kept trying to solve the puzzle never seeking help since the dogs and wolves were all raised. The same way by the same people domestication must be responsible for the behavior. So researchers began studying domesticated creatures, other animals, species like some horses boats have been Stephen this this. There were no dieted combinations with those Paula Peres Fraga and he thala gist at. Lawrence University in Hungary. Pet Cats respond more like wolves, dogs, cats are domesticated, but they are not social like dogs and wolves pigs however are social. When big save in the wine or even like why endorse this animals lives in group on they need to communicate. We've they're gonNA specifics to be able to leave, which is why the researchers decided compare pet dogs with pet pigs. While the pigs revealed, they work capable of referential communication. They didn't actually turn to people for help. Once. The test became unsolvable. They acted more like wolves determined to find a solution on their own. The results were published in the journal Animal Cognition. Well, the medication man's is slightly to leave the days Connecticut change in the in the species from their wild relatives, and normally these genetic change has appear because of human pressure most domesticated animals, including dogs, cats, horses, goats, foxes, and so on. Show similar anatomical and physiological changes associated with domestication. But Franca says, her study shows that the domestication process can precede along different pathways in different animals and that could explain by domestication and sociality alone can't explain why dogs react the way they do when faced with an unsolvable puzzle. Fraga thinks that it could be related to their domestication history. Their domestication was different speaks has been domestic. Normally. Like mostly for being us meets resource. It was only later that we started treating some pigs as pets dogs on the other hand were treated as companion animals from almost the beginning which appears to explain their willingness to ask for help.

Timmy Paula Peres Fraga Lawrence University Stephen Hungary John Animal Cognition Franca Connecticut
Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

"In England, second largest city Birmingham, are being urged to stop socializing with each other is part of a dramatic tightening of Corona virus restrictions in the wake of a sharp spike in new confirmed cases. A number of new confirmed cases spiked in parts of eastern Europe, with Hungary and the Czech Republic registering all time. Daily highs. Hungary's prime minister says his government was drafting a war plan to defend against the second wave of the pandemic. The plan, he says, is not to shut down but to defend Hungary's functionality. I'm a

Hungary Prime Minister Czech Republic Birmingham Europe England
Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

"Some countries in Europe are dealing with the resurgence of cove in nineteen the Dutch public health institute says twelve hundred seventy people tested positive for coke in nineteen in the last twenty four hours that's the highest number since mid April it's the second time this week the Dutch daily infections have talked a thousand and a sign that the virus is making a resurgence in the Netherlands in Birmingham England's second largest city households are being urged to stop socializing the latest government data for Birmingham England shows the infection rate has doubled in the past week and the number of confirmed cases in the UK has spiked at over thirty five hundred the highest daily total since may seventeenth in Eastern Europe Hungary and the Czech Republic registered all time daily highs on Friday I'm Jennifer king

Europe Dutch Public Health Institute The Netherlands Birmingham England UK Hungary Czech Republic Jennifer King Eastern Europe
Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

"Some countries in Europe are dealing with the resurgence of cove in nineteen the Dutch public health institute says twelve hundred seventy people tested positive for coke in nineteen in the last twenty four hours that's the highest number since mid April it's the second time this week the Dutch daily infections have talked a thousand and a sign that the virus is making a resurgence in the Netherlands in Birmingham England's second largest city households are being urged to stop socializing the latest government data for Birmingham England shows the infection rate has doubled in the past week and the number of confirmed cases in the UK has spiked at over thirty five hundred the highest daily total since may seventeenth in Eastern Europe Hungary and the Czech Republic registered all time daily highs on Friday I'm Jennifer king

Europe Dutch Public Health Institute The Netherlands Birmingham England UK Hungary Czech Republic Jennifer King Eastern Europe
"hungary" Discussed on Jonny Gould's Jewish State

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

03:02 min | 2 weeks ago

"hungary" Discussed on Jonny Gould's Jewish State

"A certain balance East around between Brussels and the nation states and we should keep this allows us and if we want a stronger Unio what we want. Along with our partners along with every single member state, then the direction should be the enlargement. We see we see certain potential for enlargement in our neighborhood. There's a whole bunch of countries, the western Barca's that are waiting for for their European perspective, and we do believe that they are ready where we should. We should be more open for the integration ambitions and by having them and especially after Brexit when when the number of member states when down in the first time of our history as European Union, we should should find ways to to somehow go against threat this standards and to find new member-states, and these are the ones who are eager to join. Is still we don't give them the perspective that they need something like a date something like. Conditions well-set set conditions which if they met. They could they could join us and. This is art way of approaching the entire European. Union makes us I. DO believe that it just makes us very European. Sometimes, it's questioned by the mainstream media. This makes us a I guess a strong supporter of European integration. As a general idea. We are big supporters of this but not by giving up more more policies towards Brussels because the covid nineteen pandemic was just a very spectacular illustration. Of What Role Nation States can play when when there is an emergency when there is a when there is a situation where quick action is required and the Brussels bureaucracy was really not there. To be able to step in and do the writing immediately, which is I wouldn't say it's okay. But but having the nation states with their capacities em- place just gives us the security of our people. When situation such as this was comes around, we are able to to act to the right direction ambassador I hear the words nation states repeated in your question and in a sense with a British hat on here that sounds like a contradiction in terms to the European projects on one hand year reaching out to neighboring nations who looking for the European perspective as you called it on the other hand. Britain declared itself independent a nation state once more to affect its own policy. How does Hungary tread that line between being a productive member of the European Union and being? A Nation State. There are certain policies of the European Union I would say. The policy achievements that are already Iran which which we because Cedar has great achievements and we should stay with US Hungary's an open economy..

European Union Brussels European Union I Hungary Brexit Britain Iran Cedar US
Hungary to unveil statue of late President George H.W. Bush

KHOW Marketplace

00:18 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hungary to unveil statue of late President George H.W. Bush

"And a statue of former U. S. President George H. W. Bush will be unveiled in Hungary next month to honor the first sitting US president to visit the country in 1989. The statue will be inaugurated October 23rd and Budapest Liberty Square, near a statue of former President Ronald Reagan, also honored for fighting the communist

President Ronald Reagan U. S. President George H. W. B President Trump Budapest Liberty Square Hungary United States
Lockdown in Honolulu

Travel with Rick Steves

05:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Lockdown in Honolulu

"Don Wallace is on the line from Honolulu. He tells US authorities they're put in a new set of restrictions because of a recent surge in Cova cases on Oahu justice they were hoping they could start reopening. It's crucial tourism industry. Don's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine and he's updated us on Hawaii tourism in the past and done you're you're out there about twenty five, hundred miles away from anywhere else in the middle of the Pacific. Hawaii depends so much on tourism and I would imagine it's been quite a stressful time with the coronavirus continuing to spread. What's it like in Hawaii right now. Well the whiny started out as soon as thirty thousand tourists stopped coming way did very well on the virus were the lowest in the nation for states. Now we've had a spike starting at the fourth of July and August it began to get up to two hundred cases a day. I know that doesn't sound like much but. you don't have that many hospital facilities. That, we had to do a banning perks, beaches hiking trails and gatherings over ten So is the response and the impact of the corona virus different from different islands. who gets most of it in fact, it's almost miniscule on now big island, the ninety MILICI, those islands, the people can pretty much go cleese they. You wear masks you're allowed to fly into a walk who without according to you. But people who can't find their without of quarantine. What about people in the tourism industry? Are they impatient or they realizing that haste makes waste when it comes to getting over the so they can start making money again. It's a very interesting case people very concerned. There's no voice irresponsibly pushing for white opener light opening deal like Texas, did for instance. And I think that's because the workers sixty seventy percent of the are. No a minimum wage workers they don't have good health plans. They carry the burden of this, and the other part is the Theresa Stop Coming. Can Americans from the mainland fly into Hawaiian vacation if they want to yeah, you can come We get about three thousand a day. And I think the hitch there is you do a fourteen day quarantine and you check into your hotel and you can't leave your hotel room. The impact on tourism would be you're probably wondering around the beaches thinking this is like it was back in the old days. You're very much in nineteen threes, Hawaii. Waikiki is a ghost town. That's not entirely a bad thing We think tasteful Hawaii empty beaches, very clean water clean here you feel like being caress be hanging out with the beach boys. Old School Beach Boys. And if you do go out to dinner, for instance, you may have the restaurant to yourself just one or two people. Magic. So That's interesting. I mean, of course the you've lost the revenue, but you've regained your beaches as far as the locals go there was something in the news and I think you wrote about it about gun toting extremists who are wearing Hawaii shirts. It doesn't seem like the Aloha spirit to me what's Really thought it. Up in the news, there's one of these Gun Group extremists start showing up at the black lives, matter protests and other places. Instead of what they weren't Loescher it's Kinda create a sort of scary dissidence. Then people here reacted really strongly. Ensured is about Aloha Aloha is welcoming. It's inclusive. And it's actually something. I wrote an article about how Hawaiian shirts fight extremism. Hungary magazines. It's a love story about two sisters from Portland. Hawaii's eighteen twenty. Married South Asian immigrants helped create yellow her shirt industry. It's a beautiful beautiful story and it's that Louis Spirit that sort of loved that easygoing nece that caring for others. What a what a dissonance by these? What do they call? Boo Goo Boo Voice Blue Boys. Okay. Well I hope you have to handle and then we can read about that in your article and then very quickly what's open now if you are in Hawaii, museums, clubs, restaurants what's The dishes and Him after limited reopening had to close again. We hooked to get them back up in a couple of weeks neither good their little outdoor cafes and restaurants they've shifted to putting cafe tables out on the sidewalks and even the streets in some cases. So Madonna. Of Lua. And you know, thankfully, why is a very outdoor culture? So eating outdoors is. No big concession. So that lends itself to social distancing done. It's so great to have you on. We'll talk again soon I hope everything goes well with Hawaii and tourism, and your work there done Wallace's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine. He's written the French house about buying a fixer upper on the island and Brittany and he's written articles about what's going on. In Hawaii these days

Hawaii Don Wallace Honolulu Magazine Contributing Editor Aloha Aloha Honolulu United States Old School Beach Boys Cova Oahu Hungary Portland Waikiki Texas Louis Spirit Brittany
How She Crafted a Career Where Passion and Profit Intersect

The Goal Digger Podcast

06:24 min | Last month

How She Crafted a Career Where Passion and Profit Intersect

"Are just it is due time that you are on the gold digger podcast. So welcome to the show I had stop our early intro chatting because like we need to hit record on this this. So welcome to the PODCAST. So happy to be here. Finally, I I feel like we've been like in each other's DM's just for the last year being when when, when, and honestly there's never been a better time than this. So I am so I like divine. Niagara Oh. Okay. So I wanNa know like, tell me because I actually don't know this about you wear and when did all of this start telling me about the early days of your career before you were consulting for these massive brands and changing the world as we know it, how did this all begin for you? You know like all good stories, it began a little bit by accident I've been an entrepreneur for twenty five years I have never ever worked for anybody else. We'll wait that's not true. I worked for I worked for Clothing Company for four days. Would it? Out of college but I, I went to college at Penn state I loved feeder and performing. Arts and I thought that you know that's all I wanted to do was perform, write, and produce and direct, and then I got there and liberal arts education blew my mind and I got a degree in women's studies and a degree in classics. So now I have three degrees at gaming to make no money in. At least back then that was the thinking and so honestly, at twenty one years old I I had been so educated at Penn State, but at twenty one I'm out of college now and I take another community college class on grant writing, and this is where it started for me. I started my own company at twenty. One I learned how to write a grant to get money from businesses and my first grant that I got was five thousand. Dollars it was from an insurance company and I wanted to talk about eating disorders and body image and social issues that were affecting women at the time has always been a passion point for me and this company gave me five thousand dollars to produce my plays and take them to school and and that's how I started I literally had no idea how to pay people pay people, eleven, dollars a week because I thought it sounded better than ten. It was crazy back in back in the day like I was just ambitious in Hungary and naive and and committed and I just you know I started this company was twenty one I ran out for six for six years, and then I sold it and kind of came out here to to California trying to find my place in the media landscape and you know I was twenty seven years old landed out here. I didn't know anybody in California I. Didn't know. How I was going to parlay all of this incredible experience. I had on the road talking to students for six years, but then I wanted to move into a completely different medium and I had no training in that I just had a curiosity and that's always been a guiding force for me I love that do that five thousand dollars feel like a million dollars was probably the most essential money you've ever earned while yeah. That time if I could even just place. Our listeners Eric I'm in my mid forties, and so this is a while ago and I paid a hundred and seventy five dollars a month for rent and I you know at the time my first. So I took that five thousand dollars. That's I think why paid everybody like eleven bucks a week for people but like you know like everybody was happy to perform and get paid and and I just stretch that money as much as I could until I learned. that. I could get matching grants and I could fundraise more and so I built that business when I you know even at the time when I sold that business, I was twenty four years twenty, five years old I was making twenty five, thirty, thousand dollars year and I was living high life. I was like paid off my dad and I was living at a time even a little bit beneath my amusement gave me money to save to come out to California but. When you're new at this and I didn't know that I was really an entrepreneur I. didn't call myself that I just was trying to make the most of all this education I had gotten. Yeah. So walk me through what happens. So you get to California you WANNA, enter this media scene. You have these big visions than ideas and what I'm thinking of is nowadays, we can talk about all of these things body image and inclusivity and eating disorders and and it doesn't necessarily feel like a dirty word or something wrong or shameful back then it was very different. So walk me through what happened next yeah I felt very kind. Of alone in out there in my field of choice, you know it was a hybrid of women's issues, social issues self-help empowerment, and I was a young you know as a young woman who was trying to kind of chart my own course, and so I got out to California drove out to that quintessential road trip with friend got out to California and my Geo Prizm stayed at a hotel by the airport the extended stay America I lived there for three months and couldn't find a place to live in La like didn't have a lot of friends out here but I just have always had this dogged determination that's part of. My DNA it's part of my type A personality, and so you know I called everybody I knew I did a lot of cold calling and I did have to factors that I think helped when I got out here when I was in college I did a show for MTV news at the time where I I was able to share some of the work that I was doing on college campuses around sexual assault and sexual harassment and MTV picked up that story. So this summer I graduated I had a lot of press coverage and I had some you know offers to speak places and so I started following that path and. That helped kind of learn how to pitch myself how to talk about myself how to par lay the press that I had into the next opportunity, and so you know when I was out here, I knocked on every door I could, and eventually what I did was I went entered myself into this pitch contest at this big television production conference called Nat P. It's the National Association of television programming exacts and it was like everywhere you went like when you wanted to be Oprah Right Oprah soldier show and everybody's like selling their TV shows into syndication and I signed myself up as a solo person and I bought the wrong badge. Bought a badge that was a promoter like a sponsor bad and so I was asked to come into everybody's sweet and everybody was being so nice to me and I thought Oh my God this is. Like everybody is so welcoming when I realize at the end of the day, they thought I

California MTV Hungary Nat P. It Clothing Company Eric I Niagara National Association Of Televi Geo Prizm Oprah LA Assault Harassment
The American Jewish Community and the 2020 US Election

People of the Pod

09:44 min | Last month

The American Jewish Community and the 2020 US Election

"Soifer previously served as national security adviser for Senator Comma Harris now, the Democratic nominee for vice president and Joe Biden's running mate. She joins us now to talk about the role. Jewish. Voters play and how she believes. Democrats addressed. Jewish. Priorities please keep in mind. AJC. Is a five. Oh One C. Three not profit organization AJC neither supports nor opposes candidates for elective office and with that disclaimer Haley welcome thank you so much for having me. So let's start with the basics and Kinda, the horse race aspect of this how much of the American voting population identifies as Jewish? So the Jewish community in terms of the American population is about two percent, but we're actually about three percent of the electorate and we'd play an outsized role in. NHS for three reasons, we voted higher rates. On average Jewish Americans vote at a higher rate than. By about fifteen percents we also where we live correlates with wear our votes tend to matter even more we tend to live in swing states and a third reason which I'm sure we'll get into is that we overwhelmingly support Democrats in our view as Jewish Democrat organization that is especially or in terms of the outsize impact we have. So Haley Bernie Sanders in his speech on Monday addressed the many Democrats who really wanted him to be the nominee and many of them were Jewish are Jewish many of them have us on Israel, that don't jibe with the very pro Israel aspects of the party, platform. It really sounded like Bernie was calling on Democrats to unify despite their differences and I'm curious how the Party and its leadership have prevented Israel from becoming a wedge issue. Joe Biden has done an exceptional job in unifying the party around these critically important issues, including Israel and the platform that's been adopted at this convention exemplifies what is overwhelming democratic support for the US Israel relationship. Ebeidi s support a full funding for military. And Support of the STOORIKHEL alliance, it's the view of the majority of members of Congress that is the democratic mainstream media. So you emphasize what a majority of Democrats you certainly we've had concerns over the years about Ilan Omar had to leave. Is that kind of who you're thinking about when you say a majority of Democrats feel this way I should have said an over overwhelming majority you mentioned. Two. Members, of Congress, we currently between the House and the Senate head of over two hundred and seventy. So between those two members of Congress who we agree do not share our views on Israel and we've spoken out against them going back to before they were even elected. But between the two of them to over two seventy, we're talking about less than one percent of the Democratic members of Congress. They are very outspoken though they have expressed views with which we disagree and we've made that clear and that's why we're not supporting their re election and we don't share their views but luckily, their views are not shared by our party either look at the platform I mean the platform is the views of our candidate and the views of our Party and the platform could not be more clear in. Its support of Israel, what I the states to watch in this upcoming election and in which of those states could the Jewish vote really make a difference. When we look in elections, we always look at the last election as a baseline and we know that had Donald Trump not one Florida and either Michigan or Pennsylvania. He would not be president today and in those three states Florida Michigan and Pennsylvania. The Jewish vote alone could made up those margins. So when we looked to twenty twenty in this election, we are looking at the Jewish vote in those critically important states, my home state of Michigan Donald. Trump won by just ten, thousand, seven, hundred, and four votes. That margin could be overcome by the Jewish student population of Michigan in Michigan state a low. We are looking at the Jewish vote in those three critically important states but also states like Arizona and Colorado and Georgia, which in addition to being presidential swing states are going to be critically important in terms of the control of the Senate. Are you saying that the Jews in those swing states voted Republican or didn't vote at all did shoes in those swing states voted we know that Jewish voters do turn out and in twenty sixteen, it was no different than in previous elections choose turned out. But. We also know bat they turned out in support of Hillary. Clinton at about seventy two percents. If you look at the two thousand eighteen midterms Jewish voters supported Democrats at seventy nine percents. So we saw an increase, we believe that in twenty twenty, those numbers can continue to go up in terms of Jewish support for Democrats. So now we'll talk with your Republican counterpart on next week's episode. But from your vantage point, you said that most Jews identify with the Democratic Party why is that? So, choose have historically for decades defied overwhelmingly with the Democrats, the values that Jews hold dear tend to be those aligned with the policies supported by Democrats. So when it comes to domestic policies such as access to affordable healthcare and education ED and gun safety and ensuring that we are country welcoming the stranger and not enacting cruel and discriminatory policies toward immigrants and refugees. These are all key issues driving the Jewish vote. On those issues and more, that's where Jewish voters align with Democrats when it comes to foreign policy is well, we know that support of Israel is an issue that is important of course to Jewish voters and Mrs. Issue Where Democrats to our squarely aligned with the priority of Jewish voters, which is the support of the strong US Israel relationship, and in this election, we have a new issue. So all of those things have been constance. New issue in this election that is impacting the Jewish, vote in Support of Democrats and that is our rising insecurity as a community. We have seen an unprecedented rise in anti-semitic attacks targeting our community including the horrific attacks in Pittsburgh and Powei we know that seventy three percent of Jews feel less secure than they did years ago and over half of US blame. Donald Trump for that and that's because we've seen him embolden anti-semites white nationalist just last night he tweeted out support for an extremist group Hugh a non that has peddled conspiracy theories still on these issues especially when it comes to the security of our community. There's a clear choice in this election and Jewish especially do not believe that Donald Trump has the best interest of our community in mind he has Jewish family members. He's certainly been friendly to Israel is strengthened that relationship. So how does that square? There's no question. He has Jewish family members. He's also married and he's done said many misogynistic things. So that alone does not qualify him as what I would consider to be someone who's been particularly good for the Jewish community I look at the numbers and I look at the unprecedented rise in white nationalist propaganda or anti Semitic attack and the words that. Come out of his mouth better clear signs to anti-semites to racist to bigots that he is their ally whether it is identifying anti-semites white nationalist marching Charlottesville as very fine people or calling the extremists that marched in Michigan with swastikas very good people that was earlier this year or hiring someone recently, Sebastian Gorka who is affiliated with the Nazi party in Hungary? When it comes to Israel. Donald Trump. Has Been Long on symbolism and short on substance. Yes. He moved the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, and we recognize that Jerusalem is, of course, the capital of Israel. But the substance matters and when you look at the record of Joe Biden who with President Obama finalized unprecedented historic thirty eight. DOLLAR AGREEMENT WITH ISRAEL PROVIDING FOR AID for the next ten years, and you look at the security issues that Israel faces. Actually Donald. Trump has not been that great for Israel.

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Intellectual-Property Assets Are Getting More Valuable

Intelligence Matters

37:14 min | Last month

Intellectual-Property Assets Are Getting More Valuable

"As a foreign intelligence agency were responsible for understanding a broad range of threats. Presented by governments to the United States, one of those threats include our cyber threats how nations may be using cyber to achieve their national objectives that might be intellectual property theft for example, to counter department offensively valid by accelerating foreign governments ability to actually productized particular RDA for weapon that may be targetting critical infrastructure of a country. As part of threatening that country or as part of putting pressure on a given country. How are we doing against the cyber threats are we? Barely keeping up, are we catching up? Are we getting ahead of the game or? Is it always going to be hard for the defender. Overall technology is getting more secure. Technologies Belt more securely today. So. The fundamental resilience is is improving known. You have open source products. We have lots of is looking at a given technology and helping find vulnerabilities and address them. That being said for an ever-more connected economy in ever more connected society, and as we build more connections, sometimes systems that were not necessarily built for those kinds of connections we bring and introduce new risks on the third poll the positive side there's far more awareness about those risks and how to approach addressing them identifying what are the most important assets to protect. Seems to be an effort on the part of NSA to kind of open up a blackbox and Kinda shut the reputation no such agency we want to be trusted to achieve or we believe we can uniquely contribute to team USA on either the first step. Is conveying who we are conveying the culture. That's here the commitment to American values. Certainly. When a part of our mission is an intelligence mission in a democracy, you have an obligation to ensure that the Americans. We serve feel they understand the values by which we live. And neuberger is the current director of the national security. Agency's Cybersecurity Directorate. She has held a variety of jobs in both the public and private sectors. We just sat down with an to talk about her career, her and her director. It's multiple responsibilities and how she sees a cyber threats facing our country. I'm Michael Morale and this is intelligence matters. So an welcomed to intelligence matters, it is great to have you on the show. It's great to be here. So I think the place to start and is with your career before you joined the national security. Agency. You had a career in the private sector. Can you tell us about that and tell us what you did in the private sector and then what drew you into government, service. Sure. So I was in running technology at a at a financial services company during that time period when financial services companies really moved off mainframe environments to the Web. Decline server technology. So that piece of both taking an operations and emission and its associated technology and people and culture really Shaked shaped the way I approach a lot of those problems today. And I was raised in in a family where my dad came as a refugee all my grandparents came as refugees to the US and they just. Constantly instilled in US how grateful we should be for the opportunity to be born in America and raised in America, with its freedoms with its ability to pursue one's dreams and and that we owed it for that and. I was driving home from from work in. In two, thousand six, we just done a large acquisition of. Companies of banks, custodian operations. And on the radio, they were talking about the bombing of mosque. Samara Moscow in smaller rock and just the. Soldiers dying civilians dying and the troubles there and I I still don't know why but I thought of my dad and. That's myself. Perhaps now's the time to repay a little bit of of that in some way and. I've been a graduate student at Columbia had a I had a professor tell me about the White House fellows program and encouraged me to apply and I kind of I have to admit was a bit of the New Yorker Countless New York ever. kind of put that aside and for whatever reason I just felt that calling at that moment called him and said I'll apply and fast forward I was assigned to the Pentagon. With zero military background. And you learned a lot about the culture very drawn to that shared commitment and spent a year in the Pentagon worked for the navy and then came to NSA. Couple years later. What did they doing at the Pentagon and the Navy? So I was the deputy chief management officer, the Navy essentially, the Navy had a number of broad enterprise wide technology efforts which they were working again, bring that you people mission. Technology Triangle. And they asked me to help work on a couple of working directly for the secretary of the Navy figure out why a of them were struggling and then help them get on track. So I worked on that and I often get asked by people. How did YOU END UP AT NSA? A pretty funny story in that I had a seventy six year old and I was commuting from Baltimore and the. The work life balance was a bit tough and I met somebody and he asked me about. How he was doing and I commented that I really love the work but it was a little hard for me to do the juggle. And he said, you know I happen to know that NSA standing up you director NSA standing up cyber command and I know they need people with your kind of of background. So how about if I make a phone call there? And I went for an interview commute was thirty minutes and it sounds so foolish but. That was pretty much what it took. Interesting interesting. So the private sector and then the Department of Defence which is as you know this huge enterprise and then NSA and this is a this is not an easy question I know about kind of the similarities and differences of those three different experiences. It all begins with people. In every organization missions have to adapt and change They adopted change in the private sector because perhaps you have a competitor, perhaps the customer spaces adapted. Certainly financial services saw that we're the scale of data was just increasing the scale of trains was increasing and the traditional manual processes couldn't keep up. So we automation with needed to reduce errors and help us keep on track with we're trading was going. Technology could deliver on that, but the the business of the organization had to change to fully take advantage of the technology and the way people did that mission and use technology had to change along the way. So I think in each of those organizations that taught me that for that, that triangle has to be kind of guided together to get to an outcome mission technology and people if you really want to be able to fully. Whether it's take advantage of a market or stay ahead of an adversary in our own mission here in the ICU dod that triangle has to work together and you have to communicate every those three planes together when talking about why the changes needed. So an in your tenure at NSA, you've served as its first chief risk officer. The assistant deputy director of operations, the head of the Russia's small group, and now the head of the Cybersecurity Directorate. Can you take us through your trajectory there how did your responsibilities differ from roll to roll? Absolutely, and so I came into an Santa's small team part of a small team that was standing up cyber command, the chief risk officer role was. was created after the media leaks period of two, thousand, thirteen where we learned that. Really appreciating risk mount looking at in a holistic way across partnership risk operational. Risks Technology risks. We learned that we needed to adapt the way we looked at risk and then change according to that. So I think in each of those roles. Either, the adversary was changing around us a threat was changing around us. We. Wanted to take advantage fully of an opportunity and I was responsible for taking the big picture strategic goals, translating those two measurable outcomes and objectives and helping you know contribute, communicate the why and then bringing the team of people along to get their each other's efforts was a bit different. But you know. We talked about the risk of doing the risk of not doing weighing that appropriately we talked about the insuring that as we approached new missions policy and technology move together, and certainly when we looked at the elections work in two, thousand, eighteen, the Russia's small group work we saw we're adversaries of have used influence operation since the time of Adam and Eve perhaps would have changed was again the ability to use social media to both focus and directed to have larger impact. So focusing on the Russia's small group for just a second and what was that what was the what was the mission and what were your responsibilities with regard to the two thousand eighteen election's to the extent that you can talk about that. Absolutely. So the mission was ensuring the integrity of the two thousand eighteen midterm elections ensuring that we I understood the threat second that we appropriately tipped all the information we had about the threat to key partners across the US government. Certainly, FBI from a counter infants perspective digest from Cybersecurity of elections, infrastructure perspective, and they finally that we would support Cyber Command. If if authorized to impose costs, it's were attempts to disrupt. Disrupt the election. So. After the two thousand eighteen election's president trump publicly confirmed that cyber command played a role in deterring the Russians in two thousand eighteen are they're important lessons from what happened in two thousand eighteen about how we as a country can defend ourselves against this this insidious threat. Yes. So you know across the government, we look at two key polls. Integrity one is attempts to malignly influence population whether that is to highlight social discord to highlight issues that divide the population or to. Hand up sheer inappropriate. You know share information as part of shaping individuals ideas, and then the second is potentially interfering hacking into elections infrastructure as part of efforts to change the vote and I think the first pieces, the value of resiliency. The sense that you know once trust is lost, it's very hard to regain. So the knowledge for the American public that there are hundreds of people across the US government committed to and working to ensure the integrity of our elections. When it comes to counter influence though the biggest resilience as each of us. As Americans when we're reading something asking who might be trying to influence me what is the source of that information I fully confident in that source of that information. And then finally the role of the role of technology and the role of Public Private Partnership. In as part of elections integrity. So for us in the intelligence community were constantly watching for which adversaries maybe seeking to to shape a populations thinking to shape an election and then rapidly tipping that to partners or. To the private sector to ensure that they're both aware of techniques and our countering them on their platforms. So we've since learned shocked last week the updates from deny that the Russians continue to engage in election interference, the Chinese, the Iranians, and the punchline of all that for me is it's really hard to deter. Foreign interference right and I'm wondering if it's something special about foreign interference or if it's more about cyber at the end of the day and the difficulty of seeing cyber attributing it if you see it, how do you think about that question absolutely I think it is more about cyber than about elections from a cyber perspective when we look at fully both protecting cyber infrastructure and then to your second point about attribution, there's complexity laying what we call the red on top of the we may see threats. That are talked about strategic perspective and then we partners across the US government a looking to see where does that present itself? Where are the given vulnerabilities in a given infrastructure? The powers when you can lay the two together and say, here is a nation state that has intent to interfere in whatever that is an election critical infrastructure. I Pete Best and then translate that to the tactical level to say that network scanning or that vulnerability in hardware or software may well be used to achieve the objective putting that in place, and then most importantly preventing it because at the end of the day riding report about a victim and notifying the victim is far less satisfying than being able to put that together and prevent the adversary cheating their objective. So we've already started to shift now into your new role, right which was relaunched in October I believe. So be great if you could, and if you could explain for our listeners I, what NASA's two main missions are. Again and then cybersecurity and the difference between them just to give folks here level set absolutely. So Ns as a foreign intelligence agency were responsible for understanding a broad range of threats. Presented by governments to the United States, one of those threats include our cyber threats how nations may be using cyber to achieve their national objectives as that might be intellectual property theft for example, to counter the department defensively Thallady by accelerating foreign governments ability to to actually productized particular rnd for weapon that may be targetting critical infrastructure of a country. As part of threatening that country or as part of putting pressure on a given country. So that is the threat information on the second side. And say has cybersecurity mission. We're celestial known We build the keys codes and cryptography that's used to protect all of US government's most sensitive communications thinking nuclear command control weapon systems, the president's communications with allies, and we provide technical advice to mitigate those same threats that I talked about. So the really the he integration of the two missions where we think the magic is where we can say here's what we think adversaries are seeking to do, and here's how from a cybersecurity perspective we recommend you protect against. So so what motivated and the relaunch of the directorate and has its mission changed at all really good question. So we recognize that we were at a crossroads with national security as both technology and society ships were happening. We saw only kinds of technology that people want to from small satellites to Internet of things and each of those presents huge advancements. But they also present cybersecurity risk. Along with that, we saw various nation surtees. New Technologies think North Korean crypto currencies to get around sanctions to achieve their own objectives and we said we really need to up our game to more quickly be understanding those threats and ensuring that. We could both provide advice to build new technologies as early as possible, but also to counter adversaries use of those same technologies to achieve their national security. We're GONNA take a quick break to hear from our sponsor. Dumb. We'll be right back with more discussion with an neuberger. At Lockheed Martin, we're on a mission. Your mission. Not just the next mission but the one that's two steps ahead. That's why we've not only taken the lead in hyper sonics, but we're helping you integrate technology faster than. It's why we're not only developing the laser weapons systems you'll need but deploying them in the field. Our mission is to build the integrated solutions you can depend on because the world is depending on you. So and what are the what are the primary areas of Focus for your directorate? What kind of people work there? What's their skill set and what kind of customers do you serve? Questions. So the first parties. Operationalizing Intelligence. How do we ensure that from the intelligence that we see we took anything that's unique. And timely quickly so that we can prevent the victim. So that's the first, the first piece of of work, our areas of focus are. Both understanding that giving guidance encryption, we believe encryption. A key protection particularly in telecommunications environment that in many cases is entrusted. So both in building the government's special encryption, modernizing that as well as providing advice and insights on how to best use. Encryption the text of people who work cure are like we see him any organizations abroad gamut we have intelligence analyst. We have country-specific experts have a broad swath of technical experts, encryption network technologies, hardware, and software vulnerability analysts as well but the power is weird that can be integrated where you can say. How do you build on route of trust all the way through to an end point? Had you properly defend network and take a step back and do risk analysis to say? We are the gaps in your resilience and we're should your next dollar investment to closest gaps Right, and then what about customers is your is, is it just the Department of Defense? Is that the US government is even broader than that? How do you think about who it is you're working for? Yup Great Question. So there's a specific set work we do for what we call national security systems systems carrying classified information national security information the director. Vanessa is also the national manager for National Security Systems, that's the authority under which as I mentioned, we have we build the keys codes and cryptography responsible for distributing threat information as well. So those are across the US government with a particular focus on duty. Weapons Systems. And Related Systems. A second set of key partners and customers are dhs I. D. H., S. and its role supporting critical infrastructure. And, the sector specific agencies, and like I said the the real magic of understanding the critical infrastructure, we're it's key gaps and vulnerabilities are and being able to marry that up with what a foreign government may be intending to do and providing focused insight. Across the US government, there is broad use of commercial technologies, particularly duty and and national security system. So you may have seen when we're issuing advisories were also issuing advice on how to secure and configure those commercial technologies well because we see that. Those are used all across. Sensitive, systems as well. Your director has issued I think a dozen or so. Advisories about cybersecurity threats. Can you talk about why you guys do that? What the criteria is for quitting one of those out and then how do you think about the impact they have? Do You keep metrics on that? How do you think about? Advisories absolutely. So. Our advisories other way we really do them for three reasons. One is if we see a nation state actor using a particular vulnerability against the system care about we find that it really drives urgency of action people run faster when they're pursued, and if we can say, this nation state actor is using this vulnerability. Here's the mitigation advice to protect yourself against that we see impact and I'll talk about that how we measure that impact at the end. The second thing is there's a deep expertise here because we build and we break encryption. So encryption related technologies like the peons like you. You may recall the windows ten cryptographic vulnerability in January. Those are areas we focus on because we know those are sometimes hard to understand technically hard to implement. So if we can give very practical advice, them will issue those as well to help that be put in place, and then the third would be where there's a timely need and we're getting a lot of questions and we feel that putting out a product helps guide people and thinking about how to think about security I'll give an example. As. As covid. Pressed a lot of organizations across the US government particularly duty as well to move to telework. We started getting a lot of questions about secure collaboration. which commercial tools were safe to us and our goal was teaching people how to evaluate what safe to us. So we issued a product we're laid out the different attributes like. Code is available for review its end to end Krypton and a few other such attributes, and then we rated different secure collaboration publicly available tools against them and the cool part was we had companies call and say, well, you didn't get something quite right or can we be included as well and we said absolutely, we issued a second version and then we have another one coming out next week because our goal was making it as useful as possible and also helping teach people. How to assess. Different. Products for security. You ask the question about how we measure impact. So there's three different measures we've been using. The first is, do we see patch rates go up? They'll do we see for vulnerabilities that we've talked about here is a foreign actor might be using a boehner ability to achieve an objective. Can we watch those patriots go up and it was really cool to see. And a number of cases we've we've watched that increase. The second piece is there is a very capable and active cybersecurity industry has the information shared enable them to better protect. Sensitive US government national security systems networks, and you know in the case of the Xm vulnerability that we issued, we're advisory where we talked about the particular unit of Russian intelligence using the XML male vulnerability. It was really great to see five different cyber-security entities using that to identify other. Russian intelligence infrastructure and then take that down. So that was success for us that we made it harder for that adversary to achieve its objectives, and then the third one is really the feedback on the number of downloads and the feedback from administrators saying this was useful. This was unique timely and actionable could act on it, and then in May you guys took what I thought was an unprecedented step of actually openly attributing the exploitation of vulnerability to the Russian, Gru. and. That seemed to rare to me and I'm wondering why you decided to actually name Russia in this instance. So I it is rare because as you noted earlier, implicitly attributions hard. You may have seen a prior product where we highlighted one st state using another country's. Infrastructure to achieve its objective and then highlight he just hard attribution is. So when it's done, it needs to be done with precision to be confident. In that and we chose to do it because. We see that it makes targeted network owners more quickly patch and secure and build the resilience of their systems network administrators have way more vulnerabilities to address than they have time for or frankly money for and way more alerts than they can act on. So we can say this particular vulnerability is being used by a nation State Intelligence Service. We see them we see network administrators moving quickly and addressing it, and that's a fundamental goal. Fundamental goal is improving cybersecurity. If you kind of step back and look at look at the big picture here, you know, maybe from a thirty five thousand foot level how are we doing? The cyber threats are we barely keeping up? Are we catching up? Are we getting ahead of the game or? Is it always going to be hard for the defender. In this game in because the guy on the offense can always come up come up with something new how you think about sort of where we are in the history of of the threat of cyber and defense against it. I think we points overall technology is getting more secure. Technologies built more securely today. So the fundamental resilience is is improving you know when you have open source products, we have lots of is looking at a given technology and helping find vulnerabilities and address them. That being said were an ever more connected economy in an ever-more connected society, and as we build more connections, sometimes two systems that were not necessarily built for those kinds of connections. Data Systems. In that way, we bring and introduce new risks. On the third poll on the positive side, there's far more awareness about those risks and how to approach addressing them identifying what are the most important assets to protect and ensuring good practices are in place and it's far easier than ever to put that in place. So I think it's a mixed story on the one hand more more technologies built more securely, and there are communities of individuals working together to ensure their secure on the other hand far more. Technology some of which. Is connected in ways that bring risk in ways that we always have to and I guess the third part, which is where we started adversary seeking to take advantage of those risks to achieve their objectives. So. If you if you were standing in front of a large multinationals board of directors in you're talking to them about cybersecurity. What's the one or two things that you would absolutely want them to take away from from your conversation? What is the tangible thing you most want to protect and what's the intangible thank you most want to protect. So if you're drug company, what is the intellectual property that's going to be your next potentially big drug big driver of economic growth, big driver of healing, and then second what's the biggest intangible? Thank perhaps, that's your reputation. The way you treat your employees, the price, the prices that you charge and what you're, what you're. How much you mark that up. Make sure that you're protecting both carefully make your your cyber security commensurate with with the risk presented to you if you lose either one. And you mentioned you mentioned Skater Systems and I'm not sure that all my listeners know what those are just explain that and then is there something? Is there something special about protecting data system from protecting? Normal network absolutely. So Skater Systems are essentially control systems for the core areas of infrastructure in a given country in a given company. So think power systems clean water drug manufacturing. and. Those are. Those are often complex system. So what's unique about them is you know those systems over the years were often built four reliability in the event of a bad storm that power system would come back online with confidence as. More technologies got connected. So for example, the ability to measure. Use of power the ability to measure confidence in in water and chemical level. Some of those systems got connected to network systems that provide a way to access them. One of the joint products we recently issued between Ns. WAS An ICS product because there had been some public articles about. a given attack against skater systems in the Middle East, and we wanted to ensure that we together with. One of our closest partners was providing technical advice to. Skate entities in the US based on what we were learning about those attacks. So interest, a couple more questions you've been terrific with your time. Seems to be an effort on the part of an essay to kind of open up the black box and showed the reputation no such agency right. Your conversation with me thinking example of that why is that a priority for for the agency and for General Nakasone? I in the cybersecurity mission fundamentally if we're not trusted we can't achieve our intact. People take advice from those they trust and the power of. Across the US Government Team USA work cyber. There each organization plays its position within that role. You Know My counterpart at Digest Chris Crabs often talks about them being the national risk managers. At an essay, we believe what we can bring uniquely is that integration of intelligence series of seeking to do what their capabilities are, what their infrastructure looks like and how to defend against cyber security advice to counter that, and that's always continuing because technologies change adversaries, goals change, and the resilient always has to be increased to meet that. So we want to be trusted to achieve what we believe. We can uniquely contribute to team USA on cyber. The first step to doing that is conveying, we are conveying the culture that's here the commitment to American values, and certainly WanNa part of our mission is an intelligence mission. In a in a democracy, we have an obligation to ensure that the Americans we serve. Feel they understand the values which we live. So your your former colleague and my really good friend Glenn Gerstl road. Op Ed about a year ago about what he saw the. Profound implications of the Digital Revolution on national security, and he raised a lot of concerns and among those was the sheer pace and scale and volume of technological change and. And data that's GONNA force intelligence agencies including NSA to fundamentally change how they do business I was GonNa say thinking big picture about those kinds of challenges. What are you trying to tackle I? Would've the adjustments look like, how do you? How do you think about the challenge that Glenn laid out? Absolutely, so I from the perspective of large amounts of data and ensuring, we can make sense of them. Ensuring that we can do big data analysis to help. Triage the information we identify and determine what are people are big assets put their time on to determine he's and how to act on them. So for example. We we're looking at machine learning to classify malware and we're certainly looking at. Machine learning potentially to help us identify vulnerabilities scale particularly when we look at systems that represent thirty years of technology like muffins systems, how do you secure a weapon system? That's been out there and represent each phase of technology and have confidence in its resilience and in command and control. And then finally. We have an obligation to both bring those technologies to be on our mission and understand how adversaries might use that and manage that accordingly. So for example, as we think about artificial intelligence and the potential to automatically. Direct weapon. In the United States we have strong values around how we would think about automation versus human control. In other countries around the world, there might be different ways that those kinds of decisions are approached. So how do we ensure that we both? Bring that integration of. Compliance and technology to the way we pursue it but also be aware of those gaps and keep an eye on the risks of those gaps. And you mentioned you mentioned people and you mentioned people a couple of times and and just took two questions about that. One is given the competition that you face with all of these cyber security firms and. Your folks must be very attractive to them, and their skills are quite valuable in their private sector. How how difficult is it for you to recruit and retain talent? Really thoughtful question because you asked two questions in their recruit entertained. So. From the recruit side, we get really great people. On the routine side. We have a really compelling mission. and. What brings keeps people. Here is the sense that they're contributing to something bigger than themselves. That is challenging fulfilling. It's on us as organizational leaders to ensure that each person has that opportunity to contribute what they can uniquely bring chew to that mission. And one of the one of the cool aspects of the Cybersecurity standup has been people who have left to call in and say, Hey, I'd like to come back I learned a lot. In the private sector, the missions, calling me and like to contribute again, and we've hired a number of them back and continuing to increase that and part of the message we have when people if people do decide to leave is to say that is great. You will continue to contribute to the nation's security. You'll learn a lot in the five at sector, and if you ever want to come back the doors open. What do you? What do you want the American people to know about the women and men who work for you. That, they're committed to the values. That this country was established for. That there are significant threats to the United States, our allies and to those values, and that not always can we talk about those threats because? By impact sometimes intelligence community, even the security mission has to operate in those shad in the show does so. Trust our values, trust that we are proud Americans. We swear an oath to the Constitution of the United States, and if you do question it or if you want to learn more roll up your sleeves and come into the for a few years and get to know what yourself because each person has unique abilities and a unique ability to contribute to their to their country in whatever way they choose whether that's government are in the private sector. But if you ever doubt it come on in and work here and and raise your voice and be a part of it. It sort of takes you back to what your parents taught you to. It really does it my dad grew up in in communist Hungary and In the beginning when I came into government, he would call me on the phone sometimes and switched to a foreign language and. I realized that for him growing up in another country. Is that complete trust of government that I American born? You know have that doesn't mean it's trust and verify it's from verify but there are things that I take for granted growing up in this society that I don't know if he ever will. So being able to look at things through his eyes and through mind make me realize how fortunate we are to be here and how much we have obligation to. To ensure it stays that way. And thank you so much for joining us and thank you for your service. Thank you so much for your time.

United States Director NSA Cybersecurity Directorate Russia USA Theft National Security Systems New Technologies President Trump Navy Michael Morale Neuberger FBI Pete Best Nasa Department Of Defense Lockheed Martin Chief Risk Officer
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | Last month

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
Belarus Election: Svetlana Tikhanovskaya Flees Country Amid Protests

Monocle 24: Midori House

03:28 min | Last month

Belarus Election: Svetlana Tikhanovskaya Flees Country Amid Protests

"The leader of the opposition in Belarus, Atlantic sky has fled the country to neighboring Lithuania following. Sunday's presidential election in Belarus protests have continued in the country following the election results in which the country's longstanding President Alexander Lukashenko claimed a landslide victory with some eighty percent of the vote. A result opposition claims was rigged Chris Show Max Fat Lana. Posted an emotional video to supporters explaining why she'd fled the country predominantly she said to ensure the safety in the well being of her children she ran for the presidency in place of her husband. Of course, Sergei T Shanansky who we know is in prisoner political charges in Belarus what's the latest reaction from other countries around batteries speed looking on at the fallout from the election on Sunday Chris well. The reaction has been one of, of course, criticism of the vote that took place and calling for calm in terms of how Belarus Belarus majorities should deal with protests. The European Union, which you know is argued be key of course, the EU and the US have criticized the vote but the E is is particularly key with Belarus being you know sort of between the European Union and Russia if you will. In terms of the spheres of influence, and there has been some talk of renewed sanctions from the EU. A lot of that sanctions talk interestingly is coming from Poland while the on another side neighbor Hungary's against sanctions. So it'll be interesting to see what kind of developments come from the EU in terms of what they can actually do to try and to try and influence anything that is happening in Belarus. The irony is that the EU actually lifted many of its sanctions back in two thousand sixteen ended asset freezes and travel bans against Lukashenko and about one hundred and seventy other people. The decision at that point looking back was actually unanimous among foreign ministers they cited improving relations. With Belarus although an arms embargo was still kept in place a certain amount of sanctions. So not everything was. Returned to normal. But there for the question now is could the e U reintroduced those kinds of sanctions that it had in the past on targeted individuals including Liquor Shaneco the question is whether this will really have any major effect was under Lukashenko has not been particularly interested in joining the e U along running sanctions already in place you know were put in place after the disappearance of opposition politicians way back at the turn of the Millennium gives you a sign of how long this has been. Has Been going on. so that you could try to react with further sanctions, but it has tended in some ways to see as in Russia's sphere of influence perhaps in terms of Russia. Putin was of course, quick to recognize the results. will be watching closely. You would imagine if anything near what amounts to a revolution starts to to come about in Belarus but the there has been also some talk from analysts saying, of course, they may favor a certain amount of instability if it helps to keep Belarus under wraps as it were an in Russia's sphere for the time being

Belarus European Union Alexander Lukashenko Lithuania Sergei T Shanansky President Trump Putin Hungary United States
Tennis is back; James Blake discusses the challenges

The Tennis Podcast

05:58 min | Last month

Tennis is back; James Blake discusses the challenges

"Hello. and. Welcome to the tennis podcast. It is Monday the third of August twenty, twenty and two. There is tennis actual tennis. Not, exhibition tennis competitive tennis featuring plays, we've heard of playing for ranking points and prize money. We haven't seen any of it yet. It's just been. It's just been qualifying for the weekend but at the Palermo WPA event does get underway the main draw in earnest. Later on today David's Matt I, Give You Tennis It has suddenly occurred to me that we were together when tennis was last to think. Remember when we were watching. Dubai. Was it when Jovic Matt. Watch. Kim Clijsters Return in my lounge. Yeah. That feels like a different lifetime. I. Think. I was. Kind of the last weekend of tennis, which was the Davis Cup qualifying which. Never, find run event, which is taking place to eighteen months after they. After they, qualified for it. And the even then there were. It was kind of in the background there were rumbling signs of covid nineteen. I think the airport I was at in Hungary actually had a case and they shut the airport down and but then two days later everything just shut down it's amazing how quickly it happened. Just. Tennis tennis is back and it came back with a tennis way because I think the first day of qualifying in Palermo ended gone to am in the morning. kind of like we're doing this again. Given there's no crowds to worry about a no corporate lunches to around the there is no excuse for that is the because he can stop playing at eight am. And you can play on his you can play on his many courses is as you want or need to I mean how how it is? So tennis is it like comfortingly reassuringly tennis. is finishing yeah but also stupid. We stopped terriers and your we. When you didn't go to the airport because Indian Wells was canceled. You had a fully packed suitcase. State fully packed for some time. What is status? Is still my bedroom floor it hasn't been unpacked is had items removed from I would describe it now as haw full. Because Yeah I've removed you know the old parachutes. Only items only items with an elasticated waste obviously because lockdown But yes, all items with an elasticated waste have been removed from it. And all items which you might have to wear a Nike shoe with awesome accessories they remain in the case. Keeping most of. My bedroom floor. I said I said I would leave it the like Tracy unmade beds for the duration of Tennessee's absence and I'm a woman of my word five months. Yup. There's no. Mouse. No no mouth. Remembering the mouse, the other day and thinking was that dream It was that feels like a different lifetime. The masses in the suitcase I know why inspect that regularly? Don't you don't joke about that because that is that is those are the dark thoughts 'cause my mind when I'm trying to get to sleep. So. Yes. My suitcase remains on unpacked a spouse. Now I should probably technically go to unpack it this afternoon before three PM, which is when right the main draw of Paloma starts in the UK. Literally part of the Furniture Knob? Yes. Okay. I will. I will consider that we WANNA pitch empty. I mean that will just be a pitch of an MTC case day K. Okay, sure and case with just a mouse corpse at the Boscovich. It's It's the content that everyone's waiting for you. Welcome. Seven terms of tennis. News from this week, there's been no sort of big bombshell news. The deadline of the thirty first of July has been put. On the US Open confirming. Wants him four whether or not? It was going ahead? We haven't had that sort of concrete hundred percent confirmation. From the US Open from everything we're hearing as much as the little concerned around a concern around everything we're hearing suggests that with a heck of a lot of regulations in place in and details of those those rules and regulations have been. Leaking sporadically of the last couple of weeks, it will be going ahead. I mean seems to me that the only outstanding detailed in terms of it being categoric is. The quarantine situation on reentering the you and I think I mean in some ways that is I don't know whether that might even be made easier by the fact that it sounds like Madrid isn't going to happen anymore in this is not quite such a rush to get back to to Europe in order to play the very next event.

Tennis Palermo United States Kim Clijsters Jovic Matt Dubai Hungary Nike Tennessee Indian Wells Europe David Matt I Paloma Tracy MTC UK Boscovich
The George Soros Saga: Antisemitism, Conspiracies, and Influence

People of the Pod

05:39 min | 2 months ago

The George Soros Saga: Antisemitism, Conspiracies, and Influence

"Billion-a-year Fillon therapist mega donor George Soros has long been the villain of conspiracy theories. He has also been a target of politicians and pundits on the right who resent his fierce opposition to George W Bush and Donald. Trump, they also object to his philanthropy support of liberal causes support most clearly defined by his mega donations. Earlier this month, the open society foundations, the ill philanthropic group founded by Mr Soros announced it would invest one hundred, fifty million dollars in grants for black lead, racial justice groups, and another seventy million toward local grants for criminal justice reform. The announcement came amid protests in the streets and calls for racial justice sparked by the murder of George. Floyd. Minneapolis those protests, some of which have turned violent have fuelled critics to view those donations as efforts to foment anarchy and back government corruption emily. Tamken. saw these critiques and conspiracy theories already building steam and two thousand sixteen which inspired her to research and write the influence. Of Soros, her latest Book Emily Welcome. Thank you so much for having me on the show so far listeners. Let's take a step back and start with WHO is George Soros not who the conspiracy theorists say he is but who is he really and what causes does he support and why? George. Is a Hungarian born American billionaire he is very influential in three realms the realm of finance, the rubber philanthropy, and the realm of politics in finance. He was a very famous and successful hedge fund manager. He's maybe the most famous and successful currency speculator in the history of finance, and then you know in the nineteen seventies after making a lot of money, he decides to start giving away some of that money to the cause of what he calls open society. The title comes the Name Open Society comes. From this book by Karl. Popper who was Soros's tutor at the London School of Economics and basically the premise of open society and its enemies is that this gross over simplification but basically, the premise is that you know neither you nor I can really know the truth. So what we're supposed to do is all of us together in a society come together and we discuss and debate, and we try to reach this perfect understanding and practice that's meant giving students scholarships. It's meant setting up a university in. It's meant you know after the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc in Suva Union paying for Internet for various government ministries and trying to connect people to information. He's also a big an influential figure in politics beginning in two thousand four. In the United States, he decided that he really wanted George W Bush out of office and became a major political donor. So I think you know I WANNA be careful to make clear that the political spending is separate from thirty but because he's this major philanthropic and also major political donor and because the political donations or not exclusively, but do tend to be four Democrats in liberal causes. I think that that colors the perception of some not just on the right but particularly, some people on the right in the United States. So source is a Hungarian. Jewish emigrant right tell us more about his upbringing and how it informed his philanthropy and political activism nineteen thirty Hungary is the Inter war period between World War One and World War Two prior to World War One Jews in the Hungarian part of the austro-hungarian Empire were more assimilated than many other Jews in Europe. They really saw themselves. Many of them saw themselves as Hungarian were part of the Hungarian national project report of this Lake Glittering Budapest life world we're one happens Hungary is on the losing side they lose a lot of their territory in the tree of and all, which is like the austro-hungarian version of the treaty of Versailles. And for a variety of reasons, the Jews are scapegoated for this. So you have these he's born into this world where you start having a Jewish quotas laws meant to persecute Jews, and this is. Even, before World War Two, his father has them changed their name from shorts to Soros to seem less obviously Jewish in this increasingly hostile environment his father had previously like escaped. Prison camp in Siberia during World War, one and made his way back to Hungary during the Russian civil war. So he knew something about survival. World to comes and there's there's not the occupation and there's the Arrow Cross which is like the Hungarian variant. He sees his father as this great protective figure who helped other people the father. was procured bull forged embargo documents of the Soros family and friends in front of friends could hide out is Christians during during the time, but he also he's persecuted for being Jewish he then after world, War Two is living under a certainly not the same kind of persecution but under a repressive oppressive socialist regime and I think that this is two things one, it makes this concept of society where we can all debate and discuss very attractive and I also think that for him because he was persecuted on the basis of his ethnicity religion. That inspired in him. The understanding that it was important to try to help whatever group was caught under the wheel at a given moment with this history and background in mind. IS IT ANTI Semitic to criticize Mr Soros and the causes he supports I'm not saying the criticizing Soros is. Anti Semitic I think he's done things that you can criticise part of the reason that I wrote this book is that it should be what he is actually done and the money that he's actually spent not money that he has never spent and thinks he has never going to do that to me is when it trips over into in antisemitic conspiratorial.

George Soros Soros Family George W Bush George Hungary United States Donald Trump Suva Union Murder Fund Manager Floyd London School Of Economics Minneapolis Tamken. Karl Lake Glittering Budapest Europe
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 2 months ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
The Forgotten Favorites Episode

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

06:05 min | 2 months ago

The Forgotten Favorites Episode

"Hey there. It's me Lisa. Lillian also known as hungry girl. I am super excited to be here for yet. Another episode of the chew the right thing podcast. How are you? Mike Jamie were good. How are you I am good less melty than I was over the weekend. It's finally cooling off. Fine a line. At least you didn't have a power failure in your house. That is so true. Thank goodness. But if you have a power failure, that's the best excuse to eat everything in the freezer. Is Facing. I was like Tonita everything well Mike. Kept telling me. Don't open the refrigerator or the freezer, so that was my reason, not to and little known fact. That's probably a known fact. I didn't know it. The CDC recommends that you can keep things in the refrigerator for up to four hours as long as you don't open the refrigerator, but after four hours with longer now I throw it all things so I think you can just never open the fridge. I, just like I remember when I, was a child in the power to go out and I want to eat everything. Like funny, it's funny I'm talking about a childhood memory because today's episode is all about forgotten favorites. It's just Retro Very Retro today which I like because I consider myself kind of retro person I feel like all of my like my sensibility, my style. My tastes are a little retro. So agree. Yeah, little, vintage vintage A. I. Don't I'll take that as a compliment. but we've got it all today. We have some tasting. We have a sponsor. We've got news. We have a rousing game of chew or false right. Columbus. I can't even believe it. I'm so excited so I think we should probably just jump on in. have. You heard of avocado milk now. Okay? Well, apparently, it's Jamie have you heard of it only because I. Go on. L.. Apparently, it's a big deal in New Zealand, and it's about to hit the US. The drink is ninety calories a cup and has made with oats, honey freeze dried avocado water and lentil extract and it also they also have a chocolate flavor along with the regular flavor, and the chocolate actually is also ninety calories. They just add cocoa to it. So, we gotta get ourselves some of this and try and try and house the fat content to. We know I didn't look grams per cup. North Bad. Okay now I would try the I trip told. It doesn't sound delicious to me, but I love trying new. Milk Products, and it's always good to check out a new chocolate milk swab, because that calorie count is pretty good so I will give it a shot, but not so excited, so this one is really more for your niece. Lauren and all the other begins out there. Have you ever heard of the Vegan? Hawaiian store called Veg, oh. Okay so it's. It's dubbed the Costco. For vegans and it's an actual story can go and pick up stuff now. It's going to be on the mainland by the end of the summer. It's going to be for delivery only so you order it on to kind of gambling. You ordered online and they they'll send out to you in I guess freeze packed. Boxes and they have every Vegan brand like everyone. I didn't have to name them all. They literally have every V and brand in the store. Oh, wow, that's really cool, so there's not going to be like an actual physical brick and mortar location. It's all online right it's going to be. They're gonNA. PUT Basically warehouses in the major cities, probably at first, and then like Amazon you'll order it, and they'll ship it out from those those warehouses interesting. Amazing I think that's going to be super popular now it's like that. Love it. There's a lot of actually vegan products. That was so funny I was just thinking like. I spend a lot of time. 'cause I am the ultimate carnivore, but I say now these days it's fifty fifty whether I reach for something. That's actually like an animal, product or something. That's made by Gardena or AMY's. That is just sort of a substitute and I love them both so I will be partaking true excellent. All right so we a sponsor this week and we have a good one. I love sponsored segments where we get to taste food and we're going to do that today, so our show today's brought to you by back to nature back to nature that sounds so healthy, doesn't it and fitting for today's episode back to you know? That's right, but this is not. It's actually not a retro ran. It's a very like hip and cool brand. That has a ton of stuff I was so excited I have to be honest about the portion control. Many chocolate chunk cookies that are incredible. They have cookies. They have crackers. You guys like Fudge Man I. Know Mike. You're like a mint. Fudge Mint Person, aren't you? Yeah I definitely love the the Mindy Fudgy things for sure said yeah, they have a fudge mint cookie. That's amazing. They have organic stone, ground, wheat, crackers, and I love the flax seed flat breads like they have these huge flat breads that are so crunchy and incredible. We had them. I think we had them at Hungary lamb for a while, and they were like everybody was just eating them like they were going out of style, which they are not there in style, but their new. New Protein crackers is what we're going to try today, so the protein crackers come in two flavors I have one flavor. You guys have another flavor and we're GONNA try them. I love them because they are made with P.. Protein pea protein is very hot right now, so these happen to be plant based and everything back to nature as plant based. I should start by saying that also so even their cookies right there Vegan right everything is plenty Everything's plant-based inspired by nature. Simple ingredients all right so. I'm going to bite into my We're GONNA. Try Wait. What flavor do you have because I have roasted garlic and Basil? Back to nature plant based PEA protein crackers. Would you have? I'm so excited. These are the whole lot of seeds, crackers, flax, Chia poppy and hemp seeds. They look so good and they're the big flat ones to which I like

Mike Jamie Lillian Lisa Costco New Zealand Milk Products CDC United States Columbus Hungary Basil Lauren Amazon Gardena AMY
China imposes sanctions on U.S. senators Rubio, Cruz over Xinjiang advocacy

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:10 min | 2 months ago

China imposes sanctions on U.S. senators Rubio, Cruz over Xinjiang advocacy

"Hungary, Janus Henderson, who did this survey reckons? That's going to be about nine trillion cumulus, if speaking of debt around four companies now debt debt by itself is not good or bad. It just depends whether you can repay it or not. The authors of the forecast also say that debt has been going up faster than prophets of growing over the past few years. That is worrying, but as you alluded to interest rates around the world have been so low. Is this debt pile necessarily a problem for these companies? Well the lower interest rates off the easier. It is to pay that money back, but at some point interest rates will have to go, and that could be a problem for companies now. The worry is that when company stock coming out of the bad times caused by the corona virus. Whether they of making prophet or not. They still have to pay the interest in payback the debt. It's interesting. The chief economist of the International Monetary Fund last week was saying that perhaps governments should think again about lending money to so many companies to help save them, but think more in terms of perhaps buying shares or coming up with financial instruments that are more light buying shares equity say

Janus Henderson International Monetary Fund Hungary Chief Economist
"hungary" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

10:14 min | 5 months ago

"hungary" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"At dawn on October fifth. Two Thousand Ten Deva Chair mayor to all the Tomas was waiting through a caustic swamp of heavy metals. He fervently hoped his boots and protective coveralls would protect him from the cadmium cobalt and lead swirling in the mud around him. An acrid smell filled his nose as he looked out over his little town. Every building fence and tree left standing had an eerie waist. High Line of rust colored residue it appeared as though the town had been painted carefully by a brush overnight in a misguided prank. Tomas was exhausted. He had been up through the night and he'd been frantically working since. The flood rushed over the town at noon the day before now. Small mountains of red rebels stood everywhere. The leftovers of the crumbled buildings that had toppled in the wave of toxic sludge. Deva chair no longer resembled the sleepy town where Tomas had spent his whole life. That looked like it had been bombed most of Devon chair surviving residents had been evacuated to nearby villages where shelters had been set up in churches and auditoriums rows of beds and tables of packed sandwiches. Were put out for the displaced victims but the toxic flow soon reached those surrounding villages as well. The sludge seeped into small creeks that fed into the larger tributaries of the Danube River. The recent rain had softened the ground and increase the permeability of the soil which only helped to quicken the spread of pollutants. Toxic plume had travelled nearly fifteen miles by October fifth. Reaching at least six other towns the region was in dire. Need of immediate help. Tomasa cell phone rang incessantly. As he slowly tramped through the sludge he was discussing how to find shelters for displaced residents. And keep the evacuees safe. He spoke with a never ending line of different government. Officials policemen and workers to coordinate the incoming help but it was calls from the press. Were the most intrusive. They wanted quotes. They wanted to know how disaster happened. Reporters came to the village. Protective outfits and masks poised and ready with cameras and microphones in addition to the reporters over five. Hundred policemen and soldiers arrived to organize infrastructure among the madness and ruin they were directing traffic and continuing to clean roads and walkways and everyone wore head to toe protective gear. The rescuers looked like aliens or spacemen. New arrivals to an unknown toxic as the clean-up began in earnest. The Hungarian government directed the temporary shutdown of Mall Zero. The company responsible for the spill workers from the aluminum plant were dispatched to gather sludge from the streets of Deva Chair and ship it back to the headquarters in Ocu- about twelve miles away rusty alkaline water splashed as industrial vacuums sucked up. Sludge gathered in homes and offices workers from the company hosed down streets and alleyways to wash away the heavy metals to foot deep puddles of diluted toxic water or then suctioned from between trees and the dips of Roadways. Huge bulldozers gathered building wreckage and scooped up poisoned swaths of the surrounding forest floor. But no amount of cleaning could erase the red stains or fully removed. The powdery toxic dust that caked on wherever the waste dried the demolished homes. Were haunting site. Living Room couches were sopping wet with red mud. Never to be sat on again. Tv's were toppled over poison melted through plastic frames and burned away family pictures. Broken walls revealed inundated bathrooms with tubs sinks filled with sludge amidst piles of d'etre 'tis dolls and basketball's floated along in. What used to be children's toy rooms? Refrigerators with food still inside removed and put in massive garbage crate in the mid day on October. Fifth government workers arrived with giant dump trucks and drove down unchartered paths and back roads. They poured Klay into the tributaries of the Danube River. Officials claimed at the time that they would be able to neutralize toxins and minimize contamination with the clay. As Claes naturally absorbent. It could lower the Ph of the water by soaking in the poisons but the mud was wildly toxic yielding a Ph of thirteen that level of alkalinity could burn through skin and muscle tissue in a matter of minutes. A Ph of thirteen is similar to bleach oven cleaner. Neither of which is a substance. A person would want to touch jest war inhale throughout the afternoon of the fifth the sludge spread through rivers and woodlands around Deva Chair and Colon Tar just a day before these bodies of water had been lively clean and filled with wildlife water sources. That had been fresh enough to drink turned caustic overnight red sludge clogged the gills of fish. Their bodies floating to the surface birds who had eaten poison plants and dying aquatic. Animals lay bloated. At the river's edge. Small drowned rodents looked like clay figurines. The sheer number of dead creatures alarmed. The workers gathered the nauseous carcasses with gloved hands. They lifted the limp bodies of squirrels and raccoons that dripped with sludge into bins trash cans filled to the brim with these. Little corpses were incinerated by the dozen. The forest was strangely silent. Save for the sounds of the heavy machinery scooping and sectioning the toxic waste from the environment however the cleaning efforts to stop the flow of caustic sludge rivers and soil. Were coming up short. The emergency responders had underestimated the amount of toxic liquid. There was to clean up. This was due to a corporate lie in their own. Disaster plan malls accounted for only a fraction of the amount of toxic sludge. They had generated. They had been using the same waste pond to dump aluminum biproduct. Since the nineteen sixties in addition to the glut of toxic waste excess rainwater collected in the waste. Reservoir at the plant mixed with the aluminum. Byproduct years of rain created a much more fluid and powerful force than expected when the dam failed. The vast amount of rain water in the waste pond diluted the toxic sludge when the wall deteriorated burst the sludge spread in a more fluid form. It flowed markedly faster than a more solid substance the volume multiplied to over one hundred eighty five million gallons of destructive liquid that polluted roughly two thousand acres of land now the excess liquid pooling around the villages made the cleanup process much more harrowing as it dried and hardened the evacuated residents would not be able to return as soon as they had hoped. Once the sludge had absorbed the cleanup would take much longer than anticipated by October. Sixth and seventh. Some of these frightening facts trickled into the news and became public knowledge. The shock of what had happened was turning into anger. Deep Sadness and fear for the future residents listened to the news and read articles online has details about the true scope of the disaster. Were beginning to come to light. They heard the wide swath of land affected by the flood and realized the disaster was much greater than what they had seen Endeavour Chair. They saw pictures of fish floating belly up. In the midst of a- bling burping globs Greenpeace reported the danger of arsenic chromium and excessive mercury in the waters around Deva Chair. Arsenic levels in the wells of Colon Tar were twenty five times higher than the legal limit for drinking water and double the anticipated levels from the waste reservoir. It was difficult for residents to comprehend the level of poison now surrounding them many townspeople with only partially damaged. Homes remained endeavour chair refusing to leave these residents watched out their windows as blurry. Red Clouds filled the air. They tried to stay calm. The danger was only increasing. A new problem arose says the toxic mud began to dry. The sludge became a cancerous dust. It was not safe to breathe in but it was everywhere. Caught in the breeze and stirred up by the machines masks were required to be outside. In some cases people even wore them indoors as a dust made its way through air vents and under doors and on the morning of October Seventh. The wind started to pick up coming up. We'll see how the danger grew as the government and town officials rushed to save lives podcasters. I have some exciting news for you. I'm hosting a new show called daily quote. It's a quick two to three minute. Podcast that is sure to inspire you put you on the path to positively each quote will motivate uplift and renew your outlook on life plus. I'll dive deeper into the context surrounding the quote. You can learn more about its origin and the meaning behind it. Here's an episode for you to sample. Take a listen and then follow daily quote free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts..

Deva Chair Tomas Danube River Endeavour Chair Colon Tar Devon spotify basketball Hungarian government Ocu Klay
"hungary" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

08:44 min | 5 months ago

"hungary" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"The same. Tomasz 's crew joined alongside them in pulling frightened in injured residents from windows and rescuing kids who were balanced on. Rooftops families gathered together on dry ground. Just outside of town trying to piece together. What was going on those who couldn't find their loved ones. Were Frantic with fear praying. Their families had survived the flood. Coming up we'll see how. The World responded to Deva chairs disaster now back to the story after the toxic flood on October fourth. Two thousand ten around four hundred residents of Deva chair were forced to evacuate immediately. The injury count was rising and the burn victims needed medical attention. These were the issues that kept mayor. Tomas Twenty in constant motion Tomasz worked with officials in nearby towns to find food and housing for people whose homes had been destroyed or severely damaged. They were quickly able to set up shelters and find residents willing to house the displaced he coordinated with police forces an outside workers who were called in to help with rescue efforts maintain order and treat wounds using high-pressure water hoses they redirected the sludge from roadways so people could move semi safely through the town but there was worry amongst officials that things could take a turn at any moment and residents might riot or refuse to evacuate mayor. Thomas had confidence that the people of Deva Chair would cooperate with. The situation was already slipping out of his control is actions were punctuated by constant calls from his working crews and other officials. Eventually he bought another cell phone solely to field calls from the press everywhere he went a news crew or TV reporter was stationed poised and ready to ask him what happened and what is plan was he stayed up for twenty four hours that first day a foreshadowing of how little sleep he would get in the coming weeks. The residents around him were angry. Afraid and devastated. They had no one else to look to. Everyone wanted to know who was to blame and how this possibly could have happened. Did no one realize the wall was about to break is truly nothing that could have been done. Why didn't no one no that? The waste posed such a threat to the human body on contact. Tomas was exhausted and emotionally on edge. He answered their questions even though he had little more idea than they had at that point. Only those who built the waste reservoir really knew what caused the concrete structure to break altemus. New was that the town's recovery now rested in his hands. The impact of the flood would continue long beyond the initial horrors but the sudden devastation alone was nearly impossible to comprehend in particular the injuries when injured residents did make it to doctors. The Grave. Nature of their wounds became apparent. They were being closely watched. At nearby health centers. Doctors warn the patients and their families that the chemical burns could worsen over time. There was a potential. The wounds would continue growing eating away at tissue for days. Even if the injuries seemed relatively harmless at first several people died at the hospital from complications others were only beginning to reckon with ailments that would take years to heal and even as Thomas and other officials evacuated people out of town to stained safe zones but toxic. Dangers weren't over even once the current calmed and the flood effectively ran through Deva Chair. The town was cloaked with dried cancerous. Red Mud by the end of the day it not only served as an eerie reminder of the cataclysmic event but the residue was deadly in and of itself. The dust made breathing challenge the dangerous effects of the dust. Particles would only continue to reveal themselves over time not long after the flood hit the outside world learned about the unique ecological nightmare reporters from around the globe flew in to bear witness to the flood and to keep track of the effect it was having on the population and the terrain. Hungary's minister of the Interior and the Director of the National Directorate General for Disaster Management. Travel Deva Chair that day to try and control the disaster they were met by reporters lining the streets setting up camp in their vans. Getting footage of the Uis in every crevice of town from the broken down Barnes to the washed out backyards even after the floods current die down. The ruins of town were left in. Its wake sludge flowed in rivulets down the sides of alleyways red mud filled in every pothole and sidewalk crevice a waist. High Red mark stained everything. The flood had touched this disaster dubbed the worst Hungary had ever seen would put deva chair in the world news spotlight for the first time. Ever the flood changed it from a historically rooted. Sleepy village into a synonym for ECO. Disaster on the ground. It wasn't hard to tell. Just how dangerous. The sludge would continue to be to humans and the environment alike. The Central Agricultural Office declared a ban on fishing and hunting that night and official intervention by the chief veterinary officer prohibited sales and use of food or other items that had been contaminated by the sludge and while. Deva chair saw the worst of the flood that day. Seven more towns were endanger. The toxic mud was continuing to move. Hungarian government spokeswoman on Anais told Reuters that they had declared a state of emergency in the regions around of a chair as well. The Aluminum Company malls eared. Still wouldn't admit that the sludge was in fact toxic but the burning flesh the ruined homes collapsing structures. An overturned cars were tangible. Evidence of how harmful the red mud was to everything it came across. There was no way to deny what everyone was seeing with their own eyes and as the red mud spread to the surrounding areas to a thick uis covered everything in its path. The flood headed into the valleys and forests surrounding the area. Contaminating the water and decimating aquatic life. Wild animals were killed and flora annihilated farmland. Filled with crops would never again be viable. More extensive. Widespread cleanup efforts began the next day at dawn. Water management professionals directed firefighters and military troops to poor calcium nitrate and magnesium into the Marquel River. They were hoping to prevent pollution of the Danube or at least neutralize the sludge to make it less toxic at the same time on orders from the central agricultural office workers began to collect and dispose of animal carcasses in the surrounding forests the army and the National Public Health and Medical Officer Service came in to assess radiation levels not surprisingly production at Mall. Zere was put to a screeching halt by government order on this as well. Company officials were responsible for immediate repairs to the waste pond to contain whatever was left up the red mud in its original holding zone but the fear and damn anche would continue to spread now. Serbia and Bulgaria were beginning to prepare for contamination. Authorities announced that it would take an estimated year to recover any semblance of Structure Endeavor Chair and that would come at the cost of about ten billion forint the equivalent of roughly thirty million dollars and within days despite efforts to stop it the toxic flood would be heading towards the Rabah and Danube rivers. No one knew where the devastation would end..

Deva Chair Tomas Twenty Tomasz Thomas Structure Endeavor Chair Hungary reporter Serbia Marquel River Zere Danube rivers National Public Health Barnes Medical Officer Service Central Agricultural Office Reuters Aluminum Company Bulgaria Hungarian government
"hungary" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

12:55 min | 6 months ago

"hungary" Discussed on Worldly

"Down with Senator Elizabeth. Warren it is the federal government that can order the tests. It is the federal government that can use the pence production at in order to force companies to produce the test kits to produce the mass to produce the gown. The states don't have the power to do that. Only the federal government does listened to our whole conversation subscribed to clinch. Oh wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome back worldly listeners. we are talking about what is effectively a constitutional coup in Hungary where the parliament handed the prime minister. Dictatorial powers in keeping with his long-held authoritarian ambitions Hungary as the most extreme case of the corona virus being used as a pretext for a power grab but it is not the only one right. There are several countries around the world where authoritarian leaders authoritarian-minded leaders have taken on new powers disturbing powers and try new legislative or political tactics that they might not otherwise have been willing to do because the crisis has legitimized some sorts of power-grabs. Now to your mind you to what do you think some of the more egregious. Examples are outside of Hungary to stand out to me in particular of both in South America. So one is in. Bolivia which we talked about on the show before the quick recap here is that there was a rigged election. At least that's what most election observers say and the President Morales even rallies left and been caretaker from the opposite more right-leaning party actually a lot. More right. Leaning Party has come in and because of the corona virus that caretaker is now postponing elections and possibly trying to keep power in her office for some there was a coup against Morales and again. I think the statistics of the election is show that that's not the case but now it looks like this is someone who's trying to stay in power in using the corona virus as an excuse and so without elections without any actual kind of democratic process going strictly from the caretaker role to just being in charge and then nearby in juillet. There's been a long going tension between its military people. There were protesters against government's actions and the government decided to send the military out to those areas to push the protesters out to end the demonstrations if there was a case of large scale violence. One could see somewhat of a case for doing that. This was not the case. These were protesters. There was some incidents of or some reports of perhaps some small bouts of violence but largely peaceful in the grand scheme of things based on most reports and yet the military was called in to quash the descent and so in these two cases were seeing again the excuse of Oh. There is a corona virus crisis being used by governments to either hold onto power that has been usurped in many senses and then also to quell dissent against government both of these incidents they sound less than Hungary case than they are in the grand scheme of things right. These are not but still. This is what happens when you have an not just national price of international crisis and it gives leaders that are not so tied to democratic principles. Small D. The opening to do things like this. Yeah you know the one country that I've been keeping my eye on a lot and it's one that we talk a lot about in the same context as we often talk about Hungary and other countries that we're watching that were once quasi-democratic or moving toward democracy and are now you know backsliding towards authoritarianism and it's Turkey you know. In recent years we've seen president of Turkey. Really try to clamp down on dissent trying to exert more control over the media and control narratives. He is post-coup the attempted coup against his rule. His locked up journalists. He's locked up. People of all walks of life. And you know we're seeing him kind of extending that control and using the corona virus again as the pretext or or as the reason for doing that so what they're doing is they're really trying to crack down on what they're saying is misinformation about the colonel virus and again at surface level right. That sounds like a good thing. You don't want people spreading misinformation and getting people killed you know and saying certain things are curious if they're not or saying that the virus is not dangerous when it is. That's that's the argument that they're making right that we're just trying to crack down the misinformation. The reality is that they're cracking down on people who were going against the status quo narrative of what everyone says is happening in the country so while it may be some cases of misinformation we have the government you have. Aragon deciding what is misinformation? And there's this really remarkable moment this truck driver who had this viral video talking about the virus. He was arrested and he was finally released. Because the public was was really mad but Turkey's interior ministry was talking about the the guys detention and why he was. He was detained and he said that nearly three thousand social media accounts had been identified for propagating misinformation. And then he said we're trying to detain as many as possible like not even not sugar coating it right like literally like no. We're trying to arrest literally everyone on these social media accounts and that's really scary right and that's the same thing because if it's misinformation again about something that's dangerous that's one thing but if you're posting on social media criticizing the government and saying maybe not doing enough or. I'm not getting supplies. I need it my hospital and they come in rescue. That's the same thing we saw in China rate. That's the same thing that caused arguably outbreak in the first place so not only is that scary for democracy. It's scary for the corona virus response inside just quickly to add like this is the kind of thing we're seeing elsewhere and even in Thailand. The prime minister is now going after journalists who criticized the government or pretty much anyone who says the government like all under. Oh we have to make sure we have the right information for Corona virus. This seems to be one of the commonplace. It's fascinating to see this happen. Europe Asia Latin America all Middle East across the board. This seems to be one of the major plays. Well I mean it makes perfect sense right as John said. Everyone agrees that you need to be dealing with current virus misinformation because it can literally get people killed it is in the structure of a public health crisis that it is really really important that individuals take specific action on their own in ways that the state just can't force them to which the information you can't have a government agent in your house making you wash your hands right so under those circumstances it's really important that people get the right messages that viral misinformation no pun intended be corrected on social media like that. That sort of thing is fight all Yet in a country where the leadership is not democratically accountable. Or is dubiously democratically accountable. Or Hell even is democratically accountable but can figure out some way to temporarily get around at right there. It's much easier to abuse the same steps to insulate yourself from any kind of legitimate and meaningful criticism. Right that's why this this transcends region and really speaks to the nature of the people in power in all of these various different governments. We've been talking about is that they have a degree of authority. They care more about maintaining it than they do about ensuring the continued viability of democratic practice in their country and so they're willing to exploit the corona virus using plausible-sounding excuses. It's just it is really the perfect situation for somebody. Who wants to clamp down on the free flow of information and so you're seeing that happen in country after country in different ways. I don't know if we made this clear in the hungry situation but I believe until me. He's like if I had this wrong. But part of the the measures the state of emergency measures that that put in place mean that there are no rallies no elections that can be held during the state of emergency. Is that correct? Yeah that's right that's right that to me even more than the suppression of dissent and. Control of information that is potentially even more terrifying because you talked about Democratic Accountability Right that actually takes away that democratic accountability very directly. I'm not in any way trying to suggest that the situation in the US is comparable or that trump is comparable to two or Bonn at all to make that clear but we are seeing concerns among people especially on the left. Obviously you know what happens. Are we going to have an election here in the US? Because we're this is an election year and there are a lot of people who are scared that could could trump suspend the elections. And you know there's a lot of discussion that looks like legally probably couldn't and we would still get it done but there was a moment this week when trump was overheard saying. I'm not sure the exact context but was basically talking about the issue of whether we could do mail in ballots for all these elections that are coming up and he was essentially saying we shouldn't do that. We can't do that because then Republicans will never win another election. And I'm paraphrasing but that response is really scary because it's like a very overt political response like no. We can't do that and so again. I think you know the concerns over. The Corona virus make even holding elections sketchy and scary and an unclear whether you can do them in a fair way and so it's just it's just another way to kind of erode that democratic accountability. That's really scary. We've been talking mostly about dubiously democratic or questionably democratic states right but this is as John points out up potentially problem even for countries that have long democratic traditions in Israel for instance the parliament's speaker who is a member of prime minister. Netanyahu's party refused to comply with a court order that would force the government to seize the parliament where the opposition held a majority in in this maneuver which had thrown the country's political system into chaos basically coerced the leader of the opposition for reasons that are totally unclear to me and to joining up with the governments for what he claims are are the duration of the crisis but seems to empower Netanyahu. Who's been acting throughout this crisis Swiftly in sometimes in in ways and bitter consistent with public health dictates but also in ways that fit with his long standing authoritarian tendencies to try to hold onto power at any cost and now the opposition is fractured. And Netanyahu has a relatively solid majority in parliament. No in Britain you've seen pretty substantially stepped up surveillance powers that the Johnson government has received and real concerns from civil libertarians. That they just won't give those up after the virus crisis is over so while it obviously is a bigger problem in states where the the leadership actively dedicated to dismantling democracy even in countries that are more solidly democratic in Israel's Increasingly. Not In that situation for reasons that we've talked about other shows. It creates a problem for the tenuous balance of rights and freedoms you need for democracy to be functioning in the way that you wanted to for people to feel free enough to act in how they like in their private life as well as to participate politically and to challenge the government in public life. And you can you can you. Don't there's like a spectrum here right? It's not just democracy not democracy. It's Kellyanne emergency powers crew during times like these and up eroding the quality of democracy in your country and we saw that pretty vividly in the United States after nine eleven with the expansion of police powers and the Patriot. Act and stuff like that but now increasingly you're seeing it to varying degrees in cure democracies in struggling democracies alike. I don't let that America point go because I think that's incredibly illustrative and important. I mean let's remember. Yes we all number nine eleven. We don't have to go through that but what happened next. Which at the time. You could make some reasonable arguments for was a large surveillance capability to survey foreigners and some Americans were in contact with foreigners. It's all their communications. These warrants to spy on people effectively to see what they were up to because they might be suspected of of doing terrorist acts or may be. I mean it goes on and on and all of this was done with the well. We don't want another nine eleven to happen again in the government needs to have control. There's actually kind of decent ish arguments for those authorities at least more plausible arguments that you can make but what happened was an goes to a warning. I I kind of mentioned earlier is a lot of those powers. Remain or a lot of those power stayed or are around in some form and once you put these in place..

Hungary federal government parliament prime minister Turkey United States Netanyahu president trump Israel Corona John Senator Elizabeth South America Morales Bolivia Warren Leaning Party
"hungary" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

05:38 min | 6 months ago

"hungary" Discussed on Worldly

"It was frustrating for him to have to put up with even the veneer of a democratic system even though it was cleverly designed to keep him not a foul of EU rules about democracy. You're supposed to still be a democracy if you're going to be in European Union and it is a big deal for Hungary to be in the EU reason being the EU gives them a tremendous amount of subsidies which the government has used to funnel money to their preferred businesses and private sector leaders and also just generally keep their economy afloat site poor management by the organ regime. So it's strings overreach. Not just because it's unnecessary for dealing with the coronavirus problem but because it is in fact likely to produce a backlash you already have people in the European Union talking about what kinds of punishments or not exactly sanctions in the sense of like what. America does the country that doesn't like but other kinds of internal rules that might maybe restrict the flow of money to Hungary a have hearings of some sort about its continued membership in the EU right if it gets cut off from EU funding and resources. There isn't an obvious way for the government to make up the gap moreover it strikes me. This is from talking to Hungarians again that it's really really important for the regime's legitimacy to be able to tell people that they still live in democracy. If you'll get pulling inside Hungary people still believe that they should have democracy. I think ordinary citizens believed at least as of two thousand eighteen that they were still living in one. That was part of the point of having a state bought media right. You can convince people their living democracy even though they're not but if they do this and then they Now recently a new push to try to take power away from mayors at the local level. It just so happens that some of the mayors in the country's largest cities including Budapest. Our opposition party mayors that they actually managed to despite the playing field being so tilted against them manage to win some local elections which is an extraordinary feat and a testament to the fact that maybe Hungarians are starting to get tired of the way that Bonn had been running the country. Now it's GonNa be much much much much more difficult to say. We respect the will of the People. We respect what they decided to do. And that could in theory there have been street. Protests against government policies that successfully forced them to back off. That could Engender a serious popular backlash against the regime. So that's kind of why I actually think that the timing right now is really smart on Orban's part not that again. Not that I support this idea but I think the timing actually makes a lot of sense because one just talking about popular protests and backlash. Well if everyone's scared of getting corona virus and it doesn't gather in large groups that makes protesting a lot harder just physically you know logistically. So there's that there's also the kind of broader idea a lot of strong men dictators. We've seen this in authoritarian regimes across the world. And over time they like to present themselves. Often is this benevolent father. Figure who is watching over the country in protecting you and keeping you safe and I can understand at a time of great fear overcurrent virus. Alex like you said they. They may only have a comparatively low number of cases but their neighbors and other countries in the EU have a lot more cases and and I can understand that presenting himself as this look. I'm just doing this to protect you. It reminds me a lot of how you see. Hooton trying to set himself up as a wise elder Russia. You've seen that obviously in the Kim family regimes throughout time in North Korea is like we are the ones protecting you from this threat so I think in that sense it makes sense the question which I think you've both gotten at is okay. That lasts for only so long right once. This threat goes away and it will. It may be months or a year but it will and at that point if he doesn't then rescinded which everything points to the fact that he probably won't then do you start to see popular protests. Then do you start to see the backlash capitalizing on on fear? A lot of people just want to make sure that the government's in control and doing something in a way that people who don't normally like government control you know might not otherwise. Have those kind of stronger feelings. Like I wanNA feel like somebody's in charge and taking control and keeping me safe so I will let him have these powers for now. The question again is what happens when the crisis is over. We're going to take a quick break. Because Jen helpfully brought up the fact that this is not just a Hungary problem but actually global problem. We're talking about a few other places where the current of. Irs Crisis has served as an opportunity for authoritarian leaders to or authoritarian minded leaders in democracies to try to expand their own powers or scope of control of the state. Hey It's Swisher you may know me as the only person who looks cool wearing sunglasses indoors but in my spare time. I hosted podcast called Rico decode every week. We talk about power changed the people you need to know. Around tech and beyond some of my recent guests include Edward Snowden Megan and the cast of the ellwood which was a huge thrill for me. If any of these sound interesting to you. Listen them now on Rico. Decode subscribe to the show for free on apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP to be the first to hear new interviews every week. Hey it is as a host of Ezra Klein show podcast. We've been covering a huge amount of corona virus related questions over on the show and this week we sat.

European Union Hungary Orban Ezra Klein Bonn Budapest apple America Edward Snowden Megan North Korea Russia ellwood Alex Swisher Irs Jen
"hungary" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:15 min | 6 months ago

"hungary" Discussed on Worldly

"Maybe there's a few leaves in there and it keeps like riding over Jen's face sometimes we just see a mouth in some disembodied tattoos talking to us it's like enjoy interacting with somebody So yeah as you. Listeners are aware of at this point we are recording from our home studios which is to say just places in our actual houses. We apologize for any errors in the quality of sound so we are talking about a common feature of crises of any sort. Which is that leaders. Who have authoritarian tendencies often tend to use them to expand their own power? And this is true. Both in the thornberry in states where it's to be expected but also in countries that are nominally democratic but have elected leaders who have consolidated their own power and used it to undermine the process of elections themselves. No country is more known for this phenomenon. Hungary where just in this past week? The parliament which is controlled by Prime Minister Viktor. Orban's government passed a bill that would essentially give him the ability to rule by dictate for as long as he wants not just the duration of the crisis but literally as as long as he sees fit to be in charge of the country and ruling it by his own orders Jenner. Alex is there any other order like that? You're aware of in any democracy around the world democracy. No we see these kinds of orders all the time in authoritarian countries the sweeping power here in Hungary is so pervasive. I mean we'll go into the details momentarily but I think just generally speaking. It's important to note that is effectively. Cut off any form of dissent especially from journalists that has given the authorities a lot of power to kind of jail people for staying outside of quarantines wherever may be antidote suspended a lot of the political processes whether it be elections whether it be actual having a parliament etc and so like this is unheard of in the democratic world? I mean democratic nations. Do take a lot of steps that trample on civil freedoms and whatnot. And we'll get into those but this is way beyond this is very much a centralizing the power in the executive and in Orban's specifically in Hungary and so this this is why it's it's stepped outside of the norm and broken through Outside of all the other cases that will soon talk about this is so much further and so much more authoritarian than we've seen and it's even leading calls. I mean it's gotten so bad that even some in the European Union are saying maybe it's time to kick Hungary out. Yeah Zach longtime worldly listeners. Probably know that you did a really awesome reporting trip. In Hungary in the not too distant past time has no meaning anymore. We are in the ninety third day of March. I think that's correct. Yes even though. It's April first one one recording this and since you know a lot about Hungary and have done some really great on the ground reporting there. I wonder if you could just walk us through in detail. What specifically or bonded what these orders are and how he pushed it through. Because I'm still you know I know the kind of general outline but I wonder if you could just walk us through the details here so it's important to understand the background here. That is to say what the Orban's government has been doing for the past ten years. Roughly that it's been in power or was prime minister of the country is not his first time in power. He was shortly after the end of the Cold War and his party lost an election an early one and he decided afterwards that the problem was not with anything that he had done. But with the voters and the media and so on that yet his his feet as faction or fee dash depending on how accurate. You WanNa be in terms of the Hungarian pronunciation. I'm not going to be accurate this time because my Hungarian is very very bad or bond after after taking power this time around systematically worked to undermine the free functioning of democracy. Now this is not being until right now a overtly authoritarian takeover of the state. That's a relatively new thing What he has done instead is very very. Subtly corrupt the system to rig the playing field of elections specifically parliamentary elections. The important ones and to make it difficult for anyone to fund or start off any meaningful opposition bloc so this involves things like redistributing economic and regulatory favors towards his friends and his political allies buying up media broadcasters and newspapers to the point where something like ninety percents of all media outlets and Hungary by one estimate are owned either by the government or by its associates that is to say business leaders or rich people who've been empowered by the state to work with them and to make it so that elections are functionally noncompetitive and by functionally non competitive. I don't mean that opposition can't run and they can say what they wanna say can do all of those things until recently you didn't go to jail in Hungary for expressing to send what they did was make it such that it was already difficult to begin with because they gerrymandered. The map pretty profoundly so that feed us would have structural advantages in the electorate. They also would not give equal time to opposition members. They would do tricks like stand up faked parties with similar names. This one is less proven but so plausible or voted. Ballet's Lee. Yeah. They tried this before. That's crazy I heard on the underground for people in Hungary but the point was to make it so that it still looks like a democratic political system. It talked like a democratic political system. But you know when you're you're actually paying attention close and very very detailed attention to the way the electoral system functioned. You'd realize that this is not an electoral system at all. It's a way of legitimising. One man rule They also amended the constitution of variety of different ways with a two-thirds majority which they've won repeatedly in these rigged elections. So when I was there in two thousand eighteen there so live debate as to whether Hungary was authoritarian or democratic state and I made the case in my piece to link to in the notes that it was not a democratic state that it was essentially making a mockery of the idea of democracy and there are still some people in the West even who have defended this as merely an expression of the populist. Right-wing will in Hungarian society when in fact or on his real popular support. I don't want to understate this. But in fact or buying You know in the last election. He won under fifty percent of the vote but over two thirds of the seats in Parliament. And that's even despite systematic rigging with the media. This isn't a guy who's winning on a wave of popular support even though he does have some in reality the current order. You know part of me wonders why the decided to issue this at all because it it strips away the subtle and clever veneer that the government had used claim that they were still democratic state as Alex said it indefinitely suspended democratic procedure most notably by giving ORB on the ability to issue authoritative dictates. So he just sort of says so literal dust. Yes exactly right. What's more is that? This order doesn't have an expiration date. It doesn't say until X. amount of Kovic cases are under control It it just as long as or bond himself decides that he wants to rule this way he can now it's possible for parliament's to vote and remove the powers from them. And maybe they will but if they do. It won't be in a way that provides meaningful constraints on Orban's power because again it is controlled two thirds by feed as the court also has oversight but Orban has systematically worked to pack the courts with his cronies and neuter the courts jurisdiction to make it difficult for them to overturn the ruling. And if you want to report critically on this if you're in the ten percent of media outlets that are not owned by the government or one of its allies you can be put in jail for five years under this legislation for spreading false information. Now this is supposed to be in theory about Corona virus of course when you have one strong man in charge guy who's again and again demonstrated his authoritarian instincts. There's no doubt that what this means is. He wants to power and he wants to jail people who threaten them. Just to play devil's advocate here and you know I don't actually you agree with this. But there is the corona virus crisis in Europe right. There's one here in the United States. There's pandemic going on first of all KINDA WANNA know. What is the current situation in Hungary? Like are they in the same kind of situation that like in Italy or Spain or even parts of the? Us like New York to be part of this. Bill basically is allowing like you said him to Orban's had basically issued dictates from the top down but it would seem to maybe make some sense as we're seeing potentially in the US of needing a strong federal government to handle things at a federal level rather than letting local and state or regional leaders making kind of add. Hawk Patrick Decision so one. What's the situation like to? Is there any possibility that this is actually a good move? Even if it doesn't end that itself is pretty scary. Yeah those are fair questions. And they're both wrong so the last amount of cases I've seen and I'm sure the situation changes all the time but last estimate I saw was about four hundred or so positive cases at hungry. That's incredibly small compared to what we've seen in Italy Spain the United States. I've seen in in South Korea and elsewhere the notion that Hungary's hastings such a crisis that requires A dictator literally from the top to solve. The crisis is mute It's never good to have four hundred seven people sick this way but it is not necessarily worse. It's not even close to one of the worst cases in the world. Plus we've also seen democracies handle these crises without needing dictates We've see south. Korea is a good example Heck I know the United States situations out of control but we've ramped up testing and a whole bunch of other measures without needing dictatorial rule. So I guess it's been proven as you do not need authoritarianism or as Zach also wrote eloquently before and we'll show like this notion of authoritarian envy if only we had these strongman rulers in charge. We would somehow be able to curb the scourge early enough to maybe try to answer. Questions is why Hungary doing this now. Y so blatantly and I can't say to have any special knowledge here but if I were a betting man I would say that Hungary is in the EU and so it had to abide by even a thin veneer of democratic practice at a time when everyone is focused on only one thing and especially when a lot of EU countries are facing a lot of this problem. France Spain Italy. Their attention turned elsewhere. And now that thin veneer doesn't need to be there anymore and what's helpful. I guess for someone like or bond is when you make these kinds of laws. When make these kinds of moves? They tend to stick. It's really hard to remove them. And so yeah. We're all criticizing and they'll be podcast episodes about Orban's doing a bad thing but this too shall pass and these laws will remain. And that's what I worry that. He's taken advantage of the small window to probably do something he's wanted to do. But had some constraint against and none of that constraint has gone he's gone full-throttle. Yeah it strikes me Alex to that point as a serious case of authoritarian overreach in some ways like like counterproductive. Move on the Orban's governments part so for one thing as you've pointed out and I it is simply incorrect. That authoritarian powers are necessary to combat the current virus. In fact if you look across cases I spoke to a number of different experts about this. There's no evidence that authoritarian states are performing better and some of the worst countries for example Iran and early on China failed due to the nature of their authoritarian systems. And that's part of why we have a global outbreak to begin with but contrast some democracies like South Korea. Taiwan had performed relatively. Well right. It's just. There's no systematic comparison argument for why you need authoritarian rule by one person or one political party powers in order to do the the the measures necessary to contain corona virus. Which are compatible with you. Know Still Standard Democratic functioning. The second point is I think Oregon and this is a little bit of speculation. But it's based in part on talking to people who know him personally used to work with him including one legislator who's in his party until she realized he was and quit Is that he. He is a guy who really wants and likes to have power right. He wants to rule as a one person states. That is what he's been building towards..

Hungary Orban Parliament Alex South Korea United States European Union Zach Jen Prime Minister Viktor Italy Spain Jenner Europe Taiwan prime minister Korea Oregon
"hungary" Discussed on GroundTruth

GroundTruth

10:43 min | 10 months ago

"hungary" Discussed on GroundTruth

"Let's recap the playbook of victims. Ben I is. Allies are banned newspapers. We Sean now. Under the umbrella of Kashmir second is government spends millions of dollars each year to keep those propaganda media afloat regardless was acquitted of journalism and third orban ban any supporters. ACOUSTICALLY trying to clamp down on independent media as ability to do that job birds all band government. Defense cash mass position. In supporting Hungary's entrepreneurs and enterprises the formulation and establishment of cash was a market like private initiative and we helped the private initiative and the resort and Kovic is victor all vans international spokesman and he explained paint to me that Kashmir also plays an important role in Hungary's development for the past nine years. We've been building up those areas. which have relevance this? From the perspective of Hungary's National Future and that is a matter of national strategy or national security including critical infrastructure picture and so on small has approached the government with an initiative which was bringing together a Hungarian owned media. And we believe that in today's world at the beginning of the Twentieth Century Emmanuel respect the national ownership of media is part of the critical infrastructure. We have to face Kovac was not concerned about the lack of transparency of Kashmir. You says the government does not intervene in this private initiative of detail title. What about a state advertising money directed to cash my media companies? Does it create a bias and distorted media market. Well I believe not I I mean. Depression is wrong. What is important for us is how to reach those Hungarians actually to whom we are talking to and that's why we have concentrated revenues that instead instead of spending it in an efficient way we spend the money efficiently according to call that because cash so fast it only makes sense for the government amen to spend money advertising food or cash match? That is we have dogs. We want to reach And it doesn't matter who is providing US those targets if if the advertisement reaches the goal for that it is fine for the government to advertise because over countries do it but the problem is unlike other governments like France Austria all bands. Advertising campaigns MIA minorities migrants or any opponents of the government. Speaking of Austria Victor Albans Media Strategy became a source of inspiration to inference twenty eighteen national election campaign. Hey this is old your former video clip codes the AP's affair which was released by two German newspapers. Newspapers Video. Looks like it was. We've called it with a hidden camera. It shows the leader of the Austrian Korean Far-right Party and Russian investors plotting to win a twenty eighteen Austrian. Parliamentary elections part of the scheme was to buy Australia's has men tabloid and to motivate after the media takeover in Hungary. Lena your birth from we are back in. Brussels does Belgium after several weeks longer. It was time to go back to my routine of covering Europe but I could not forget. How all bands methods could could become a template for the rest of the continent like scheme? We just heard out in Austria. I am not the only one. Julie Marches Zach is from reporters thirds. Vote Baldur's while it is already the case I mean if the e U does nothing he will allow other member states is to follow the road. I mean Poland does what Hungary did before. Yeah it opened the doors for other member said to say Oh Anyway Eddie. You doesn't care about value so we are free weekend whatever we want. So what can Europe do. UPN lawmakers worries at Oban tight restrictions offers a free media but also immigrants and human rights groups will only weekend Democratic Dick Freedoms what was really surprising over. The past months is how European officials in diplomats are aware of what all band is doing the free repress but some countries like Poland Romania and Croatia. I totally agree with some of all bands. Policies overs like like France and the Netherlands. Believes that Hungary's democracy is in danger. It is always difficult for European countries to jugs in neighbors. Positional GNOMES. Oh sensitive national issues. So besides what they called could monitoring Zishu said do not wish to sanction allman and. This is another novel. Line of Alban's particular playbook playing within the limits of what is acceptable to European Union and finding grey areas and when any DAS- he knows he won't face any scrutiny or consequences beyond the European Union's broader concerns about all bench controls the media there is also a local crisis. I'm reminded of what Attila by Bose. The local editor in page told me he said that there is no freedom of suppressing the pricing Ongeri Anymore Shaw Kubota shoveling atom is going to hold your most of your. I'm pessimistic because a few years ago. We never thought we could could of ended up in this situation Viktor. Orban wants to preserve a tiny version of a democracy. People can protest and some newspapers can still write bad things about the prime minister. So this allows victor hormone to say see in Hungary. There's no threat to democracy named Josh Right Act and that is a shadow. In which Hungary finds itself today where some of the trappings of democracy remain intact but the country's democracy democracy is under threat so government controls a large percentage of the media and seems to be writing history of the nation Hungary are`maybe stumbling towards a new very ties. A what all bank owes his illiberal democracy in Quinton aureus various is ground truth global reporting fellow with our democracy undone project you can read his accompanying written piece in the Atlantic magazine on our website. We've created a graphic illustration `lustration authoritarians playboy for all seven countries featured. In the project. There are also interviews with each of our democracy on reporting fellows. You tell us what you think of this episode and give us a rating. Tell your friends they can subscribe on. NPR One apple podcasts. spotify or wherever they listen. This episode was reported and produced by Quentin Arias with editorial support from Tracey Tong and Rob Rosenthal special thanks to Ludovic the Peltier Kutaisi. Our senior producer is Mitch. Hanley the Ground Truth Project editorial team includes Selena Gomez Josh Co so todd. Ching Wilson Bano and Maria Somali ground truths executive editor is Kevin Grant. The Atlantic Magazine's global editor is per shot row. This podcast is in partnership with the Atlantic magazine and is supported by W H major funding for this season of the podcast comes from the loose foundation and the Macarthur Foundation. I'm Charles Senate. Executive producer of the podcast and founder of the Ground Truth Project which which supports emerging journalists to do on the ground reporting in undercover corners of the world our democracy democracy undone series continues as we turn to the next chapter in the authoritarians playbook exploiting religion in India Prime Minister Narendra commodious redrawing India's religious fault lines to consolidate power in the world's largest democracy in Kashmir the Indian government has stripped the only muslim-majority already state of its autonomy in Assam. hindu-nationalist mobs are lynching innocent Muslims in northern India. The state is constructing a Hindu temple on. What's what's left of a mosque? Desecrated by Hindu. Nationalist Mobs Modi is also redefining. What it means to be Indian who is a citizen listen who will become stateless? Dehumanizing indigenous people is violated illegal Bangladeshis. Because they didn't they're grabbing land. That's next time on the ground truth. podcast the last press run of local newspaper. The vindicator served readers in Youngstown. Ohio since eighteen sixty nine then then on August thirty first. They're printing presses shut down and the newsroom closed ending a legacy of family ownership in public service. Aw sadly the death of a local newspaper is not uncommon. youngstown joins fifteen hundred other communities across the US that have lost their their local news organization. There's a crisis and local news that has become a crisis for our democracy. The Ground Truth Project is confronting affronting that crisis head on. But we need your help. We're calling on you to help us raise three hundred thousand dollars to put three hundred journalists in the field in twenty twenty twenty and today for the first time ever thanks to news match and a generous ground truth challenge donor. Your donation can have triple the impact for every dollar. You give through December thirty first. You unlocked two dollars more or think of it this way by helping us send one reporter into into the field. We can send to additional reporters to cover the local stories that would otherwise go untold. This news can't wait. Go to the Ground Truth Project Dot Org to give today and thank you for supporting local news..

Hungary Kashmir Atlantic magazine Austria Europe US France Selena Gomez Josh Co prime minister editor Ground Truth Project Sean Ben I Orban AP Youngstown European Union
"hungary" Discussed on GroundTruth

GroundTruth

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"hungary" Discussed on GroundTruth

"Minister Viktor. Orion the Victor Orban has been involved in politics for over thirty years during the one thousand nine hundred eighty S. He was a long head activist calling Owen to Ongeri Communist. The communist regime collapsed. I and in one thousand nine hundred ninety s country held free elections Viktor. Orban was elected to parliament leading his Fidesz party which had received saved barely nine percents of the seats. Eight years. Later or band became Hungary's Prime Minister and Bill to coalition government. We've over conservative conservative parties but oh bands. Opponents criticized each placement of allies in key wars the station and is polarizing politics. Fix all bands party lost. Its majority to fasten into any became the leader of your position. He supported the blames blames. The media for the loss in two thousand ten oban came back in a landslide so that TV on the part five this time he's feeders. Polity held the two thirds majority in parliament. This majority allowed Adam to disregard any objections forms the opposition parties and gave them the power to rewrite the constitution. They did this more than ten times since two thousand ten is tacked. The Constitutional Court is caught as a country. More conservative judges Zan Victoria all ban. Dan began to redraw the media landscape. He pushed four new regulatory bodies and media. Console stacked it with his allies the console whereas power to impose penalties on media outlets for any coverage government considers unbalance. That is anything critical of the government. We've all bands government controls in place is wealthy backers went on a buying spree from Dotan. It was the year run. The government came to power overlooked of ownership changes in the Hungarian media market or by is economist economist and member of Mythic a media watchdog. Several international investments left the Hungarian market or they just I simply saw the major of their portfolio especially in the only two car market at the same time the domestic investors bought up this media assets and this domestic to invest rs and that financial mess stars. They are political invest best starts. It means that they serve political interest of course not surprisingly program meant odaguard close to the prime minister I Began to build a media empire brought up newspapers and independent websites. The also shut down newspapers overnight like the left leaning liberty of the people more of what had been independent media suddenly became loyal promoters of government typically to Viktor Orban is looking forward to a third successive term as prime minister after e one another four year term in twenty eighteen. All Band was now how about to officially sanctions his media. Empire Kashmira now a year later. Kashmir's almost five hundred outlets. It's include political newspapers local newspapers. TV stations tabloids and news websites then the government quickly issued a decree declaring that the creation of Kashmir was a matter of his election or interest. This is key. This decree exempted cashmere from any other side from the country's competition authority and it has managed to evade any antitrust laws that could be enforced buys as European Union of which Hungary has been a member. Since two thousand four Kashmir's national dominance is built on a network of local news outlets many are in small cities across the country. So I went to one of those communities. I drove free hours to patch a CD in southwest southwest Hungary in twenty seventeen Attila. Babu's air win. Good launches a regional news website. Free pitch the explains local communities. Today have a hard time finding news about the local areas typically the Kashmir local newspapers have around sixteen pages but only a fraction is written by the local reporters that means fewer stories stories about local officials stories. We've looked going back to the issue of conducting a lot of people stopped breeding those newspapers for political reasons but but also because they weren't interesting anymore or they were badly written. Most local media owned by Kashmira and receives a content from public relations agencies. NC's told me why thinks Kashmir investors are buying small market news outlets and it's not unlike sinclair media the America which is used its chain of local TV stations to spread nationalist right-wing point of view. He yet uh-huh yeah clearly. They look for opportunities in rural areas. Where people only get information through the television or the local newspapers? It's a bigger electoral weapon than we think. Think according to a news regimen dominated by Kashmir's nationalist narrative helps keep Albans Party in power abic before launching their own. Line new site at till an air win wrote for the paper that today is owned by Kitiona but because independent and not pro government they are now running into problems of access. Zan Not invited to press conferences and officials do not answer questions. This is the easiest way to reason for that is to call us fake news so they don't communicate at all so we don't get any information on cashman not only towards information that on gas receive it plays a significant foale inside the ties moments. They see Hungary as less than ten million people about the same number as Indiana yet Indiana as it just over two hundred fifty media outlets compare that to Hungary's nearly five hundred pro government media outlets controlled.

Kashmir Hungary Prime Minister Victor Orban Minister Viktor Zan Victoria Viktor Orban sinclair media Owen Dotan Constitutional Court Indiana Albans Party European Union Adam
"hungary" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"hungary" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Steady Mellencamp here from the real housewives of Beverly Hills. I'd like to invite you to go down many many rabbit holes with me on lots of different different topics. You know you've seen your best friend's. boyfriends brothers sisters dog before been on his page. You liked it and then realized why am I following this dog yeah metoo. Some people get help. Some people just talk about it. That's what we're doing here so listen to Teddy pod on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcast or wherever you listen to podcasts this day in history class is a production of iheartradio alot again. It's EAVES and you're listening to this day in history history class. A podcast at truly believes no day is boring. Today is October six twenty nineteen. Uh Today was October nineteen o eight Austria Hungary informed the Ottoman Empire of his annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina this announcement set off what's known as the Bosnian crisis a period of conflict between Austria Hungary and the Ottoman Empire under the eighteen seventy eight treaty of Berlin Austria Hungary gained the right to occupy and administer the Ottoman Empire's provinces of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Sandjak of Novi Pazar but Austria Hungary always had its sights set on permanent possession of the provinces Bosnia and Herzegovina were widely sought after but Austria Hungary a lot of work into developing infrastructure mines factories agriculture and schools in Bosnia and Herzegovina at the same time ethnic and the end religious conflict grew within Bosnia and Herzegovina and groups in the two provinces displayed nationalist ambitions the young Turk Revolution broke out in the Ottoman Empire in Nineteen eight and restored the Ottoman Constitution Appear Seventy six and revived the Ottoman Parliament Vienna. I was afraid that the new authorities in the government of the Ottoman Empire would try to restore Ottoman political power in Bosnia and Herzegovina as a WPRO Russia Serbia for control over the Sandjak of Novi Pazar and Bosnia and Herzegovina Russia itself was stabilized after defeat in the Russo Japanese war foreign minister of Austria Hungary alloys graph flex up on Arendal saw an opportunity for Austria Hungary to assert his dominance in the Balkans Austria Hungary's ambassador to Russia Leopold Graf Ferstl set up a meeting between Aaron Paul and the Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Petrovich. It is both skis in September nineteen eight at Bouchon Arabia. What actually happened at the meeting is up for debate as no minutes of a meeting where release it is both ski. It says that Russia would not object to the annexation and an exchange Austria Hungary would not object to open the Bosphorus and Dardanelles Straits two Russian warships is Boesky insisted on an international conference before the annexation took place but on October six the day after Bulgaria declared its independence from the Ottoman Empire Emperor Franz Joseph. I of Austria announced that it was annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina the withdrawal of the austro-hungarian Armie from a Sandjak of Novi Pazar was also announced but is Boesky was not expecting the annexation to happen so soon he said that Aaron Thaw Paul did not tell him the date of annexation and that he did not know Austria Hungary planned on executing it before the matter was settled with other political power opposition to the annexation erupted in Europe Russia and the Balkans France Britain and Italy protested the annexation Pan Slavic nationalists nationalist throughout Europe. Were unhappy with announcement. Serbia insisted that Austria Hungary seed part of the Jack of Novi Pazar to them and Dan is Volsky supported them but Austria Hungary backed by Germany threatened to invade Serbia at the end of the Bosnian crisis ACIS Austria Hungary seemed to have come out on top after a boycott of austro-hungarian goods caused commercial losses Austria Hungary ended up paying an indemnity to the Ottomans and alienating many from Australian policy but the Ottoman Empire recognized the annexation which Russia and Serbia accepted opted in March of nineteen o nine the next month the treaty Berlin was amended to accept the annexation the nation's managed to avoid the war but tense relations between Austria Hungary Russia and Serbia after the latter two faced such mutilation remained and contributed due to the outbreak of World War One and nineteen fourteen. I'm jeff coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you have any burning questions or comments you can leave us a note at T. D. H. podcast on twitter facebook or instagram or you can go the old fashioned out and send us an email at this day at iheartmedia dot com. Thanks for tuning in and we'll catch you tomorrow. Our own fame place for more podcasts from IHEART radio is iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Teddy Mellencamp here from the real housewives of Beverly Hills. I'd like to invite you to go down many many rabbit holes with me on lots of different topics. You know you've seen your best friend's. boyfriends brothers sisters dog before been on his page. You liked it and then realized why am I following this dog. Yeah me too some people. We'll get help. Some people just talk about it. That's what we're doing here so listen to teddy t pod on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcast or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Austria Hungary Austria Ottoman Empire Hungary Bosnia Berlin Austria Hungary Herzegovina exchange Austria Hungary ACIS Austria Hungary Novi Pazar Ottoman Empire Emperor Franz J Balkans Austria Russia Ottoman Parliament Vienna Apple Steady Mellencamp Beverly Hills
"hungary" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"hungary" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"The world's first twenty four hour our stereo video music channel you became flashier and more aggressive and began to rely much heavier on disco influences and heavier electronic sentence so for years. Yep Roc was seen as cool. It was consigned to wedding parties and dusty record collections. I'm came in to be seen as hit me of one thousand nine hundred eighty. S Small Seed Fund fool music but what you're seeing seeing. Is that the wind in its way back in the sales of y'all rock now yeah definitely now on spotify there's playlist that have hundreds of thousands of followers and and also if you look at things like Google searches for yacht rock they've steadily climbed since the twenty tens and you see this nice little spike in summer months when people try and seek the guy that distinctive west coast sound not summery breezy be your house and when people are seeking out. Are they looking back to these classics or are we or the new yachtsman. They're definitely looking back for these classics but I think a testament to the influence of this genre of music is the fact got so many modern day artists looked back to it and include traits in their music today and some examples include fragments of time by Daft punk and if you listen to vampire weekend money of their tracks have distinctive yacht qualities to them if you're looking for more latent tribute than I think you need look no no further than undercuts show you the way which actually features Michael McDonald.

Roc Michael McDonald spotify Google twenty four hour
"hungary" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"hungary" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Any hopes they have of stopping the west destroying the woolworth soon dashed as dozens of young men pulled on a rope and chains. The chunk went up our don with the wall after the fall of communism in one thousand nine hundred nine. Hungary turned to democracy. It's new political system would be held up as an example for other central and eastern European states. That's not the case today. The current democratically elected leader is Viktor Orban's. He's held office once before for four years from nineteen ninety eight. He was re elected in two thousand ten ten and there's little sign. He's going to lose his job anytime soon I sing. Migration is stoppable in many countries especially invest your politicians tried to convince people that it's not possible to stop by not through Mr Orban's anti immigrant rhetoric and the accompanying policies of his party Videsh mean he remains popular in a country that has little ethnic diversity but he's also taken worrying steps to ensure his job security steps that have catalyzed Hungary slide into autocracy Chrissy. What victor done has achieved over the past nine years in Hungary is to hollow out a European democracy so so that it's effectively a one party state. MATT STAINED GLASS IS OUR EUROPE CORRESPONDENT. It feels like any other middle income European. Stay Day like a functional liberal democracy but it's not it's controlled by one man and his political party and his friends all of this is a far cry from the prime minister's routes when as a young long haired liberal urged the Hungarian people to reject communism communism and embrace free elections gone off in one thousand nine hundred nine as the Soviet. Via Block was coming apart. Victor Orban was a talented young law student who was identified as one of the most liberal anti-communist voices in the Hungarian student movement up politically but over the course of time he he has shifted from a liberal centre-right stance to an increasingly nationalistic stance so by today the it wants young liberal reformer is now a hardline nationalist ruler who dominates his country's political Michael System with an iron hand well. What do you mean by that in. In what way is he is a dominant. How is Hungary different under Victorian as of the late two thousands Hungary was seen as the most successful possibly the most entrenched formerly communist country in Eastern Europe in terms of its transition to democracy people saw it as a stable capitalist democratic liberal country member of the European Union and over the course of the last nine years he has changed the constitution altered all of the institutions of the democratic state so that they can be controlled old by his political party by businessmen politicians businessmen and oligarchs were linked to him. He is extended domination over the media sphere. He's hollowed out the court system but how has he managed that how has sort of gotten away with it starting from a stable happy democracy so completely undermined. How do you do that well hungry. It wasn't really a tremendously happy democracy. When Orbin took over people were quite satisfied with the previous Socialist government which was fairly corrupt erupt as well but that has faction led them in two thousand ten to vote for Mister Orban's Fidesz they about fifty three percent of the vote and because of the Hungarian electoral system that fifty three percent of the vote meant that they had two thirds of the seats in parliament and with two thirds of the seats in parliament they could changed the constitution which they quickly did they change the constitutional court they revise the electoral system and gerrymandered district in which people are being elected and make sure they wouldn't leave and what you found was that by two thousand fourteen by the time the next elections they had effectively guaranteed themselves victory victory and the two thousand eighteen election's again. They want exactly two thirds of the seats in parliament at this stage. It looks like there's no power you're in the Hungarian system of governments that can stand up to dash and Viktor Orban and the separation of powers which you need for a liberal democratic state effectively no longer exists in Hungary but insofar as they actually have. Why have the Hungarian people gone along with this is is all of this just simply below the radar clever gerrymandering and keeping quiet about procedural changes that don't look so nefarious victory robot infidels are still very popular. They're very popular because Serb. Nationalist politics of the kind of their practice are very appealing. The Jawbone was the first national leader in Europe to build a fence to block out to to block doc migrants in the migrant crisis two thousand fifteen that was extremely popular and the economy is doing well. Growth has been about three point five percents for the last five years and and unemployment is below four percent but that's also true for much of Central Europe and they've cut the budget deficit but what are the troubling things about what's happened in Hungary is that it appears that people don't really care all that much about constitutional issues and that is an issue that may have echoes well beyond Hungary. What's still surprises me about. This story is how complete Mr Orban's transformation from fist shaking liberal to shoot this kind of like absolute autocrat does that transformation kind of tell you anything about the current state of right wing leadership spreading throughout Europe well so true Viktor Orban's transformation from nine hundred eighty nine to do this in one thousand nine is an incredible encapsulation of what has happened to to the ideas that we had about liberal democracy in nineteen eighty nine and what's really worrisome is that it seems like he appears to have decided that the type of Liberalism uh-huh that he championed at the time of the fall of the Soviet Union was naive and not actually a lasting foundation on which to build a successful political party or successful State Heat Al explicitly says that he wants to govern illiberal liberal democracy he doesn't believe in Berlin he wants to govern a state in which the majority rules and takes no account minority interests and there are a lot of similar politicians to whom you could point around the world not just people like regurgitate in Philippines but people like Donald Trump United States who seem to value the will of the majority rather than individual rights who are eager to find enemies to vilify and to run campaigns based John Phobia and one just hopes that these people are not in fact the future of democracy. Uh thank you very much for joining us. My pleasure.

Viktor Orban Hungary Victor Orban Europe woolworth Central Europe prime minister European Union Soviet Union MATT Donald Trump Eastern Europe United States Orbin Michael System John Phobia gerrymandered Berlin Philippines
"hungary" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"hungary" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"If a guy by my neighbor buys a Ferrari, do I have to make the payment. And the answer is no, I'm not I'm not doing it. And by the way, these countries in Europe are very damage because once you're in Europe, you have free travel so country like Hungary that doesn't want to take people in might eventually get people because there's an issue with how you keep them out. Hungary Poland Czech Republic. Have frequently said, they don't want to take migrants, and they are right Hungary, had an election and brought in Victor Orlan. Well, I'm not gonna say is my my my favorite cat, but based on this, very concept and principle. It's madness. Now. What are you said to me as well? Do I get to drive the the the Ferrari? No, no, no, no, no, no, no, tell me what you're what the nation has getting Germany decides to take in refugees. What is it that they actually get? And by the way, they are not refugees. They're migrants remind myself of the of the terminology. What is it that they get what is the win there? Right. What is it that somehow, they're they're they're gaining? Well, they were let's say beginning a workforce. There are people who really wanted to work should hungry somehow get some benefit from that. When they said, they're not taking any migrants. The answer is absolutely not. But hungry shouldn't have to pay for their workforce, and Hungary should not be compensated. Because Germany gotta workforce. Germany made a decision. It has nothing to do with the surrounding countries. So of course, no, I shouldn't have to pay for the Ferrari, of course, not. The problem. The EU has then this is a it's a great Brexit conversation is to this very idea that somehow were we all have to deal with the consequences of the actions of one which is to say Germany in this case. This is also Germany and France trying to engage a power over the rest of the EU. A level of control over the rest of the EU. And that shouldn't happen. That should not happen at all. And nations like Poland should stand up for themselves. And I have been a proponent for a while now that what the president should do. And he he gave the great speech in Poland. We should be taking a look at military options in Poland on.

Germany Hungary Hungary Poland Czech Republic Poland EU Europe Victor Orlan president Brexit France
"hungary" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"hungary" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Hungary and make it matters is big rig with progressive commercial where he can send his customers prove insurance rate from his phone you keep on truckin and we'll keep on eating. And staying generally closed. Find out what makes progressive the number one in sheriff trucking legends across America. Visit progressive commercial dot com today. Twenty. If you're a trucking industry professional, then you need to be in the know. And there's no one more in the know than the readers of owner magazine Britain for executives and managers fleet. Owner provides information on operations vehicle maintenance regulations and information technology, but that's not all fleet honor with its monthly print publication and fleet owner dot com website has all the latest news and information to keep your business operating efficiently from industry experts to award winning writers and columnists fleet. Owner is the number one source of tracking information in North America informational. Webinars executive reports blogs videos, international, trekking, news and more are all easily accessible from fleet owner dot com. And if you're looking to buy or sell a truck visit the fleet owner Pentagon auctions page powered by asset nation. Join fleet owner on Twitter and Facebook, do you hear what others are saying? And remember to visit fleet under dot com every day for the latest industry news sign up to receive the flea owner free daily newsletter and your copy of fleet owner imprint. Boom lines are open one eight six six nine zero seven thirty three thirty nine eight six six ninety redeye or Gary McNamara and Eric Harley here is Matt Murphy and Andrea Lindenberg. Indeed. Matt Murphy, Andrea Lindenberg.

dot com Matt Murphy Andrea Lindenberg Hungary North America America Pentagon Twitter Britain executive Eric Harley Facebook Gary McNamara
"hungary" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"hungary" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"It was a cool spot. It was definitely interesting. You felt like you were back in time a little bit. There were a lot of locals there. The inside was cool. I went inside to use the bathroom. We were sitting outside because it was such nice weather. But the one downside to a lot of places in Budapest is if you're sitting outside, you can smoke. And so everybody smokes and it's really not that comfortable to be out there, especially if you have kids. So that's only downside. But other than that, it's a cool experience and they did have the IFA the local IP Endre there, which we liked call the supreme knee IPO. And this was the point I was trying to make when I start talking about this was surprisingly is the biggest. It'd be like having Budweiser in America, right? It's their, it's their national beer. I, at least I'm ninety percent sure. It's Hungary and if I'm wrong, just tweet me let me know, but it's everywhere, but surprisingly decided to get in on the action and make their own IP. So normal. So you think, okay, this is going to be crap. Well, it's certainly not the best we've ever had thought it's decent and it was enjoyable to drink, and it was really cheap, like two dollars me me. Right. So if you're out and you're looking for and you're not at a specific craft beer bar, but you're at one of these regular bars or pubs soup Supromega Roney. you can usually find way way better than the actual regular surprise me. I will say that because I tried to, I did like stomach a tiny bit of the regular supreme me, and it was not exactly the best. So supremely I pay pretty good. I want to throw in here place that we walked by a couple of times I went in, but it was always so crowded. We actually didn't stop get a drink, but it's unique in its own. Right. That's called the four sale pub. And that is right across the street from the central market, and you can what's interesting about it is you go in and people have just put pieces of paper all over the wall. So I guess it started because people are putting stuff up for sale listing stuff. That makes sense. It's, it's a little weird. It's pretty cool. There's peanuts all over the floor. It's a bit touristy now, but it's just a unique little spot right across from central market. That's easy to find. So you could check it out the four sale pub. And of course, we talked at the top of the show about all the ruined pubs. We've already mentioned them soon. Unique to Budapest where they started, and they're really fun to drink at. And you know, even simple Kurt has like a craft beer bar. It also has a wine bar has a cocktail bar and it has like a bunch of other regular Basel, whatever wine you got me wasn't the best idea yet. It stick with beer. I didn't get it from the wine bar. Allies. Close. Yeah, the wine bars close so you could check all those out as well. If you're someone who likes beer. That's cool. You probably don't start until at least noon, which means you gotta get your coffee fix in the morning..

Budapest Hungary America Kurt Supromega Roney. ninety percent two dollars
"hungary" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"hungary" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"To do less cafes. Let's places to eat much, much much quieter. If you had maybe two weeks air, maybe you split and check them both out. We did not stay on the Buda side. We stayed in the pesticide and that's where most of the people will stay. And I think if you're wanting to walk more which we did and we'll get into how walkable of a city it is if you wanted to walk more staying on the pest side might make more sense because you can walk over to the Buddhist side and see the castle, but it's not a, it's not as hilly and be. There's just more of the things to do are on that side and that's where we stayed. So if you're looking into side, there's district it set up in districts much like Paris, kind of in these circles that that go from the middle. And so- district one is right by the castle, and there's another district right on the side called district, eleven by the Geller baths, the famous famous bass, you can see them from across the river, right? So those are the kind of areas we sport on the Buddha side. On the pest side, you have district five, which is kind of the inner core. Right, right by the river on the pest side. And then you have district six, seven and eight which are right above that. And I would say district five is a little bit touristy. It's kind of where all the tourists shops are. It's right next to the river. So. We walked through it and there are some restaurants and things like that there that we went to. But I mean, you can obviously stay there too, but I preferred not staying there. It's where more of the chain hotels right on the rivers and intercontinental. And I think a Marriott and things like that. If you stay in district six, seven or eight and we stay in district seven, which is the Jewish quarter and is known as the party district. Now we stayed in the thing about the party district is a fairly big, so you can stay in all these different Airbnb like we did that are not right next to all the ruined pubs and all the clubs that are happening. So we stay in district seven, but we are, and we were close walk to all the stuff and all the, you know, the party scene, but we weren't right above it and you couldn't hear it or anything like that. So for us, we stay district seven. I think he was stay district six, seven or eight. You're gonna be definitely close enough to either. To get down to the river and to get over to the side. And so I would recommend that six. Seven or eight somewhere in there? Yeah, and they're all really beautiful. These areas are just like the architecture and the buildings and the little shops in the cafes that are scattered around six, seven and eight, I think are much cuter than district five. Yes. Yes. I know. I feel like what does that that we're in Hungary. District seven, we said Jewish quarter, the party district district eight. If you're close to the river is an area called the palace district, which I loved walking, beautiful, beautiful way, quieter, but still right near everything. So that might be something you look at right behind the national museum? Yeah. If we did it again, I would stay there. Yeah, and that's. And that's district that's district eight. And then you ought district six is like the financial kind of area. So any of those are going to work and you're going to be able to get in between him and there's they're not distinct differences. Right? Like I only know because I was looking at maps and drawing it all maps, what district Rian, but you're not going to have dinner. You're not gonna have an idea. So when we talk about where to stay district six, seven or eight, make sure I think at our preferences inside that there's kind of a ring road that goes around district five and cuts it off from district six, seven or eight, and there's another ring road that cuts that cut six, seven, and eight and a half. If you stay inside that second ring road, I and the name you are getting rears. The name changes stay south are like inside the octagon area and you're going to be able to easily walk to anything..

Buda side Airbnb Paris Hungary Rian Buddha Geller two weeks
"hungary" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"hungary" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"Hungary sure cohen dean the with a new book laura all right and dodgy well and brune eamon bailey of own elle fanning really and under pain of of the book mom no no no hang on monday one thing what two the music with bomb cigarette and not last heard this is archer of this is time warp radio celebrity my fourhundredths show here of time warp radio how is look through my archives to see what am i have might be interesting to play him i found this what do you think is the best guitar riff ever you know every one of these songs a second you hear them the vote right here give these tough fence off a quick listen numbered tang and number nine number eight number sending number six good eight number five the news number four number three and then in dan.

Hungary eamon bailey
"hungary" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"hungary" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From deportation to the concentration camps he's been telling me about his wartime resistance efforts transgender gatuma nieman the dealer budapest grad here when the germans invaded hungary change my identified caitian dork mr area i left the flatter was living and as a jew and started to live with a different identity as a gentle a few days later the leaders of the underground zionist youth movement told me i'd be joining a team to forge documents i became part of the biggest rescue operation during the holocaust run by jews i was eighteen at the time david gura with now ninety one years old he's lively in clear thinking despite his age as a young man he lived through a period of 'extraordinary danger and drama in his native hungary resisting nazi occupation it was a march of 1944 when hitler ordered the invasion of hungary the nazi leader that become increasingly distrustful of his erstwhile allies in budapest fearing they would turning against him so we sent tanks and troops to install a new fascist regime and do almost immediately hungary's million also jews was singled out for attack then the widow teddy chilean one of their first was to ban jews from travelling juice who arrived at train stations and weren't aware of these new orders were arrested taken to detention camps and where the first to go to auschwitz the germans had lists of thousands of prominent you news and they arrested them immediately a month or two after the invasion orders were sent out all the hungarian provinces for jews.

concentration camps david gura hitler budapest hungary ninety one years