35 Burst results for "Hundreds Of Years Ago"

2021s Biggest Air Show by Any Measure

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:15 min | 2 d ago

2021s Biggest Air Show by Any Measure

"Been day wherever you are. Welcome to aviation week's check six and business and commercial aviation podcast. I'm all mcmillan. Managing editor of business aviation for aviation week joining me today is lindsay beauregard. Mri editor and mike elaborate director of enter royal production. The three of us are here in oshkosh wisconsin at the world's biggest air show a era venture oshkosh and it is the sixty eighth show this year. It's also the first one in two years since last year show is cancelled because of the cove in nineteen pandemic and tell you what The organizers say that in a normal year on sunday before the show there's about five thousand airplanes that fly in this year. The number is eight thousand. And they're saying that attendances back to twenty nineteen levels and the mood seems very enthusiastic and excited to be back. Mike this is your first time here and then see this society. This'll be my second one. My i was twenty nine thousand. Nine hundred and lindsey. You had unexciting morning morning today at the show. Yeah yeah. I did too right along for my first amer. Aaron bad flight the sixty six era stars so we flew in three experts or one hundred series aircraft They're very lightweight and they're good for robotics and go upside down aircraft and it was a whole lot. One says the maneuvers. They'll be air show at some of them yes so weeding. He did loops weeded. Barrel rolls At one point one of the aircraft lou underneath another one one of those numbers and i spoke to them afterwards and the current team of three has been together for five years but apparently to them pollen harvey have been finding it for twenty years so collectively between the three of them they have been flying as phillips sixty six eurostars for one hundred years

Lindsay Beauregard Mike Elaborate Mcmillan Oshkosh Wisconsin Lindsey Mike Aaron Harvey Phillips
Google Plans to Expand Its Campus  Which Might Become Unsafe

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 4 d ago

Google Plans to Expand Its Campus Which Might Become Unsafe

"Google is expanding its campus in the san francisco bay. Area the companies. Planning to build offices as well as housing and greenspace near the shoreline which is at risk from rising sea levels. And that's raising the question of whether building there should happen at all. Npr's lauren summer has the story as a city planner in silicon valley. Michelle king. here's all about one of the biggest headaches in the bay area housing. Oh my goodness housing. Here is extremely expensive. Sunnyvale has very high cost of living in may the median. Home price in sunnyvale. Where king works was one point. Eight million so the city is looking at a different kind of housing higher density. That's walkable transit and greenspace. It would go into a part of town called moffett park right now. It's just offices lots of low rise buildings with wide parking lots one of the most sustainable things you can do is put people where they work and put people where transit is so. This is a huge opportunity. This isn't just sunnyvale vision. It shared by one of the largest landowners. Moffett park google over the last five years. The company has quietly bought more than seventy properties. Here worth almost three billion dollars. Jeff holtzman is google's director of real estate development for sunnyvale. We're incorporating sustainability into everything we do in our developments and we're doing it to support our employees but also the community and hopefully the environment. Sunnyvale is in the process of rezoning the land to allow google to build new offices and housing and just to know. Google is one of npr's financial supporters. And there's one more detail the city is looking at. This land is on the shore of san francisco bay which puts it right in the path of sea level rise sea level rises already happened. I we've seen about a foot over the last hundred years. Christina hill as a professor of environmental planning at uc berkeley. We're standing on the edge of the bay where a high tide is coming in. Hill says sea level rise will make these tides even higher by as much as seven feet by twenty one hundred. But that's not the only problem there's also seawater in the soil under our feet the groundwater and as the c rises that to- of saltwater under the soil is gonna rise also

Lauren Summer Michelle King Google Moffett Park Sunnyvale San Francisco Bay Jeff Holtzman NPR Silicon Valley Bay Area Headaches Moffett Christina Hill Uc Berkeley Hill
Maureen Dowd Manufactures Fear Over Global Warming

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | 5 d ago

Maureen Dowd Manufactures Fear Over Global Warming

"I told you. I read comments to articles not just comments on my own. Columns columns have comments usually and i love reading them. 'cause that's the face of the of the world that reads that website right so the new york times has its readers and they are virtually to a person cardboard cutouts of leftist and is a fascinating thing through the comments. Maureen dowd columnist new york. Times had a hysterical piece on global warming. It's over it's just over death and mayhem. A greenland is disappearing. Antarctic is disappearing life on earth as we know it is disappearing been. I've been hearing this since nineteen ninety. It's now thirty years that everything is horrible. In the meantime by the way. I should just not to you a fact but facts. Don't bother these people and that fact is noted by bjorn. Lomborg the dane who writes about these matters. Fewer and fewer people die from climate related natural disasters. This is even true. Twenty twenty one despite breathless climate reporting over the past hundred years annual climate related deaths have declined by more than ninety six percent in the nineteen twenties. The death count from climate related. Disasters was four hundred. Eighty five thousand on average every year in the last full decade. It was eighteen thousand three hundred to ninety six percent lower. But this doesn't matter to to maureen down none of this matters.

Maureen Dowd The New York Times Greenland Antarctic Lomborg Bjorn New York Maureen
A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

Native America Calling

01:25 min | Last week

A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

"More than a century ago nearly two hundred ojibway graves were removed from the burial grounds of a lake superior tribe to make way for. Us steals plan to develop or docks that were never built now. A new effort seeks to return those lands and reburial site to the fondling band of lake. Superior chippewa danielle catering. Reports wisconsin. Point is a remote strip of land on the shore of lake superior. It marks the ancestral home of the fondling tribe whose relatives settled there as early as four hundred years ago. Seven generations were laid to rest at the wisconsin point cemetery including the communities leader chief joseph osan gave the company uprooted the dead and those still living like calling aired parents. Aired who is ninety. Seven is a direct descendant of chievo soggy. It's hallowed ground to me. We just love dead aired says. Her father would be thrilled to see. The land turned over to the tribe. They're one step closer to that goal. After the superior city council passed a resolution supporting the transfer fonda lack chairman kevin dooby says returning. The lands would provide some closure to tribal families. Remember what happened in the past. It's our laos and we have to take care of it. Continue move forward. City and tribal officials will work with wisconsin. Us senator tammy baldwin office to petition the us department of interior to place the lands in federal trust for fonda lack for national native news. i'm daniel catering.

Superior Chippewa Danielle Cat Wisconsin Point Cemetery Joseph Osan Superior City Council Wisconsin Kevin Dooby United States Fonda Senator Tammy Baldwin Us Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

The Book Review

01:59 min | Last week

A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

"Elizabeth egan joins us now to talk about her latest. Pick for group taxed. Hey liz hi pam i thanks for having me. What's the book. The book is called. I couldn't love you more. And it's by esther freud. This is her ninth novel. And it's a book about three generations of women kind of circulating between ireland and england and the first one is a woman named ika. We get to know her in the nineteen thirties than her daughter. Roseline in the nineteen fifties and then a woman who we find out. And i'm not giving anything away that you won't learn fairly early in the book is kate who and we meet her in. Nineteen ninety-one and roseline is the linchpin of the whole story. She becomes pregnant in her early twenties and winds up in a home in ireland outside of cork a mother and baby home. Run by nuns. Who force her to give up her daughter kate for adoption and so the book is the story of these three women. And how e phi is continuing to look for roseline who disappears and kate is looking for roseline. She's looking for birth mother. And it's this incredibly powerful story about mothers and daughters and also an interesting and really heartbreaking. Look at what was happening in ireland at the time that really went on for about one hundred years where the catholic church ran the. They were like prisons for women who were in trouble in some in some way and they forced women to change their names and to give up their babies. And it's an incredibly heartbreaking walk at that legacy of secrecy.

Roseline Elizabeth Egan Liz Hi Pam Esther Freud Kate Ireland England Cork Catholic Church
What's New With the Alexa Echo-System 2021

Voice in Canada

01:47 min | Last week

What's New With the Alexa Echo-System 2021

"I want to give you a little bit of an update on the status of the Lexi ecosystem. If you will, as you know it was recently a l e x a live. And as I mentioned previously in the flash briefing, I'm going to kind of do a deep dive into all the different things that were discussed and one of those is an update on all the different stats that Amazon put up with regards to Lexi and the way it goes. So, here we go. I'm going to run through some of the key stats for you. So currently, there are hundreds of millions of Lexi enabled devices out there and customers. That means you and I spoke with, with Lexy billions of times every week. There are now more than 900,000 developers, that are there that are registered developers, and there are more than a hundred thirty thousand off these skills. There are hundreds of built-in products. There are currently more than 140000 Smart Home Products that can be controlled with Lexi, customers have connected more than a hundred years. I'm more than a hundred million smart home devices to Lexi and they're continuing to connect and millions of new devices. Everyone, these numbers are staggering. That's why I'm kind of laughing here. The numbers off of customers that are engaging with skills is growing at 40% year-over-year and some of the strongest categories are music audio games. So it's interesting. I think that I'm engaging more and more with skills. And do you know, if you are to, I'll give you two more little stats here before I sign off today, Lexi's helping to generate billions of dollars for the developers and the device maker community. So it's has a big economic impact as well and the developer revenue from in skilled, purchasing has more than doubled year-over-year. Now, if you're not sure what in skilled purchasing is that wouldn't totally surprise me because it has not been available in Canada until now.

Lexi Lexy Amazon Canada
Upping Your Content Game with Author Brendan Kane

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:23 min | Last week

Upping Your Content Game with Author Brendan Kane

"If i was thinking. Okay i need up my content game. What would be the thirty thousand foot view. Tim's of strategic approach. Would i be looking at documenting. More about what. I'm doing would be looking at more creating content for specific purposes is there any particular platforms that if i begin i should look at or should i just taste and see what i feel like. I like because there's so many platforms. There's so many things you can do. There's so many ways to do it. What's your sort of thirty thousand foot view knowing me thirty seconds. Well it's the it's the same place we start with everybody to do. The research people jump into content before actually analyzing the different platforms who successful. Who's not successful breaking down. Why somebody successful versus. Somebody's not successful Even diving into somebody that is operating at the highest levels and see their highest reformers Versus was performers. Because it's interesting. We look at science like what's his take. The vaccine for example going to talk about the efficacy of whether it's good or bad but developing a vaccine there's years and years of science relying on to inform their decisions right or wrong. It's not like they just go into laboratory and just start from scratch and be like. I think that this would be a good idea or not. Gonna look at the historical past hundred years of what's working and what's not worked. They they leverage data. The old Anything in science they do. I think it was a neil Tyson was talking about science in in space in all whether it's ufo's and he was talking about how there's so much scrutiny in insci- like you have to prove everything you have to look at data yet when it comes to creative we throw everything out the window. We just say oh. I'm going to do this. Because i think it looks pretty to do this. Because i feel like it would be fun for me to create not thinking about like were sitting on millions of billions of data points on all the social platforms. A you can dig in z. Right away what's working. What's not working and making hypothesis of how that can apply to your message or brand.

TIM Neil Tyson
Coyotes Have Taken Over Stanley Park.

The Big Story

02:06 min | Last week

Coyotes Have Taken Over Stanley Park.

"I'm jordan heathrow. This is the big story. Dr colleen cassidy. Saint clair is a professor of biological sciences. At the university of alberta she specializes in the study of how animals including peyote behave in landscapes that have been altered by humans. Hello colleen hi jordan. Thanks for having me no problem. I'm glad you could spare the time. Why don't you start by telling us what's happening right now. In stanley park in vancouver. But also i understand. It's not just in stanley park. Sure well what i know of stanley part comes to me from the news so similar to what other people know. There's an unprecedented situation going on there. Where there is spend thirty Documented attacks on people by coyotes. We're coyotes have bitten people in the past six and a half months. That's extremely unusual. I have never heard of something. Like that. Happening anywhere in north america previously. But nor have. I heard about the situation. That's occurring in calgary in the last month and calgary eight. People have also been bitten by coyotes. Eight different people so you mentioned that. This is incredibly unusual. How do coyotes normally behave in spaces that they share with humans well normal has been a sliding slope for many years decades really over about the past twenty years sir spin increasing reports from across north america of coyotes in urban areas probably coyotes always danced around urban areas and were seen there occasionally by people. There's a at edmonton. That was known as coyote alley a hundred years ago so it's not entirely new. That coyotes are in urban areas. But they just seem to be more. Abundant and boulder and that's occurring in urban areas across the continent from vancouver to halifax from phoenix. T. l. o. Knife pretty much. Every urban area in north america. That i've heard of anyway has a population of urban coyotes. And that's a fairly new phenomenon.

Jordan Heathrow Dr Colleen Cassidy Stanley Park Colleen Hi Jordan Coyotes Saint Clair University Of Alberta Calgary North America Vancouver Stanley Edmonton T. L Boulder Halifax Phoenix
The Phenomenon Of "Coffin Births"

Unexplained Mysteries

02:10 min | Last week

The Phenomenon Of "Coffin Births"

"Francois are a vias dissuade so lifted a living baby boy out of his wife's coffin. He thought it was a miracle to celebrate his son's birth he named the child. Feast dilatot french for son of the earth. The boy's name would forever be synonymous with coffin births. But he wasn't the only example of a post mortem delivery or even the first there had been other documented examples like one from roughly two hundred years prior during a time of gruesome bloodshed in europe in sixteenth century spain. The inquisition was a tool for catholic. Monarchs to keep control to stop rebellion before it started. Inquisitors traveled around the country and rooted out heresy including anti-catholic and anti royal sentiment. Those accused of betraying the throne were punished severely with practices that ranged from torture to execution. Nobody was safe not even pregnant women in one case in fifteen fifty one. The inquisition tried and sentenced a pregnant woman to death by hanging. These deaths were meant to be examples for the public reminders. Of what happens to those who choose to defy the powerful institutions that govern their lives. The woman's body remained dangling from the gallows long after her death about four hours. After the execution passersby noticed something strange according to his self-proclaimed medical professional from the time quote two living children fell from her womb. This was the first written record of what is now called postmortem. Fetal expulsion given. There aren't any other accounts of this incident. It's impossible to verify. It could have been falsified or exaggerated to illustrate the brutality of the spanish inquisition. But it's probably fair to say that until this moment humans never magin. A corpse could deliver a child

Francois Spain Europe Magin
Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

Native America Calling

00:38 sec | Last week

Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

"The rosebud sioux tribe in south dakota welcomed home the remains of children who died more than one hundred years ago at the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania native youth and their mentors repatriated the remains from carlisle last week and escorted them home. A four hour. Service was streamed online saturday where people gathered at the tribes college quilts photographs and other items line. The front of the gym for each of the nine children brought home. The service included speakers songs an honoring before the remains were escorted out to the burial site by native youth veterans and the community. They were placed in graves in buffalo robes and buried on the rosebud reservation.

Carlisle Indian School South Dakota Carlisle Pennsylvania Buffalo Rosebud
The Cecil Hotel: Terror, Murder, and Death in the World's Scariest Hotel

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

The Cecil Hotel: Terror, Murder, and Death in the World's Scariest Hotel

"The great depression changed the cels neighborhood. Dramatically downtown. la once a hot spot for tourists and nightlife became a hub for newly homeless. Thousands of people flocked downtown with nowhere to live and the area. Around the sel hotel became skid row. No longer a west coast. Gatsby esque destination. The hotel became known as a hang out for drug addicts runaways and as opposed on all that interesting dot com. Put it quote criminals far from its first days as the paul of the great depression settled over the country. The seasonal became home to a growing number of suicides and unfortunate deaths. The first successful suicide on record at the seoul was in nineteen thirty one forty six year. Old w k norton was found dead in his room after having taken poison pills he was found only a few hours after he died by the made. Police found more poison capsules in his pocket. Norton had checked into the hotel is james willis from chicago but police were able to correctly. Identify him from the numerous checks. He had with them. Made out to mrs m. c. norton in manhattan beach california just about a half an hour south of la in nineteen thirty to twenty five year. Old benjamin dotage was found in his hotel room having shot himself to death. Benjamin left no note two years after that. A former sergeant in the army medical corps fifty-three-year-old. Louis de bordon slashed his own throat in his room at the hotel. He cited ill health as the reason in his suicide note. Nine hundred thirty seven. Another military veteran jumped to his death from the top of the hotel landing on a skylight below. There is maddeningly little information about these people other than how they died. Apparently the appetite for true crime wasn't quite so hardy. A hundred years ago there were so many suicides at the c. soul that by the nineteen forties. The hotel had earned the nickname the suicide

Depression James Willis Gatsby Norton Mrs M LA Benjamin Dotage West Coast Seoul Army Medical Corps Louis De Bordon Manhattan Beach Chicago Benjamin California
Getting the Most From Your Self Tanner

You Beauty

01:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Getting the Most From Your Self Tanner

"For me who's been tanning for one hundred years i still. I'm not great of blending at my mom's like the what's this thing called the hands and and it's really because then i do the same sometimes especially if i've been drinking and then someone goes. You have a beauty. Put teddy newton. It had ten. It's like well you know what we all make mistakes. And it's and the ankle's a hot as well. So i've got a couple of relatively foolproof formulas but i still want you to practice the model car. Natural tan is in the bright pink shoob. It's like a hot cold gradual tan. So they calling a regular tan. And it's a clear watt formula. Actually put it on last night. Because i just want a little something something. It's a beautiful like a berry light glow. You wouldn't even know and like. I didn't blend very well but it's a really beautiful formula. It's no itchy itchy to smell you from across no. It's smelly won the acre ten winter. Skin is a gradual. That's really great. You could be all that up the la- tan classic farm. It's unclear so it's a lot ten but it's clear formula so you don't get any god call us just make sure you blending well. The all of paradise tanning drops. So this is literally customizing anything you put them into. Pop them into somebody lotion in customize and you could build over a few nights just to get that right ten and i practice practice practice.

Teddy Newton Tan Classic Farm LA
The 1914 Visit That Changed Australia

The Science Show

02:11 min | 3 weeks ago

The 1914 Visit That Changed Australia

"So do australians have a show really enthusiasm for scientists and does it. Matter will consider a book based on a visit over one hundred years ago when three shiploads of scientists from the british association here and thousands turned out. It was like the beatles. Fifty years later professor linnet. Russell is director of indigenous studies at monash and book is called a trip to the dominions. The scientific event that changed australia net russell. I'm fascinated to hear that. The british association advancement of science which is similar to the one. We used to have an aesthetic or dan's s. And of course the triple. As in america which is still going strong is one hundred ninety now and was just before the first world war nineteen fourteen. I think it was three phipps and one hundred seventy. Five scholars came out to australia for war. What was the purpose. What was the plan. There's a couple of things that the federal government really wanted to do. The first thing was they wanted to showcase australian science so they were keen to bring these scholars almost overwhelmingly min to australia. So that they could show off. Innocence thou- early development of science and they were very very excited about the opportunity it had been talked about for several decades prior to the actual nine hundred fourteen meeting because they had in the nineteenth century thought about whether or not they could get to australia and in fact went to south africa. And the thing that really amazed me as well beyond the scale with the ships and all the rest of it is that when the various scholars from britain arrived they had public events to which thousands turned up even then. It is absolutely astonishing. If you look in the back of the report there are literally thousands upon thousands of names and these are sort of just ordinary everyday people their mechanics for many palms and their schoolteachers from essendon and from someone from q. And this is the melbourne part. And they've got just so many average people who obviously had a great interest in science and we're very cain to come in here from the world's greatest scientists

British Association British Association Advancemen Australia Linnet Monash Beatles Phipps Russell DAN Federal Government America South Africa Britain Essendon Cain
TV Reports: Fire in food factory in Bangladesh kills dozens

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

TV Reports: Fire in food factory in Bangladesh kills dozens

"Bangladesh TV stations say at least forty nine people have died in a fire that broke out at a food and beverage factory outside the country's capital an official has confirmed that a fob again Thursday night at the five story for some food and beverage limited factory just outside the capital dot com he said additional details were not yet clear while local TV says rescuers were trying to recover the bodies from of the burn factory which was locked from the inside when the fire began Bangladesh has a tragic history of industrial disasters in twenty nineteen a five the oldest part of the city a four hundred year old area cramped with apartments shops and warehouses left at least sixty seven people dead I'm Charles Taylor that's not

Bangladesh Charles Taylor
A 100-Year-Old's Birthday Wish: Act on Climate Change

Climate Cast

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

A 100-Year-Old's Birthday Wish: Act on Climate Change

"The most critical issue humankind faces. And we're not doing anywhere near enough. Tom swain has seen a lot in his one hundred years on planet earth. He's been an insurance executive a city mayor. He even headed a state agency but it is eighties when most octogenarians might be enjoined quiet years. Tom began a quest to climate. Change awareness that journey lead to the creation of the swain climate policy series at the university of minnesota's humphrey school of public affairs. Why does this self-described small government conservative. So actively pursue climate change solutions. Tom swain happy one hundredth birthday this month and welcome to climate cast and crew. Tell us about the focus of the swain climate policy series at the university of minnesota's humphrey. School what. I turned two hundred or about to turn a hundred people. Ask me what i wanted to do. And my birthday. And i said i want more awareness and involvement on the whole issue of climate crisis. 'cause i think is the most critical issue humankind faces and we're not doing anywhere near enough. In order to prevent what ultimately some people see is the earth becoming uninhabitable. You've been a corporate executive. You've been a local mayor You've described yourself as a small government conservative for most of your one hundred years. Why do you see climate change solutions as good for our economy and our lifestyle. I'm not thought about it quite as much in terms of its impact on economy. Our lifestyle. I just think that the current generation is for the most part on this issue and expecting the next generation to deal with the critical issues

Tom Swain Humphrey School Of Public Affa University Of Minnesota TOM Humphrey
10 Things to Tell People Why You Aren't Drinking

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:44 min | 3 weeks ago

10 Things to Tell People Why You Aren't Drinking

"Today. We're talking about all awkward summertime situation or how we make them awkward before they even happen. Because we're future tripping about how uncomfortable we're going to be an anxious about what people will think if you're not drinking and what will you say. And how will they react today. I have ten things you can tell people why you aren't drinking to help you get through the summer situations with confidence and with yours. Sobriety in tact now listen. I don't think it's a great idea to put yourself in super awkward situations especially when you're newly sober. But i also know you are on your own journey and you have to learn for yourself what works for you and what doesn't if you are going to go into challenging situations or if you have to go into challenging situations because it's a family thing or a work that you can't avoid then i want you to be prepared. Today's episode is a cheat sheet to fast track. You from struggling with overwhelming zaidi about what you'll say and how everyone else will react to being able to relax and feel confident like you've been alcohol-free for hundred years it ain't no thing all by planning ahead if you take some time to think about in advance what you'll say and how you'll respond to people then it doesn't seem so scary

Zaidi
The Science Of Measuring Audience Engagement With Dr. Nick Hobson

MarTech Podcast

02:27 min | 3 weeks ago

The Science Of Measuring Audience Engagement With Dr. Nick Hobson

"Nikki said yesterday. One of the things that stuck out to me. And i i asked you to put a pin in. It was talking about your ability to evaluate and use data to understand what somebody's sort of mental status. Or what their psychology. What goes into their decision. Making let spend a little time talking about that. How do you figure out or i guess. What are the variables that you think about. When you're trying to understand what someone's decision making looks like so you can start from the very beginning which we also do in the beginning and we say if we had to sort of lay out every single reason every single psychological state every sort of internal process. That actually happens if we could some weird futuristic world which maybe we're not so far away from because you probably get there. We could look at them on a screen or on the table and say these are the ten. These are the twenty or whatever number it is that matter most in predicting some sort of important dot com that's the ideal sort of state we want now human behavior and the human mind in the human brain is infinitely complex. And although we've come a long way in the last one hundred years in particular the last twenty years since sort of neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience technology. There's so much to be done to get to a really great point where we have a great deal of accuracy so you start from that point and then the question for us is okay. What is that number is defined is. The two three is twenty-five we don't know. And we use very fancy statistical modeling things that's called factor analysis and other sort of more advanced modeling guesses relevant. Ai and machine learning and we basically prove or show with a degree of confidence that these are the number of things and this is what they are. Now go and collect data ankle zero. How strong they are with a group of individuals so the second that you said neuro science my pea brain got intimidated started blackout and not able to comprehend the various factors. So i understand. And i'll put this in layman terms. We could take pictures of the brain right now and we can get actual data to see what drives activity so we provide stimulation and understand what's happening in the brain and then start to use data from what stimulus is being driven to figure out some idea of decision making

Nikki
Defining Holistic Medicine and Its Benefits With Dr. Shealy and Dr. Sorin

Merkaba Chakras

02:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Defining Holistic Medicine and Its Benefits With Dr. Shealy and Dr. Sorin

"Back up a little bit and explain to people what is holistic medicine. Because they know regular medicine they can go and see the doctor at the clinic or the hospital but what is holistic medicine for mines is putting by mine and so together in other words to me a so in carnets foreign experience but we have a basic physical need to survive. You know. you've gotta have air water shelter nurturing kind of thing but we have things to do but at the so level we are in touch with god and the divine in what got left out of medicine. Three hundred years ago was the so and to me. It was psychology as well. But unfortunately i why did they leave out that element of spirit. That you've spirit out of medicine is no. Why would you make decisions like that. I think it was good any But interestingly i've never had any doubt that i am a spirit old. Yeah everybody knows that and So in in seventy two. I discovered technique co owner jerry training it had been around since nineteen twelve twenty. Six hundred references is on it. When i learned it but i suddenly start duties with my chronic pain patients. All of a sudden that took over it was so important and how i helped to heal patients that in nineteen seventy four went back to get a phd ecology. Woo at. I'm wanna say not a conventional Program with the program will saybrook. University is humanistic. Psychology humanistic psychology. Actually is is really related to being humid related to avenue spirit. It is the the sacred if you will carter psychology As i i learned that i can take unto training in changing into all kinds of things are now we have sixty eight. Different mental exercises retraining the

Technique Co Jerry
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Hundred years ago they made a part of their mission to ensure local businesses have what they need to serve more customers and help our community thrive whether you're looking to expand to multiple locations be more efficient in how to get things done or simply need account options to help you save one third bank could help from tools that allow you to deposit checks or wire money overseas without ever leaving your desk to lines of credit that can help you weather financial storms Wofford banks got you covered so whether in construction maritime healthcare or any industry in between Wofford banks local bankers are at your side ready to make sure you've got what it takes to thrive in twenty twenty to learn more visit wall said bank dot com and see what they were awarded best bank by money dot com for the third year in a row while fed bank member FDIC loans subject to credit approval what fed bank well as you know our governor has directed all of Washington to stay home stay healthy and story monsoon Valentine roofing continues to offer essential services as outlined in that stay home stay healthy mandate roofing needs associated with emergency repairs structural integrity home safety preservation of assets in the central operations of your home are defined in the mandate is essential services and of course Valentine roofing is taking extra precautions and exercising social distancing will deliver your bed and install your entire roof without ever entering your home and with zero down financing from Valentine roofing you can pay for your new roof on your schedule take advantage of the lowest prices of the year that have been extended through may first I'm a downturn roofing customer myself I trust Valentine roofing by all means get three bids just make sure one of them is Valentine roofing continuing to serve western Washington Olympia the Bellingham go to Valentine roof dot com for your free estimate Valentine rooftop talk your writing to see my northwest dot com getting sleepy so sleepy also texting coming into the roof of the roof test line at nine eight ninety seven three thanks.

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:22 min | 1 year ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KGO 810

"A hundred years ago the N. K. V. day Stalin's secret police when they penetrated America at MIT and I've had the conversations with spect Lana low cover over the weeks but tonight she addresses the facts as she understands them from February twenty fourteen and Cambridge university to July twenty sixteen Cambridge University that describes the parameters of the first half of what we now call Spygate and Russia gate much in the news said on television these last hours the inquired of Mr harlots has to do with those same events that's that Lana look cover will explicate this evening it is a revelation to those of us who follow it closely that's me it's a revelation as in well because we're looking at mysteries Mr how it's just touched upon some of those mysteries in its presentation he has not answered the mysteries what kind of mystery for example as the Attorney General has said in these last hours the origins of what we call spy get in Russia get later tonight but right now I turn to a democracy a birthing that is Hong Kong Hong Kong's people have voted they've demonstrated they've taken risks they've charged into the maelstrom for months for democracy and Gordon Chang of the daily beast is here Gordon is at the Twitter dress Gordon G. Chang I emphasize if you want to correspond in some fashion in a Twitter fashion with chord garden is here to comment on the effort towards democracy court is it your measure the people of color Hong Kong more than seven million and you have friends and relatives there that they started out many months ago thinking some day will wave American flags and play the star spangled banner in demand democracy did they start their guard no they certainly didn't start there John they started over a proposal to extradite or to an extradition bill which would have given the Hong Kong government the ability to ascend fugitives to mainland China that sparked opposition across Hong Kong society and nobody ever thought that they'd be waving the flags of a foreign country on the streets of Hong Kong we go to our colleague mark Clifford former editor in chief of the South China morning post he's been resident in Hong Kong since the late twentieth century and he is our guide to how the people of Hong Kong sharing with the brutalization and siege tactics being practiced by the mainland and the mysterious large shouldered extremely fit young men who we are supposed to call police and I'm just going to say I understand if you're wearing a mask you could be anyone mark a very good morning to you in Hong Kong what about the morale of the people of Hong Kong seven and a half million what did you sense in the demonstration in these last days on Sunday hundreds of thousands of people marching good morning GMR yeah good morning John and cordoned well there were well over half a million people out on the streets on Sunday was a monster March the organizer say perhaps eight hundred thousand anyway you look at it it's a huge number of of people in a city of seven and a half million I think the morale was pretty good subdued I mean this is were six months into this now it's more than a hundred eighty days since the first demonstration against the extradition bill started and it's there's been a lot of up and down as you say people of you know they've they've protest did they voted they voted very significantly a couple of weeks ago what to essentially throw out the pro government probation forces and bring in pro democracy forces at some very very low level district council elections which is the only venue they have at the ballot box to have universal suffrage cha and yet the have gotten no response from the government the the chief executive effectively the mayor continues to Stonewall continues to say she can do nothing and in fact this weekend will will fly up to Beijing for her annual work report to Shijing paying in the central government but she's given no indication of backing down I think that has some well of course it's it's angered and frustrated people but I think it's also puzzled many observers because they expected that the government would use this kind of breeding space that they the ballot box in the election brought to come up with something new and instead it's same old same old so not really sure where it's going from here the good news is that by and large a couple of exceptions on Sundays March was extremely peaceful and to get five hundred thousand or a hundred thousand people on the streets and have it be peaceful is quite an accomplishment in itself particularly given some of the violence in recent months so the Woodstock of Hong Kong board and I turned it over to you so mark Sunday's rally actually ended very inspirational a with everyone holding up their cell phone a creating this this sea of of light and after that the young protesters clad in black have been extraordinarily quiet so as you say there has been this wall this does give the government and ability to sort of come in and then create a dialogue or to make some overtures but it seems to me that what you're talking about is a Hong Kong government that is been constrained by Beijing which is taking a hardline and so my sense would be the protests will continue they will get violent we'll see other large peaceful protests but there's no end in sight to this there is no end in sight and that is very very worried because when there's no end in sight some number of people on both sides get frustrated and turn to violence and violence begets violence and if there's not a peaceful solution I mean people can say how horrible democracy is in a lot of people say that here but the good thing about democracy is that disputes are settled non violently and I worry that if the government doesn't take advantage of the good will in the pause in the kind of fire breaks that we got from these elections and make some moves that their frustrations gonna spill over again and that's that's that could be disastrous for Hong Kong mark the Kerry lab the leadership of Hong Kong is Carrie lam are serving at the will of Beijing I understand that but what is the what is the thinking about why she still in place why they haven't made a change why someone so it ineffective remains on the job well first of all there is zero for four in terms of leadership here the first chief executive had to step down halfway through his second term as a result of messing things up in terms of popular protests in opposition the second one ended up going to jail on corruption charges the third one you know was not allowed to run for reelection have a bad system there's nobody obvious to Kamanin Kerry lambs place and in fact her number two constitutionally would have to step into the job is regarded as you know very well meaning guy but long time bureaucrat with no political leader skips ship skills whatsoever so that's number one no alternative number two is Beijing and the Hong Kong government thinks it is a sign of weakness to change your mind when you made a mistake and they're sort of I don't know like a teenager a parent who just gets dug into some position and can't get out of it and they think that to admit that they were wrong means that what the whole system is going to collapse or if they lose face whatever it is they just don't want to give up just because that would mean admitting that they made a mistake I remarked to garden because I've down momentary reading in Chinese history literature especially recent Chinese history the Chinese Communist Party have become their own enemy this is how the people who resisted the Chinese communists protests fail because they they wouldn't negotiate that would talk that wouldn't enter into a dialogue that could have de fanged the the violence that followed does does anyone talk that way in China realizing that this intransigence is setting up a catastrophe well I think for many people who believe that but as the system is more and more centralized under Shijing paying their fury fewer people who one would dare to say anything or two would have any ability to affect any change I think that many people who feel the church in king's setting himself up as potentially president for life is going to lead the country in to the wrong direction because he's becoming more more hardline and people are are more more afraid to speak out against him so yeah I mean it's a classic problem of not talk Chrissy and it's a classic problem of Chinese statecraft when it's good it's very very good when it's bad it's not only very very very bad but governments fall and yet we sorry go ahead cordons mark I thank you you talk about and no one daring to bring bad news decision paying it's striking that there were all these reports that Beijing was taken by surprise by the results of the November twenty fourth district council election where approach Beijing forces were swept from power yeah they they just did not see this coming at all and I guess that is the the fatal weakness of hardline systems not yes and unfortunately that sort of way of thinking has infected Hong Kong I think the Hong Kong government there there's there's strategy was was hoping hope is not a strategy use just the hope that there was some kind of silent majority had no evidence to back it up they seem to have been completely taken by surprise so you know if if the people of the top are lying to themselves.

Stalin America Cambridge University Lana
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Emmanuel is a professor of atmospheric science at MIT what we're already seeing he is a greater incidence of the really strong hurricanes just more strong storms and more rain more flooding from tropical cyclones both fresh water because is more rain and the salt water from the storm surge because of two things the storms are stronger and sea levels are coming up the Bahamas archipelago about seven hundred islands and twenty four hundred keys stretching seven hundred and sixty miles from Florida to Cuba sits low in the water mostly just a few feet above sea level you may see level by half a foot it's a big deal you can get a lot more flooding for the same storm then if the sea level we're back where was a hundred years ago we had a point would have to think about whether by the Bahamas is an unsustainable place to continue living unfortunately and that's actually happening in the western Pacific these islands are cannon fodder in the relentless invasion spurred by climate change the first casualties in a war they did not start then one stone hello brother rates and island state or a number of states in one hurricane season how will we survive Bahamas prime minister Hubert menace clearly had this on his mind when he addressed the United Nations General Assembly on September twenty seventh I I might urgent.

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A hundred years ago a shoot out between local white law enforcement an armed African American guards protecting a sharecropper's union meeting triggered a release massacre here in the following days as many as a thousand whites civilians a militia fearing a black insurrection swarm to the Elaine area killing black men women and children she the walkers grandmother who survived listen I witness she says there were shots fired there were people nine in front of me and I just gathered up some children and we got out through the back and ran into the woods and she's just goes into hysterics no why should people were arrested if two hundred eighty five African American men and women taken into custody almost half were charged with murder and night riding a cane to terrorism twelve were sentenced to die the end double ACP intervenes and the case went to the US Supreme Court in a precedent setting decision justices ruled the defendants were denied due process and equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment and set free poet J. Chester Johnson whose wife says he had no idea growing up that his beloved maternal grandfather participated in the massacre are kept looking for that moment where I could reconcile this person that I adored and he adored me with his participation in this massacre and it never happened five why bodies were recovered but black bodies have long been rumored to be buried in mass graves are sunk into swans Brian Mitchell teaches history at the university of Arkansas at little rock we have lots of sources that maintain that more than a hundred individuals were killed but on the other side of the spectrum there now. as a large is eight hundred fifty guy Lancaster editor of the encyclopedia of Arkansas says the healing conflict was the result of pent up frustration to centuries of black exploitation at the end of slavery throughout the south African Americans achieved a modicum of political and economic power and self sufficiency as reconstruction efforts were withdrawn African American communities were targeted with legal segregation and legal sanctions and so by the time of the early twentieth century this violence was reaching an eight..

murder US Supreme Court J. Chester Johnson Brian Mitchell editor Arkansas Elaine university of Arkansas hundred years
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A hundred years ago a shoot out between local white law enforcement and armed African American guards protecting a sharecropper's union meeting triggered a release massacre here in the following days as many as a thousand whites civilians a militia fearing a black insurrection swarm to the Elaine area killing black men women and children she the walkers grand mother who survived was an eye witness she says there were shots fired there were people nine in front of me and I just gathered up some children and we got out through the back and ran into the woods and she's just goes into hysterics no white people were arrested if two hundred eighty five African American men and women taken into custody almost half were charged with murder and night riding a can to terrorism twelve were sentenced to die the end double ACP intervened and the case went to the US Supreme Court in a precedent setting decision justices ruled the defendants for deny due process and equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment and set free poet J. Chester Johnson who's white says he had no idea growing up that his beloved maternal grandfather participated in the massacre are kept looking for that moment where I could reconcile this person that I adored and he adored me with his participation in this massacre and it never happened five why bodies were recovered but black bodies have long been rumored to be buried in mass graves are sunk into swans Brian Mitchell teaches history at the university of Arkansas at little rock we have lots of sources that maintain that more than a hundred individuals were killed but on the other side of the spectrum there now. as large as eight hundred fifty guy Lancaster editor of the encyclopedia of Arkansas says the healing conflict was the result of pent up frustration to centuries of black exploitation at the end of slavery throughout the south African Americans achieved a modicum of political and economic power and self sufficiency as reconstruction efforts were withdrawn African American communities were targeted with legal segregation and legal sanctions and so by the time of the early twentieth century this violence was reaching an eight..

murder ACP US Supreme Court J. Chester Johnson Brian Mitchell editor Arkansas Elaine university of Arkansas hundred years
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"It was only a hundred years ago but it was born in this little about we made progress onto the negative positive were wondering media network i'm jenny kaplan welcome back to encyclopedia mantica if you're just tuning in for the first time here's what ticks in five minutes every weekday free year were telling the stories of women throughout history you may or may not know about it definitely should each month as a team and this month talking about dreamers women to remember due to their creative power today were adding to nineteenth century germany shocked about one of the greatest professional photographers a d h a dreamer of the day is per tempt backman virtue is born in eighteen fifteen in the brandenburg which is about seventy miles southeast of berlin she started her career as a hairdresser interest in in eighteen thirty nine a year later she met her future husband edward wayne hurt who is a photographer he introduced you to the garo type process and early ten cent method they captured images on medals he also introduced to the color to take a newer process they use classically negatives and allow offering unlimited number of print it's hard to imagine today as people snap photos without thought back and birches era photography who's just starting to become a bible technology during her career exposure time per pictures not from about half an hour to a few minutes together britain britain edward studio enlight sick virtuous germany first known professional email photographer and may have been the first woman in the world after that in eighteen forty seven virtue continue to run the business together in eighteen forty nine she decided to expand she went to the united states and opened up studios in new york city first at sixty two white street and leader at three eighty five broadway just quite close where this episode being recorded unlike many artists throughout history virtually celebrated killed during her lifetime while in new york she received a diploma special services for photography she had a variety of celebrity subject including president millard fillmore ambassadors and other politicians bird to lecture new york business in the hands of her brother i moved back to leipzig in eighteen fifty one after her turn her business grew under photographic portfolio expanded she moved to a new location hired several employees under studio became one of the most notable addresses and the city burchett continued to add to her list of famous clients including musician and composer require she says her johann us from successful trader excellent restaurants dominic and many others british kept up to date and forged ahead and aircraft she was the first person enlight thing to work with nude photography and she's credit if some of the first architectural photographs of the city she was one of two photographers her first from her region to put up an exhibit at the first german industrial era in munich in eighteen fifty four rishi display paper print as well as the metal sheets used in particular type method vertigo batmans photographed combined technical skills with artistic vision she specializes in portrait's and is renowned for her photographed children artistic in business documents both contributed to her great success birch everett's hired in eighteen eighty three three when she was just sixty eight years old she died eighteen years later in nineteen o one stags additions of her work i considered extremely valuable and historian studying early photography tune tomorrow for the story of another impressive dreamer will be talking about sculpture of the harlem renaissance this must have been cyclope deal mantica is brought to you by casper casper mattresses and products but today's dreamers get the

sixty eight years eighteen years hundred years five minutes
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

18:59 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Paso's, News Radio six hundred KT SM. Okay. Welcome back to coast to coast, George Noory with you. Let me tell you a little bit about our guest Merle, thank Houser as lead one of the most diverse and interesting careers in music. He became one of the innovators of the surf music and psychedelic folk rock back in nineteen Seventy-three. Berlin is group m you moved to the island of Maui to further their studies of the fabled lost continent of mirror or lem urea American Indian and Hawaiian legend says that the continent existed some thousand five hundred years ago in the Pacific Ocean, where the horizon islands now exist Merle is also a longtime UFO researcher, he has accumulated some very impressive evidence of the lost continent of Muir, and he can be found right now on coast to coast. Merle welcome to the program. Great to be on the air with you tonight. George looking forward to the was just with Billy Gibbons from Z Z top this weekend. Watching their show. And I gotta tell you as a musician in you'd appreciate this these these folks, man, they I don't know where they get their energy. They just keep going. Yeah, you're right. I've seen them before. They put on quite a show Billy's quite a guitarist. Jimi Jimi Hendrix once called him the best guitarist she's ever heard Billy, of course, said that about Jimmy. But he's pretty darn good Merle. Yes. Yes. Have you been what's new with you? Well, I'm just a working on another album. We've been promoting it. It's only been out three weeks called eclipse, and it's on a UK label and their seventeen different bands on the album, George that all field. Their music has been influenced by ET's or UFO sightings in the bands are from the United States, Canada and the UK and they took one of my songs calling from a star as the lead song on the first disc. It's a two disc set. So I've been. Working on that for the last three weeks Merle. How did you get interested in the paranormal end of this? Well, my father was a pilot and he had the glider port it lake Elsinore, south of Los Angeles. If you know where that is in the fifties. And he taught me to fly piper cub when I was only fourteen and I later solo in a Sweitzer one twenty six glider. So I was always interested in aviation. And I can remember asking my dad, if he thought, you know, there was life out there in space, and he said, oh, yeah. There has to be and then as a young guy, not even barely a teenager. Just then I started reading every book I could find on UFO's and I read project blue book. Can I was always looking at the sky, you know, trying to see a UFO, but I never did. And I've been interested in it all these years has that influenced your music, the the belief in the interest in UFO's. Well, it really didn't that I know of George up until nineteen seventy four I moved from Woodland Hills a suburb of LA where I had been living in the music business since nineteen sixty eight nine found this book called the lost continent of MU by Colonel James church word, and I ended up calling the band that we had at the time. Mo and we had a couple of albums out and in nineteen. Seventy three we told our record label and our promoters agents we were moving to Hawaii because Hawaii was supposedly the mountain peaks of the lost continent of. No. And so we packed up our instruments and everything and flew off to Maui and rented a house on Maui, and we decided to go up to the top of Holly Aquila crater and watch the sunset. It was a popular thing to do and they have an observatory up there. And so we went up, and we were standing there on the top of the crater and quite a few tourists were there, and there was an older gentleman. It was in the navy in the second World War standing next to me and the sun sun went down. And we were looking at all of this star. Cars and all of a sudden this blue pulsating light came over the crater, and it didn't make a sound. And the guy standing next to me said man, he said I was in the navy, and he said, I never saw anything like this. And it's not making any sound. So it can't be a helicopter and right is he said that to other lights came out of it and went up on each side. And they started shining a beam from one to the next that formed a tetrahedral in inverted pyramid. And we were all just spellbound. And this thing must have lasted for about four minutes. And then all of the the little lights went back into the big one, and it shot straight up and disappeared. And I went okay I've finally seen. Oh, it took all of this time. And then we drove down back down the mountain our house in haiku Maui. And I immediately turned on the real to reel tape recorder that I had I remember those. And I picked up my guitar and the song just came out, and I recorded it wrote the lyrics in the cord down. And that is a first song that I can honestly say I was inspired by what I saw to write that song. And I've written several songs since that. You know, I feel have been inspired by UFO's or something. I can't really say actually that they're transmitting it to me like some people do that. I it's it comes from somewhere, and it comes so fast. And you gotta get it down real quick. And I once met John Lennon in the did you? How cool at my friend Harry Nelson's house in Hollywood at a party. And I got to talk to him for about fifteen minutes. George. Nice sky. Yes. And Harry put me on the spot. I just flown over from Maui. And he said this, my friend Merle. He's gonna play a song for us. And I'd never got nervous in my life. God John sitting there. My lips started Twitter. So I played this song. I wrote called on our way to HANA, and it was talking about seeing to silver saucers while driving this beautiful road out in the jungle with cascading waterfalls on one side in the ocean on the other in a soon as I finish the song. John said that is very interesting. What inspired that and then the ice was kinda broken? And we took a break, and I got to talk to him for about fifteen minutes. And he brought up the fact that he said isn't songwriting odd. You don't know where the inspiration is gonna come from. And you've gotta get it down real quick some way either recorded or write it down. That's right or it'll go away, which is very true. And it was interesting. He. He called it automatic writing. He was ahead of his time. Yeah. Can so songs that I'd written before I had that UFO citing a lot of songs. I had written that way. And I always found the best songs came out. You hear it all in your head the music, and if it's lyrics you hear the lyrics, and then you gotta figure out how to play it on guitar, piano and transcribe it somehow or something can you know, you can radio could come on or something, and it would like be erased from your mind. And so those songs that I wrote before that as I started out in instrumental surf they were inspired. I felt by the ocean and different things something always inspired him. But that one song calling from. Star which is on this new eclectic. The album. I really feel was inspired by USO. How many people realize when they listen to your music that it was inspired by these paranormal events. Oh. So many George when I was on coast to coast. I think it was twenty thirteen with John be. Well, that's right. That's about six going on almost six years ago. Gee, yeah. I got eight hundred sixty emails after that. And they were all about people asking me about you at foes and sightings and telling me about their sightings and a lot of them were musicians. And you know, they they get the vibe they they know there's something going on. Well, let's talk about these various aspects of the paranormal world in what you think about that. Of course, there's this underwater anomaly off the coast of Malibu, it's very strange the structure is strange looking. What do you think that is? Well. I it'll take me a little bit to explain that's okay. With me when I was playing with my serve band, the impacts in Pismo beach. And I was about seventeen years old. We used to go down to Malibu and go surfing, and we went down there. This might have been nineteen sixty two about and we had a nice day of surfing, and we came out of the water. And there were some local surfers, they're building a campfire, and we were gonna drive back up the coast up here to to Pismo. And they said, hey, you guys oughta stick around and watch the lights go in and out of the water. Only went what you know. So we're driving back in one of my buddies was laughing he said, they're seeing pelicans diving for fish, which is what they do up here, and in Pismo beach, and maybe the light glinting off of their wings looks like lights or something. So we never thought anything else about it. Nobody at that point that I knew knew anything. About an anomaly out in the water under nasc- oceans and so fast forward to whole I guess about twenty thirteen Michael Luchman who wrote the book alien rock, the extra terrestrial connection called me up and said, there's an old army radio tech that lives in the hills and Malibu, and he's picked up these very strange signals from out in the water. Can I have him send them to you? And I said, yeah. So we sent him to me. And I started playing I'm and I went in my studio, and the automatic writing thing kicked in I picked up my guitar and the only way I can describe it. It was like an instrumental surf melody, but from the sixties JAMES BOND movie kinda spooky and I had these signals playing and I was playing along with the signals to a click track, and then my band came in and they went, wow, what is that? And we put the rest of the instruments the drums. And that all of the keyboards and everything to it finish this song with the signals in it. And I called it signals from Malibu. So I was talking to a security guard at one of the casinos here, and he was a shoe mash Indian, and I played there. And he said, oh, I know all about your older recordings. In fact, I have your return to move how about that? Yeah. Isn't that kind of blew my mind? And he said what are you working on now, and I told him and he got this big grin on his face. And he said, you know, hard tribe has known about that building. He called it a building underwater there, and he said. When the ocean was down. They used to use it like a pier to fish off. And I'm just going. That's how this is really something. And so. You know, he said that it it had been there for all of these years. And he said it was built by the people that were here before us. And I somehow I started thinking this is gotta have something to do with the lost continent of MU I just thought of that. And when I lived in Woodland Hills. We used to go surfing at Malibu, and I'd hike up in the hills above there. And there is like a I would call it a small monolith. Up in the hills. There it's it's like a rock pillar. And it has these hieroglyphs on it. Nobody I've talked to know what they mean. But I noticed now that I think back it points straight out two point Dume, and where that anomaly is under the water. How big is immoral. Gosh, it's pretty huge. Right. Well, it's not that huge. It may be twenty. Twenty eight feet. I would say maybe tall. And I somehow feel that has something to do with that anomaly that's underwater there George he kind of looks like a UFO all by itself. Yes. Yes. Oh, I was talking about the rock pillar. You were talking to talking about the underwater thing. Yeah. The thing is got a opening that I think about seven hundred feet wide by now. Six hundred feet tall. Yeah. That's what I meant. It's pretty big. That's where they feel the UFO's you're going in and out of in Michael Lockman wanted to get. Aro v you know, an underwater unmanned submersible merciful with a video camera to go in there and film it, but he had a stroke and passed away and didn't didn't get that done. That's that's what big loss to the community to. Yeah. But furthering the whole thing I finished the album called signals from Malibu, and my UK label gone Zo multi-media put it out booked me on a bunch of interviews. And after I'd written the first song. I noticed there were four more minutes of signals that I didn't use. So I went out in the studio sat down to piano and put the headphones on and started to push the button to play the signals. And I thought Hm better hit record here on the multi-track. Justin case. Yes didn't. And so I just started out with this kind of. I'm not a great piano player with this meandering sort of it. Almost sounds classical spooky classical in a way with these signals playing in the headphone hold on for a second Moore, we're gonna take a quick break. But we'll come back and talk more about your adventures, then we'll move on to Hawaii and talk about those incredible stories that will take calls next hours. Coast insiders, the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iphone and.

UFO George Noory Malibu Merle Maui John Lennon Hawaii UK Billy Gibbons Jimi Jimi Hendrix Woodland Hills Pacific Ocean Paso Muir Pismo beach navy Harry Nelson researcher Twitter Berlin
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KGO 810

"Midterms are not even know that mean we voted but they're not done yet. And the fires are still raging around us coming up in about a half hour Washington Post, political reporter Colby it quits will be joining me to talk about what the Democrats said this weekend on the news shows, and what they're gonna do is they take over the house of representatives but one hundred years ago hundred years ago, worldwide wine ended or mistakes day, we now call it Veterans Day. We celebrate it on this Monday. And it's interesting to see now that we're not we don't have conscription. We don't have the draft. So. Few of us actually serve in the military. How are we actually celebrating or recognizing or remembering Veterans Day properly? This is actually becoming controversy now. It really is. There's an article in USA today. Today from a retired United States Marine corps. Major. Saying, hey, you know, we say thank you for your service. He said in this article what people really ought to be saying. Or maybe what they really mean is thank you for killing for me. That's what. Major Scott Hughes. Ing said in USA today. Mythic you for killing for me. Is that really what we mean when we talk about veterans, and maybe there's some real truth in that. Not every veteran, by the way has served in combat. That's a that's a mistake that has made by people. But I I on our Veterans Day every day every year. I think it's a very important day. The sacrifice that people make to serve our country to go fight in wars be they very very far away or closer to home very few of fought closer to home..

Colby USA United States Marine corps Washington reporter Scott Hughes Ing one hundred years hundred years
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Policies of a hundred years ago that's why they call it the lifeline because if someone had a very deep rich Line they would have a lot of life Desire to enjoy their life but there there's there's no line on. The hand has had, has been more misrepresented and I would say ninety five percent. Of Palmas out there not to disk You, still, have the reading I. Have, this feeling that that that line has to. Do with, health or longevity. And I. Should say to you also that any reader palmist. Or astrologer who who who who tells? A person oh you're gonna live to this. To this age it's they're, they're, highly irresponsible it's it's it's the most irresponsible thing to tell, a person how long are they going to live that's the sign of a fraud right. There if someone if someone says oh you're gonna live til eighty four it even if it's true even if they can, say that that's a professional promised would never give, that information, now now now having said that in if if somebody is in poor health because. Of poor eating, habits or or you know their psychology and the pomace could help. With that maybe yes they could extend their life but in but professional season And palmist will never tell a, person how, long, they're gonna live ever and. Even the lifeline that's it's seen in another place on the hands somebody a Twitter. Said I think it was joy who tweeted me at deacon it said you have, the magic 'em ask him. About, the magic m most palmistry books will talk. About the, fact that it. Has something. To do with intuition and psychic ability it has. Absolutely nothing to do with that not? Seen in that area at all again what. Is the magic what is, it, it's it's three lines coming together forming something that's called an, m and this is this again this is one of the aspects of the fraudulent type. Of. Palmistry, this is this is, two hundred year old palmistry where people are looking at the lines and they have no, idea their astrological significance and they're trying to make, they're trying, to look at them in symbolic form but it's it's It's not true so tell, her thank you So I I. Have it but it, doesn't really mean, anything it does mean something. But it's, it's it's just three lines doing they're saying you have, to re lines, individually and then of course but but the the Emmett self. Has no real significance in and of itself now. This is. This is, old ancient Victorian pharmacy got that so anyway. You want to find out more about Vernon you can go to coast to coast AM dot com to and. You can link up to him from there if you, want to take classes at. The palmistry institute that'll be in Los Angeles you can hook up to Vernon and find. Out more and we'll take your calls comfortable she all the numbers. You need. To know in just a minute all. Right so then this is what we'll do we'll just I'll. I'll ask you to take another minute here when we go to the news break at, the bottom of the hour or the, break depending on what the local stations do and I'll just. Ask you take. One more look at my Hands and see whether you see one more, thing that stands out then. I could look at on the coast to coast AM dot com website see the photo. And see what you are seeing as the non Victorian fraud that. You are. Right I mean we so you you. Take take me to school coming up and show me something. That I can see that you see that that most people would never get from their, boardwalk slash sidewalk slash scam trailer at, the park palm reader okay are you willing to do that I could do it I you know that's sure I mean why not I'd rather spend my I rather spend our. Time. Talking about the science of pharmacies And and just give you a reading whenever you want it full reading Well we're going to give the numbers you're coming up so we'll see how that goes and we'll get, everybody else online who wants to talk to Vernon Mhaville just a minute and and also remember to we'll, do open lines starting over the top of the hour and that way you know all the subjects that have come up during the week or anything that's. Been percolating in your brain will give a chance to get that out finally coming up coast to coast AM and in for George Noory this is he in front Checking for updates all day with NewsRadio eight.

Vernon Mhaville fraud Twitter George Noory Victorian pharmacy Los Angeles ninety five percent two hundred year hundred years
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"They uncovered in colorado and it looks like it dates back to eight hundred eighty so no it wasn't white people who were hobbling people but it was twelve hundred years ago they found one of the largest mass of bones that had peop from people who had been slaves and were hobbled and also eaten it was the largest a configuration and find of cannibalism on our planet right here in colorado well it wasn't colorado then was it but here it is people that are hobbled because they can't walk away from their work if they are hobbled if you hobble someone which means you injure you break you tear the tissue off of their ankles and their bones in their feet so they cannot leave their workspace you think you're suffering in your cubicle guess again this hobbling has occurred in many countries all over the planet and the deal is is i feel that we are hobbling ourselves and we are hobbling those that don't even know they're being hobbled because there are their dignity as children are it's not being taught to them that they can create their lives that they can actually build something for themselves you know when i was a kid it was like what can i deal i have these things what can i do with them now it's i don't like that one i want another one what can i get and this is what these children are being taught i see it firsthand and what they don't know is that for all of what they can get what's being taken from them is the absolute most important thing you can have and that self worth you know we came into the show today with the bridge that i call shot and one of the things i included was fame by david bowie and frankly mr shankly which is more see from the early ninety s this song talks about fate fame he can't believe it can play hideous tricks on the brain but still i'd rather be famous than righteous or holy any day any day any day and when you think about.

colorado david bowie mr shankly twelve hundred years
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"To be on dynasty a hundred years ago she was putting out this desperate plea to get someone to rescue her daughter her daughter's name is india she brought india to what she thought was like a business seminar that gives you educational tools helps you about female empowerment and her daughter liked it so much that she went back for more sessions she keeps going back for these sessions and that's when she started to notice changes about her daughter she came back home she had lost a lot of weight her hair was falling out basically katherine oxen bergara saying that they sit the name of the group i believe is called nexium correct and they seduce you into abandoning your abandoning your life and within nexium is a secret group within the organization called daas where it's a slave and master situation and you're supposed to recruit other people and the way you get in as you have to tell a confession and every believe it's like every month or every week you have to tell a confession this is how they start to groom you to be this guy's sex slave so she was on this is so crazy steve this she was on with she's perfectly sane this woman you could tell she just so concerned about her daughter she was on with megan kelly i believe last fall talking about this sex group here's one of the things that she had to say what i recently learned i mean everything i learned about this organization terrifies me that they were undergoing experiments so they're hooked up to eeg machines and the women were made to watch footage of women this is what i've been told being in the new york times is reporting the dismembered and decapitated this is terrorist training to me you don't do that to desensitize somebody so that maybe they will accept branding themselves and branding other women that they'll accept this level of violence against women it's like i can't believe this is allowed and you know the women several of the women went to the authorities and the authorities dismiss their claims they said there's nothing we can do they don't care is the bottom line is that if a woman can sense to the branding which they make the socalled slaves according to the time say i can say there's nothing they can do in terms of the.

india steve megan kelly new york times hundred years
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"The muckraking it's amazing when you go back through the history of our country and you look at the left and progressives in general and they were always thrilled when someone would go undercover in the in the sweat shop or the factory or the coal mine and expose the truth of the of the rat ascoli business owner and you're pretty much doing the same thing except you're exposing a truth that i think a lot of leftists don't wanna hear so they will pull you the quote that introduces the book is from michael mann's film the insider when al pacino the character from sixty minutes goes there you're not going to air the story because the more true it gets the worse it gets and that was the climax of this book american property where i had all the we had all these videos on hillary clinton's campaign doing unthinkable you things like laundering money into subgroups that were that were admitted to inciting violence at trump rallies it's on video the guy says we don't need to follow the law we can we can break all the laws and break all the ethics because we need to win this mother effort is what he says in the video and if we had that on russia if we had that type of content but the reason why all these major media corporations wouldn't air this story and this is unbelievable is because they were afraid they were afraid that if hillary one the election that she would like revoke their broadcast licenses and it was just unbelievable for me to realize that well these media corporations can't do it because i suppose we live in some type of banana republic were media corporations are afraid of retaliation and to your point hundreds one hundred years ago you know the.

business owner michael mann al pacino hillary clinton russia banana republic one hundred years sixty minutes
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

NewsRadio1620

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

"We had two hundred years ago question but it doesn't do it what technology stars is it increases productivity of humans you use technology increases your productivity in that increases the wage that you can earn and that is the story of progress in this country and so technology is very much your friend as as a worker now i'll say two more things along those lines i is that people sometimes say well that's all well and good but what technology does is it is it makes all these high paying high skill jobs like geneticist and it destroys he's low end jobs like ordertaker at fast food and then people say this and watch because this is the bait and switch this is this is this is the part where you have to pay attention if you really think that that ordertaker is going to become a geneticist professor will become a geneticist or high school biology teacher will get the college job as substitute teacher i'll be hired backfield at high school job and all the way down the line the question is can the people at the bottom do these jobs at the top the question is can everybody do a job a little harder than the one they have today and if you answer to that is yes the technology creates he's awesome new jobs at the top and everybody gets a promotion one one step up and that is the story of that is the story of progress that is why we have full employment and a rising standard of living for two hundred fifty years because technology kept making better and better jobs and we all kept kinda shifting up and taking now if you really are we're like okay all of that's good i'll i'll do that but i really do want to know what are those nine percent of jobs that argument get lost you know for my own edification i had a question cussed that you can take dot com that has all and scored on the test and it tells you but they they go like this how similar or two days of your job that lots of people do then that's probably more likely the automated unlike say the person that restored the chimneys yantai chimneys in my house.

professor yantai two hundred fifty years two hundred years nine percent two days
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"It being a dublin dry you know is about two hundred years ago and they they develop the killed and at that point they were still making celts importers in england with you know amber malts marks that were smoke because he was spoke before like right khan i woulda hated that because they weren't they were done with the killing but then in ireland they started using the kilns they could use the darker molson pavel lighter peers and so porters used to be dark beers and eventually those are also the heaviest peers in the most alcohol in overtime at just kinda got synonymous with the color sure so we're doing more of a classic version of a dry stout even though there was a version of the dry spell before that or version of style before that the more classic version diaz wanted the many classic versions of i was there any like i don't know i guess mass commercial stoute's that you do for inspiration on this is this your take on what a guinness would do or is this departure from from that what most people think about and they think of an irish though i don't think we we we don't ever really trying make appear like somebody else makes it bearman there's flavors we like who not only make light guinness i mean maybe draw some inspiration sure like i lake quit guinness does with this but i want to take a sore here in this way they are rich rich fullbody bureau without being sweet tunnel what's great about a dry stout is the impression is is gonna be a real rich multi beer it's got a full mall feel to it there some dextra molten there with no it's that's a multi will definitely give you that that impression of sweetness way without it being sweden so it's kind of a trick almost to the palette where it's a fullbodied beer and unnatural also the smaller bubbles it just it's more creamy it's a fantastic texture yes the really does i totally agree there i'm biased but i agree i like that you'd think you'd made up by i liked the fact that it did scott this rich body took but not a rich sweet flavor i mean our our foreign extra so it was a little bit more sweet there is a little more circus and alcohol but i liked the dryness of the beer it's only four and a half percent alcohol it's easy deterring ice down it seems like this sweetness you mentioned is a bit of a trend i don't know outside of.

dublin ireland diaz stoute guinness bearman i lake sweden scott two hundred years
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on Science Friday

"Time for mary shelley was writing from two hundred years ago this year and some the technology and science that was on her mind at that don't which strikes me most of our reading frankenstein who in in now is an adult so to speak is that it is so as you mentioned before 80s so different then boris karloff already the other frankenstein this is an intelligent creature and then unlike the go just gino arbel's around like he doesn't know what you're doing these yeah he's a he's an auto died at he teaches himself to read he teaches himself french and arabic actually to languages he the friends people or he tries to on he's really trying to live this autonomous independent life out in the world and as you might see as you finish up reading ira it's okay that you're not finished yet you'll find out that maybe it's a bit of a tragedy for him more than maybe victor frankenstein i might have a side here i got wall really one of the deaths in there um what if i want to read more stuff for a from a really fast if you're really fustrated we have more stuff for you to read and that is our newsletter that were putting out every monday you can go to our website science friday dot com slash book club and join our newsletter that's going out intel february ninth when we have our wrap up conversation with author elizabeth bear bioethicist josephine johnston we're gonna talk about all the various things that we've thought about it in the last five weeks that's february ninth on our show in the meantime that newsletter is coming for you or you can come for it science friday dot com slash book club we at this week are going to have some highlights from the silicon valley conversation out there we're also going to have a educational resource that our fabulous team put together where you can do your own case study of a modern bioethics uh thought process basically and then of course there's twitter which you may or may be on after that conversation science for us our our house cla are hashtag for the book club is hashtag sifi book club now we also want to hear from you if you have any comments you can phone in your comments right correct that's again are off air after hours voicemail fi.

mary shelley gino arbel josephine johnston twitter boris karloff victor frankenstein intel elizabeth bear two hundred years five weeks
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"A hundred years ago or two hundred years ago but this is something that you can find all over indiana and especially in bomb day i remember being really young on the on the side of the street or at a very fine dining at the thought hotel at the at at the see lounge having now bobby cheese toast and so this is the same thing we've just put another piece of brett on top and made it a sandwich yeah too right i'm set that is dangerous like yeah you could lb a bunch of those not yeah not to he it hits few different plays the hits the tip of the tang in the back of the top of the a soft out you're welcome many other you get to watch a down with some ice time so we're finally doing ice try which everyone is been asking about will like and you just you know the ratios allowing alright i love i love your try yeah so this is a leave emphasize with a little bit more of the cart i'm on little bit more sentiment and and a little bit more shoulder because and so now you can actually taste it they still spaces when it's cold now yeah that's good nothing in straight than and then two more dishes that we're very excited very happy about the one you have in front of years apart belly hashed up with us on the side as a good and a little bit of that pao brad so that's our part belly that we fucked for a brace for six hours we just toss it with carr lick of some green peppers red peppers i'd man really chris be potatoes so we finish it was i'm a salo out of trouble to yeah and and the bacon very on you so we've done this that at a few events las w in and an that sort of thing so we decided to bring our bacon very on the fact over topping at it breaking bring it yeah it's on the brunts menus so every single saturday and sunday you can have it we top it was a beautiful sonny side ag and we.

indiana brett brad bobby cheese carr chris two hundred years hundred years six hours
"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"hundreds years ago" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Back it was a hundred years ago over a hundred years ago thomas edison and henry ford who we're good friends had a i bet and the bet was with the battery or gasoline emerged as the energy supply of the future well we all know who won the bet it was henry forward who won the bet but all commit lee thomas addison may have the last laugh now when you think of solar power when power you say well everyone's been talking about that for ever why you know we have cheap solar and chief weekend backing compete with with off also feels like oil and call well there's a problem the problem with solar is not the solar self the promise older and win is storage the batter a when the sun doesn't schein window when doesn't blow you hear ascension to blow him in the wind and you're wasting your money so that's one of the reasons why henry ford be promise that is set how over now that people are conscious about energy and jimmy years and inventor is of all stars are jumping into that battery again this is something they should have done a hundred years ago they're jumping into the battery game to kind of create more efficient and cheaper batteries in fact the price of batteries goes done about seven percent per year semester monaco read just in the last decade because so many young enter pricing people are jumping in this game.

energy supply solar power thomas edison henry ford lee thomas addison jimmy hundred years seven percent