40 Burst results for "Hundreds Of Years"

A highlight from BITCOIN REVOLUTION | TUCKER CARLSON & JAVIER MILEI MAKE HISTORY

Simply Bitcoin

11:45 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from BITCOIN REVOLUTION | TUCKER CARLSON & JAVIER MILEI MAKE HISTORY

"We don't see lugar a ludas, esta nueces una taria para tibios, esta nueces una taria para córdes, esta nueces una taria para los politicamente correntos. Xo no me me ti yaca para estar y ando córderos. Xo me me ti yaca para despastar de odres. ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! ¡Quiero! When you think of Argentina you might envision tango, soccer, or maybe a juicy steak, but today it's all about a wild surge in bitcoin advocacy and a man whose opposition to statism might be louder than a wake -up call from Frankie. BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM That's right, baby. Wake the f 'up and get on the Freedom Train. We get a lot of s*** to cover. Let's get it! I think that it can be my moment. Because as we have seen, we are in all of them. And we are not one of them. This is what we are in all of them. Because we are going to do everything, and we are going to take care of everything in the world. Yes, to be able to build Argentina properly. A liberal Argentina. An Argentinian people. An Argentinian that is going to build the borders of the world. And yes, in 35 years, we will be able to build the first global potential. So yes, effectively, I am going to be in politics. be Will it Teresa? Míle he is right. Míle? Míle, he is right. farm. go I'm gonna ahead and start with this go ahead and take a look down there 339 .8 million views and I want you to put that in perspective so when I said that you know these bit corners just made history well they're both advocates and it just became the most watched interview in history now Tucker's last interview with that orange guy yeah Trump that set the record and beat Oprah's former record with her interview with Michael Jackson and it appears Tucker Carlson is going full Eminem breaking a record every time he drops a record right now what this really had me thinking is the fact that well you know Joe Rogan gets like 11 million views he's the number one podcaster in the world Tucker was the number one show on Fox News and all mainstream media and he was getting about three four million views I'm putting that in perspective he's gone independent and he's got 340 million views blowing everyone out of the water talking about well look at this Argentina's next president and this guy is winning big -time you saw those crowds who is he well Tucker traveled to Buenos Aires to speak to him and find out and we of course hear it simply Bitcoin have covered Malay quite a bit but very exciting stuff an amazing conversation very base and before we get into that now Malay you got to understand they kind of do language a little different right so when he uses the the terms liberal he's referring to classical liberal like Bastia which is closer to libertarianism or anarcho capitalism if you'd like to say and when he refers to anything like socialism or communism of course they're all the same thing all statism and that's really the point that he's driving home is the fact that it's freedom versus the state and I love it until you fix the money for example a lot of Western democracies went full tyrannical regimes over the past few years and they're supposed to be democracies with representative government that is supposed to work in your best interest but I think we know the truth well let's get to it we're in downtown Buenos Aires the capital of Argentina this was once about a hundred years ago one of the richest cities in the world and you could tell as you walk around the fated grandeur of a once great city but this is now a desperate country its economy is in shambles has been for a long time Argentina famously defaulted on his debt more than 20 years ago but now hyperinflation has made this country genuinely desperate you see when you have dinner here in restaurants and people pull out bricks of local currency the peso to pay it feels like Weimar or Zimbabwe but it's not this is a developed country that's moving backwards at high speed and because of the frustration that has built up among the population particularly among poor people a man called Javier Miele is poised to become its next president he's a former soccer star goalie a performer in a Rolling Stones cover band and a libertarian economist he's not a libertarian in the traditional American sense he wouldn't fit into the Cato Institute he's libertarian in the traditional sense he believes people should have the maximum amount of freedom they can be given which is a lot much more than they now get in Argentina he has moved from basically nowhere in the last several years to become maybe the most famous person in this country the election is next month in October and once again it seems like he's likely to win he himself is a Bitcoin enthusiast right he jetted off to Argentina not for steak not for soccer but to meet the rock star economist and fellow Bitcoin advocate Javier Miele why do you think from your perspective you've become a man with no political background so popular so quickly in this country that in a cable con el hecho de que ese de huador de football a mismo tiempo ese do cantante rock -and -roll y ademas a soy economista y creo que esa combinación es una combinación attractive en terminos de producto televisivo pero por otra parte lo que también es importante el tema de las cídeas y argentina a pasicamente es un país que se va cien años abraçando las cídeas socialistas y entonces la revelión natural del sistema era ser libérales y es por eso que la revelión natural la parece siempre los jovenes y los jovenes encontraron alguien que man Miele from an 18 % poll prediction grabbing a 29 % victory in the primaries Miele maybe is unpredictable as a Bitcoin price chart and with hair that's probably more talked about than the latest thing what is that now like men in black aliens in Mexico or something and the guy is very based he's just gonna say what he thinks what he feels but Miele's boldness isn't limited to just critiquing the state but he also questioned the Pope talked about advising the orange guy and has many times advocated for Bitcoin is the future of financial freedom in short Javier Miele is making waves the Pope the current Pope is from Argentina I would think he would support you he has instead criticized you and you've called him a communist why the disconnect bueno primero porque el papa juega politica vente a si luma some papa donde tiene forte Ingenencia política ademostrado además una granda finidad con dictadores como Castro o como comaduro si restar el lado de de dictadores wait I'm sorry Raul Castro's a murderer si if you got to the minute at Rocesino but the Pope you believe the Pope has an affinity for Raul Castro si exacto si decho no los condena si repatante condescending de conesos y esta mien condescending de con la dictadora venesolana a si el condescending de con todos los discuiras a un cuando se verdaderos criminals toco el esos un problema prudemas es a lien que consider a que la justicia social un elemento central de desu vision y eso es muy complicado porque la justicia social case robar el fruit su trabajo una persona y dar ciudad otra en dos es implicado dos cosas una es un robo y el problema es que el robo esta encontra de lo que seniela los días mandamientos si ha valar la justicia sociales ha valar el robo por otando son problema de que está violando los días mandamientos el otro problema es que es un trato decíbal friende a la ley now me and myself I'm kind of against protectionist policies but Malay on the global stage he has a clear stance no deals with status so china lula unless it's about decentralized money of the future bitcoin probably don't bother knocking you've said that as president of argentina you will not do business with china de cho no solo no via certain negocios con china no via certain negocios con nimún comunista esir habar yo soy un defensor de la libertad de la paz y la demogracía lo comunista no entranay but also incredible beyond the politics and probably his bitcoin price checks who is this Javier Malay at heart well one thing he's a man whose phone screensaver is joy has no end and is as passionate about freedom the austrian economic community as he is about bitcoin and decentralization no no no no no no when you talk about and live according to your conscience you don't have me because you know what is the definition of this personal me you know that when you are in the last moment or when you are in the constant pressure of being big you know what I mean? You know what I mean? You know what I mean? This will pass all over your life.

Javier Miele Buenos Aires Castro Raul Castro Joe Rogan 29 % Cato Institute Michael Jackson Javier Malay 18 % Donald Trump 340 Million Views Oprah Tucker Carlson Today 11 Million Views 35 Years Cien Años Pope Zimbabwe
Fresh update on "hundreds years" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:00 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "hundreds years" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"County Michigan which is going to be really a pivotal moment the first time in more than a hundred years that a sitting president has done that we I don't want to stop the show from my thoughts on this but just you know would Harry Truman do this you know I mean what Truman took from the unions I just don't think so after FDR thank you I appreciate that excuse me I will get it out the juxtaposition between President Biden and the former President Trump coming the following day will be interesting and then at 1 30 p .m eastern Fed Governor Michelle Bowman speaking after yesterday we heard from Neil Kashkari saying one more hike for the remainder of this year the risk to the upside when it comes to inflation Tom yeah you know why don't you bring in Emily Rowland because you know I was talking with Emily early in the season and you know like the third week of April I said it's over and she said oh no those Red Sox will come back and you know she and I really aren't in speaking terms I'll let you guys work it out. The last place Boston Red Sox they took they took the damn John Hancock sign down what was that about? Emily I'll let you work it out with him in a little bit but I do want to start Emily Rowland co -chief investment strategist just a gin John Hancock investment management and mailing everything this morning. I'm curious I'm curious perspective your when we look at some of these yields are they sustainable does this look logical that we could see a 10 -year yield at 4 and heading north? Yeah it's unbelievable Lisa the backup that we've seen in yields and it's seemingly on no news at all last Friday we were kind of combing the headlines trying to figure out why the 10 -year Treasury yield had backed up 10 basis points in a day and it was really no news no economic data this feels like a move that's very much driven on sentiment very much driven on technicals maybe it's liquidity fears maybe it's some fears supply but we see this cycle as being a lot more relevant in fact if you look this at backup and yields against the macro backdrop it doesn't really make a ton of sense you know you looked at headline CPI at 9 % yields were lower than I look back at 2021 manufacturing highs were 63 in the United States and 10 -year Treasury yields were had a one handle on them so what we've seen is that yields have moved higher even in the face of this sluggish economic growth this decelerating economic and growth its moderation in inflation you guys have talked a lot about the housing market this morning we're seeing disinflation in in housing and in fact housing prices on a real basis you talk about real -time measures of rent are probably about flat year -to -date so it's very strange to us to see yields backing up to this extent. Emily the difference between you and me is in my youth the Red Sox never ever ever ever won always and disappointing you of course know all those glory years now here we are the end of September we're both crushed by the last place Boston Red Sox and my question is like Red the Sox is all this gloom and tension in the market is it seasonal is it just the week were in the week we're in yeah I mean September is a notoriously difficult month for markets you know we try to look past that there's all sorts of data out there right now suggesting hey when September's bad we're then going into a positive time for seasonal all of these are sort of shorter -term gyrations in the market you know I do think that it's possible that we'll see some volatility we're gonna start to hear more from earnings season picks up next month it's just hard to see what the positive catalyst is for markets today in an environment again where the economic data is slowing the cost of capital is readily elevated right now you know obviously it's hurting consumers there's major headwinds you guys have talked a lot about this this morning everything from oil prices rising which acts as a tax on the US consumer we're seeing mortgage rates approaching 8 % auto loans are the most unaffordable in US history right now the labor market's looking fine but eventually the consumer is going to start to do the math when they look at the restrictive cost of borrowing and potentially pull away here you beautifully explained that so I got a cost of capital issue with a real yield up new a lot of people have never experienced this seriously folks and so that comes down to what I call the choice set I'm talking you know allerian here game theory and that by definition with an elevated real yield don't I have fewer choices in my set absolutely of opportunities and what we're really trying to do here is minimize our exposure to companies that need to issue debt or equity in this market we look at unprofitable companies growth at any price companies you know when you go way down in market cap for example the Russell 2000 forty five percent of its comprise of companies that don't make money that's not where we want to be in this cycle one thing that we're watching really closely is we're finally seeing defensive equities perk up and you can give me a hard time on this one Tom because I've been about talking defensive equity since the spring and I've been wrong you know who needs defensive stocks when you can you know stocks

A highlight from Encore of Episode 7: Cell Phones Are Not Evil with Antero Garcia

Overthrowing Education

01:48 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Encore of Episode 7: Cell Phones Are Not Evil with Antero Garcia

"Hey, it's Batsheva. I've pulled this episode out of the archive vault for you, in case you hadn't heard it before. But if you have already heard it, well, you might want to listen again because this time you'll know all the answers to the 5 -Minute Game Show. And also because there's always something to learn from my wonderful guests. With the exception of adding this intro, I'm bringing you the original episode in its original form, which is also kind of a time capsule. So enjoy. The Arte Institute, in conjunction with Arte Preparatory Academy presents... Overthrowing Education, with your host, Batsheva Frankel. Today's episode is sponsored by... Hello, I'm, uh, Tack. And I'm a worksheet. Are you that new teaching -aid cell phone? Yep, and you can just call me Tack. Well, I've been around about a hundred years, so there's that. Cool. And, uh, what are you into? I'm into fun stuff that engages students and makes learning an adventure. Well, I engage students in mind -numbing questions and repetitions that some students find fun. Yeah, that sounds great. Actually, right now I'm gearing up for a social studies class where the students learn to use the latest technology as they virtually explore the world with me. They're teaching -aid cell phone. I'm gearing up to watch students' smiling faces as they skim the textbook mindlessly to look for answers to fill me up. So that's fun. Yep, that is so much fun. You want to join me and some students later as they create math games and puzzles for each other, learning both the content and applying it with critical thinking and tech skills. I would, but here come some kids now eagerly waiting to fill out row after row after row of similar math problems. Want to join us? Uh, no, no, I'm good. Thanks, though.

Arte Preparatory Academy Batsheva Today Both About A Hundred Years Arte Institute Batsheva Frankel 5 -Minute Game Show Tack
Fresh "Hundreds Of Years" from Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:06 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "Hundreds Of Years" from Bloomberg Surveillance

"24 hours Abromowitz a day starts at US Bloomberg right growth now. .com both accelerating and the Bloomberg and surprising Business US to Act. the economy Broadcasting upside, near term will probably that's be something slowing that's down. going to 24 change. When I look at The the bond market, it's pricing in a slowdown. When I look at the equity market, it's not. What people have been doing all year which has confused me is sold bonds but said that they like them. Right now, we're still in the annoyance phase of inflation. That's why we think it'll persist. This is Bloomberg Surveillance with Tom Kean, Jonathan Farrow and Lisa Abromowitz. Good morning, everyone. Bloomberg Surveillance, Jonathan Farrow, Lisa Abromowitz and Tom on television. Right there is what we're about. Katie Kaminsky and Eric Davis yesterday each separately, equities and bonds looking for price down, yield up. Bramo loved Monday, not so much in love with Tuesday. But Lisa, I mean, the toxic stew or brew of the last 48 hours is something. Yesterday was a tipping point moment where we saw yields climb to levels that people didn't think plausible. And they basically were all saying that this we had seen the peak about six months ago and here we were reaching new post 2007 peaks in the 10 year yield. And today we're seeing a little bit of a bounce back, but not with conviction. And that raises a question, can we live with these rates? Why are risk assets holding in as much as they are? Yes, you're seeing of a bit softness today. And are we entering a new regime that looks unfamiliar to anything that we seen have over the past 20 years? And I would stagger the date of dependency. Yesterday, the 30 year bank rate, I don't have the mortgage yet, but 7 .75%. That's an American statistic for our global audience that we're all it's like Dow the Dow Jones industrial average 34 ,149. It's just a heritage statistic for our listeners and viewers. Can you imagine that breaking out and not going where Jamie Dimon's blathering on today, but the 30 year bank rate at 7 .98 %? And what if that stays there? Right? I mean, issue. this is the What if it stays there for the next 10 years or the next five years, the next three years, and people actually have to start moving and you actually get price discovery and the existing sales that have fallen off a cliff. Is that when you start to see things we pricing can or we deal with this? Are we adapting and adjusting? Are people basically managing through a world that just looks different? What were data dependent on the 26th of September? Michael McKee 9 a .m. this morning. Case Schiller. Look, I'm sorry, I'm not going to call it S &P CoreLogic, Carl Case, Robert Schiller. That's the way it is. Case Schiller, we're going to get a negative statistic year over year, new home sales, who knows what we'll see, but that becomes the data path into jobs October in inflation if we don't get the dreaded shutdown. Well, if you start to get disinflation housing, that could be positive, right? If you get the idea of prices going down at a time where affordability is at a record low for the average American, that might be what the Fed wants. The shocking aspect is it hasn't been deeper. We haven't seen that 20 % correction in home prices you'd expect if you have a tripling in terms of mortgage rates. At this point, really, the issue is we don't understand the and long variable lags. Let me get to the data. We got to sell a book here quickly for the hour. Futures were worse earlier, negative 18 right now it's done four tenths of a percent. SPX down half a percent as well. The VIX 17 4 .42 in from that 18 level yesterday. Quickly in the yield space 4 .50 after a higher yield on the 10 -year real yield 2 .14 %. We got out to 216, 217. Will Kennedy tells me oil's stable, right Will. $1 .06 DXY yen 149 ish rounded up. I'm going for the gloom here folks. It's a it's a data check is well coming up in this hour. Jonathan Farrell in conversation. They sold the movie rights to this book already. It's amazing. It was because of Gordon Brown. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Gordon Brown writing with Mohammed El -Erian and the laureate Michael Spence Permacrisis and this is a primal scream about the technology think Spence but just up against the game theory think El -Erian many tea decisions in the book and then Gordon Brown about the politics of how we extract ourselves from the emotion of the time. John Farrell with that later in the hour from London. We need a brief. She met his conversation which I'm looking forward to today. We do get economic data including the S &P CoreLogic K Shiller housing price data that comes out at 945 a .m. as well as new home sales that come out shortly after in Conference Board consumer confidence. I am curious to see how much that downdraft evaluations accelerates. Do we See actual an correction in a market that is not a market because houses are not moving and in the existing home space the new home sales. those yes ok but my time is what the rents how does this come over to rents and there is rental disinflation across America you and I don't know that in New York but come on rents are disinflating they are disinflating some nuances around that all really important things to watch because they feed so heavily into the feds inflation gauges then at noon we do see President Biden joining the picket line with the UAW workers in Wayne County Michigan which is going to be really a pivotal moment the first time in more than a hundred years that a sitting president has done that we I don't want to stop the show from my thoughts on this but just you know would Harry Truman do this you know I mean what Truman took from the unions I just don't think so after FDR

A highlight from A Sober Journey to Becoming an Author

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

20:08 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from A Sober Journey to Becoming an Author

"You know, I had maybe 100 or 150 failed attempts behind me, you know, of me saying, that's it, no more. I'm not doing it today. I honestly can't say what the difference was that one time, but that one time I was well and truly freaking done. And I just said to my wife, I have to get help. It's out of control. I can't control it. And it was terrifying. Hey, everybody. Welcome to the Addiction Unlimited podcast, where you get to learn everything you want to know about addiction and recovery. I'm your host, Angela Pugh, co -founder of Kansas City Recovery, Life Coach, and Recovering Alcoholics. To learn more about me, you can listen to episode zero on your podcast app or find us on the web at addictionunlimited .com. Hi, Will. Thank you so much for coming on and doing this show with me. It's so good to see you. Hey, Angela. Good to see you too. Take a couple of minutes and tell everybody a little bit about you and what you do. Thank you. So my name is Will Thacher, and I'm an author of addiction fiction novels. I'm also an addiction fiction nerd and fan. And that's my little world. I'm a sober guy and I love these stories. I'm a big lifelong avid reader. And I just sort of found this space, which there's really not that much in it. There are a handful of authors that have done some great work and I'm passionate about it. And so that's how I'm doing it. There are so many typical books that you get in the recovery space, right? It's not self -help based. It's not personal story based. It's not a memoir or a how -to or a guide, right? This is really reading for enjoyment. Totally. Yeah, that's exactly right. And you know, there are so many good books that are in the categories that you just listed. And there are new ones out every year and it's very well represented. Personally, I love fiction. It's something that I grew up with. I always had a book in my hands. And from my perspective, it's 90 % enjoyment. And there is a 10 % value in terms of relating this to my recovery, reading about people who are going through the same types of things, albeit in much more extreme circumstances in my books, relating that back to my own recovery. When we watch a movie, for example, that has characters in recovery or in active addiction, I have a very direct emotional reaction to that because I've lived through that pain. And I won't quite call it a spiritual experience, but certainly I'll have an emotional experience, a connection to those characters. So I do think that there is some little residual benefit to my recovery when I read these books. Yeah, I would agree with that for sure. And I think the audience can relate to this also in that recovery can be heavy work. Especially in the beginning, it takes so much of you and your time and your energy and it can start to feel very overwhelming. So to not constantly be immersed in the self -help, the personal development, sobriety, recovery, change your life, get your act together, to have something that has some pieces of that in the familiarity of recovery and recovery language, but to have it be just for enjoyment, I think is so powerful. And I'm really excited to watch this category grow. It's nice to hear you say that. And I personally agree with that entirely. This is deadly serious stuff, literally. But also, I'm a big AA guy and we always say there has to be some fun in it or else people aren't going to want it. And so I think that this is a way to keep a foot in the work, keep the themes and the ideas that you're trying to bring into your mind, trying to bring into your life and take a little bit of a break from the hardcore recovery aspect of it. I think it's worth mentioning that a lot of what I write is definitely not so much for people in their first three or six months of recovery. There are much better things that those people should be reading than fiction. Frankly, their lives are at stake. My work is really much more for people who have a little bit of sobriety under their belts, they're living a sober life and they want to relate to and hear stories about sober characters that are out there. I'm getting ready to publish my second novel now. And what I write about is what's interesting to me. What's going on in my life and in my head, which are next step sober problems. Okay, you got sober, your life got good, then what? Because that's what I'm interested in at this point. And that's what a lot of my characters go through. Yeah. I appreciate you saying that. And it reminds me of when I was new, I'm a 12 step person also. And I remember when I was really new sitting in those rooms and for several months, right? Not understanding a lot of the lingo and like the one liners. And now I love those things, right? Because I've been in it for a hundred years and it all makes sense to me. And it's this beautiful sort of shorthand, like you can pop out this one liner and it has so much profound meaning. Once you get it, it simplifies things. But when I was new sitting in there, I was like, what the hell are these people talking about? I just didn't understand those things. So I appreciate you pointing that out, that there is some depth of knowledge, but I think it can also bring some really great familiarity to the recovery world and some of that terminology and what it means. So I think it could go both ways, but you definitely want to have some basic understanding of a sober life. Yeah. I mean, that's why everybody recommends what they recommend to the newcomer, right? 90 and 90, there's an immersion that should happen in the beginning so that to your point, you start to speak the language and you start to think in those terms. And then from that point on, yes, you don't have to necessarily go to a meeting or two or three a day like I did from my first three to six months in sobriety. Yeah, for sure. So let's talk a little bit about your personal journey. What was it for you? At what point did you recognize that you really had a problem? I mean, I knew I had a problem for a good year or two before the rest of the world was rudely introduced to it. My problem came to light to ring a family vacation. I've actually heard a couple of other people tell versions of this story in the rooms, which was gratifying to me. I had spent the last really year, year and a half of my using and drinking in isolation, and I had gotten very good at hiding away from my family and from friends and doing my thing, doing at that time what I thought of as whatever I had to do to get through the day, surviving in this head of mine. And then we booked a vacation. I went away with not just my direct family, but my extended family for two weeks, and there was no hiding. There was no sitting in my office behind two closed doors, and it was unmanageable. And so I ran around for the first half of it, trying to keep a buzz going, trying to figure out a way to do this. And it just became clear that not just to me, but to everybody else, that this was a real problem and it needed to be addressed. And it was really humiliating to have that happen in such a public way, but probably the best thing that could have happened. What did you do when you really understood, okay, this has to stop, right? We get to that, what I call what everybody refers to as that sort of rock bottom moment. And just to clarify, because there is a misconception about rock bottom, rock bottom doesn't have to be a huge extravagant event. Rock bottom is just the very moment you hit in your head that you're like, oh my gosh, I cannot live like this anymore. Something has to change. So you have that epiphany. What was your next thought and next action to get started in making the change? Well, I had maybe 100 or 150 failed attempts behind me of me saying, that's it, no more. I'm not doing it today. I honestly can't say what the difference was that one time, but that one time I was well and truly freaking done. And I just said to my wife, I have to get help. It's out of control. I can't control it. It's totally out of my hands. Whatever happens, happens. And it was terrifying. So we came home from the vacation and my plan was to get myself into a rehab, go spend 28 days somewhere and let them tell me what to do. But in the meantime, I decided to hit a couple of AA meetings while I got that all sorted out. I have a good close cousin who's in recovery, who's a huge AA proponent. I actually have two cousins, both of whom I adore and whose lives are incredible because of recovery. And they always talk about AA. I guess they talked about it in front of me for a reason. We call that planting seed. I think that's right. So I went to AA. I sat down in a meeting and I heard my first couple of sober stories and I was hooked. I tell people that's what got me sober was the stories that I heard before there was fellowship, before there were steps, before there was service, any of the other key aspects of recovery. Before I even knew what those things were, I heard those stories. I read myself into every one of them, even if the circumstances were totally different from mine. I loved the arc of the qualification, what happened, how it is, how it is now. Just people amazing being incredibly honest. And I really thought, okay, if they can do this, I can do this. They sound just like me. They're literally saying the things that are inside my head. So I must be in the right place. I'm not a stupid person. I can connect those two things. I think I can do this. So I held off on the rehab thing because I thought I could, the great and powerful me, could sort this out on my own. But I did AA immersion, like two or three meetings a day. My work was in the garbage at that point. It turned out to be a blessing in some ways. And so I was doing two or three meetings every day and following guys around and that was how I got sober. Hearing you say all of that just again takes me back to my early days and so much the same experience. And I know a ton of people listening right now are nodding their heads in agreement, where you sit and you hear the other people share. And this isn't a 12 step specific thing. People say the same thing in my online community, and I'm sure they have the same experience in other people's online communities. But you hear people share their stories and you hear your story just with their details. And it's a really powerful experience when you can sit back and go, oh wow, I'm not the only one. Because I think in active addiction, it's so isolating. Even if you're not isolated physically, even if you're going out and drinking with people and you're not isolating in that way, mentally and emotionally, psychologically, it's so isolating because you feel so different from everyone else. I know for sure I felt like I was the biggest piece of garbage on the planet. I was disgusting. I thought my drinking was worse than everybody's, right? Because in my immediate friend group, I was probably the worst, you know? And then I got to the rooms and I hear other people talking and sharing those stories. And I was like, oh wow, okay. I'm not so isolated. I'm not on this one man island all by myself. I do have people that I can connect with and that truly understand. Yeah, totally. And there's a whole room full of them here nodding along the way that I am. For me personally, that's how I learn the best is through stories, which is why I do what I do. It's a passion of mine. But the thing that you pointed to just now that was really powerful for me also was just the self -talk that was going on in my head at that point was so vicious. It was so negative. And I was just brutalizing myself by the time I got in there. Like you said, I was the worst person. Let's be honest, I did some pretty bad things. And so there was some evidence available for that theory. But that's not the whole story. I was also a sick person. And I'd also done some really good things. And so being among people who have felt that way in the past and getting their compassion back in such a direct way was life -saving for me. Yeah. That's so important what you just said too, that it wasn't the whole story. I always say, we are all a thousand piece puzzle and I definitely have some bad pieces. I have some trauma pieces and I have pieces of my personality that can be really unpleasant. I have bad pieces, but that's not all my pieces. We all have good ones and bad ones. And luckily because of recovery, my bad pieces have gotten a little bit smaller and my good pieces have gotten a little bit bigger. But it's important to remember that, that it's not the whole story. And just like as a sober person, I'm sure you'll agree with this too, being sober a long time, my sobriety isn't my whole story either. There's still all these other pieces and facets of my personality that are super important that I have to be mindful of. And I have to nurture all those pieces too. Totally. Yeah. And maybe the most valuable thing that I learned in early sobriety was to discount my thoughts by about 90%. For sure, yes. Whether they were good or bad. On the long list of things that I have no control over, my thoughts is at the top of that list. This brain just cranks out bad data on a regular basis. So the most useful thing that I can do is to understand that. And when I get an idea or a thought or whatever it is, say, okay, that's just a thought. That's not a fact. That is not how the world is. That is not how this person is. That is not how I am. It's just the latest thing that comes out of this head of mine. And I learned to try to lead as much as possible with my heart and not with my head because my heart is much more reliable. My love, my compassion, if I lead with that, I really can't go too wrong. I can't really mess things up too badly. I'd been in the process of messing things up for a long time. So I was in the stop messing things up business at that point. And so that was a very good strategy for me for a long time. It remains a good strategy. Yeah. Remembering too that those thoughts don't put down the drink. Those thoughts in my head, that self -talk and how vicious it was, didn't magically disappear when I stopped chugging tequila on a daily basis. That's the stuff. That's really the recovery part that you have to work on and shift that. And just having that understanding is so powerful too that I couldn't trust what my head was telling me early in the game. I needed outside counsel. I needed another human that was farther along in the process that I could talk those things through. I think, well, this is what my head's telling me. This is what I think I should do to have that person go, oh, no, that's not what you want to do at all. Exactly. Yeah. I totally relate to that. For me, the tone of the voice changed over time. It was equally unreliable, but it was not as negative over time. And that's actually one of the themes in Killing Hurt is that the main character, because he's been sober for a little while and he feels better and his life conditions have improved and he's living a sober life, he becomes much more confident in this voice in his head and he doesn't realize that he's still full of bad ideas. So he has all of these sort of judgments and all of his thinking and he's so sure of them because he's a smart guy and he establishes in the beginning of the book how smart he is and how vital that is to his character, but he's wrong all the time. It's like amazing how often this guy's wrong and that's me. That's how I walk through the life. That's kind of what I like to do with the book is whatever I'm journaling on, whatever I'm 10th stepping in my recovery, it ends up being sort of embedded in one of these characters somehow. Okay. So you just mentioned 10th stepping. So I want you to explain to everybody what that is because a vast piece of my audience is not going to understand what that means. Oh, sure. Yeah. So steps 10, 11 and 12 are in AA, the maintenance steps, meaning these are the steps that you're supposed to do for the rest of your life once you finish your step work. So the 10th step is essentially your inventory. So each night, the way that I do inventory is that I sit down with a notebook every night and I just write what's going on in my head and then I look at what's there and I try to identify where are my character defects at play in this story that's playing out in Will Thatcher's head. I point them out. I'm like, okay, there's some greed, there's some dishonesty, there's some fear, a lot of fear in my inventory.

Angela Pugh Angela Will Thacher 90 % 100 Two Weeks 28 Days 10 % Will Thatcher Addictionunlimited .Com. TWO Will Second Novel First Half Two Things Both Three 12 Step Two Closed Doors Two Cousins
Fresh update on "hundreds years" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:00 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hundreds years" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

"Wanted but could get it through the house once it passes the Senate it goes to the house Where speaker Kevin McCarthy will face a tough choice on whether to hold a vote at all so far McCarthy has Not been able to muster enough Republican votes for a rival stopgap measure that would cut spending by 27 percent and change border policies now if McCarthy does put this Senate bill up for a vote Conservatives have Threatened to try to oust him in Washington. I'm Amy Morris Bloomberg radio all right Amy. Thanks well in addition to Over negotiations a possible government shutdown the auto workers strike is also making headlines this morning President Biden is stepping further into the dispute in a highly unusual move and Bloomberg's Ed Baxter has the Story Biden travels to the Detroit area today to join workers on the UAW picket line White House spokeswoman Karine Jean -Pierre is the most pro -union president in modern times and says the Message is clear. This is the president that's made very very clear that he believes that corporate profits should lead to record UAW a record UAW contract now Donald Trump visits Michigan on Wednesday as a to battle for blue the -collar vote I'm Ed Baxter Bloomberg Radio okay Ed thank you President Biden's decision to stand alongside United Auto Workers on the 12th day of their strike appears to be historic more on that from Bloomberg Auto reporter Oliver Kruk the question I think is does this help the union workers more does this help Biden more so this is the first time you know over a hundred years that are sitting president has done anything like this and really breaking with a historical precedent and it comes at a time when the u .s. are really showing the highest support for unions in about 25 years so politically for Biden this is certainly an attractive thing the risk for Biden is that if this goes on longer and longer the economy starts to suffer that this is going to be used as ammunition against him Bloomberg Auto reporter Oliver says Kruk the Biden administration has no formal role in the negotiations between the UAW and the automakers well turning to the markets now Nathan the CEOs of two of Wall Street's biggest banks have been weighing in on growth and rates Goldman Sachs boss David Solomon said he expects the Fed to hike further and the economy to cool here's what he told the American Energy Security Summit I think it's gonna be hard to get inflation back to the target and that probably means that inflation is sticky we will see additional interest rate increases ultimately that probably does lead to a little bit more of a slowdown in the economy whether that's a recession or or it's just a slowdown you know it's hard to say but it would be unprecedented to go through this type of a tightening cycle and not see us get to a little bit of slower economic growth than what we're seeing right now. In the comments from Solomon, Well then, come as JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon says he's not sure if the world is prepared for 7 percent rates. Speaking to the Times of India, Dimon said that going to that level would be much more painful than getting to 5 percent. On top Fed officials also speaking about interest rates Karen, Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari says he expects the central bank will need to raise rates one more time this year. So the economy has continued to exceed expectations in its underlying resilience. So if the economy is fundamentally much stronger than we realized, on a margin that would tell me rates probably have to go a little bit higher and then be held higher for longer to cool things off. Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari made those comments yesterday at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. While turning to Asia, Nathan the troubled Chinese property developer Evergrande says its mainland unit has defaulted on a 547 million dollar onshore bond. The default comes as reports emerge that former executives have been detained by Chinese authorities. Bloomberg's Loretta Chen has more from Hong Kong. The local media testing, which is a reputable media in mainland China, reported last night that the ex -CFO and CEO of Evergrande Group were detained by police. And these are the people who used to be right -hand men of Huikao Yan, the founder of Evergrande. So this is quite significant in terms of the destiny of this company. You know, whether it's going to finish all these unfinished projects while its chief executives are detained. Bloomberg's Loretta Chen says the pensions add another layer of uncertainty to Evergrande's debt restructuring plan. We've got some legal news to get you caught up on this morning, Karen. A top Apple executive is set to testify in Washington today at the Justice Department's antitrust trial against Google. Eddy Cue, Apple's services chief, plans to defend the lucrative that deal made Google's search engine the default option on the iPhone. Sources say Cue plans to say he's always believed Google makes the best search engine and that's why Apple uses it as the go -to option across its major devices. The government accuses Google of using its dominance in search to hinder competition. And Nathan, Bloomberg News has learned the Federal Communications Commission will announce plans today to reinstate so -called net neutrality rules governing broadband providers. Rules barring broadband providers from unfairly interfering with Internet traffic were gutted by the FCC under Republican leadership during the Trump presidency. President Biden said he would recommit the United States to the principles of an open Internet including net neutrality. And straight ahead we have more global headlines plus a check of sports And it is time to take a look at some of the other stories where he's making news in New York and around the world. For that we're joined by Bloomberg's Michael Barr. Good morning Michael. Good morning Nathan. Democratic Senator Bob Menendez of New Jersey is pushing back on the allegations of corruption and bribery against him by federal prosecutors. On Friday the Southern District of New York brought charges against me. I understand how deeply concerning this can be. However the allegations against me are just that, allegations. However fellow Democrats are calling for Menendez to resign. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy says the Senator should step down. Now at least two of his Senate Democratic colleagues John Fetterman of Pennsylvania and Sherrod Brown of Ohio say that it's broken the public trust. There has been a third arrest in connection with the fentanyl poisoning death of a toddler at York a New City daycare earlier this month. He is an alleged drug dealer accused of doing business with the suspects. Investigators say they found a kilogram of the deadly drug on top of playmat where the children napped. Gray Mendez, owner of the daycare, was arrested earlier along with relative. a The search continues for Mendez's husband who authorities say may have fled to the Dominican Republic. Residents were allowed to return to their devastated properties in Lahaina yesterday, many for the first time Maui since the town was demolished by a wildfire over a month ago. This woman's home was destroyed. It's so unreal to see and you know we've driven past it and we've seen it on the news but I think you really need to just see we need to see it in person we need to go and stand on our property and see you know what's left. The wildfire killed nearly 100 people and destroyed over 2 ,000 buildings. Actor David McCallum has died. McCallum had a supporting role on the TV series NCIS and he also starred in the spy drama The Man From U .N .C .L .E. David McCallum was 90. Global news 24 hours a day powered by than more 2 ,700 journalists and analysts in over 120 countries. I'm Michael Barr and this is Bloomberg Nathan. All right Michael thank you. Now you know we bring you the news throughout the day here on Bloomberg Radio but now you can get the latest latest news on demand whenever you want it. Subscribe to Bloomberg News now to get the latest headlines at the click of a button. Get informed on your schedule. You can listen and subscribe to Bloomberg News now on the Bloomberg business app Bloomberg .com plus Apple Spotify and Facebook .com.

Democrats Hate Oil Companies That Have Been Central to Our Growth

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 6 d ago

Democrats Hate Oil Companies That Have Been Central to Our Growth

"These companies have been a tremendous benefit to our society for over a hundred years. They fueled the Industrial Revolution. They created light at night. They fuel electricity. Oil companies, which you've been told to hate by the Democrat Party and the Marxists, because they have been to the growth of our society, to our prosperity, central to people don't realize how much oil is used in our economy. It's ubiquitous. It's our food. It's oil -based. Electricity can't replace all this. Electricity needs oil. So the Marxist phony environmental groups for the last 30 or 40 years have been trying to destroy the oil companies by litigation. And came they up with a plan, not so clever but nonetheless, that these oil companies, these oil executives, have spent decades concealing from investors, the fact that they have

Democrat Party Over A Hundred Years Industrial Revolution Decades 40 Years Last 30 Marxists Marxist
Fresh "Hundreds Of Years" from Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

00:07 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Hundreds Of Years" from Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

"And priority number one for Beijing is to get those apartments built and delivered to the people who bought them so that they don't have protests number two and maybe even further down the list is whether or not the creditors are paid. Yeah, and I suppose reracking, because we've been talking about this story for so long John, I suppose What do we think initiated what went wrong you know in that reckoning that you've talked about what went wrong in in particular with China Evergrande. So China Evergrande in the spring put out a restructuring proposal. They've been trying to get the creditors on board to accept that proposal. They have struggled to do that. They were supposed to have some important meetings with creditors This week to try and finalize an agreement that cancel those meetings that would suggest that restructuring is they're not going to be able to get the support they need for it. In the announcement about why they're canceling these meetings that were supposed to happen this week they noted that the sales of apartments has not gone the way they thought they would. So the company has been trying to bring in more money. Less of it's coming in than they thought. They're having trouble getting the creditors to agree to how to restructure the existing debt. I think all this is sort of compounding into the situation that we have now. Thanks so much John. joining Thanks for us. John Liu, managing editor for Greater China here at Bloomberg. Now let's talk about the auto industry. The first televised US presidential debate was held 63 years ago today in a famous head -to -head between Kennedy and Nixon. Later today, both Joe Biden Donald and Trump will be hoping that that time in front of the camera will help boost their hopes of winning the next US presidential election. President Joe Biden is going to join the United Auto Workers Union on the picket line today in Michigan whilst the former President Donald Trump will also be in that same state to make his case to auto workers. Joining us now to discuss is Bloomberg's Oliver Crook who is in Berlin for that debate. Oliver, first of all to the US auto workers strike how much clout does having the president on the picket line add to the UAW? Yeah, I think it's a good question. Another question is who does it help more, the union negotiators or Biden in his reelection? So we're talking about an event that's really without precedent and at least a hundred years of sitting president going down showing that kind of solidarity with a union at a time polls when opinion in the US are really showing the highest support for unions in a long time. You made me sort of dig into this talking about Nixon and Kennedy, but apparently approval for unions according to Gallup is up at 71%. That's the highest point it's been since 1965. The risk of course to Biden in the union is if this goes on for a very long time, the economy starts suffer to and sympathy starts to wane. UAW backed Biden back in 2020. Sean Fain has walked the line. He has not endorsed Biden saying that you have to earn our endorsement, though he is joining Biden and speaking there alongside him we understand. He's been critical of Donald Trump. He's been critical of people like Donald Trump in a system that sort of enriches this class of people at the expense of the workers and Trump of course will go to Detroit on Wednesday he and will probably be talking about the Biden policy, the painful transition to EVs and saying that really that the center of the auto industry. Right yes the transition for EVs famously requires fewer fewer employees or fewer people to actually make the vehicles doesn't it Ollie which is partly why it gets caught up in these political conversations on that front on the EV from the EU trade chief Dombrovskis is in China defending the EU's investigation that could lead to tariffs on Chinese in EVs how at risk is our German automakers then from Chinese competition or from Chinese retaliation yeah and if you think about this fracturing within the United States fracturing is within Europe on this point the French for example we understand push much more for this investigation we understand why France you know did 90 billion euros worth of trade with China last year Germany did about 300 billion for Renault the revenues are about 6 % in Asia Pacific for the German automakers it's more than a third of their deliveries now they have a number of joint ventures on the ground there which would be exempt from these kind of tariffs but what will get hit is the very high -end stuff the big margin items from the German automakers we're talking about the Porsches the S -Classes the 7 Series all of these cars that are built in Europe and would be sent over if get you tariffs from the Chinese EVs coming in you could very well get tariffs in the other direction and that is going to hit the German automakers yeah it's not just tariffs on EVs when it comes to China there's also the issue in the UK and the EU yeah if nothing happens basically what will happen is EVs that are traded between the UK and the EU will get 10 % tariffs at the end of the year that is because there are rules of origin that go into at power the end of the year which will mean that if 45 % of the value of the car is not sourced within the UK and the EU you get a 10 % tariff at the end of the year that's a problem because the lion's share of the cost of an EV is the battery and that's basically impossible at this stage so the EU is pushing for this they don't want to delay it as they say that if we delay it basically you're discouraging the development of these battery supply chains the saying UK and listen the auto industry this are is hard enough as it is we don't need to impose needless hurdles and self -inflicted wounds in getting this transition they're pushing for a three -year delay to this and so EU and UK officials are meeting today to discuss this and thrash debate this out a bit it's a really interesting concept isn't it whether you need further hurdles to spur investments in the that places it's most needed Oliver thanks very much being based Oliver Crook with a look at some of the themes dominating the autos sector on both sides of the Atlantic and both of them come back to EVs Caroline plenty of conversation about EVs I when was I in was Germany last week of course talking as Oliver was there about the damage that could be done to German players in the Chinese market and also some fear expressed by the head of Germany Goldman Sachs actually about the way that China might choose to is to retaliate away from the auto sector could it be for example around the commodity space yeah absolutely blue take bag intelligence seems to put that possibility reasonably low but it definitely does seem that China has turned from an opportunity to more of a risk for the European car makers really fascinating well look we bring you the news you need throughout the day here on Bloomberg radio so a word on where you get the news on demand whenever you want it do subscribe to blue bag news now to get all the latest headlines just at the click of a button you can listen and subscribe to blue bag news now on the Bloomberg business app bluebird .com also on Apple Spotify anywhere you listen or find your podcast just five minutes it's that five minutes of news that you need every morning okay still ahead on Bloomberg Daybreak Europe how to solve the perma crisis former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown at Bloomberg opinion columnist Muhammad al again and Nobel Prize winning economist Michael Spence have a new book out offering their ideas they've been speaking to Bloomberg will bring you highlights of that conversation it talks a lot about cooperation and the way that so many problems are increasingly global and therefore require global cooperation to fix them will bring you the thoughts of these co shortly this is Bloomberg type Bloomberg Radio on demand and in your podcast feed on the latest sound on podcast we talk with Republican congressman Brian style of Wisconsin about whether it's possible to avoid a government shutdown at the end of this week I'm optimistic that at the end of the day we're gonna get there there's nothing like a deadline in to Washington be able to get a deal done I feel like sometimes it's a bunch of college students working on a term paper waiting until the final hour it's no way to run a railroad that's a little bit of the reality of what we're dealing with in Washington hopefully cooler heads will prevail and we can prevent a shutdown no one wins in the event of a shutdown so imagine a couple college guys come over from a different dorm congressman and they've got a paper they've I'm already written wondering just where your head is today on the idea of the Senate showing up with a continuing resolution that the House might adopt does that save the day or present more challenges for

A highlight from Diogo Monica Interview - Anchorage Digital on Rise of Institutional Crypto & Providing Custody to EDX Markets

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

04:10 min | Last week

A highlight from Diogo Monica Interview - Anchorage Digital on Rise of Institutional Crypto & Providing Custody to EDX Markets

"This content is brought to you by Link2, which makes private equity investment easy. Link2 is a great platform that allows you to get equity in companies before they go public, before they do an IPO. Within their portfolio includes crypto companies, AI companies, and fintech companies. Some of the crypto companies you may recognize include Circle, Ripple, Chainalysis, Ledger, Dapper Labs, and many more. If you'd like to learn more about Link2, please visit the link in the description. Welcome back to the Thinking Crypto podcast, your home for cryptocurrency news and interviews. With me today is Diogo Monica, who's the co -founder and president of Anchorage Digital. Diogo, it's great to have you back on the show. Thank you for having me again. Diogo, I followed Anchorage for a long time. We spoke about two years ago. You guys are certainly one of the regulated institutions out there building some great things for the crypto market. There are some folks who may not have heard of Anchorage. Give us an overview of the company and some of the services that you provide. Yeah, at its most basic level, Anchorage Digital allows institutions to participate in the digital asset ecosystem. What that means is that we offer services such as custody, staking, governance, trading, to allow institutions to build products in crypto, or just simply invest in the market. So at the most high level, that's what we do for them. One thing that is unique about Anchorage is the fact that we were the first and are still the only federally chartered crypto bank. What that means is that we actually have a charter by the OCC, the oldest banking regulator in the United States, which is the same charter as JPMorgan Chase and BNY Mellon and all these other funds. So that's pretty unique to have a charter that allows you to do crypto at the highest level of regulatory scrutiny. And if I'm not mistaken, that OCC charter, was that under Brian Brooks when that was passed, where you folks benefit from that? That is exactly right. There was a set of companies that tried to go into the OCC when the OCC requested the participation and offered to actually look at charges like this. And we were the only ones that were actually able to get through. And so it's been pretty fantastic. Over two years, that has been a pretty key for Anchorage and really has proven to be such a great decision for us, the strategy that we took and the fact that we really took the time, took the effort, which is, as you'd imagine, a very, very cumbersome and hard process to get a banking license. People don't know, but even traditional banking licenses, there's very fewer years, sometimes all the way down to like one new banking license, two conversions. So that's to get a charter that actually does under charter crypto custody, staking, that's incredibly unique. And it was a big step function for crypto in terms of regulatory clarity. So we're very proud of it. Yeah, that's awesome. I'm sure you guys are like the first of your kind, so to speak, if I'm articulating that well, because that's right. This asset class is still fairly young. There's still a lot of regulations that need to be ironed out, but the fact that you're not a traditional bank in a sense, a JP Morgan has a hundred years of history, but you are a crypto startup. Would that be right? Yeah, that's right. I mean, at this point, I think people would call us sort of a scale up, but yeah, six year in, I think we still identify with the startup mentality and with the technology background. Sometimes you say that Anchorage has a bank, but we're really a technology company that has a bank more than we're a bank that does technology. I think that's how it would actually describe us. And it's been pretty great to be able to push the industry forward in this way. And in many ways, by having technology, they're superior by adding support for so many assets and by allowing these very large institutions, all the crypto funds, all the large hedge funds, we have sovereign wealth funds. We have pension funds. We have had very large banks in corporates. So all of these very large capitalized institutions now are users of Anchorage and users to participate in the space.

Brian Brooks OCC Jpmorgan Chase Dapper Labs United States Anchorage Digital Chainalysis Ledger Jp Morgan Bny Mellon Circle Diogo Six Year Ripple Diogo Monica First Two Conversions Today Link2 Over Two Years
Fresh update on "hundreds years" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

00:00 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hundreds years" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

"At GMM, my global macro mover screens going on at the moment. yields trading at 4 .54 % so up by another basis point this morning after you had at least 11 basis point gain yesterday and the 10 year yield hitting a 16 year high in terms of shares in Asia they declined this morning six tenths of one percent for the MSCI Asia Pacific index at the hang saying also down at 7 10th of 1 % this morning CSI 300 down 3 and stop futures for the U .S. and Europe both deeply in the red S &P 500 EMI features down by three tenths of one percent so risk off pretty much sure a lot of pessimism Bloomberg dollar spot index though up by more than tenth a of one percent this morning and oil prices easing off Brent crude futures at 92 94 that is your blimberg radio business flash the latest on the market steven well let's dig into some of those market moving themes now U .S. treasuries extending their sell -off that 10 -year yield rising to the highest level since 2007 is also going to 30 -year yield to its highest point in 12 years so what's driving it well joining us now to discuss is our market supporter Valerie I tell and Valerie just in context for us how unusual is it to see this sort of bear deepening what given else is going on the world it's it's very unusual to see this move in the treasury market there's not a usual point in the cycle that we do see it and I think that's really what's worrying investors out there that this move really has had no catalyst especially yesterday what a dramatic move in the treasury market with those long end yields rising on essentially nothing Stephen that that made made my sleep last night a little bit more difficult let me tell you that but this this move is just I mean many people are are I guess guessing yeah what's driving it what one those of things is higher a better -than -expected US growth other people are citing things like rising oil prices pressuring yields pressuring inflation and then others are citing that this is more of a supply story this is the market essentially freaking out that US government is still spending at a fast clip and they will have to issue more treasuries and who is going to absorb them all at this point in the cycle okay I'm going to test you though explain what bear steepening is because I hate having phrases that we use in the markets all the time but actually that any ordinary person outside of a bond market won't know so there's a few ways that the US curve can move when we say it's moved in a bear way that means yields are rising and the steepening means that it's being led by the long end of the curve this is very unusual because we normally see the curve move by the front end because central bank policy really dictates where the front end is so they come out hawkish if they come out mount dovish the move in the treasury yield in the treasury curve is normally led by the front end it is very very unlikely and very rare we see a move led by the long end which let's be frank the central bank has no control over unless they do something crazy like the bank of japan interest rates and u .s growth and yeah well the the long end is is very much a miss mix of nominal GDP which is a mix of inflation and growth expectations but at this point it's very odd because because we have seen so many people bearish on the consumer so many people think the u .s. economy is going to turn and in that narrative if you you normally see long end bonds rally if people want to position for a growth slowdown we are seeing the opposite which is leading many to believe this could be a bit more about supply this fact that we have u .s. government spending thing a lot of money and we haven't even gotten into the recession yet which is normally when these that the automatic stabilizers kick in like welfare programs which cause the government to spend more so we do go into a downturn we actually can see government spending spiking even further meaning more issuance of treasuries that meaning you know foreign investors uh... along that term investors might step away from holding these these long and if bonds there's no rally uh... around the corner if you ever decide to become a teacher, sign me up it's interesting that you say that though about the consumer sector because we've had two big market names talking about u s consumer stocks perhaps that have not been so great. Exactly, we heard from Morgan Stanley's Mike Wilson yesterday being bearish on the consumer sector also mirrors the likes of Goldman Sachs analysts and even Jeffrey's analysts yesterday downgrading some consumer stocks that we have all this pessimism about the consumer but no one is willing to buy bonds no one is willing to go long fixed income that is something that is highly unusual to me at the moment and I think is what is keeping people up at night especially myself. Great stuff, thank you so much. Pimbeg's Markets report a value title, who better the valet to explain bond the markets to us. Let's turn our attention to the automakers as well this morning. Yeah the battle for pay and the ev jobs of the future the united auto workers union still on strike president joe biden expected to join uaw president sean fein on the picket line today in michigan and a war of words over a planned ford battery plant meanwhile electric vehicles becoming a political issue too between the european union and china with germany's high -end manufacturers mercedes -benz bmw and portia most exposed joining us now to discuss is bloomberg's crookie oliver joins us from berlin this morning oliver starting with that strike in the u .s. how much clout does having the president on the picket line add to the u a w yeah there's a lot to unpack today and really i mean this is an event that's really kind of unprecedented at least it's the first time in at least a hundred years at a sitting president has gone down to demonstrate with you know union i'm so you'll be doing that in wayne county michigan detroit you know the motor city and it comes at a time in the united states where there are polls are showing the highest support for unions in about twenty five year so you know in terms of the moment for this uh... to happen as a political move is certainly a positive one of in terms where public opinion is the risk for byden however is if this becomes a very protracted very elongated and then starts to hit the economy then that can be a liability for him you'll start to get attacked by the republican side i of it mean the UAW backed byden back in twenty twenty Sean Fain has been walking the line he's not endorsed byden he said that endorsement needs to be earned but at the same time he's been very critical of people like donald trump they put a statement out last week that every fiber of our union is being poured into fighting the billionaire class in an economy that enriches people like donald trump at the expense of workers and of course trump will speak in Detroit on Wednesday he's skipping the republican debate to do so he will probably lean on EVs being the reason that the u .s auto industry is suffering and emphasizing biden on that and again these are very critical voters for this election in 2024 yes everyone is fighting for that well look electric vehicles are also a political issue elsewhere i'm the eu trade chief valdis d 'omboscis in china defending the eu's investigation into tariffs on EVs how much of a risk um do people in germany think it is for the automakers there yeah this is really interesting because if it's a political issue domestically in the united states it's a domestic sort of intra european debate as well so you have a big division within the eu france and germany for namely where you look at the kind of trade numbers france did about ninety billion dollars worth of trade with china last year germany did three hundred billion dollars last year if you look at the car makers themselves it's even more stark reno has something like six percent of revenue from asia pacific for volkswagen mercedes bmw it's more than a third of the cars that they sell and not just any cars we're talking about their super high end high margin really nice cars and you know i went to the factory factory fifty six mercedes where they build like a lot of these may box and s classes and it is a beautiful installation you can eat off the floor and i think the reason for that is because they sit make a lot of money selling these cars so if you get trade tariffs put up these are the cars that are going to get hit and these are huge profit centers for the german car makers and tariffs on evs not just a concern when it comes to china but also an issue between the uk and the eu yeah yeah there's really no sort of uh... you know resting on this issue so this is all about the rules of origin basically the by end of this year if forty five percent of the value of the car that you build is not source from within the u or the uk you're gonna get a ten percent tariff when you cross the channel the issue is for evs most of that cost is in

A highlight from Episode 10  The Drama of Atheist Humanism  Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J., Vivian Dudro, and Joseph Pearce  FBC Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

14:13 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 10 The Drama of Atheist Humanism Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J., Vivian Dudro, and Joseph Pearce FBC Podcast

"Ignatius Press and the Augustine Institute present the Formed Book Club. Catholic book lovers unpacking good books, chapter by chapter. If you like us, please help us by subscribing, and by reviewing us on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you might listen. And don't forget to sign up for weekly updates and study questions at formedbookclub .ignatius .com. Welcome again to the Formed Book Club. We continue to discuss Ari de Dubac's extraordinary book here, The Drama of Atheist Humanism. We've done enough now that we can maybe situate where we are as we go forward. You know, the first part, called Atheist Humanism, focused on Feuerbach, Marx, and Nietzsche, with a side note on Kierkegaard, but now part two is Auguste Comte and Christianity. And covered we the first chapter here, the meeting of Comte and Atheism. We're on the second chapter, Christianity and Catholicism. There's four sections, we took antisocial Christianity, where he claims that Christianity is antisocial, because it's basically the soul and God and eternity. Part two is section two is Jesus and St. Paul, where he says St. Paul corrected Jesus and set things straight. Now we're on two interesting parts here, the work of the Catholic priesthood and the Holy Alliance. So we begin again on page 192, section three of chapter two, chapter one of part two. The work of the Catholic priesthood. Joseph, take it away. Well, again, right at the beginning of the first paragraph of this section, towards the top of page 193, it's his weird understanding of history. He seems to believe that Catholicism, strictly speaking, did not come into being until the 11th century, and which by the 13th had already passed into the phase of decadence. So basically the Catholicism didn't even come into being until a thousand years after Christ and only lasted for a couple of hundred years before it basically decayed. So if you're going to begin your understanding of the church with such a warped understanding of history, it's no surprise that all sorts of odd conclusions are going to be the consequence. And the reason why he dates it that way has something to do with what Father said in his introduction. He thought Christianity, in its essence, was something that just had to do with the individual and God. And so if what he wants to worship is the collective, well, that reaches its apex, if you will, in terms of social organization in Christendom, right? So what he thinks is the essence of Christianity are these exterior forms holding together a cohesive society. And that just comes and goes, right? It came and it went, in his view. But if you're looking at worshipping the collective, it makes sense that that's why you would look at it that way. He's mistaking the tree for the fruit, isn't he? I mean, this good thing was a consequence of a thousand years of of inheritance, and it took that long for it to actually mature into the fullness of what you might call the High Middle Ages. But it's obviously a fruit of the thing, which is Catholicism. The thing didn't come into being as some sort of spontaneous combustion, evidently. Yes. I mean, the first quote in that paragraph at the beginning on page 192, where Cope says, since the year 1825, our writings have shown an increasing respect for Catholicism, as he understands it, the immediate and necessary precursor of the religion that has, above all, to consolidate and develop the structure that first took shape in the 12th century. And again, you have this theory of Catholic history that it was just a kind of amorphous movement of Jesus, you know, love and be kind and compassionate. And then after it became a state religion or approved by the state under Constantine in the fourth century, it became hardened in its structure. Oh, but then we have what secular theologians call the Dark Ages. And after the fall of the Roman Empire, there was a lot of confusion, but the church was still present in her God -given form during that period. But he sees, as you said, Vivian, at the end of the Dark Ages, he'll call your Middle Ages, 12th or 15th century, here's where there's a consolidation, and you see the social character of the church in Christendom. By the way, you know, de Lubac writes this during the 40s, his first major work was in the 30s called Catholicism, the social aspects of dogma, in which he made very clear that from the beginning, the Catholic faith has had an intrinsic social connection, which makes sense as a church, after all, we're not an aggregate of individuals who have no relation to each other, except for the fact that we happen to hold the same attitude towards Jesus. Sorry, I'm wandering on there. As Chesterton said in, I think, The Everlasting Man, it could have been orthodoxy, that the church was the only thing that was the bridge that connected the civilization of Rome with the civilization of the High Middle Ages. The church was the connector between the two, the bridge, so it's not as if it just arises out of, as if by magic. And that's what he, he's an everlasting man, where he calls Christ the Pontifex Maximus, the greatest builder of bridges. This Pontifex, pontiff, we have in English, means pawns, bridge, fatre, to make, to build. So it's basically the bridge builder. But he reduces the papacy to being the centralized authority of the church. And, and so he actually wants to replace the pope with himself. But he's actually going to require such total obedience and control, unlike anything the church ever did or ever desired to do. But yes, he talks about on the top of 196, it was by this means, meaning the papacy, that the bonds of society were strengthened. He sees that you can't have the strong bonds of society that he aspires to, you know, a humankind in love with itself without a total authority at the top. Yes, and as we're progressing into the heart of Auguste Pont, you know, Burubak has all these citations that really back up what he's saying about him. I just wonder, he's a brilliant madman. And it kind of like Nietzsche was a brilliant madman, you know. And as we said before, hardly anyone knows that name now. Whereas Nietzsche, Marx, even Feuerbach, those are somewhat household words among the intelligentsia. And we have to ask ourselves a question, we could finish them off. Was he really influential or was it just that he had the thoughts he had ended up being part of the signs of the times and because he, I mean, his life and his writings and his philosophy kind of foreshadow the whole great reset, globalization. Yeah, and some of it sounds very Orwellian in the sense of it also seems to prefigure totalitarianism of the 20th century, you know, where the system, so politics and sociology united in a tyranny. And that seems to be what he's calling for. Obviously, he wanted to be the Fuhrer and that didn't happen. But basically other people became Fuhrers in his wake, so to speak. Well, the reason why his thought is a big part of the air that we breathe is because he wanted to turn all knowledge of everything into a concrete science, including the knowledge of man himself, the knowledge of the universe, everything he wanted to reduce down to a science. We wouldn't have the expression political science if it had not been for Comte. So the whole, in fact, social science, you know, every university has a social science department, as if these things are sciences in the same way that physics and chemistry. Yeah, you hit the nail on the head there, because as we see later on, he actually, he criticizes empirical science. So in other words, he criticizes the hard sciences because the hard sciences should subject themselves to sociology, to society, to an understanding of anthropology. So, you know, so he's actually becomes, he begins by being someone who uses the empirical sciences as a method of beating God. And then when he seeks to establish his own sociological religion, he then attacks the sciences because they are a threat, because they've got to question some of his presumptions and he's not into being questioned. We'll return to the Forum Book Club with Father Joseph Fessio, Vivian Doudreaux, and Joseph Pierce in just a moment. on the Discerning Hearts free app. Did you also know that you can stream Discerning Hearts programming on numerous streaming platforms such as Apple Podcasts, Google Play, iHeart Radio, Pandora, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and so many more. And did you know that Discerning Hearts also has the YouTube page? Be sure to check out all these different places where you can find Discerning Hearts. Everything is yours. Do with it what you will. Give me only your love and your grace. That is enough for me. Amen. Amen. We now return to the Forum Book Club with Father Joseph Fessio, Vivian Doudreaux, and Joseph Pierce. He's not so much attacking the sciences for the inability to get the truth, but rather, he has what I think is a legitimate criticism. That is to say, the hard sciences progress by specializing more and more and losing often the larger picture. And so he's in need for something synthetic because science takes things apart and makes small and smaller areas where people, I mean, I live with a Jesuit in Germany. They call him Blitzlach because he was so slow. I mean, in his thinking and walking and everything. But he did his doctorate on the heat -sensitive organs in cockroach antennae, but a specific species or variety of cockroach. And in Germany, you have to do a second doctoral thesis called a meditation to be a professor. So he did his second thesis on the moisture -sensitive organs in cockroach antennae. Well, I mean, there's no question about it. This was the world expert on the antennae of these cockroaches. But where does that fit? Big picture thing. And so, you know, Kant would say, look, we have to unify this some way. And therefore, he sees sociology and he's the father of sociology. That's right. As the master of science.

Vivian Doudreaux Joseph Pierce Ari De Dubac Kant Joseph 1825 Germany Jesus 12Th Century Augustine Institute De Lubac Chesterton Burubak Vivian Second Thesis Formedbookclub .Ignatius .Com. Holy Alliance First Paragraph 20Th Century Cope
A highlight from Larry Taunton

The Eric Metaxas Show

09:08 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Larry Taunton

"Ladies and gentlemen, are you ready to listen to a man of grace, sophistication, integrity, and whimsy? Well, so are we, but until such a man shows up, please welcome Eric Metaxas. Welcome back, folks. This is Eric Metaxas, and welcome to the show. It's hour two. I continue talking to John Smirack, and after this segment, we'll bring on Larry Taunton to go over the news of the day and other things, but the news of the day being Tucker Carlson's mind -blowing interview with Larry Sinclair. Absolutely insane, insane that we're hearing about this for the first time 15 years after we should have heard about it. And the country's a different country because the media and the Republicans just squashed this information because they think you're too stupid to be able to process it on your own, so they have to censor it for you, scandalous. Okay, John, you were talking about something else. I was saying that Winston Churchill had a lot of flaws. He had been a warmonger in 1914. In 1923, he was hostile to the Germans, even though they were the Weimar Republic. He was an anti -German jingoist, but in 1940, he was the indispensable man, the only man who would stop the British from surrendering after France fell and cutting a disgraceful deal that let Hitler essentially run Europe. He was the indispensable man for all his flaws. And there were people in his party, the British Conservative Party, who wanted to push him aside and make a deal with the Nazis because it seemed like the prudent and sensible thing to do. That is exactly when you hear pious Christians condemning Donald Trump saying, well, he's got this terrible moral character. And he says, he puts out mean tweets. They wanna shove Winston Churchill aside and make a deal with the enemies of freedom and surrender to them because they find things unsavory about Donald Trump. And that's what's happening potentially in the Texas Senate right now with Ken Paxton, a heroic defender of religious freedom and the unborn and America's borders and election integrity. He's being savaged from the left by people who hate all those things and attacked from the squish center by the Bush family, which just resents him for beating one of their family members, George P. Bush, in an election. So you've got the most disgusting squish rhinos on the one hand and the far left cooperating the way they cooperated in the election of Obama. So that is my latest political article, but I've got a much more important piece I'd like to talk about. Sure. It has to do with our Lord and savior, Jesus Christ. Was Jesus a sinner? Do we get to say that Jesus was a sinner too? I can't wait to hear where you're going with this one, John Smirack, what do you got? This is a theme I've seen first in mainline Protestant preaching and then in some woke evangelicals. So now of course it eventually filters down to the Vatican. One of the closest advisors to Pope Francis is Father Antonio Spadaro. He runs the semi -official magazine at the Vatican, La Civilta Cattolica. So he is like Pope Francis' right -hand man. He gave a sermon just recently about Jesus' encounter with the Canaanite woman. And I think we all sort of remember that story, this Canaanite woman whose daughter is possessed by a demon starts basically pestering Jesus for a miraculous cure. And Jesus makes her jump through a bunch of hoops. He tells her, look, I've only come to preach to the lost children of Abraham. It is not fit to give to the dogs the bread that is meant for the children. And when we read this, I think we're all a little shocked by it at first. Jesus doesn't sound very nuts. And we're like, wow, what is this? What is this about? I think it is one of those hard sayings in the gospel that we have to think through that challenge us. Jesus was not acting like Oprah here. He was being kind of a hard guy, kind of a tough guy. He makes the woman, basically she gets to the point of saying, but even the dogs get the scraps that fall from the master's table. Then Jesus praises her for her persistence and for her faith, and he heals her daughter, just remotely, heals her daughter. A happy ending. Well, Father Antonio Spadaro, Pope Francis's right -hand man, gave a sermon recently where he says Jesus does not care. He calls Jesus angry and insensitive. He says that his hardness is unshakable. He said that Jesus replies in a mocking and disrespectful way towards that poor woman, because he's apparently blinded by nationalism and theological rigor. But - Hold on, hold on, hold on. You're telling me that one of the top priests at the Vatican genuinely publicly disapproved of the behavior of Jesus of Nazareth, our God. He said that Jesus is giving in to his own racism and nationalism, but by the end, the woman, through her persistence, heals Jesus. He says, quote, Jesus also appears healed and in the end shows himself free from the rigidity of the dominant theological, political and cultural elements of his time. So in other words, the woman heals Jesus instead of Jesus healing the woman's daughter. Jesus's racism is rebuked and repents Jesus for his sin of racism. This is what Pope Francis's right -hand man is saying, but don't take comfort in the fact that you're Protestant. This crap has been around. Protestants have been preaching this for years. You would see it if you go to Woke Preacher TV, you can see videos of Protestant ministers saying this five years ago. Well, first of all, the word Protestant is meaningless because the Protestant church has been in the tank, since Dietrich Bonhoeffer was at union in 1930. I mean, we've had liberal, progressive Protestantism for about a hundred years, so - These are self -described evangelicals. Right, that's the difference. Some of these folks would be described as evangelicals, but they are woke and they're doing the same thing you're describing. But somebody that close to the pope to be saying this, unless you're exaggerating - No, I'm not exaggerating. I was quoting directly from the translation. So let me unpack what's going on here, okay? This is an attempt to put ourselves above Jesus to where we can judge Jesus Christ, because we're so enlightened and we're so intelligent and we have made so much progress. This is the ultimate rebellion, the ultimate new gospel of the Antichrist. And this is what is being preached in our churches where we can judge even the behavior of Jesus Christ. John, it's the clearest mercy I've ever heard. I mean, for somebody to be criticizing Jesus as having sinned even slightly, that goes against every doctrine of the church from the beginning. I can't imagine that this could be - That is what the Vatican is now preaching. So really what happened in this story is this woman is a Canaanite. She's a member of a fertility cult that used to sacrifice infants. So she basically is in a religion that worships demons. She comes to Jesus. The daughter she raised in the demon -worshipping religion is, big surprise, possessed by a demon. She asks Jesus for a miracle, a miracle, a suspension of the laws of nature. God is not some water tap. We turn it on and off. Oh, I need a miracle. Okay, thank you. She's asking for a miracle from a God whom she has rejected her whole life. He makes her jump through a few hoops to show her sincerity and then gives her a miracle. And yet these progressive Christians are so proud that they want to condemn Jesus so that they can feel superior to Jesus. That is the essence of liberal Christianity, where you are the ultimate authority and the secular culture around you are the ultimate authority. George Soros, Microsoft, Facebook, Harvard, Google, they are the authority. They judge even Christ. We have less than a minute left. It's just hard for me to believe that things are that bad, but it seems like they are that bad. I don't know how your average faithful Catholic could make sense of this. This is very, very disturbing. Well, we've had terrible popes before and we've had heretical popes before. We now have one who's probably the worst, most heretical in the history of the church.

Barack Obama Hitler Eric Metaxas John Smirack Ken Paxton 1930 Bush Dietrich Bonhoeffer 1914 Antonio Spadaro Donald Trump John 1923 Larry Taunton 1940 Facebook Winston Churchill Harvard Google Jesus
A highlight from CAN'T DEFEAT ME - Andrew Tate Motivational Speech

Andrew Tate Motivational Speech

10:34 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from CAN'T DEFEAT ME - Andrew Tate Motivational Speech

"If you were born a hundred years ago and it was the 1920s you'd be in some ditch in northern France Living in the fucking mud hoping not to get killed by a random sniper in some bullshit war You barely understand for four years, then you'd come home and hope your wife hasn't been bombed Yo But that's the word. That's the world. The world has become exceptionally easy for a lot of men It used to be a different different place. Most men were kind of far Most of us would have ended up in wars dying for fucking no reason Now we don't have to do that So because we don't have to do that men think it's okay to just become comfortable now You don't not supposed to be comfortable. You were never evolved to be comfortable You're supposed to be uncomfortable right if you find make yourself uncomfortable constructively. It's very easy to be anything you want I find it amazing that people will sit there and spend all their time upgrading that character Making as much money as they can getting the best guns getting strong getting some hoes meeting important people getting the best car They'll do all that again, but they won't do it in real life. I find that incredible Like I my life is gta I don't need to play a game to gta if I want a gun i'll fucking buy it But what car i'll fucking buy I want bitch o 'gher. It's me. I am gta I don't see why people play the games They play the games because they're scared of loss because if you die in the game you get another chance If you lose in the game, you're getting up for chance in life. You get one shot. Damn. That's what you get some balls If you get some balls That's what life is is a game. That's what life is is a man This is one big video game you get to upgrade your character you're not born with any value All these women that you just put me on with are born with value. They're pretty already. They're gorgeous already They're good looking enough Even if there are five someone's going to give a shit they exist because someone wants to fuck them As a man, if you don't make yourself valuable, you have no value You have to get up and do it just like a video game you start with fucking zero You have to decide if you want to complete you have to upgrade your character So I find it amazing that men are going to play video games and fuck about and waste their time instead of upgrading their character Everyone knows what to do. You know what you have to do, right? If you hadn't become the most dangerous intelligent respectable man on the planet, you know You're supposed to go to the gym, you know, you're supposed to train learn how to fight, you know, you know all these things You don't do them. That's your just that's your decision. It's your prerogative. I didn't I didn't make that choice I made the choice to do it all I decided all of them And every single man watching this can do the exact same thing, which is why I have very little pain I'd never make fun of someone who hasn't got a choice. I wouldn't make fun of someone born with I have a choice though but if you if you've made a fucking To be less than you should be Then I believe you should be mocked for that. I agree Yeah, because like you're not living up to your full potential like it's your choice to basically not live up to your full potential Completely and me as a man when I put myself through hell When I have had such exacting such stringent standards for myself Why would I then have less exacting stringent standards on the people I meet? Why would I put myself through hell? To be me and then meet someone who didn't put themselves through hell and then treat them like my equal. No, fuck you I suffered when you didn't so you're not my equal because you decided not to suffer You have enjoyed comfort when I haven't and that's fine But don't expect me to look at you as my equal because you're not i'll snap your fucking neck When I tell people that you are the sum of the five people you spend the most time with everyone agrees they go Yeah, that's probably true the people the five people you spend the most time with that's what you're gonna end up like they say Yeah, that's true And then they continue to hang around with people who they don't want to be Why? You had there has to be a point there has to be a point where you sit and go Okay, you're my friends etc. Etc. I love you guys. Yeah, we can talk whatever but i'm on a different life path You have to leave some people behind You wouldn't want to be if you were to come hang out with me and you're in a room with me and my five friends You'd feel you'd feel self -conscious. You're right. You don't feel so with your friends because you only so you don't you you only you only Surround yourself around people that are on like your level of like with viewers I'm with killers. We're fucking monsters If you were to come hang around with me and my crew you would be self -conscious and that self -consciousness Would motivate you or they would certainly instill the discipline required for you to change You don't feel self -conscious amongst your peers. That's why you don't change If you were to get in a room and you're the only person who ain't a fucking monster you'd want to become a monster That's life. That's humanity So I say this to people all the time If you know, you're the sum of the five people you hang around with why you hang around people you don't want to be Brother does 500 push -ups. I ain't gonna be the bitch in the house. I ain't gonna not do them, right, right So that that's another reason the war room exists my organization The reason it's so competitive is the reason we kick people out you have to fight Even even if they pay you're like, I don't give a fuck get out like get out Doesn't matter everyone pays to join you get kicked out. Anyway, you have to fight to keep your place. That's all That's because that's how life was If we were still in the animal kingdom the lions that you see on tv They weren't just born big lions. They had to fight other lions They had to fight to get that antelope. They had to fight other animals hyenas jackals. They had to fight to be the boss We live in a comfortable world now where people think oh, it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter but you know what? To some degree it does matter. It does matter and i'll tell you who it matters to it matters to your soul And it matters to god. I stand in the mirror with a pure heart I know I am the best version of me that could possibly ever exist. I know that god is proud of me There is nothing that god hates more than sloth and laziness If god were to create a man and that man were to sit around and do fuck all god will frown upon you It's why you're never lucky If you're listening to this and you think i'm never lucky i'll tell you why because god dislikes you because you're fucking lazy Start to work start to show god the beauty of his own creations. You'd be amazed how lucky you'll become God is unhappy with these people And inside their hearts, they're unhappy We talk about depression anxiety all those things you mentioned earlier on this podcast that comes from self -loathing You load your own weakness you load your own laziness. This is what all of these things are. I don't feel depression How can I feel depression when i'm the most powerful version of me that I could ever fucking be? How can I feel depression when I can squeeze my own hand hard enough to break my own bones? How can I feel depression when i've smashed and destroyed 68 people's faces in front of me? Men who thought they could test me in fair combat. How can I feel depressed? It's impossible Watch your friends when they're on tik tok How long can they even focus on a video before they have to change half a second a second? All of your minds are broken you can't even focus on anything anymore You are constantly distracted to the point where you can't even appreciate the good things in your life You're distracted your minds are broken you need to rewire your mind and resist the slave programming how they approach I'll tell you how First thing you have to do is identify it. You have to identify what is happening to you I use my mind To break the trap What I do is I allow my enemy to manipulate me on purpose And then I use my mind to break the trap and punish the perpetrators I will sit on tik tok for a day And i'll just enjoy tik tok and by the end of the day i'll watch myself How fucked how quickly i'm looking to be entertained how little time I give a video how fucked up I am And then i'll blink and i'll cure my fucking brain You must allow yourself to be manipulated and you must fix it all of it You just talked about not appreciating the things you have then blink and cure your brain So It's not difficult there's just no competition because everybody's fucking distracted They're getting distracted by this distracted by that watching fucking netflix jerking off to pornhub like fucking jackasses It's so easy to win If you can control your own mind, but it seems nobody fucking can And that's how the people who run the world keep the world running because they have all the slaves exactly where they need them to be Permanently distracted and semi -depressed working their asses off in jobs, which will never satisfy them and never pay enough money. That's the matrix I I can't imagine a mind frame or a mindset where I want to do something and can't do it Right, so it's it's it's almost difficult for me to answer that question because if you have that kind of mind If your mind is so fundamentally broken that you cannot do with your own mind what you want to do, right? You know like that then you're then you're just fucked right life is hierarchical There's always going to be kings and there's always going to be peasants If you have a mind that you can't control then you're never going to be a king. You're going to be a peasant That's your life. You have a peasant's life ahead of you and that's your that's your destiny. Enjoy right, there's always been peasants that's life, but I I believe that I mean the most important thing you can do as a man Is to gain control of your own is to gain control of your mind Once you have control of your mind life is so ridiculously easy It's it's so ridiculously easy It's so easy to be and people say to me tate you're in good shape But all you do is drink vodka and travel the world. You're never even home. You never even have a gym How do you do it? It's ridiculously easy if you control your mind If I decide to do a thousand push -ups, i'll do them maybe I have to do them one at a time Maybe i'll get tired. Maybe I need a break I'm going to do a thousand because I said i'm going to do a thousand. It's not fucking hard Everyone knows what they're supposed to do Once you control your mind, it's easy right getting over a breakup with that bitch You miss that girl you're upset you miss her with all your heart But once you realize she's gone if you control your mind, she's gone now It's gone now i'm gonna miss her. That's a shame off to the gym But like you either control your mind or you don't And then this all of these things stem from the same problem It's something you can do. It's something that is learned something that is taught But it's it's something that I needed to survive. So for me, it's easy, right? It's all i've ever known But people have like now they don't need it to survive so they never develop the skill That's just how it works at the end of world war ii when men seen seen When men went to europe and saw unspeakable horrors at the end of world war ii Did they all come home and need therapy or did they all come home and get back to life? Get back to life? Because because that was everyone was taught to have a mind that they control because they needed to survive There's no one else that's how life worked back then Do what i'm supposed to do wow Uh, it's it's not a matter of how I feel or how i'm motivated if I was depressed It's impossible, but if I was depressed My life would be and the day -to -day activities would be exactly the same as if I was exactly happy You wouldn't be able to see a difference. I'd be up at the same time I'd be in the gym the same i'd be doing the same shit It's those are my duties as my duties to god.

Five Four Years Five Friends Five People Europe 68 People World War One Shot GTA Northern France A Hundred Years Ago Netflix A Thousand Pornhub One Big Video Game 1920S Zero First Thing ONE Half A Second A Second
A highlight from S13 E02: Writer's Path: New Book Release Discussion

The Aloönæ Show

24:58 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from S13 E02: Writer's Path: New Book Release Discussion

"Hello, welcome to The Loney Show. I'm your host, John Lee Loney. In this episode, don't have regulars because reasons, as always. As for our guest, she's from Houston, Texas, and she does Houston, Texas, I guess. Well, she's also an author, just to make it clear. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Saborna Roy Chowdhury. Hi, thank you so much for inviting me. This is an honor. And I, as you said, I do live in Houston, Texas, but I'm also an author. And I wrote two books. My first book was called The Distance, which came out in 2013. And more recently, my second book was published by a good, you know, small publisher, Houston based publisher, and called Black Rose Writing. And the name of my second novel is Everything Here Belongs to You. Oh, nice, nice. Thank you. Welcome. And how long have you been an author for? So actually, by profession, I'm a chemist, and I teach chemistry in community college. But around 2004, you know, I was in between jobs and looking for something to do. And I decided, I decided to take a workshop, you know, I used to live in Boston at that time. And there's a very great writing workshop in Boston called The Grub Street. And I took a workshop, you know, short story writing workshop from one of the teachers there. And the beautiful thing about this teacher was he gave us a great writing prompt, he said, you know, I'm going to switch off the light and step outside. And you guys go into deep meditation for at least five minutes. And then when I come back, and I switch on the light, you will pick up the pen, and you will start writing whatever comes to your mind. And you're not going to stop yourself, you're not going to edit yourself. If you see any images, you're going to write about that character. So when he did that, you know, when he switched the light back on, I saw the image of a girl. And I instantly recognize that girl, she was kind of very, very thin emaciated, you know, she had a lot of beads and strings on her body. She was, she had this deep, you know, sad eyes. And I recognize that girl. And I remembered that girl from years ago, you know, when I was child, she used to work at my aunt's place in in in India. And so that character came to me, and I did not stop myself, I picked up my pen, and I just started to write about her. And then it grew into a short story. My very first short story called Bengal Bansun. And when it came to sharing it with the rest of the class, you know, at Grub Street, I was really terrified because here I was, you know, a chemistry teacher. And all of a sudden, I write a short story, and I have to share it in front of my whole class. So I did read it very hesitantly. But you know, most of the class was very appreciative, they really liked it. They gave me great feedback. And most importantly, the teacher said, you need to send this out, you need to send out your work. So I sent it off to a publication, you know, the only one I sent it out to it was called New York stories. I sent them my very first short story. And I heard back from them right away. They said they want to publish my short story. So this was really surprising to me. And this is how my journey started. And later on this, the short story was nominated for a push cut price. So that's when I knew, you know, that I like writing. Wow. Very good. Nice. Thank you. Welcome. And are there any more books that you're in the process of writing? Yes. Well, the one I just finished, and the one that just came out, I'm trying to promote that. And it's called Everything Here Belongs to You. And strangely enough, you know, in between, I wrote another book called The Distance. But this the short story that I was just talking to you about the Bengal Mansoon one, never really left me. So that girl, you know, the girl with the big eyes, she had a problem. She had her father come in every single month from the village and take away all her money. And, you know, she used to come and complain to my aunt. And she used to say, my father is using me like a bank. He's taking away all my money. I don't know what to do. And my aunt was, you know, my aunt is a good person. She really wanted to help this girl. But there was nothing she could do. She, other than consoling her, there was nothing she could do to help out this girl. And then something really terrible happened. One morning at six o 'clock, my aunt was calling her name. She was asking her to come down. She used to live in the girl used to sleep in the terrace room. And the girl was not coming down. So my aunt went upstairs to look for her and found the girl hanging. And she was she was hanging from the ceiling. She had used her sari as like a noose. And my aunt tried to revive her. You know, her body was still warm. My aunt tried her best to bring her back, but she couldn't. And then the father came back from the village and blamed my aunt for for killing this girl. And, you know, the whole the slum came down to our house and started to break everything. So, you know, this this story, even though I captured most of it in Bengal monsoon, I felt like I had not done justice to the whole story. And the girl and her father were not leaving me. And they were still hunting me. So there was something incomplete there. And so even after I finished my first novel, those images did not go away. And I thought that I should expand the story and I should complete the story and I should bring those characters back. So I just I just made the girl a Muslim in my second book. And I continue with the story. You know, the this helpless girl whose father comes every single month and takes away all her salary and she's hopeless. She has no future. Everything is dark around her. She doesn't know where to go. She feels trapped. And that's how I came to write my second novel, Everything Here Belongs to You, which is right now available in the bookstores and on Amazon. All right, then. Very good. So where do you see yourself 20 years from now? 20 years from now. I would like to say I wrote 20 books, but that's not going to happen because each book for me, you know, takes a very, very long time. The distance did not take that much time distance. I think I took only three to four years to write. But my second book, Everything Here Belongs to You, I wrote it for five years. And then I met my agent, Julie Stevenson, you know, from M .M. Q .L .T., M .M. Q. Lit. And asked she me to edit my book. And this editing process went on for three years. So she asked me to make, you know, major changes like change the POV. OK, from omniscient narrator to close third person, then write it chronologically. Make sure you have a very close connection between the sisters from the beginning. You know, major changes change the tense of the novel. So this went on and on. And so that took three years. So that was a total of eight years to write my second novel. So if this is the way I write, I don't think in 20 years I'll accomplish much. It could be worse, to be honest. It could be worse, to be honest. Yeah, I have friends who wrote. Sorry, I think my phone is talking. So, yeah, I have friends who wrote a novel for 20 years. So, yeah, if you if you want to do something perfectly, I guess you have to put in the time. Yeah, absolutely. How did you spend? Sorry, go on. No, so that's that's my 20 year plan to write. Very good. How did you spend your last birthday? My last birthday? Eating cake? Yeah. No. Yeah, I don't focus much on birthdays. My family does. My family definitely made sure that I cut my cake. Yeah. But if I'm writing a book, I'm usually so immersed in the fictional world that I don't pay much attention to what is going on in my real life. All right, then. What is your favorite quote? Oh, my goodness. I don't have one on the top of my head. Do I have to answer this? I mean, you don't have to. Yeah. So go on with the flow. Okay. Okay, I'll take that. Yes, then. If you could create your own job title, what would it be? I would be a full time author. I don't want to do anything else. I think the most meaningful thing we do in life is right. Because I'm able to give voice to, you know, the most voiceless people, the most neglected people, people who cannot defend themselves, who don't get justice, if I'm able to bring them to the forefront, and I'm able to make them make other people visualize them and understand their pain and understand their sorrow, and I'm able to give them justice. That is the most important thing I can do. That's very good. What is the best way to start the morning? I would say, well, there's a real answer, and then there is a hopeful answer. The real answer is I get my girls ready for school, and that's not a peaceful process. So I'm rushing them, I'm pushing them, I'm trying to get them on the school bus, and my mornings are not peaceful or restful enough. However, if I were living, I were, you know, living my ideal life, I would love to wake up and do a long meditation. And I would like to connect to my subconscious and see who is plaguing me, who is bothering me, who is sitting in there, and I would draw out those characters and I would talk to them and I would put them down on the page. And that would be the peaceful start of a morning, to be able to write, you know, at least two to three pages without interruption, without the phone ringing, without the internet, without having to communicate with the outside world, just to be able to write and meditate. That's my ideal life. Very good. Would you rather sleep on the wall or sleep on the ceiling? Sleep on the wall or sleep on the ceiling? I've never heard a question like that before. I would sleep on the ceiling, yeah. Yes, that's a good option. Yeah, because I can see the world from the top, right? I have a larger and bigger and wider perspective of things. And I basically, you know, when I wrote my first novel, I mean, the second novel, sorry, I used omniscient narrator, and that's kind of your place on the ceiling, because you get to see everyone, what they're doing. If they're doing mean things, bad things, you know, hiding things from you, have secrets, you basically have a view of every single character in that room or in that house, right, if you're on the ceiling. So I would definitely want the ceiling position. But my agent says I should write in close third person. Intriguing. Yes. Oh, yes. Very good. Would you ever try space tourism? Actually not. Especially today, you know, today in the news, did you see how this vessel tried to go in the depths of the ocean and never came back? It was blown away. So I'm very, very nervous about getting into claustrophobic places and where I have no control, and other people taking me, you know, promising me things, making me sign papers and taking me places. And then I do not know if I'll make it back. And there's a lot to do on Earth. Itself, right? There's a lot to improve right here. I don't need to go to space. Yes, that's a very good point. You'll never know what life hits at you. Yes. What fictional item do you wish you owned in real life? What fictional item? Do you wish you owned in real life? Let me think about this. And it's a fictional item. It's not a real one. My daughters will tell you a lot about Harry Potter things that they want to own. Fictional item. Can you give me an example of fictional items? Well, you said your daughters like Harry Potter, so possibly a magic wand, then there's lightsabers from Star Wars, a couple of video game items like the mega mushroom from Super The magic wand sounds very attractive because when I cannot wake them up in the morning to go to school, I can always be the magic wand and make them do things for me, right? I mean, every mother wishes she had a magic wand and she could control her children. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Where do you spend most of your free time? First of all, being a teacher, a mother and a writer, I have no free time. But I to write, I do go to a coffee shop and I can only write in a coffee shop because it kind of takes away the pressure of writing. It kind of takes away, you know, the fear of writing because I have so many people surrounding me and there is this chatter, this laughter, this camarade, you know, the smell of coffee. Everything takes away that extreme pressure of having to accomplish something or to finish something or to get something done. And I'm able to relax in a coffee shop and actually do some writing. And then, of course, when you come back home, that reality strikes and that you'd have so many chores to do and so many other things you have to get done, right? And so the coffee shop is my escape. OK, I can see that. This is a question from the very top of my head. Have you heard of a drink called banana friche? Banana friche? Banana friche? Friche? Yeah. Have you heard of it? I have never heard of a drink banana friche, no. I get that a lot from a lot of people. It's understandable. So do you want me to try it out or? Sorry, what is the question? So I asked you, have you heard of a drink called banana friche? No. Oh, that's all right, because I get that every time. Yeah, something from that came from the top of my head. Sure. Yeah. Would you rather? If you recommend it to me, if you recommend me the drink, I'll definitely try it. I do not know where to get it from. Well, well, it's a concept at first, but maybe a few years down the line, it can become a thing. So, yes. So definitely, when it becomes a thing, I'll give it a try. All right, very good. Would you rather not be able to open any closed doors or not be able to close any open doors? Both. I don't want to close any open doors for anyone who is a minority and needs those open doors. And so what was the first part again? So I asked you, would you rather not to open closed doors or not be able to close open doors? Yeah, so second part, I don't want to close any open doors for people who need it. Yes, very good, because there's opportunities in front of you. You must seize it. That's true. Yes. But, you know, be inclusive as well. I mean, you don't want to seize it just for yourself, but you seize it for everyone else. Yes, everyone is free to open and enter the door. Yes, the door should not be closed for anyone. Exactly. What's your favorite season? Spring, because I cannot tolerate the heat. I live in a place called Houston, Texas, and it does get extremely hot. And when it gets hot like that, you know, it's hard to function. So spring here is beautiful. You know, the flowers bloom and the birds come out the usual spring thing. And so and we can all go for long walks. So spring definitely is beautiful in Texas. All right, then. Nice. If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be? So I would go back to India. Right now, I live in Houston, Texas. So let me tell you this in a more poetic manner. Give me one second. So basically, I grew up in Kolkata, India. Can you still hear me? Yeah, I can still hear you. Okay, so I grew up in Kolkata, India, and I grew up in a middle class Hindu family. And, you know, I mean, if you read my second novel, I featured the house I grew up in in this in this novel. And, and like, like the characters in my novel, you know, I used to live in this hundred year old house with my extended family, with my aunts, uncles and cousins. So because it was a hundred year old house, and it was it was like a crumbling mansion, and it had two wings and two floors, but there was no one to take care of this house. So years of neglect, you know, had left this house in very poor condition. My house had, you know, cracked tiles on the floor and yellowing walls and broken windows, everything needed repair. And during the monsoon season, you know, water dripped from the roof and and we had, you to collect the water, and everything had to be covered, you know, our antique furniture, our paintings, our encyclopedias, our photographs, everything had to be covered with plastic sheets. And so it was really hard for us to maintain this house, you know, there was like spiders behind the clothes horse and termite mud piles that went up the walls. And, you know, all the grandfather clocks that just kept on chiming at wrong hours. And if you looked at the skylight holes, you would see pigeons nesting there. Then when I turned 19, I left Kolkata and I came to America and I settled down here. Right. I came as a student. I finished my chemistry degrees. And finally, you know, I got my job in Houston. I settled down here. But I left behind this house, this house, which is full of history and, you know, my childhood tales. And I and somehow this house still remains alive inside me and it shows up in my book, especially in my second book, I would say this house is my main main backdrop of my second book. And now, you know, I have a relatively comfortable life. I live in the suburbs of Houston now. Here, you know, I have a wooden house which has central air conditioning and it has modern appliances. I have, you know, carpet that covers all the floors and I have, you know, all my walls are really well painted. I have modern furniture. I have a spacious living room. Every every week we have lawnmowers who come to trim our lawns and prune the bushes and, you know, our driveway and sidewalk looks so clean. They almost like they glisten like glass. And my existence right now in Houston is very neat, tidy, comfortable, hygienic, whatever you want to look at it. But unfortunately, whenever I pick up my pen to write either a short story or a novel or a poem, I I don't write about the suburbs of Houston. I still find myself, you know, going back to that old mansion that I left behind in Kolkata and I'm still pining away for for what I left behind. So I don't think, you know, as I age, this nostalgia will go away and somehow I will I will end up living living in that old house again years later. OK, I can see that. Sorry for the very long answer. That's all right. I enjoy it. It's fabulous. Thank you. You're welcome. What kind of music do you often listen to? I don't know if I am a Bengali and we have a Nobel laureate, author, songwriter. His name is Rabindranath Tagore. And I used to learn his songs. I used to learn his music and I still listen to that. I just I listen to Tagore songs all the time. It calms me down. And once once again, it connects me back home. It's part of my nostalgia. Very good. When things break, do you prefer to fix them or replace them? I always try to fix them. I hold on to old things. You must have guessed that by now. And I have a very hard time throwing away things because all your old things have a memory. And as writers, when we when we when we touch things, old photos, old albums, even, you know, somebody's glasses or somebody's shawl, we feel things in our fingers and then something can become can become a spark for a new project. So, yes, I repair things and I keep things and I grab onto things and I hold onto things and I don't want to let them go. My husband is opposite. He's a neat, tidy person. And he would rather get rid of things and clean up the house. And he's an engineer by profession. So you can see that we have completely different personalities.

Julie Stevenson 2013 John Lee Loney Rabindranath Tagore Kolkata Boston Two Books 20 Books Three Years Eight Years Today Star Wars Second Book India America Five Years Texas 20 Year First Book First Novel
A highlight from Episode 62: I went to Lourdes! // Marian Apparitions & Miraculous Healings

Let's Talk About It

06:36 min | Last month

A highlight from Episode 62: I went to Lourdes! // Marian Apparitions & Miraculous Healings

"Hey, welcome back to Let's Talk About It with Jackie and Megan. We like to talk about things that are messy, awkward, hard, or controversial, and create a space for healing. Well, welcome to... is this season five? Yeah, I don't actually, I don't know. I think it is, yeah. We only loosely keep track. Yeah, we loosely keep track at this point, but I feel like a lot of big podcasters, they don't even do seasons anymore, they just like record whenever they can. Today we're talking about that I went to Lourdes, which we hinted at last episode. Yeah, how was it there? It was great. I think before we share this episode, well, maybe along with sharing it, I'll share some of my pictures on our podcast Instagram, so you should go over there if you don't follow us, but it was kind of everything I expected and not what I expected. I don't know how to explain it. I had not seen any pictures of it besides the actual grotto where Mary appeared to Bernadette, so I knew what that looked like because you see pictures of that everywhere, but I had not really looked at pictures of Lourdes because I just wanted to not have expectations. I think I said before, I just want to go into this without expectations, and I kind of want to let God just do whatever he's going to do while I'm there because I don't want to be disappointed or, I don't know, I don't want to have a lot of expectations. I didn't even look at any pictures of Lourdes, but Lourdes was so much more beautiful than I even expected. It's up in the Pyrenees Mountains, so it's surrounded by mountains, which are just absolutely gorgeous. Meghan, you've been to Greece and you've been to mountains, and I just feel like there's just no way to describe. And then just the way that European cities look is just so beautiful, and I just think Europe is so much more beautiful than the United States. It just is. We have beautiful places with mountains and such, but just the town and everything around it and the culture, I don't know. Maybe it's just because I'm also not familiar with it, but it's just so great to me. But yeah, it was beautiful. And the church there is ridiculous. The cathedral at Lourdes, which yeah, we'll share a lot of pictures, but in the cathedral, which basically looks like if you walk into Disneyland, it kind of looks like the castle at Disneyland. And so there's the joke that Lourdes is like Catholic Disneyland because it's just so gorgeous and it kind of looks like a palace, the church there. And that was one of my favorite moments when I walked into Lourdes the first time. We got to the hotel first the night before, and then we walked down to the actual shrine, and just walking down and seeing it for the first time, I walked in with my friend and I was literally just hitting him on the arm because I was so excited and it was so beautiful. Yeah, there's like five churches in this one church. There's like, on the lower level, you can walk up and there's stairs and you can walk in, and there's this beautiful cathedral. I think it's the biggest of all the cathedrals. And then on either side, there's like, from either the bottom, you can go up this set of stairs to go toward like the top, or on the side, there's like two giant ramps that you like can go up, and you can get to the top, and there's a bottom door you can go in that's one cathedral, and there's a set of two little stairs above that door where you could go in and then go in, and there's a different church. And at the very top one, there's two side chapels off to the side before you would walk into the main church. So there's like five churches in this one giant church, and I don't know the history exactly of like how long it took, because I'm assuming it took a long time, to like build an add -on and all of that. I don't know exactly how long all of that took, but yeah, that was super cool. And we went with a Catholic priest, he's the one that led the pilgrimage, and he's one of, there's like a thousand priests that are like official priests of the shrine in Lourdes, and he's one of them because he's been going there for so long, so he got that status. So we were able to say to have Mass said in different parts of the cathedral, so yeah, I don't know. It's like, it's really hard to explain unless you've been there, but it's yeah, it's definitely very beautiful and stunning, and I had a great time, which I guess I'll talk all about in this episode, so stay tuned. So for someone like me who did not grow up with many Catholics, I'm not super familiar with a lot of the like Marian apparitions or anything, like really until I think I was friends with you, I didn't even know it was a thing. So for someone listening who's maybe in a similar position, what is the significance and the history of Lourdes? Okay, so I guess I can start with that. So I'm gonna go to my notes here because I don't want to mess it up. This region of France, which where Lourdes is, was a strategic stronghold during medieval times, and it's like situated at the foot of the Pyrenees, which I talked about, and the medieval castle of Lourdes provided protection against foreign forces. So this was like a very significant part of France. During the Hundred Years War, the French captured this region from the English in 1406 after an 18 -month siege. The medieval castle was used as a state prison from the reign of Louis the 14th, so that's something interesting. So in 1858, basically when we believe that Mary appeared to Bernadette, it was still known as a military and state stronghold. So like this place that now has been turned into like this very religious town before was a military and like state stronghold. So we believe it was in 1858, so I don't know how many years ago that was at this point, a long time, between February 11th and July 16th the Virgin Mary appeared to this young peasant girl named Bernadette. I don't know how to say her last name, it starts with an S, but we'll put it in the show notes. She was a 14 -year -old girl, and we believe that she appeared to her 18 different times. And I won't get into the details of each of those apparitions, but I'll leave a link if you want to like read the story of some of the more significant apparitions.

1858 Mary Meghan 1406 February 11Th Greece United States July 16Th France Louis Pyrenees Mountains Europe 18 -Month Five Churches Jackie ONE Today Disneyland One Cathedral Megan
A highlight from DC26-Bernard-pt1

Audio

29:53 min | Last month

A highlight from DC26-Bernard-pt1

"Discerninghearts .com presents The Doctors of the Church, the Carerism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. For over 20 years, Dr. Bunsen has been active in the area of Catholic social communications and education, including writing, editing, and teaching on a variety of topics related to church history, the papacy, the saints, and Catholic culture. He is the faculty chair at the Catholic Distance University, a senior fellow of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology, and the author or co -author of over 50 books, including the Encyclopedia of Catholic History and the best -selling biographies of St. Damien of Malachi and St. Kateri Tekakawisa. He also serves as a senior editor for the National Catholic Register and is a senior contributor to EWTN News. The Doctors of the Church, the Carerism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. I'm your host, Chris McGregor. Welcome, Dr. Bunsen. Great to be with you, Chris. I'm really looking forward to talking about our next doctor, St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Tell us why he's really quite special in the rankings of the doctors. Well, he's known as the Doctor Malifluous. He's known as the Ophthalmaturgist. In other words, he's a healer and a miracle worker. He was also kind of one of those doctors that was all -encompassing for his era, but who also imparted then important lessons for us today. He was a reformer who helped build the Cistercian Order, who helped reform much of monastic life. He was also a brilliant theologian who defended the teachings of the Church. He had a particular devotion to the Blessed Mother. But there's also one other thing that we're going to talk about, and that, of course, was his impact on the society of his time. And it came, as we're going to see, especially where the Second Crusade was concerned, at great price to him personally. And that's one of the other hallmarks of the Doctors of the Church. We always think of them as brilliant, as magnificent writers and theologians, but they were also saints. They were also people who put themselves totally at the service of Christ and his Church. And there, I think, was one of the areas where St. Bernard of Clairvaux really shined forth across the medieval sky, but it's a brightness that we can still see today. Help us to understand a term like mellifluous. What we mean by mellifluous is somebody who is perfectly capable of speaking, who's gifted as an orator, who is a brilliant speaker. Somebody who, we always say that the words just seem to roll off their tongue. Well, that certainly was St. Bernard. But there's also implied in the use of the term mellifluous, a smoothness, an elegance. Now, it's something of an apparent contradiction to think of somebody who lived a life of such severe austerity as St. Bernard of Clairvaux as being elegant. And yet, his theology, his mind, his love for the Church were indeed very elegant. He had a beautiful turn of phrase. He had a way of expressing himself that was indeed intellectually elegant. So mellifluous, I think, really works quite well when we're discussing a Doctor of the Church like this. What do we know of his upbringing? Well, we know that he was born into a noble family. And he, in France, he was born probably around 1090 to a very prominent family. His father, in fact, was a nobleman, a lord of what was known as Fontaine. His name was Tesselyn and his mother was named Alith of Mont Barde. They were part of Burgundy. So when we think of France, we think of the Burgundy region as creating these beautiful wines, the Burgundy wine. Burgundy, during this time, was emerging onto the French scene and then the European scene as one of the most prominent of the great duchies in medieval Europe. It was positioned sort of between France and Germany, but then the Burgundians would also influence the great and terrible Hundred Years' War in a couple of centuries. So the family itself enjoyed quite a bit of prominence, which meant that Bernard, as one of seven children, was given the opportunity for a great education. He was then sent to a very prominent school of chatillon that was run by a group of canons. And he quickly showed himself very capable of great learning. He enjoyed poetry. He had a skill, an aptitude for literature. And he demonstrated that ability to speak well, to be mellifluous. And he had two interesting devotions. The first was a great love of the Bible, and then the other was a particular devotion to the Blessed Mother that was going to carry him forward for the rest of his life. What led him into the Benedictine Order? Yeah. Well, Bernard himself always had a rather low opinion of himself. He was tempted by the great opportunities of life, by the temptations of the flesh, but also of the mind. He was somebody who probably would have excelled, and boy we have seen this with so many of the Doctors of the Church, he could have excelled at anything he chose to do. He could have become a very, very powerful and prominent leader in the secular world, in the world of the nobility of the time. He understood that about himself though, and I think his mother had a great deal to do with that. His mother helped ingrain in him an abiding love of the faith. And when she died, when he was 19 years old, he understood that he was being called to something else. And as we have seen with other Doctors of the Church, he felt called by Christ to escape the world, to live a life of prayer, of solitude, of contemplation. And so, in order to control himself, he used the phrase that he was aware that his body needed strong medicine. And what he meant by that was that he needed strong spiritual medicine. He turned himself over to the Benedictine order. Now, as it happens, when Bernard was only 8 years old, a very famous saint at the time, named Robert of Mollem, had founded, near the great French city of Dijon, what was known as the Abbey of Citeaux. This was the foundation of the Cistercians. Their objective was very simple, to restore the rule of Saint Benedict. Now, there's no implication that the great house, for example, of Cluny, that was the dominant institution of the time from monasticism, was corrupt. Rather, it simply did not have the same devotion to the rigor of the rule of Saint Benedict that there were some who felt it needed to have. Robert of Mollem was one of them. So, the Cistercian monastery really looked to recapture the vigor of the original rule of Saint Benedict. And it began attracting many people, many young men, who also sought what Bernard was seeking. And, as it happened, in 1113, another saint, by the name of Stephen Harding, became abbot of Citeaux. And Bernard arrived, along with a group of other young noblemen, who followed him from Burgundy and the surrounding regions, with a desire to enter the Cistercians. And Bernard proved himself, really from the very beginning, a most apt postulant. And he found his true life in Citeaux, in the Cistercians. And it was clear, in short order, that the Cistercians saw in him somebody with almost unlimited potential. You mentioned his great love for scripture. He's known for some of the most beautiful teachings, from one book in particular of the Bible, that being the Song of Songs. Yes, yes. What's interesting about his love of scripture is that he was able to reflect on scripture, but how did he do it? He did it through a series of sermons, in particular, as you note, on the Song of Songs. Now, the Song of Songs is one of the most controversial, so to speak, of the texts of scripture, of the books of the Bible, because so many people interpret it in almost exclusively sensual terms. And yet, here we have Bernard preaching on this beautiful book of the Old Testament. And for him, it was not just simply a rhetorical device to use sermons, but it was a way of imparting to every possible audience some of his most important teachings. And so we have, aside from his sermons on the Song of Songs, we also have in excess of a hundred sermons that he delivered throughout the year, throughout the liturgical year. And then he gave sermons as well on a variety of other subjects, and then of course we also have his letters. We'll be talking more, I know, about his writings in a little bit. What are some of those marks of those early years in his involvement with the Cistercians, or his living out that Cistercian call? We know, as I said, that Bernard was acutely aware of his own failings, of his own temptations, and the need, as he said, for strong medicine. The environment, Cistercian with its stress on prayer, on contemplatio, on contemplative prayer, on discipline of the monastic life, on the full embrace of not just the rigor, but also the deep humanity of the Benedictine rule, of the rule of St. Benedict, I think had a really profound influence on him. He was able to control himself, to focus his mind as he needed to have it focused. And within a short amount of time, I mean, consider that he entered around 1113, what happened within three years. He was chosen by the Cistercians to set out and do something that was almost impossible to imagine at the time. This young man was sent out to establish a new house, and it became the great founding of Clairvaux. Now, where he was sent was in the Diocese of Langres in France, in what was called the Valley of Desolation. It gives us a little visual of what we're actually talking about. This was a virtual swamp where they chose to establish this new community. And this is around 1115. And it soon became a place of almost ceaseless toil. But imagine trying to convert a swamp into a new community of religious life, and yet this is exactly what Bernard was able to accomplish. But he did it with austerity, with prayer, with almost ceaseless toil, and that took its toll on him. And always of a somewhat frail disposition, he consistently embraced austerity to the point that he wrecked much of his health, but he saw it as a worthy gift in order to get this institution of Clairvaux up and running. Now what you've just described sounds so unappealing. We're really honest with ourselves, and yet it attracted so many to the extent that it would thrive. Yes, that's the thing precisely. The harder the life was at Clairvaux, the more people seemed to be attracted to it. Now, it's not a sense of, oh, I want to embrace suffering. What it is, rather, is I want to conform my life to what the Cistercians, what Clairvaux had to offer. Think about the Sons of Nobility, who a century from now would be joining the mendicant orders of the Dominicans and especially the Franciscans. We're seeing a similar impulse toward a lifestyle of the rejection of the self, of giving up everything we have, picking up their cross and following Christ. This was the appeal of Clairvaux. This was the appeal of the Cistercians. And it was accomplished. Why? Because Bernard was able to create an environment that, yes, it was difficult, there was work and toil for everyone. But two things. One, that prayer life, but also the joy. The valley, which had once been called a place of desolation, a valley of desolation, soon acquired the title of the Valley of Light. Why? Because it was a place of prayer. It was a place of joy. And young men in growing numbers came to Clairvaux to embrace that life, but also to place themselves under the spiritual direction of Bernard. Among them were Bernard's brothers. His father, after the death of his mother, of course, embraced this life. And even his sister, Humboldtine, remained out in the world and yet she eventually, with the permission of her husband, became a Benedictine nun. This is the influence of Bernard. Bernard's brother Gerard became the master of the cellars of the Cistercians. And, of course, what soon happened, this small community of Clairvaux was bursting at the seams. They simply had no more room for the young men. So, they themselves then went out and found, established new houses, new Cistercian communities based on the model that Bernard had established at Clairvaux. And by the time of his death, more than 160 new establishments were flourishing across, not just France, but increasingly across the whole of Christendom. And if we want a testament as to what the Church thought of all of this, one of the Popes came for a visit one night and he was asked, Bernard was asked, to make it possible for the Pope to dine at Clairvaux. And he certainly gave what was a very warm welcome to the Pope and the whole papal court. Well, what was the meal? It was a humble meal of bread and a few fish. The analogy, of course, being very obvious to the Pope. Wine was not really served, but rather he received water that was filled with herbs to give it some taste. So, in other words, the Pope came to this monastery and he was not served a feast. He was given loaves in the fishes and a cup of bitter herbs. And yet, the Pope was grateful and found the entire experience to be so powerfully edifying that it confirmed once again Bernard's value to the Church, but also his value to the Popes. And that was something that many Popes availed themselves of. We'll return in just a moment to The Doctors of the Church, the terrorism of wisdom with Dr. Matthew Monson. Did you know that Discerning Hearts has a free app where you can find all your favorite Discerning Hearts programming? Father Timothy Gallagher, Dr. Anthony Lillis, Monsignor John S. of Deacon James Keating, Father Donald Haggerty, Mike Aquilina, Dr. Matthew Monson and so many more. They're all available on the free Discerning Hearts app. Over 3 ,000 spiritual formation programs and prayers, all available to you with no hidden fees or subscriptions. Did you also know that you can listen to Discerning Hearts programming wherever you download your favorite podcasts, like Apple Podcasts, Google Play, iHeartRadio, Spotify, even on Audible, as well as numerous other worldwide podcast streaming platforms? And did you know that Discerning Hearts also has a YouTube channel? Be sure to check out all these different places where you can find Discerning Hearts Catholic podcasts, dedicated to those on the spiritual journey. A prayer of St. Ignatius of Loyola Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will, all that I have and call my own. You have given all to me. To you, Lord, I return it. Everything is Yours. Do with it what You will. Give me only Your love and Your grace. That is enough for me. Amen. Show your support for Discerning Hearts by liking and leaving positive reviews on your favorite streaming platforms, such as Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, and more. With a collection of insightful podcasts led by renowned Catholic spiritual guides such as Father Timothy Gallagher, Monsignor John S .F., Dr. Anthony Lillis, and more, Discerning Hearts is your gateway to a deeper understanding of discerning life's mysteries and growing deeper in your relationship with Christ. Your likes and reviews not only affirm the value these podcasts bring to your spiritual journey, but also help others discover the guidance and inspiration they seek. Share your thoughts, spread the word, and be part of a community that's committed to elevating hearts and minds through meaningful conversations. Your feedback fuels our mission to help others climb higher and go deeper in their spiritual growth. Like, review, and let your voice be a beacon of light for fellow seekers on this spiritual journey. We now return to The Doctors of the Church, The Charism of Wisdom, with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. Is it possible for us to underestimate the power of the foundational element in all of this, of the Holy Rule of St. Benedict? And in particular, that very first paragraph, that very first exhortation by Good St. Benedict to listen with the ear of the heart. As you're describing this, that's exactly what Bernard was doing. Yeah, and in that sense we see in Bernard not something extraordinarily new, but something wonderfully old. In the sense that here was a reformer, here was in the great tradition of the church, a reformer who wanted to go back to recapture the original zeal, the fire of St. Benedict. But what was it that was always so remarkably successful about Benedict's rule? To pray, to work. All of these rules of St. Benedict are aimed at bringing the soul to Christ through work, through prayer. But there is this underlying practicality to Benedict's rule. Benedict knew people. He knew humanity. So that the rule itself was able to take a person, form them in Christ, and help them not to become less than they were with rules and other things, but rather through the rule to form them into more fully created humans, living as Christ really wants us to. Authentic freedom in giving up of ourselves for Christ. But in a way that still accommodates human frailty and human weakness, not by catering to it, but by understanding it and forming it. To use that word again, forming an authentic human person. And I think Bernard, while incredibly tough on himself, helped create an environment that was truly faithful to what Benedict had in mind. He's visited by the pope and the papal court. From this point forward, he becomes quite a, can we say, influential person within the life of the church. Very much so. In Bernard, we have one of those great voices within Christendom. And what did he use his voice for? He always placed it at the service of the popes. He defended the church against secular interference. He worked to diffuse potentially violent situations. Despite the fact that he wanted to stay at Clairvaux, he wanted to give his life exclusively to his monks, to his life of prayer. He was constantly being called out of the monastery to travel, to go forth on behalf of the popes. In 1128, for example, he took part in the Council of Troia that had been convoked by Pope Honorius II. Its was purpose to settle controversies that had developed among some of the bishops in France, as well as to try to make some sense of the ecclesiastical life of the Church of France. The church at the time in France was growing, but it was also being beset by the demands of secular rulers, of the need for internal reform. And what was Bernard given the task of doing? Well, he served as secretary of the council. He was asked to write the statutes of the synod. And as a result of it, one bishop was deposed and a real effort at reform was implemented. It's notable that coming out of this particular synod, though, there were those who did not like him. There were those who found him excessive in his call for reform. There were others in the church who felt that as a monk he had no business interfering in the life of diocese. And in one particular instance, a letter was sent to Bernard describing him as sounding like little more than a noisy and vexatious frog sitting in his marshes. Which of course was a phrase sort of going back to the very origins of Clairvaux. So here was this noisy and difficult frog croaking in the marshes and annoying as this one cardinal wrote the Holy See in the cardinals of the church. Well, of course, Bernard, using his sharp mind, made a reply to this cardinal by the name of Harmeric. And he said that he was the one who was asked by the pope to do this. And so he said, if you wish, forbid the noises of this vexatious frog. Don't allow him to leave his hole, to leave the marshes. And if that's the case, then your friends of the Holy See in the cardinals will not be forced to endure the accusations of pride and presumption that this frog is croaking in their direction. What it did was to diffuse the entire situation. And Bernard actually rose in the estimation of people because it implied two things. It showed that he had a sense of humor, which he did. He was able to do a fraternal correction of a cardinal, but in a way that everyone could appreciate. But it also pointed to his humility. It pointed to the fact that he'd been given these tasks against his will. There were other things that he would rather be doing. And yet he took up that task and he did it exceedingly well. And so in the next years, two years later, what happened? With the death of Pope Honorius, you had a new schism in the church. You had two popes who were rivals and, of course, Bernard entered the fray and helped to settle many of these issues. And then, of course, in the next years, he was so profoundly trusted that he was summoned to the second laddering council in which the schism was decisively put down. In which the rights of the real pope were validated. And then, in the coming years, he was asked by the pope to bring about the second crusade. And this, of course, became one of the great crosses that he was forced to bear. With some of the doctors that we've explored, their lives are so full and their teachings so rich that it takes us sometimes two, maybe even three episodes. And I think this is what we're encountering with St. Bernard of Clairvaux. So in conclusion of this particular conversation on his life, what's a final thought? The final thought is that we can trace in the life of St. Bernard from his earliest days a love of the faith, a desire to serve the faith. But as we have seen consistently with doctors of the church, serving in the way that God wills, not what he would rather do. And he was called, felt deeply the love of the contemplative life, but God had other plans for him. The wider service of the church. And he spent those years, his early years at Clairvaux, serving the church. And he was asked to serve on a wider plane. And he was going to give the rest of his life to that, regardless of the cost. And there, I think, is the lesson for all of us. I look forward to our future conversations, particularly about St. Bernard. So do I. Looking forward to it, Chris. God bless. Thank you.

Chris Stephen Harding Chris Mcgregor Gerard Mike Aquilina France Alith 1113 TWO Tesselyn 1128 Humboldtine Christ Matthew Monson St. Paul Center For Biblical T Robert Of Mollem Bible Bunsen Anthony Lillis Dijon
A highlight from Anita Posch on Why Bitcoin Is a Tool for Freedom  Especially in Africa  - Ep. 531

Unchained

17:23 min | Last month

A highlight from Anita Posch on Why Bitcoin Is a Tool for Freedom Especially in Africa - Ep. 531

"Bitcoin can be one of the solutions for people who are disempowered, who are outlawed, the misfits, you know, basically Bitcoin is for them. Hi, everyone, welcome to Unchained, your no -hype resource for all things crypto. I'm your host, Laura Shin, author of The Cryptopians. I started covering crypto eight years ago, and as a senior editor at Forbes, was the first mainstream media reporter to cover cryptocurrency full time. This is the August 15th, 2023 episode of Unchained. At Token 2049 Singapore on September 13th to 14th, Balaji Sreenivasan, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, Arthur Hayes and 200 others will hit the stage, joining over 10 ,000 attendees. Visit token2049 .com for 65 % off regular ticket prices with the code unchained. Link in the description. Arbitrum's leading layer two scaling solutions can provide you with lightning fast transactions at a fraction of the cost, all while ensuring security rooted on Ethereum. Arbitrum's newest addition, Orbit, enables you to build your own tailor made layer three. Visit arbitrum .io today. Buy, trade and spend crypto on the crypto .com app. New users can enjoy zero credit card fees on crypto purchases in the first seven days. Download the crypto .com app and get $25 with the code Laura. Link in the description. If you've been enjoying Unchained and find the discussions here fascinating, mind blowing or as crypto tends to be downright bonkers, please share this episode with a friend to keep the conversation going. Today's guest is Anita Pausch, Bitcoin educator, founder of Bitcoin for Fairness and author of Learn Bitcoin. Welcome, Anita. Hi, Laura. Thank you very much for the invitation. I'm honored to be here. I'm excited to have you. You work on so many different things related to Bitcoin. Why don't you just give us an overview of your work? I guess it's almost too much sometimes for my personal life. So, yeah, my main focus is on Bitcoin education, and I founded a nonprofit initiative called Bitcoin for Fairness, which brings knowledge or shares knowledge with people on the ground in the global south. And the last year I spent around eight months in southern African countries to support local initiatives with building Bitcoin communities, meetups, and of course, to share knowledge there and build knowledge on the ground. And two years ago, I published a book called Learn Bitcoin, which is a book for beginners, which basically speeds you up from zero to a self custody Bitcoin holder. So a real Bitcoin holder. And yeah, and besides that, I'm part of the C4 cryptocurrency certification consortium, Bitcoin Professional Committee. So I also help there to establish standards of education and knowledge of Bitcoin for people in the professional space. And at the moment, I'm just building a online learning program. Maybe we can talk about that later. So I do a lot of things. And also I'm testing wallets, for instance, in rural areas in Zimbabwe and see if they are working or not. And yeah, so I try to contribute my part to the Bitcoin adoption and Bitcoin education. And yeah, that's what I actually spend every day on almost. And how did you get into Bitcoin? That was early 2017. And I was working in web development and web platform development and online products for about 20 years, online marketing and build little businesses. I was an entrepreneur and I always had the feeling or I was looking for something that I'm really, really, really interested in. I mean, internet marketing, et cetera. I liked it. I loved it. But then after 20 years, it felt boring. And I also, we built online platforms for designers, for people who have small businesses. So we had something like Etsy in Austria when Etsy wasn't even in Austria. And when we built that tool, I realized how difficult it was back then to let people pay over the internet in your shop. And we had to pay upfront like 3 ,000 euros or something just to get the possibility to do that. So I learned how complicated that is and how much permissions you need, basically, and how much friction is in that system and how expensive it is. And so in 2016, I thought to myself, oh, I want to do something else and something that really makes more sense for the world than just sell stuff. And then I stumbled upon Bitcoin and I was drawn to it because very early, I think I understood because I had a great teacher in Andreas Antonopoulos, for instance, that Bitcoin is a tool for freedom. And it gives people like me, for instance, I'm a lesbian. I was born in Austria, 53 years ago already. And the first 30 years of my life, I didn't have the same rights as all the other people. And also my grandparents came from Bohemia, you know, they passed borders, they became Austrians. We had hyperinflation a hundred years ago in Austria too. And also they told me a lot about the Nazis in Austria and how life was for them and how shocking the change was suddenly when the Nazis came to Austria. And all these kinds of things, I think, came together. My life story, what I experienced so far, and that Bitcoin can be one of the solutions for people who are disempowered, who are outlawed, the misfits. You know, basically Bitcoin is for them because no one can take it away from you. It gives you the freedom to interact without anyone that can hinder you. And that's what I saw. And that's what I thought is a life -changing tool. Basically, we didn't have that in hundreds of thousands of years, an invention like that. And so I was greatly drawn to that. And that's, I think, where I take my energy from, from that discrimination that I felt here. And I think that for many, many, many people in other countries, life is much worse than for me. And so I think even more for them is a tool for liberation. And that's why I work so hard. And how did you, like, when you first got into Bitcoin, like you said, you had been doing web development. And so how did you go from that to Bitcoin education? Because I think your initiative in Africa, I think it only started in, I don't know, 2021 or 2022. Yeah. I think you just started it when I met you in 2022. That was Bitcoin for fairness. I just started that half a year before. Okay, so from 2017 on, I had to learn myself. That was the first thing. So I still did the marketing stuff and the web design stuff. And at the same time, I taught myself and I learned a lot about Bitcoin. I did the University of Nicosia online curriculum and course to learn more. And I very early started to write my first book, my first learn Bitcoin book, because I thought you can learn the most. If you have to understand everything to write it down for other people to learn it. And also I had a lot of good feedback. I asked people who were much more knowledgeable about it back then as I was and they helped me. And then one of the first things I also did was I translated Andreas Antonopoulos' The Internet of Money to German and learned a lot with that, of course. And I very early in 2018, end of 2018 or something like that, I did my first Bitcoin seminars in Austria and then also an online course in German. And then I took on the podcast because that was actually the first bigger thing where I think people in the English speaking world got to know me. So I did like 160 interviews with all sorts of people from the Bitcoin space, Adam Beck, Andreas Antonopoulos, James Loeb, yeah, on and on to learn myself. The Anita Pausch show, which you apparently have suspended or paused or something. It's paused because I was in Africa and in Zimbabwe, I didn't have internet. I could not record something like this. It's just it's not possible. So I stopped doing it, but I want to start again. And so and in 2020, let me go back a little bit. Like I said, in 2017, 2018, everyone was talking about how Bitcoin can be a tool against hyperinflation, a hedge against inflation, for instance, in Venezuela or in Zimbabwe. And I always was like, aha, that's interesting. And I have a friend who is living in Zimbabwe. And then I thought, OK, so if I think that Bitcoin is a tool of liberation for people in these countries, for people who are living under authoritarian leaders and against inflation. Then I have to go there and see if anyone is really using it because the Bitcoiners are talking about it. So I focused also in my podcast on the global south and on Argentina, Venezuela, I had guests from these countries. And then in early 2020, before the pandemic started, I visited my friend for four weeks in Zimbabwe to understand the problems there in real life, because, you know, we're always talking about it. And it's like, if you're not there and if you don't really see it, if you don't feel it, if you don't have to calculate each day the price of goods again and the next day, it's different than the day before. If you don't feel that yourself, I think you can't really understand the problems of the people. And that was the first time I went there. I also went to Botswana to meet with Alakani Etireleng, who founded the Satoshi Center in Botswana, I think, as early as in 2015 or maybe even earlier. So she's a real pioneer also. And then I went back to Austria because I still had my place here, my apartment and everything. But I knew that I want to go into that direction. And after the travel bans were lifted, I started traveling again to El Salvador when the Bitcoin was introduced there. And then I realized, podcasting is all good and fine, but where is the real education happening? I mean, podcasts are great for education, but there are so many now. I think it's even also difficult to get to have an audience there. And when I saw in Zimbabwe that there is some sort of adoption, yes, some people are knowledgeable about Bitcoin and are using it, but the vast amount of people is not. And there are so many scams down there. Everyone knows Bitcoin. Really, you can ask anyone, they know it, but everyone will ask you, but is it not a scam? Because everyone has been scammed or at least knows someone. And when I was there the last time I was living in a house and the maid, there are still people who have maids there, came to me because she saw a Bitcoin flyer on my desk and she said to me, can you tell me what is this Bitcoin? You are doing something with it. And I said, yeah, I mean, imagine it's like cash, only digital and your government can take it away from you. And she said, uh -huh, uh -huh. And I said, why are you asking? And she said, I'm in a WhatsApp group. And suddenly someone sent me a message saying to me, give me $50 now and in three weeks you get $100. And she said, yeah. And she said, that can't be right, can it? And I said, no. Yeah. So people are bombarded with emails, with messages like that. And I have seen so many people who've lost money and that's really sickening. And I think that's also why I try to get more and more and more education on the ground there so that people can share the knowledge with their own peers and things like that. And so is your sense that the efforts that you are making are, I mean, you know, obviously I'm sure what you're doing is true Bitcoin education in the sense that you're educating people about this technology and like understanding what this is. But is your sense that a lot of the activity in those places is, yeah, more of like using it to perpetrate scams? I mean, yeah, that can be. I mean, but I can't estimate that. I mean, using the name Bitcoin to do scams, of course, yes, they are all using that name. But it's not Bitcoin what they sell, of course. I definitely also a big amount of like exchanging dollars into Bitcoin because people who have dollars and know Bitcoin know that Bitcoin is a hedge against inflation of their own Zimbabwean dollar and also the US dollar also has inflation. But I also saw that a lot of people want to get hold of Bitcoin as a sort of a small investment for themselves. And of course, the rate of usage as a means to be able to send money in and out of the country is going up as well because Zimbabwe, for instance, is a country where you have very strict financial exchange controls. And also, you can't easily send money in and out of the country. I mean, first, no one wants the Zimbabwe dollar. I mean, I wouldn't want it, you know. The US dollar is mostly in banknotes. They only have banknotes. So, I mean, that's the next thing. You only have one dollar notes. And when you go into a shop and something is like 30 US dollar cents, you don't get 70 cents back. You get a small goodie or something. Yeah, so they are using like in the war times in Austria when people use cigarettes as money. You don't get any cash back. So I know people in Zimbabwe, for instance, who have freelancers in other African countries, and it's not easy to send money in and out of the country. And they told me, you know, when I send my freelancer in, I say, Malawi, three or four times money via mobile money or other providers, the government comes and asks me what I'm doing with that money. Why am I sending that money out? And with Bitcoin, I mean, she immediately could send the money from her wallet to the guy's wallet and no problem. Yeah, less costs, less friction, can't be censored. Nobody's questioning why she's doing that. And another big story in Zimbabwe is foreign exchange control also means that if you, for instance, a business in Zimbabwe and you want to buy goods from South Africa or another country. You can't do that with Zimbabwean dollar. So you need US dollar and then you have to go to the central bank of Zimbabwe and say, I would like to buy, let's say, 10 ,000 US dollars because I need them to buy the goods from South Africa. And every week is an auction in the central bank where the central bank decides on the value of the exchange rate from the Zimbabwe dollar to the US dollar. So it's decided it's totally controlled. And then when you get your US dollar granted, so you are allowed to exchange it. It's not that you as the business owner get the money and you pay your partner in South Africa. No, the central bank is paying you on your behalf.

Laura Shin Anita Pausch Anita Adam Beck James Loeb $50 $100 August 15Th, 2023 $25 El Salvador 2017 65 % Argentina Zimbabwe Africa 70 Cents Austria Venezuela 2016 Bohemia
Christopher Rufo: What Values Are We Prioritizing & Deprioritizing?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:52 min | Last month

Christopher Rufo: What Values Are We Prioritizing & Deprioritizing?

"The anti -communist, to be against collective power. But that's not the world we live in right now. The advent of CBDCs, the corruption of the education system, the police state, the weaponization of government and the power they have, I mean the use of AI, we're going to have to have to get comfortable with using political power, but just using it for a good kind of common cause rather than what the left has been been using for. Am I kind of stretching that too far or is that kind of where you're going with it? exactly where I'm going with it. And the facts are very simple. In an ideal world, I would love a system a of very limited government as the founders imagined, but we don't live in an ideal world. We live in a world where for the last hundred years American political leaders of both political parties have expanded government to the point where now our government as a percentage of GDP is larger than the government in Communist China. And so the question is, because conservatives have failed to reduce the size of government for the last hundred years, what are we going to do about it? Government controls 75 % of the colleges and universities, government controls 90 % of the K -12 education system. And so what values are we going to put in these institutions? Are we simply going to say that we elect conservative leaders to serve as figureheads to get the nice titles and prestige of legislator or governor, but we're going to delegate the management of all of our public institutions to our enemies, to our opponents, to people who would want to destroy all of the values that we cherish? The answer is obviously no. We can advocate for smaller government, while at the same time recognizing the fact that we have a large government and someone has to run it. Some people's values will be prioritized. Other people's values will be deprioritized. And so to me, that is the essential question. When we're teaching kids, what do

75 % 90 % K -12 Both Political Parties American Last Hundred Years Communist China
A highlight from UNCLEAN

The Refiners Furnace

26:23 min | Last month

A highlight from UNCLEAN

"Hi, everyone. Good morning. You're welcome to the Refinance Faunus podcast and we are trusting the Lord to help us understand his word. We also trust him to bring so much light to very that aspect of our lives that we are struggling in and then he will cause his face to shine upon us in the name of Jesus. I hope your weekend is going well. I hope that your week was blessed. I hope that all is working out for you for good. And I also want to believe that sincerely you are growing in God daily. I think I've told us early that this is really it's going to be number one, a very deliberate affair. It's going to be an extremely deliberate action. Yes, it has to be extremely consistent. I mean, it has to be so, so, so, so consistent because the process of transformation is never easy. It's not going to be easy. You know, anyone that told you that this was going to be an easy adventure. I think that person lied too. I think I've said this severely, but we are trusting the Lord that truly our lives will make so much meaning to him, even as he is going to help us get rid of our excesses. Yes. Even as he's going to help us get rid of the old man in us. So child of God today, I came to want to talk about a man actually, not Jesus, but a man that truly was a Christian. A man that, you know, represented Christ to to his generation and to his, his best of abilities. And, you know, I just started coming to share the story with us. We'll see how the Lord is going to help us. Okay. Just hope you understand that there is the Gentile and there is the Jew. Okay. We want to look at this thing practically. Okay. Because Jesus Christ was majorly a Jew. He was from the Hebrew background. Salvation as people in the Jewish religion, the Jewish sect as at that time was only believed to have come for the Jewish or the Jews. Okay. Now follow me carefully. Follow me carefully. You see, if you're not a Jew, if you're not from the Jewish tradition, if you're not from the Hebrew sect, you're not supposed to have anything to do with salvation. And I've told us carefully in my previous episodes that, um, when we're talking about salvation to the Hebrew, I mean the average Jewish man, salvation to him before Christ was, um, like, it take over, like a coup d 'etat. Maybe I should use that word. Yes. It was like a coup d 'etat, like a very serious, um, political, you know, governmental, uh, war. When someone is going to come and fight the existing government, take over the government and then make things easy for his followers. That was the mindset because from prophecy, they interpreted the prophecy wrongly. No one had an accurate understanding about what prophecy was. Everyone was, they were just religious. Yes. They were extremely religious. So when Jesus Christ came to the scene, okay, they were like, they were surprised. What is this that you are telling us? Aren't you supposed to start recruiting boys soldiers? You are the Messiah. That's why it was very hard for somebody to believe that, he is the Messiah. How can you be the Messiah? I am a hundred years of age and you call yourself the Messiah. All I have been believing for the past hundred years is that when the Messiah in court will come, the Messiah is going to do what? You know, take over the political government and you have been existing here for maybe two years. You are here for two years and you have been existing. In fact, you are called what you call the carpenters. You have been existing here. You are not doing any thing in regards to what we believe and then you are telling us you are the Messiah. In fact, highest we have seen is you gathering 12 reckless, you know, disappointed, frustrated men. You call them your disciples. How are we supposed to believe you, sir? Amen. So this was, this was, this was just believe, believe me. This was it. This was it. No one was ready to buy into that idea that, ah, Messiah, you are not recruiting boys. We are not in a training for the takeover. It also defeats the Roman empire. If, if I am sure I understand my prophecy, I hope you know that a Jewish, I mean, an average Jewish man was a student of prophecy. Yes. An average Jewish man had a clear understanding of the Torah. I mean, the book of the law. Yes. He had that clear understanding of what Torah was about. That's why you see a child of five years who will be able to recite the calling David, recite Isaiah, recite Jeremiah, recite Ussiah, pay attention and you'll be blessed. You know, that's why sometimes I look at our generation today and, and you know, a Christian will be in trouble and then, and then doesn't have I mean, spiritual backup. I mean, there's no scriptures. There's no word from his spiritual. And do you know that Jesus Christ was only able to communicate with the teachers of the law at the age of 12, because of his background as a Jewish boy. See, it's not magic, but pay attention. Jesus Christ at the age of five, I mean, I hope you know that Joseph, Jesus's father was a devoted Jew. Pay attention and you'll be blessed. And, and he morally, morally, he had put in a lot of energy on Jesus. So it would have been so impossible for a child at the age of 12 pay attention, not to have that communication skills. I mean, this was, it was normal. I mean, believe me, go, go back to your Bible history. Check. Amen. But there's something about Jesus. I think we have this situation all over. There are people you see and something exceptional just comes on them. That was the situation of Jesus. But I tell you the truth that an average Jewish boy, 10, 12, 5, will be able to recite the Torah. Sometimes when you go into what they call it now, the, what do you call it now? The Muslim sect. Yes. You see their young boys able to, now it's just the same situation, but something came upon Jesus that it made him exceptional. Okay. Pay attention and you'll be blessed. Now we are going somewhere. Okay. So the salvation, the redemption, the Messiah talk and prophecy wasn't really what these guys expected. They saw something different. I think I've said this several in my previous episodes. They saw something extremely different from what they have been expecting or what they have been taught to expect. Amen. So when Jesus came and then told them that he is, or not that he is, people started saying, we have made the Messiah. It was really hard for people to believe, especially the teachers of the law. Are you telling me that those guys didn't want salvation, but they were frustrated at what they were seeing. I'm telling the truth. In fact, they will never believe that someone will be coming to contend with their religious knowledge. Oh God, you are the Messiah. What are you doing, arguing with us? Imagine you are telling me that I am an old wine skin, that there's something called a new wine and a new one was, are you following me? Pay attention and you'll be blessed. So it was so strange. I mean, I mean, the whole thing was so strange and, and you know, an average man would not like contention. So they had to fight Jesus back to back because what they knew all their lives, what they have been taught all their life was extremely different from what they were seeing. Amen. So, so, so, uh, when we talk of salvation, salvation was, was major, majorly for the Jews and the Gentiles. I mean, any other person that is not a Jew, that is not from the Hebrew sect was not even supposed to, I mean, enjoy what salvation is because, because, because the idea of the Roman reign has been an existing thing for a very, I mean, a very long time. So if you're not a Jew, you don't understand what it means to be under the cage of the Roman empire. Pay attention and you'll be blessed. So it was Apostle Paul that came and mean with this accurate knowledge of the word of God and by the revelation of the spirit, he was able to expand that Jesus Christ did not only come for the Jew or from the people from the Hebrew background or the Hebrew or the call it now sect that he came for everybody. And then, and then it went, Oh, the Jews or the Gentiles. So it gave an opportunity for, for the Gentiles to also tap into the multitude of the totality of Jesus Christ. Okay. I hope you're fooling me. Anyways, there's a link, there's a link attached to this podcast episode. So if there are questions, please, you send it via the link and then we will, I'll attend to all your questions by the message of God. Okay. So our podcast episode today will be centralized on Cornelius, Peter and the conversion of Gentiles. Okay. Pay attention and you'll be blessed. So our central text will be act chapter 10 from verse one to two, or we are going to read more than that actually, but our emphasis will be acts chapter 10. So, so in regards to these, you know, the disciples and everything in regards to this very scene that I've been trying to expand, many people pay attention. Many people started having revelations. Many people started having revelations. A lot of people also, a lot of people also had, many people had revelations, you know, what, what, what will I say now? This is it. Okay. This is it. Many people have revelations, but, but, um, uniquely a man by the name Cornelius was recorded. Now I, I hope follow me carefully. I don't want to say a lot of things because I know some people are not going to take it kindly. Okay. But, um, while you, you are able to study your scriptures, you should be begging God to, um, help you, help you expand on some things to you. Okay. Now you won't tell me that it was only, um, one man in his entire generation that had a revelation about now don't, don't be, don't be, don't be religious. Don't be, don't be too, um, prophetic or something. Now people kept wondering, I hope, you know, we'll talk about revelation about dreams. Now it comes in different ways. Okay. Um, a light can fall on someone and what you've been struggling to understand for years, you just understanding it in seconds. Now people get to wonder, is this thing real? What is this thing that the Jewish people are talking about? And people get to wonder, and I think peculiarly, okay, peculiarly, God had to use Cornelius because of the popularity of his position. Pay attention. I've told you separately that for everything that the law will do, I've said this in my previous episodes, if it is not to the end that he be glorified, trust me, there is no need of him doing it. In fact, the God I know will not do it. Okay. Okay. Matthew chapter five talks about your light shining and to what end was that light that men will see and what the end result of the totality of what God will ever want to do is what that is glory be seen. Okay. So you cannot tell me that it was only Cornelius. Okay. Just like you telling me that in the 21st century, there is only one man of God that has seen Jesus. No, no, no, no, no. You can't do that. You can't do that to me. Amen. So a lot of people might have had, but, but Cornelius was recorded because of the peculiarity of what God would have or God wanted to do through Cornelius. Okay. So, um, Act of Gospel chapter 10 speaks about a Gentile who was devoted to God, maybe to other Gentiles, but their devotion to God was not as loud as Cornelius. Now the Bible speaking about Noah is that Noah found favor in the sight of the Lord and that, that, that you could see how the Lord picked interest in Noah because of the peculiarity of his genuineness to God. Okay. A lot of people were there. I know some people will come. No, are you, are you right? No, are you accurate? Are you sure? Some people were doubting. Some were hardly denying. I mean, rejecting the other. Some people were considering. Is it, is it right? So at the end, it was only his family that believed in him. Now pay attention and you'll be blessed. Pay attention. So there was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of what was called the Italian regiment, a devout man, and one who pay attention, fear God, and with all his household who give arms generously to people and pray to God always consistency. So Caesarea was a predominant, predominated Roman city on the shores of the Mediterranean in Judea. Okay. So it was the headquarters of the Roman governor of the province of Judea. So archaeologists have discovered a stone from a building in Caesarea inscribed with the name Pontius Pilate as actually not necessary. So Cornelius was an officer in the Roman army, a patriotic Jew. Okay. Of that day would materially dislike or even hate him. Now Cornelius was a Roman, an officer in the Roman army. Okay. A high ranking. I mean, very high ranking officer pay attention. Now, I think I've explained this earlier, Jew. Now Jew had nothing to do with Gentiles. So when we are talking about salvation, it is for the Jew and not for the Gentiles, according to all they know. I think I made, I took my time to explain this. Okay. So Cornelius maybe heard about it. I think, I think I've explained it. He might have been contemplating and you know, you know, is this God, is this God they are talking about Jew? How can they, how big God is this? So as a typical Roman, he had been exposed to Roman gods, Jupiter or God's Zeus, Mars, Venus. I mean, these are the, the varieties of the Roman gods. So he had, he had varieties to choose from. He wanted to serve, but the guy was like, come the God of now God. So this is God. So he was contemplating. And I mean, somehow we paid attention to his spirit and then followed. I think if you want to understand this very phrase, you should go back to my podcast episode on wooing of the spirit. I told you in that episode that for every point in life, you wouldn't say that God is not faithful. No, the spirit had blown so fast to the heart of men. But the question is how many people paid attention to the wooing of the spirits? Okay. So Cornelius paid attention. So he might have been contemplating just like the men in the days of Noah. Some people, some people might have gotten the whispers of the spirit listening to this man, but they were still, do you understand me? They were still not paying attention. How many times will the spirit speak to you, sir, ma? And you're still ignorant. You still choose to be ignorant. Pay attention. Is it but found they had been exposed to the enlightened concept of Judaism and they had become devoutly monetized. Okay. So Cornelius was in the category of what the Jew called Godfarers. Okay. So they actually, Cornelius actually feared God. So these were Gentiles who loved the God of Israel. Pay attention. Now they are heard stories. Remember faith commit by what? Hearing. They are heard. So out of hearing their faith, follow me carefully. They were sympathetic to the, to and supportive to the Jewish faith. Yet they stopped short of becoming full Jews in lifestyle and in circumstances. So Jewish people of that time respected and appreciated these God fearing Gentiles, but they could not share their life and homes food with them because they were still in fact Gentiles and not full Jewish convert. Okay. Now, if you're following you understand that I've been saying this in my previous episode, that it's not about saying to a Jewish man, you can't say you fear God. No, no, no. Have you gone through the process of circumcision? Do you, there's a lot of things, a lot of things. I think, I think one time I was watching a movie and I was like, come, it was a Jewish movie. And one guy, what I call them, a zealot. Yes. That's the name. That's the name they call this guy. A zealot wore an apparel that was actually not, I mean, in the context of the Jewish and a Jewish religious leader was condemning. They had to seize it from the zealot. They had to seize the apparel. Now, now it's that serious that these guys pay attention to details. Okay. How, what you eat, what you say, the things you, that's why these guys did not like John the Baptist because I think, calling a Jew, a viper at that time, man, you have committed a sin. Don't worry, let me not bore you with that. So, so, so they couldn't actually share their life because of the peculiarity of what they were. Okay. So even if these guys feared God, but they won't accept that they truly feared God because they're not actually, you know, they are not like them, they are tradition, they are Jewish converts, I mean fully. So because of the way the life and heart of Cornelius is being described, we see a man who obviously had a real relationship with God. Come, come. These guys had a relationship at the time. Now, oh my God, help me. Oh, I don't, I don't expect to deviate because I've not touched what I want to touch, but I want to pay, I want you to pay attention to this again and again. Now, this man had a relationship with God and how was this relationship established? The Bible says that Cornelius prayed to God always. That takes us back to Luke gospel chapter 18 verse 1. To this end, Jesus made a parable that man ought always to pray and not to fail. Now, all Jesus trying to do, to bring man into sync with God. Now, Jesus came that he will, I mean, realign man to God, but for that realignment to be consistent. Prayer has to be constant. Yes. So Cornelius had a lifestyle of what? Praying always. Now check out the lives of men who could pray always, who were always praying to God. Always they had a life with God. So at the same time, he was not part of the mainstream of the Jewish life. So God sends an angel to tell Cornelius to get Peter. Okay. Now, because of the relationship with God, God had to appear maybe to an angel to Cornelius and then, you know, so let's read about, let's read about chapter 10 verse 3 to 6. About the ninth hour of the day, he saw clearly in a vision an angel of God coming in and saying to him, Cornelius. And when he observed him, he was afraid and said, what is it, Lord? So he said to him, your prayers and your harms have come up for a memorial before God. Ah, I love this. Now send men to Joppa and send for Simon whose surname is Peter. He is lodging with Simon a tanner whose house is by the sea. He will tell you what you must do. So we are not told specifically here that Cornelius was praying about this ninth hour. No. But it was the ninth hour. I mean, what you call three o 'clock that this vision came. So this was a customary time of prayer for Jews. So imagine he was observing these things. So also as Cornelius related incidents to Peter in Acts chapter 10 verse 33, he specifically said he was praying at the ninth hour. So we are not actually sure. So this was not a dream nor did an angel physically appear to Cornelius. Okay. This was not a dream and it was not a physical. So this was a vision that came in the mind's eye of Cornelius at the same time. So it was so vivid that Cornelius would later say a man stood beside me in bright clothing. That's Acts chapter 10 verse 30. When you check, you're going to see that. So it was significant that God spoke to Cornelius directly, even calling him by name. It was so significant that Cornelius responded with a healthy fear of the heavenly and the holy. So this shows that Cornelius had a real relationship.

Simon Joseph 21St Century Jesus Two Years Caesarea David Christ 12 Five Years Bible 10 Judea Jewish Hebrew Pontius Pilate John The Baptist Jesus Christ Act Of Gospel 5
A highlight from You Need To BUY MORE ETH Before It's TOO LATE!

Crypto Banter

02:34 min | Last month

A highlight from You Need To BUY MORE ETH Before It's TOO LATE!

"All right, we got the inflation numbers. They are higher than last time, but we did get them better than the forecast. The CPI, the year -on -year inflation number CPI is 3 .2%. The estimate was 3 .3%. So we beat the analysts estimates. Core CPI was 4 .7%. The estimate was 4 .8%. That's good news. We did expect inflation to go up, but inflation actually went up much, much, much less than we actually expected. So what are the markets doing? Let's quickly look at Bitcoin. Bitcoin is at 29 ,525. It hasn't broken below or above that trend line, but we did give away a lot of the gains that we had at 30 ,000 and we got rejected off that 30 ,000 level again. And worse than that, remember I showed you that the leverage was building up and I thought that the leverage may actually be a short squeeze. Well, you think for now, not much of a short buildup or not much of a short leverage buildup. I'm also looking at the NASDAQ because I wanted to see how the NASDAQ is responding to these inflation numbers. Okay. The NASDAQ is now 0 .75 % up, but more interestingly, if you look at where the NASDAQ is relative to its all time high, we are now 9 % away from the all time high. So here you've got NASDAQ 9 % away from the all time high and you've got Bitcoin well, 50 % away from its all time high. So one of them has to catch up. Something has to happen here. And I think what's going to happen is that Bitcoin is going to be the one to shoot up. But even though all the talk is actually about Bitcoin, I think that what the smart money is doing is actually not going into Bitcoin. And I'm going to show you where I think the smart money is going today. I think the smart money is going into Ethereum. And I think it's happening on this slide. I think it's happening by the big institutions. And I'm going to show you one institutional report by a very, very, very reputable institution that says that the price of Bitcoin may get to 51 ,000 if their bull case is achieved. And that's pretty soon. That's not like in a hundred years. So I want to show you that research report. Also, we're going to talk about XRP because it looks like the SEC is fighting back and they are going to appeal the case. And let's talk about what the implications are and when that may actually happen. And then I want to show you a trading tool. I want to show you this amazing, amazing, amazing trading tool. And maybe we'll use the trading tool together. It's a free trading tool. Maybe we'll use the trading tool together to actually take a few trades. I found it today. I want to share it with you guys. That's coming up right at the end of the show. So it's going to be fun. Let's go. It's a big day today. Some news is coming out. Let's go.

4 .7% 3 .3% 51 ,000 3 .2% 4 .8% 0 .75 % 30 ,000 29 ,525 50 % 9 % SEC Today Nasdaq ONE Hundred Years Bitcoin One Institutional Them Ethereum
A highlight from Short Stuff: History of English

Stuff You Should Know

07:30 min | Last month

A highlight from Short Stuff: History of English

"But I like the short version, and we want to thank EnglishClub .com, and in particular, TheConversation .com, and a professor of lit at the University of Bristol named Ad Putter. Go fighting Abby's. Is that what it is? You got me again. But anyway, Putter wrote a really good article that helped out with this one. But we're talking about the history of the English language briefly, because I was just kind of curious, like, who were the first people to speak English? And the first English is what you have to talk about first, which is, of course, Old English, which came about right after the Romans left Britain. This is a very long time ago. They colonized Britain, but they were like, things aren't going so great in the Roman Empire, so we're going to leave. Yeah. So, it's just interesting. The Romans spoke Latin, but the Brits spoke Celtic. And then after the Romans left, because their empire was crumbling around them, the Brits still kept speaking Celtic, but not for very long, because the Romans had basically been occupying Britain, but they had also been, in turn, protecting it. But as the Roman Empire crumbled, it left Britain totally vulnerable and open to invasion, and in very short order, that's exactly what happened. Three Germanic tribes, the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes, all basically came down from northern Germany, Denmark area, and said, we own this place now. You guys are going to start speaking like us. Yeah. They spoke what's called North Sea Germanic, and those Celtic speakers were kind of, they ended up where they ended up, which was north and west in what we now call Ireland and Scotland and Wales. So, the Angles, which was one of those Germanic tribes, like you've ever heard Anglo -Saxon, that was because they were the Angles and the Saxons and the Jutes. Two of the three of those tribes were the Angles and the Saxons. And once they got to Britain, their language was referred to as what we would call Old English or Anglo -Saxon. And it is the original form of English, and this was used in the early Middle Ages, but this is not anything that you would recognize as English as we know it today, except for just a few words here and there. Yeah. Like, his, he, some of these really, really old words. And remember, he, they think, is possibly as old as humanity as far as words go. That was already in use. But, yeah, it didn't bear much of a resemblance. And so, Old English, Chuck, was in use, I think, from about 450 to 1100 CE. Yeah. And, you know, the original thing that got me looking for this was if they could pinpoint, like, not necessarily the people, but who the first English speakers were. But our friend, Professor Putter here, actually does name a couple of people. And this is, you know, this is sort of as legend goes. But when these Germanic tribes came through, they asked a couple of those leaders, Hengist and Horsa, to come in and help protect the country. And showed they up. They, and of course, again, this is, this is, as the story goes, we really don't know if it's true or not, but they would have been the ones that brought in this Old English. So, technically, you could say that they were maybe the first English speakers as we know it as Old English. That's so fascinating. Like, if these guys aren't legendary, they are the first English speakers in England or Britain. So, Old English stuck around until the Normans came along. So, in 1066, William the Conqueror, the head of the Normans, he was the Duke of Normandy, which is in France today, showed up in England and said, Hengist, Horsa, you guys are a few hundred years old, it's time for you to hand over the reins to me, William the Conqueror. And it just so happened, since he was from what's today part of modern France, he spoke what you would kind of recognize as a type of French. And so, the Normans brought French to England. But rather than it becoming totally widespread, it actually became part of what Professor Putter calls a linguistic class division, where the royal court in the upper classes spoke the king's French, and then the lower classes continued to speak Old English. Yeah, and what's going to happen here, of course, and as we'll see, as England got to conquering for hundreds of years, you pick up on words as you move about the earth. And in this case, a lot of French words were added to what was now known as Middle English. Do you want to hear one that I guessed was right? Yeah. Sausage. Oh, yeah. Sausage. Sausage. Let's take a break. When we come back, we'll talk about a big change that happened to Middle English pronunciation that linguists are still trying to figure out right after this. Sausage. Hey, friends, we want to talk to you about Viator. Viator has over 300 ,000 bookable travel experiences, get this, in over 190 countries. Yeah, they have everything on offer from simple tours to extreme adventures and all the niche interesting stuff in between. Viator is the place to go to book memorable travel experiences. Plus, get this, Viator's travel experiences have millions of real traveler reviews. Millions. So you have the information you need to book the best activities for your trip. And when you book a travel experience with Viator, there's always flexibility and support with free cancellation, payment options, and 24 -7 service. So download Viator app now and use code Viator10 for 10 % off your first booking. One app, over 300 ,000 experiences you'll remember. Do more with Viator. Hey, everybody, we want to tell you about Squarespace. If you have something to say and you want to put it on the Internet, then Squarespace has you covered. They've got everything from selling custom merch in your online store to asset library organization and even the ability to accept appointments on your website. That's right. Let's talk about this custom merch thing because you can actually create a passive income stream that's going to engage your audience and scale your brand. You can design your products and production inventory and shipping all handled for you by Squarespace, which is going to save you time and money. Yep. And they have all the tools you need to start selling online in your online store, whether you sell physical, digital or service products. Yeah, sell in person by connecting a Square reader to the SQSP app and keep your orders, inventory and customer data in sync with your online store. Go to squarespace .com slash stuff for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch, use offer code stuff to save 10 % off your first purchase of a website or domain. Squarespace.

France England TWO 1066 Putter Millions 10 % Viator Celtic Squarespace Hundreds Of Years Three Ireland Latin Over 300 ,000 Experiences Chuck William The Conqueror One App English Scotland
A highlight from The Gospel Professed Pt. 2

Evangelism on SermonAudio

15:20 min | Last month

A highlight from The Gospel Professed Pt. 2

"I'm going to continue tonight in our study that I've entitled, The Evangelism Revolution. If you have your Bibles, you can turn to the book of Acts. Just briefly, I'll just summarize where we're at so far. From last week, we just began a brief introduction, but as you go through the book of Acts and I guess you could call it, called The Gospel in Acts, I believe it's going to be on our website and it might be in the Yahoo groups as well. It is on the website. You can get that. I'll be referring to that in the next week or two, but it just kind of gives you some of the results of the survey of going through almost every place in the book of Acts where the Gospel is being presented. Sometimes it's only summarized, sometimes it's given explicitly, and it shows what aspects of the Gospel were presented in each presentation. Some were emphasized, the response, the audience, and it gives just an overall view of how the Gospel was advanced throughout the book of Acts. And I think it's beneficial. It's certainly been really what has caused me to see some of these things that I have been sharing with you throughout this series. Last week, though, we began with the subject of baptism, and we saw that baptism was an integral part of evangelism in the first century. When they heard the Gospel and when they received the Gospel, they didn't say a prayer to receive the Gospel. Instead, throughout these examples, they were baptized, having given evidence of believing in the Gospel. That baptism really became the profession or the confession of their faith, so that they believed, and then the text says they were baptized. That's very important, as I hope by the end you will agree with me, that baptism in the book of Acts is primarily, if not exclusively, portrayed as a confession of faith, a profession of acceptance of faith, a believing. Implicit, I think, throughout the book of Acts is that belief was necessary for baptism. They wouldn't just baptize anybody. You'll see that there is this implicit undercurrent throughout the book that belief in the Lord Jesus Christ was necessary for baptism. And this comes out very strongly in a couple of places. I would invite you, first of all, to turn to Acts chapter 8. In Acts chapter 8, it is the story of the Ethiopian who is reading through the prophet Isaiah, Isaiah 53 to be exact, and Philip comes along and Gospels him, tells him the good news about Jesus, it says in verse 35, he opened his mouth and he began from the Scripture, he preached Jesus. What's interesting is I'd like to read verses 36 through verse 38, and as they went along the road, they came to some water and the eunuch said, Look, water, what prevents me from being baptized? And Philip said, If you believe with all your heart, you may. And he answered and said, I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. And he ordered the chariot to stop, and they both went down into the water, Philip as well as the eunuch, and he baptized him. Clearly this particular passage of Scripture shows that belief in the Lord Jesus Christ was for necessary baptism. I'll share with you just a bit of... I want to be honest with you, verse 37 there is in my Greek Bible, it's not even there. It goes from verse 36 and it goes straight to verse 38, because verse 37 isn't in most of the earliest manuscripts, Greek manuscripts we have of the New Testament. They appear much later in some of the older, newer versions or newer copies of the New Testament. That's why my New American Standard Bible has it in brackets. How do we answer that? Well, I think the answer that I heard Alistair Begg share was probably one of the most helpful analogies for me. If verse 37 isn't there, clearly we still see that baptism is a very significant part evangelism of the that's going on here. Verse 36 is in all the earliest manuscripts and, look, water, what prevents me from being baptized? Verse 38, and he ordered the chariot to stop and they both went down into the water, Philip as well as the eunuch, and he baptized him. Whether that verse 37 is in the earliest or the original manuscript, I'm not sure, but I think one thing it shows is that even the copyist, even the scribes at a very early year in the development of the church understood that this would be an important aspect and very likely could have made a comment on the side of a text or whatever, but it represents a very early belief in the church that, as a matter of fact, belief was required for baptism. Now, where there might be a textual variant here that may cast some shadow on it, if you turn over just a few chapters to Acts chapter 10, there is no textual variant here and it is a very clear, implicit reference that belief was necessary for baptism. Peter is speaking to the house of Cornelius and it says, verse 46, For they were hearing them speaking with tongues and exalting God. Then Peter answered, verse 47, Surely no one can refuse the water for these to be baptized who have received the Holy Spirit just as we did. And he ordered them to be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. Then they asked him to stay on for a few days. Peter raises a question, I mean, who could prevent us from baptizing? These people have obviously displayed that they are born again, that they believe. How could we withhold baptism from that? I mean, the other side of the coin would be, well, if they weren't sincere believers or they didn't believe, then we could prevent them from being baptized, but who could prevent us now? Now these people obviously believe the Holy Spirit, we've seen this gift of tongues upon them and so he had them ordered to be baptized. As we look at baptism in the book of Acts, I really do believe that it is a radical, if not revolutionary discovery of not only the gospel, but baptism itself. Jesus ended His earthly ministry commanding His disciples, go and make disciples, baptizing them. And the way that's set up in Matthew 28 is the command is make disciples and baptizing them is telling you how to do it. It's a participle that comes underneath there, go make disciples by baptizing them in the name of the Father, Son. So we have that command in Jesus. The book of Acts follows it in many ways, I think it tells us how then we baptize. So I do believe that what we find in the book of Acts is authoritative. And what we find in the book of Acts is that when the gospel is preached, it's not received by saying a prayer. In the book of Acts, it is believed and then it is professed by baptism. And that is radical, that is revolutionary today. We had an elder meeting a week or so ago, and as the elders were talking, there was the confession, the admission, that as we look at what the gospel is, as we look at the contents, as we look at how the gospel is preached and how it is received and how baptism plays all this, it was said in our meeting, this is challenging us, that we're having to work through a bunch of things. What is this going to mean in the life of our church? What does it mean in our theology? It's challenging us in the traditions that many of us, most of us, have inherited from our evangelical heritage. Well, I've marked three areas in particular that this model that we get from the book of Acts really challenges us. Two of them challenges us as a church very directly. So let me just begin with the first area where I think this teaching on baptism really challenges our church. Very clearly in the book of Acts, number one, we see that there is an emphasis on baptism that is not present today in the church. In the first century, there was a very strong emphasis on baptism. It was commanded by Jesus all throughout the book of Acts, time and time again. Again, they believed and they were baptized. Mass baptisms, 3 ,000 were baptized, then 2 ,000 were baptized. It was repeated time and again. It would be a complete anomaly, a total departure of the norm to have a person in the first century profess to be a Christian and not get baptized. That would have been unheard of, impossible. I don't know if I'm quoting anyone, I've read so much on this, or I've just formatted this opinion. I put it in quotation marks, but I don't know who to credit it to, so here it goes, but I believe there are more unbaptized, professing Christians in the church today than any other time in history. Many people professing, oh yeah, I got saved at Billy Graham Crusader, I walked the aisle, never been baptized. Today, even in Baptist churches, there's no emphasis upon baptism. John MacArthur and I alluded to it last week, and I think we have a few handouts there in the back, preached a sermon in 1998. I think we put that on our website today. I just want to quote a paragraph from his observation, baptism is not a particularly popular subject today, it's not of great interest in the evangelical community. It's been years since I've seen any new book written on baptism or any book emphasizing baptism or any series of messages or any preacher or any teacher emphasizing baptism. I never hear about it on the radio, I never hear about it on Christian radio, I never see a baptism on Christian television programs. Though you have a lot of services, you rarely, if ever, see a baptismal service. The interest in baptism has sort of gone away, sad to say in many cases. 1998, six years ago, John MacArthur had already said, there's a problem in the church today. There's no identity with baptism. It's been relegated to something that we may do or may not do, and it's kind of in the back. Totally opposite of the first century. In the first century, Christianity was all about baptism. That's how you made your profession of faith. What has happened today? In the last fifty to a hundred years, we have substituted the prayer for baptism. That's what has happened in the church today. The prayer has taken the place of baptism. You know, the messages that I've been preaching, particularly on the gospel, if I were to preach those in a majority of churches today, I'd be ran out on my ear. They wouldn't want to hear that. If I said the things that I've been saying about the sinner's prayer, not saving anyone, and it not being the gospel, you would see people's blood pressure rise. You would see them get flushed in the face. You wouldn't be invited back. This would be a very controversial topic in the church today, in Baptist churches today, in Bible -believing, preaching churches today. It would be extremely controversial. And yet, in most of those churches, rarely do they ever do baptisms, and rarely is anything ever said about baptism. We have lost the connection between a profession of faith in Christ, and following Christ, and baptism. We've lost that. There's no longer that link there. Jesus Christ said, unless you take up your cross and follow Me, you cannot be My disciples. And yet, how many professing Christians haven't even taken the first order of obedience and I had a relative once who professed to be a Christian, but she didn't want to get baptized because she didn't want to get her hair wet in front of everyone. Can a person's heart be born again and raptured with the Lord Jesus Christ and say, I don't want to get baptized because I don't want to get my hair wet? There's something wrong there. In the nine years of ministry that I've been involved with, and I've seen the Lord work in people's lives, and I've seen them, it seems, to start responding to the gospel, and I get excited, and I can think of at least, on the top of my head, three or four, that as we begin to move towards baptism and press baptism and encourage them to baptism, they either drastically fell away before they could ever get baptized, or Satan dropped some of the most oppressive burdens on them or trials on them and they just walked away. I've seen that happen and I know Dad has said he's seen it happen in his own ministry. There is something about baptism being associated with one's salvation, and anybody can make a profession of faith, but I have seen it time and again where when that person that's made a profession of faith tries to make the commitment, says, oh yeah, I want to get baptized, things happen and they fall, they leave, they don't get baptized. It's happened on a number of occasions.

1998 John Macarthur Alistair Begg Peter Philip Last Week TWO 3 ,000 Tonight 2 ,000 Next Week Nine Years Jesus Six Years Ago Four Christ Both Today First Area
A highlight from Dear Diary...

Stuff You Should Know

03:30 min | Last month

A highlight from Dear Diary...

"Welcome to Stuff You Should Know, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, and welcome to the podcast. I'm Josh Clark and Charles W. Chuck Bryan is here, and this is Stuff You Should Know, Dear Diary edition. Uh, well, I guess I'll just ask the obvious question, have you ever kept a diary of any kind? Any kind of journal? Yeah, I think I did when I was younger, but I haven't in a long, long time. And it's one of those things like, I'm like, gosh, this is such a great idea. And I'll do it a couple of times and then I just fall off, fall off the wagon. I think it's one of those things that you can either be inclined to be one of those people that does it and keeps up with it or not. But you can also learn to do it, I think, with practice, like anything else, by setting that habit. And the reason I assigned this idea to Livia, who did a great job, is because my good friend Mike Anderson has kept a daily journal since 1991. Dear Mike. It's pretty amazing. I obviously never read it, but it's just, uh, it comes up, it comes up every now and then because it's, it is a journal of his life, but what it serves as far as the friend group goes is a journal of all of our lives to a certain degree. And sometimes we'll be talking, we'll be camping or just hanging out or something, and we'll be talking about something that happened in the old days and we won't be clear on it. And Mike will just be like, you know, I can find that out for us. And it's just, it's cool. It's a bit of a time capsule and, you know, he's currently getting them, I think, digitized from his old handwriting days, handwritten days, rather. And I was like, you know, these are important, right? And you need to make sure, you know, we're all getting older. And like, what if a UFO picked you up and took you away? And he's like, I got that covered, my friend there. Going to his daughter already that will be preserved by her. And I would, Mike's a crazy, weird, creative genius. So I'd like to see these like published one day. Yeah, that's who you want to keep a journal for that long, for sure. It could be one of those things that comes out, you know, a hundred years from now. And that's when he becomes famous. What year did he start? 1991, and it's 2023, so do the math. 32, no wait, 38 years. Do the math. Are you sweating? My upper lip is. Anyway, so this is on diaries. And this actually turned out, at least in the history section, to be way more woman -centric than I imagined it would be. But it makes a lot of sense now that I see the history of it. Well, yeah. And if you kind of dive into 10th century Japan, which we'll talk about in a second, there was a kind of a movement of journaling. What a lot of people point to as the first real historical example of people using diaries. They're writing because they're not allowed to be externally. So the only way to share themselves is to write to themselves. And women have so long been repressed by men that I could see journaling being a largely woman affair.

Mike Josh Clark Mike Anderson 10Th Century Charles W. Chuck Bryan 2023 38 Years First 1991 Livia 32 Iheartradio Japan ONE Stuff You Should Know Second Hundred Years
"hundreds years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:40 min | 4 months ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Special guest today is Howard Lindsey, somebody I've known for close to 90, a hundred years, it seems like that. Howard in addition to running a venture fund social leverage, also hosts a podcast called panic with friends. So I got so many questions to ask you about. First, what is this podcast you talk about? Well, there is podcasts. A thing now a little bit. Should I look into this? You should. So I think the podcast is popular in general because you get to have these conversations with people. Conan being a perfect example. I only listen to comedy podcasts, so I listen to them and Conan is just so talented. He happens to be just quick digression, which you and I both can't help but do when I was pitching masters in business. To Bloomberg, I pitched it as Mark Marin meets Charlie rose, and Marc maron, he was the first guy doing long form interviews with people in his industry, and he's a stand up and a television show producer. But it's let me bring in my Friends from the world to stand up comedy and let's dissect what makes something funny. Correct. So inspired like Jerry's show, inspired by what you do, inspired by Conan. I started my own podcast in March 10th of 2020. So the market, the vix was like, oh, so we're not quite shut down yet. To shut down. People were freaking out. As kind of a service to myself and my next and a service to the my network to be able to talk to Fred Wilson and you I said, why don't I just for 30 days document the panic, and start the show called panic with friends? Well, we are calm voice. So my first inclination with COVID was, this will pass. Obviously, 'cause by the dip. Everybody, I think had the same. Maybe my best call, but it wasn't like I had some great insight. It was just, oh my God, people. Like, at least we could do is take a deep breath. So I had this idea, we're going to do the opposite of panic, even though the show is called panic with friends. And I would get my calmest friends that have been through many cycles, and just chat with them about the panic. And at the time the now the market closes, I'm doing a show a day, a great guess, Jim has honesty is my first gas emissions. Really good advice. And then I start bringing in traders when the vix hits 8 and I'm like, what are we buying? Oil was negative. I bring on my favorite oil trader. And we were just like, if you listen to my podcast, you made fortunes because we were there. And it was so proud of just being kind of not making a voice of reason. You don't have to buy it, but if you're not thinking about buying during these weeks, you may not want to ever be an investor. How did you come across the Robinhood opportunity and what made you so enthusiastic about it? First of all, it was just E trade two. So my big idea, like even with wall strip was CNBC on YouTube. Robinhood was just an extension of what E trade. E trade on the phone. Again, I'm going to power position in some level because people needed stock to spam to get users. So we were a gateway to traffic much like Twitter, but the people that came to me were people with financial apps. And because I was too wimpy to build my own brokerage. So in 2013, just like you said, VCs are not perfect. They are like moss, and at the time, the world of VC was enamored with disrupting Vanguard. So the VC model. What do they have to 8 trillion? Good job. Telling you my hack. So the VCs were seeing the world one way. I saw the world another way. So the VCs were like, we got to go after the assets under management. I was like, who cares? Those are worth the dollar. You need to get the customer. And you need the, you know, so it wasn't like any genius insight. It was just all the money was trying to disrupt Vanguard and Vanguard wasn't disruptive. You couldn't build a product that was 20 times better than Vancouver. Whereas E trade. They were spending billions on advertising. So emphasizing, but expensive. So at the time, in 2013, you could look through the financial statements of Schwab and TD public statements, and they were spending a $150 for a customer acquisition. So this is the math that I applied. We could acquire them for next to nothing. How about zero and less than zero? Right? Meaning, I show my friend my free trade on my phone. He didn't see a TV commercial. So what does that cost you? Less than one. Because one customer led to ten, so it was like Uber growth. But you're giving them a free trade. You're giving them a free share of stock, understand them. But what is that 20 bucks? 30 bucks? Not even think like that. It was a seed investor. You can now let interest rates are 5%. But if Schwab's spending a buck 50 per client and you're spending one share of a $5 stock, your cost of acquisition is $5. It's meaningless who cares. Right. So at worst it was $5. But at best it was still negative because that person told 5 other people. Got to understand how that type of networking works. Organic growth. It was SnapChat but with trading. So think about this. Do the math. If I acquire a million users and I'm at Schwab and I did that for $10, you'd be CEO of the company. Bring me the kid that

"hundreds years" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"What can I lose you hundred years waiting for dogs you can just have one chance. 'cause who am I? I want to come up with my show and trust. Be careful when you let yourself listen. Hold on come on come on come on baby come on come on. This is the station. You're a family 5 .7. What's the matter.

"hundreds years" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Girl gonna be a good boy give me your body but you are a hundred years old in your eyes gotta find it but you're not a hundred years old moving it up is it.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Over this weekend in chicago. Perhaps maybe even a hyper stick around back in a moment more everybody wrestling observer live. Have you written a book. You can become a published author with dorrance publishing. The nation's oldest publishing services company countless authors have trusted durance for nearly a hundred years to bring their book to the market are professional team will editor text design your book pages and create an appealing eye-catching custom cover loss our authors benefit from a custom book promotion marketing.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Over this weekend in chicago. Perhaps maybe even a hyper stick around back in a moment more everybody wrestling observer live. Have you written a book. You can become a published author with dorrance publishing. The nation's oldest publishing services company countless authors have trusted durance for nearly a hundred years to bring their book to the market are professional team will editor text design your book pages and create an appealing eye-catching custom cover loss our authors benefit from a custom book promotion marketing.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Over this weekend in chicago. Perhaps maybe even a hyper stick around back in a moment more everybody wrestling observer live. Have you written a book. You can become a published author with dorrance publishing. The nation's oldest publishing services company countless authors have trusted durance for nearly a hundred years to bring their book to the market are professional team will editor text design your book pages and create an appealing eye-catching custom cover loss our authors benefit from a custom book promotion marketing.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Over this weekend in chicago. Perhaps maybe even a hyper stick around back in a moment more everybody wrestling observer live. Have you written a book. You can become a published author with dorrance publishing. The nation's oldest publishing services company countless authors have trusted durance for nearly a hundred years to bring their book to the market are professional team will editor text design your book pages and create an appealing eye-catching custom cover loss our authors benefit from a custom book promotion marketing.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Yes it's time for declare your independence with ernest hancock. Believe me when. I say we have a difficult time ahead of them but if we are to be prepared for it we must burs shed our here with our fear because i remember i remember that i am meer. Not because of the That lies before me but because them live behind me. I remember the one hundred years. We have caught these machines and after a century of war. I remember that moment. Remember.

"hundreds years" Discussed on The Thread with OZY

The Thread with OZY

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on The Thread with OZY

"Screen to widen our view. One hundred years ago. The center of florida just a few miles from where disneyworld.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Into America

Into America

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Into America

"Almost a race from public record. And we tell the story of white tolson's of those who kept their ancestors secrets those who didn't and what it's like one hundred years later to.

"hundreds years" Discussed on The Vaping Fix

The Vaping Fix

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on The Vaping Fix

"Publicly criticized big tobacco companies. So what they did next left everyone the public the fda and even their own employees in total shock. I'd heard rumors about tops with tobacco companies and always tried to discourage my my bosses from even thinking about it. May i even said something to the board members in my interview. Big tobacco is the enemy. Right they've been killing people one hundred years in lying about it. I thought that.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Absurd Hypotheticals

Absurd Hypotheticals

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Absurd Hypotheticals

"Those are like the two things before nine hundred ninety one where bill had got there and then his. His bigger influences actually didn't kickoff until now to which is after. Bill and ted got there. And that's when he started getting more attention and he founded the international psychoanalytic association in nineteen ten. Which is like this whole organization of say houses which is still around today yet. None of that happened. He actually sigmund. Freud probably went have been like a big name. Like people might not have noticed disappeared because they took him before he is well known so the next person again they picked up the took. A lot of people from history next person is beethoven said. They went to a ten in kassel germany. And beethoven his fiftieth that point and he probably would have had because he's known to hearing wasn't decorate and he started to lose his hearing in eighteen. O one so he probably would have had bad hearing. I don't think he would have been completely deaf at that point but obviously beethoven was incredibly influential in the music world. It's kind of hard to trace like correlations to modern music. But i imagine music would be very different next. Joan of arc so they went to fourteen twenty nine in orleans. France who joan of arc shoe seventeen and if you don't know who. Joan of arc shoe. She reportedly received visions from archangel. Michael saint margaret at saint catherine of alexandria telling her to support charles. The seventh and to protect france from english rule during the hundred years war and her victories. In one hundred years war ended a boosting morale lot and eventually led to the french victory and the end of the hundred years war and then and then two years after when bill would have arrived she actually got captured burned at the stake for her crimes. I guess against england but a pre presumably she would have been taken before that so bill and ted saved her life they might have not one hundred years war maybe hard to tell but she will live past nineteen which is good after joan of arc..

Bill orleans Freud ted alexandria fiftieth bill seventeen kassel germany charles today hundred years seventh two things nineteen england one hundred years nineteen ten one Joan of arc
"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Ninety nine on my wikipedia right now back in a moment observer live. Oh have you written a book. You can become a published author with door and publishing the nation's oldest publishing services company countless authors have trusted dorrance for nearly a hundred years to bring their book to the.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Gotta go to the brink. Sorry callers trag next time back in a moment of super live. Have you written a book. You can become a published author with jordan's and publishing the nation's oldest publishing services company countless authors trusted dorrance for nearly a hundred years to bring their book to the market are professional team will editor text design your book pages and create an appealing eye-catching custom cover plus our authors benefit from accustomed book promotion marketing campaign..

"hundreds years" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

"And i am realizing that is a really long sentence but what happens. This is this is an incident occurs on one day. June fifth nineteen fifty seven. But you start pulling the threads and all of a sudden you two hundred years back three hundred years back. You're talking about like conquest another punk. Not the american conquest but the spanish conquest so I really wanted to figure out more about this man and What he was about. What.

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Community coffee. We've been making great tasting coffee for over one hundred years but what makes us different isn't just how long we've been around. It's how far we're willing to go in pursuit of the perfect cup. We select only the finest beams and us over four generations of family roasting experience to give you the richest most delicious coffee around fine community. Coffee at your local grocery store or visit community coffee dot com to order some today..

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"hundreds years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The past offense. Have you written a book. You can become a published author. With the nation's oldest publishing services company countless authors have trusted dorrance for nearly a hundred years to bring their book to the market are professional team will editor text design your book pages and create an appealing eye-catching custom cover plus offers benefit from accustomed book promotion marketing campaign. Make your book available where people buy books like amazon and brick.