35 Burst results for "Hundred Year"

Google Plans to Expand Its Campus  Which Might Become Unsafe

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 2 d ago

Google Plans to Expand Its Campus Which Might Become Unsafe

"Google is expanding its campus in the san francisco bay. Area the companies. Planning to build offices as well as housing and greenspace near the shoreline which is at risk from rising sea levels. And that's raising the question of whether building there should happen at all. Npr's lauren summer has the story as a city planner in silicon valley. Michelle king. here's all about one of the biggest headaches in the bay area housing. Oh my goodness housing. Here is extremely expensive. Sunnyvale has very high cost of living in may the median. Home price in sunnyvale. Where king works was one point. Eight million so the city is looking at a different kind of housing higher density. That's walkable transit and greenspace. It would go into a part of town called moffett park right now. It's just offices lots of low rise buildings with wide parking lots one of the most sustainable things you can do is put people where they work and put people where transit is so. This is a huge opportunity. This isn't just sunnyvale vision. It shared by one of the largest landowners. Moffett park google over the last five years. The company has quietly bought more than seventy properties. Here worth almost three billion dollars. Jeff holtzman is google's director of real estate development for sunnyvale. We're incorporating sustainability into everything we do in our developments and we're doing it to support our employees but also the community and hopefully the environment. Sunnyvale is in the process of rezoning the land to allow google to build new offices and housing and just to know. Google is one of npr's financial supporters. And there's one more detail the city is looking at. This land is on the shore of san francisco bay which puts it right in the path of sea level rise sea level rises already happened. I we've seen about a foot over the last hundred years. Christina hill as a professor of environmental planning at uc berkeley. We're standing on the edge of the bay where a high tide is coming in. Hill says sea level rise will make these tides even higher by as much as seven feet by twenty one hundred. But that's not the only problem there's also seawater in the soil under our feet the groundwater and as the c rises that to- of saltwater under the soil is gonna rise also

Lauren Summer Michelle King Google Moffett Park Sunnyvale San Francisco Bay Jeff Holtzman NPR Silicon Valley Bay Area Headaches Moffett Christina Hill Uc Berkeley Hill
Maureen Dowd Manufactures Fear Over Global Warming

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | 3 d ago

Maureen Dowd Manufactures Fear Over Global Warming

"I told you. I read comments to articles not just comments on my own. Columns columns have comments usually and i love reading them. 'cause that's the face of the of the world that reads that website right so the new york times has its readers and they are virtually to a person cardboard cutouts of leftist and is a fascinating thing through the comments. Maureen dowd columnist new york. Times had a hysterical piece on global warming. It's over it's just over death and mayhem. A greenland is disappearing. Antarctic is disappearing life on earth as we know it is disappearing been. I've been hearing this since nineteen ninety. It's now thirty years that everything is horrible. In the meantime by the way. I should just not to you a fact but facts. Don't bother these people and that fact is noted by bjorn. Lomborg the dane who writes about these matters. Fewer and fewer people die from climate related natural disasters. This is even true. Twenty twenty one despite breathless climate reporting over the past hundred years annual climate related deaths have declined by more than ninety six percent in the nineteen twenties. The death count from climate related. Disasters was four hundred. Eighty five thousand on average every year in the last full decade. It was eighteen thousand three hundred to ninety six percent lower. But this doesn't matter to to maureen down none of this matters.

Maureen Dowd The New York Times Greenland Antarctic Lomborg Bjorn New York Maureen
A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

Native America Calling

01:25 min | 6 d ago

A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

"More than a century ago nearly two hundred ojibway graves were removed from the burial grounds of a lake superior tribe to make way for. Us steals plan to develop or docks that were never built now. A new effort seeks to return those lands and reburial site to the fondling band of lake. Superior chippewa danielle catering. Reports wisconsin. Point is a remote strip of land on the shore of lake superior. It marks the ancestral home of the fondling tribe whose relatives settled there as early as four hundred years ago. Seven generations were laid to rest at the wisconsin point cemetery including the communities leader chief joseph osan gave the company uprooted the dead and those still living like calling aired parents. Aired who is ninety. Seven is a direct descendant of chievo soggy. It's hallowed ground to me. We just love dead aired says. Her father would be thrilled to see. The land turned over to the tribe. They're one step closer to that goal. After the superior city council passed a resolution supporting the transfer fonda lack chairman kevin dooby says returning. The lands would provide some closure to tribal families. Remember what happened in the past. It's our laos and we have to take care of it. Continue move forward. City and tribal officials will work with wisconsin. Us senator tammy baldwin office to petition the us department of interior to place the lands in federal trust for fonda lack for national native news. i'm daniel catering.

Superior Chippewa Danielle Cat Wisconsin Point Cemetery Joseph Osan Superior City Council Wisconsin Kevin Dooby United States Fonda Senator Tammy Baldwin Us Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

The Book Review

01:59 min | 6 d ago

A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

"Elizabeth egan joins us now to talk about her latest. Pick for group taxed. Hey liz hi pam i thanks for having me. What's the book. The book is called. I couldn't love you more. And it's by esther freud. This is her ninth novel. And it's a book about three generations of women kind of circulating between ireland and england and the first one is a woman named ika. We get to know her in the nineteen thirties than her daughter. Roseline in the nineteen fifties and then a woman who we find out. And i'm not giving anything away that you won't learn fairly early in the book is kate who and we meet her in. Nineteen ninety-one and roseline is the linchpin of the whole story. She becomes pregnant in her early twenties and winds up in a home in ireland outside of cork a mother and baby home. Run by nuns. Who force her to give up her daughter kate for adoption and so the book is the story of these three women. And how e phi is continuing to look for roseline who disappears and kate is looking for roseline. She's looking for birth mother. And it's this incredibly powerful story about mothers and daughters and also an interesting and really heartbreaking. Look at what was happening in ireland at the time that really went on for about one hundred years where the catholic church ran the. They were like prisons for women who were in trouble in some in some way and they forced women to change their names and to give up their babies. And it's an incredibly heartbreaking walk at that legacy of secrecy.

Roseline Elizabeth Egan Liz Hi Pam Esther Freud Kate Ireland England Cork Catholic Church
What's New With the Alexa Echo-System 2021

Voice in Canada

01:47 min | 6 d ago

What's New With the Alexa Echo-System 2021

"I want to give you a little bit of an update on the status of the Lexi ecosystem. If you will, as you know it was recently a l e x a live. And as I mentioned previously in the flash briefing, I'm going to kind of do a deep dive into all the different things that were discussed and one of those is an update on all the different stats that Amazon put up with regards to Lexi and the way it goes. So, here we go. I'm going to run through some of the key stats for you. So currently, there are hundreds of millions of Lexi enabled devices out there and customers. That means you and I spoke with, with Lexy billions of times every week. There are now more than 900,000 developers, that are there that are registered developers, and there are more than a hundred thirty thousand off these skills. There are hundreds of built-in products. There are currently more than 140000 Smart Home Products that can be controlled with Lexi, customers have connected more than a hundred years. I'm more than a hundred million smart home devices to Lexi and they're continuing to connect and millions of new devices. Everyone, these numbers are staggering. That's why I'm kind of laughing here. The numbers off of customers that are engaging with skills is growing at 40% year-over-year and some of the strongest categories are music audio games. So it's interesting. I think that I'm engaging more and more with skills. And do you know, if you are to, I'll give you two more little stats here before I sign off today, Lexi's helping to generate billions of dollars for the developers and the device maker community. So it's has a big economic impact as well and the developer revenue from in skilled, purchasing has more than doubled year-over-year. Now, if you're not sure what in skilled purchasing is that wouldn't totally surprise me because it has not been available in Canada until now.

Lexi Lexy Amazon Canada
Upping Your Content Game with Author Brendan Kane

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:23 min | Last week

Upping Your Content Game with Author Brendan Kane

"If i was thinking. Okay i need up my content game. What would be the thirty thousand foot view. Tim's of strategic approach. Would i be looking at documenting. More about what. I'm doing would be looking at more creating content for specific purposes is there any particular platforms that if i begin i should look at or should i just taste and see what i feel like. I like because there's so many platforms. There's so many things you can do. There's so many ways to do it. What's your sort of thirty thousand foot view knowing me thirty seconds. Well it's the it's the same place we start with everybody to do. The research people jump into content before actually analyzing the different platforms who successful. Who's not successful breaking down. Why somebody successful versus. Somebody's not successful Even diving into somebody that is operating at the highest levels and see their highest reformers Versus was performers. Because it's interesting. We look at science like what's his take. The vaccine for example going to talk about the efficacy of whether it's good or bad but developing a vaccine there's years and years of science relying on to inform their decisions right or wrong. It's not like they just go into laboratory and just start from scratch and be like. I think that this would be a good idea or not. Gonna look at the historical past hundred years of what's working and what's not worked. They they leverage data. The old Anything in science they do. I think it was a neil Tyson was talking about science in in space in all whether it's ufo's and he was talking about how there's so much scrutiny in insci- like you have to prove everything you have to look at data yet when it comes to creative we throw everything out the window. We just say oh. I'm going to do this. Because i think it looks pretty to do this. Because i feel like it would be fun for me to create not thinking about like were sitting on millions of billions of data points on all the social platforms. A you can dig in z. Right away what's working. What's not working and making hypothesis of how that can apply to your message or brand.

TIM Neil Tyson
Coyotes Have Taken Over Stanley Park.

The Big Story

02:06 min | Last week

Coyotes Have Taken Over Stanley Park.

"I'm jordan heathrow. This is the big story. Dr colleen cassidy. Saint clair is a professor of biological sciences. At the university of alberta she specializes in the study of how animals including peyote behave in landscapes that have been altered by humans. Hello colleen hi jordan. Thanks for having me no problem. I'm glad you could spare the time. Why don't you start by telling us what's happening right now. In stanley park in vancouver. But also i understand. It's not just in stanley park. Sure well what i know of stanley part comes to me from the news so similar to what other people know. There's an unprecedented situation going on there. Where there is spend thirty Documented attacks on people by coyotes. We're coyotes have bitten people in the past six and a half months. That's extremely unusual. I have never heard of something. Like that. Happening anywhere in north america previously. But nor have. I heard about the situation. That's occurring in calgary in the last month and calgary eight. People have also been bitten by coyotes. Eight different people so you mentioned that. This is incredibly unusual. How do coyotes normally behave in spaces that they share with humans well normal has been a sliding slope for many years decades really over about the past twenty years sir spin increasing reports from across north america of coyotes in urban areas probably coyotes always danced around urban areas and were seen there occasionally by people. There's a at edmonton. That was known as coyote alley a hundred years ago so it's not entirely new. That coyotes are in urban areas. But they just seem to be more. Abundant and boulder and that's occurring in urban areas across the continent from vancouver to halifax from phoenix. T. l. o. Knife pretty much. Every urban area in north america. That i've heard of anyway has a population of urban coyotes. And that's a fairly new phenomenon.

Jordan Heathrow Dr Colleen Cassidy Stanley Park Colleen Hi Jordan Coyotes Saint Clair University Of Alberta Calgary North America Vancouver Stanley Edmonton T. L Boulder Halifax Phoenix
The Phenomenon Of "Coffin Births"

Unexplained Mysteries

02:10 min | Last week

The Phenomenon Of "Coffin Births"

"Francois are a vias dissuade so lifted a living baby boy out of his wife's coffin. He thought it was a miracle to celebrate his son's birth he named the child. Feast dilatot french for son of the earth. The boy's name would forever be synonymous with coffin births. But he wasn't the only example of a post mortem delivery or even the first there had been other documented examples like one from roughly two hundred years prior during a time of gruesome bloodshed in europe in sixteenth century spain. The inquisition was a tool for catholic. Monarchs to keep control to stop rebellion before it started. Inquisitors traveled around the country and rooted out heresy including anti-catholic and anti royal sentiment. Those accused of betraying the throne were punished severely with practices that ranged from torture to execution. Nobody was safe not even pregnant women in one case in fifteen fifty one. The inquisition tried and sentenced a pregnant woman to death by hanging. These deaths were meant to be examples for the public reminders. Of what happens to those who choose to defy the powerful institutions that govern their lives. The woman's body remained dangling from the gallows long after her death about four hours. After the execution passersby noticed something strange according to his self-proclaimed medical professional from the time quote two living children fell from her womb. This was the first written record of what is now called postmortem. Fetal expulsion given. There aren't any other accounts of this incident. It's impossible to verify. It could have been falsified or exaggerated to illustrate the brutality of the spanish inquisition. But it's probably fair to say that until this moment humans never magin. A corpse could deliver a child

Francois Spain Europe Magin
Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

Native America Calling

00:38 sec | Last week

Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

"The rosebud sioux tribe in south dakota welcomed home the remains of children who died more than one hundred years ago at the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania native youth and their mentors repatriated the remains from carlisle last week and escorted them home. A four hour. Service was streamed online saturday where people gathered at the tribes college quilts photographs and other items line. The front of the gym for each of the nine children brought home. The service included speakers songs an honoring before the remains were escorted out to the burial site by native youth veterans and the community. They were placed in graves in buffalo robes and buried on the rosebud reservation.

Carlisle Indian School South Dakota Carlisle Pennsylvania Buffalo Rosebud
The Cecil Hotel: Terror, Murder, and Death in the World's Scariest Hotel

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

The Cecil Hotel: Terror, Murder, and Death in the World's Scariest Hotel

"The great depression changed the cels neighborhood. Dramatically downtown. la once a hot spot for tourists and nightlife became a hub for newly homeless. Thousands of people flocked downtown with nowhere to live and the area. Around the sel hotel became skid row. No longer a west coast. Gatsby esque destination. The hotel became known as a hang out for drug addicts runaways and as opposed on all that interesting dot com. Put it quote criminals far from its first days as the paul of the great depression settled over the country. The seasonal became home to a growing number of suicides and unfortunate deaths. The first successful suicide on record at the seoul was in nineteen thirty one forty six year. Old w k norton was found dead in his room after having taken poison pills he was found only a few hours after he died by the made. Police found more poison capsules in his pocket. Norton had checked into the hotel is james willis from chicago but police were able to correctly. Identify him from the numerous checks. He had with them. Made out to mrs m. c. norton in manhattan beach california just about a half an hour south of la in nineteen thirty to twenty five year. Old benjamin dotage was found in his hotel room having shot himself to death. Benjamin left no note two years after that. A former sergeant in the army medical corps fifty-three-year-old. Louis de bordon slashed his own throat in his room at the hotel. He cited ill health as the reason in his suicide note. Nine hundred thirty seven. Another military veteran jumped to his death from the top of the hotel landing on a skylight below. There is maddeningly little information about these people other than how they died. Apparently the appetite for true crime wasn't quite so hardy. A hundred years ago there were so many suicides at the c. soul that by the nineteen forties. The hotel had earned the nickname the suicide

Depression James Willis Gatsby Norton Mrs M LA Benjamin Dotage West Coast Seoul Army Medical Corps Louis De Bordon Manhattan Beach Chicago Benjamin California
Getting the Most From Your Self Tanner

You Beauty

01:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Getting the Most From Your Self Tanner

"For me who's been tanning for one hundred years i still. I'm not great of blending at my mom's like the what's this thing called the hands and and it's really because then i do the same sometimes especially if i've been drinking and then someone goes. You have a beauty. Put teddy newton. It had ten. It's like well you know what we all make mistakes. And it's and the ankle's a hot as well. So i've got a couple of relatively foolproof formulas but i still want you to practice the model car. Natural tan is in the bright pink shoob. It's like a hot cold gradual tan. So they calling a regular tan. And it's a clear watt formula. Actually put it on last night. Because i just want a little something something. It's a beautiful like a berry light glow. You wouldn't even know and like. I didn't blend very well but it's a really beautiful formula. It's no itchy itchy to smell you from across no. It's smelly won the acre ten winter. Skin is a gradual. That's really great. You could be all that up the la- tan classic farm. It's unclear so it's a lot ten but it's clear formula so you don't get any god call us just make sure you blending well. The all of paradise tanning drops. So this is literally customizing anything you put them into. Pop them into somebody lotion in customize and you could build over a few nights just to get that right ten and i practice practice practice.

Teddy Newton Tan Classic Farm LA
The 1914 Visit That Changed Australia

The Science Show

02:11 min | 2 weeks ago

The 1914 Visit That Changed Australia

"So do australians have a show really enthusiasm for scientists and does it. Matter will consider a book based on a visit over one hundred years ago when three shiploads of scientists from the british association here and thousands turned out. It was like the beatles. Fifty years later professor linnet. Russell is director of indigenous studies at monash and book is called a trip to the dominions. The scientific event that changed australia net russell. I'm fascinated to hear that. The british association advancement of science which is similar to the one. We used to have an aesthetic or dan's s. And of course the triple. As in america which is still going strong is one hundred ninety now and was just before the first world war nineteen fourteen. I think it was three phipps and one hundred seventy. Five scholars came out to australia for war. What was the purpose. What was the plan. There's a couple of things that the federal government really wanted to do. The first thing was they wanted to showcase australian science so they were keen to bring these scholars almost overwhelmingly min to australia. So that they could show off. Innocence thou- early development of science and they were very very excited about the opportunity it had been talked about for several decades prior to the actual nine hundred fourteen meeting because they had in the nineteenth century thought about whether or not they could get to australia and in fact went to south africa. And the thing that really amazed me as well beyond the scale with the ships and all the rest of it is that when the various scholars from britain arrived they had public events to which thousands turned up even then. It is absolutely astonishing. If you look in the back of the report there are literally thousands upon thousands of names and these are sort of just ordinary everyday people their mechanics for many palms and their schoolteachers from essendon and from someone from q. And this is the melbourne part. And they've got just so many average people who obviously had a great interest in science and we're very cain to come in here from the world's greatest scientists

British Association British Association Advancemen Australia Linnet Monash Beatles Phipps Russell DAN Federal Government America South Africa Britain Essendon Cain
TV Reports: Fire in food factory in Bangladesh kills dozens

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

TV Reports: Fire in food factory in Bangladesh kills dozens

"Bangladesh TV stations say at least forty nine people have died in a fire that broke out at a food and beverage factory outside the country's capital an official has confirmed that a fob again Thursday night at the five story for some food and beverage limited factory just outside the capital dot com he said additional details were not yet clear while local TV says rescuers were trying to recover the bodies from of the burn factory which was locked from the inside when the fire began Bangladesh has a tragic history of industrial disasters in twenty nineteen a five the oldest part of the city a four hundred year old area cramped with apartments shops and warehouses left at least sixty seven people dead I'm Charles Taylor that's not

Bangladesh Charles Taylor
A 100-Year-Old's Birthday Wish: Act on Climate Change

Climate Cast

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

A 100-Year-Old's Birthday Wish: Act on Climate Change

"The most critical issue humankind faces. And we're not doing anywhere near enough. Tom swain has seen a lot in his one hundred years on planet earth. He's been an insurance executive a city mayor. He even headed a state agency but it is eighties when most octogenarians might be enjoined quiet years. Tom began a quest to climate. Change awareness that journey lead to the creation of the swain climate policy series at the university of minnesota's humphrey school of public affairs. Why does this self-described small government conservative. So actively pursue climate change solutions. Tom swain happy one hundredth birthday this month and welcome to climate cast and crew. Tell us about the focus of the swain climate policy series at the university of minnesota's humphrey. School what. I turned two hundred or about to turn a hundred people. Ask me what i wanted to do. And my birthday. And i said i want more awareness and involvement on the whole issue of climate crisis. 'cause i think is the most critical issue humankind faces and we're not doing anywhere near enough. In order to prevent what ultimately some people see is the earth becoming uninhabitable. You've been a corporate executive. You've been a local mayor You've described yourself as a small government conservative for most of your one hundred years. Why do you see climate change solutions as good for our economy and our lifestyle. I'm not thought about it quite as much in terms of its impact on economy. Our lifestyle. I just think that the current generation is for the most part on this issue and expecting the next generation to deal with the critical issues

Tom Swain Humphrey School Of Public Affa University Of Minnesota TOM Humphrey
10 Things to Tell People Why You Aren't Drinking

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:44 min | 3 weeks ago

10 Things to Tell People Why You Aren't Drinking

"Today. We're talking about all awkward summertime situation or how we make them awkward before they even happen. Because we're future tripping about how uncomfortable we're going to be an anxious about what people will think if you're not drinking and what will you say. And how will they react today. I have ten things you can tell people why you aren't drinking to help you get through the summer situations with confidence and with yours. Sobriety in tact now listen. I don't think it's a great idea to put yourself in super awkward situations especially when you're newly sober. But i also know you are on your own journey and you have to learn for yourself what works for you and what doesn't if you are going to go into challenging situations or if you have to go into challenging situations because it's a family thing or a work that you can't avoid then i want you to be prepared. Today's episode is a cheat sheet to fast track. You from struggling with overwhelming zaidi about what you'll say and how everyone else will react to being able to relax and feel confident like you've been alcohol-free for hundred years it ain't no thing all by planning ahead if you take some time to think about in advance what you'll say and how you'll respond to people then it doesn't seem so scary

Zaidi
The Science Of Measuring Audience Engagement With Dr. Nick Hobson

MarTech Podcast

02:27 min | 3 weeks ago

The Science Of Measuring Audience Engagement With Dr. Nick Hobson

"Nikki said yesterday. One of the things that stuck out to me. And i i asked you to put a pin in. It was talking about your ability to evaluate and use data to understand what somebody's sort of mental status. Or what their psychology. What goes into their decision. Making let spend a little time talking about that. How do you figure out or i guess. What are the variables that you think about. When you're trying to understand what someone's decision making looks like so you can start from the very beginning which we also do in the beginning and we say if we had to sort of lay out every single reason every single psychological state every sort of internal process. That actually happens if we could some weird futuristic world which maybe we're not so far away from because you probably get there. We could look at them on a screen or on the table and say these are the ten. These are the twenty or whatever number it is that matter most in predicting some sort of important dot com that's the ideal sort of state we want now human behavior and the human mind in the human brain is infinitely complex. And although we've come a long way in the last one hundred years in particular the last twenty years since sort of neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience technology. There's so much to be done to get to a really great point where we have a great deal of accuracy so you start from that point and then the question for us is okay. What is that number is defined is. The two three is twenty-five we don't know. And we use very fancy statistical modeling things that's called factor analysis and other sort of more advanced modeling guesses relevant. Ai and machine learning and we basically prove or show with a degree of confidence that these are the number of things and this is what they are. Now go and collect data ankle zero. How strong they are with a group of individuals so the second that you said neuro science my pea brain got intimidated started blackout and not able to comprehend the various factors. So i understand. And i'll put this in layman terms. We could take pictures of the brain right now and we can get actual data to see what drives activity so we provide stimulation and understand what's happening in the brain and then start to use data from what stimulus is being driven to figure out some idea of decision making

Nikki
Defining Holistic Medicine and Its Benefits With Dr. Shealy and Dr. Sorin

Merkaba Chakras

02:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Defining Holistic Medicine and Its Benefits With Dr. Shealy and Dr. Sorin

"Back up a little bit and explain to people what is holistic medicine. Because they know regular medicine they can go and see the doctor at the clinic or the hospital but what is holistic medicine for mines is putting by mine and so together in other words to me a so in carnets foreign experience but we have a basic physical need to survive. You know. you've gotta have air water shelter nurturing kind of thing but we have things to do but at the so level we are in touch with god and the divine in what got left out of medicine. Three hundred years ago was the so and to me. It was psychology as well. But unfortunately i why did they leave out that element of spirit. That you've spirit out of medicine is no. Why would you make decisions like that. I think it was good any But interestingly i've never had any doubt that i am a spirit old. Yeah everybody knows that and So in in seventy two. I discovered technique co owner jerry training it had been around since nineteen twelve twenty. Six hundred references is on it. When i learned it but i suddenly start duties with my chronic pain patients. All of a sudden that took over it was so important and how i helped to heal patients that in nineteen seventy four went back to get a phd ecology. Woo at. I'm wanna say not a conventional Program with the program will saybrook. University is humanistic. Psychology humanistic psychology. Actually is is really related to being humid related to avenue spirit. It is the the sacred if you will carter psychology As i i learned that i can take unto training in changing into all kinds of things are now we have sixty eight. Different mental exercises retraining the

Technique Co Jerry
Why Do Americans Celebrate the Fourth of July with Fireworks?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

02:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Do Americans Celebrate the Fourth of July with Fireworks?

"Does this sound familiar at all. Without a visual clue it might be a little hard to figure out. But that's the sound of fireworks. Many of you are curious about how these celebratory explosions work. And why we use them. Historians and archaeologists think fireworks started in china. Maybe as early as twenty two hundred years ago and they've been used in europe and other parts of the world for at least eight hundred years in the united states where our show is based they've become a big tradition on the fourth of july. So hi my name is nicholas in six years old. And i live in plymouth michigan and i want to know why people do fireworks on the fourth of july. Thank you bye while nicholas. Americans have been celebrating. July fourth fireworks since seventeen. Seventy seven the first anniversary of the signing of the declaration of independence. John adams was one of the people who signed that document in seventeen. Seventy six a year earlier declaring their wish for the american colonies to become independent from england. Afterwards adams wrote to his wife that he wanted that day to be celebrated with lots of parades shows bonfires bells illuminations. Adams was a well known person. In the early days of the united states he later became the first vice president and the second president so his wish would have been shared with others as well and so on the one year anniversary of the signing. The city of philadelphia had a big celebration with thirteen fireworks. One for each of the original thirteen colonies. Now john adams didn't come up with this idea entirely on his own. English royalty had been using fireworks for national celebrations since at least the thirteenth century. Which went fireworks came to europe. They were widely in use by the fifteenth century. That's about six hundred years ago. But they were hard to find in the early days of the united states so celebrations back then often included guns and cannons more than actual fireworks.

Nicholas John Adams United States Plymouth Europe China Michigan Adams England Philadelphia
"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:28 min | 8 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Paul rogers who co-authored my book with me Lucky me the three of us. Go out to dinner with our wives about once a month and paulin. I've been trying to get bothered to do a book. He and i would do it together. But he's not he's reluctant to do it just doesn't seem to want to so you can't get out of a tournament and he didn't wanna you well. I'm glad that you're preserving of these stories. And i'm curious because it seems like you have been very open minded and adaptable throughout your career. When it comes to trying new things and now you know at ninety nine years old starting a podcast seems like you're very open to new thing. Well you know. Podcast is interesting. Because i am unique and i go back that far and unless i tell it was gonna tell it. I don't know if there any other players living at played with point four it. I guess there are but Mickey mantle greenberg. joe gordon. I look booed ro. I'm and i'm happy to share my experiences with those guys. Warren spahn and johnny sain. Just so many joe dimaggio and i'm happy doing then. I like doing it so why not do it. In last time we talked to you. We asked you bet. Jackie robinson but this time i wanted to ask you about larry doby who i imagine you just talked about in your nine thousand four hundred. Yeah i'd talk a lot about. Larry doby because i don't think he's received anywhere near the credit right that he should receive. He was first black in american league. He went through the same indignities that robinson did. I don't wanna take anything away from jack. Up played against jack in nineteen forty six when he was he was in montreal and i was in baltimore and the international cannot and i had occasion to watch him and and play against him all that year and i admired him. I thought he was a very good player. And a good guy on the proved to be just that he was very deserving lehrer dovy very very deserve. What was it like when when he came up in forty seven well he was accepted. It was the same thing he had to sleep in different hotels. He couldn't eat in a restaurant and he did all the things. that jacket. larry was a very nice guy. Good teammate and a damn good hitter and with power power hitter. One thing that i was struck by as i was reading through some of the coverage of your birthday and i wonder if this might be a topic of the future podcast episode was a really lovely answer that you gave to. Mlb dot michael clare about the role that your wife played in your career and the support that she gave you. And i wondered if you could talk a little bit about what life is like for the wife of a major leaguer and a farm director in baseball executive. Because i imagine that she has a fair number of stories that she tell the podcast to come onto. You wanna talk to her. Sure she put her on. yeah. I'll.

Larry doby Mickey mantle greenberg joe gordon Paul rogers Warren spahn johnny sain paulin joe dimaggio Jackie robinson jack american league robinson montreal baltimore michael clare larry Mlb
"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

08:07 min | 8 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And i think all of that is good to think about. But i also just find it really hard to believe that. If you're the mets and you have all this steve cohen money and you got all these cohen bucks and you want to shower someone with them that you can't go to real muto and be like how 'bout this wild number that he wouldn't go y- okay. I mean maybe he doesn't wanna play in new york. Maybe he doesn't wanna play in queens. Maybe he doesn't want to be the face of this new era of the mets. Like i don't know. I don't know remove show. I don't know what his hierarchy of needs are when it comes to the next contract that he sides but it does strike me as sort of an odd excuse. Because it's like if you're willing to spend the most money then it seems like it's a non issue and you know there is reference made to a bidding war. And what have you. But it's like you're never. It seems hard to believe that you're going to get more efficient sort of bang for your buck in this market than signing realmuto. He's the best. And it's a position of need on your roster like what are we doing here right sandy. Alderson seemed to suggest that it was a matter of timing that they didn't want to weed round for him. But maybe you'd better off. Her would have made up his mind. You know i was reading another report. There was a report that digitally mayhew and the yankees were like. Twenty five million dollars apart but it was like well lemay mayhew wants for years and one hundred and the yankees want to give him four years and seventy five or something and like even four seventy five. I think that is above what most people projected for will mayhew in this market. Which was expected to be so depressed and so if that is the real difference between them and there were some subsequent reports that suggested maybe the difference between them is actually bigger than that. But if that's the low number and maybe they end up meeting somewhere in the middle. Then that's another data point. That sorta says well. Maybe this market won't be quite so disastrous. At least not for everyone and in a piece i was reading about that at j. dot com. It was mentioned quote. It's believed the. Mlb players association has strongly suggested to free agents not to accept deals just yet unless their exact prices met technically. It's still early in the offseason with spring training not scheduled to start until mid-february there's a sense in the industry that spring training and opening day could be pushed back as the owners and players worked to navigate another year in the time of the coronavirus and vaccine news. Get your price or wait. It out is essentially what free agents are being advised. The person said so. If that's the case then yeah maybe the people who are signing got their price but the fact that some players are getting their prices may be better than people expected coming into this. Yeah i think that it's i mean. It's never a bad thing. If what you want is your expectation and hope for the market is that players will be paid commensurate with their talent when you see players meeting or exceeding your understanding of where that lies from a dollar perspective. That's not a bad thing like it's such a bad thing. I do think that like the back end of this deal. Might end up looking of gnarly for the mets because even as craig edwards pointed out when he wrote the suppress at van graphs. Like even if you assume that what he showed last year and in two thousand eighteen is his new baseline he's still a catcher advancing into his thirty so he's gonna have age related decline regardless of what his new sort of defensive and hitting is. But also your steve cohen and you have billions of dollars. So maybe don't care about the back end of the deal lake riding on our. It's funny how cohen has become such a celebrity. Really since he bought the mets. It one needs to chill out. Yes i know that. His twitter presence is abusing right now. Almost endearing in a way in like cow a oddly punctuated. It is times like it. It seems like he is writing these tweets as opposed to getting someone else to write them for him. Yes i mean he is maybe not quite as cuddly his tweets but it is just sort of striking like how you already are. Multi-billionaire like steve cohen. And a big person in the business world but like most people didn't know who steve cohen was. Your average new yorker didn't really know who he was and yet may be. Bobby axelrod was based on him but he wasn't like a household name or anything. And yet you buy a sports franchise and suddenly everyone knows who you are. And millions of people in your city love you and follow you and hang on your every word and peace seems to be really enjoying this personal tweeting. That he's doing and just kind of goes to show you like. Buying sports team is a money making venture or is treated as such by many people who purchase sports teams. But it's also just really about echo in about getting recognized in a way that you weren't in kind of like being the big man in town you know by the sports team like get recognized. People know who you are people care what you say. Outside of the boardrooms you know people are talking about you. And so that's i think a big part of the reason why a lot of people wanna by sports teams. I mean if. You're steve cohen yet maybe you think it is a valuable asset to add to your portfolio. But i'm sure he could invest that money in some other way. That would make him just as much so really. You probably do it because you wanna be famous and you want to be liked in a way that you can't be just for being rich really so i guess that's a big part of why you would want to buy a sports team. I can hear our listener saying that. You always say that. You want more steve bombers in baseball which i think is the the sort of basketball equivalent to two cohen right. We're here flamboyant and clearly super invested almost to the point of mania. And i think that yeah like if we're picking a mold of billionaire to engage with the sport. I'd rather one whose i'd like to win. A world series and the way that i'm deriving my sense of personal ego and satisfaction is by mets twitter liking me which like as an aside seems like a thing that should be examined with the help of a professional but we all like what we like and some of the stuff we like is really weird. So that's that's steve. Cohen's thing then go with god and a good wind but i do. I do want to do want to caution. people should just okay just. It's okay to enjoy it clearly. I'm not going to tell people to not enjoy something and twenty twenty. I'm not a monster. Just remember like you don't have to just don't give yourself away cheaply as all i'm asking for just saying you don't have to be impressed. You don't have to be impressed. You're not obligated. He should a good team on the field. That's what he should be obligated to do as an owner. You are not obligated to find him charming he want to. That's cool but you don't have to s- okay. I get it. If i were mets fan. I'm sure i'd be seduced by now. I mean i don't know if you can even say like eh. He'll get milkshake duct at some point. Because like you know. He's already like ben dineh his company. You know plead guilty insider trading so like that happened already cast. But you know it's like if you've been living under the wilpon regime for perhaps your whole life or or decades and then suddenly a competent person appears and Speaks to you in a way that you would want your owner to speak and you know easier said than done but hey he signed a couple free agents and that's encouraging the so i get it. I understand the cult of cohen. I just thinking about it from his perspective. Like you're worth fourteen billion or whatever like what more do you want or need like what do you lack. And i guess the only thing money can buy really at that. Point is the kind of fame that he has now in like people carrying about him in a way that they would not have cared about him before or even heard of him. So it's just overnight. You know you're a big figure in the business world. Most people don't know who you are. Then you buy a baseball team and suddenly you're famous and everyone's talking about you and liking you. He had very very few twitter followers..

steve cohen mets mayhew lemay mayhew cohen Mlb players association yankees craig edwards Alderson Bobby axelrod queens steve bombers new york twitter ben dineh baseball basketball Cohen steve
"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

05:04 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Carlos and I are at the theatre. The audiences of buzz with excitement. Yes. But also many of them are the insects that infest this theater. Bugs became entranced by the story over the years passing down through brief generation. After brief generation history of all that happened before the story of the play became something of a religion to this creepy crawly civilization, and so now the bugs are jittery on the walls thrilled to beat the generation that gets to see the end of this great tale. The curtain rises on a scene. I recognize well. It is a simple set of studio apartment. A kitchen caught a window overlooking a brick wall. A man sits in the corner deep in thought Doorbell rings come in it's open, the man calls. A woman enters she is very old tottering unsteadily on legs that have carried our for many many years. Please take my seat. The man says with genuine concern. Thank you. She says collapsing with relief onto the cushions then looking out. As for the first time noticing the audience. I know this woman I I saw her as a baby later as a twenty year old, it seems she has lived her whole life on the stage taking part in this play. The woman says his Hanoch her spin. I was born in this theater clutching scripted my off. That was bigger than I was my twin in a way. I started acting in that script of mind before I was even aware of the world. I grew up in that script lived my entire life in the play I had written from infancy to now. And she rises and the man reaches out to help but she waves him away she speaks her. Voice is strong ringing out through the theater. The play ends with my death. Because the play is my life. It is bounded by the same hours and minutes that I am. Audiences wrapped many have tears in their eyes even the INCEX. Weep. Thank you for these Hundred Years Hannah Hirshman says. This script is complete. She walks to the window. It might look like raid she says. Who knows? Lights. Thunderous. Applause cries of a claim and Hannah Hirschman dies to the best possible sound person can hear concrete evidence of the good they have done in the lives of other humans. Stay tuned next for the second ever Night Vale players playhouse production now that they finally finished this one. They're going to do. God's spell. And from the script of a life I have not yet finished performing. Good night night fail. Good night. Welcome to Night Vale is a production. Of Nightingale, presents it is written by Joseph, Fink, and Jeffrey Craner and produced by disparition. The Voice of Night Vale is see slow Baldwin original music by disparition all of it can be found at disparition dot band camp, Dot Com. This episodes weather was shallow is by Brad bence. Go find out more at Brad, Ben, school, music, Dot Com comments, questions, canal us at Info at. Welcome to Night Vale Dot Com or follow us on twitter at night Ville radio or wait for us to run out of television. WE'RE GONNA run out of television soon right check out. Welcome to Night Vale Dot. com for Info about our upcoming livestream production of our classic episode the sandstorm with a number of brand new guest appearances live theater but you don't have to wear real clothes to watch it today's proverb. Many are called but few are chosen and fewer still pick up. Because most calls are spammy stays. High it's Joseph Inc my friend Jeffrey I created welcome tonight fail back in two thousand twelve normally worthy the ones turning our ideas into writing. But for our brand new show start with this, it's you who will do the creating on each episode. We'll talk about a topic of the creative process. Then we will give you too short assignments something to consume and something to create. You can share your work on our membership forum to see what other people are up to. We want you to start creating one simple assignment at a time because the best way to start writing is to start writing and find it wherever you get your podcasts..

Night Vale Night Vale Dot Com Night Vale Dot. Hannah Hirshman Dot Com Brad bence Carlos Hannah Hirschman Joseph Inc Jeffrey I twitter Joseph Baldwin Jeffrey Craner Ben Fink
"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

03:29 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Believe. Cab. But you throw it all away. They have. Off. The three. Spin. System. A. Wow..

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

06:27 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"From the Night Vale Medical Board. Twenty years passed without me thinking about the hundred year play. You know how it is one day you're an intern at the local radio station doing all the normal Erin's like getting coffee and painting pinnacles upon station management doors as part of the ritual of the slumbering ancients. Then twenty years passes and everything is different for you. Your boss is gone. Now you are the host of the community radio station and there are so many new responsibilities and worries and lucid nightmares in which you explore a broken landscape of colossal ruins so With all of that I, just kind of forgot the hundred year play was happening. But they were toiling away in they're doing scenes around the. Building and tearing down set set a frantic pace trying to keep up with the script that relentlessly went on page after page and sometimes one of the people working on the plate would wonder how does this all end? But before they could flip ahead and look, there would be another seem that had to be performed. They wouldn't have a chance. So no one knew how it ended. No one except Hannah Hirschman, the mysterious author of this centennial. Play. Soon after becoming radio host during the reading of a community calendar I was reminded that the play was still going on and so decided to check in I put on my best Tux. Yeah. It's the one with the Scales Confetti Canon and then took myself to a night at the theatre. I can't say what happened in the plot since that first scene but certainly much had transpired. We were now in a space colony thousands of years from now, and the set was simple just some sleek chairs and a black backdrop dotted with white stars of paint. A woman was giving a monologue about the distance she felt between the planet she was born on which I believe was supposed to be earth and the planet she now stood on. I understood from what she was saying that the trip she had taken to this planet. One Way. And that she would never return to the place she was born. We are all of us move. By Da. She whispered in a cracked force voice. Not, what of US dies in the world we were born into. Sitting in my seat in that darkened theater, I knew to facts with certainty. The first was that this woman had been giving a monologue for several days. Now, she wavered on her feet speaking the entire four hours that I was there. And I don't know how much longer she spoke after I left, but it could have been weeks. She was Pale and her voice was barely audible, but there was something. Transfixed sing about it and the audience sat in perfect silence leaning forward to hear her words. The other fact I understood was that this woman was the newborn from the very first scene. Not, just the same character, but the same actor twenty years later, she was still on that stage still portraying the life of the child we had been introduced to in the opening lines. She was an extraordinary performer. Presumably having had a literal lifetime of practice. And that was the last time I saw the play. Until tonight when I will go to watch. The final scene. But first. Let's have a look at that community calendar. Tonight, the school board is meeting to discuss the issues of school lunches. It seems that some empower argued that it isn't enough that for some reason, we charge the kids actual money for these lunches. They argue that the students should also be required to give devotion and worship to a great glowing cloud who's benevolent power will fill their lives with purpose. Due to new privacy rules, we cannot say which member of the school board made the suggestion. The board will be taking public comment in a small flimsy wooden booth out by the highway just entered the damp dark interior and whispered your comment and it will be heard. Perhaps, not by the school board, but certainly by something. Tuesday morning Lee Marvin will be offering free acting classes. At the REC center the classes entitled acting is just lying. We'll teach you how acting is just saying things that aren't true. With, emotions you don't feel so that you may fool those watching with these miss truths. Fortunately. Marvin commented. Most people don't want to be told the truth and prefer the quiet comfort of ally. well-told classes are pay what you want starting at ten thousand dollars. Thursday Josh Creighton will be taking the form of a waterfall in Grove Park so that neighborhood kids may swim in him. There is not a lot of swimming opportunities in town is dry as night vale, and so this is a generous move on Josh's part. He has promised that he has been working on the form and has added a water slide and sunbathing deck. He asked that everyone swim safely and please not leave any trash on. Friday the cornfields will appear in the middle of Town Right Br does each September as the air turns cooler and the sky and the west takes on a certain shade of green. The cornfield emanates a power electric an awful. please. Do not go into the Cornfield as we don't know what lives in there or what it wants. The city council would like to remind you that the Cornfield is perfectly safe. It is perfect and it is safe. Finally, Saturday never happened. Night if you know what's good for you got it. This has been the community calendar. Oh look at the time you're I am blathering on the play is about to end. Okay. Let Me Grab my new many recorder that Carlos got me for my birthday. It's only thirty five pounds and the antenna is a highly reasonable seven feet and I'll see you all there. What's the weather like for my commute?.

Lee Marvin Night Vale Medical Board Josh Creighton intern Hannah Hirschman US Erin Carlos Grove Park
"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

07:22 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Listeners some exciting news from the world of theatre. The hundred year play is about to reach its final scene. Yes. This is the play that has been running continuously since nineteen twenty. Written by brilliant playwright, Hannah Hirschman designed to take exactly one hundred years to four. And the tireless volunteers of the Night Vale players playhouse have been going through those scenes one after another for decade upon decade. There is little time to rehearse for each hour brings new scenes and. Will only performed once the play moves on in order to keep up with tight scheduled needed to. The entire script before a century elapse it's It is a monumental work of theater, but like all work, it must someday cease. Today specifically. I will be in attendance at that historic moment when the final scene is performed and the curtain closes on the hundred year play. More soon but I, the news. We bring you the latest on the lawsuit, the estate of Franklin Chen versus the city of Night Vale. As you know this case has grown so large and complicated that I've not had the time to discuss it in my usual community radio broadcasts. But instead have started a true crime podcast called bloody laws bloody claws, the murder of Frank Chan. Which I strive to get to the truth just what happened on that fateful night when five headed Dragon Hiram. mcdaniels met Frank Chin and then later Francesa body was found covered in burns and claw marks. It's a confounding mystery. The sheriff's secret police announced that it seems really complicated and they're not even GonNa try to solve that sucker. Oh what a secret police spokesman muttered at an earthworm found in his garden, you want us to fail. You want to see US fail. That's why you want us to investigate this case to see a let it. The family of Frank Chen say they merely want the appropriate parties in this case, the city of night fail Hiram mcdaniels and an initiative conception of God to take responsibility for their part in this tragedy. The trial is now in its tenth month and has included spirited reenactments of the supposed- murder by hopeful players playhouse performers in between their work on the hundred year play. Three changes of judge and venue due to quote some dragon attacks and constant interruptions from a local audio journalists who hosts a widely respected true crime podcast. Still with all this we near A. Judge Chaplain has indicated she will issue a ruling soon like in the next year or so she said certainly within five years listen I don't owe you a verdict just because you're paying me to do a job, you can't rush me to do it. The verdict will be done when it's done. Chaplain then huffed out of the courtroom followed by journalists, shouting recommendations for episodes of their podcast to listen to. I was present. On opening night of the hundred year play. How. The theater buzzed of course, this was partly the audience thrilled to be at the start of such an unprecedented work but mostly. It was the insects. The night failed players. playhouse had quite a pest problem at the time and still does. It's difficult to do pest control when there is a hundred year long play being performed on stage at every hour of every day. The curtain opened those many years ago on a simple set of a studio apartment, a kitchen, a hot a window overlooking a brick wall. A man sits in the corner deep in thought. A doorbell rings come here. It's open. The man says, a woman enters flustered. She is holding a newborn. This been a murder. She says, the victim was alone in a room and all the doors and windows were locked. My God, the man says springs up who could have done this and how. The woman tells him. IT TURNS OUT TO BE THE GARDENER MR sprinkle. He served with the victim and the war and never could forgive him for what happened there. He threw a venomous snake through and event. The man sits back down nodding So the mystery is solved. As a playwright, Hannah Hirschman did not believe in stringing up mysteries a second longer than was necessary. The baby in the woman's arm stirs Shish Little One. The woman says, the man looks out the window where he cannot see sky. It might look like rain he says. knows. Thus began a journey of one hundred years. And now a word from our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by the Knightdale Medical Board which would like to remind you that it is important to drink enough water throughout the day. Drink more water. Your body can't function without water without water. You're just dust made intimate water forms the squelching mud of sentence. Try to have at least ten big glasses of water not over the entire day right now see if you can get all ten of them down, explore the capacity of your stomach. See if you can make burst, you will either feel so much better or an organ will explode and you will die. An. Either one is more interesting than the mundane now. You should drink even more water than that. Wander out of your door searched the earth for liquids, find a lake and drain the entire thing until the bottom feeders flop helplessly on the flatlands laugh slushing Lee as you look upon the destruction, you have wrought the power that you possess. Now that you are well hydrated move on from the lake and come to the shore of an ocean. All Oceans are one ocean that we have arbitrarily categorized by language. The scene knows no separation and neither will you will lay belly down. On the sand, put your lips against the waves and guzzle the ocean. The ocean is salty it will not be very hydrating. So you'll need to drink a lot of it. Keep going until the tower tops of Atlantis See sky again for the first time in centuries until the strange glowing creatures of the deep deep are exposed splayed out from their bodies now that they no longer have the immense pressure of the ocean depths to keep their structure intact, and once you have drunk the oceans, turn your eyes to the stars. For their is water out there to at, you must suck dry the universe. This has been a message.

murder Hannah Hirschman Hiram. mcdaniels Night Vale A. Judge Chaplain US Frank Chen Franklin Chen Frank Chan Knightdale Medical Board Frank Chin slushing Lee Francesa
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"But that said those of us who were photographers who are champions for photography and love photography and really believe as I do that photography is a very, very high level medium deserving of its. Own Accolades independent of all other form of media photography that is to say is not junior sculpture or junior ballet or junior music or junior painting. That photography is a medium that deserves respect in and of itself. I think that historians will look back at our time and realized that this was the time in which photography really started to establish itself as an independent medium. Partly because of what's happening in the overwhelming distribution of photographic imagery through books and through digital media. To some degree this is an academic discussion because, of course, one hundred years now you and I won't be around. So we won't know and why should we even care? I think it's important for us to recognize however. That in order for an individual photograph to survive and to be of interest to anybody in future generations, it will be because it connects with them on an emotional psychological, artistic and aesthetic level. Not Because of its Extraordinary use of the technology of the day we can look back at Prince from a hundred years ago and say they're extraordinary examples of the technology of the day. But. That doesn't make them interesting in and of themselves. The reason some photographs have survived is because they speak so deeply to the human heart and I think that's the universal thing that happens with all art in all. Times Photography. So our. Times. In the history of photography will be known. As a blip. In the technological. Of. Photography. But a continuation of the aesthetic movement of the communication from our generation of our observations of the human heart and the human condition. And in that regard. We are just like all the photographers from one hundred years ago and all of the photographers from a hundred years from now. While, we are simultaneously unique in our own generation..

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"For the last fifty years anyway, a lot of photography has been presented in very high quality offset lithographic reproductions, duo tones, try tones, etc.. And we don't need to see those photographs on the wall a frame in order to appreciate them. It's a different experience of course when you see original print. And there may be something that you can get from an original print that you can't get from a book reproduction but the thing about a book reproduction is it can go almost everywhere and lots and lots of photographers know lots and lots of great photographs. Because of books. And that is a marvellous an interesting thing. That is beginning a little bit of separation between Photography and painting. And I think that is even extended further when we consider the effects of digital distribution. So much of photography is now being digitally distributed. The obvious ones are think of instagram etcetera, which will be long forgotten technologies a hundred years from now, but the method of distributing images without requiring physical paper that I suspect. We'll still remain a hundred years from now. And so I think one of the interesting things about the times in which you and I are living in our cutting edge and our contemporary times. Is simply that. Historians will look back at this time and see that this was when photography came into its own when it established itself as a medium that wasn't reproducing some other mediums form of presentation it's not junior painting any longer. But. Photography is establishing its own universe. Its own sort of language as Partially, anyway independent of physical. Media. Of course will always exist as physical media I. Don't I don't WanNa. Go down a rabbit hole that makes it sound like. I'm saying that there will be the end of prince there won't there will always be prints. But there will also be non physical distribution of images that we're seeing now for the first time, and that technology is likely to continue and the more it does. The more I think historians will look back at our time as the time when photography really came into its own. I would like to think that photography came into its own in the age of Stieglitz. But it didn't. STIEGLITZ was still trying to establish photography as a serious art medium enhance his. Exhibition of photographs right next to paintings he was trying to. Elevate photography by Association and in two ninety one he exhibited as much painting as he did photography. So, there was still a connection between. Those two media that was undeniable and photography was considered the sort of the secondary medium as much as stieglitz tried to make it not. It's still was it still is to this day and anybody who doesn't admit that is not really being realistic..

Stieglitz instagram WanNa
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"That don't have anything to do with the technology of when they were photographed or when they were published but have to do with something else by the same token poets can have their work appreciated one hundred years after they've written their poem and gone into that Great Poetry Library in the sky, the same thing can happen with photography. It points out that. Every artist I think is living at the cutting edge of whatever their technology is. If if you were a novelist one, hundred years ago, the cutting edge might have been the typewriter I don't know when the typewriter was invented but let's say it was a hundred years ago and before that it was the cutting edge was the quill and ink, and maybe the cutting edge fifty years ago was the typewriter. Every artist lives at the cutting edge in history of whatever technology is used in their particular art medium. But If we're careful if we're sensitive if we pay attention as artists, what we also realize. Is that in. To being at the cutting edge of whatever our medium is we are also simultaneously. coterminous with all artists throughout all history be they photographers or painters or sculptors, or poets, or novelist, or dancers, or singers, or whatever. And this brings me to one of the reasons why I think we're not only connected to all of history. But we do live in a time that's going to be very interesting in photography's history for reasons that don't have anything to do with the technology of making photographs and it's this. Up until now primarily because of stieglitz I've mentioned this and other contexts but primarily, because of stieglitz fine art photography has been presented to the world more or less. The same way that painting has been presented to the world. In a frame on the wall in a gallery. But we're in the midst of time when that is radically changing. When a lot of photography is starting to be seen off the wall out of the frame..

stieglitz Great Poetry Library
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"At the cutting edge of technology, the cutting edge of the thought process of what were engaged with with photographic art. It's attribute he thought he was at the cutting edge. In fact, he was at the cutting edge of technology with his photograph Viewer Magazine Camera Work and with his creative thinking about what photography could be in terms of an art medium. He could have no more imagined the future of. Football Books and dual tone printing and galleries all across America and huge events like photo plus Houston photo festival that would have been. Literally inconceivable to him. But yet, it all came to pass. I would propose that it is equally difficult for us to imagine. What photography will be a hundred years from now in twenty one twenty what the technology will be in twenty one twenty, what the means of distribution will be in twenty one twenty. But isn't it interesting that when we look at Alfred? stieglitz photographs. We can still relate to them. The technology has changed the Zeitgeist has changed. The method of presentation has changed everything about photography has changed except. The content. Content is the one thing that hasn't changed. It's evolved sure and there are things being photographed today that Stieglitz can only imagine photographing. But when you look at Stieglitz work in general. And the other photographers of his generation. We can see the content threads that are still alive today. There are photographers today who doing. Essentially. The same kind of thing or an outgrowth of the kind of thing that Stieglitz did. I would propose the same thing will happen one hundred years from now our technology will seem so primitive our methods of distribution will seem so quaint. All of the things that we're worrying about now in terms of gear and process and methods of distribution will seem. The product of our times. But in fact, the content that we produce. Will. Possibly maybe. We hope. Still be of interest. Because whatever we do in terms of. Addressing, the issues of being human being the nature of being alive the nature of observing. What, goes on around us and capturing something in our artwork will be just as valid. It'll be hundred years old, but it'll be just as valid then. As it is today. By the same token, we read novels that are a hundred years old and we can relate to that they may be the language may be a little different than what we use today and all of that but. But. Nonetheless when they touch the human heart and they address the content of what it is to be alive. They still carry forward and they're still valuable even. Novelists who aren't famous and well remembered. There's something to be gained by reading their books. There will be something to be gained by looking at our photographs. One Hundred Years from now just light. There is something to be gained by looking at photographs from a hundred years ago. Now I mentioned Stieglitz Stieglitz is famous and he's still. Appreciated, today. But if you have the opportunity, go back and look at other publications from. Well, it's hard to find them from one hundred years ago 'cause Stieglitz was sort of unique but you can get a hold of a book that has all of the camera work photographs in it. That's well worth getting not too. Surprisingly the book is called camera work the complete photographs it's published by. It's really interesting little book kind of small but very thick and supposedly contains every photograph that was published in camera work and a lot of them seem. Somewhat dated but still interesting. But..

Stieglitz Stieglitz Viewer Magazine Football Houston America Alfred
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"Here's the editor of Lens. Work Publishing. Bruce. Jensen I had a truly weird and strange experience this morning that I wanNA share with you I had to dry for about an hour this morning down to Anna Cordis and as I almost always do when I have that kind of drive I use that time to do some dictation to make nodes to. Possibly, put together ideas for an editor's comment for Lens Work and sometimes actually do the dictation and I happen to be doing a dictation about Alfred. stieglitz. And this particular dictation was sort of a bit of a test if you will because I had purchased a new Bluetooth headphone and I wanted to test how the quality of the audience would be while I was dictating in the car with the car noise driving down the freeway at seventy miles an hour. That's oftentimes a problem when it comes to try to transcribe those dictation because the car noise is so loud that it sometimes gets difficult to. Understand the words and for the dictation software to translate correctly. So I was really hoping that this new Bluetooth headphone would work. Fine. So there, I am I'm driving down the freeway I'm dictating an article about Alfred Stieglitz, and it dawns on me that Alfred Stieglitz was doing his thing. Almost, exactly a hundred years ago. and think about what Alfred Stieglitz was doing a hundred years ago. He was trying to make a place for photography in the art world he'd. Published Camera Work for a number of years, and then there was a to ninety one, the gallery in New York and he was essentially promoting photography as an art medium. When up to this point, it hadn't been promoted much as an art medium. And let's look ahead of Stieglitz for a few years. What was yet to come well yet to come in. Roughly Nineteen nineteen or nineteen twenty were gelatin silver paper and certainly things like enlargements were yet in the future and most photographers in his day were probably printing on. Platinum palladium prints or something like that. So Pretty primitive in terms of the technology that we think about today I forward today here. I am in the car driving seventy miles an hour down the freeway using my Bluetooth headphone to dictate an article about his time in photography onto my smartphone, which I'll have transcribed by the computer later so that it can appear in the digital version and print version of Lens work so that all of you can see it. That's what happened in a hundred years of technological advancement. Can you imagine what Alfred Stieglitz would say if he had been sitting next to me in the car listening to me describe in my thoughts what I think his point of view about photography was and where his place in photographic history was it it would be beyond his comprehension. To think about what I was doing. In the period of a short one, hundred years after he was. Publishing Camera Work and doing to ninety one. Now, obviously, the point of this is to project forward. Can we possibly imagine where photography is going to be a hundred years from now we like to think that we're.

Alfred. stieglitz Jensen editor Bruce Anna Cordis New York
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Years trying to get a hope. The real hotel tell room is very hard. I spoke to someone. I met at the event who goes every year in state at the holiday inn. He had to agree to a minimum of five days and paid about route three hundred and fifty dollars per night yikes <hes> he's been going for years and he kinda renews each year but there's other options <hes> this year he says i stayed at the university of wisconsin oshkosh. I pass along a brochure <hes>. It's a dorm rooms. You know what dorm rooms are like their there are no. They're simple <hes> the bathrooms down the hall maybe but the price is good lo- <hes> low prices around seventy five dollars a night and he's got some other tips on that he says is that the <hes> the university of wisconsin nash kosh is easy to get to a busta leaves. He's the dorms for ya every <hes> <hes> every. I'm not sure what it is maybe every half hour. It's it's very frequently and it costs. I five dollars a ride or thirty dollars rides so <hes> that's another option that i will be looking at. I don't know about you max but i've done camping. I've done the university and i've done believe it or not a family farm house down the road from the airport yeah so there's a lot of options besides the hotel the hotels and i don't my my remembrance. The first time i went with with the museum my remembrance of the dorm room was it was a dorm room and if you don't mind going down and showering down down the hall and know how to deal with it. It's a comfortable bed and it does have a little bit of a._c. So it's nice to come back and get a shower a._c. Not nine climbing to attend but that's just my own personal personal opinion sorry guys who can't bake and i like that idea yeah. The camping is fun <hes> you you know hotels are nice. The only concern i have is what if you're on one of those upper floors of the dormitory and you don't have air conditioning. That's gotta be pretty hot. I would imagine yeah yeah. I think there's a recommendation to bring a fan if you don't have an air conditioner in the room but <hes> hey as as for community showers i mean hey. I'm a product of the sixties. M used to beat in there with a bunch of people that who knows where they came from all taking showers. It's not a big deal but <hes> <hes> showers are nice. Patrick wiggins wrote us. He said i saw this while taxiing to my hanger salt lake international. Maybe something for the show notes oops. I send us a photo says i've seen be seventeen before an f. eighteens before but never together this <hes> photo makes for a great old meets new picture and there's just you know which be seventeen. This is david di recognize. This must be the collins foundation as i didn't i. I didn't look that closely at it. I saw be seventeen and went yup. It's be seventeen. Sorry okay. I don't know how many flying b seventeen are is there more than just one of the collings foundation. There's there's at least ten. <hes> oh yeah yes yes certainly there is i'm thinking this was parked over by the the military section you know when you come into salt lake international national general aviation military is on the other side of the field from the the terminal so i'm thinking this may be parked over there. I will put that that picture in the show notes. Somebody can identify this. <hes> this play maybe even where the eighteen comes from based on the markings which are the the markings on the f. eighteen have actually i don't really see very many markings on that if eighteen but i'm looking at a small version of the picture <hes> but patrick also says are he mentioned about how david made a comment comment about people being cargo patrick's is according to far ninety one point one quote. No person may operate in the aircraft aft carrying passengers for hire in formation flight and yet. It's not at all uncommon for this to happen in skydiving. Were jumpers paid a jump from the planes that are flying in formation. So how can it be legal for. The purpose of jumping parachute is not considered passengers..

Patrick wiggins busta david di university of wisconsin oshkos salt lake university of wisconsin collings foundation collins foundation seventy five dollars thirty dollars fifty dollars five dollars five days
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Well. It's like there's all these unique advances and technology but we're just not a neighbor with like we were in the past because they're not speed records. <hes> that's interesting rick kennedy. Wanna thank you for joining joining us for <hes> a great conversation. <hes> i'd really encourage people to take a look at this book one hundred years of reimagining flight and and even if you're not just purely an engine nut like some of us. Maybe i think you'll find it really really fascinating because i mean you can't talk about the the engines you can't describe the history you can't talk about the people involved and the decisions that were made in not talk about the airplanes as well obviously <hes> one is no good without the other so <hes> if you're interested in aviation in general in the in the history of both commercial and military <hes> we we haven't really talked much of the military aspects of this but there's a lot of that in the book as well so check it out really encourage it encourage. You take a look at it then rick thanks again. Well dave maximum max. I appreciate the chance to talk with you guys about. I mean just we're. We're all very blessed to be engaged in. A fascinating inch in this industry is so fantastic and it's booming. It's just booming. I mean it really is. It's just a continuous. It really is booming so thank first time. I really appreciate this. Are you a bit of a musician yeah as a music major in college. I played jazz. I've written a couple of books on early jazz music so yeah ah i thought i saw something about that. What what do you play yeah. I play piano <hes> which basically consist of walking the base an four four line the base. I play a lot of like monk and you know nineteen fifties and sixties jazz but my <hes> my study of it in terms of book riding is nineteen twenties and thirties jazz labels <hes> living in cincinnati. I live an hour away from richmond. Indiana where the first great jazz record label able was. I mean the twenty so i like interest on that stuff so yeah that was a journalist and i covered entertainment music and so i had a chance to hang out with all the great jazz players great <hes>. That's amazing but i i wanted. I just went in with one thing just to say and i think you'll see that in the book i i liked. I made a very big point to the site accomplishments from rolls royce and pratt and the book because yes the three of us just absolutely hate each other but respect respect each other because the big three are killing each other and just have done some great things in the aviation world so we all have the grizzly like each on a little a little bit well and i'm guessing you wouldn't have as many accomplishments if there weren't one or two competitors right i mean hasn't that really driven the the industry too far greater accomplishments schwantz than you could have if there were just you know one company out there doing this and that's why worry about consolidation sometimes because when it there i mean i really do. I mean you you know. Roles came along with a wide chord fan where he once. We got to do that and we came composite. Not roles is working on a composite and we're don't seem sees prescott this weird good system and so we're always trying to leapfrog each other and i think has made a huge difference in the quality aviation for travelers and in the military world have three guys just cotton each other up and i hope that always remains that way because the consolidation at least makes me nervous especially because they can play you guys off against each other. Oh if you look at u._t. C. a. g. guy look at u._t..

rick kennedy Indiana richmond dave prescott cincinnati pratt one hundred years
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"From inside the engine to cool parts parts so you lose about thirty percent of the air that comes to that from san the cool parts and the rest goes to the engine well with ceramic matrix composites. Is you have to do that so when we opened that plant in alabama a year ago the agreement was with the government they gave us a nice grant for that thing and they you said you will make that raw material available to defense company and the united states but guess what you press gonna be buying that stuff. They're not stupid you know they're they're good company. There are on c._m._c.'s already and so i think at some point she will probably be a provider of the material to pratt and other aerospace companies in the united states. Pratt has its own operation was c._m._c.'s g has its own r._n._d. Research in gear turbofans by the way the gear your turbofan is a company owned by g._e. In italy yeah i know i was when i i know i know i know my. Oh my goodness 'cause i remember i remember before i it was called fiatavio but maybe it's just obvio- now. I'm not sure yeah i i used to <hes> visit naples <hes> several times a year to see them and then when when i remember when g. e. bought them and i'm on thinking oh no oh my goodness so it's really interesting. Is i look in the future. I think you're the question you're exactly right. I think if you're gonna see a marrying of geared systems you're marrying a obviously ceramic matrix composites on the geared system. It really comes down to the thrust class and works the best there <hes> that can becoming yeah so. I think that's gonna come. I said the beginning to show the real challenges for all of us is going to be any new technology introduction financially. You have to be able to meet the same reliability of the predecessor engine and that is not easy easy to do at all tough. I mean look at pratt right now. I mean you know they are paying some serious money right now to get this engine gone and it's gonna work. I mean i'm a g._i. I'm just telling you and within the halls of general electric they know the press. They're good and they're gonna make that thing work. It's going to be painful foolish l. but they're gonna make it work because that's the world we live in today. These engines have to be so reliable and that's a financial arrangement when you sell them. Yes absolutely you have you have guarantees and you have remedies. It's crazy yeah yeah. Thank god for the spare parts yeah. That's a a a model. I know <hes> because i was involved. I'm that pratt and whitney struggled with as the the o._j._t. A dis the seventy seven and others was starting to wind down in that spare parts sales stream was starting to starting to dry up. That's when pregnant. He decided to engage a lot more in the side of the business. <hes> gee did as well but but i think gee strategy now is is somewhat different and in that <hes> g._e. I guess is not owning <hes> maintenance shops overhaul shops part repair businesses <hes> but <hes> i guess licensing <hes> to others to third parties that kind of the strategy for tomorrow for g._e. Aviation he's now. That's exactly right. There was twenty years of stumbling. Oh boy in trouble for saying that but really the night in the nineteen nineties the theory was was a general electric corporation was just this just.

pratt united states Pratt alabama c._m._c. naples italy g. e. whitney thirty percent twenty years
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Is really the most successful jet engine manufacturer curious syria and so yes. I talked to my friends from pratt and whitney. They always say it. Wasn't i still owe you either right there right there absolutely absolutely right now that that was the one thing you know working for g for thirty years. I always thought of c._f._m. International joint-venture the bills the engine for the seven three seven the three twenty. I always thought as joint venture of two companies as they did the research it was so obvious it's a relationship between g._e. And the french government it's a government relations should be so. It's like second joint venture between g._e. And france that's simple it gonna go if it wasn't for pompidou chiampou president pompidou's france the jet the joint venture never would have been binging been created so so you go from you know the tia thirty nine with a high bypass engines lisa see six commercial engines and then that leads were relationship with a friend and then she creates the effeminate national and the rush system and the m fifty six engine. They're great engines there. They're really really good engines pratt. I don't you know i'm i'm a little out out of touch but <hes> at least for a while there pratt had a engine overhaul shop that did c._f._m. Fifty-six engines and i it was kind of a joy to to tour for that years ago in this i it's a it's a great engine. There's no doubt about that. Well the first generation to see if the secret was as is we use the the <hes> the hot section of the b one bomber engine that was called the f. one. No one had single stage turbine. I'll get too technical technical with your audience but now you can get technical. Go ahead now. I can't and that was the secret yup. Oh that was the secret i was. The absolute secret is that had a single stage turbine and so the strategy and philosophy was we may never win on fuel burn. We may never went on admissions. We may never win on knows that damn thing will be reliable as hell and kill everybody on maintenance costs and so that was the philosophy. You're going to see a families to keep that engine really simple now when you get to the next generation which is when pratt's dorms and with the geared system. You're turbofan. Dan then again see offense. Let's keep it simple.

pratt pompidou chiampou president po france syria french government whitney Dan thirty years
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Powering aircrafts in war too so we were the logical choice to do the jet engine so people are always confused by g._e. Did engines. It's like well oh yeah because we had to create power for those electrical products and that power system lead right to turbo superchargers and then from there to jet jet engines and i think it's interesting how the the government of integral to not as g._e. Aviation but aviation companies in in general in terms of pushing and in many cases funding the development of technologies well. That's exactly right. I mean gee would never i mean in the early days. A turbo superchargers was the direct result of a work with the government to try to figure out how they get piston piston planes to fly higher as we all know. Is you get hired. There's less oxygen and the piston playing can't inserts losing power so that was a major government government initiative and war one they got involved and then of course by the mid nineteen thirties with the advent of a b seventeen turbo superchargers made that very lethal weapon and so from there you go into all the fighter jets of the forties and fifties. She's i mean. She didn't really have a viable commercial business until the nineteen th avenue right. I think people may not may not realize that during the war effort the second world war of course pratt and whitney and right were focused on producing as many radio engines his could in g._e. Was supporting the effort the war effort with these <hes> turbo superchargers that's right yeah right in fact the and they selected g._e. To do the first the u._s. jet engine because they didn't want wright aeronautical and pratt and whitney to be distracted because they needed them to produce those piston piston engines and the jet engines very different so they took the frank whittle design from england and it was a it was a competition between westinghouse and g._e. But she was perfectly perfect should have to do that but you're right. I mean and then of course pratt them credit. Manny didn't take them long once. The jet engine was a viable product by the early fifties they they were all over it. They were all yes. <hes> tried to to play catch up and of course it was some early successes. Does that really kind of lodged them in. I would say carried the company in many ways for for many many years but but we'll we'll get up to that time period one of the fun things that <hes> some people may not realize is there was actually it at one point an effort to develop the atomic engine and both g._e. He and pratt where it's separately on that. That was the one of the things that in doing this book. I worked at g._e. For thirty years it's funny when you write a book you have a chance to step it back and see these broad themes and she was always attracted by exotica. You know we love the atomic engine. The supersonic engine that that was canceled the j. ninety three engine power the x._p. Seventy and while we're doing all this league tzadek stuff perhaps like okay. We'll just do a this figure bigger away to do a google spool compressor on our military engine and they just cleaned our clock on those first jetliners of first generation but you're right right. There was an effort to do an atomic engine. It went for purity years. It was finally killed by john kennedy's administration but the idea was that the atomic reactor was where the combustion was so great thing about jet engine we always joke suck squeeze bang and blow so the air comes through you compress the air and then you bring that compressed air into atomic reactor and that i pointed blows out the outside the determine so the idea was that the aircraft would just you know basically circle the world nonstop for months on end yeah but <hes> that's kind of g. was very involved in all this kind of exotic concepts. <hes> were pratt was doing that but but they were also thinking. We're going to get involved in this jetliner. Business g was a little slow to get through the game. They really are different companies..

g._e pratt whitney wright aeronautical john kennedy Manny england westinghouse thirty years
"hundred year" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"hundred year" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"And that history connected to Einstein's theory of relativity is also very closely connected to the first World War. There wasn't astronomer in putt, stem. His name is Evan Finley, frankly, and he was obsessed about trying to prove Einstein's theory of relativity. He was working very closely with an Stein and already in nineteen fourteen. He set out to go to observe an eclipse in the Crimea, but that was at the evening of the first World War, and so he was immediately captured and locked away and was not able to do the observation. And in, in the sense this was a blessing in disguise because at that time, incensio referral tippety was not yet completely the parade, and he still was missing a factor of two so his predictions where effector of two off from the real result. Two years later nine hundred sixteen college fat chilled was actually, the first one to solve Einstein's equations. Very simply, and he did this on the front in the Russian Freund, while he was a soldier in the first World War, and then later. Basically presented his results in Berlin, and said he would never have thought that his equations would have such a simple solution. Now, unfortunately culture died a year later from a disease that he has actually caught at the front. And so we were missing a big genius in the strana me for the rest of the time. But his equations are still what Beijing are current understanding of calls on, and then sir ASA Addington at that time, he was not yet, sir. He was working at Cambridge. He was a professor at Cambridge at that time. And during the first World War, there was almost no communication between Germany Stein and Cambridge, but I think had the private version of the incense theory of relativity, and he used that theory in order to evade becoming a soldier in the first World War, because he convinced the London. Military that he doesn't have to go to war, but he's preparing solar eclipse, and so, adding right after the first World War, then set out to west Africa, and there was another expedition to Brazil, where they observed the light bending and the exactly measured or roughly measured. What had predicted and I think the most important effect of this measurement was that all of a sudden became famous like a rockstar, and from then, on everybody knew the theory of relativity. And a lot of people were trying to measure it to prove it. And in the years after there were many, many different and more and more accurate measurements that prove the theory of general, relativity hundred years later, gravitational waves read discovered, which was a major prediction of the Serey, and then also just last year, the gravitational Redshift from the black hole neglected center was detected with telescopes at ease. And so I think this round up the hundred year history of the general theory of relativity, when you think about similar events that could happen now or the future. I cannot help but think about the mess, which we are in our ignorance about dark matter dark energy, black holes. We don't have a clue yet about what dark matter is what dark energy is. We know.

Einstein ASA Addington Freund Cambridge Germany Stein Evan Finley Berlin Crimea Beijing Brazil London west Africa hundred years hundred year Two years