32 Burst results for "Hundred Thousand Times"

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Were you know running the vietnam war for a long time. There's no obvious idea that. Because if kennedy had been robert kennedy. Bobby kennedy had been elected. He would have gotten us out of vietnam. Politicians are tricky. They say things and they don't end up doing them all the time. So i don't know enough about that era to say how devoted or how influential he would have been actually make that happen. And as far as watergate is concerned watergate was an example of agree gio abuse of power illegal actions on the part of the president but it also led to reforms of the system. You know the ability to have special prosecutors and things like that so maybe it would have been worse overall. If watergate had not happened if i were to imagine ideal histories i would have wanted to stop some terrible massacres tragedies genocides right like the holocaust or various other terrible things that happened. There is a little bit more cut and dried to me that if that had not happened the world would be better on the other hand. I don't know like if it comes to either assassinating or not assassinating one person. I'm not what not at all sure. What would need to happen to guarantee that the holocaust would not have happened. Yeah you can say will kill baby hitler. That's the usual thing to say but it's not at all obvious to me that the social forces wouldn't have led to something more or less similar to what actually happened in world war two. I don't know maybe they wouldn't. But i just don't know claudio slam says about a moua the interstellar visitor. We had that. We talked about with envelope while his speed was notably high for solar system standards twenty six point three kilometers per second relative to the sun. It's still very low. Compared to the speed of light would we have noticed anything weird had the movie was dash been a hundred thousand times faster. Is it conceivable that a material object can be accelerated to relativistic speeds by accession of pushes from stars or other massive bodies so it certainly would have been much weirder if a who's been one hundred thousand times faster so if you think about what is going on in our galaxy the stars moving around and you know with respect to each other and around the center of the galaxy the typical speed you should have in mind is something like a couple hundred kilometers per second okay. Two hundred kilometers per second three hundred kilometers per second something like that. That's the typical speed that stars and other objects have in the galaxy. So that's the speed. You expect everything to have with respect to everything else on average okay. This is why we made the point. That in some sense move. Speed is anomalous. Low twenty six kilometers per second is lower than three hundred kilometers per second but if it had been three thousand kilometers per second that will be an all mostly high and that would be weird. So yes that would be weird. Is it conceivable that something could actually be celebrated that fast. You know it's conceivable but it's very very unlikely Things do get pushed around by passing by stars but it happens slowly and gradually An every little pushes very tiny and sometimes the pushes go in opposite directions from each other right so you certainly do not expect things to be accelerated to very very fast speeds and i should go further than that. You certainly don't expect things to be accelerated to relativistic speeds near the speed of light. Because once they're accelerated to the escape velocity of the galaxy. They escape from the galaxy and they're no longer being accelerated by a gravitational assists from nearby stars. And things like that so there is an upper limit to speeds you expect for things that are galaxy namely the escape velocity. That is fair in christie's says a priority question. You guys are using up your priority questions..

claudio slam vietnam world war two one hundred thousand times three kilometers per second three hundred kilometers per s vietnam war three thousand kilometers per twenty six kilometers per seco one person Two hundred kilometers per sec robert kennedy Bobby kennedy christie couple hundred kilometers per twenty six point baby hitler hundred thousand times watergate every little
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

The Vance Crowe Podcast

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

"Then they have. The perfect replica displayed in the home. In some cases so I've also heard stories about people that have Jewelry so by like a you know the biz diamonds and went out on the street. They have the perfect replica. Made of moisten. I or something. So there's this interesting difference between like the value in these things. I think is your relationship to the thing not necessarily the thing. If that makes sense you can with an nfc or digital file. You can clone one hundred thousand times and put it everywhere and honestly maybe that makes it more valuable to the collector because so many people can you can fund the work of an artist. You believe in. Show it to everybody but you still get that. I own this thing. I am i am the you know the Someone that he made an amazing comparison yesterday like renaissance era patronage patronage. So you can fund one like there's one patron and one artist and you can fund their entire career but the difference is everybody gets to see their work people a building to your point about virtual reality. The guy that won the people auction for sixty nine million commissioned an architect to build a museum in virtual reality to display that work so he bought an now. You can go and strap your vr headset on. Walk around this museum. He had commissioned to go and see that work. So it's it's fascinating moving incredibly fast. Let's talk about you because you jumped in on it right. A lot of people would have seen. Nfc's like oh that's the future. Oh that's exciting but there's very few people that would be like even. I don't understand the theory him. I'm going to jump into this space. So how did you do that. Yeah so what was i. I've been hearing about it. We have a community of a couple thousand people who into all sorts of things technology so of crypto enthusiasts in the law technologists and. I've been getting messages over the last six months or so like. Oh you should token is this thing or you should look into what theory can do. More small contracts could do for stuff within the product. So maybe you issue. A token and people like earn tokens for completing modules in the education products and things of that nature. I sounds good. But it's like honestly super clunky so like user experience wise one. i don't feel like. I have the expertise to implement it and really understand it and to i think because you know we have technically less literate. People join our community all the time. Is that like way too way too. High of a barrier to entry so on my radar long time ago. And then i started to look at the platforms where digital art was being auctioned for the most part. It was like there was incredibly. All these crypto native products are generally very complex or they feel very complex because engineers designed them or people that have been really native to the space of design. They're amazing but for like the mass market. They're incredibly difficult to use. So i think the real catalyst was starting to see a couple of the Platforms arrive that way. More user friendly and that fell more consistent with the bride the simplicity of the work. And i think well i just had a friend introduce me to the guy that runs a an app called foundation..

sixty nine million yesterday one hundred thousand times Nfc one artist one patron last six months thousand people renaissance one many
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"New york for additional comment but did not hear back before publication. So this guy did the equivalent of pulling a prank right. You know it's like. I don't know your kid. Brother gets gets a car for the first time Don't forget to check the muffler. Fluid are eroding faith in the working vehicles. Roading faith in the automotive industry. You are stealing that from other people. You are stealing conveyance ridiculous things. And here's the truth of the matter. The establishment hates memes. They despise them because the establishment by definition has no sense of humor. That love them so much i am. I love memes. I've created a few not many but a few and they've gotten some play. You know some some re posts and that kind of thing but man. I really love me because people will sometimes say who am i. Gosh i can't believe he responded with a me. It's like well okay. They say a picture is worth a thousand words. I'm a mom has got to be worth at least one hundred thousand times that well. Here's something that a lot of people don't take into account about this. I mean the establishment share does the universal availability of means. I mean you don't have to learn anything. Fancy you don't need did how to work new piece of technology. You don't need to put together a story line. You don't need to learn how to draw. It's unbelievably accessible. And yeah sure. Most of them are lame. That's fine we ended up generating so many new ways of expressing thoughts. Some of them are great. Some of them are just and appropriate for moment. They can be done instantaneously about any topic of any kind. The most recent one that i've seen is of course. The bernie mittens. That.

New york first time least one hundred thousand tim thousand words
Baby Shark becomes YouTube's most-watched video of all time

Daily Pop

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Baby Shark becomes YouTube's most-watched video of all time

"The streak is over. Just announced. d'esposito is no longer the sites top video. But i gotta warn you. You may not like the new reigning champ with over seven billion views. The new top video on youtube is dinner. Baby baby baby. I'm so sorry parents. I know you've probably heard that twenty five times already today and that was going to be second yet again. I for one. I'm not surprised at all how this didn't happen years ago. I don't know because my son alone watch that at least two hundred thousand times. I'm letting everybody know right now. All the strippers in miami. When i get back to magic city there's not somebody dancing to this. And a g string. I will be sold the days of magic city in miami. Wow so those are over also like this. it's fun it's good wine. After the one hundred thousand times man. I chase really memorized in new all the actions and sorry guys.

Esposito Youtube Miami
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Now one on a car that is too cool for school get out the dragnet for Jesus I love I love one on a car she did a whole body of secular work which you've heard a hundred thousand times of my music show and some of it here she's got one call act right the dog just to blow your way across the room but here she is in a gospel mo get out to dragnet for Jesus that was one of Aretha Franklin's father's favorite gospel singers in all the world one of the current I guess they did some work at one point but here she is on alternative bought music Friday you know whatever sensors bother me what I do is I took him down the air conditioned Cobo arena I get a micro monkey flip and then from time to time I put the call hold on I always get in with a sleeper hold you can do the same thing they run X. alternative bought music Friday we do a lot of fooling around today we don't get to hot and heavy into subject matter but there's one here I'm dying to tell you about but it's a really involved so and we're going to it today but this is incredible Oxford university of all the universities novel and that's a pretty big shot university well I was in Oxford and I remember ox I did go to university that they will let me and see my acute as qualified but I was getting knocked out loaded in a pub over there and I was I remember when I had to would you drink a lot of beer you have to from time to time relieve yourself and I remember going into the at that time was called it was a men's room what but they had a stone slab against the wall and it was literally a stone trough and all the men stood there and relieve themselves but not not all of this too much information against the wall and the truck ran out and into a field behind the this does pop and this was supposedly a pub that was there and twelve sixteen or something like that and this depth of memory and I and I remember thinking at the time how many how many Mona cultures are in this this journal from nights and nights who knows Roman soldiers are but anyway free association that's what we do here for a living of my pretty much five days a week but this is Peter from Victor David Hanson we will definitely be getting into this on Monday I'm pretty diversity is getting rid of actually really good books that this is this shredding of western civilizations even hitting Oxford university unbelievable hello Audra X. and if you're on the way to just check back and haven't heard from her in awhile I **** means from all directions causing great means he's been a great means before we get into this up our next a tutor after share something with you this should be inspirational to us neck dismisses treat yourself like I ninety four never stop working on yourself no.

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"It's a beautiful Sunday morning and then what a great opportunity there is to share with our listeners a rescue natural supplement that we're gonna talk about it this morning or a scene and a hard focus benefits at all furs and and doctor pearl you help formulate this most one of the most beloved rescue products other days one of the most ordered rescue products so what makes or seen unique for listeners I'm so excited that we're devoting an entire hour or seen and to our omega three fish oils because together they can really change the pattern of heart disease and as you know heart disease is still the number one killer in our society so we need to take a strong hold we need to prevent this from being the number one killer and overseen and our rescue will make history especially the rescue twelve fifty plus could do that for you you could change the pattern of your life not only from your heart standpoint but from a medical standpoint as well so what makes or seen very unique is it's really the first product of its kind to work directly on the cells of our body to improve the delivery of oxygen and blood to the heart which is very important because the heartbeat as we heard in the beginning of the show three billion times in your lifetime but on a daily basis it beats anywheres between seven hundred thousand and about seven hundred thousand times per twenty four hours a day so just think about that in one day your heart is beating a hundred thousand a hundred excuse me seventy thousand to a hundred thousand times that is just amazing is all about how much work all the hard puts in on a regular basis and we all take it for granted so when you think about it how does the heart create energy for that well it creates energy by eighty substrate called ATP adenosine triphosphate in order scene is pivotal in making sure that there's enough ATP in every cell of your body but especially your heart cells so that's why it's so important to understand that energy comes from things that we eat but also comes from generating adenosine triphosphate the energy molecule in every cell of our body but the heart uses more ATP than any other organ system in the body so it's important to realize that four seems really aids in so many different aspects of our health was within the stuck this hour it is a superior for Miller it's all natural it helps not only regenerate and rejuvenate cells but also helps create an energy necessary to go through your daily activities especially when you need to increase your heart rate or increase your work on it on an exercise protocol so it really is is a a phenomenal phenomenal supplement from rescue and there's nothing like it there's nothing like it out there there's nothing else on the on the market anything even remotely similar to or seen it again we have this is something the doctor Shapiro work to develop them as you just heard him describe it and again it has many benefits includes lowering your blood pressure blood pressure naturally and reduces the regular rhythms and and palpitations and so on and so forth but here's a question that we have for you doctor if you're taking blood pressure medication already or if you're taking heart meds can you take your scene with it absolutely so when you think about what it does physiologically to the blood vessels it relaxes the cells that line the blood vessels those are called the endothelial cells and by relaxing those cells we were able to dilate the blood vessels especially to the heart into the circulatory system thereby lowering your blood pressure naturally so if you already are on a blood pressure medicine you could certainly improve your blood pressure taking rescue or seen one tablet twice a day recommended dose I just want to have a twice a day and again you can also tell you what happens if you're on a another heart medication for some kind of you know cardiovascular issue that you are experiencing no matter what kind of medicine you're taking it does not interfere with any of your regular medication so the ingredients with in or seen are two fold one is excuse me the ingredients in Orsino to fold it inosine plus magnesium or Kate at least two proprietary blends of ingredients are naturally occurring compounds in the body we have these things in our body but as we get older they become short supply we don't have enough of them so here's a way to increase the number of of it is seen N. or Kate molecules within a body which play an important role in helping US cellular material the building blocks of our cellular material which is our DNA and RNA to improve the function ourself function and to regenerate cells so medically people suffer from a read me is they suffer from things like atrial fibrillation or ventricular premature beats overseeing will certainly aid in suppressing those those beats it also plays a huge role in atherosclerosis which is the common factor as to why we clog up your arteries it lowers your LDL and it improves your HDL about the same time improves that endothelial lining to yourselves so that your blood pressure now is down it improves recovery from heart attack well if you have any blockages if you've had a stent put into your heart or scene is certainly the way to go as a supplement to improve the integrity of your blood vessels and also to improve the delivery of oxygen to your heart cells it was on the rescuers here today if you have a question about this incredible supplement we would advise you to get in early don't wait till in the last five six minutes of the program we it often happens just give us a call and your you be talking with a position to help formulate and help develop.

Gas Station Could Get Shut Down After a Dude Filmed Porn in the Snack Aisle

Savage Lovecast

05:53 min | 2 years ago

Gas Station Could Get Shut Down After a Dude Filmed Porn in the Snack Aisle

"I see what you're up to their Milwaukee and I gotta say it seems like a bad idea Milwaukee city government. There is trying to shut down a gas station. Thirty fifth hometown is the name of the gas station. Because someone without the permission of the gas stations owner filmed a down and dirty. Gonzo porn in the aisles of the convenience store chunk of the gas station at three o'clock in the morning and amateur porn actor in Frederick Allen. Enter the store in the middle of the night with a female companion Jelicic Astro del. She's reporter advice. Not The female companion reporter advice to be perfectly clear JELICIC caster. Del says that Allen who's wearing a bathrobe dances around in the video. Strokes himself for the Cameron. And then shrugs off his bathrobe gets on his knees and bones the woman from behind looking over his shoulder into the camera quote with an expression that says. Can you believe I'm doing this? Beside the starburst. The video posted to porn. How has been viewed more than seven hundred thousand times and a couple of dozen people with nothing better to do after enjoying that? Video signed a petition calling for thirty fifth hometown to be closed an elected official an actual elected official with nothing better to do after watching. The video took up their cause. And what Milwaukee District Seven Aldermen? Khalif raining told Fox. Six now news had convinced that this was a comedy piece of the onion at first. But no it's real Alderman Rainey. Who's leading the push to put? The Guy who owns thirty fifth hometown out of business actually said this into a microphone under my watch. I won't allow it keep in mind. It was filmed right next to the chips and across from the sunflower seeds. Ono those poor chips and won't someone please think of the sunflower seeds. I WanNa make it clear that I do not rise now. In defense of Frederick Allen Amateur Porn Star he's a convicted Felon Castro reports advice. Who's been with second degree sexual assault of a child? After a woman told him her fifteen year old daughter appeared in two of his videos. Those charges were dropped after a witness refused to testify. So Yeah Allen doesn't sound like a good dude but you know what I found in less than five minutes of searching on porn hub. Amateur porn videos shot on buses and subways guns. Oh porn video shot in big box stores. In airports and beam parks airplanes in airbnb fees amateur porn shot at world famous tourist sites. I didn't find anyone getting Eiffel Tower at the Eiffel Tower but I did find the Eiffel Tower and amateur porn. Shot and so many hotel rooms recognizable hotel chains and in one case a porn shot in my favorite hotel in the world. Quick shout out to the Maritime Hotel. My home away from home in New York City's Chelsea neighborhood. There's also some gay porn out there that was shot or so. It's makers claim in the Vatican basically wherever people go with their genitals on their smartphones. And there's really no where people don't go with their genitals and they're smart bones. Someone at some point has made a porno there and uploaded it to the Internet so shutting down places where someone shot a little Gonzo porn. Yeah let's just say that seems like the slippery of slopes to me a pretty luby's slope in fact because of the whole world goes the way of Milwaukee. If officials started closing down businesses where people made porn videos without the permission of the owners to say nothing of. Shutting Down Airlines and hotel chains and world religions. Pretty soon. There won't be anywhere for people to get gas or get a bed or get religion personally. Konso porn shot in gas stations. On I WANNA see that interested but you know what I would like to see what I am personally interested in seeing Milwaukee district seven Aldermen Khalif Rainey's Internet browser history. In fact I'd like to see the Internet browser histories of every member of the Milwaukee Common Council who voted to revoke the business license of Kalat Dallin the owner of the thirty fifth hometown gas station. Because I'd like to know where the porn they've been watching was shot. City officials three Alderman justified. Their decision to strip dylan of his business license because he was in the store when it happened and didn't call the police which leads me to believe that. No one on the Milwaukee. Common Council has ever worked in a gas station or as following the news very closely customers who all sorts of weird shit and gas stations and the goal of everyone behind the counter on the graveyard shift is just to get through that shift alive confronting dancing man in a bathrobe in the middle of the night. When there's no one else in the store why why would you do that? Could get you killed an L. In the dancing man in the bathroom in the store in the middle of the night is a black man. And if you've been following the news well it's possible Dylan worried that calling. The police could get allen killed. It would certainly cross my mind anyway. According to the testimony taken at the hearing where the licensed committee voted to strip dylan of his business license effectively shutting him down Dylan has run thirty fifth hometown for twenty years without incident and has a forty year quote positive track record as a small business owner in Milwaukee and he's cooperated with the police in the past and on this case to prosecutors credit him for the successful prosecution of Frederick Allen and they voted to close the business anyway after Alderman. Rainy said the two magic words sex trafficking. No one knows that the woman in the video was trafficked but she might have been for all anyone knows according to Rainey so they voted to shut thirty fifth hometown down lawsuit. Thirty hometown remains open while the decision is under appeal but there is one detail from the testimony that leaped out of me testimony taken before the licenses committee that seems to have been overlooked by the licenses committee. By the Milwaukee Common Council quote the man involved in the sex act better gallon amateur porn star has a history of doing this all over the city. So looks like we're going to have to shot all of Milwaukee

Milwaukee Frederick Allen Milwaukee Common Council Dylan Khalif Rainey Milwaukee District Eiffel Tower Alderman Rainey Reporter Maritime Hotel Airbnb Assault Cameron New York City FOX DEL
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Crime the prevalence and nature of self defense with a gun two thousand five corporate resisting crime the effects of victim action on the outcome of crimes more recently two thousand eighteen research on the effect of firearms on suicide rates in response in survey response errors rather in survey estimates on how often people use guns for defensive purposes please welcome to the program professor Gary Kleck thank you so much for taking the time I appreciate it learn professor how often do Americans use guns every year for defensive purposes depending on what you're you're talking about it's probably in the vicinity of one point five to two point five million times the that's a lot of people professor one point of reference you can compare with the number of crimes committed by attendants who used to guns which is not on the order of two or three hundred thousand times you so it's considerably more often the case that a crime victim is using a self protection than the sender is using a gun collector and professor from time to time as you know there is mass shootings inevitably there is a hue and cry on us needing to pass more a gun control laws I'm always struck when I watch these debates whether it's on CNN or even on fox professor collect that almost nobody asked how often do Americans use guns to defend themselves in other words how many Americans are alive because of but guns as opposed to Americans who lost their lives criminally because of guns yeah I mean you'd think any serious ball players you would consider both costs and benefits but both sides of the equation themselves Pentagon years ought to be a central part of the date of birth control if you want you can and it's often simply known professor you just heard Elizabeth Warren say I would not feel comfortable being in the church were quote everybody without a firearm close quote I hear that kind of scenario all the time wind you have discussions with people about whether not they ought to be able to carry concealed weapons that you're gonna be in a public place and quote everybody without a firearm court at the same time close quote what's your reaction when you hear something like that professor your honor senator long which is sort of imagining a nonexistent scenario long when people use guns for self protection novel the only one using a gun for self protection and secondly she's probably envisioning lead flung in all directions that is people are not just using in the sense in the left lane and a friend of the gun but let the fire and it's it's even rarer that more than one individual would be in a situation where the firing a gun for self protection because now I'm only about seven percent of defensive gun uses involved the gun being fired so you know the the likelihood of two people in the same situation and than the same church for example firing guns manned and striking someone as a result of that crossfire is really unlikely it's probably one of the least likely consequences of of that kind of incident on the other hand there's some merit to the argument that precisely because there aren't that many people carrying guns and willing to use them by shooting unless you very few mass shootings actually do involve somebody into being an issue the offender well let's see it's pretty unusual presumably because it's unusual for role today AT one armed defenders happens to be close and and is willing to use the gun to shoot the mansion the couple of instances where that happened early years of their lives on my guess is criminologist professor Gary clack of Florida State University professor are there any gun control laws close quote that you would support for example universal background check closing the so called gun show loophole closed go with those things help I'm I'm in favor of it have been for decades extending background checks to private clients with the done this which is basically what a universal background check here although I I I think advocates may generate how likely that is to make a dent in crime the problem is the compliance date whether the implemented universal background checks find that we're not getting nearly as many people submitting to background checks as there should be based on the number of private clients with guns and going on this thing clearly a lot of people are not complying with the legal requirement to submit to a background check before a lot trying to transfer the gun can be completed still it's not on from there some some bad guys are stopped from getting guns as a result of a background check in connection with a crime because the translunar gun and some of those would have committed a violent act had they not been stopped if it's true usually criminals will get guns from sources that are subject to a background check that much is currently but again it's not it's not nonexistent try to get a gun from a comfortable room in the case of the clan between us for the gentran some relative a friend who works at the the prospective clients to look back on track so have a huge impact probably not no due to low levels of compliance with the law but would have no effect on professor Gary Kleck is my guest he's a criminologist Florida State University professor I am in one of those states California as you know that already has a universal background check and the loss of course have benefits and costs one might argue that the cost is that the universal background check might differ a law abiding person getting a weapon and using the weapon for self defense and that might all set the the the rare occasion where a bad guy was born from getting a gun that's certainly possible to possible cost we just don't have any data on how often that happens your medical a law abiding citizen global trade along with the fun definition but the reality is that people more otherwise law abiding right it will not obey a law that they have moral objections from the long gone on Jackson street lot of different kinds of restrictions on on professor Gary.

Fake health news went viral in 2019, with a focus on these misleading topics

Orlando's News at Noon

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Fake health news went viral in 2019, with a focus on these misleading topics

"You're looking for the best advice for your health you should probably stay away from social media NBC news has compiled a list of the most viral fake health news for twenty nineteen most fake health news focused on cancer including the most engage article that said big pharma was hiding the cure for cancer other fake health news that went viral in twenty nineteen included an article shared eight hundred thousand times stating that ginger was ten thousand times more powerful it killing cancer than chemo it's no coincidence that the ginger article went to a website selling you guessed it ginger supplements experts say that social media giants need to crack down on fake news and that you should reach out to

Chemo NBC Cancer
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:13 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"What they all boil down to is this and we've exposed on the show back awhile ago I don't wanna go deep into there's a great piece night I did not find it because the print magazine is not the same as the website and maybe if there someplace but they they tend to put those up after you after the magazines out of circulation so the most recent is up there right now but anyway all of this negotiation around we're gonna work on agreement were we have trade with Mexico and Canada and the U. S. and are gonna do through T. P. P. or nafta or whatever you wanna call MS MCA whatever it's all be S. all of it even the most current one because here's what's really happening they are laying the foundation for more government huge Leviathan bureaucratic government more bureaucracy tons of it and the whole thing is around it let's put it this way it takes away from an American farmer contacting someone and say Englander China or chill or as a chief and say Hey I wanna I wanna say some stuff okay let's do it no no no does go like that you have to go through some kind of a a trade board you've got to go through some kind of possibly all get together every all the farmers and put their stuff in one big band who are paid a certain amount based on currency exchange or currency devaluation you get the point it's all B. S. and it's scary because what this really comes down to is these let's call them soon sovereignty that's exactly what they're who said it was on in fact it's on the peace in the in the print magazine that the best way I was Kissinger Henry Kissinger the best way to bring about a war the New World order one world government I'm paraphrasing it was exactly what he said is to bring about these these bureaucratic sovereignty is you get America Canada and Mexico all linked together I think I always play this a hundred thousand times and now you've got a country based on trade that that those three mixed together yes they still have their their names and therefore he will only borders which are becoming more meaningless by the day and that's it now would you do with that well now you like that what the one down there that's got Bolivia Paraguay Venice with whatever in and then that gets linked at some point with the European Union which is already semblance of the borders off of every country in it there there are irrelevant other federal currency standing army the whole nine yards so that's what it's all about getting rid of the nation state these trade agreements are about getting rid of the nation state and the this is not paranoia this is that eight chance stuff where they're willing to make an arrest me was a bit of an upswing but the the bottom line on this is this is not tin foil helmet paranoia it's the way of the world now with the swamp with the one world of the New World order one world government clowns running everything and it in in in in the immediate it's somewhat comfortable for some people but are you gonna be comfortable down the pike talking about with regard to this GM they were GM is pretty much outsourced to the rest of the world no matter what we do and and there's no out of it because again the car companies are not in business to subsidize workers it's not the way it works never has been that way never been that way the union overplayed their hand way back when making the whole thing out to be Hey with that and that and the union is a socialist construct instances make decorate for the get go communist less socials construct unions are that's it has nothing to do with a somebody saying hammer started business make product when I heard these guys to make the product of their pay them agreed upon wage and I'm gonna make a bunch of money no the union came in and said no you're gonna give us this this and this or else we'll shut your business down dead in communism I don't know what it but the bottom line is is that right now other ways of the world this is becoming a let's call standard operating procedure and kind of up a stealth way of bringing about a globalist well one world New World order your talks about all the time has in public hearing this everywhere they're great expose on this one of them have been several of them is in the new American magazine it was the I think the last issue or second less issue back got to see this stuff so that's for rent so that don't think for one minute that this will not all be tied together these these choirs I sued all countries if you will sovereignty is this call because it'll be for example music as example the European Union there there are exactly that so that some point will be melded with the Pacific that's what the transpacific partnership was all about by the way remember that we expose that on the show as soon as we found exposed by Jeff sessions yeah and that's what that was all about trump came and said no we're not going to do that but on the other hand trump's guys are working on this New Mexico Canada in the new deal were recall on it and it's the same kind of thing and much of it borrows from the trans Pacific partnership so the end is always couched in we're gonna have cheaper goods we're gonna have easy easier access to goods products services everybody was going to be better but what they're doing to make people's lives better is there sand blasting off of the world the sovereignty of the nation state and the sovereignty of the United States of America the look at as evolution I look at a strip evil because this is the first country ever ever ever ever based on the fact that we don't need a king telling us what do anyway you can see that in the new American magazine which you should be subscribing to talk to that Tellem don't hang out we've looked yep I'm still blown the face to our bonuses I just posted something up on Facebook that I found quite by accident mess around over there looking for the the the piece I wanted to share with you which I'm telling you is a new American magazine and it's about how the farm subsidies that came down fact let me reference it here now I'm completely lost it anyway farm subsidies are not going to the farmers here yeah here it is right here it says billions in farm subsidies going to giant multinational agricultural business not family farms well I got I got caught up in something called the hunt thank you Wendy exes looks fabulous it's a trailer for a movie called the hunt the trailer for two thousand nineteen off that's going to make it to a media to Netflix I hope it does I can't go to a movie theater I can't mingle with the general public on movie theater I'm like it's on me but anyway this pieces looks of standing up the billions in farm bailouts going to giant multinational Agra businesses not family farms and they point out in here we're not gonna get too deep into this one but the family farmers get maybe five grant where as a somebody like archer Daniels or whatever companies like that they're getting millions millions of ounces numbers come here often one deal information a lots of fun every Monday through Friday three to six PM eastern standard thank you so much for supporting the people support us about them we are nothing that's literally we're going over by others from a bunch of right now we'll be right we said it somewhere how do they keep up.

print magazine nine yards one minute
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"To a hundred thousand times the normal level of material that can be radioactive the institute says there is no danger for people or the fish there's a crash on the one on one in Hollywood well it's like they're starting to open up some lanes there was a fatal crash investigation one on one north fana highlands still see a little bit of a back up but traffic is dissipated little bit the backup is to sunset now was it for a month so things looking better there on the Hollywood freeway also we still have a problem working in the rose meet areas some road work on the ten west Palm Beach we have walnut Grove in Delmar carpool left lane shut down for overnight road work yeah we still have a crash live what one oh five east bottom Long Beach Boulevard motorcycle down there in the carpool lane do you see anything else slowing you don't give us call other rep save you time travel flying triple eight five hundred five thousand three KFI in the sky helps get you there faster I'm Jennifer Weiss the forecast is next join GT I. T. and own a career of possibilities apply now at GT I. T. dot com slash careers GT I. T. is an equal opportunity employer disability veteran motors you already know eastern's automotive group has thousands of the highest quality vehicles to choose from you know every vehicle has been rigorously inspected and is backed by a seven day return policy but have you seen how eastern continues to step it up in our community they pay it forward on fox five DC and find a road to a better community on CBS ninety C. so you can feel good about the company your doing business with eastern dot com slash community today to nominate someone in our community or just check out what they're.

Hollywood Palm Beach KFI Jennifer Weiss DC CBS seven day
The Slingshot Spider

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

The Slingshot Spider

"My favorite comic book character is Spiderman is too bad. There isn't really a spider more like him weld on in twenty nine thousand nine three researchers from Georgia. George reported that they'd discovered a tiny spider in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest that has a behavior that surprisingly similar to the web slinging superhero whole soyoil the spider uses its web as a slingshot. It attaches silken thread to the center of the web and to an anchor point somewhere behind it then it reels the central thread in putting the web under tension and pulling it back into a cone then the spider waits. At the center of the cone when a tasty insect flies by the spider releases the thread and the spider and its web are flung forward like a stone from a sling shot. The unfortunate insect is entangled in the web. and the spider attacks the insect becomes the spiders dinner to catch an insect in flight. The slingshot must be really fast it is the researchers studied the spider using high speed digital video imaging. They found that the slingshots spiders maximum acceleration was more than three thousand feet per second squared. This is a hundred times faster than a Cheetah can accelerate toward. It's prey really want to see this video. Is it on the web they researchers put it on Youtube in two thousand fourteen and as of January twenty nineteen. The video has been viewed more than three hundred thousand times. The slingshot spider is an Internet star. This moment of science comes from Indiana University with production.

Georgia Youtube George Amazon Indiana University Three Thousand Feet
New Harry Potter Game Lacking in Niantics Old Magic?

Business Wars Daily

04:35 min | 3 years ago

New Harry Potter Game Lacking in Niantics Old Magic?

"I'm wondering i'm david brown and this is business wars daily on this wednesday july tenth if you need a little magic in your life you're in luck the new harry potter game wizards unite was released late last month harry potter fans have been anticipating be apps release for close two years since gaming company ny antic announced its development ny antic is known for its hit game pokey mongo which earned more than one billion dollars in sales during its first seven months the first mobile game in history hit that billion dollar mark so quickly with wizards unite code developed with warner brothers entertainment ny antic clearly wanna build on the success of augmented reality pokey mongo model when i antic first release pokemon go players of all just gathered in real world locations like parks and streets to catch virtual pokey minded appeared on these apps virtual maps as if they exist in the real world that playful fun use of augmented reality is what made pokey mongo such a lasting hit three years after its release the game has been downloaded more than a billion times that could be a hard active follow but enormous harry potter fan base could help ny antic repeat it's early success this wizard unite revolves around an event called a calamity which has caused people animals in artifacts from the wizard ing world to appear in the real world like poke him on doing pokey mongo in wizards unite these things called found doubles as a wizard it's your job to break spells collect the found doubles and return them to their proper homes thereby containing magic around the world to achieve you're mission you'll need all the magic you can get or by by which you square in game spending comes in like pokey mongo wizards unitas free but offers numerous options depart which you're real cash on things like virtual gold potions and spells gamers spent three hundred thousand dollars on those features in the first day alone in its first twenty four hours wizards unite with downloaded more than four hundred thousand times and became the number one downloaded app on apple's usa apps store despite zooming to the top of the apple charts the game open to mixed reviews wired gave it a thumbs up but said it's no pokey mongo online site the verge disagreed enumerated all the ways in which the game is a clone pokey mongo but essentially called it a pale imitation lacking in magic in so many fans complained at the basic currency of the game called energy was in such scare supply but it was hard to play wizards unite without quickly needing spend ben real money to buy more and continue game play in less than a week developers responded changing the game mechanics so good it would be easier to play the game free still in its first weekend inapp sales were disappointing especially compared pokey mongo wizards unite to again only about one million dollars in revenue in its first weekend a far cry from poke him on goes twenty eight million following up on a wrecker it hit in any industry movies books games is a tricky endeavor deborah because expectations can be impossibly high still cnn reports the analytics firm at any expects wizards unite to earn more than one hundred million dollars in its first thirty days cnn ads and if it does the game would surge ahead of its closest rival candy crush saga perhaps if i had the wizard ing skills to see the future in a crystal ball i'd be able to tell you whether or not advantage production will come to patch but as it happens i'm all out of potions and spells bernau so just like you have to wait another few weeks defined down the waiting is the hardest

David Brown Three Hundred Thousand Dollars One Hundred Million Dollars One Billion Dollars One Million Dollars Twenty Four Hours Billion Dollar Seven Months Thirty Days Three Years Two Years
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Hey everyone this Lorenzo and Chris from the hacking your leadership podcast. We wanted to drop a quick update this weekend to discuss two very cool things, and we think you may be just as excited about them, as we are. Yeah. Well, I we want to discuss some of the recent milestones for the podcast. We're still thank you for listening and the show. You've downloaded hacking your leadership more than six hundred thousand times in less than twenty three months. And this has kept us ranked the number two management marketing show in all of that Papa chest. And the number one management marketing show on our hosts pod being for pretty much the last six months. Yeah. And just to add during may and June. We landed in the top one hundred in the apple podcasts business category, multiple times, and we've been a top one hundred business podcast on Stitcher since last December. It's been so amazing to see the downloads climbing every month and two things we could really use your help with our subscribing and reviews. We currently have nine hundred ratings and apple podcast, but only around thirty written reviews, so you can take about a minute and write a review for the show that would be. Thing. And if you could, please double check to make sure your subscribe to the show, these two things help a ton to put the show in front of his many is as possible, and that really helps to build our audience. Yeah. As of now we're on all podcasting platforms including iheartradio Spotify. We've also been posting on the chirp app Amilton as well. So please share the podcast with someone you think may find value in our content. I also wanna take a minute to thank everyone for the emails, text direct messages comments questions and content ideas Lorenzo and I want to add, as much value as possible to anyone looking to grow as a leader and the dialogue with us really helped to continue to achieve that goal. One of the top is we get messages about pretty regularly is the desire to be a guest on hacking your leadership. We've been discussing this over the last six months, and this sparked an idea that we're excited announce in July. But as of now we've never really had a guest on the show. Well, you can't exactly say, never so, like what about the whole Gary v one minute hack thing. Okay, good call. But, you know you to do whatever he wants to do. Yeah, that's true. And I'm super excited about this upcoming element to the show that we have already had some great leaders provide. His with content. It will be a mix of leaders that some of you may have never heard of and some that we are big fans. Oh, yeah. Very true. So again, thank you all for you. Continued investment in us ending yourselves. Please a fun fourth of July weekend and be safe setting off fireworks, on the Renzo birthday heck, yeah. Thought you all next time?

Lorenzo Papa chest apple Renzo Chris Gary six months twenty three months one minute
The OnePlus 7 Pro reveals a notch-free future (The 3:59, Ep. 561)

The 3:59

05:07 min | 3 years ago

The OnePlus 7 Pro reveals a notch-free future (The 3:59, Ep. 561)

"The. Welcome to the three fifty nine. I'm Ben FOX Ruben. And I'm here with mobile senior reporter Charlotte Tipton jar thanks for being here. Thanks for having me shar was at the one plus launch event yesterday for the one plus seven pro it's new six hundred seventy dollar flagship device is the first phone coming to the US. That includes a pop-up camera for selfish instead of a notch or a whole punch or whatever to charming first question to you is what do you think of that change? Do you think that it's significant enough or it's worth it to have, you know, like just that full screen? What are your thoughts? You know? I think it could go either way I think for a lot of people having that full screen is is awesome. Oneplus? Did they told me hundreds of prototypes before they decided on the pop up camera because they were really trying to figure out what the best way to kind of have this full screen. They had pulled users and talk to people, and what everybody wanted was an immersive screen, and when you're using your phone, if you think about it, you're using the screen all the time, you're using that selfie camera. You know, infrequently. So for them. Like that Papa camera is all about the screen. You know, we've seen a lot of notches though. And I feel like at a certain point that you stop noticing that they're even the air. So I think it'll be interesting to see like after using something like this where there is. No, not if it makes it harder to go back to something with a notch like the iphone or. If you don't really notice it. Do you have a personal preference yourself between like a notch or a hole punch? I don't know how much time you got to spend with like the Samsung as ten. Yeah. I mean, I haven't I don't really personally have a big preference. I think it kind of depends on what you're doing with it. I don't watch a ton video on my phone a lot of people do and that's kind of one of the areas where it could be distracting if you're part of the videos cut out. You know, like for what I'm doing scrolling through Twitter and Instagram and things like that. It's not quite as big. Let's talk about like durability for a second here as far as like having a tiny element on the phone pop up pop down again, did they tell you far as like how durable? This is likely. It is that something like that could break off. Yeah. So they they did a lot of tests. They had kind of sent whenever a phone comes out. There's a ton of torture tests that it goes through and they created some special ones to test the camera so like for one they had a barrel, and they dropped the phone with the camera open into the barrel. I one hundred fifty times and then each time they dropped it. They spin it seventy five times, I believe, and then they had another one where they had basically box with Dustin it, and they like through the phone in it opened and closed. I think three hundred thousand times which is kind of the the bar for like this last five years is what they're saying. So they when they first working on this. They had a version that had kind of a smaller motor it took up less space. But it just wasn't strong enough. Or durable enough. So then they ended up having to go with a bigger motor which meant they essentially had to redesign the phone redesign everything on the phone to kind of deal with that. But that is what they really think is going to make this durable. And they showed a video during their vet of like, a forty nine pounds of cement being kind of hoisted, and what it was being held on was the camera module. Really? Yeah. I mean, and obviously that's a video. So it's not like we saw in real life to be like. Wow. Look that you know. But it's interesting. They really are trying to say, hey, this is durable. It's not going to pop off the first time you so that so I want to introduce apple little bit more into the conversation. And what do you think apple is going to do this year that could get people more excited or more interested in the iphone, maybe get them to buy it or upgraded more? Frequently the is there something on the horizon, particularly this year that you expect that that might generate a little bit more interest. I I don't know. It's kind of hard to say like the things this year that everybody's really excited about like foldable screens five G, those are not things that we're going to see from apple this year. Like, we're just not. So it is really kind of hard to figure out what it is that they are going to come out with that really gets people to upgrade in maybe more like a services bundle or things that that make you say I need the iphone because I want this. I want the apple card. I want the new TV service. I want whatever. It's going to work better on my iphone, hardware wise. I don't know what it is that they could do that really exciting. Or really interesting. That's kind of a bummer, but but it's still early. It's only may the phone there. There are obviously rumors all the time. There hasn't been anything. That's like really like earth shattering or yet. But it's still it's early. Anyway, if you want to read more about these stories, check them out on CNN on Ben FOX, Rueben Charlotte's have gained. Thanks for listening.

Apple Ben Fox Ruben United States Charlotte Tipton Reporter Samsung Twitter CNN Dustin Instagram Ben Fox Rueben Charlotte Six Hundred Seventy Dollar Forty Nine Pounds Five Years Five G
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

15:35 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on KTRH

"Aluminum to this diptheria, toxin or antitoxin. Who made the decision when was it made? And how did they arrive at a potassium aluminum? Was saying the shot was really nasty. It was developed in horses and children were getting sick from the shot. Because of allergy serum sickness because they had never seen allergy before. And they didn't know what it was. But a lot of allergy the initial exposure to it is not so bad that second and third re exposures where you get, you know, the full on in lactic reaction that can kill. So by chance as often happens in scientific discovery. They added some aluminum who one of the injections, they get to the horses. And the horse developed antibodies bacteria and about one hundred thousand times faster than it. Previously. Had normally take it weeks or even months to develop enough antibodies harvest from their blood, and when the aluminum was added, it did it in days and two scientists couldn't believe in fact, the experiment again because they couldn't believe how well or I should say aggressively horses immune system responded to the initiative of aluminum. And the reason they were even messing around with that component at all is because they were using it to help filter things out aluminum had been used in water public water systems to help filter things out it the aluminum cleans things in the water. And it helps it settle to the bottom and allows them to filter things out more easily. So they had been using aluminum in developing different components of the shot, but they always removed it before it went into the children once they saw the horses immune system responded Inc. Really aggressively with the addition of aluminum, they decided around nineteen thirty to start testing it to see children would respond more aggressively. And the reason they wanted to do this is because they hope that they can give children diptheria shot. Only one remember multiple times. Where the allergy problem surfaces. Not the initial exposure. It's the subsequent exposures these horrible. Deflecting a reaction. So in nineteen thirty two after they had done some tests at some orphanages and institutions in Arlon and in New York or New Jersey, they decided that they were going to purposely at aluminum to the diptheria vaccine in hopes that it would work better because it wasn't a very good shot to begin with. And really in hopes that children would only need one shot and Witton have to risk that allergy problem. So in nineteen thirty two they made the decision that aluminum was going to be added to the vaccine, and this is really the first time in the history of humanity that children, and in fact, I should say any human than people with syphilis we're going to receive a metallic substance in an. Objected form into their bodies. And it's it's important to to make distinction between things that are ingested like as as part of your normal dietary intake and center injected because your your body's immune system, which they say sixty to seventy percent of resides in your gut and your intestine is really good at filtering things out before they even get into your bloodstream, and that is the case with metallic aluminum, your intestines are remarkably effective at filtering it out and keeping it from even getting into your body when you inject something it bypasses, the majority of protections your body place to prevent you from harm. So when aluminum was added to the vaccine in nineteen thirty two that is really the seminal year in my opinion as to win a couple of. Things started long healthwise with our children. Notably the appearance of a new near logical disorder that had never been seen before by most. Psychiatrist in the country and later, call it autism. Well, we we should point out that there was an Austrian American psychiatrist by the name of Dr Leo Kanner who was working at Johns Hopkins Medical center in in Baltimore, and he had just completed something like a five hundred page book on on child psychiatric disorders in head. He had he chronicled at that point any cases of what would be what would go on to be called autism. Liam Connor was the preeminent child psychiatrist in the country. He had a newspaper column he was tiered on radio shows. He was thought of as de most knowledgeable person in the country when it came to childhood psychiatry, and in fact, he has founded the clinic at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, which was considered the preeminent clinic for children with neurological disorders. So if there was anyone in the country, you know, as he published a five hundred page book on anyone in the country who would have seen it before it would have been him. And in nineteen thirty five the first child shows up at his clinic. With a parent who actually was a psychologist herself and cannot figure out what was going on with her son Elfriede. This is Alfred who I guess could be call him. Could we call Elfriede patient zero and his autism epidemic? They should but because of a curious numbering system another child named Donald triplet is actually referred to as patient zero in the autism pedantic, although he wasn't. He was born in nineteen thirty three which is the year the net nationwide diptheria campaign. Swung into action. Alfred I believe a year or two older. But with seeing in nineteen thirty five he was actually the first patient that Dr Connor. Yeah. I think it would be right to consider him patient zero. Because he was the first to show up at Dr Connors clinic because they lived in Baltimore. And. Go ahead, and what it wouldn't made this particular case autism. I mean most of us now with some of the symptoms, but how did Dr Kanter describe Alfred condition? The only thing they could relate it to get the. Linnea and the things that really stood out to him. Were. The aloneness. He didn't have any desire to play with other children, and even his parents, he has he wouldn't respond to being picked up, you know, normally Abadie will stiffen and maybe hold their arms up toward their parent in intimidation of being picked up, and he had none of those things he had an obsession with routine and order and patterns, and we'll get really upset if some of these patterns were disrupted and one of the interesting if you could call it that things as as Dr Connor worked with Alfred later on his IQ test was very high. He tested, I think over one forty and that's considered gifted if you're not familiar with the scale, and that was very confusing to Dr Connor and other psychiatrists who work John. Doc in because Alfred like a lot of the other children that were soon to start showing up so both deficiencies and some remarkable intellect in other ways, and that was one of the defining characteristics of autism early on was these children definitely had some deficiencies, but it wasn't their entire brain. There were other components that actually excelled, and you know, you've heard about this now in the in the name of in the label of savant where certain children will develop incredible music abilities. Incredible memory incredible ability to recite passages, you know from poetry that they heard once in their life. So connor. Thought well childhood schizophrenia is close but these children weren't hallucinating. There was no neither paranoia that. Would normally be associated with schizophrenia. And like I said they had some mental abilities that were far beyond a normal human would have. So it really stood out like a sore. Thumb to Dr Connor it was clear to him. This was something new now in retrospect, seventy five years later, you can go through the medical record. And you will see a few cases like this pop up one or two here one or two there, you know, in in the early nineteen hundreds. There was a couple of kids in Austria that to have something similar to this. But the reality is Dr Connor who was the premanent childhood psychiatrist in the country at the preeminent childhood psychiatry clinic in the country and wrote what was basically the bible of childhood Seki after disorders. He was so astounded by Alfred and the other children as they begin to show what more and more, you know, that eight years later after he saw the original patient in nineteen thirty five eight years later in nineteen forty three when he would finally compile these cases into a paper, he had still not found any historical record of these children. Now, like, I said seventy five years later, we've been able to earth a case here a case there. In fact, I found a child a mention in the early eighteen hundreds by Charles bell who's wanted to early neurologists. The guy that we name Bell's palsy after I found a case that he'd written. If someone I would basically label as autistic, so you can find autism sprinkled throughout the medical literature. You know, one every twenty thirty maybe forty years, but doesn't that excuse me force? But doesn't that undermine the argument that that if you can find cases of autism in the literature that predate the use of aluminum in vaccines, doesn't that then negate the causation or the connection? I wish it did. I really do. No one wants to cause autism. I don't want that. I wish it negated it because I could stop writing these crazy books and go on with their normal life. But unfortunately, autism can be caused by many things there's drugs such as the litter or misoprostol that are known to be capable of causing autism. And in my opinion. And this is a hypothesis I explained really clearly in the book, I'm autism is very specific geography within the brain, the brain stem, entry in my opinion. And in fact, it's an asymmetrical brain stem Andris happens on one side of the brain or the other. And for this to occur is not that difficult. So the route history, we should find cases of autism. Is autism is a specific injury in the brain stem and a specific location in the brain stem, which we can talk about later, I would expect you would see autism sprinkled throughout the medical literature because there is nothing. Particularly unique about aluminum that other things couldn't also call given the right variables in place. So no seeing autism appear before nineteen thirty two does not negate when the vaccines vaccines, unfortunately are uniquely suited to causing autism. Because of the way they're administered. Would you can talk about later? Yes, we will or autism to appear before then. Does nothing affect it. Doesn't affect whether that the argument the vaccines could or could not could not cause autism. I in fact, I believe it bolsters the case because we we know that there are other things that can cause it and we can start to connect. Why why do vaccines cause them so much more frequently? There's actually an interesting Canadian connection you spend quite a bit of time in the book detailing this in order to get the public on board with this vaccine because it was a great deal of reticence. People didn't want to be pincushions because they didn't want their children to be subjected to so many jabs the needle and prior to the introduction of aluminum took three four five jabs of this anti-toxins. They employed a very famous doctor a Canadian doctor who was..

Liam Connor Alfred allergy Baltimore Dr Leo Kanner Dr Connors clinic Johns Hopkins Medical center Dr Kanter vaccines Charles bell New Jersey Elfriede Arlon neurological disorders Donald triplet Witton Johns Hopkins
Samsung delays release of Galaxy smartphone

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

04:11 min | 3 years ago

Samsung delays release of Galaxy smartphone

"Samsung is pushing back this week's plan public launch of its two thousand dollar folding phone after reports the reviewers phones were breaking to two thousand dollar phone. So have you thought what was it the iphone? It's pretty expensive two thousand dollars the iphone ten right? Is that the new? Yes. And it's called ten not ex-, not iphone X. Right. Okay. James James is the only one I know who has any idea when it comes to technology confirmed him, and and it comes to like eleven hundred dollars that was the most expensive one on the market. But now you've got this this it's called galaxy fold and it's a two thousand dollar phone. They've been planning to release the galaxy fold this Friday, but instead are not going to run more tests and announce a new launch date in the coming weeks device reviewers quickly found issues with the galaxy fold which is about the size of an average smartphone. When folded and the size of a small tablet when it's two sides are pulled apart. So that'd be kinda cool where you've got your phone that can also become a tablet if you just kind of open it up. I like that. I guess I don't but. Several journalists reported the inside screens flickering freezing and finally dying on their test units within the first couple of days to reviewers mistakenly removed an outer plastic layer that was meant to stay on and reported scratches on the screen afterward. Samsung said will find ways to better protect the screens. And explain to people the outside protective layer must stay on. If you've got something on your phone. That's supposed to stay on and come off that easy. The might want to let people know, right? Samsung has made a pledge that the phone can be unfolded about two hundred thousand times in its life. Why don't how often do you need to unfold? I have nothing to is that a little bit. Is that like going to be a years worth of unfolding? That's what I was one to open and close it a million times a day. How did two hundred thousand doesn't seem like that much? Right. I don't know because you're on your phone. I don't know. Well, yeah. But you can use it as a phone, or this would only be when you want to open it up to the tablet size and enclose it back again. So I don't know you probably do that a couple times a day. So the last couple of years years, I mean, how long do you keep phones? Anyway, these days you'll need really use tablets often anymore though. I mean, they were popular for awhile. I never see people tablets anymore. I have my ipad, mini home. And I always really wanna use it because I feel like I should use it and it's a little bit bigger. And I haven't. It's literally like my bedside clock eight right? Stand. And that's all I use it to take it on a plane to like watch movies the surface have a surface. So that's like, it can be a tablet and a regular left. Is that what that is? Okay. That that's more like a laptop. It is technically when you buy it. You just get the tablet part of it. Okay. But I mean, it's, you know, for me, it's my computer. Yeah. I like that. You don't need it twenty four seven. So it's not I think I need is on this little screen right here. I don't need to open it doublet inside. Well, you should never get a two thousand dollar folding phone anyway because you break your phone day. I know that is very true. So I can't imagine that you have days it really would. I I could see that being a cool feature. It just depends on how it functions if it's very easy, and and it works right in its compact when it folds then I could see it being cooled, but we're two thousand dollars not so much to keep everything separate by phone, my laptop separate, and that's why I like to do it. I when I have to do reading like when I was going through the mullahs report. For instance, you would think that I would grab the ipad and read it on that because it would just make sense to do that. And I started to. But then eventually I want to doing it on my phone. You know, it always wants back to the phone so two thousand bucks. I mean, I ain't gonna be a lot of people. Carrying around a folding phone price tag. That's

Samsung James James Mullahs Two Thousand Dollar Two Thousand Dollars Eleven Hundred Dollars
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The second of two sisters run over by a big rig while walking to school in south LA has died. The twelve year old had been in critical condition for more than two weeks. She died today the girl and her fourteen year old sister were on their way to Clinton middle school when they were hit. Driver of the truck did stop and has been cooperating with investigators. The Orange County food Bank has called for the state to make a deposit into a new diaper Bank sea food, Bank director, Mark Lowry, says the diaper Bank is greatly needed. Even if you only consider the forty two thousand families in Orange County that signed up for baby food assistance. And if we figure that the average infant needs nine diapers today it actually came out to a hundred and fifty two million diapers year needed. Just by those families. Larry says now local lawmakers have asked for the same one point six million dollars at four other counties receive last year in order to create a diaper Bank news brought to you by choice administrators insurance. Researchers in southern California have been working to stop a disease that threatens to decimate California. Citrus industry UC riverside's pick. Peggy mock says one one being also known as citrus greening has has cost Florida's seventy five percent of its citrus production. Another impact that homeowners really care about is that we won't have door yard trees anymore. Florida. You don't have citrus outside the front door anymore. They're all God model died. Mark says the disease has been found in more than one thousand citrus. Trees in LA, an Orange County's the diseases spread by a small insect. You have to wait a while longer to get a Samsung flip phone the two thousand dollar folding phone was supposed to be unveiled this week. But that's been pushed back because reviewers phones were breaking several journalists say the screens on the galaxy fold flickered frozen than died within the first couple of days to reviewers removed and outer plastic layer, which resulted in the screens being scratched other tests phones have held up to the Samsung pledge that the phone which when folded is about the size of a smartphone in about the size of a small tablet went unfolded can be unfolded about two hundred thousand times a new launch date will be announced in the coming weeks. Any king KFI news? Heads up in Sun Valley. There is a crash.

Orange County Mark Lowry LA diaper Bank Samsung Florida Clinton middle school California KFI Bank Peggy mock UC riverside Sun Valley Larry director seventy five percent six million dollars two thousand dollar
Milky Way Warped and Twisted

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:27 min | 3 years ago

Milky Way Warped and Twisted

"Accurate three dimensional map of Milky Way. Galaxy shows that it's warped and twisted. A report in the journal nature astronomy claims this woop spiral patent is being caused by talk of spinning of the milky way's massive in disk of stars than you observations of based on the positions of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars, which will use to map the milky ways real shape. They found the milky way's disk of stars becomes increasingly warped and twisted. The further away the stars are from the galactic Santa one of the study's authors. Professor Richard de grace from MacQuarie university says people usually think of spiral galaxies as being flat discs. The problem is trying to determine the rue shave avow. Galaxy is bit like standing in the middle of the woods trying to determine the exact size and shape of the hull forest. It's also the touristy difficult to determine distances from the sun to some parts of the milky ways. Gaseous disk without having a clear idea of what the disc actually looks like however of the past fifty years or so the have been some tantalizing hints that hydrogen clouds in the Milky Way could be warped from a great distance. I'll spiral galaxy look like thin disk of stars that obits roughly once every two hundred and fifty million years around the central region where hundreds of billions of stars provide all the gravitational glue native the whole the galaxy together. The Pat from dot matter that is, but it now seems this pull of gravity is far waker in the galaxies fi outta disk there. The hydrogen atoms making up most of the galaxy's gas disk no longer confined to a thin plane. Instead, they give the disk and s like a wolf to peerages coast by the huge man of toll coming from the spinning the milky way's massive in a disc of starves the Katie developing. This new three-dimensional map was recently published catalogue of young variable stars, none is classical Cepheids located in the wool Milky Way. Disc. Data on the east is was provided by Nashes wise wide field. Infrared survey explorer spacecraft the authors rebel, use a thousand three hundred thirty nine of these had variables to help them develop. They Matt and this allowed them that attempt that twisted appearance of the galaxies fire out a ragions classical Cepheids some four to twenty times as massive as the sun and up to one hundred thousand times as bright syfy at variables pulse. I that. He's expanding contract at set rates based on their intrinsic luminosity. And so that can be used the standard candles to measure cosmic distances because strana is no hang trinity luminous syfy variable star is because it's Paul sation. Right. They can determine how far away it must be. It's exactly the same. As looking at a row of straight lights down the road. You know, the vocal at the same brightness for the ones further down the road will appear dim it than the ones near it to you. This allows very accurate distances to determined for the stars with an era. Of only three to five percent. Then you research provides a crucial updated map for studies of the Milky Way, still emotions the origins of the milky way's disc. The grace reminds us that most of the matter in the milky ways dot matter, which is an intrinsic part of a universe. But the grace also points out that not only decide to not have any idea. What dot matter is not even sure exactly where it is. The new research the roszak of the Milky Way could help scientists better determine how dot matter is distributed around the Milky Way galaxy built those role surprised to find that they three dimensional collection of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars and the milky gas disk shared the stars tended to follow each other closely. The grace is that a scullery off his new insights into the formation of the Milky Way. He says perhaps more importantly, you found that in the milky way's outer regions the s like still a disk is warped in a progressively more. Twisted spiral Patton. Astronomers have observed dozens of other galaxies which have shown similar, Pat. Tens degrade says that means the milky way's twists rare. But not unique what we found is that towards the outer regions of anarchy by galaxy galaxy starts to DVI Toma flat bag shack without that was known for longtime in its distribution of gasoline by gossiping hydrogen atoms of which we knew for the last five decades or so in the region. The hydrogen gas would deviate from the plain become higher on bumps on one end and lower on the other end. Now, our study under the results have found fun for the first time that the young stars in the QA Trist by so-called seat variable stars, which are quite massive there for quite young followed that same kind of warped distribution where there is a clear deviation from does flatbed geic shed. But that's not everything also found is that the main direction of this war is not a straight line. But it starts to Marlins chase a spiral structure Espy go further for that. In the sense that this war becomes twisted at greater and greater radio as this. Anything to do at all with the total on stars within the galaxy coast by the galaxy's rotation. Yeah. So our interpretation of this result is not the massive disc of star king up. Most of the milk is rotating around the center of the galaxy. Every tune is sixty two three hundred million years, and it's dragging behind it the outer layers, which are less strongly gravitationally bound to the milky right because I've much further is and so that rotation the warped. Our two disc is slightly lagging behind is there any connection between this this warped structure in the thick and thin disks of the Milky Way is the correlation. And that's a good question. But we haven't actually looked up. Now having said that the dole cough the stars in. By are distributed into thin disc. That's ready to device majority of stars the thick disk is puffed up somewhat and it tends to extend to greater radio. But at much lower numbers of stars than the thinness. The the works distribution of stars would deviate from this thing this in the into the realm of the thickness. So there might be some dynamically. Action. But I would say about the warp itself is originates from the thin. That's probably must less associated with Findus. I don't think this has to do with the spiral structure of the milky QA such because it's quite well known by now death, the the longevity of the spiral arms is due to something called density Reich Swiss stars move around the center of the Milky Way, and they get attracted by the higher density of potato in despite alarm today that move faster towards spiral. I've spent more time there because of gravity and they move out slowly between his firearms that don't spend much time. That's that's the density by feary. I think there's a difficult. That's that's a completely different dynamical process in in this particular case, we believe that we really sees graft national torquing dragging behind of material by the inner massive disc. What do you need to do next for your research? Well, there's a couple of things that we can do first of all we looked at about thirteen hundred or so of the variables that's sizable sample. But it's know. You can always be improved one of the problems with our sample is that all of these stars were located on the near side of the nookie right centers on our side of the center. It would be great if he could get similar quality data on the other side of the QA center. So that we could see whether or not the features out. We have found are symmetrical, and that is more than just an academic exercise. The idea here is if the warts distribution of the seats in the twisting, this symmetrical either side of the Milky Way center, then we truly have a process here that works across the galaxy. Comex have suggested that what we we've seen might have been caused by the info of dwarf galaxy towards the region stuff, I'm Yukio. And if that's stick as you would only expect your side. So that's one thing that we would like to explore another thing, of course, is probably not very well. The European Space Agency is currently operating its guy satellite, which is meant to determine positions and distances to about a billion stars nuclei galaxy the first data released has has come out in the second releases Jew soon, but the full date. Percents will not be released for another three to five years by that time accurate three d map of nuclear galaxy. At hopefully, result will serve as a benchmark to hold those guy results against and I finally the other quite exciting prospects here is that by concentrating distribution of stars in our Milky Way. More a better more carefully before we may have a fighting chance of determining all the doc metro is located and that's still a big open question. That's professor Richard grace from Corean versity in Sydney,

Galaxy Milky Way Center Professor Richard De Grace Cepheids Nature Astronomy Macquarie University Hull Forest Comex European Space Agency Marlins Nashes Peerages Strana PAT Matt Professor Richard Grace Paul Sation
Milky Way Warped and Twisted

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:27 min | 3 years ago

Milky Way Warped and Twisted

"Accurate three dimensional map of Milky Way. Galaxy shows that it's warped and twisted. A report in the journal nature astronomy claims this woop spiral patent is being caused by talk of spinning of the milky way's massive in disk of stars than you observations of based on the positions of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars, which will use to map the milky ways real shape. They found the milky way's disk of stars becomes increasingly warped and twisted. The further away the stars are from the galactic Santa one of the study's authors. Professor Richard de grace from MacQuarie university says people usually think of spiral galaxies as being flat discs. The problem is trying to determine the rue shave avow. Galaxy is bit like standing in the middle of the woods trying to determine the exact size and shape of the hull forest. It's also the touristy difficult to determine distances from the sun to some parts of the milky ways. Gaseous disk without having a clear idea of what the disc actually looks like however of the past fifty years or so the have been some tantalizing hints that hydrogen clouds in the Milky Way could be warped from a great distance. I'll spiral galaxy look like thin disk of stars that obits roughly once every two hundred and fifty million years around the central region where hundreds of billions of stars provide all the gravitational glue native the whole the galaxy together. The Pat from dot matter that is, but it now seems this pull of gravity is far waker in the galaxies fi outta disk there. The hydrogen atoms making up most of the galaxy's gas disk no longer confined to a thin plane. Instead, they give the disk and s like a wolf to peerages coast by the huge man of toll coming from the spinning the milky way's massive in a disc of starves the Katie developing. This new three-dimensional map was recently published catalogue of young variable stars, none is classical Cepheids located in the wool Milky Way. Disc. Data on the east is was provided by Nashes wise wide field. Infrared survey explorer spacecraft the authors rebel, use a thousand three hundred thirty nine of these had variables to help them develop. They Matt and this allowed them that attempt that twisted appearance of the galaxies fire out a ragions classical Cepheids some four to twenty times as massive as the sun and up to one hundred thousand times as bright syfy at variables pulse. I that. He's expanding contract at set rates based on their intrinsic luminosity. And so that can be used the standard candles to measure cosmic distances because strana is no hang trinity luminous syfy variable star is because it's Paul sation. Right. They can determine how far away it must be. It's exactly the same. As looking at a row of straight lights down the road. You know, the vocal at the same brightness for the ones further down the road will appear dim it than the ones near it to you. This allows very accurate distances to determined for the stars with an era. Of only three to five percent. Then you research provides a crucial updated map for studies of the Milky Way, still emotions the origins of the milky way's disc. The grace reminds us that most of the matter in the milky ways dot matter, which is an intrinsic part of a universe. But the grace also points out that not only decide to not have any idea. What dot matter is not even sure exactly where it is. The new research the roszak of the Milky Way could help scientists better determine how dot matter is distributed around the Milky Way galaxy built those role surprised to find that they three dimensional collection of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars and the milky gas disk shared the stars tended to follow each other closely. The grace is that a scullery off his new insights into the formation of the Milky Way. He says perhaps more importantly, you found that in the milky way's outer regions the s like still a disk is warped in a progressively more. Twisted spiral Patton. Astronomers have observed dozens of other galaxies which have shown similar, Pat. Tens degrade says that means the milky way's twists rare. But not unique what we found is that towards the outer regions of anarchy by galaxy galaxy starts to DVI Toma flat bag shack without that was known for longtime in its distribution of gasoline by gossiping hydrogen atoms of which we knew for the last five decades or so in the region. The hydrogen gas would deviate from the plain become higher on bumps on one end and lower on the other end. Now, our study under the results have found fun for the first time that the young stars in the QA Trist by so-called seat variable stars, which are quite massive there for quite young followed that same kind of warped distribution where there is a clear deviation from does flatbed geic shed. But that's not everything also found is that the main direction of this war is not a straight line. But it starts to Marlins chase a spiral structure Espy go further for that. In the sense that this war becomes twisted at greater and greater radio as this. Anything to do at all with the total on stars within the galaxy coast by the galaxy's rotation. Yeah. So our interpretation of this result is not the massive disc of star king up. Most of the milk is rotating around the center of the galaxy. Every tune is sixty two three hundred million years, and it's dragging behind it the outer layers, which are less strongly gravitationally bound to the milky right because I've much further is and so that rotation the warped. Our two disc is slightly lagging behind is there any connection between this this warped structure in the thick and thin disks of the Milky Way is the correlation. And that's a good question. But we haven't actually looked up. Now having said that the dole cough the stars in. By are distributed into thin disc. That's ready to device majority of stars the thick disk is puffed up somewhat and it tends to extend to greater radio. But at much lower numbers of stars than the thinness. The the works distribution of stars would deviate from this thing this in the into the realm of the thickness. So there might be some dynamically. Action. But I would say about the warp itself is originates from the thin. That's probably must less associated with Findus. I don't think this has to do with the spiral structure of the milky QA such because it's quite well known by now death, the the longevity of the spiral arms is due to something called density Reich Swiss stars move around the center of the Milky Way, and they get attracted by the higher density of potato in despite alarm today that move faster towards spiral. I've spent more time there because of gravity and they move out slowly between his firearms that don't spend much time. That's that's the density by feary. I think there's a difficult. That's that's a completely different dynamical process in in this particular case, we believe that we really sees graft national torquing dragging behind of material by the inner massive disc. What do you need to do next for your research? Well, there's a couple of things that we can do first of all we looked at about thirteen hundred or so of the variables that's sizable sample. But it's know. You can always be improved one of the problems with our sample is that all of these stars were located on the near side of the nookie right centers on our side of the center. It would be great if he could get similar quality data on the other side of the QA center. So that we could see whether or not the features out. We have found are symmetrical, and that is more than just an academic exercise. The idea here is if the warts distribution of the seats in the twisting, this symmetrical either side of the Milky Way center, then we truly have a process here that works across the galaxy. Comex have suggested that what we we've seen might have been caused by the info of dwarf galaxy towards the region stuff, I'm Yukio. And if that's stick as you would only expect your side. So that's one thing that we would like to explore another thing, of course, is probably not very well. The European Space Agency is currently operating its guy satellite, which is meant to determine positions and distances to about a billion stars nuclei galaxy the first data released has has come out in the second releases Jew soon, but the full date. Percents will not be released for another three to five years by that time accurate three d map of nuclear galaxy. At hopefully, result will serve as a benchmark to hold those guy results against and I finally the other quite exciting prospects here is that by concentrating distribution of stars in our Milky Way. More a better more carefully before we may have a fighting chance of determining all the doc metro is located and that's still a big open question. That's professor Richard grace from Corean versity in Sydney,

Galaxy Milky Way Center Professor Richard De Grace Cepheids Nature Astronomy Macquarie University Hull Forest Comex European Space Agency Marlins Nashes Peerages Strana PAT Matt Professor Richard Grace Paul Sation
Milky Way Warped and Twisted

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:27 min | 3 years ago

Milky Way Warped and Twisted

"Accurate three dimensional map of Milky Way. Galaxy shows that it's warped and twisted. A report in the journal nature astronomy claims this woop spiral patent is being caused by talk of spinning of the milky way's massive in disk of stars than you observations of based on the positions of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars, which will use to map the milky ways real shape. They found the milky way's disk of stars becomes increasingly warped and twisted. The further away the stars are from the galactic Santa one of the study's authors. Professor Richard de grace from MacQuarie university says people usually think of spiral galaxies as being flat discs. The problem is trying to determine the rue shave avow. Galaxy is bit like standing in the middle of the woods trying to determine the exact size and shape of the hull forest. It's also the touristy difficult to determine distances from the sun to some parts of the milky ways. Gaseous disk without having a clear idea of what the disc actually looks like however of the past fifty years or so the have been some tantalizing hints that hydrogen clouds in the Milky Way could be warped from a great distance. I'll spiral galaxy look like thin disk of stars that obits roughly once every two hundred and fifty million years around the central region where hundreds of billions of stars provide all the gravitational glue native the whole the galaxy together. The Pat from dot matter that is, but it now seems this pull of gravity is far waker in the galaxies fi outta disk there. The hydrogen atoms making up most of the galaxy's gas disk no longer confined to a thin plane. Instead, they give the disk and s like a wolf to peerages coast by the huge man of toll coming from the spinning the milky way's massive in a disc of starves the Katie developing. This new three-dimensional map was recently published catalogue of young variable stars, none is classical Cepheids located in the wool Milky Way. Disc. Data on the east is was provided by Nashes wise wide field. Infrared survey explorer spacecraft the authors rebel, use a thousand three hundred thirty nine of these had variables to help them develop. They Matt and this allowed them that attempt that twisted appearance of the galaxies fire out a ragions classical Cepheids some four to twenty times as massive as the sun and up to one hundred thousand times as bright syfy at variables pulse. I that. He's expanding contract at set rates based on their intrinsic luminosity. And so that can be used the standard candles to measure cosmic distances because strana is no hang trinity luminous syfy variable star is because it's Paul sation. Right. They can determine how far away it must be. It's exactly the same. As looking at a row of straight lights down the road. You know, the vocal at the same brightness for the ones further down the road will appear dim it than the ones near it to you. This allows very accurate distances to determined for the stars with an era. Of only three to five percent. Then you research provides a crucial updated map for studies of the Milky Way, still emotions the origins of the milky way's disc. The grace reminds us that most of the matter in the milky ways dot matter, which is an intrinsic part of a universe. But the grace also points out that not only decide to not have any idea. What dot matter is not even sure exactly where it is. The new research the roszak of the Milky Way could help scientists better determine how dot matter is distributed around the Milky Way galaxy built those role surprised to find that they three dimensional collection of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars and the milky gas disk shared the stars tended to follow each other closely. The grace is that a scullery off his new insights into the formation of the Milky Way. He says perhaps more importantly, you found that in the milky way's outer regions the s like still a disk is warped in a progressively more. Twisted spiral Patton. Astronomers have observed dozens of other galaxies which have shown similar, Pat. Tens degrade says that means the milky way's twists rare. But not unique what we found is that towards the outer regions of anarchy by galaxy galaxy starts to DVI Toma flat bag shack without that was known for longtime in its distribution of gasoline by gossiping hydrogen atoms of which we knew for the last five decades or so in the region. The hydrogen gas would deviate from the plain become higher on bumps on one end and lower on the other end. Now, our study under the results have found fun for the first time that the young stars in the QA Trist by so-called seat variable stars, which are quite massive there for quite young followed that same kind of warped distribution where there is a clear deviation from does flatbed geic shed. But that's not everything also found is that the main direction of this war is not a straight line. But it starts to Marlins chase a spiral structure Espy go further for that. In the sense that this war becomes twisted at greater and greater radio as this. Anything to do at all with the total on stars within the galaxy coast by the galaxy's rotation. Yeah. So our interpretation of this result is not the massive disc of star king up. Most of the milk is rotating around the center of the galaxy. Every tune is sixty two three hundred million years, and it's dragging behind it the outer layers, which are less strongly gravitationally bound to the milky right because I've much further is and so that rotation the warped. Our two disc is slightly lagging behind is there any connection between this this warped structure in the thick and thin disks of the Milky Way is the correlation. And that's a good question. But we haven't actually looked up. Now having said that the dole cough the stars in. By are distributed into thin disc. That's ready to device majority of stars the thick disk is puffed up somewhat and it tends to extend to greater radio. But at much lower numbers of stars than the thinness. The the works distribution of stars would deviate from this thing this in the into the realm of the thickness. So there might be some dynamically. Action. But I would say about the warp itself is originates from the thin. That's probably must less associated with Findus. I don't think this has to do with the spiral structure of the milky QA such because it's quite well known by now death, the the longevity of the spiral arms is due to something called density Reich Swiss stars move around the center of the Milky Way, and they get attracted by the higher density of potato in despite alarm today that move faster towards spiral. I've spent more time there because of gravity and they move out slowly between his firearms that don't spend much time. That's that's the density by feary. I think there's a difficult. That's that's a completely different dynamical process in in this particular case, we believe that we really sees graft national torquing dragging behind of material by the inner massive disc. What do you need to do next for your research? Well, there's a couple of things that we can do first of all we looked at about thirteen hundred or so of the variables that's sizable sample. But it's know. You can always be improved one of the problems with our sample is that all of these stars were located on the near side of the nookie right centers on our side of the center. It would be great if he could get similar quality data on the other side of the QA center. So that we could see whether or not the features out. We have found are symmetrical, and that is more than just an academic exercise. The idea here is if the warts distribution of the seats in the twisting, this symmetrical either side of the Milky Way center, then we truly have a process here that works across the galaxy. Comex have suggested that what we we've seen might have been caused by the info of dwarf galaxy towards the region stuff, I'm Yukio. And if that's stick as you would only expect your side. So that's one thing that we would like to explore another thing, of course, is probably not very well. The European Space Agency is currently operating its guy satellite, which is meant to determine positions and distances to about a billion stars nuclei galaxy the first data released has has come out in the second releases Jew soon, but the full date. Percents will not be released for another three to five years by that time accurate three d map of nuclear galaxy. At hopefully, result will serve as a benchmark to hold those guy results against and I finally the other quite exciting prospects here is that by concentrating distribution of stars in our Milky Way. More a better more carefully before we may have a fighting chance of determining all the doc metro is located and that's still a big open question. That's professor Richard grace from Corean versity in Sydney,

Galaxy Milky Way Center Professor Richard De Grace Cepheids Nature Astronomy Macquarie University Hull Forest Comex European Space Agency Marlins Nashes Peerages Strana PAT Matt Professor Richard Grace Paul Sation
Samsung's foldable phone is the Galaxy Fold, available April 26th

Your Weekly Tech Update

04:07 min | 3 years ago

Samsung's foldable phone is the Galaxy Fold, available April 26th

"Plus resolution. This thing is a beast. Samsung is using five hundred and twelve gigabytes of universal flash storage three point zero for faster. Feeds this comes alongside a Qualcomm seven nanometer Octo core processor in twelve gigs of ram Samsung has even built two batteries for its galaxy fold that are separated by the fold but combined in the Android operating system to represent a total four thousand three hundred eighty mill amp hours of battery power Samsung has built a sturdy backbone to the device with a hinge system that has multiple interlocking gears all of these gears or hidden under the rear of the device. So you're never actually going to see them. It looks pretty sleek, and it allows the galaxy full transform from tablet to phone modes. Samsung says it's able to fold at least two hundred thousand times, which if you work it out is about five years, if you fold it a hundred times a day at the rear of the device is a triple camera system for some reason. It's going to be used for both tablet and phone modes. There's a sixteen megapixel ultra-wide camera alongside a twelve megapixel wide angle and telephoto camera at the rear and ten megapixel cover camera for self as in the front. Samsung is also creating four different colors for the galaxy fold. But it's the main tablet display, that's key. Here. Samsung is allowing the galaxy fold to run three apps at once on this Android device, and it's using an app continuity system to adjust those apps when you move between tablet and phone modes. This thing is awesome apps. Like, what's at Microsoft Office?

Samsung Qualcomm Microsoft Four Thousand Three Hundred Ei Twelve Gigabytes Seven Nanometer Five Years
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Fold it's the latest offering that boasts an INFINITI flex display it allows the phone to heavy tablets size screen, and then you can fold it in half and fit it in your pocket. It can run three apps at once. But it cost two thousand dollars for more on this. We spoke to rob verger. He's an assistant tech editor at popular science. And we just started off by talking about all the latest from Samsung, we got a whole bunch of new gadgets from Samsung on Wednesday, and they revealed their new S ten galaxy S ten phones and there's actually four of those. So we got a whole slew of new S ten devices and three of the four of them have this ultra sonic fingerprint sensor. That's built right into the display, and it you just sound ways to look at your fingerprint and get a kind of three dimensional image of it and uses that to basically validate, your identity and give you a way to unlock the phone, and it's a really clever way using biometrics. All smartphones makers have to figure out how do we let somebody unlock the phone? You know, maybe it's apple users face ID, for example. Fingerprint sensors aren't new on fallen, but on all tra-, sonic fingerprint sensor, built into the display is I think I've pretty cool. No trick. I I'm an iphone ten right now. And it does have the facial recognition thing. It works. Pretty good. But I always do miss that fingerprint sensor is just easy to open it real quick. As you're holding and picking up your phone. It's already on its way to being open Samson always makes beautiful phones. Beautiful displays they're great phones. But briefly tell us how the ultra sonic fingerprint sensor works. It uses sound waves to detect the three dimensional image of your fingerprint. Right. Well, you've probably heard of like an ultrasound in medicine, right? Whereas using to get an image of something. So they're doing something similar, obviously, it's going to dairy in some technical ways. But it's using sound waves that you can't hear so they're all tra- sonic waves are doubting off of your fingerprint and returning to the sensor. So it's kind of doing putting an active reading of what your fingerprint is. And that's different from like a capacitor fingerprint sensor, which is like what was built into the home button of older apple iphones. So choosenissan ways to bounce off of your fingerprint? And from that it's looking at the ridges and the valleys and a consensus the depth of the valleys as well. So that let's get a three-dimensional or textured look at your fingerprint validated that way how much are these funds going to cost us? They're all around nine hundred thousand dollars, which is pretty par for the course. Flagship smartphone these days. All right. Let's talk about the next one that they unveiled also the galaxy old phone which a lot of people are saying you're going to start seeing more of these foldable type displays this one does come at a price at one thousand nine hundred eighty dollars. So basically two thousand dollars and it's going to be available starting April twenty six. So that's pretty soon. Tell us a little bit about that one. Yeah. It seems pretty science fiction and yet it's kind of exciting. But you're right. It is almost two thousand dollars which funny because my guess is that most consumers who buy Samsung products will go out and buy something like the ten kind of your normal kind of smartphone. But the galaxy full got all this attention. And that's because it can fold open like a book. And when it does it reveals this screen, that's like a tablet sized screen. It's about seven point three inches across when you close it like a book on the front of it is a smaller screen that's four point six inches across. So there really aiming this has a luxury device that some people will use as a phone and then later on you're at home, you're on your couch, and you unfold it and use it as a tablet to consume net flicks. Or or whatever. Yeah. This thing is so interesting, and I understand the purpose of it. I don't know if the consumer at large is ready for something. Like this the display you're talking about in the front. It's not as nice as some of the other smartphones out there, even the S tens or the iphones. It almost seems like you're going to be looking at it for notifications. Like, you would like on an apple watch or something? And then you open the display in. Yes. Then it does look much more impressive. Tell us about that screen there. Because since it's a foldable display. I've read somewhere that it doesn't completely lay flat. When you open it. They say that it's able to fold of at least two hundred thousand times which works out to over five years. If you one hundred times a day, the interesting thing will be you know, a couple of things one will be to see how did this phone hold up over time. You know, how to the gears work? How does that phone the screen that they say is made out of a new kind of polymer had dad hold up over time with all this kind of this new use case, right? So how does it hold up physically? And I think the other question is what you like to use. It can. Run up to three apps at a time. Yeah. So you can multitask. You know, you can have a YouTube video open you can have what's up on and, you know, a third app and some people may love that. And they're like this is so fun. I'm being so productive and other people might think God this is like overwhelming, I don't know which screened footwear, and whether I should just close it and use the small screen. So some people may find a freedom in using it. They're like, wow, this is the future. And I think other people may think this just a little bit much for me. Verger assistant tech editor of popular science. Thank you very much for joining us. My pleasure. Thanks so much for having me..

Samsung apple editor rob verger INFINITI YouTube Samson two thousand dollars one thousand nine hundred eigh nine hundred thousand dollars three inches five years six inches
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

10:12 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I'm Joanie Siani. And Paula Larry Welsh you hear from ninety three financial group. And I love the fact that we're we're having this opportunity on WBZ to get some stuff they're out to the public. So at some point. Things that we know that we take for granted. Because we've talked about it so many times that it gets into the public consciousness that things are common knowledge. Just like I said before the break, the kind of inside scoop on mutual funds work and all the different shifts. Classes and people have no idea, you're probably driving home from Costco, right now. Saving money on paper towel saying. Well, what kind of shares? Do we have? Yeah. Should you should know? I it's it's you know, it's your money. And you should really know what you know what what's being? Taken out of your account every month or every day. Or basically is how it works. You say it it doesn't sound like much money. One percent. It doesn't sound like that much money. When you're looking if your average annual fees, and your portfolio are say, let's just say that there there are two percent compared to one percent. That's just a one percent difference. But on five hundred thousand dollars that's five thousand dollars now becomes real money. Right. So you could buy a truckload of paper towels to give you an example, you know, the average mutual fund the average annual expense ratio is probably I don't know. Maybe three quarters of one percent like point seven five. Okay. But that's the average you know, that doesn't mean everybody's paying that. Some people are paying much more because they have higher expense funds. And they don't even realize that they could be paying two percent. Some see share classes are two percent higher. But then an investor that uses the index funds their expense ratio. Show could be less than five basis points. So the average is point seven five. But what are you paying is what you should want to know? Right. So, you know, just to give you an idea like. You know, say your average expense ratio is point seven say your own expense ratio. Like, you added up. You did an like this is something that we do for new people. They can come in with their investments, and we'll do this. What we call portfolio analysis. Joni. Line by line all the different funds you own. You know, what each one of them charging you for any annual expense ratio what the performances, and then what the overall average performance you've been receiving the average expense ratio. So just to give you an idea say say, we do that for you. And it turns out Jerry expense ratio was point eight five like, oh that's less than one percent. That's not bad. Right. But just think of it, you know, on one hundred thousand dollars point eight five is eight hundred and fifty dollars a year while if you had an index on like one of the positions will, you know, we use as you know, some index funds, and they could be lower than five basis points is five basis points on one hundred thousand dollars instead of eight hundred and fifty dollars five basis points is fifty dollars. So that's that's a hundred dollar difference on one hundred thousand dollars. What if you have a half a million that's a four thousand dollar difference every year that means that money's being taken out? And it's not that money's not letting your portfolio grow for the next year. So so do I understand you correctly. When you're saying that you can literally get a very comparable mutual fund for a point zero. Yeah, it's it's really matter of I'm not saying, oh, my mutual fund is better. Well, while it really comes down to the bottom line is performance in our portfolio. We don't just use index funds will use some active manage funds, and if the active manage fund even with an expense ratio has better performance in the index fund is like who cares? What the is undoing better. Right. Right. But if you have like what I was saying is sometimes the same exact fund, you just have a higher expense Schick last. That's crazy to my mind. You know, you can get the same the same exact fund for a lower. Cost average consumer and just what you were going back. Larry to say, the average consumer. And this is why this show is so important that the getting it out to the public to ask these questions how much is this costing me. Can I do better somewhere else? You know, as you're saying, you're cutting coupons to go to Kohl's. And you're why and you're doing the big paper towel Ron BJ's to save, you know, fifty bucks over the year. And you should be doing. Why are we not? Why are we so sheepish when it comes to literally aggressively saying, what am I being? My opinion. My my reason why is because nobody knows the questions to ask. Nobody knows it's like an unknown item in your life. Like, you know. Hey, if I can get the same paper towels at Costco, BJ's say twenty bucks on a case. I that simple. Why even like I talked about I think even last week last week people refinance a homes idea to getting a mortgage Wallace. Very simple. I can get one for three point seven five versus four point five. I'm going to get the three point seven five, but when it comes to ever investments, people don't even understand. What they are. How do you even know what the fees are paying commissions are not paying commissions? And so we've seen it where investment accounts are when people come in. They're not paying too much in fees factor with it should be. And so that happens to on the opposite side of that. We see people coming in and. It's almost hard to believe this. But I'm not days have happened with the Feazel like three point two or three point three or more percent, right? A year in if you have a half a million dollars. And then all of a sudden we bring to their attention. These are things that happen. Right. Right. And. Do you know what the fees you're paying in your account, and they really don't know right on this particular financial product. And then you're saying then like Paul said, you have to have some knowledge in this area. But you know, after know what questions to ask? So we can call companies directly cells along with our client. And we know what questions to ask obviously, so income to find out the fees are like, you know, three point two percent at three point three or four percent. That's on the other end. We don't see it. So awesome. But once in a while you see that. So someone has you know, like Paul said a half a million dollars five hundred thousand times three point two percent is sixteen thousand dollars a year in fees. And when we explain that, obviously people are in shock. I didn't know that night. If I knew that I wouldn't have my money would not be there. But it's not on their statement. So they're not seeing it just being taken out. Are you former look at it another way if you're paying two or three percent and fees? You have to earn three. If you're paying three percent and fees. You have and three. Percent before you get zero. Right. And if if if your portfolio goes down three percent, you're really down six percent because it's the market went down three, but Japan, another three and fees. So three is excessive. We don't see that often. But it's just it's not just fees. It's really like again, you know, the type of portfolio have and is it being an actively managed and the bottom line is performance. And it's not like everybody comes in. And we say, oh, you're paying too much in fees, and we do a portfolio analysis. It's not our opinion. It's it's fact, it's it's the analysis the portfolio software, it's not us. It's not our opinion. Yes. So this time soon, we do this for people, and it looks great. Hey, your, you know, your allocation is appropriate, according to your objectives. And the expense ratio was is reasonable. And you're told us you're meeting what they Representative regularly. So I think you find. I mean, we happen to have you as a client? But there's no red flags here. So. Right. But you sit there and you're like, okay. I we talked earlier about how fast time goes. And sometimes, you know, a decade goes by and if you had one hundred hundred thousand dollars, and and it was whatever it was costing sixteen thousand a year. And you're like, okay. And then all of a sudden ten years has gone by. And you're like what happens. Okay. I could have had one hundred and sixty thousand dollars I had planned earlier if I had done my due diligence just to say at fifty years old, what is it that? I had really a matter of. Yeah. But you could have at least known that you were there was other options available. What you had right? I mean, not the you don't. And again, I'm I'm I know that you're saying it doesn't happen often. But when it does you're sitting there with an actual human not person and they're kicking themselves. And I know sometimes you're saying, you know, don't don't kick yourself. You know, water under the bridge on from there. So that's what really coach it's better to know. What the not know it now, it's like you said instead of waiting another ten years because you know, life is busy time goes by fast goes by so fast. And then, you know, when people do realize this, and then you're saying, according to this last question, sometimes people don't even know the relationship that they have with the person that they purchased some financial product. Yeah. When you when you invest in a transaction. It's really technically it's up to you to contact the professional to see if you should make any changes is no obligation the professional to to do that for you. I mean, a a good professional would to keep satisfied client budgets, no obligation. It was a transaction. Right. So that's why we're hoping that we're able to empower you with the right questions is set earlier poets, you know, it's not you. It's just it's not in the public consciousness of the list of questions that you should be. We get kind of Intel. Date at times. Thank you very much Bye-bye. We'll talk to you. We'll be back right after this break. Here's an important question. What do you want out of your investments growth income or maybe it's just to conserve what you currently have.

Costco Paula Larry Welsh Paul Joanie Siani Intel Ron BJ Kohl Japan Representative BJ two percent one percent one hundred thousand dollars fifty dollars three percent million dollars ten years one hundred hundred thousand d five hundred thousand dollars
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:34 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Peach teachable, featuring. This is. Tip of the iceberg for president is going down. Tip tip going down that was cut to by the way. What what was the last week? It was all manufactured crisis. Democrats media. They all use the same words they come to the same conclusions. They coordinate their messages, and they figure if they say manufactured crisis, manufactured prices, manufactured crisis enough that that's all that's finally gonna work, and you can add to that the fact that oh in this particular case if true, it's unbelievable. It's beyond malpractice. They don't care who we play that montage. Actually, it's a very good montage go would you like to? I think it'd be great since you're in such good contributing just here support us. So that they can hear back in the word. They used support me with some coffee. Go ahead. Oh boy. News report is true. Then we are likely on our way to possible impeachment proceedings wrong. If it were to be true. It means the president told someone to lie under oath. I simply is a crime as a peachable wrong. If this story is true, we must begin impeachment proceedings wrong. If you can prove that the president ordered it that to certainly rise to the level of rises to the level, and peaceful fans wrong and the president of the United States committed a federal felony. And at that point we are in high crimes and misdemeanors impeachment wrong. Is that in a peaceful offense? This is suborning perjury. I think there's no question. It's an impeachable offense wrong that is considered an impeachable offense wrong. Absolutely. These are impeachable offenses. Wrong inside that answer. I did hear the I word impeachable impeachment is a very fine alternative way to deal with this wrong. Democrats will move faster more aggressively toward impeachment wrong or an awful. Lot of similarities Michigan a couple of the articles of impeachment against Nixon and the elements of this story wrong, the very same offence for which the house of representatives moved to impeach Richard Nixon. Wrong in the past been impeachable. That way. Wrong. It's one of the things that drove Richard Nixon out of office wrong wrong on a spectacular level. They are wrong, by the way has anyone apologized to the kids and been any media outlet agency offered to help the students for their rush to judgment. Now. They have an attorney which I'm glad they have. And I hope this attorney does. Exactly there's a guy in in Georgia that represented. Richard jewell. His name is Lynwood. I know him at the time. And I'm known them over the years. He I interviewed him and spent a long time, though, he was a great attorney. You know, what he did? He got every tape. You went to every news organization, and he absolutely pulverized every single one of them rightly so I think a lot of women probably nondisclosure agreements. But I guarantee you they all paid a heavy price. Obviously, they haven't learned anything, but they paid a heavy price. So we got John Kerry voted for the urban billion before against it. This is a guy that comes back from Vietnam and trashes his own fellow Vietnam. That's an accuses them of of torture. We still have that tape member. When he got back from Virginia Gengis Khan. He says the way said it anyway, Carey's appearance at Davos at the World Economic Forum to call for the president's resignation. I didn't think that Senator is thought, you know, politics ended at the water's edge and Trump should resign. He saying in Davos interesting, the house, a House Democrat, apparently no longer things that radical Islamic terrorism is a threat to our national security. So instead, according to the Washington Times, they want to stop investigating terrorist threats and devote some local the same resources to investigating Trump. That's what's more important. That's Elliott angles. Genius say New York liberal Democrat. Yeah. Let's see let's look at their. Let's look let's look for the four hundred thousand time into Donald Trump. Anyway, let's get to our busy phones. You didn't find that J owned you Jay? Stories of the day personally raped cut off ears. Wires from portable telephones human genitals turned up our cut off Liam. Aussies randomly shot at civilians razed villages. Reminiscent of Genesis con shot cattle dogs for fun poison phone stocks and generally ravaged countryside itself. I actually did vote for the eighty dollars before I voted against it. Yeah. Before voted against the right. Let's get to our busy phones. Here. We have a great show tonight on Hannity. The great one Mark Levin is stopping by Lindsey Graham stop. And by we got a lot of fights. Lot of updates. We're gonna get to Covington the corrupt media. Buzzfeed the latest on the deep state border fight much, much more. Let's go to Donna, Staten Island, New York. Hey, Donna, how are you? Welcome to the all new AM seven ten w o war. How are you? Hi there. Sean great. How are you? Good. What's going on? Sean, it seems to me I I realized that I think a lot of us realize I should say that there's been an attack on masculinity. And now, I think about it ruin Catholicism, and the reason being it might be that the left is starting to gear up their attacks on Catholicism as a whole because they fear that if anything happens to Ginsburg, the next person on top of that list is Amy Coney Barrett. And she's a devout Catholic. That would also mean that there's a lot more Catholics on the supreme court, and they're trying to base the Catholic faith, and that's what part of the attack on these young men is it's not just the white males going back a hat. Aspect to that. And think about it also the situation. I don't really remember exactly the guy's name, but he was on the knights of Columbus. And they were trying to say that heaping Catholic that would be a negative in that situation. You know what I'm talking about? Correct. Who? I mean, I'm just starting to see that. I think that a lot of this a lot of this vitriol from the wall is because highness stacking Jack. So that there'll be a very negative impression of Catholicism. And that's why when AB Coney Barrett. You know, possibly nominated which we hope she will be ready stacking check against her in her face. Well, look, I think she would be a great choice. I would not be surprised in any way of the president picked or I don't know if there's an opening on the US court, but we know what's going to happen. It's going to be Bork. It's going to be Thomas. It's going to be cavenaugh. It's going to be smear slander besmirch destroy guaranteed. No question about it. But hopefully, we will be able to handle it as we did the last time. Hey, listen, I wanna remind you at the new year upon us, and you.

president Donald Trump attorney Richard Nixon Amy Coney Barrett New York United States Vietnam Richard jewell perjury John Kerry Washington Times Sean Virginia Gengis Khan Donna Davos Trump Michigan
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:24 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Which the house of representatives moved to impeach Richard Nixon. Wrong in the past mid impeachable. Exact way that Nixon was. Was wrong. It's one of the things that drove Richard Nixon out of office wrong wrong on a spectacular level. They're all by the way, has anyone apologized to the kids and. Been any media outlet agency offered to help the students for their rush to judgment. Now. They have an attorney which I'm glad they have. And I hope this attorney does exactly there's a guy in in Georgia that represented. Richard jewel. His name is Lynwood. I know him at the time. And I'm known them over the years. He I interviewed him and spent a long time, though, he was a great attorney. You know, what he did? He got every tape. You went to every news organization, and he absolutely pulverized every single one of them rightly so I think a lot of whom will probably nondisclosure agreements. But I guarantee you they all paid a heavy price. Obviously, they haven't learned anything, but they paid a heavy price. So we got John Kerry I voted for the rim billion before against it. This is a guy that comes back from Vietnam and trashes his own fellow Vietnam, vets and accuses them of of torture. We still have that tape member when he got back from Virginia Gengis Khan. He says the way said it anyway, carries appearance at Davos at the World Economic Forum to call for the president's resignation. I didn't think that Senator is thought, you know, politics ended at the water's edge and Trump should resign. He saying in Davos, oh interesting. The house a House Democrat apparently no longer thinks that radical Islamic terrorism is a threat to our national security. So instead, according to the Washington Times, they want to stop investigating terrorist threats and devote some local the same resources to investigating Trump. That's what's more important. That's Elliott angles. Genius say New York liberal Democrat. Yeah. Let's let's look at. Let's look let's look for the four hundred thousand time and the Donald Trump. Anyway, let's get to our busy phones. You didn't find that JC owned? Jay. Personally raped at all. Portable telephones human genitals turned up our cut off. Randomly shot at civilians. Reminiscent of. Hot dogs for fun points. And generally. Sean. Mom. I actually did vote for the eighty seven billion dollars before I voted against. Yeah. Before voted against the right. Let's get to our busy phones. Here. We have a great show tonight on Hannity. The great one Mark Levin is stopping by Lindsey Graham stopping by. We got a lot of fights lot of updates. We're going to get to Covington the corrupt media. Buzzfeed the latest on the deep state border fight much, much more. Let's go to Donna, Staten Island, New York. Hey, donna. How are you? Welcome to the all new AM seven ten WRR. How are you? Hi there. Sean great. How are you? Good. What's going on? Sean, it seems to me I I mean, I realized that I think a lot of us realize I should say that there's been an attack on masculinity. And now, I think about it. To the Knicks Catholicism, and the reason being it might be that the left is starting to gear up their attacks on Catholicism as a whole because they fear that if anything happens Ginsburg, the next person on top of that list is Amy Coney Barrett. And she's a devout Catholic. That would also mean that there's a lot more Catholics on the supreme court, and they're trying to debase the Catholic faith, and that's what part of the attack on these young men is it's not just that. John White males. Aspect to that. And think about it also the situation. I don't really remember exactly the guy's name, but he was on the knights of Columbus. And they were trying to say the heaping Catholic that would be a negative investiture. You know what I'm talking about? Correct. So I mean, I'm just starting to see that. I think that a lot of this. A lot of this vitriol from the wall is almost because highness stacking, Jack. So that they'll be a very negative impression of Catholicism. And that's by when Amy Barrett. You know, possibly nominated which we hope she will be. Stacking NASDAQ against her in her face. Well, look, I think she would be a great choice. I would not be surprised in any way of the president picked or I don't know if there's an opening on the US court, but we know what's going to happen. It's going to be born. It's going to be Thomas. It's gonna be cavenaugh. It's going to be smear slander besmirch destroy guaranteed. No question about it. But hopefully, we will be able to handle it as we did the last time. Hey, listen, I wanna remind you at the new year upon us, and you want to get a new job.

Amy Coney Barrett Richard jewel Donald Trump Sean Richard Nixon attorney New York Davos president Vietnam John Kerry Virginia Gengis Khan Washington Times Georgia Donna Lynwood US
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:25 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Wrong the very same offence for which the house of representatives moved to impeach Richard Nixon. Wrong in the past been impeachable. Zack. Nixon was wrong. It's one of the things that drove Richard Nixon out of office wrong wrong on a spectacular level. They're wrong. By the way, has anyone apologized to the kids and been any media outlet agency offered to help the students for their rush to judgment. Now. They have an attorney which I'm glad they have. And I hope this attorney does. Exactly there's a guy in in Georgia that represented Richard jewel. His name is Lynwood. I know him at the time. And I'm known them over the years. He I interviewed him and spent a long time, though, he was a great attorney. You know, what he did? He got every tape. You went to every news organization, and he absolutely pulverized every single one of them rightly so I think a lot of women probably nondisclosure agreements. But I guarantee you they all paid a heavy price. Obviously, they haven't learned anything, but they paid a heavy price. So we got John Kerry voted for the urban billion before against it. This is a guy that comes back from Vietnam and trashes his own fellow Vietnam. That's and accuses them of of torture. We still have that tape. Remember when he got back from Virginia Gengis Khan. He says the way said it anyway, carries the DeVos at the World Economic Forum to call for the president's resignation. I didn't think that Senator is. I thought, you know, politics ended at the water's edge and Trump should resign. He saying in Davos, oh interesting. The house a House Democrat apparently no longer thinks that radical Islamic terrorism is a threat to our national security. So instead, according to the Washington Times, they wanna stop investigating terrorist threats and devote some local the same resources to investigating Trump. That's what's more important. That's Elliott angles. Genius New York liberal Democrat. Yeah. Yeah. Let's let's look at. Let's look let's look for the four hundred thousand time and the Donald Trump. Anyway, let's get to our busy phones. You didn't find that J own O? Jay. Personally raped cut off hands. Pliers portable telephones to human genitals turned up, our cut off Lynn. Blown-up bodies, randomly shot at civilians villages. Reminiscent of con- shot. Cattle dogs for fun points from Hong stocks and generally ravaged countryside. Mom, I actually did vote for the eighty seven billion dollars before I voted against. Yeah. Before voted against the right. Let's get to our busy phones. Here. We have a great show tonight on Hannity. The great one Mark Levin is stopping by Lindsey Graham. Stop by. We've got a lot of fights. Lot of updates. We're gonna get to Covington the corrupt media. Buzzfeed the latest on the deep state border fight much, much more. Let's go to Donna, Staten Island, New York. Hey, donna. How are you? Welcome to the all new AM seven ten w war. How are you? Hi there. Sean great. How are you? Good. What's going on? Sean, it seems to me I I mean, I realized that I think a lot of us realize they should say that there's been an attack on masculinity. And now, I think if you think about it throw into the mix Catholicism, and the reason being it might be that the left is starting to gear up their tax on Catholicism as a whole because they fear that if anything happens to look Ginsburg, the next person on top of that list is Amy Coney Barrett. And she's a devout Catholic. That would also mean that there's a lot more Catholics on the supreme court, and they're trying to debase the Catholic faith, and that's what part of the attack on these young is it's not just that though John White males going back a half, though, some other aspect to that. And if you think about it also the situation, I don't really remember exactly the guy's name, but he was on the knights of Columbus. And they were trying to say that he being a Catholic that would be negative investiture. Well, you know what I'm talking about? Correct. So I mean, I'm just starting to see that. I think that a lot of this on a lot of this vitriol from the west is because highness stacking the deck so that they'll be a very negative impression of Catholicism. And that's why when AB Coney Barrett. You know, it's possibly nominated which we hope she will be. Stacking back against her in her face. Well, look, I think she would be a great choice. I would not be surprised in any way. If the president picked or I don't know if there's an opening on the US supreme court, but we know what's going to happen. It's going to be Bork. It's going to be Thomas. It's going to be cavenaugh. It's going to be smear slander besmirch destroy guaranteed. No question about it. But hopefully, we will be able to handle it as we did the last time. Hey, listen, I wanna remind you at the new year upon us, and you want to get a new.

Amy Coney Barrett Richard jewel Donald Trump Richard Nixon attorney New York president Vietnam Zack John Kerry Virginia Gengis Khan Sean Washington Times Donna Georgia Lynwood US Senator
"hundred thousand times" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

13:31 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand times" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"I really enjoyed what you were doing here, especially with the amount of research. You did for inside the black vault. So thank you for giving us time tonight. Oh, it's my pleasure. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it. But there's scant information in your biography available to me. So I want you to fill in a few blanks. I mentioned how early you got onto the whole foia thing, I thought that was really cool. Well, other kids are having lemonade stands. You know, wrestle government documents. But it so tell us a little bit more about you starting at that age too. Where you end up now. Sure. Well, like, you said, I I started at the age of fifteen firing off foia requests. And the the quick back story to why I started doing that which I'm sure we'll probably talk about at some point in the next three hours is the amount of information that is out there, and I'm not talking about just government documents, but about UFO stories and even back in nineteen ninety six I was amazed at how much information was on the internet. Now, it's, you know, a hundred thousand times over what was what was on back then, but I was amazed by it. And I wanted to know more, and I I've said at once, and I'll say it again, it was kind of like the stupidest decision I ever made. But it was the smartest choice. I ever decided to, you know, do where if somebody was gonna tell me the truth, it would be the United States government. Really thought that at the age of fifteen and you should think that fifteen. Well. Yeah. Yeah. Young and naive as I was. But I I I honestly did as silly. As that sounds, and and that's why I started with the foia was I thought, okay. Let's just go after the heart of this. I mean, you you read these stories on the internet, and I'm sure a lot of your listeners do it as well where they Google search something, and you get lost in the rabbit hole of going through millions of web pages that you can choose. But, but how do you know, what to believe and what not to believe? And so when I started going after the documents, I thought, okay, this is going to be verifiable, which is still true. But the information within it tells an amazing story of a cover up of lies of deceit. I mean, and it spans decades and decades, and there's no way around that. And and that's what got me interested very early on. Because I realized very very quickly that I was getting document. That shouldn't exist. So if if you believe what I call and thank you for for mentioning the book what I what I mentioned in the book is what I call the company line. And so what what I mean by the company line is the government wants you to think a certain way about UFO's and what they are. And they aren't and that's what they want you to believe and it's all based on project blue book and their investigation and their determination. And and as a fifteen year old kid that was that was what they first sent me. They sent me these fact sheets, and, you know, this is what you're supposed to believe John. But I didn't really believe it. I just had a kind of got feeling that there would be more. And I went after it. And here we are more than twenty two years later and not all on UFO's. But I've amassed about two point one million pages of declassified documents on any government secret. You could probably dream of. I've got probably documents on it or. Went after it. And here we are. So I run the vault dot com. And and ultimately that is what I've done for for twenty two years of just researching accept what the government has. And what they don't have ex- except John that didn't give me more by a graphical information about. Where'd you go to school like what did you? Yeah. I know. But it's like, I that's exactly it's I I know what you're doing now. And I know that's where you start it. But there's a little gap a little knowledge gap between I mean. So what was your academic background that gave you 'cause I mean Roman a little field is no that's not an insignificant publisher. They publish mostly academic work. And then there's the trade books that they do involve themselves with have to have some level of gravitas to it, and they don't just publish anything or do romance. Now, Leonard a lot of stuff, so they they clearly see the value in the amount of research that you've done in helping to define an argument here. But where did you get that skill? How did you? How did you come to to being able to collate all of this material and become an archivist? Well, I honestly I taught myself. I mean at the age of fifteen when you're taking, you know, high school classes, I you know, I was a sophomore in high school in Mission Hills Calif. At a high school named Alumini. I you don't you know, you can't say, hey, I want to take a class on the freedom of information act. I mean, you know, it doesn't exist. And while I was supposed to be reading Richard the third in my English class. You know, I and this is a true story. I'm not exaggerating. I was supposed to be reading Richard the third. I was literally sitting in my class handwriting freedom of information act request to the CIA. And I remember one time I did get caught that they were wondering like what are what are you doing? 'cause the the black vault although was around back, then I mean, it wasn't anything of what it is today. So I got in trouble. You know? I mean, I wasn't focusing. And I know my parents are listening, and they're probably laughing because you know, I was school suffered a little bit because I started focusing on what I wanted to learn and in in the history classes that you take and this also plays a role in why I do what I do in the history classes that you've taken like a high school prior to college. You know, you blow through like a World War Two era in in forty minutes. You know, it it just deserve so much more like history is so much more valuable than that. And and so that's what I was doing. Not only what the UFO information. But again, I was going after everything as the months and years went on after I taught myself how to do this thing. And and so through high school, I just kind of continued learning figuring out what to do if I had patients for school and much better at it. Maybe I would have went after a law degree or something like that. But but I I actually didn't pursue anything. I I other than you know, researching archiving putting it all online I got into television production as a as a quote unquote day job because I was doing a lot of on camera stuff for you know, being interviewed for history channel and Discovery Channel. I fell in love with the way that television was made. So that became a career. I'm embarrassed to say, but I'll say it. I didn't go to college. I went for about a semester and. It just it wasn't. It wasn't for me. I mean, I kind of found what I wanted to do what I love doing. And what I needed to know I taught myself and kind of took the next step. And so that day job became ultimately for many years a television production. So I was producing and writing and directing and then during the night, I was, you know, firing off requests and mailing them off to the CIA and the FBI. And and so so that was kind of it was like a double life kind of hole in my biography. That's true. I mean, I don't talk about that a whole lot just simply because you know, I mean, I'm kind of embarrassed I'd love to tell you. They'll be a bears nothing to be embarrassed about. In fact, you are probably the the typical of the person who might not benefit from a college education because yourself your self directed learner and college is is can become superfluous for somebody who has the. Discipline to study and create their own life, major as it were and a minor. So you were you are majoring in in archiving, and you're minoring in television. And you did just fine. Did you end up being involved in in any way or preliminarily even discussions about this hit TV show on based on project blue book, but not the drama? No, I've worked on a couple that have been you know, just based on the the hype about it about a year ago. I worked behind the scenes on some documentaries that that may air later this year on networks like the history channel, I can't go into great detail on the networks yet because I'm not sure if there's going to be an air date for forum, but I did work on that. But I did not work on the on the drama series. That's getting all the hype now on the on the history channel, I did work with them, publicity wise and interviewed the creator, David O'Leary and had fun, you know, kind of picking his brain. And and just. Back into a a fellow producer who obviously he's very passionate about what he does. It is a dramatized series, obviously. And I asked him about that about accuracy. And you know, how much did they follow the truth and so on, and you know, I I have mixed feelings. It's fantastic show in the sense production value, and they have amazing cast. And so on I always a little bit more. Yeah. I I mean, and and that's you know, I mean, we're talking about some some some big name actors and actresses and this those that you would recognize over history channel, production wise. It's fantastic. I mean, it really is then so then I take my producer off. And then put my, you know, UFO research on and then cringe a little bit. Because in my opinion, truth for the most part is a lot stranger than fiction, and you don't need that drama. You know, I mean sadly from a production standpoint. Yes, you do about from for me. Anyway, a historical standpoint, you don't need. I cringe a little bit. I mean, I wish they they stayed a little bit more accurate than they did. But, but hey, you know, it it it's out there. It's it's getting people watching and and hopefully interested in in the subject, and it's fun to watch. So I wasn't. I think I appreciate your candid response. I I had a similar reaction when I watched it was the things that they decided to dramatic. I had no frame of reference for whether it was accurate. I just suspected that. It wasn't based on what little I did know. And particularly when it comes to the personality of j Allen Hynek, and and and how he developed over the years, and I think that's that is being well represented that that people may not be aware of that. He was originally brought on by the air force into the nascent stages of project blue book as a debunk over, and he was perfectly willing to play that role because he personally didn't believe as an astrophysicist that there was anything to this notion of unidentified flying objects that they were all going to be easily explained or you know, just dismissed if nothing else which he did a lot of and for me that is one of the biggest takeaways from the project blue book what I call the project blue book era getting away from the show a little bit. But more history that I don't think people really. Realize in that arguably he was a scientist true? Scientists that looked at more UFO cases than probably almost any other scientists out there, and he went from that skeptic to believer. I think people largely missed that, you know, because a lot of scientists today, and I you know, I don't wanna point fingers, but those that are known to be more skeptical about this whole phenomena, and I do say plural because I think there's multiple aspects of get letters when I say phenomena. But I, but I'd say it intentionally you would get letters. If you didn't say it somebody would complain you can't win on that. So you can never win in general. But but so the skeptics, you know, today on the scientists today, they don't look at cases, you know. I mean, they have an overall view of the topic and and their points. Sometimes are very valid. But they didn't do the research that he did. And so when you look at somebody a man of science that looked at thousands of cases in the evidence, and he goes from, hey, this is nothing to, hey, this is something to me that that's an amazing that's amazing pivot for somebody of his stature. And I think it's something that we should look at. I don't care what the government ultimately concluded or the military. Ultimately concluded what I look at is. You know, the people that were looking at the cases, namely, you know, Dr j Allen Hynek that he walked away from that saying this deserves more. Scrutiny. This deserves a closer look, and he goes on. And he creates his own UFO research organization that to me is an amazing foundation for UFO research that now moving decades beyond that era, it it does deserve a closer. Look, we still don't have answers as much as as the government wants to tell us that they have them all we really don't. And and and I think that their own government documents even post project blue book proved just that that there's much more to this story to things about what you said strike me. I is the numbers the sheer numbers you mentioned that he had investigated or been a part of overseen something in the area of twelve thousand reports between..

government Dr j Allen Hynek CIA John scientist UFO Google United States Richard producer David O'Leary Alumini Mission Hills Calif Leonard publisher
Boca police officer fist-bumping white supremacist in body-cam video

South Florida Morning Show

00:20 sec | 4 years ago

Boca police officer fist-bumping white supremacist in body-cam video

"Released body Cam footage. From Boca Raton police was shared four hundred thousand. Times after book Raton officer gave a fist bump to. A presidential candidate Patrick lane who was a self proclaimed white supremacist who was on. A street corner the hateful sign police were called there because someone ripped the sign and that person was charged with simple battery. And criminal,

Cohen Donald Trump Palm Beach County High School Officer Boca Raton Patrick Lane Forecaster Jen Garner Atlantic Andrew Mike Bush President Trump Raton Ben Affleck Africa Florida NBC Kidnapping W. F. T. L. Broward
BlackBerry Mobile launches new smartphone

Kim Komando

01:09 min | 4 years ago

BlackBerry Mobile launches new smartphone

"Upper seventies Center top and bottom. Of each hour stay connected, sell Florida news talk eight fifty w. f. t. Al So in Texas the woman. Is looking for an Amazon delivering it's all over Facebook getting, shared like four hundred thousand times, her, stories he basically she has a. Little doormat and the doormat says please hide the packages from husband. Hey so the Amazon

Amazon United States Florida Google Epson Grand Canyon Texas Blackberry Facebook Hudson River KIM F. L. Boeing America Cameron
Ed Lee Bloomberg, Volvo and Tesla discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

01:29 min | 4 years ago

Ed Lee Bloomberg, Volvo and Tesla discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

"Seen as a, lens into the company's outlook for growth then this cloud Google CEO Sunday pitch I told analysts. Cloud was saying an inflection point, is business accelerates for all of. The big, players you, also highlighted emerging markets is a key However, the future growth particularly around maps. Where the, company wants to boost ads in San Francisco Ed Lee Bloomberg daybreak Europe and analysts are raising new questions for the one hundred thousand time about the future of tesla after it asked suppliers to give back. Some cash Elon Musk insists the new model three will pull his money loser into the black but observers say the appeal could, be a sign that something has. Gone wrong Tesla's spent billions trying to ramp up production and it's feared second quarter. Numbers may be disappointing. Another story from the Cossacks initial feedback. Is said to value. Volvo 'cause fall below owner jellies. Top end estimates for potential listing sources say institutional investors think the maker is worth between twelve and eighteen billion dollars box were told. Volvo and jelly, put the, figure is. Highest thirty billion, dollars closely held, Lee bought Volvo cars back in two thousand ten and according to. People familiar it. Was planning to sell Hsieh's Stockholm and Hong Kong It's due to be a key test of Turkey's central Bank independence when it releases its. Latest monetary, policy decision later today Bloomberg's owner aunt. Has the preview Turkey central Bank will convenience..

Ed Lee Bloomberg Volvo Tesla Cloud Volvo Cars Turkey Turkey Central Bank Elon Musk Bloomberg CEO Google Hsieh Europe San Francisco Hong Kong Stockholm Eighteen Billion Dollars
Woman survives seven days on radiator water after California crash

WBZ Afternoon News

04:23 min | 4 years ago

Woman survives seven days on radiator water after California crash

"And Taylor van Cise at the editor's desk here are the top stories Russian President Vladimir Putin has rejected allegations that Moscow was collected compromising materials on President Trump or his family he was responding. To a question during a joint news conference with President Trump following their summit in Helsinki a community, activist who has pushed for more police transparency. Says he's asked Chicago police for the body camera footage from the all the officers at the scene where. One of them fatally shot a man Saturday William Callaway says the, footage. Shows Harith Augusta's was armed with a holstered handgun when. He was shot but? Does not explain why police approached him he's a pretty incredible story a couple of quick thinking campers saving a twenty three year old woman's life she disappeared for a week after crashing her SUV. In Big Sur California we found her car about a mile north of the Campground it looked pretty new but it was rusty And, it was destroyed just walked around the. Rocks news like a yard sale of car parts Angela Hernandez was driving on highway one when she lost control over Jeep and plummeted to the bottom of a two hundred foot cliff. And the female are, going to be about But rescuers couldn't find her. She detailed her daily struggle to, survive from her Facebook page in the hospital writing. I climb on rocks to avoid the sharp sand walk along the shore to avoid the hot rocks about three days had passed by now and the back of my jeans were torn apart my socks were nothing but holes. And I could start feeling the effects of, dehydration that's, when she. Says she heard what. Sounded like a miracle fresh water dripping from Iraq. Using part of a radiator hose as an, improvised canteen Hernandez says she went back to that rock every day to get fresh water she didn't have the strength. Or the energy and frankly just condition she was, in chic she would. Have never made it up that cliff so she wasn't even able to. Attempt that but she remained missing till four days later when the more spotted her near their camp site ran up to her she said she rector car and we were like The white Jeep yeah Oh. My gosh here alive. You're in one piece I couldn't believe it merely. Realized she needed help she. Looked pretty, beat up. Her sister rejoice? Savvy Okay Angeles family says she's recovering in the hospital right. Now they described her injuries as more than just a shoulder. Fracture she's in stable but guarded. Condition but you, know it could be days before doctors know when she can be released, remarkable recover that story from ABC's GIO. Benitez another bizarre story, here a Colorado toddler was nearly killed by an. Appliance here's ABC's area were chef, Lindsey and macgyver recounting their heart-stopping, nightmare their toddler trapped inside their, brand new washing. Machine there was, terrifying, Wednesday macgyver bought and installed the frontloading. LG they instructed all three of their young kids to stay. Away but early the next morning they woke to terrified screams from their four year old son was crying so. Hard I couldn't understand the. Words he was saying it was the realization. Hit he had said khloe inside washer Allen immediately rushed downstairs to the laundry room to find three year old khloe locked. In Inside the airtight washer as it tumbled and filled with water I can tell us she was screaming Machines airtight. Being on the door so hard I. Mean I moved them Shane from the wall but it's locked you can't get it open within seconds Alan and Lyndsey were able to stop the machine and get khloe out colder, outside out. In got the best hug in the world from her as she was out and crying but safe. The little one emerging shaken, with only, minor scrapes and bruises with a, valuable lesson. Learned pretty quickly after we pulled her out she, said we'd better not do that again. Lindsay's post and now with more than ninety thousand likes shared almost, two hundred thousand times on Facebook the couple hoping their story serves as a warning parents out there evaluate dangers in their house and look at the. Situation and where potential dangers exist and LG the company that makes the.

Angela Hernandez Facebook President Trump William Callaway ABC LG Khloe Vladimir Putin Taylor Van Cise Harith Augusta Chicago Helsinki Shane Big Sur California Iraq Moscow Editor Lindsay