35 Burst results for "Humor"

Elon Musk's Twitter Will No Longer Allow the Left Free Rein

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:20 min | 2 d ago

Elon Musk's Twitter Will No Longer Allow the Left Free Rein

"In terms of open and public online debate, conservatives have spent the past 6 years or so essentially underground. This is not so much a complaint as it is a statement of fact. Like working out with extra weights makes you stronger, the added difficulty has led to a number of extraordinary developments. When conservative metal was tested, we rose to the occasion and made some incredible advancements. One example would be distributed networks that can't be shut down by zealous governments or banks. We also developed new techniques for getting the conservative message across. It's widely recognized, for example, that conservatives excel in both humor and political means. At the same time, pundits and thought leaders on the right have become extremely skilled in debate. A field we traditionally fared very well in, has now become an area where conservatives absolutely dominate. So now that Twitter is in the hands of Elon Musk and he is rolling back years of leftist bigotry, conservatives are reentering the field, looking like technically accomplished veteran verbal conventions. Meanwhile, for the past few years, the exact opposite has been happening on the left. Instead of engaging in debate, they were more than happy to run conservative speakers out of town with threats of violence. They also censor and cancel anyone who they even remotely disagree with. The life grew so used to always having their way in the public space that this made them much weaker intellectually. Their shocked at the fact that they might have to actually abide by Twitter's terms of service now. They can't instigate violence. Andy, no, who's been physically attacked. Had reported threats of violence to Twitter, made by members of antifa and Twitter did nothing. But now that Elon Musk is at the helm. He's assured Andy that this will no longer be allowed. The left is so used to be able to getting away with anything. Well, we tiptoe around them. But the tables have turned. Now the left is fearful. In preparation for the midterms, many notice that Democrat candidates always ran from the debates. And when they were successfully coaxed onto stage, they fared horribly. Yet their campaigns managed their social media and put up a facade on the ground. This might be more difficult for the left to pull off in the future now.

Elon Musk Twitter Andy
Trish Analyses What's Changed Since 2016

The Trish Regan Show

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Trish Analyses What's Changed Since 2016

"Go back to 2015 and 2016. So what was unique about Donald Trump in 2015, 2016. He was the anti politician, right? And there's something very, very appealing about the guy who's just going to say anything, especially when you're up against the woman who was so controlled and so contrived. I'm talking about Hillary Clinton and so frankly despised by so many Americans. She was not well liked. She didn't have that sense of humor that he seemed to display, and so he won. Now, one strategist once told me, and I thought this was very interesting. In some ways, 2016 was more about a vote against Hillary than it was for Trump. I think there's an element to that, of course, but simultaneously, I do think that people, they felt like he could do something different and they were desperate for different. We've been going down the same path and we've had the bushes and we've had that clintons and people wanted something new. And here was this businessman who had done some pretty exciting things in the business space and heck was a household name on the apprentice show, a very popular show and they thought, hey, why not roll the dice on something different? But a lot has happened since then, I still stand by what I said all along. It was a mistake to shut the economy down. That was the first red flag, if you would, in what was about to go wrong because at that point, the Trump administration effectively was just giving in if you would, too, those that really wanted to take control of things. And we became a complete failure as an economy. I think we did a lot of extra damage along the way, including to our children who spent many, many months over year right without getting in some cases proper schooling. So there was a lot of damage inflicted by that one decision. Look, I'm neutral on this. You know that. I'd like to see conservatives win, but I'm neutral on who would be the person, but I'm doubtful that we can get back to where we were in that 2015, 2016 kind of scenario where you saw this groundswell and you saw this momentum for so many people even crossing party lines,

Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Trump Administration Clintons Hillary
Ukrainians face nuclear threat with grit and dark humor

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Ukrainians face nuclear threat with grit and dark humor

"With the Russian invasion in its 9th month Many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons They're actively preparing for that once unthinkable possibility Over dinner tables and in bars people often discuss which city would be the most likely target or what type of weapon could be used Many are stocking up on supplies and making survival plans Ukraine after all has seen the world's worst nuclear disaster At Chernobyl in 1986 in an interview with The Associated Press presidential adviser Mikayla polo yak says of course Ukraine takes this threat seriously because we understand what kind of country we're dealing with referring to Russia I'm Charles De Ledesma

Ukraine Mikayla Polo Yak The Associated Press Russia Charles De Ledesma
Andrew Klavan on the Status of Courage in a Post-COVID World

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:45 min | Last month

Andrew Klavan on the Status of Courage in a Post-COVID World

"Status of courage after the last two and a half years of COVID, what's your diagnosis? Oh, it was. You have courage left? Oh, it was embarrassing. And it had a cause, the cause was materialism, the lack of faith. When you have these guys, when Donald Trump stood up, this is one of my favorite moments because I have this kind of morbid sense of humor. But when Donald Trump got COVID and he stood up on the balcony, took his mask off. The news media went nuts. And there are two words to describe women, the word womanly, which is what you look for in a woman, a womanly woman will she walks into the room, men straighten up, and they stand up. But woman ish is the opposite of that. It's kind of like macho is for men. It's kind of this over emotional hysterical, fearful idea. Well, if the press was not woman in that moment, I've never seen it. And there were all men. There were all men going, no, be afraid. Trump said, don't be afraid. Don't let it dominate. Be not afraid. Jake tapper said, no. Be afraid. I just cracked up because I thought, no, that is what they've sold us for these two years. Andrew Cuomo, there's nothing worse than death. What's worse than death? Of course you have to give up your dream and close your business and closure. Because otherwise, it's death and death is death. Well, you know, some of us believe that no, there are things more important freedom is more important than life. I mean, you're willing to die to stay free. You're willing to die to protect your family. You're willing to die to stand up for what you believe in if it's important enough. So once you believe the death, there's nothing worse than death and death is everything. You're a coward by nature. I mean, you have to be. It's only logical. And that's what they've been preaching. And of course they're preaching it. If they steal power by creating crises, what good is a crisis if you're not afraid.

Donald Trump Jake Tapper Andrew Cuomo
Elon Musk Takes Over Twitter

The Officer Tatum Show

01:22 min | Last month

Elon Musk Takes Over Twitter

"Ladies and gentlemen's official. Elon Musk has purchased Twitter. He is now officially the owner. I probably probably him in a bunch of investors. But he now owns Twitter and they are having a meltdown. They are having a meltdown salad. He showed up with a sink. He is the weirdest dude, but he is brilliant at the same time. He came to the headquarters front door with a sink, like an actual sink that you wash your hands and he's holding it. And I guess the analogy or the thought process behind it is that you need to let this sink in, right? So he's in there walking through the headquarters with the sink. You know how dry humor that he is, but it actually makes sense, but the people that work there are taking a brain nap. He, I guess, made reference or there's rumors that he's going to eliminate 75% of their workforce and they're having a liberal meltdown. Let me give you the quote that they wrote, let me see where they write it today. I guess they wrote it to the public. I mean, I let her open letter to the public. It says, we, the undersigned Twitter workers, believe that the public conversation is in jeopardy. Elon Musk's plan to lay off 75% of Twitter workers will hurt Twitter's ability to serve the public conversation.

Elon Musk Twitter
A Second Woman Alleges Herschel Walker Paid for Her Abortion

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:16 min | Last month

A Second Woman Alleges Herschel Walker Paid for Her Abortion

"Everything they got, they're throwing it Republicans in a Hail Mary. Is there a single person in Georgia who would say, you know, I was all set to vote for Herschel Walker. But attorney Gloria allred held a press conference yesterday and played a woman's voice on a speaker. We don't know who she is, there's no evidence at all that this is true, but she's claiming that in 1993, Herschel Walker urged her to get an abortion. Every level of this is satirical. It's comedy. It's absolute, dark humor. First of all, the left loves abortions. You think they'd throw a ticker tape parade for Herschel. They want abortion. They worship at the altar of abortion. Everything's about abortion. And if a woman doesn't have a right to an abortion, well, the world has come to an end. She needs to be able to abort that baby. That's their rallying cry. That's the flag. They're taken back. Did you hear

Herschel Walker Gloria Allred Georgia Herschel
What Makes a Great Speech?

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:42 min | Last month

What Makes a Great Speech?

"Space that comes up and people have asked me about is the famous speech from Abraham Lincoln, which is the Gettysburg address. Now, we've done Abraham Lincoln's speeches and is a president from as an inaugural perspective and others, but we've never done the Gettysburg address, which is an interesting in the midst. And I think some of this came up in the discussion one day of this, what does makes a good speech? And, you know, when you're out in talking about speeches and when you're giving speeches, you get into these things. And you have the joke, some people say, you know, my former strucker told me the best speeches have a great ending and a great closing and have them very close together. You know, it's funny, people laugh, but the reality is, what makes up the dynamic of a speech and I wanted to talk a little bit about this before we get into the actual Gettysburg address today, is it's not always the length. It's not always the, the content, it's not even the opening or the closing. It's how number one is delivered. Number two, it's what is being said. And number three actually connecting to the audience. In a very real and tangible way. Now, sometimes that can be done and I've used this to great effect. And using a speech in which I use humor. And sometimes self deprecating humor. Others is just, you know, you're getting people laughing. I believe that speech is so many times are really good when you have a humor element in those speeches. Because when people laugh, they learn. They're relaxed. It doesn't. It breaks up, you know, many times the monotony of listening.

Abraham Lincoln
Mark Levin: I'm Not Rush Limbaugh, I'm Mark Levin

Mark Levin

01:48 min | Last month

Mark Levin: I'm Not Rush Limbaugh, I'm Mark Levin

"That was one of Russia's great talents among many He was able to Humiliate the left if you will He was able to bring comedy you remember the skits he had and the names he would call that that he would make up and all the rest of it He was hilarious Hilarious So I would suggest these folks every now and then give credit where credit's due in a little tip of the hat In some ways I think some conservatives act like liberals They think the world begins with them And it doesn't and it didn't But one of the reasons rush had the biggest audience of all time Is because you liked them You liked this personality You liked the way he analyzed things And he was entertaining He was funny I'm not rush I do the best I can I do the best I can But I'm not Babe Ruth either I can't be Babe Ruth I can't be rushed They are in the league of their own A Mark Levin little Mark Levin But I just wanted to point that out because Rush brought a lot of humor to what he did And he used it in a brilliant brilliant way And let me suggest that people who are doing it today and I'm glad they are And he'd be glad they are

Russia Babe Ruth Mark Levin Rush
Finding Inner Peace

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:52 sec | Last month

Finding Inner Peace

"A lot of dark humor here. All right, ladies and gentlemen, the term is inner peace. Maybe that's more helpful than happiness as the goal for a happier life inner peace. Nobody asks what is inner peace. Everybody asks, what's the definition of happiness, Dennis? But nobody else wants the definition of inner peace because nobody asks the definition of peace, right? What's the definition of peace? Everybody knows the absence of conflict. That's peace. No war, no violence. And no verbal violence, if the term is usable, so that's peace.

Dennis
"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

How to Live A Fantastic Life

05:46 min | Last month

"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

"I once owned a racehorse, a trotter with one of my teachers, Dan Kennedy, who was a business owner. And when we were buying the horse, I said, with all due respect, I will buy the back end of the horse. You can buy as much as he said, why do you want to do that? I said, it eats less. It'll cost me less. Okay. So again, the huber eyes. The huber eyes that you have to look at anything. Yeah. Are there one or two more points you'd like to make before we go to our brain? Well, one, I think step back from laughter and first of all, let me just define an even I use laughter humor in the same sentence, but there really is a bit different. So just quickly to divide it for your audience. Please, please. So for me, humor is what we're talking about, seeing the world differently with a different perspective, seeing it lighter. And the humor is when we see that, we start to, we start to laugh. So physical expression, life is so physical expression of things we find funny, which we call humorous. Excellent. Excellent. Good stuff. And so I think one step before that is to remember to smile. And if you can't smile, I have a little technique you can take a pencil, putting them out and push it way back. So your mouth is now in the smile position. And then take the pencil out and keep your mouth that way. That

Dan Kennedy
"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

How to Live A Fantastic Life

05:05 min | Last month

"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

"Just simple words, you know? And what words are we feeding into us all the time? Yeah, and I think that's where you need to turn on your humor eyes. You have to turn on your eyes to look for things that are funny. Like you bring up one story and one of your books of how there was a headline in a newspaper of how all the toilet seats were stolen in the police station. So the policemen have nothing to go on. Great, great. But you got to look for funny things. We really have to look hard for funny things these days because everything is morose. The sky is black. Everything is going down. And really, it's not. The world, you know, when I look at my existence, I mean, since the 1900s, there was a great pandemic in the early 1990s. There was a great depression that people went to through people lost everything. This was supposed to be another great depression, but you know, governments responded better this time. And so people didn't lose everything. They did a better job at things. There were two world wars, there was a Vietnam crisis. There was a crisis. There was an Afghan crisis. You know, how many crises have gone on. And every day, Alan, the sun still shines. Every day, things still happen. You know, I look at myself and I say, jeez, you know, many years ago, Alan, I was diagnosed with ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease. And I was told by my neurologist get my affairs in order. You have 6 months to live. in 2000 that was in 2003. Okay. Yeah. So either the diagnosis was wrong or I'm one of the longest living ALS patients that's ever existed. So the point is, you know, we could always look at the dark clouds or we could look at the clouds with the silver lining.

depression Alan ALS Vietnam Lou Gehrig
"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

How to Live A Fantastic Life

05:06 min | Last month

"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

"You know, and we came home from the hospital and we would at a leaf, a look at a plant and we would start to laugh. And then I looked back and I realized it wasn't a lot of laughter, was 5 or ten seconds. But I also realized it helped me rise above the situation. Gave us a reprieve, gave us a perspective that humor always gives people. And so I had a business in San Francisco. I gave it up, I went back to school to learn about death and dying. I became a hospice volunteer, and I also went to school to learn about therapeutic humor and that's when I start writing the healing power of humor. Wow. How many years did it take you to write Ellen? Well, it was to stop and go thing. I had to get a book written and I did a proposal. We got, I think the 13th rejection, third lucky 13, we got a wonderful publisher. Started to write for 9 months and they women that my editor, the book was originally called learning to laugh when you feel like crying. And she said that is The New York Times bestselling title never changed the title, and she left the company. I got a new editor. And he changed everything. Including the title became the healing power of humor. So it took several years with that kind of stop and go, but you know, would that have been a better title and sold more books? I don't know, as we said, what a 40 plus printing, 9th foreign language. It's doing well still. You didn't want to tell people how old it is, but it's 33 years ago. It was published. So it's still selling. And I tell you, when I read this, and I just read this year, I said, it could have been written yesterday.

San Francisco Ellen The New York Times
"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

How to Live A Fantastic Life

05:44 min | Last month

"humor" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

"You know, and okay, it's a doll. I'm a grown man, you know, but it helps me lighten up. It helps me see things differently. Excellent. Well, the fourth letter is the letter G and the letter G stands for go do it. What do you mean by that? So go do it. So what do cartoonists comedians do to get us to laugh? They exaggerate often, right? They take a simple thing and they exaggerate. So if you could take something like let's take your paperwork. Okay, so what would happen? We're gonna exaggerate here. What would happen if you didn't fill out all that paperwork for the house? The new house. Oh, I don't think I'd get my house. I think it would be going to somebody else. And then my wife will be very upset. And then she wouldn't love me anymore, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Yeah, and so you start exaggerating. She would love me, you know, she might leave me. I might lose the house that I have now. You exaggerate and it becomes what absurdity, which is a kind of humor, class of humor. And you start to laugh, when you exaggerate it so much that it becomes absurd. So that go that's one technique you can go do. Very important in this very important that people exaggerate that and realize that it really isn't that bad and it really doesn't matter that much. Last one is the letter H and you use that for humor eyes. What do you mean by that? To open a humor eyes open our humor is because there is humor all around us. One example I was in the laundromat and I looked on the wall and there was a sign on the wall that said, when the machine stops, remove all your clothing. Which I did. And you probably got arrested. And then I had exaggerate what's so bad about being arrested? No. The point is that there is humor all around and we need to open our eyes and ears and look for it. Excellent. Excellent. I'm going to try now to change things a bit, my friend. I'm going to bring up a screenshot here.

Mike Pompeo Talks About His New Book, 'Never Give an Inch'

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:55 sec | Last month

Mike Pompeo Talks About His New Book, 'Never Give an Inch'

"Here. From studio north, joined by my friend former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who is announcing today a brand new book by Mike Pompeo is out never give an inch actually it's not out, it is announced. Good morning, mister secretary, welcome back. Good morning, Hugh. How the heck are you? I am great. You know my fancy myself a pretty good giver of titles. I help Sarah Huckabee Sanders come up with speaking my mind. I don't think I could have come up with a better title for a book than never give an inch from Mike Pompeo. Well, thanks. Look at tell some stories about the work that we did that frankly just no one wants to tell. And so it was important to recount that history. I think there's a little bit of humor. I directed this some pretty exciting good stuff in there too. And I hope everybody hope everybody I'll go take a look at it and enjoy reading. I think it's a lot of fun to read through. And tells the story of how we put American people first. Now, I want to

Mike Pompeo Secretary Of State Mike Pompeo Sarah Huckabee Sanders Hugh
Iconic WABC Radio Host Bernard McGuirk Passes Away

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Iconic WABC Radio Host Bernard McGuirk Passes Away

"We start today's program sadly Talking about the passing of Bernoulli nationwide know him from the imus program In and around New York City many of you know him from WABC Where he did a morning show And I did a morning show there were great twosome in the morning and WABC Bernie and I were buddies I don't mean social buddies I don't mean that we went out I don't mean that we called every day But we were buddies We shared the same philosophy kind of the same weird humor We didn't take any enemies And he was a really really smart guy but kind Extremely kind He would call me before I go on I miss I miss would like me to come on from time to time actually often And he would say heads up you know he's going to do this He's going to talk about that I said okay and that's cool And he was very loyal Extremely loyal And I wish more of you around the country could have heard his morning show Because he's just fantastic

Bernoulli Wabc Bernie New York City
AJ Appreciates Sen. John Kennedy's New Ad Campaign

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:09 min | 2 months ago

AJ Appreciates Sen. John Kennedy's New Ad Campaign

"Louisiana state senator Joe Kennedy. John Kennedy, sorry. I love him. He's funny to me, but he launched this new ad campaign that took aim at anti cop voters the other day to 32nd ad, he tells viewers that violent crime is surging in Louisiana and behind in their images of dark figures holding guns surrounding a white truck and he says, walk leaders blame the police. And there's all protesters carrying signs that read defund the police, I blame the criminals, he said. I voted against the early release of criminals, and I oppose defunding police. Look, if you hate cops, just because they're cops. Next time you're in trouble, call a crackhead. I love this guy. I always like his appearances on Fox News. He's got that Cajun sense of humor. We don't get too much of any more. Up here and he out in California. I got it when I was down there. I love the Yuma down there when I was in the French Quarter and hanging out with some friends. It was really fun.

Senator Joe Kennedy Louisiana John Kennedy Fox News Yuma California
Parenting Autistic Children  David Grant MBE - burst 2

stay first

30:43 min | 2 months ago

Parenting Autistic Children David Grant MBE - burst 2

"This episode will be doing things a little bit differently, though, as I'll be interviewing my husband, yes, fellow broadcast a vocal coach and leadership coach and campaigner David grant. As we talk about our own experiences of raising four neurodivergent children, welcome to the show David. Wow, nice to be here, Gary. So for those people that don't know about our family, could you just give us a rundown of our kids? Okay, we have four children our eldest olive is an actor. Our and olive is 27. Next in line is Thailand, who is 20 and also an actor. Next in line is Arlo, who is 16 and at school. And next is in line is Nathan, who is 12. And supposed to be at school, but currently not in school. Yes, okay, so you just had a little bit of a hint towards their not in school. That's been a familiar experience for us with three out of the four children. Because you've named all of their ages in their names and stuff. But what about their diagnoses? Just run me by some of the diagnosis that our children have got. Okay, I will, but because this is like a pick and mix at which point I'm bound to forget some. Would you jump in if I forget any? Yes. Because you know them as well as I do. Olive, has a disparity. And ADHD, Thailand is on the autism spectrum. And Arlo, third is on the autism spectrum. And Nathan. Now I got a minute rewind rewind back up back up. Arlo is autistic and has ADHD. Of course, yes, I forgot all of it as a whole a whole suit of what coterie. Yeah, these disabilities, they're traveling gangs, don't they? And has ADHD. Nathan a 12 year old has ADHD DMDD. Probably dyslexia. Even though they're still working on a diagnosis, and yeah, we have, you know, at some point, if anybody does disability bingo, we jump up and say house. Yeah, well, it's interesting you say disability because I don't really think of them as being disabilities. I think of them as being just different. I don't think of them as there are any disabilities in the light of the fact that the world is so unaccepting. That's very true. I think that one of the things with an invisible disability so it's called is that, you know, if we what we have done in our family is to recognize that the reason why it's called a disability is because some people find it more challenging to do things that neurotypical people take for granted. On the other hand, without children, it's also proven to be a different ability, because so many of them are able in ways in so many ways that they might not otherwise be able. You know, the gifted in ways that they might otherwise not be gifted. They're different and see the world in ways that absolutely challenge a neurotypical vision of the world. Yeah, and that's what we love about them. So tell me what it was like when all of these diagnoses that you've just mentioned there started to pop up. How did that come about and what were your feelings? Well, it's interesting. I've spoken to so many parents because we run parent groups. And I spoke to so many parents about the initial diagnosis and the reactions have been very, very many in varied, you know, for some people, it's a bit of a shock for some people it's almost like a disappointment for others. It's a surprise for others. It's an explanation. And I would say for us, well, certainly for me, it was in part an explanation. And also, in part, a sort of a wake-up call that said to me, this journey isn't going to be anything that you might have imagined. It is going to be. We don't know what it's going to be, but what we do know is that it's going to, it's going to plow its own field and chart its own course when we first got the diagnosis of our second and third Thailand and Arlo, the ones who are now 2016, which we got the autism diagnosis on the same day. Tai was 7. Aloe was three. What was that like for you? I have to be honest. And there was absolutely no sort of like heightened emotion connected to it, concern or disappointment or what was there was, okay, I need to now discover what this means. What this means for them, what this means for us and how it makes things different. Is it going to make things different if it does? How is it going to make things different? Because it didn't change them in any way. They got in the car. You got given the diagnosis and then they just got in the car and they were still Tyler and Arlo, weren't they? They had to change. But with that bit of paper yeah, it didn't change them one dot. One shot. One bit. But what it did change was my awareness of who they were. What it did change is my awareness that they may see the world a different way. And I didn't know what that was going to be, because there are only 7 and three, but what I did know was that the carnage journey that you can prescribe and chart out and say that the raising of a child is likely to fall within these parameters. There may be anywhere from track a to track B but the train is going to run along these tracks in some way. That went completely out of the way. I didn't realize at the time just how far out of the window it was going to go. But I did think, okay, this changes things. And one of the, I mean, some people might call it exciting with the benefit of hindsight, but at the time slightly sort of slightly nerve wracking things was having no idea of what it meant was going to change as they grew and as they developed. And as they began to inhabit the fullness of their personhood and understand the fullness of their identities, what was going to change. Well, we didn't know. And I think that, you know, there's a saying that everyone to see person probably knows, which is even if you've met one autistic person, you've met one autistic person. And even with just having two children on the spectrum in the family, the presentation is so entirely different. Yeah, they are. If somebody said to me, when we got the diagnosis, this is what autism looked like. And used one of them as in illustration. It would have completely excluded the other. Because the other one wouldn't have got a diagnosis based on that. It's very, very good point. So you've talked about what it was like to kind of grow in your knowledge of them and who they might become and to understand them a little. But what about parenting? Have you changed as a parent? This was 2009 if I remember. So we've had a good few years since. Have you changed as a parent? As a parent, I am unrecognizable from the parent I was in 2009. Now let's be really honest about this. Anybody who has raised a child will say, well, yes, of course, the parent you are to a 16 year old and the same parent you are to three year old. So there's the natural evolution of your relationship that happens as your child grows and matures. But there's also, I think that certainly for me having children on the spectrum, it meant that I needed to really abandon everything I thought I knew about parenting. It meant that I had to discover and develop a bespoke style of parenting that fitted specifically the child that was in front of me rather than having a general sort of one size fits all approach because it absolutely didn't fit. And really, it's not to my credit that I think that I was quite resistant to that because of the way they don't fit the one size fits all. Then it's obviously because I'm not implementing the one size fits all with enough figure. So I need to I need to just retrain and double down on the one size fits all and it will work and the fact is it was never going to work. And it kind of I would say out of the two of us, I was you were the hair when it came to realizing that we needed to adapt and adopt a new parenting style and we need it to be fluid and I was very much the tortoise. There was a kind of rigidity of no this is how you do it. And you know, I think that with regard to parenting, having children on the autism spectrum has taught me and continues to teach me is teaching me to be a parent, I would otherwise never have been. And I think that had I never have been, I would have missed a lot. There's a lot of their growing up that I got by constantly having to reassess and reappraise and recognize who they are now. You know, not living on who they were last year or last week, even. You know, who are they now? Who are they today? And who do they need me to be today? Yeah. So you talked about the fact that it took you a little bit longer to describe yourself as the tortoise. So how was that then? Well, I made the tool to seem like St. Louis Hamilton. We got the diagnosis in 2009. Up until about 2012, I thought there's something wrong with these kids because they're really not getting my style of parenting. About 2012, I began to realize there was something wrong with me because I wasn't being the parent they needed me to be. And then I was all at sea. I think I took a little while to actually work out. If I've got autistic kids, I need to learn, it's not me teaching them and then learning how to be. It's actually me learning and I think that I think that when I kind of was humble enough to recognize that I didn't actually know, you know, sometimes you don't know what you don't know. But when you've got autistic children and they need you to be a parent, you have to learn what you don't know. You have to realize what you don't know and it is certainly in my case. I think I learned a lot from watching you, but I also learned a lot from realizing that I couldn't be you and I couldn't just be you the deeper voice that I actually had to change me. I couldn't just ape behavior that I saw it with someone else. I had to change the way my outlook and gosh, I would say that you're saying how long did it take to be? Well, the diagnosis arrived 13 years ago. And I consider myself still to be under construction, and a work in progress, because the dads that I was 5 years ago that they needed me to be 5 years ago isn't the dad they need me to be now. Because they've changed. Yeah. You talked a little bit there about you said this lovely phrase bespoke parenting. So just give me some examples of what you have bespoke. Bespoken. Okay, it's interesting because with, I was 16 year old, there was a rigidity of actions that isn't always, so it wasn't just a rigidity of thinking. So with Arlo, we have certain things. I am my face is a stress toy. I actually, I mean, I know I look like this, but you know, I think I would look about maybe 15 years younger, if not for all. All that has to excuse my face. And they always squeeze my face and there are certain things that we do. There are certain actions that we do. There are certain little dances we do. There are certain words that we say. I don't even understand your communication. I mean, you two are like a whole, you're like a double act. I know. It's all part of my being father to Arlo, is that we have loads of unspoken communication. That revolve around movement and actions and dances and laughing at the same thing that other people don't understand what's going on. I've had to learn that I've had to enter into our lives world and learn how that world works. On a practical thing, although loves to have drives, they want to have a drive once a day. It's part of a de stressor towards the end of the day. Some people read or watch TV or they're too young to have a drink, they go on a drive. They sit in the car and listening to music and we drive and 40 minutes later, half an hour, 40 minutes later, we arrive back home and they're in a different head space to the one they were when we left. And that's an important thing. So whatever the schedule will have my day. If I'm at home or if I'm coming home, I know I need to be out for that drive for Allah because that's an important part of parenting are there. And it's an interesting thing that to me, it's not even I don't even think of it as a chore or a stress. It's just part of being a dad. It's part of being their dad. Yeah. Because I actually think that, you know, speaking of bespoke parenting, I could quite probably be a rubbish dad to every other child in the world, but I've learned how to be the dad that the children I have need. Yeah. And that is bespoke. It is also humor. You have loads of humor, I would say, with Arlo. Yeah, yeah, we are a lot. Mostly at me, but often at all because Arlo is really funny at all that has learned to laugh at themselves in a way that they couldn't when they were younger. You know, in the early teens, they could not laugh at themselves because I think they felt such a level of low self worth and such a lack of confidence that to laugh with them at themselves would have been perceived to be laughing at them. And one of the ways that I can see that their confidence is growing and their belief that they have a place in the world is growing. Is for how much they laugh at themselves, how much of their humor is directed inwards. Yeah. I agree with you on that. Okay, so that's Arlo, who's our 16 year old. What about Tyler and katana is very different? What have you had to change very different? In your parenting of time and what's changed there for them? I think in my parenting style and what's changed is to listen to time. It's to really listen is to not be so ready to give advice, not be so ready to give an answer because even sometimes when ty says. I need to know what to do. I know that what will happen is that I'll be giving answers. And they'll be saying no, those aren't the answers. That's really bad advice. What I should be doing is this. So it's almost like they're using me as a sounding board. A classic example is when we run our way up to Holly oaks for their final audition. Time is one of the members of the cast of Holly oaks down. And it was their final audition and they were absolutely wrapped with nerves. And we're driving along the M1. And they're almost crying with us. And I thought this isn't good for them. It's really isn't good. And I said, you know what? I want you to know you don't have to do this. We can turn the car around and we can go back, and they said, so that's the worst thing you could have said. You can't say that. This is what you're supposed to say. I told you what they wanted to hear. And you know, it's a completely different kind of relationship to all that. And how we connect and how we relate is to share time together. Yes. And that's the wonderful thing we're tie. I mean, tiles say there's a box set that I've been watching and I really want you to watch it. So I'll sit and watch. And you know, maybe in the course of an hour, we'll say three or four sentences, but time. That's together time. That's valuable time. That's been our time. And you know, it'll be, I'll get a text with have a listen to this music or I'll send them some music. And tire listens and goes, yeah, I like this. I really like this. And then he'll put that on his playlist and that'll be and that will be a connection to the communication because what tie really loves. One of the things that I love is that feeling of being part of my heritage and my dad played this for me or my dad told me about this. And then what ty does then is to do the same for me. So I know you're like this. Have you heard of such and such? And it'll be somebody that I liked when I was 20 years old or something. And then we'll connect on that level, but it's a very, very different communication to our lows, but it's just as deep and it's just as valid, but it's entirely different. And if I was to switch and relate to time, like I do to other and relate to other, like I do to tie it, I would be completely disconnected from a couple of meltdowns going on there for sure. Yes. So you and I have run a parent support group. It has over a 180 parents, families, and we work with the families and with the children. That's been running for very long while. And over lockdown, you have run your weekly meeting online every single week for those parents. And I've been absolutely amazed and marvel at you and your consistency and the way that you love those parents is just wonderful. I love them too, by the way. But I love watching you talk to it to them. If there's parents of autistic children listening today or families of autistic children. What advice would you have? You know those parents when they join our group. What do they most need to hear? I think what most autistic superior will most parents of autistic children that join our group and need to hear is that they're not alone on this journey. I don't think that most people need parenting advice. Occasionally people will ask, look, this is a situation how would you approach this situation and ask the group? But generally, I mean, we're talking about super parents, parents who sacrifice everything and are willing to sacrifice everything. And by that, I'm not talking about money or material I'm talking about themselves. They're hopes aspirations, dreams, whatever they expected for themselves later on in life is just like that all of that gets put into a margin. That gets parked and everything is focused on the needs of their children. So what they need to hear generally is you're not alone on this journey. We've all walked this journey and so when you say something that to somebody else who isn't on this journey may sound outrageous about how you feel about what you're going through about how challenging or difficult or impossible you feel, how inadequate you feel to the task, it's fine to say it here because we've all felt it and we've all expressed it. And the other thing is having a space in your life where you can describe without having to explain, I think that so much energy is spent and wasted and exhausted by people feeling as though they have to explain their children. They have to explain their situation. They stand with a teacher. People say, wow, your child's your child's not that at all. Your child's like this. And they go, well, no, you don't know the whole picture. There is a different person at home to the one in school or the one not in school because they refuse to go into school. Or the one not sleeping because they're refused to go to bed or whatever. Just having a space where you can describe, but you don't have to explain because everybody else who is listening to you gets it. So is your advice that people link up with other parents? I think it's really important to do that. I think it's so important to do that because I think that in Albert Einstein said, if you measure the fish by how well it climbed a tree, you would think it was stupid. And quite often, all we get in terms of a metric for our own children is the yardstick of a kind of neurotypical world. And if the neurotypical world is the tree, our children may be the fastest swimmer in the ocean, but they're not going to climb the tree. So yes, I think it's really important to link up with other parents who are walking the same walk. Others who are in the same situation others who will be able to listen to you and not just sympathize and not just empathize but experientially understand. Yeah. No, I know for many of our families that we support theirs. There's quite a high percentage of their children and young people and we see this in the adults as well autistic adults might be struggling with their mental health, what have you learned about coming alongside our children in their mental health crises? Wow. I think I've learned more than anything that there's no quick fix. There are no easy answers and presents is everything. And that there's no guarantee that if you do a and B, you're going to get C that two and two are going to act a four. But what I do know is this that our children, even when they, we sometimes become The Rock against which they bash. And we feel bashed, but we're the only rocks they've got. And so the thing that I think is how important it is to be there and to listen and when possible to talk them down and when necessary to talk them up and also more than anything to also come alongside others so that we guard our own mental health. Because it's impossible to carry somebody if you're limping. You know, it's really so much harder. And yeah, our children's mental health is such a big deal. It's such a big deal. And it can turn on a sixpence. Everything can be going well. And then one thing, real or imagined, one thing can completely trans the picture. And so I think that most parents I know with autistic children live as such are a level of hyper vigilance that, if anything, yeah, do what you do and be there the way that you're there. But please remember your own mental health, remember your own need for support, remember your own need to be heard. Yeah, and to find voice. Just moving on to, I guess that thing of school and the workplace, how well or not well, our things set up for allowing our neurodivergent people to thrive. Wow. That's really interesting. It's an interesting question because the question in itself is it presupposes that any advanced society would recognize that there is more than one way of seeing the world and there is more than one way of thinking and therefore. An advanced society like ours would set things up that everybody, whatever that, not just the well-being of whether the neurological situation would be able to say, yeah, there's a space for me. There's a place for me. There's an opening for me. There's an acceptance of me. People are making the allowances I need made so that I can thrive, not just so that I can fit in and limp along, but so that I can thrive. But that doesn't really exist in any way like the number that it should. The number of employers who I think employers should be made to have a number of people who are on the autism spectrum, a number of people who have just had a neurodivergent. I think it's really important we get away from this cookie cutter one size fits all everyone has to look the same and replicate one another's strengths in order to fit in. And yeah, I suppose my answer so far suggests that I don't think that nearly enough is done. I don't think the nearly enough is being done. There's so much talent and there's so much ability there's so much intuition and knowledge and just being wasted being sidelined being overlooked being ignored. And if it wasn't overlooked, how much richer we'd be, the companies that actively seek out people on the spectrum because they have an attention to detail perhaps that others don't have or they have a skill set that I was specially interested, which means that they know their stuff almost as much as a PhD student would know just because they're taught themselves that kind of auto didactic skills that so many autistic people have, if only there was a recognition that these aren't just skills that come from a hobby. These are skills that become so deeply engraved. So knowledge based and so worthwhile that their valuable if we could find and be made to find ways to fully utilize the gifts and the talents that we have from people on the autism spectrum, the world would be a much richer place because so many of the things that enrich the modern world were devised or created developed or initiated by people on the autism spectrum. Yeah, which is exactly what all too kind of trying to do. That's absolutely you've just given their remit basically their davids. And we know that for Thailand, their workplace at hollyoaks has they've made all those kinds of adjustments four Thailand. So there is some good practice happening out there, isn't there, but there is. But probably not enough. And I do want to also about people even disclosing that they are artistic before they can even get to the needs that I might have. It is this sense of disclosure. How do we change perceptions out there, David? Gosh, I think that we change perceptions by I think drawing a line that delineates between our understanding of terminology and understanding that the term different and the term normal shouldn't actually be the opposite of one another. That your normal isn't my normal. And the your differences could complement my differences. The fact is that we've created an environment where two often people who are different in any way feel as though they have to underplay or deny their differences and create some kind of fake fake normal that fits with other people. And I don't think that that I don't think that that's right and I don't think it helps. But I can understand why. You know, somebody walked into a typical edition and started by saying, I'm autistic. They don't know they don't know the reaction they're going to get. They don't know whether the person sitting opposite is going to get, you know, yeah, fine. You almost want to go in and say, could you just tell me what you think is autistic looks like? Hear what they say and then

Arlo David Grant Nathan Thailand Adhd Gary Autism David Dyslexia Holly Oaks Tyler TY Aloe TAI St. Louis Katana Hamilton Albert Einstein
Eric Discusses His New Book 'Letter to the American Church'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:38 min | 2 months ago

Eric Discusses His New Book 'Letter to the American Church'

"I interview someone, but today Albin, he thought it would be fun for him to interview me since I have a new book out called letter to the American church, so Alvin. Yeah. It's yours. Usually it's fun. I got to tell you my favorite book because of the fun aspect is Martin Luther because it was such a crazy time. It almost looks like a fun facts Fridays. Relics and indulgences. There was a lot of humor in my Martin Luther book. This is not a book loaded with fun. No. I want to go on to what the pastors did back then and of course it's going to dovetail onto what the passengers are doing now. I just want to read this real quick. And it's a mathematical calculation, which I found really fun, and it really explains, again, what happened when the pastors did try to speak up and who was strong about their faith and who said, I am, you know, I stand here and know, I'm not going to move. You say, we know what followed in Germany, because the 12,000 pastors or 12,000 passengers chose to be chose not to be political and shrink back from taking a heroic stand, the Nazis were successful, and they were able to marginalize and hopefully get in. But it began with, you started with 12,000 pastors, you said there were three things. Well, no, no. There were 80 actually. I didn't know this. I didn't know this until I wrote this book, because I said, the parallel to today is that when the Nazis first took over bahn hoffer and a few heroes said, okay, we as the church must clearly speak against this Nazi regime. They're basically trying to destroy the church. Now it's different than it is here in America. But it's the same concept.

American Church Martin Luther Albin Alvin Germany Bahn Hoffer America
Jim Hanson and Kurt Schlicter Discuss 'Scumbag' Kevin Williamson

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Jim Hanson and Kurt Schlicter Discuss 'Scumbag' Kevin Williamson

"Kerch schlichter and I have what I call the mutually assured domination pact. When I host he's a guest when he hosts I'm a guest because you guys need us both. I'm the east coast warlord. He's the West Coast warlord. And senior columnist for town hall. Yeah, and now that's part of the dispatch employment package. God, painful. They got another piece of refuse from national review joining one of those toss off. Let's talk about Kevin Williamson right now. Let's do it because he's a scumbag. He's, you know, he's trying to be a good writer and you know why he's trying because he freaking copies me. No, no, I mean, look at it. His stuff is evolved over time. If I became more popular and he became more, well, his audience became more select. Right. He has moved into a definite kind of slick revive and you can see the magic that I work every day like my great town hall article of yesterday whose title I forget or today whose title I forget. He's definitely tried to get that kind of wacky insightful humor and he's just ended up at the dispatch. Which is that it didn't work. It's

Kerch Schlichter Kevin Williamson East Coast Town Hall West Coast
Jimmy Kimmel signs 3-year extension for ABC late-night show

AP News Radio

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Jimmy Kimmel signs 3-year extension for ABC late-night show

"Jimmy Kimmel has extended his contract with ABC for another three years a marchesa a letter with the latest Jimmy Kimmel Live will be on the air at least through 2026 Kimmel will mark 20 years with the show in January ABC entertainment president Craig erwich says Kimmel has entertained viewers with irreverent humor and gotten them through some of the most momentous events in history Kimmel says after two decades at ABC he's looking forward to three years of quiet quitting

Jimmy Kimmel Kimmel ABC Craig Erwich
Sebastian Talks Breaking News With Devin Nunes, CEO of Truth Social

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:13 min | 2 months ago

Sebastian Talks Breaking News With Devin Nunes, CEO of Truth Social

"Himself in battle against the deep state as chairman of the intelligence committee of the House, and now he runs truth, social congressman, chairman, president, CEO, Devin Nunes, welcome in studio. C that's it is a pleasure, honestly, to be here. You've invited me for so many years and it's great to see your Millennium Falcon, all your Star Wars paraphernalia around here. You got your red phone. I mean, it's great. I think we have a similar vintage, so I think you can appreciate all the stuff that my wife will like me to get out of the house and stuff my studio full of. But my wife would like for me to get all this stuff out of the house. You have to get a show insane and then we have to build your studio and then we can fill it. All right, I'm glad we've got a sense of humor because in Reagan's tradition we have to be happy warriors. I can't butt start with the news to shocking items that we have we have Steve Bannon mentioned this last week after he has to go to New York he was on the show with us after he walked out of that indictment in New York that dozens of people associated with president Trump being ambushed being subpoenaed by the DoJ. We have the confirmation today, 44 zero, including our regular friend here, Boris Epstein, who is a lawyer to president Trump had his phone, his phone taken away from him by the federal authorities. And then as you're walking into the studio with your colleague, we find out that danchenko, the notorious danchenko sauce with the Steele dossier, thanks to Durham filing. We now know he's an FBI informant. Did you know all of this? Did you know the subpoenas were coming danchenko was a plant? I have to have your response. Well, I think that let's take the danchenko stuff first and we can come back to the other subpoenas that Steve Bannon mentioned. But this is really breaking news right now. It's only a few hours old, Durham went to unseal some findings and in that, just to remind the audience, danchenko was the super secret Russian source that when we were investigating this, everybody said, oh, these people are going to die. These are sources that are close to Putin, Putin could off of a minute minute and it ends up sea bass that he was like within a few blocks of here. Yeah, it was a

Intelligence Committee Of The President Trump Devin Nunes Steve Bannon Danchenko Boris Epstein New York Reagan DOJ Durham FBI Putin
Mark Levin Reacts to the Death of Kenneth Starr

Mark Levin

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Mark Levin Reacts to the Death of Kenneth Starr

"Before coming on the air Ben an hour and a half ago I learned as you did about the passing of Ken Starr absolutely Shocking I knew Ken Starr was a great patriot Was a brilliant brilliant man He had a terrific sense of humor A man of deep faith and family He had a wonderful wife and kids And he will be missed He appeared on life liberty and Levin several times We asked for him about four or 5 6 weeks ago And we were told quietly that he wasn't doing great after surgery I had no idea how bad it was apparently The last time he was on was may 15th of this year Just a few months ago While we also discuss other subjects I can not allow the passing of a monumental patriot A monumental legal mind I can not allow him and that to pass Without acknowledging him

Ken Starr BEN Levin
"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

"You know <Speech_Male> you can do if you <Speech_Male> walk around saying that. <Speech_Male> We're in your white. You <Speech_Male> go suck off <Speech_Male> a conservative. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> shove that <Speech_Male> way down <Speech_Male> your throat <SpeakerChange> you hear me. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that's wrong. <Speech_Male> you know it <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So why do it <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> you're <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> You're phony <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and because you're jealous <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> jealous. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's right <Silence> <Speech_Male> take <Speech_Male> take it in for a second <Speech_Male> think about it. <Speech_Male> Those people who <Speech_Male> say those hateful things <Speech_Male> are jealous <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> black people. <Speech_Male> You know why <Speech_Male> because we actually <Speech_Male> came up in the world <Speech_Male> and they're still <Speech_Male> sitting in the <Speech_Male> same god damn <Speech_Male> place that they're fucking <Speech_Male> relatives were sitting <Speech_Male> in and they had <Speech_Male> all the handout handouts <Speech_Male> in the world <Speech_Male> and they still <Speech_Male> were able to do anything <Silence> with their lives <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> still <Speech_Male> even <Speech_Male> after all the free <Speech_Male> welfare <Speech_Male> for white people that's <Speech_Male> been going on for years <Speech_Male> in terms <Speech_Male> of corporate welfare. <Speech_Male> Hollywood welfare <Speech_Male> fucking <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They own all the <Speech_Male> companies. They own everything. <Speech_Male> <Music> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They go either way <Silence> not to job <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and we still. <Speech_Male> We still <SpeakerChange> survived. <Speech_Music_Male> Only we still found a <Speech_Male> way. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> That's resourcefulness <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> jealous. <Silence> Because they don't have. It <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> says simple. <SpeakerChange> He <Silence> saw you saw <Speech_Male> they had. <Speech_Male> They had the <Speech_Male> the country in their hands <Speech_Male> and they were too stupid <Speech_Male> to maintain <SpeakerChange> it. They were <Speech_Male> too stupid <Speech_Male> too dumb <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in who beat them <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a black man. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> right <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> that's right <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so jealous <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that's jealousy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> saddam. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> you keep <Speech_Male> using that word. <Speech_Male> That's my advice <Speech_Male> to you. You're <Speech_Male> absolutely right. <Speech_Male> I don't censor people <Speech_Male> one bit. <Silence> <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> not my thing. <Speech_Male> I stay <Silence> out of it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Don't <Speech_Male> say that shit around me <Speech_Male> okay. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> i'm not going <Speech_Male> to censor you. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> I'm not gonna <Silence> <Speech_Male> hit <Speech_Male> you. I'm not gonna do anything <Speech_Male> but eventually <Silence> someone will. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> That's the beauty of it. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> you keep acting <Speech_Male> stupid like that <Speech_Male> long enough. <SpeakerChange> Someone <Silence> will punch in the face. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Hey it may be a white guy. <Silence> I don't know <Silence> <Speech_Male> you'll <Speech_Male> piss someone off. <Speech_Male> You'll rub someone the wrong <Speech_Male> way. You'll <Speech_Male> step on their foot. <Speech_Male> You'll do something something <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and it will set <Speech_Male> them off and they'll <Speech_Male> take out all <Silence> the rage <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> they had their <Speech_Male> day right on <Speech_Male> your stupid fucking <Silence> face. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I've <Speech_Male> seen it happen before <Speech_Male> it will happen <Speech_Male> again. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't encourage <SpeakerChange> it <Speech_Male> but at the same time. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> my fucking problem. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> The <Speech_Male> at me <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the obsession <Speech_Male> <Silence> with <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> putting <Speech_Male> vitriol <Speech_Male> in the guise <Silence> of humor <Silence> is <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> disgusting <Silence> <Silence> sickening <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the lowest form <Speech_Male> of humor <Speech_Male> and it <Silence> is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> not <Speech_Male> funny <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and it <Speech_Male> is not <Speech_Male> okay <Speech_Male> for you to <Silence> sit in a room <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and recites <Speech_Male> insults <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> just because <Speech_Male> you're having a bad <Silence> day <Silence> <Speech_Male> or just <Silence> because the paper said <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> Everyone <Speech_Male> be phenomenal <Speech_Male> day evening afternoon. <Speech_Male> Fiesta siesta <Speech_Male> downtime. Lunchtime <Speech_Male> chill time party <Speech_Male> time whatever. It may be <Speech_Male> an remember when <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> life gets you down. You <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> can always laugh <SpeakerChange> at something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> else farewell <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> folks.

Hollywood
"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

"That allow you to create your podcast directly from your browser or phone anchor will distribute your podcast on spotify apple podcast and more. You can make money on anchor with With no minimum listenership is everything. You need to make a podcast in one place. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started today because anchor.

"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

"All it takes is a few idiots to make it all come tumbling down. You saw it. On january six he saw with donald trump. Don't start. Don't don't get cute with this stuff all right. You know why you can't say you know what it leads to. You know how people get when they start using those words as if it's just some you know some cool little thing that we're all doing whatever i know history very well and every time i see a society become comfortable with the racial slurs. It always leads to violence. It always has led to violence since you talked to me about your psychology. And what way. People so touchy where people so offended because we know where it goes. That's why you think you press me because you get on a youtube and you make video about the psychology of people getting offended. That's not what this is about you jackass doesn't matter what the psychology of it is matters. What the politics of it are. You got white nationalist. Living in this country always pushing you on the edge edgy new along making you say shit making you say racial slurs making you laugh at things that they find funny and it's all worldview warfare. It's psychological warfare. Actually if you wanna talk about psychology. Why Why don't you talk about how a lot of this humor. This new humor this new dialogue. Who is the nigger word talk. About how white nationalist had the same sense of humor and that's where they got all the jokes from they don't realize it but that's where they got this urge this urge to say that we're where do you think that comes from. Don't you for one second. Try to kid around with me. I've been around too long low. This is no sir and christopher card for more content and more content. Talk i am telling you to use anchor. First of all because maker is free. Which is a really good reason. But anchor also has awesome creation tools..

donald trump youtube christopher
"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on More Content Talk

"Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of or content talk. It's the only show that cuts through the glamour glitz and all the bullshit to bring you the truth..

"humor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Humor couldn't help myself Cat's pride. For cats who care if you're worried about your cholesterol here, how others are taking charge with garlic, healthy cholesterol formula, my doctor said. My cholesterol was borderline somewhat been taking garlic and it works. I take our leak every day to help maintain healthy cholesterol. No garlic, breath and garlic is a world leader in garlic potency. So you know what works. Take charge of your cholesterol with garlic, healthy cholesterol formula. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any Disease use as directed. Here's a fact too much of today's journalism is politically biased. So where should you turn to get accurate leading edge information that you can trust the epic times? The epic times covers the news the way you need it unfiltered and accurate cutting edge topics like the danger of the Chinese Communist Party, the pandemic, Russia, the Middle East, the economy and news you won't hear anywhere else. The epic times is free from the influence of governments, corporations or political parties. You get to form your own opinions. Here's the special introductory offer. You can get one month subscription to the Epic Times Weekly Prince newspaper as well as unlimited access to their dynamic website for just $1. That's right, $1. Go right now to trusted newspaper dot com That's trusted newspaper dot com To subscribe to it now trusted newspaper dot com. Hi. I'm Lisa.

"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

Daddy Never Cried

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

"Yeah yeah like. I say he was. He was an activist in terms of going to bat for the men that worked for him. And dabney to. What do you attribute his elevated consciousness. Because it's hard in a particular generation to stand out and have a different opinion. Yeah and i'm not sure he stood out. I'm not sure that he would have said a whole lot of stuff to his peers about how he felt about stuff. Not but i think being in the army and He said that when he would go into places with black people that he knew black soldiers that they would not be welcome in restaurants and he would and that was kind of his early decision. That was his early realization. That things were wrong in inequity right. Yeah it was a different era in that we would have never had black people in that. My mother had a black woman because she had a lunch for the people that you work with. We wouldn't have had black guests or house necessarily but But in the larger world and in his workplace he was certainly aware was a different year. That's that's fascinating. How far we've come and how far we have yet to go. It's a it's a it's wonderful near you share this story because it's a you either. Get the the normal everyday family in the south in the sixties and the conflicts that that had to arise in most families in terms of of Kids you know having a a different exposure to To the world and and boy. That's fascinating like i say. He knew just how to he knew because he would say something and i would just get so outraged and he would just kind of sit back and watch me. He was he was pushing. Your buttons. just. Have fun with your. What was interesting was like. I say i was such a daddy's girl and i think as i grew older grew up he began to it was like that was the way he stayed close. That was the way he made. Connect with knee was to just aggravate me. It was his left.

dabney army
"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

Daddy Never Cried

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

"That's an point of a child of the sixties growing up in the deep south There are conflicting messages being set from parents to children and and from society to children and Must have been an interesting time to be a child in the south. It really was from the being in school standpoint and the family. Yeah yeah i was. Yeah daphne i know you. I know you to be compassionate person and fair-minded who's interested in social equity to. Are there any other characteristics of your dad that you feel like you have inherited. Well we talk in our family about the dark stevens humor and Because my dad had that and it was you know he could find humor in anything and my husband and i have sort of. That's how we got attracted to one another as a husband had that same kind of quality but dad would for example My brother no. My brother was the more openly rebellious one. And so he he and dad really did come to blows when point about the vietnam war and had later said that he was wrong about it but at the moment it was pretty passionate issue and david was just always on his own thread.

daphne stevens vietnam david
"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

Daddy Never Cried

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

"Sometimes it'd be round sometimes. They weren't but Yeah we were there. So did your your parents was that the extent of their drink or did they. Do they like a party and social gathering big heartier. 's they they you know took business troops together and they did travel a lot and that kind of stuff but no they weren't re real big party goers over you know. This was their tradition. So daphne the that drinking tradition though had has another little vein to it as i recall if you were going to an event. Isn't there a tradition of taking a plastic. Yes well in in that era The ladies would sit in back and of the car and the men would stood in front and the ladies would have our little plastic cup of wine and we were just tipple a little bit on the way to the event. So yeah there was that this was just a tradition across the whole area. This wasn't unique to your family. I think it was sort of a southern thing. It i mean. I don't know how it is. And how truly southern it is but like i say the ladies would sit in the back on the men would sit in the front and it was. It was kind of a traditional thing every member we call them. Road sodas call them where i was from and you know it was. It was polite then to say. Would you like one for the road and not to drink before you left but for the road. A road soda. Yeah you better have a roadside take with you a glass of beer or glass of wine or something to to take on the road where we were all worried about open container laws so it was sort of a different era. Daphne the title of this program is daddy never cried. The subtitle is daddy never cried. Do ever recall seeing your father cry. You know i really don't.

Daphne
"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

Daddy Never Cried

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Daddy Never Cried

"And our guest today is daphne. I appreciate you being here. Daphne here i'm so glad you're here. Daphne daphne's a really good friend of mine for many years. So it's a special treat to hear this story about her father. So sorry okay. Daphne you have a story to tell us about your father. And this is about sunday. Martinis and it really reveals a lot about his character and his relationship to you all So would you tell us what happens on what happened on sundays in your house. Why this is kind of all of my life. And at the point i was in my forty. I think when i really when this happened they Appearance for real big in the methodist church and they would every sunday go to church the methodist church and then they would come home and have said the afternoon martinis and then take their sunday now. So sunday afternoon. Martinez is not something that i've heard about before. Was this kind of a common practice. Oh no no especially in the methodist church and the methodist church. It was unusual in the methodist church. But that's what they would do and It will as a family kind of thing so we would go over there. As they got old her we would go over there on sunday afternoon. And have martinis with them. Sometimes and Erin my husband had had a bad experience with martinis at so. He had sworn off for a little while. So aaron would fix the martinis and my dad and my mom would sit out on the patio. Big big nice lawn. Nice country place and aaron when he was off of. Martinis didn't want my dad to feel bad. So he missed the martinis but he put a sprite in his own glass. So aaron was so aaron. Was the bartender. The bartender and he was serving. Everybody right. said he didn't want them to know he was not drinking martinis. He filled his glass with a sprite instead. Got antenna have macular degeneration and he was sort of as i say blind as a bat indefinite depose and but he was smart and he looked all the way across. The patio saw aaron with his drink..

methodist church Daphne daphne Daphne daphne aaron Martinez Erin macular degeneration
"humor" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"You know what. I i gotta be honest listening back to that. We don't sound half bad. You know not break a wrist patting ourselves on the back but But i like to think through the magic podcast. Addity max was along and a couple couple things. Hey max that's still counts as a nod max's nodding no right down. But that's still counts as acknowledged the nah thought thought no was shake non -firmative. Well we will sort that out later but they so much for listening to that. I hope that you got something out of it. A little bit of a peek behind the curtain for how we approach this show and at the end of the day. I mean it's just about you know being human being in approaching these topics with kind of empathy and humanity and treating these subjects like human beings while also not being too self serious. And that's i think hopefully what makes the show Fun to listen to. We surely appreciate all of you listening every week absolutely Big thanks to the wonderful audience. Thanks our colleagues. And of course big. Thanks to max williams folks if you like the idea of us going live and being on the road or even doing something virtual you know. Let us know because we're excited at maximum nolan. I have only been working together through the pandemic a we have this is true. Maximize specifically have never met in person. Having max only wants we met during the underwear. Oh wait no. You're right you're right. I briefly forgot though right. Like i mean i knew max before. He was our producer years ago. You know through mutual friends and alex one nine and so. We hadn't seen each other for a long time and same with a lot of our colleagues. This web park has been me was such a big deal because we actually got to hang out with folks that we'd only seen in little avatar forum. I actually have gotten to the point where i can flake the to. You know what i mean. I'm like oh no we totally see each other all the time. It's the same. And it's also different. i'm rambling but Appoint being lovely to be in person with human beings again. Hope everybody out. There plays smart in safe so we can get back to doing more of that Sooner than later well said well. You might Make job at another. no promises. See next for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your shows this episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by fruit of the loom. Fruit of the loom has been part of people's lives for such a long time one hundred and seventy years to be exact but not over fruit of the loom. Oh if anything. It's just beginning. They're continuing to grow evolve and improve with every single passing day every single stitch sewn and every single innovation that they launch just like they've been doing since eighteen fifty one their pioneering spirit match what their relentless pursuit of the next amazing thing means they're always putting in extra effort for you. Don't miss out on the top stories from the insiders around the nfl. I'm your host rhett lewis in on the nfl inside report podcast. I'll go around the league for in-depth analysis in storytelling with a multitude of exclusive. Nfl insiders getting unmatched access game. Recaps the biggest news in depth reports. That take you beyond the headlines. Multiple times per week all on. Nfl inside report the nfl inside report. Podcast debuts september eighth listen to nfl inside report on the iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. I want to get back to kissing cheeks and my grandbabies making sunday dinner. What a house full of family and lots of laughs kobe. Nineteen has changed how we live and how we feel for now. They're vaccines and they are the very first step that let us get back to what we miss. Most it's okay to have questions is it say cannot wait. Now get the facts visit get vaccine answers dot org so you can make an informed decision when vaccines are available to you brought to you by the ad council..

Addity max max williams nfl iheartradio nolan rhett lewis max alex apple
"humor" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"A to a higher place can give an example not from this show at all. We all work on lots of different stuff for nine particular. Lauren and i did a true crime. Show called happy. Face that was about the father was about the daughter of a infamous serial killer and she got very emotional talking about finding out about her father. Being this rapist murderer you know secret. Life kind of guy and she cried a lot and we had to walk the line of like are we doing service to her story by using these clips or is it exploitative to her and she's obviously part of this using executive producer on the project she was very much open to whatever we wanted to do and had like cut. If you wanted gone. She was fine with whatever we wanted to us. But we had a you know. I think obligation to ourselves and to listeners to not overplay that hand into only use it in a way that serve the story and served the narrative and like the emotion of her you know revelation kind of so is that makes i kind of feel out in the moment and it certainly different conversational show that it might be for a heavy shirt action. Type show i would. I would say Holly in terms of nuts and bolts with those kinds of interviews. You are as the interviewer you're going to find yourself. Being the object of stability in his conversation about these things that have happened as so everything can change and be perfect and just so in post in the editing room right but when you are with that person in that moment one of the most important things is You don't shouldn't feel like you have to rush it. Silence can always be cuts right and you shouldn't feel like okay. We need to wrap it up because often. Psychologically for people when you're remembering something you're experiencing it again right right and so it's incredibly crucial. I would say to. I if you know that kind of stuff is if you're gonna go into those waters bacon for that interview at least at least fifty percent more time than you were planning. So you're like we're gonna talk for an hour. Be ready to go for an hour and a half or two hours a make sure that you don't leave them in that moment you know and and you can. You can stay with them. It's totally fine to say. Hey do you wanna take a break right and will you know we will come back in ten but when you say you know come back and ten what you're saying and what they're feeling even if it's unconscious is this person is not going to leave me alone. They're not going to run away from this. And then that once you once you kind of unlocked that and you build that level of trust they are going to be super super open to talk about other stuff because they don't wanna live in that moment necessarily either you sort of help shepherd them through. It does build and the next thing you know. The conversation ends on like police academy for or clearly. The best police rotten tomatoes spoken now. We're hit hi. My name is amy watson. And i have a podcast on. Ptsd that started after the pandemic. And so my podcast is wednesdays with watson and i started my first season autobiographical because i have lots of trauma climbed in a closet and started telling my story right And i loved what you just said about not leaving the listener in a bad place right but you can imagine like i'm pretty funny and real life but it's very difficult to be funny when you're talking especially when i was telling my my autobiography which is lots and lots of trauma. Do you guys find just as valuable. And i think you hit it. I'm sorry i can't reach your name from here. But i but do you find it just because i just there's no way to really inject humor and and a podcast about ptsd. There's just isn't it. I mean there's some ways but is it just as effective to just what you just said not leave them in a bad place so like my second season is telling the stories of other people's trauma and the crooked roads of hope and pain and how they're not there anymore right and so we leave them with that but the journey the twenty minute journey there is not fun. Sure and so one of the things. I did because to avoid what happened to her is when people come on and tell their stories. Because i'm also a writer. So i printer view. Listen to their story of keefer could can swallow it and small parts and a little bit of creative way and then and our view them so in your opinion and the hard. Which is why i came in here. Is i want them to keep listening to the next story. The next because this is something people aren't talking about. Is that in your opinion just as effective as being funny. Because i can't be funny about this. We don't have to a i'm going to be fully transparent with you really joking Diana ally are in my opinion a little funnier than us. But i think i think all all five of us could agree that so we're thinking in terms of palate right like a color palette and the what's worse than a lack of uber is forced to humor. You know somebody's talking about like a time. They lost someone in a house fire. And you know if you have the temerity to try to force a joke in there. That's that's either monstrous or it's Cartoonish negligence and like. You're that that is a missing piece. So i would say i would say if humor feels force than that probably is. That is a strong indicator that it doesn't belong in that part and an audience feels that The way that animals can sense earthquakes before they happen. Like they will know podcast. Listeners are very intelligent for sure thing. Well yeah i mean we're we're we start. You know making sure that we are in a story that we can be funny about to some degree so it it's it's a little outside our our world but But i think we've done comedy for a long time together and one thing. One major thing that we learned is that you're walking your audience through it and comedy is human and and humane good. Comedy is and you can be jarring and shocking and surprising without breaking that wall of being humane and and i think will interrupt a lot of our heavy moments with a joke but we to find a way to do that. That doesn't negate that moment. That doesn't undo the the importance in the heaviness of what we just talked about and i've cut jokes. That didn't do that before you know we don't always nail in the record but But when they're when they're right. I think it really kind of helps your audience kind of walk away from that moment. Films and television shows do that too or they break up like heavy stuff with like a little bit of levity and think. That's new need that kapalik cleanser to kind of gets you through the next thing. Yeah it does help you hang on to the end. You know what. I mean when you're talking about something so heavy and so real and of course there's nothing to joke about but it's hard to stay in that space for a really long time so finding away even if not humorous. But i think you're thinking in the right direction of like finding a light moment even if it's not funny laugh out loud moment just to like okay. We good we did that. And now we're back and now we can go into the rest of it exactly. Yeah giving them. Yeah yeah yeah. That's that's what i would say. Thank you guys hit on it so maybe a better way to think of this. Is that comedy or humor is a genre of connection is not the only genre so if there is some sort of connection it is doing the work that comedy would have done all of these and i hate to interject. We've got.

amy watson Lauren Diana ally Holly keefer watson
"humor" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Really yeah over a hedging. We were being so reverent and because this was a totally different culture than ours we really wanted to be respectful and stuff. And i think we went a little too far in. It wasn't fun it was. It was a little too quiet and calm and it didn't have a lot of energy time lanny like you mentioned earlier. Born thing they did this stuff and it was over you know and it was like this is it. We've let's just empty minds and just redo it without any serious notes. Who were just like. let's just have more fun with it. Have a good time with that. Tell this story keep the respect and it turned out great. The second time this much resume. I don't know if we've walked away from now. Have a full disclosure. We have a amazing research is just game helps us do kind of like bullet points and pulled from different sources and helps to pick topics. 'cause i also do another show called stuff they don't want you to know That we five days a week. We do two episodes ridiculous history every week. So it's nice to have a little bit of research help but we dig ourselves as well and contribute and it's sort of a collaborative process. But i think there were a few that he pulled that we may be never did because they there was one was about like some german folktales around christmas or something like that was so like just grim and dark and depressing and ring around the posey moment. It really was and it was like. I think we were just like you know i was just wanna miss we. I guess you're right. We did walk away from. we did. Walk away from jack the ripper not to be too martius about it. There's lots of i mean. There's a lot of excellent scholarship on. This is probably one of the most well documented serial murders in in this era for a different show though it has a different show. Yeah and then. Also you know it's We didn't we precious about it but it's kind of callous to be like hey. These people's lives were horrible. They died in horrible ways. What do you do net. Walk a wocka wocka. That's terrible and so we. We've i think over time Me and this guy have developed. Sort of a spidey sense for that kind of for that kind of thing because you know you you earn the trust the report of again the most important part of the show the person listening and they're extending i would i would argue as most valuable currency of this time which is time right your personal time in world bigwigs never-ending information make it worth it and if you're if someone's trusting us to to properly convey a story into travel along with us for a few minutes then we don't want to trick them that's like hopping into an uber to go down the street and you're like holy. Why are we going to montana and the dove active. That's really totally true delight. We said earlier about fine. You can speak french all you want. it is about that connection with the audience. And you could get these we didn't. We don't have like the monopoly on weird history stories. there's other podcasts. Have done the same stories. We've done we have a sister. Podcast called Stuffy in history class. We initially fantastically initially. Were like trying really hard not to cover anything that they'd covered but then we realize it we it's different it doesn't matter it is our perspective and it's going even if someone enjoys that show they can hear us doing the same episode topic and it would be a completely different version of it. Even if like the facts are all true. It's like a different version of that story. That could probably be valuable or at least entertaining in a different way comforting in a different way. No one owns a story. No and that's what. I'm saying that what we want to make sure we continue to do is approach everything. We do with that empathy and connectedness with the audience so that people continue to hang out. Yeah cool Speaking of the audience high. We were wondering if y'all had any questions for us as there's a microphone. That's going to be coming around. I'm sure you're used to this by now. We're recording virtual so be clear pick pleased. Hey everybody i'm adidi king kavala near the host of nfl explained it's the podcast where football fanatics come to learn everything they always wanted to know about football but didn't know who to ask they can ask us now. Of course we're going through all of these topics adidi. And i know you and i are so excited to start. Disseminating nothing but football nuggets. Well it makes. I've got questions of my own like. Do you know why the packers named the packer do that. It has nothing to do with pacman and it has everything to do with cheese. Not cheese with me. Meat-packing it was packing company. That put five hundred dollars up for the uniform. Or how about this now. What the constitution actual catch in football. Which i would imagine all my years of covering college. Football is a different answer now covering the nfl and unfortunately. I don't think that we will possibly have enough time to figure that one out but the point is you're going to be able to join us every thursday to talk about every interesting detail about the game we love. It's nfl explained. Listen on the iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts stories that are affecting the black community are being covered on the black information network. Not a show or a podcast. Bin is twenty four seven news network covering stories from a black perspective. Listen to the black information that work on the iheartradio app get news four and by the black community anywhere anytime keeping you informed keeping you engaged the black information network and b. i n. News dot com four decades. This area has been a hotbed for paranormal sightings. This is a strange place. This part of the country about it just doesn't feel right strange things we're having him back then and strange. Things are happening again now. Something this other worldly corner of southeastern massachusetts the bridgewater trying iheartradio and grim and mild presents. Bridgewater starring michel collins. Melissa ponchio and nathan fillion created by aaron monkey and written by lordship and listen to bridgewater now on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. And learn more at grim and mild dot com slash bridgewater. Hi my name's colleen and my podcast is not almost there. It's not funny but it's Kind of like uplifting motivational inspirational. And there's a couple of moments we had this guest and we plan for it. Do i research everything like that. And this one guy whose father had passed away which was a pivotal moment in his life. And he's done countless interviews about it spoken about it but on our podcast he got really emotional and it was like deer in the headlights. Like i don't know how to respond to this emotion right now and like worst transition on youtube. We even got this comment. That was like good content. But you missed that moment like right away. The audience like commented on it so. I don't know if you have any advice on even all your prep like you get to a moment while you're according that you're that it gets like super emotional like how do you comfortably live in that emotional moment and then bring it out to even if it's not humor but it's like.

lanny football adidi king kavala nfl montana pacman nuggets packers michel collins Melissa ponchio aaron monkey apple Football Bin nathan fillion Bridgewater bridgewater massachusetts colleen
"humor" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

Relentless Geekery

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"humor" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

"Well, if we go in doors over here, we know just wandering around em, you just wonder how to Costco we're going to have a good time with your class. Are you having to write comedy lines or write short stories? Are you doing a stand-up for the you know final credit or whatever know it's it's really not that it really is a film appreciation class. So what he's doing is taking us through like one per decade what he thinks are some of the funniest movies ever made and talking a lot about why they're funny. So the week started off with night at the Opera Marx brothers were very famous. You lots of great funny scenes wage to see we're doing Some Like It Hot from the 50s. We're doing the graduate which is both a drama and a comedy but has some very funny scenes. We're doing the Philadelphia Story, which is one of those great over layered conversation for these comedies where I think it's like right Spencer Tracy and Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn just a monster wage. Yeah at the height of their powers and that the script is like, you know inches thick instead of twenty Pages because there's so much back and forth and which going on with anyway, so that's what the issue seems to be about is people putting in like that where they first saw it or why they think it's funny and it'll be a participatory and contributory but it isn't if you're create your own movie yet. So it is wage where near like one of your cool writing workshops or something that says go ask cuz asking you know, what is funny there's no answer to that. You can't give it a definitive answer except maybe 42 and I cuz I could definitely see out of any ten movies for any decade that some of the people will agree in like it some of the people will disagree and not like it and some don't care or even understand maybe and that shifts and changes for every ten movies in every different decade cuz I know exactly like I know people that oh my gosh that movies in black and white Pig Can't be funny. Well, we talked about that before the things that people think that the world started when they were born or that black and white is we kind of high definition corny, but that's what point of watching The Philadelphia Story is there's touch wit packed into that movie as there are jokes in airplanes or observed as references in Idiocracy or whatever might be like, it's just a difference in style. You know what I mean? So yeah definitely so that's interesting. I would like to hear more cuz for example, I mean you're wearing the tap dance killer shirt. I've been re-reading the apama stuff since I got my Kickstarter that and exactly there's bits of humor with that but it's not laugh-out-loud type humor. It's light-hearted. You might say more than humorous. Yeah, you know, but the whole fact that you know has a rat that he talks too young to stand in that weird yoga pose to get his powers and his looks like you know, it's made out of a garbage bag or something, you know, I mean, it's there's rights of humor that keep it lighthearted wage. Still yeah, I mean, what's that the second big guy he faces is the propeller man or whatever and he falls through the skyline. It's it's absurd yet. That's you know what I mean wage..

Katharine Hepburn Cary Grant Spencer Tracy The Philadelphia Story twenty Pages Philadelphia Story Costco first ten movies both one 50s Marx one per decade second big Hot 42 Kickstarter Opera Some Like