35 Burst results for "Hume"

60 Huntington Beach teachers elect to take leave over mandated return to Los Angeles campus

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

60 Huntington Beach teachers elect to take leave over mandated return to Los Angeles campus

"In Huntington Beach says at risk teachers are being forced back to campus, even though 60% of the students are staying home Teachers union president Sean Hume says. It's just 9% of teachers who could easily continue teaching remotely. It keeps them connected to their students. It allows them to keep working. They don't have to be on unpaid leave. They don't have to risk their lives or the lives of their family members, she says. 60 teachers have had to take sick leave while the district brings in unqualified substitutes. The Huntington Beach High School District has not responded to requests for comment.

Sean Hume Huntington Beach Teachers Union Huntington Beach High School D
"hume" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

09:06 min | 3 months ago

"hume" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"Afford that my son and it was just really like and it wasn't a so angry message like i just can't believe that we're in a world where two people can have such different lives painting system and now i'm not reaping anything and it got. She basically went viral. Because at this message would like to go picked up and are we interview tattoo. Die on the show and then because of that message that she that someone tact this morning that she'd per we then going touch with her and then today she had a daughter and grandchildren live in texas. And this morning. It's so well arranged for them to surprise her live in. But you know what my point is out of something for her to really grim social media if used in the right way you can connect people and you can and today than live on this morning. We rice way more jenner. Just give page for this. She was way over double what she'd ask for the gripes stein by the end of obeying and united. So if it's using positive for him really be. It is an amazing. It's amazing tool for businesses. That stopping and then. I think like anything in life when it's in the hands of the whole person or not even passing the ability to be nice but using such a negative way and then it's obviously a good thing. It's not a good thing. When i think that kids are teens are seeing in thinking that she'd be like ago has docked the hell out of her and so i think there's really swings for me But the. I think that we've anything in life that you can make great things happen if you want to that away. Spe those negative people. And i think it just sums up the world in general. I've had you reminded me a little bit of what johnson charity authors when. She came on the show when she's like this is a choice. You have a choice to get up people's too time times that i think you're crazy is anyone can sit behind a phone or cable and type one But really what they have enough. You can my face. And i welcome that but if you come and you would literally shut focused. Runway shows us this person. You are but listen. I've so lucky and have a really lovely following and and nice of group of people on mine. And i think it's what you make here. I mean me follow you want to follow people that are going to make you feel positive not negative so you do have a choice all of that. Yeah it's true. I want to come back to what you said about six months in goals and priorities. Yeah sorry. I'm putting the word goals in that. I'm wondering if you do set goals if you sit down and say whether it's on december thirty first or any point you say generic i feel like i feel like i'm building up some momentum with worksite for the next six months. I'm going to see if we can make x. winds ed happen. Do you do now. Like i don't really have. I suppose everybody has goes as such like really like sort of write down a formula upton. Go this is the bucket list. This is what i want to happen. But i do. Kinda go okay. This is my passion to focus on this day or whatever that might be but then sometimes is a case of just riding away. If you have a good period this. I wanted to do my work now and just judging it. I think that's just life. I think but yeah. Every of every day is a di. We normally got wife. Anne exousia anytime we can guarantee that we're going to get holiday together as a family as in like wanna industry does require and the summer if we get a kit. Today's very last minute. A new us data always sit down. And i watched the secret uprated lifetime visual one and i just give myself a little boost to flight going into the and i do that every day. What do you get out of the secret. It might be really pass no but What what for you add such value. That means that you we visited time and time again. I just think if you put anything out there the universe it will come. Ta in the sense of like i think negative braids negative energy just breeds more and more negative energy which is overseen or anything like health related. Obviously that's just you've sadly gotten are controlled run health to some degree but yeah i think i think the company kate as well as think is such a big thing to do with that. Yeah i think she'll take from it but aways feel really like re-energized by what she and i just think if you just vision is what you want you'll get if you keep so on and so working away. I think because you one of direction that you can have. And that's to get you off to it because this is anyone who maybe doesn't know the secret or has heard about it and isn't quite how to apply. But it's different from wishing it's almost like a structure little things like mentally visualizing such they call them. Night-vision bodes all sounds. Millbury ferries actually not very simple that ryan list of what it is you actually on looking at that list often as you can don't just right and then that certainly do news damn forget about it like cape so coming back then slowly it starts to happen and it all starts to come out little things i on their like printing off a picture of your dream house and sticking on your fridge and you know some of this stuff is a little bit farfetched. The premise. I think he's just really just to be positive and do so. Think tools that mental go constant. I think the the will you take those things and i really believe that. Yeah and curious. I'm curious about whether when you have a goal. It seems like you eat to love them. I mean like. I think i've worked hard such and i don't like my trumpet with that by just think my children that it doesn't happen because you got. This is why i want to do whereas all i'm trying to teach at to my younger siblings and stuff because i think there's a little bit more millennial this is going to happen. They're gonna live this instagram. And it's not about that like you're gonna get not backs all part of the story at the end when you get there and so for me. It's yeah no of my guy was of what town. Not because i've so rupp crystal and paid in front of me is because i've put the time in and that's that's always what i want to show my kids and you have to work to reach what you want. Don't rely on someone else to bring that. Ceo you're you're mazda freely and it's interesting to me because i feel i feel similar. I definitely would describe myself as a growth and hoste. Meaning that i work. I refi on my head. No one else is just for me. And i would. I would be a bit funny about saying that in certain company and i think it's funny. I think it's interesting that were saying. I think you have to be. I remember watching the ages ago. Fun content documentary and she. I remember her being away with craig davidson. We quite good friends. His miami is why house which was just epic but she was saying why the move to miami because it just seemed very random in the peak of his golfing up to move to miami and he was saying that. Just the whole vibe about being state side to be here too so different in the in the whereas when it comes down to post he remembers. He was driving a car wanted since he was a tie and bought. This car got point when his career. He put really happy about that and he. It was a convertible car. Was he had his roof down in some ways. That's driving for what flash seven south this. You can imagine sweats. i'm gonna. He was driving the same car in america and songs. Hey man nice car. The difference in like waste of programs to have to keep people grounded by of bringing them back down to one which is which is. Also one side is amazing. I'm us but now there's i do think he's minding his own business driving his car. These very hard to have the negative in that. Yeah so yeah..

Anne exousia stein Millbury ferries texas johnson ryan craig davidson miami america mazda
"hume" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

05:51 min | 3 months ago

"hume" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"Put music. How am like now when a guy owns ten a offers. I would imagine at that point yet. Oh yeah definitely. And i think it just it just. Didn't i think i've done that for so long and it just didn't want to do that anymore. So of park that with the girls and that was that. And i wanted to do something that was really may and teddy's always been that. So yeah did it. Keep also i guess maybe it kept stays in your mind. It obvious sacred. I suppose yeah maybe i just think i was kind of happy with its success that we had all that we did shaved and the thought of doing it on my own. When i wasn't really at that point kind of pose. And i was kind of happy that we had we always hence why we did. It wasn't long into go back and do that. Same thing and do the same circuit by myself. I was just really excited. About sort of a fresh endeavoring something. It's it speaks of paying attention and actually trusting yourself. So i'm curious and i love my guests this but is there somebody who instilled that sense of self in like a role model or mentor. Who taught you to trust what you think i mean. I suppose my mom in the sense of like she. She raised us on her own and she was very. She's always very much been ninety nine. You live once you got there and get what you want. And she's always been she also been the kind of you know she's never which i really admire. Actually she's my mom's single now and she's dating. Which kind of freaks me out. 'cause she tells me everything but she's been like when we were younger. You know she could have stayed with my dad you know. She wouldn't have been happy but she could have done for the sake of us but she kind of taught me what respect was really young age because she was not happy in this situation she was very open and very frank about it and always been that way. She doesn't feel right and situation. You know life's too short to be stuck in a situation that you don't want to be and she was very much like you know i'm still going to be a good mom and my kids but i don't defined being a good mom stein with the other parent if it doesn't mean yeah because that reflects on your children so it was always kind of brought up that way so think might be that innocence of like nodding was right for you. She always knew what was right for her. So i guess not doing what other people. We'd expect you to do what you should do. Exactly exactly do you have a. This is a funny word. should i've come to really toxic word. The i suppose is a and i think everyone is so obviously everyone's individual an every story is different and i'm really not down for so of govern with you know going with what you should be because really what should anyone be doing. And that's the beauty of where we are in the world. Now like this this so much change and you can be who you on. You can be gender-neutral embiid. Skull like that's okay. Now that happens so. I think it's only a positive is an apple. Yeah you have. I would describe is quite an entrepreneurial spirit because when you go through what you do fashion beauty that you have beauty right and it's like yeah. I know it's crazy is now. You seem to do everything that you seem to do. The things that a lot of people talk about. That's always been mayor. I don't just talk about it. Mike i want to do it. I'm not one of those people. That are done that a couple of years ago when i was talking about it for so long because someone else might have done it or you know always of on the okay. That's that's best as always my. That's my drive. I come have nothing. Not so different pies but i just find it. That's sort of what sort of gets me going. I love that. I love the chris christie behind it and i just think yeah i just like i said i just think you have more than one. Passion is okay to kind of be passionate about lots of different things. Is it learning as well do you like. Do you like constantly testing yourself and learning new things. Yeah boys and i think life is that and i think you just have to. I think is important to keep your brain active when you're comfortable in one thing you know exactly what you're doing and you not exactly. I think it's always good to be kept on your toes. What's the thing that kept you on your toes. The most you think it's a very good question. I think life generally keith ties. I think i've got two kids which i'm constantly like learning hair. Just dial eight just daily lesson. So i i would say to children into being wear different ages and they lived completely different lives of the two yard and a six year old and just by different everything. I thought i learned about being a the first time around. I know nothing with my job because different sites like parents alive again. I love that Absolutely all that. It's unpredictable as well. So yeah with the amount that you do I imagine that must be quite bit planning in place. Yeah i mean. I have a really good group. Who kind of is not. Just may atl and a lot of the time. They're chasing me for you know. Can you do this day. Could i just did not like that yet. Because i was sports diane somebody else was going on then i forgot time and then i was back at work the next day so i think there's a lot of like unquiet person jimmy knife and but yeah i..

teddy stein keith ties chris christie apple Mike jimmy knife
U.N. Investigators Help Yazidis In Iraq Find Bodies Of Loved Ones Killed By ISIS

All Things Considered

06:44 min | 3 months ago

U.N. Investigators Help Yazidis In Iraq Find Bodies Of Loved Ones Killed By ISIS

"Region of Iraq. It has now been six years since the ISIS genocide against the ancient ancient Yazidi Yazidi religious religious minority. minority. And And yet yet survivors survivors are are still still trying trying to to find find bodies bodies of of their their loved loved ones. ones. To To that that end, end, U. U. N. N. Investigators Investigators began began X X Hume Hume ng ng a a mass grave in October, MPR's Jane Arraf was there. In the village of Solo yellow tape ropes off what used to be a fish farm attached to a technical college laborers and investigators dressed in white suits and masks. Carefully digging and sifting through the Pachter as I walk up to take a closer look at one of the man is shoveling the dirt into this big rectangular sifter and then Fine pieces of dirt come out, and he flips the gravel over. The other one is now going through it by hand, trying to make sure that they don't miss any of the bones. Investigators have found at least 17, mass graves so far in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq. Things. One is known as the mother's grave, and it's believed to contain the remains of dozens of pregnant and the older women. Isis decided it didn't have any use for Including the mother of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Nadia Murad. And game ideas. I would frosty Sarah Holly in all areas born on this land, but in bigger Snus is her brother Side. Murad is among the Yazidis who have come here in 2014. Isis rounded up and shot almost all the men and older boys. And they're morons Village of coach. Oh, Sayid was wounded Overlooked among all the bodies he managed to escape. He could have moved to Europe is a refugee, but he doesn't want to leave this land where there's been so much tragedy, or did they come in? I shall remember of vision. And now for the dish they come up with. That number was born. I come and get you if you're not getting my mother was the most peaceful, charitable person in the world. If she saw a poor person and we had only one piece of bread, she would cut it into half and give it to him. No idea, And I didn't get enough time to spend with her. We needed to have her with us longer. He takes off his dark sunglasses and wipes tears from his eyes as he body movement quotes whatever he's in all of Green uniform, a fighter now Thea's Edie paramilitary forces here in Sinjar, it's taken years even begin to exhumed bodies to identify them. Some will likely never be found. Sayid returned here after US backed Kurdish forces drove Isis out. It was a year after the massacre, and some the remains were still lying on the ground. They got hot demand. Mama, where a ditty Rusty and Beef Acela's when they came back, and so this I was very depressed because I could see their clothes, some bones. They all disappeared. I don't know who took them. Maybe animals got them or some group of people took them away. When we came back after that, we didn't see their bones. People leaves that, along with his mother's body. The grave contains the bodies of his aunts and his uncles and cousins, wives against the backdrop of so much horror and loss. The only consolation for many of the survivors has to be able to find the remains of their loved ones and bury them properly. A community center still under construction in the village of coach Joe Yazidis have gathered to give DNA's samples. The International Commission of Missing Persons based in The Hague started working to identify victims and mass graves in Bosnia. 1996. There's still not done there. It will likely take years here is well. Woz Abdullah Bas, the commission's deputy Iraq director walks me through the process we start. Take the information. Take it. In our record. There is any missing formation. After that, we shift Do the second table just on here. He would give a blood sample. Ideally, each missing persons with $3 on it's better to be, you know, Close one. So mother, Father Sir. Planes. You know, parents, six year

Sinjar Hume Hume Ng Ng Jane Arraf Nadia Murad Sarah Holly Isis Iraq Sayid Pachter Murad Thea Europe Joe Yazidis International Commission Of Mi Green Woz Abdullah Bas The Hague United States
College football games canceled or postponed because of the coronavirus

CBS Sports Radio

00:16 sec | 4 months ago

College football games canceled or postponed because of the coronavirus

"Top ranked Alabama who had a road date with LS Hume. Games featuring Number five Texas A and M, but number 12, Georgia also moved back. The Aggie is we're going to be at Tennessee and the Bulldogs were scheduled to head to Mizzou. The virus canceling third Rank. Ohio State's visit to Maryland

Hume Alabama Aggie Texas Georgia Bulldogs Tennessee Mizzou Ohio State Maryland
Are Beans a Protein or Carbohydrate?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:48 min | 4 months ago

Are Beans a Protein or Carbohydrate?

"Hello and welcome to the nutrition. Diva podcast. i'm your host monterey nagel and in this episode. i'm going to answer. The eternal question are being of protein or carbohydrate food. Vegetarians and vegans lean pretty hard on beans as a source of protein. And even those of us who sometimes eat meat but also enjoy plant based meals will often build our meat free meals around some sort of legume and that's because they contain more protein per serving than most other plant foods but the nutritional profile of legumes is very different from animal protein sources eggs meat fish and chicken get anywhere from fifty to ninety five percent of their calories from protein with the rest usually coming from fat leg. Hume's on the other hand only get about a quarter of their calories from protein and the rest is mostly carbohydrate. Soybeans are a bit of an exception being higher in both protein and fat and lowering carbohydrate than other legumes. Peanuts which are technically legumes are another exception. They're even higher in fat than soybeans and lower in protein than most beans. Perhaps because of this peanuts are generally categorized as nuts for the purposes of dietary guidelines despite their botanical classification. So can you get enough protein from beans well. Although we think of beans as being a protein food the truth is that they provide a lot less protein per serving and per calorie than animal proteins. A three ounce serving of cooked chicken breast for example provides about twenty six grams of protein and about one hundred and sixty calories. The standard serving size for beans is a half of cup of cooked beans and that provides just eight grams of protein for around one hundred twenty calories so we would need to eat a lot more beans to get the same amount of protein as we get from meet. It would take two cups of black beans. That's about four hundred and eighty calories to get the same amount of protein as you'd get from three quarters of a cup of chicken breast for example so for every gram of protein and beans. You're also taking in about three grams of carbohydrate and a lot more calories now although beans are relatively high in carbs these are some of the healthiest types of carbs. The carbohydrate portion of beans is a combination of fiber and starch but about half of the starch in beans is actually what we refer to as resistant starch that means it resists digestion and absorption in the small intestine and goes on to function much like fiber in the gut the fiber and the resistant starch in beans feed the beneficial bacteria in the gut. They promote regularity they helped to modulate our blood sugar response to food. They also increase our satiafaction and society after meals helping us feel full with fewer calories. Perhaps that's why people who eat. More beans generally have healthier body weights and lower waist. Circumference beans also contain fido sterols. These are plant compounds that are shaped so similarly to cholesterol that they can occupy the cholesterol receptors in ourselves and regular being consumption is linked with better cholesterol profiles. So beans have a lot going for them. But let's talk about how they fit into your diet because when we build a meal around beans instead of meat which is a great idea. We may need to make some other adjustments to our plates because beans contain both protein and starch. It might make sense to reduce other sources of starch to compensate for that. So if you're having black-eyed peas instead of blackened catfish for dinner. Perhaps you skip the bread or the potatoes. Beans and rice of course are a classic combination in part because of the complementary amino acid profile. But you could have a smaller portion of rice with your beans instead of half a cup of beans and a cup of rice. For example you could switch the proportions on that double up on the beans ordered to bump up the protein and reduce the rice to half a cup and keep in. Mind that if you're trying to match the protein content that you'd get from meet. You may not have as many calories to spend on other foods due to the extra calories that are riding along with that plant to protein.

Hume
Are Beans a Protein or Carbohydrate?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:33 min | 4 months ago

Are Beans a Protein or Carbohydrate?

"Hello and welcome to the nutrition. Diva podcast. i'm your host monterey nagel and in this episode. i'm going to answer. The eternal question are being of protein or carbohydrate food. Vegetarians and vegans lean pretty hard on beans as a source of protein. And even those of us who sometimes eat meat but also enjoy plant based meals will often build our meat free meals around some sort of legume and that's because they contain more protein per serving than most other plant foods but the nutritional profile of legumes is very different from animal protein sources eggs meat fish and chicken get anywhere from fifty to ninety five percent of their calories from protein with the rest usually coming from fat leg. Hume's on the other hand only get about a quarter of their calories from protein and the rest is mostly carbohydrate. Soybeans are a bit of an exception being higher in both protein and fat and lowering carbohydrate than other legumes. Peanuts which are technically legumes are another exception. They're even higher in fat than soybeans and lower in protein than most beans. Perhaps because of this peanuts are generally categorized as nuts for the purposes of dietary guidelines despite their botanical classification. So can you get enough protein from beans well. Although we think of beans as being a protein food the truth is that they provide a lot less protein per serving and per calorie than animal proteins. A three ounce serving of cooked chicken breast for example provides about twenty six grams of protein and about one hundred and sixty calories. The standard serving size for beans is a half of cup of cooked beans and that provides just eight grams of protein for around one hundred twenty calories so we would need to eat a lot more beans to get the same amount of protein as we get from meet. It would take two cups of black beans. That's about four hundred and eighty calories to get the same amount of protein as you'd get from three quarters of a cup of chicken breast for example so for every gram of protein and beans. You're also taking in about three grams of carbohydrate and a lot more calories now although beans are relatively high in carbs these are some of the healthiest types of carbs. The carbohydrate portion of beans is a combination of fiber and starch but about half of the starch in beans is actually what we refer to as resistant starch that means it resists digestion and absorption in the small intestine and goes on to function much like fiber in the gut the fiber and the resistant starch in beans feed the beneficial bacteria in the gut. They promote regularity they helped to modulate our blood sugar response to food. They also increase our satiafaction and society after meals helping us feel full with fewer calories. Perhaps that's why people who eat. More beans generally have healthier body weights and lower waist. Circumference beans also contain fido sterols. These are plant compounds that are shaped so similarly to cholesterol that they can occupy the cholesterol receptors in ourselves and regular being consumption is linked with better cholesterol profiles. So beans have a lot going for them. But let's talk about how they fit into your diet because when we build a meal around beans instead of meat which is a great idea. We may need to make some other adjustments to our plates because beans contain both protein and starch. It might make sense to reduce other sources of starch to compensate for that. So if you're having black-eyed peas instead of blackened catfish for dinner. Perhaps you skip the bread or the potatoes. Beans and rice of course are a classic combination in part because of the complementary amino acid profile. But you could have a smaller portion of rice with your beans instead of half a cup of beans and a cup of rice. For example you could switch the proportions on that double up on the beans ordered to bump up the protein and reduce the rice to half a cup

Hume
How Much Alcohol Is Too Much

Food for Thought

02:27 min | 5 months ago

How Much Alcohol Is Too Much

"Many start stopped to consider how much we're drinking and in lots of cases it can be more than we realize. It can often be that trip to the doctor that forces you to really think about how much you consuming we come week for some. This might just be the realization that you're actually drinking in excess with a reliance on alcohol that you didn't even know really existed. This week's food for thought, sees myself a mental health, `Nice Mark Himes who specializes in substance misuse delve into alcohol and addiction to explore how it can change us and what we can do to prevent this from happening. Had No mark aloke morning good morning we are recording this at the feels like the crack of dawn to me to be on mark but. The conversation we're about to have. Probably some people would associate. She thinks star typically with the evening habits but actually for some, it could be all day long. So we know that the health implications of drinking alcohol. A pretty strong. Would it be better for us all on a whole if we were just Tito till Question and we. If we look at it if alcohol yet, another alcohol is a highly. Kelsey GENYK. alcon council, another is linked to sixty different medical conditions. There's always balances while about being humid and looking into experiences were social creatures and some people alcohol plays a really important part in. So in a in a way alcohol. Can just talk modern personal life is the I wouldn't have met my wife I. We probably wouldn't have had my three children without the aid of alcohol. Out The hourly sheet is hume is very complex. We we've been probably doing it from from Vive Aleutians. So it's actually say we'll get rid of this substance Then that's that's that's not going to happen and he's supposed to be aware over that. Really is the people that we should ban it. You know if alcohol was new substances coming out, would bonnet that that's pretty true by actually hasn't we've grown up around it. You know the way that we process alcohol. Way With evolved. Because we've been living side by side with it. And you know throughout I'll. Recycle.

Tito Mark Himes Vive Aleutians Kelsey Genyk. Hume
"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

04:48 min | 5 months ago

"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Which a lot of people have been asking. About the election and whatever look a lot of people don't want to vote for Biden in. Trump is a fascist so. Biden's not a great pick I prefer when people just be honest my preferred thing would be. Elect Biden and the first day of his the days and. The biggest protests in the history of America? Whatever you think. It comes on it it should come down to this cove Vida's here. Trump is trying to. Have heard immunity and he's GonNa kill. -ality he's GonNa kill a Shitload of fucking people and those paper of vulnerable people. Those people are largely. Minorities in America and they're old people and they're sick people. That's a Nazis, dream. So. So I would say you know both for Biden and. And then. and. Then fucking protested leading living shit out of the guy and make sure every person in this country who thinks he's an awesome awesome president. Knows that we don't have is back and we're going to make him or at least try to make him do the right thing it'd be doesn't we'll make life a living fucking hell because we don't have time anymore and we don't have time for climate change. We don't have time for anything and then well, the truth is we don't have time for Biden but we really don't have time for sure. We'd have time for trump and look. I. Don't like the fact that the Democrats have no plan for what trump does if he loses and that's that could be the greatest accelerate that ever happened in America but you know you gotta you. GotTa. I get people have a lot of problems with by and they're right. Not a lot of it but cova. WELL IS KILLING The weakest among us in the most vulnerable amongst us, and that's what you need to think about. And that's Biden does have a plan for it and I'm sorry but any. Any monster would have a plan for it. We just happen to have the fucking one monster that doesn't like it's What trump is doing is extraordinary. So. I even Biden even if you don't like him at his worst, he'll do a better job. Than I look. I. Mean I truly there. There's also there's nothing worse than when you're falling in line with the stupidity that has been the Democratic Party and the selection process and you're getting voters shamed still. The idea of I think everything you said is is right I mean I it's unfortunate that every election in my lifetime has been a choice between the lesser of two evils and that you are told that you cannot huge just half to fall line and do it, and then you do and you keep getting shittier choices every four years and and then the process it's become normal now voter shame people become normalized to say what are you stupid you like it's like this it's so ass backwards the way that it works now that you. You now have to have voters sell you on why not vote for the other politician that's just not a system that it's just not supposed to be that there's supposed to be somebody who makes you want to vote and we've completely lost sight of that and I think to your point like. Yeah it it's time for that to change and really there's only one. person you can actually probably changed that under because it's not total fascism. So all right. All Right Take Care Asshole you fuck off. Son of a bitch..

Biden Trump America president cova Democratic Party
"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

03:36 min | 5 months ago

"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Meli cocktail. Through at least a dozen violent storms of despair day. Yeah. There you go. Yeah. He moved to house. That's right the Moon House with three other Dupont chemists. And it became a nicknamed whiskey acres Oh. My Lord. Okay. We're experimenting with some chemicals in the House as well. His roommates were active, but he didn't take part quote. I'm living out in the country now with three other bachelors and they being socially inclined have all gone out in tall hats and white ties while I after my ancient custom sit sullenly at home. Can't put on a top hat and a white T to. He could do that and just sit at home. I've done that. Yeah I know then you sit in a chair and just go. Now what? At this point, he showed one of his roommates that he had a capsule of cyanide on his watch chain. Oh. My God Jesus Christ. Got The time. Sort of. With the Great Depression happening Dupont started pushing him to work on stuff that would make money. And The depression caused his his college his father worked out too close. So his parents came to live with them. Okay sure. Wallace was not thrilled quote I. Not only don't have any affection for my father, but I find it exasperatingly and sometimes sickening merely to be in his presence. Well, this ought to help everything. I get I get that you completely. got a sickening to be in your presence. He ended the affair with the married woman mostly under pressure from workers and his parents and friends, and this is spot. So everybody. Everybody, but she was getting a divorce the whole time so. It's like, so that could be a girlfriend. Yeah. But it's a different time where she's still technically married. So you're not supposed to but. It had been the best relationship of his life and he really started hitting the bottle his parents moved out. Beside him hating his father tension had built because of the affair. So they left and went back to des Moines in early nineteen, thirty four. K.. Now. Around this time Dupont pushed him to look at fibers again. And so he he went for it and he got his assistance all the job but this is exactly when his mental health issues over him. A coworker quote it was rather strange. You would. You would be a normal conversation back and forth, and then suddenly he would become silent and have a blank look on his face looking at me and not moving not saying a word no facial expression. The first time it happened at upset me I, thought he'd had a heart attack. Okay. So this guy also doesn't like it's a heart attack. Yeah, usually, if someone just goes of. Comatose staring at me I think heart attack Ariz pump his chest quick get oxygen into it. Can't pause around this guy. My. Heart attack? Also. You. Know he also he he he has been. He definitely was seeing a psychiatrist..

Dupont Moon House Meli cocktail des Moines Wallace
"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

03:55 min | 5 months ago

"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"I can understand as Mr see appeared mean spirited thin nose close together cold grey is so he's just like well look he's a fucking monster but I liked that we give him the happy days finds e treatment. Hey, Mr seat. Big douchebag with like one one gray cyclops I in the middle of his ED, which is still Mr c can't you tell you son does a love you? Do you think anybody in their twenties seen happy days or like we'll be like, US watching old black and white shows. Probably? Not. Probably, not even of curiosity but I only know I own. I only know happy days from. Most shows that I know. Like that are older from from nickelodeon. So right maybe like that's just yeah. That's my parents argued I watched every episode of Taxi. His graduates, rumors tears had graduated, and then the two of them snuck out to celebrate, and that is when Wallis had his very first drink. We go now your American. That'd be something he enjoyed very much. Okay. Okay. A former student Arthur party now ran the chemistry department and Wallace found love with tiny basement lab at the school. He finished his chemistry curriculum in his junior year and party left for another job. So the college. Had Wallace become the chemistry instructor when he was still a senior Okay that's quite an interesting move. His. going. To be great I'm going to be grading and teaching myself to. Well, can you imagine you're in? You're in a class the guy next year you're like, Hey, man you on his study. Study for the test teacher and mentor. Then you go to the next class and he's and he's like teaching. That's literally what would be like yeah. That's like I told you. I told you one time when I was eleven. My mother hired a twelve year old to babysit me. and. I was like this is absolutely insane. He taught Cam for two years and actually had to delay graduation a year because he was so busy teaching. Okay So he graduates in Nineteen Twenty, eight, twenty, four. Now at this time, American chemists are not really thought much of in America. German. Chemist dominates before Pfizer okay. That's right. Right, right? Yeah. Right. I remember reading about that. German communists chemist dominant everything everything for a while and American American chemists just a huge drop down American chemists are ranked. By which German professor they got their post. DOC Under in Europe. Okay. So it's not even it's not even how good you are. It's like which German did you study at her right right? And so Americans depend on just German chemicals aspirin die like everything is a German based right but then World War Two comes and that's it breaks on Germany. Suddenly American chemistry is rising up. But at this point when Wallace graduates, which is when it's rising up. He's a guy with no money and he's got a degree from. College, Right. So. Yeah. So he goes to the University of Illinois to try to get a doctorate degree in chemistry. And the professor in charge of the program he's like a hot shit guy that God's that's a really good program Doug Hot. Shit. His name Oh. Did I say it? Does it..

Wallace Mr seat Arthur party professor US Germany America Pfizer Cam nickelodeon Wallis University of Illinois Europe Doug Hot instructor aspirin
"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

03:32 min | 5 months ago

"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Who died for you. Stop Gareth Stop It. That's too specific for this. Very specifically I don't like that he's specific. No, that's too much weight. I do not want that weight. Suck it up. That's one of the Jesus famous. Sang's suck it up. Uses remember everyone suck it up. Quick being pussies. Jesus. Get over here. He he came out pretty hard. Yeah. When he came out from the rock three days later and he was like stumbling surly y'all don't even know anymore. Wallace Hume carruthers was born in Burlington Iowa. As young boy, he was very into tools mechanical devices. That's a dangerous to start at the recipe for a dollar. That's fine. That's little lines like that Dave when I did this I go okay. He's crafty works with hey, it's work should now I'm like Oh, man, this dude is going to cause some trouble. He began experimenting he and his friends formed a sort of engineering club with the headquarters in an old barn behind the others house. Share what? A what a great age kill. They wired things like they take something that didn't have a battery powdered and add wires they. The work with coils. School, he was super into chemistry. This dark his father knowing walls interest. In invention, an expiration pushed him to go to a local college to learn shorthand and bookkeeping. Right says father as I put real crafty, pretty good with electronics. You should write things down on cards. That should be what you do boy soon, I've tried to church your your gift. No. No I believe in your son. Now, what's your favorite thing to do? I like to. Tinker with electronics and just sort of chemistry stuff going to be a library in. No doubt I said I'd like to be librarian. You'll work with books all the time that I've spent in the barn, and that'll be your life. I made a robot we'll bring you little robot. Maybe can help you stack the shelves of the return books and Organiz. The pile of ones that are supposed to go out and keep an eye on the late fee San. Why you've got a skill set, that's perfectly applicable for. Librarian ship. Perfect is there something you wanted to say no I'm fine. Good. Don't because in a library you're not going to be able to follow that impulse. So Sh sh. Think it. Would always say think things. His father happen to be the vice president of the college that he was going to learn shorthand and bookkeeping. Okay. The capital city Commercial College. So that's where he goes. He goes there for I think a year he finished in July. Nineteen. Fifteen And His dad then made a deal with the Presbyterian minister send walls to Tarquinio, college in Missouri which was a Presbyterian College. Wow. Great. Perfect they. The revel. Technology and things like that. That goes great there. So the deal the dad made is that. Go to the college he would work part time and that would cover. Tuition and then studied English that would be as Major..

vice president Jesus city Commercial College Wallace Hume carruthers Dave Sang Burlington Organiz Iowa San Tarquinio Missouri
Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:30 min | 6 months ago

Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

"Earlier today. European Commission President Ursula von Delaying gave her first State of the Union address to the European. Parliament. It's fair to say that it has been and will be more closely scrutinized than the setpiece usually is the EU is beset like the rest of the world by an ongoing pandemic and associated economic turbulence, and also attempting to ease the United Kingdom out of the block with as little damage to the fixtures and fittings as possible and the UK's latest history on x over the last week or so demonstrate that this remains an unsolved problem while joined with more Bite Niamey Leery Europe correspondent at the Irish Times. Niamey before we talk about the details of what Slovan delay and had to say, did it strike you? There was an overall theme or tone she was swinging for I. Think it was quite striking. Future focused. She talked about how can we get out of the Democrats economic repercussions in a way that says. The continent for the future. So it was very much to do with tying together the various different goals whether that's a climate and economic development where increasing digitalization on. Also a one section of her speech, which I thought was particularly strong was on discrimination and efforts at kind of acknowledging the reality in the block of racism and discrimination. Based on sexual orientation or religious beliefs. So it was quite wide ranging and then the other aspect of it was. She proposed making it easier for the EU to come up with common policy when it comes to international relations particularly on matters relating to human rights sanctions. So just as a liberation on that idea of general tone this being her first state of the Union as as commission president does it does it seem that we understand what her idea of the European Union is. I think she Saturday as being. A sort of an unfinished project what it ought to be somewhere where people can have a quality of life get paid fairly for work have social protections that you're does better on that than other parts of the world, and that's part of the reason why able better able to weather the pandemic but that it's not enough and she said that there would be a new framework introduced to. Member states to set minimum wages in order to make work pay property. Then an in addition to that there was the The section on discrimination which I think was unusual in acknowledged the struggles in the block in terms of she mentioned a particular discrimination against Rome people on also the LGBTQ I free zones in. Poland or she called out as inhumane. And so I think she's she was quite strong meticulous division of the block as being a place where people and live more freely with rights and have a better quality of life in general but I think that she also you know it's it's. It's quite telling that she. She had. Many. Difficulties take me in terms of international relations they were for her to talk about it was difficult relationship with Russia difficult relationship with China difficult relationship with the United States difficult relationship Britain as well. Well, let's talk about some of those difficult relationships and because we are here broadcasting from London let's talk about the difficult relationship. The now has with the UK did brexit get much of a mention? She did mention us. So she said that with every day that passes it becomes more difficult for deal to be reached and she also said that. The EU would stand by with the agreement would never at go back on its the an agreement that had been passed by the European Parliament Anheuser Commons and that had been jointly agreed by the UK Andy you to Protect citizen's rights but also she said first and foremost the Good Friday Agreement on the department and it was quite interesting as well to know that she she also quote the late John Hume, the Nobel laureate. And former SDLP leader from dairy and she said that she described him as one of the Great Europeans. And mentioned that he he recently passed away on us used a quote from him to kind of talk about the strength of diversity which I thought was quite. An interesting use of quotes. It was notable high. She was sort of writing in that story, which is I suppose a Northern Irish story really into this story of the European Union. You mentioned the difficulty of the relationship with Russia and obviously the country of which us live underlying walls defense minister. Germany has found itself once again. On the front line over that relationship having taken in the apparently poisoned opposition politician Alexei Navalny did she took you light any kind of? Way of how the e you can live alongside Russia. She was quite I thought her words were quite firm on Russia's so she said. That the poison she mentioned the poisoner Nevada and said that it wasn't a one sauce and she said, no. Number of gas, pipelines is GONNA. Is GonNa fix that relationship she also am I thought spoke quite in quite heartfelt way in solidarity with the people of Belarus Moore she said that they'd be brave and gone out on the streets and they should have the they shouldn't be pieces on someone else's chessboard what she said, but they should have the ability to determine their own future. You said at the top of this item that she attempted to link the recovery. Well, hopeful eventual recovery from the pandemic the associated economic problems to broader themes of climate in the future on climate in particular. Did she have anything of note to say. So. What? What under nine has proposed that the target for the block to reduce emissions should be increased fifty five percent by twenty thirty, that's compared to a previous commitment to forty percent. This is compared to nine thousand, nine, hundred levels of emissions, and she said that this would be vital in order for the block to reach its Paris Agreement commitments on also its goal of becoming climate neutral by twenty fifty on the way she she described the landmark agreement of the e you to join me borrow seven, hundred, fifty, billion, euro. As an opportunity to do this by directing at least thirty percent or thirty seven percent of the investment towards green initiatives. So things like development of green hydrogen. Renovating homes with. Forty percent of emissions and also. Increasing the car charging network electric vehicle charging that things like that an while this could go in. With kind of digital developments there. For example, at fast broadband were available continent wide including in rural areas that would both alive for rural development but also for things like you know people to work from home more easily and things like that. So she she s she she argued that these things could go hand in hand essentially. But Green groups have been quick to come out and say that fifty five percent of the target isn't enough now some of them had themselves called for that in the. In the past but I guess with the scale of the disaster that they say we're facing, you know they're always going to want to push for more and more ambitious targets

European Union Poland President Trump European Commission United Kingdom Ursula Von Delaying Slovan UK Sdlp Alexei Navalny European Parliament Anheuser C London The Irish Times Germany Rome Nevada Russia
"hume" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

09:16 min | 6 months ago

"hume" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"Not. But it's just that's the one I'm Radio Wax Mike Aponte is here is my best friend as well. Inches mature at like probably about ten years ago and I've like not. So strides since. Oil. And then yeah, I could really good hammer him skin the minute I swear description de I just think like downtime for me just means Spice Mosque hammer and just trying to coffey a south of Nice make one in spokes which just smells like holiday. Yet, but you need united just not. So black. Tropical Payment Calorie Every time he's on July. Yeah just think it's just I'm rainy in the like. Self Chasm divides. Yeah As, you can relay obviously like. Myself carries always done between in and around the kids. So it's kind of like up ahead, us. And then new two days later I'm not really. Wanted. She's nice and so but probably because it's been in for longer than he was supposed to be. The Yeah I just think as soon as you all like. It's nice to just feel properly office net. Hundred percent I think everyone discovered a love affair smalls during lockdown or at least doing something different something well as was like. You doing that I'm GonNa kill and not always. I put the arrived new am. The new Polish my box went actually. Think GATT nude policies. The best it's not Track Guy The guy when I got Nash they can you need something different die? Basically like you say boy. Oh try something else look down on the artist we go out to heighten is it snowed and so yeah look down us all into like hair color s manicure it's. Everything chefs. Movie House. The day. Like, we let all these new skills that we didn't have before. Yeah yeah, it was definitely A. Friend of mine who recently the great accelerator. Go to really put your foot down and go in a particular direction. How's your How's the way you've talked to your skin change during your pregnancy? Today. Well, it's really. It's really like maintenance in pregnant. Say I, they talk about this glove that you got a man. I just find that that doesn't happen for a while because. I get morning sickness and then I've liked up pressure on them out blow I. Always Dream. So I, was you never see. A have ninety S is. The broadcast minimal, and for me, it's just a massive breakout classes but I mean is lacob to do a lot more to keep it. So. Why but yeah, it's really low maintenance impertinence as handy, which is hand I mean about the only thing that is will there. Yeah. And then which leads quite nicely onto one of your other habits which is about. Doing facials. Yeah. Honestly they come around him assist isn't the first thing that Must Be. What was it that in a and I love like? I've I've let Saimaa I've said Lucky and what really pay Paul and a really good guy acquisition Kepa and that does the most fabulous frazier's these at she goes on brand. Defects Mosque. and. So, we're really lucky over the years to like tight-lip nuggets from people that I. Love Like I will actually do my proper fight show. And they like you need to have some extraction. Find it Seifan attracted it to Marvin and he just gets Brady stressors May. Stop picking. He's really yeah. You're selling. So I tried to wrestle him to like might please. Let me help. But he doesn't like it so much. So when my sisters come a really. Guy Freight them because they'll let me and then I can. Do you going for the whole thing you do it like a good proper hour-long spa face. They liked back half the I. Could do a proper place you. Honestly I would really like to do that if this wasn't my job. I. Think. Yeah. I find it really therapeutic. Weighty Day really I think you can really see the difference after. And I only say people must think I like to for seventy different skincare brand. Just I'm not selling them. I promise you I'm non-commission. I just really like them. What's what? What do you have? Any particular favorites? If. I've got a lot of different scientific thanks mass yet today and I am a kills one in my box, which is enough which is. Really hot writing anything hydrates. Nothing is good and I think I don't think. Over say if you if your skin split up also is good too hard drive say I think. Sometimes what happens an anonymous from financial specialist? If you if you get breakout sometimes you think. That, you should start your skin dry skin out because you've had a breakout but actually. A lot of the time because you're doing that your skin them produces oil, which then gets trapped and then you get, we know the the the bumps and stuff even more side. So I think the Hydroxy Moss I think it's as it says hydrated and I would always pick up that mosque. Yeah there's a difference moisture in the skin and oil miskin. And Oil is what you want. But meisters always. Yeah always sounds like, yeah. Maybe maybe need to rise up your facial protocol caroline. He Eh. It'd be too much. That's why they sometimes up just found this newport. I also feel like if you've had a good if you've ever had a good facial don t there's something about you but I've wanted to then use those same sort of muscles techniques on someone else I never I love which again, I put in my box I've done it in my previous box as well but just purely convinces brilliant. The J.J. Roller. I will say in front of ten A and I will just run. Into that count me out anyway. And I love it. So funny my duty was cannot have one of those. So now after the bob she puts, it works strides she likes to have live gut. But I, keep them in my in my back and if we're gonna any start, let when I do this morning I wanted is. On my way in the back of the car I dislike we'll just guy from my is at. Any rate he came to. One side. And, then the. So yeah that's kind of. One of my. Top things the way she as during the heatwave I kept my rose courts one in the fridge and it was a Isn't that. So. So on sign-on you start using on your face and then you're like, it's down your neck. And then needs pretty back in the fridge. 'cause you. Exactly but it's amazing for a minute. Okay and now now onto your final, your final feel-good habit, which is another tasty one. Is another text is a bit by King. Good old fashioned Viking with my kids they love it. I love it if you're having one of them as we alike. Oh. I WANNA tying them but I don't really want to get out got out the house or whatever, and is the perfect thing to do and I just think this sounds really comforting about biking. I. Mean I'm a better cook than I am a by here. Because I find it quite technical as in like the measurements that have to be not quite on. You've left one thing I. IT might sink call. The other might spread too much. So he jeff is definitely more technical find whereas I'm not one of those cooks that will have the put ever come back in tips. I l. said like studying. So. And I just love it as something my kids love at the subsequent in house, but you know just it makes me happy. And there anything is there anything you'll particularly cakes cakes? Bread. Every we did cookies the appetite. and not yet what she really not box again an a what I did.

Spice Mosque Mike Aponte dry skin Nash Kepa jeff Saimaa Seifan newport J.J. Roller Marvin Brady frazier Paul
"hume" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

06:39 min | 7 months ago

"hume" Discussed on What It Takes

"Back in two thousand and two in these interviews took place when the Good Friday agreement was only four years old David Trimble was more cautious than his partner in peace. The IRA had not yet formally up its arms paramilitaries on both sides were laying low but still letting their presence be known. Trimble even had a measured response to their Nobel Peace Prize the Norwegian Nobel. Committee did say to US when we're? Speaking to them that. they liked if they opportunity was there to use the prize constructively to encourage developments that are taking place that they didn't sit and wait until you hardy situation where everything was settled no more problems and then. The award making an award drawing a line over something that's finished the they know that they're acting. Evolving a changing situation I'm glad that they have that tolerance because the what was in my mind when I first heard about the award. Was Nineteen seventy seven the original bell committed awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. To people from northbound. with regard to their efforts to bring about peace. Time. When there was some hope that those efforts would succeed but unfortunately. In the fairly short time after the award was mid. that. Hope died. On the award was made to people who were trying hard no reflection on them personally that had failed but nonetheless, it did feel. In the autumn of Nineteen Ninety Eight. Yes. We've got an agreement quite significant to to get an agreement most significant, but I was fully conscious of the difficulties that would be an implementing agreement on us. The agreement was not guaranteed to succeed. So my first reaction on the award was concerned that history that history should not repeat itself. I didn't want to see nineteen, Ninety, seven, repeat itself onto find the award is made only defined a few months later that the political effort that the award recognizes collapse. That's why I said at the time. I published Coleman was that I hoped that the award would not prove premature. Now in the event I think I'm still on the right side of the line in that respect, and we've managed to keep the process going mid since then but mine Jews, we come to even say that things are definitely settled and resolved at the moment the night before this interview, a policeman's car was booby-trapped with a bomb and the weekend before there was rioting in Belfast since the Good Friday Agreement though. I Roland has been a largely peaceful place and in two thousand and five, the IRA did disband. But to this day, some of the people who reject the terms of the peace known as the dissenters are still armed and in Belfast and Derry and other cities. So called peace walls still stand dividing Catholic and Protestant neighborhoods and just recently the Brexit vote has added another source of uncertainty to the future of Northern, Ireland. But we'll give John Hume the final word on what he saw as one of the key ingredients to unity and to lasting peace throughout the world. Summarized. On the American sent. A Boon written large in the grave of Abraham Lincoln from many. We are one. The of our unity is respect for diversity, and of course, when you consider the finding fathers of the United States were driven of other companies by poverty by famine. By conflict by all of those things and they decided that those things do happen in their new land and that was the philosophy of course when you consider that. The essence of unity is respect for diversity. That's a philosophy of peace for the word. And, of course, the student and me and A. Lot, as a student. Studying but I also think Education. Is Central to the development of any society. Our generation was the first generation. To get full education right through to university level, and that's why even to this very day is I'm talking to you. I've been saying publicly recent months. That One of the things that we should be sending to. Afghanistan. Is Education. When. You look at that, that per country eighty, five percent of its woman can't read or write because we are not allowed to go to school and sixty five percent of the community can read or write because they don't. The only wealth. Listeners. Work. The only wealth that any country has people. People any competition jong-il? It's people who create. And therefore if some new education, their talents and creativity will not be fully developed I believe that education has transformed our society. I wouldn't be sitting here talking to you if it wasn't for education. And an before I grew up, our society was was full of intelligent people who didn't get educated. Very many. Then we're known a street characters. And, we're very humorous people and. I've been asked reason it reviews. Are there any street characters in your city and I say, no, there's not who says, well, we're they're all university professors. That's John Hume who died on August third at the age of eighty three may the champion of peace rest in peace? David Trimble became the first head of Northern Ireland's coalition government following the peace agreement. He now has a lifetime appointment to the House of Lords and as a member of the conservative. Party I'd like to go out with a few words from the Great Irish poet shameless Haney who was a friend of John Hume's these lines are from the poem, the cure at troy and are some of the most quoted in Irish poetry. They are also the perfect tribute to John Hume and David Trimble. History. Don't hope on this side of the grave but then once in a lifetime, the longed for tidal wave of justice can rise up and hope and history rhyme. So hope for great seachange on the far side of revenge. Believe that further shore is reachable from here believe in miracle and cures and healing.

David Trimble John Hume US Belfast House of Lords partner Ireland bell Northern Ireland Coleman Abraham Lincoln Roland Haney Afghanistan Derry troy
"hume" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

07:45 min | 7 months ago

"hume" Discussed on What It Takes

"Historic day at Stormont after two years of talks and after a generation of bloodshed and decades of division after thirty brutal years of violence in Northern Ireland two men from opposing sides had the guts to talk and talk and talk some more they brought others into their talks and finally on Good Friday in nineteen ninety eight, a deal was signed bringing a promise of peace in end to the seemingly endless cycle of attack and retaliation between the Protestants. Loyal to Britain and the Catholics who favored unity with the rest of Ireland. The two men I'm talking about here were John Hume and David Trimble they were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts. Later, that same year well, as you may have read, Mr Hume died earlier this month on August third twenty twenty. Since their interviews with both John Hume and David Trimble in the Academy of Achievements Remarkable Archive we WANNA revisit their story today a story of hope against the odds, a story of what can be accomplished by rather understated people who have a bedrock belief in justice and peace. This is what it takes I'm Alice Winkler. At. This child is gifted. And I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it, you may never have another it. All was so clear. It was just like the pick your started to form itself. There was new wing which ally to prevail over the truth darkness over light their life every day I wake up and decide. Today I'm going to love my life. Decide. Lab Isis if they're going to break a leg or it's when you go on that play, stay out of there, and then along companies differential experiences that you look for you don't plan for. The boy better not miss him. I think that all conflict when you look out. is about the same thing? By difference. Whether differences religion or nationality, or Ritz. Difference when you think of it as an accident burst. None of US chose to be born into any particular race religion or nationality. Therefore it's nothing we should fight about. This is peacemaker John Hume speaking to the academy, of achievement, in Dublin in two thousand. Several years ago in a poll conducted by Irish national television he was voted the greatest single person in the history of Ireland. John Hume was a longtime Irish, Catholic civil rights activist and an advocate of non-violence in the mold of Louis and Martin. Luther King. Junior. At the time of the peace talks, he was also the leader of Northern Ireland's moderate social democratic and Labour Party. David Trimble who will hear from in a few minutes is Protestant and he was leader of the Ulster Unionist Party loyal to Britain differences of the essence of humanity to people in this room. There's not to people in the whole word. And respect for difference therefore. Should be a fundamental principle that has brought right across the word. And of course. When You look at our conflict respect for difference is the first principle of our settlement but. Where you are on the side of the conflict lasted has been going on for three hundred years. But. The worst was last thirty. One, I two, five, hundred people lost their lives. On one fifty was maimed or injured. And that's so series of morals. If. You're too young to remember the troubles as the decades of fighting were called. Here are the broad strokes the Irish. Citizens of Northern Ireland generally Catholics saw the British citizens of Northern Ireland Generally Protestants as their oppressors, an occupying force that had denied their rights beaten down, jailed them without trial and sometimes killed them while they were trying to protest many of the Irish nationalists believed Northern Ireland to reunite with the rest of Ireland and they were willing to take up arms and die. For their cause, the British for their part saw the Irish fighters as terrorists out loss who blew up policemen, soldiers, political figures, and sometimes civilians. It was an impossible task to bring these entrenched sides to the peace table but John Hume and David Trimble weren't cowed by the impossible and they weren't cowed by the intense criticism they suffered or the risk to their careers and the threats on their lives hume talked about what motivated him over a cup of tea in. Dublin with journalists, Gail. For the academy achievement, it was four years after the historic peace agreement had been signed and was approved by Irish voters will I grew up in, of course. and. It was it was the worst example of Northern Ireland's discrimination. the of course, the unionist people wishing to protect their heritage. And their identity and every right to do that. In my opinion because heavy society. Has Diversity and respect for diversity is the central and essential but my thera approach was of course earlier. I called Afrikaner mindset the held all par in their own hands in order to protect themselves in order to ensure. That, the minority in northern iron, which was a Catholic population never became a majority and that widespread discrimination in housing and jobs, and in voting rights, and of course, the worst example of that was the city of Danny where I lived. Seventy. percent of the population of day was from the Catholic community largely nationals people who wanted Irish unity and of course, thirty percent where the Protestant community who unionist but they govern the city. And their system was known as Gerrymander divided the city into three electoral wards. And in one word, there was seventy percent of the people the Catholic population and they elected it. Representatives to the city council. And the other to other districts. which represent thirty percent of the population in each of those districts elected six members. So the unions always had twelve it. Again was ation total ghettoisation because they were in charge of public housing, the local council, and they deliberately located people. In a ghetto situation in order to ensure that the maintain control this meant that there was discrimination not only in housing, but in jobs and my father was unemployed, and of course, he was a very very. Intelligent man and well known as that because when I was a child growing up in our home. I. would be sitting at the table, my homework and my father would be sitting at the table. For. People would be coming in from the district and around the city for him to write their letters does he was a copperplate handwriting and the also knew the whole system.

John Hume Northern Ireland David Trimble Ireland Britain Dublin Ulster Unionist Party Alice Winkler Academy of Achievements Luther King US Labour Party Gerrymander Gail Danny Louis Martin
John Hume, who won Nobel Peace Prize for work to end violence in Northern Ireland, has died at 83

Business Rockstars

00:23 sec | 7 months ago

John Hume, who won Nobel Peace Prize for work to end violence in Northern Ireland, has died at 83

"John Hume, The political leader who won the Nobel Peace Prize for helping bring Peace to Northern Ireland, has died at 83. He passed away early today at a nursing home in Londonderry. Hume was one of Northern Ireland's best known politicians for more than 30 years and played a major role in the peace talks. That led to the Good Friday agreement in 1998 for use radio News. I'm Chris

John Hume Northern Ireland Londonderry Chris
John Hume, who worked to end N. Ireland violence, dies at 83

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

John Hume, who worked to end N. Ireland violence, dies at 83

"Politician John Hume who won the Nobel Peace Prize the look to environments he's native Northern Ireland has died at eighty three the Catholic leader of the moderate social democratic and Labour Party who was seen as the principal architect behind the peace agreement he shared the prize with Protestant lawmaker David Trimble the civil rights leader who joined the northern Irish civil rights movement in the nineteen sixties him soul nationalism as a declining force he said the solution to almonds problems will not be found on the basis of victory for either but on the basis of agreement a partnership between both Charles Taylor this month London

John Hume Northern Ireland Principal Architect David Trimble Charles Taylor London Labour Party
"hume" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:47 min | 9 months ago

"hume" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people events, and even the places that shaped the story of Christianity. This is our story family history. Let's start. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode. We are continuing conversation. We started last week last week. We were talking about David Hume the skeptical Scottish philosopher from the eighteenth century. We're talking about how one of his books. That was very popular in his own day. Eight volume series of books actually history of Great Britain mentions the Westminster standards, and that's an aspect of David Hume that not everybody knows about David, hume the historian well today. We'll talk about that aspect that people do know about David Hume the philosopher as we mentioned, he is known as the father or the founder of skepticism philosophical skepticism. This idea that we really can't know what we know. We can't have certainty. In what we know in one sense were plagued with doubt. Well, one of the reasons hume arrived at this was because of his understanding. Of how we understand experienced in what we can make of experience. Talking about the law of causality here, and how we know that every effect has an equal or greater than costs. This goes back in the history of philosophy back to Aristotle at David Hume question that he said. How can we know we can observe called customary relationships, but how can we know every time in every place that the law of cause and effect works? He concludes you know what we can't. All we can speak of is customary relationships well. David Hume used that to defeat many of the classical arguments for the existence of God namely the cozma logical argument. He also took on the design argument for the existence of God. This comes from one of his books later in his life dialogues, concerning natural religion, and it's set up as a dialogue with various characters in hume uses it to just walk through the arguments in from his perspective. Dismantle them when he gets to the design argument. This is what hume says. The design that we think we see in the world is not really a design. Hume says instead what we see our quote. The chance permutations of particles falling into a temporary or permanent self, sustaining order, which has the appearance of design. And quote well, let's unpack that think about it just for a moment. the human self you as a person, you are ultimately a result of particles falling by chance, and what happens to be a perfect order to allow you to function. That's what hume's argument would demand. It would be like saying. Let's take a five thousand piece puzzle. And let's just throw all of those five thousand pieces into the air. And what will happen by chance? Is that all five? Thousand of those pieces will fall into a perfect place in relationship with each other and form a completed puzzle just like the picture on the box. Well of that all I can say is I think I'm skeptical of what David who is trying to say about this world in which we live the important thing about David Hume is where he falls in the history of ideas he comes. Right in the eighteenth century. As the sciences or maturing and coming into their own in the university. At the same time theology is getting marginalized and religion is getting marginalized. Much of culture, shifting its eyes off of God at the center, and putting their eyes on man at the center, and along comes David. Hume with his epistemology, and his philosophy had a huge influence. In his day, but it had an even greater influence and the centuries to come well. That's David Hume an essayist and historian philosopher. A skeptic. And I'm Steve. Nichols thanks for listening to five minutes in Church history..

David Hume Aristotle Dr Stephen Nicholson Great Britain founder Nichols
David Hume the Philosopher

5 Minutes in Church History

04:47 min | 9 months ago

David Hume the Philosopher

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode. We are continuing conversation. We started last week last week. We were talking about David Hume the skeptical Scottish philosopher from the eighteenth century. We're talking about how one of his books. That was very popular in his own day. Eight volume series of books actually history of Great Britain mentions the Westminster standards, and that's an aspect of David Hume that not everybody knows about David, hume the historian well today. We'll talk about that aspect that people do know about David Hume the philosopher as we mentioned, he is known as the father or the founder of skepticism philosophical skepticism. This idea that we really can't know what we know. We can't have certainty. In what we know in one sense were plagued with doubt. Well, one of the reasons hume arrived at this was because of his understanding. Of how we understand experienced in what we can make of experience. Talking about the law of causality here, and how we know that every effect has an equal or greater than costs. This goes back in the history of philosophy back to Aristotle at David Hume question that he said. How can we know we can observe called customary relationships, but how can we know every time in every place that the law of cause and effect works? He concludes you know what we can't. All we can speak of is customary relationships well. David Hume used that to defeat many of the classical arguments for the existence of God namely the cozma logical argument. He also took on the design argument for the existence of God. This comes from one of his books later in his life dialogues, concerning natural religion, and it's set up as a dialogue with various characters in hume uses it to just walk through the arguments in from his perspective. Dismantle them when he gets to the design argument. This is what hume says. The design that we think we see in the world is not really a design. Hume says instead what we see our quote. The chance permutations of particles falling into a temporary or permanent self, sustaining order, which has the appearance of design. And quote well, let's unpack that think about it just for a moment. the human self you as a person, you are ultimately a result of particles falling by chance, and what happens to be a perfect order to allow you to function. That's what hume's argument would demand. It would be like saying. Let's take a five thousand piece puzzle. And let's just throw all of those five thousand pieces into the air. And what will happen by chance? Is that all five? Thousand of those pieces will fall into a perfect place in relationship with each other and form a completed puzzle just like the picture on the box. Well of that all I can say is I think I'm skeptical of what David who is trying to say about this world in which we live the important thing about David Hume is where he falls in the history of ideas he comes. Right in the eighteenth century. As the sciences or maturing and coming into their own in the university. At the same time theology is getting marginalized and religion is getting marginalized. Much of culture, shifting its eyes off of God at the center, and putting their eyes on man at the center, and along comes David. Hume with his epistemology, and his philosophy had a huge influence. In his day, but it had an even greater influence and the centuries to come well. That's David Hume an essayist and historian philosopher. A skeptic.

David Hume Aristotle Great Britain Founder
15-year-old arrested after man shot, killed during robbery attempt outside Buckhead apartment complex, Atlanta

Clark Howard

00:16 sec | 10 months ago

15-year-old arrested after man shot, killed during robbery attempt outside Buckhead apartment complex, Atlanta

"Atlanta police arrested a fifteen year old and expect to make even more arrests in the murder of thirty five year old Kevin Humes Humes who normally took uber decided to walk to his apartment because of the corona virus that's where he was gunned down during a robbery attempt outside of his

Murder Kevin Humes Humes Atlanta Robbery
Trump mocks Biden for wearing a face mask

John Howell

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

Trump mocks Biden for wearing a face mask

"Trump today mocked Joe Biden after Biden appeared in public wearing a mask on Memorial Day here's Bob Costantini with Joe and Jill Biden appearing in public in a personal no frills way and wearing masks to pay homage to America's war dead he was a sure bet that would not go unnoticed on president trump's Twitter feed he writes Joe Biden's handling of the H. one N. one swine flu was a complete and total disaster the president also retweeted a fox news analyst brit Hume's message showing Biden in a black mask wearing sunglasses with the caption this might help explain why trump doesn't like to wear a mask in public the president has made clear he doesn't want the media to see him wearing a mask even if it is part of his administration's

Donald Trump Joe Biden Bob Costantini JOE America FLU President Trump Jill Biden Twitter Analyst Brit Hume
"hume" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"hume" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Hume yes brit Hume out and said the exact same thing that senior citizens should be sacrificed in order to make sure that the American economy does not falter I mean what would Jesus do four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three I will play some of that brit Hume audio later during the show quite unbelievable but real let's go to fate in Stonecrest fate good day welcome what they believe that all they have to do is get out and seniors that told them that and you know go to the nearest hospital because every every state is having the problem go to the nearest hospital and tell the I. C. U. nurses we will work here with you with no protection we'll just work up and he may need to volunteer they need volunteers but I am going to kill you this is the biggest shale and I'm glad you pointed out that this money angle show up today this is the biggest Sam you ever want to see what this money because if they were going to do so they've already told us they're going to give people that work there gonna give these companies money to pay people their salary for four months they're gone and they're gonna give unemployment benefits they've gone up increases almost so you'll pay for four months so we all know that the biggest expenses we have a going back and forth to work so why are they talking about everybody needs to go back to work because by the time that money gets to you you will be working and you will be happy you will be smiling and you'll take it and you will go and spend it right now you know right now racing away out I'm a do this on the do that what you know to try to stay you know stay alive the end of your voice getting this you've got people talking about let's re open the schools they want to do all of this so that the economy will start to look good because when people start seeing the unemployment rate of what it really is and can't be adjusted they are going to be upset this is foolishness that the governor of this state could even fix his mouth as old people say to talk about open it up to school after spring break and letting all those children come back to school all those teachers back to school bring in all the support staff and everybody else back to school knowing that we've already been told by the experts this thing is two or three months from leveling off this is pure foolishness and I'm sick and tired of these trump right every time you present and you know it was shocked at the door to you every time you process of that and you say I'll say anything about this this person is occupied at the sixteen hundred they say would you do if you just picking on the president this is the man that no as early as January how bad this was his intelligence people have even said it was gonna be bad he did nothing he told us it was a hoax he told us it was only fifteen cases in February he did nothing in March she did nothing this is madness rests with him this by with and how we spread through this country rests with him because we could have did just like they're doing in these African countries we could have shut down the country we could have prepared for it instead of having doctors and nurses are running around begging for mask and then he says apple found that million man okay you're supposed to be tight with the president apple you didn't know this this man the only thing he cares about the only thing he cares about is money and the economy he doesn't care about US citizens and he just doesn't care I don't think he really cares about money and the economy I think money in the economy is only important to him because it becomes a conduit for his political success and his political leveraging without VAT he has absolutely nothing to run on in the twenty twenty election fight what what thank you let me say this the full final thing they need to stop this foolishness about old people right now we know that there ought to be in your arms if it does have contracted it we know young people are contracting it we don't know all has it because we have not had enough test to test to see who has it in the C. why did that why they either died or why the recovery effort for somebody to even say something that foolish that sounds like something you'd hear from one of these third world dictators of some kind of and now he is the most complex is get rid of this group of people this man is apple I don't even know how to begin to explain Russia but I know that you will continue as long as you have breath and you have a way to get it out you will continue to tell the people the truth do not be fooled by this twelve hundred dollars and also are we going to pay the tax on this twelve hundred dollars at the end of the year so anyway most likely a big part in luckily yes okay so so we I really get nothing but probably some of us to probably get maybe eight hundred because we got to pay a hundred on the taxes when it when it you know he says whatever else we've made or else we may lose this is foolishness and I blame nobody but the person at sixteen hundred and those people who keep running around talking about he know what he's doing so anyway my brother you be blessed and eyes I love you to death and I'm a tell you I am so proud of the way you handle yourself through this whole thing be blessed thank you sister I love you back be blessed let me read a direct tweet from Donald J. trump he said and I quote the lame stream media is the dominant force in trying to get me to keep our country closed as long as possible in the hope that it will be detrimental to my election success the real people want to get back to work a sap we will be stronger than ever before there's so much in that one tweet I will break it down for you on the other side you're getting real with the realest man on radio their suffrage morning show G. S. C. thank you okay with these plastic Stacey hi Melanie matic's with the cab county sheriff office and I woke up this morning with the rich are rich the morning show the realist man all radio four four eight nine two two seven oh three our news and talk thirteen eighty W. A. okay here's the latest from the WTO K. news center good.

brit Hume
The Great Heart Race

American Innovations

03:00 min | 1 year ago

The Great Heart Race

"Richmond Virginia. Nineteen sixty six in the prep room at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. A team of surgeons prepares to enter the operating room moving quickly. They scrubbed their hands with disinfectant soap in slip into their blue surgical gowns urging them on as a stocky dark haired. Bundle of energy. Dr David Hume. He's the hospital's head of surgery and director of its organ transplant program. Come ON EVERYBODY. We could lose any moment. Anybody seen the lower right on cue. Dick Lower enters prep room. He's the hospitals lead cardiac surgeon and like most good surgeons. He's unflappable even in this hectic environment. Donahue what have we got? Oh we've been waiting for donor and recipient as soon as you scrub in. We can get started or those charts. Can I see of course? Incompatible blood types not ideal. I know but this patient will die anyway if we don't try the transplant. Our studies the charts carefully squinting through his horn rimmed glasses. Shorter hume hovers anxiously around like a terrier pointing at the charts. Look at this donor. I mean we couldn't ask for any better for this head injury. He was in perfect health. We've got the state medical examiner in there already. We'll pronounce him dead. The second heart stops. Come on let's go. Lower closes the folders and handsome back to you. Sorry David I can't do it. What are you talking about? Of course you can. Based on his vitals. I'd say this recipient is too far gone. The blood type mismatch will kill him. You don't know that even if he lives only a few hours if the new heartbeats will have done it the first human heart transplant. I'm sorry David I know you WANNA BE I. I do too but not like this as chief of Surgery. I order you to perform this operation. Lower is already walking away. Lower lower. Get back here. The other Surgeons Watch stunned as lower leaves and hume in. A rage clings patient charts on the floor. He sees the room full of eyes staring at him over there. Surgical masks and takes a deep breath. Somebody tell the medical examiner transplant is off. Its furious with lower. But he can't afford to fire him. Dick glower is one of the best cardiac surgeons in the world is performed more experimental heart transplants on dogs than anyone else in the field if anyone's going to do the first human heart transplant. It's him and hume desperately wants his program to be the first. He already feels cheated out of his rightful place in medical history for performing the first successful kidney transplant. He doesn't want to get left behind again.

Dr David Hume Dick Lower Medical College Of Virginia Ho Richmond Virginia Dick Glower David I Director Donahue
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 1 year ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
Critics Blast Proposed Changes To The National Environmental Policy Act

Environment: NPR

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Critics Blast Proposed Changes To The National Environmental Policy Act

"And Environmental Law that is obscured many. Americans became a point of heated debate between business and environmental groups in Denver. Yesterday the trump administration held the first of two hearings on proposed changes grace hood of Colorado public radio reports the fifty year old National Environmental Policy Act or Niba requires -quires a major evaluation. Every time new infrastructure like highways dams and oil pipelines. Get built reviews can average seven years to complete trump trump administration officials and industry advocates. Like Ed Mortimer with the US Chamber of Commerce say. The process needs to be streamlined. The investors can be lined up but those plans may be mothballed for years and sometimes decades due to the ever thickening layer of process that has amassed on project applicants who seek federal Permits under Niba depot. The trump administration would limit in depth environmental reviews to just two years analysis of Hume live or indirect effects would no longer be required tired. That would limit the government's ability to evaluate climate change impacts of projects and it concerns third-generation Nebraska rancher and farmer emerged genie. Crumley who lives along the path of the Keystone Excel pipeline. We take seriously that fifty years from now when our grandchildren are running this very farm cats L. would have abandoned toxic leaky thirty six inch pipeline in our field. Leaving our grandson with a liability the proposed changes would allow private companies to write the most complicated reviews themselves. Under federal supervision and public comment periods would be moved to earlier in the process process. Something environmentalists worry would limit participation with only about one hundred speaking slots available in Denver. Many spoke outside the hearing hearing nearby about one. Hundred environmentalists gathered around a small stage in a parking lot. People like Denver Metro Resident Merrill Blackwell. DOC well one hundred slots for something so critical is not really enough for public comment. That's why we're here. A second hearing on the trump administration's nations proposal to reform the National Environmental Policy Act will be held in Washington. DC In two weeks digital comments are being taken through March tenth. Environmental groups are expected to challenge any final changes in court for N._P._R.. News I'M GRACE HOOD IN DENVER.

Denver Donald Trump Environmental Law Ed Mortimer Us Chamber Of Commerce Colorado Nebraska Merrill Blackwell Washington DC Hume
Joe Biden Eager to Debate Mike Bloomberg on the Issues

Kilmeade and Friends

07:12 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden Eager to Debate Mike Bloomberg on the Issues

"Is Mike Bloomberg trying to buy the presidency tell us where ever I guess when you have over sixty billion dollars is think you can do about it I'm looking forward to baby numbered about his support for African Americans I'm looking forward to debating Mike Bloomberg about his is ten years I'm looking forward to because I sure can't compete with him in terms of money well that was killed by a short time ago talking about the fact that there is some tapes out of Michael Bloomberg in twenty fifteen basically saying why we need to stop and frisk in the area it was a ham handed description of how he deals in minority communities which he apologized for but not specifically bus stop and frisk months before he apologized for stop and frisk he was saying I can't run for president because I found myself apologizing for everything and I just can't will be able to do that well something happened and he feels like he is able to do it will be enough with me right now getting set to talk about this for about twelve hours of brit you the legendary a news anchor reporter very smart guy so Joe Biden says he wants this debate about the African American community with Mike Bloomberg should you want to well yeah because that's a perceived weak weakness with Bloomberg is also perceived weakness of Bernie Sanders so obviously this is an and Biden is thought to have tremendous strength among African Americans how well it will hold up after nearly losing streak in these primaries remains to be seen but but surely this is what you'd expect bye bye and at least say he wants so you heard some of those twenty fifteen tapes I did all right I'll play one of them one of these cuts just in case some of our listeners with the stats say brit Hume that they tune out every ten to fifteen minutes so I might have lost somebody so here we go cut fifty cut nineteen and it was all my god you are resting here's the marijuana all my heart yes that's true why house minority that's true and that's also part of it yeah and that's the one we just heard because most of the crimes committed a minority communities in this is the line that people are underlining the Pratt par scale was pulled out sometimes what you gotta do is just throw somebody against the wall and first them listen the regarded at first sound bite to just put it right we live in a country now we can't say that even though it is probably true man it is undeniably true that minority committee suffer the highest crime rates yes so if you're trying to suppress crime that's where you'd go you'd go with the crime is you can't say that because it's politically incorrect to say so but it is factually correct even if politically incorrect so is it so he could you pay a price for this in the Democratic Party with and want to hear this but it's true in fact also is it stop and frisk for which he's now apologizing was effective in helping suppress crime in New York started by Giuliani continued under Bloomberg he always defended it and now because he's bailed out on it because he he thinks he can't get anywhere the Democratic Party if he doesn't and the sad thing is that's probably true right so what would you do if your Bloomberg now we everything you said is a hundred percent correct now the ball is yours now deal well the way I like to say a bunch of mealy mouth stuff about how is incentive to put it that way and he was trying to do policing for the benefit of a minute with things you can say but you know then they're not going to play in in a party which sinks in anything that in any way is even impliedly critical of in a minority is it is a terrible political St I want you you would don junior just said about this as we played it what he said about it on our show is obviously it's sort of you know the racist clips coming out today I mean I was pretty extreme I mean if a Republican said things that you do that he said the Bloomberg said about African American minorities they'd be calling him first just get out of the race no because he's a Democrat because all of the other Democrats ultimately won his money if he's not the nominee he will get a total pass but every resulted column out this morning I hope she did that's great you know and and Donna can actually you to do that and be in be honest about it but like the real if Donald Trump said what Michael Bloomberg said they'd be telling a baby demanding he resign and step out of the race as you know my little book get it passed because everyone wants a big check the truth is when Michael Bloomberg said that he was a Republican right he didn't change his party registration to twenty eighteen he was still Republican when he said those things was he as an air New York he was a Republican we had we had you have three terms I'm not sure if he was Republican at that time it mind yeah anyways he changes party registration twenty eighteen so and for all for info on Denton purposes he was are you know it's interesting because now well even no criminal just reform is hot right now nationally locally now we're seeing what's happening in these major cities with crime coming back in trucks coming back especially were watching the assassinations the murders they're happening in New York taking up again people might want to go back to the law and order days you know these it's always a case it no matter how liberal the city is when the crime gets bad enough people want to crackdown and will rewarded as Rudy Giuliani's career New York illustrates right so you see you don't have police sealed you few Palmer get out where this is his number non non sentiment worries it that he's a Democrat now and and he's he's got this is the kind of stuff he's gonna have to deal with right couple other things Joe Biden for me when people try to figure out who's hot who's now why is culture resume why did their peak drop was Elizabeth Warren to me Biden is the simplest one to figure out it is pure a performance you watch him on the stump people are concerned I mean I've never seen someone underperform like this have you I've known Joe Biden since he came to the Senate I've always liked him on a personal basis is one of the nicest men I've ever known he's always make gaffes always I mean the classic example of a bind gave his when he said that no poor poor kids everybody's smart as white kids that's that's kind of the buttons always side but Brian when he screws in Keene New Hampshire in rooms as Terry like keen the so what's not to like about for months that's a that's an old man's gaffe I know this because I sometimes make them myself when he's when he couldn't remember where he was and that he could remember he was out of office when he said that he had met part of our kids yeah that's a that's a confused as a memory and a confusion issue of the kind of elderly people have and he's got him and and you see it on his performance on the stumping see the uncertainty in the confusion as a Tatian and I think people looking at noticing they don't want to say that they think he's too old but that's what they think he's too old and eighties and nineties at times almost non compass menace right I don't think that you could take trump losses have guesses same trump I don't think it's a Bernie Sanders losses that because the same guy right well they may try it roughly well in and trump in is trump and he hasn't it isn't any better or any worse in his discourse and he's ever been in the same I think it's true Bernie Sanders the same it is true I think of Bloomberg the Bloomberg is now I guess is it is the oldest the second only to that and for some we're discussing right and he seems on top of his game by this loss to step in and in it look it happens is is that you don't hold it against him but is a presidential candidates a

Mike Bloomberg
Causality 101 with Robert Ness

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:35 min | 1 year ago

Causality 101 with Robert Ness

"I am on the line with Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert is a machine learning research engineer at Gammel on and an instructor at northeastern North Eastern University Robert and I met at the last nerves conference where he had an accepted poster session around his paper integrating hitting Markov processes with structural. Causal Modeling Enables counterfactual inference in complex systems which he also presented at the black doc in a in a workshop This kicked off a bunch of great conversations between the two of US leading ultimately to collaboration. That we'll talk a little bit about in this conversation. Robert thanks so much for joining me on the Tuomo. Ai podcast thanks for having me Sam. You're injured us. It makes me think I should've. It came up with more clever name for that paper. You know what a lot of papers we talk about on. This show are quite the mouthful so yours is no exception exception Maybe someone will build a model. You know that. seeks to determine a inverse correlation or correlation between the lengthiness papers the title and It's number of citations or something like that. Let's set that aside for now and have you spent a few minutes introducing yourself. How did you get started in machine learning what piqued your interest You know ultimately will be spending a lot of time here talking about causality. How did you come to Become interested in that you know my path to machine learning was a bit. I'd say unconventional I started off working In Asia Tanna specifically I was the degree at Hopkins in International Studies and was planning adding to pursue a degree in economic In economics focusing on economic development I got involved with some Internet companies out in Beijing That got me into coding. And database is in data in general and I decided I was interested in in debt in that and went to apply for programs in statistics. Particularly with a focus on computational statistics I back to the states came back to the states went to Purdue University to do my PhD in stats My PhD work was on causal. Inference graphical models Basically how to learn causal models from data particularly in the context of systems systems biology and from then after I graduated I went to trade industry. Got It now. We hear very frequently folks refer to their path into machine learning as unconventional are indirect In your case you came into an interesting gaming net leads you to apply live for Or into Grad School for statistic. What was that particular connection really? It's when you're on the back end of an APP and you're looking at the data and you're realizing that there's a lot of insights to be had if only we could model this data and turn it into some service on the front end Um I realized I mean this was you know people had were just kinda starting to talk about data science and then Hell Varian had just recently came out and said I said that's the districts is the new sexiest will. I can't remember the exact quote was pick your Metaphor Metaphor New Black statistics is the new. I don't know Rockstar and so And Yeah that's that's kind of why pivoted to do the two stats in machine. Learning I guess through stats view. May people might argue whether or not stats machine. Learning Are same thing. Might the problems that I was working on my PhD or using Publicity graphical models so which has strong roots in artificial intelligence. So that was my introduction machine learning. Yeah one of the things that's come up in our conversations about causality and The work that you're doing with your courses is the idea that it historically talking about causality has been the you know the domain of statisticians and in Yeah folks like economists And that a lot of that conversation is inaccessible or isn't really tailored to do the needs of developers and data scientists machine learning engineers. I didn't realize all the time we were talking about that. That your background wasn't economics. You you have some of the exposure to the way that causality is has been traditionally kind of us and talked about. Maybe I guess I'll just use this as a segue to Kind of opening up the floor to to ask you. What how do you define causality? The interesting thing about causality may be part of why maybe is a challenging thing to deal with particularly for statisticians I would say is that. It's very difficult to talk about it without finding yourself having a philosophical conversation and you know so going you know this is something that fill in. What is the causality? These in that philosophers have been wrestling with through the ages. Right hume had has counterfactual definition initial possibility. That's you know a follows from being had a not happy would not have happened But you know philosophers going back to the Buddha all kind of take their stab at what is caused -ality so there's a different philosophical arguments for causality and what it means I think from a practical standpoint. What most people mean when they say? causal inference is. They mean the estimation of Causal Effects. So if you're safer example at a tech company and you want to run some kind of experiment about the about whether a feature will drive a click or some other key performance indicator or metric. You're asking you. Your experiment is essentially trying to get at the question of what is the causal effect of this feature on this outcome and you'll be using the assumptions and methods from Statistics to estimate assuming Air Assumptions are valid those causal effects. But when we've talked in machine learning where now hearing you know. So I hadn Europe's like you said This talk about having agents that can understand that. Causal Structure of the world and and that causes allergies essential from moving from system one system to cognition day Pearl was very preeminent. Causal inference researcher talks about causal reasoning in in terms of free will and the ability to understand Dan intention and so there are definitely definitely a lot of angles to tackle this question from the perspective of artificial intelligence is that you know people who are running experiments in facebook. Netflix are not really thinking about

Causal Effects Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert United States AI North Eastern University Tuomo Purdue University Gammel Netflix Research Engineer Hell Varian Instructor Grad School Rockstar Beijing Asia Facebook Pearl Hume
What exactly is a river?

Robot or Not?

05:53 min | 1 year ago

What exactly is a river?

"Listening Elliott would like to know the definition of a river now. I watched a youtube video recently about this about what. The world's shortest shortest river was and the idea was that there was one place where it was a like a spring that emerges and then there's like about fifty yards it's of concrete between it in a river and then flows into the river and the argument was this is the shortest river. It starts here at the spring and it flows out and then it ends up merging with this other river her then there was another example of somewhere else in the world where there are two lakes and there was a connector between them. The water flowed from one lake into the other and that was a river that flowed between between these two bodies of water. Do you have any thoughts about what what what makes a river with depth length. Anything else that it might make something a river versus the old creek or stream. I saw that video to and does get it had definition in it which just like whatever the the cartographers definition about where it has to flow from into. But I'm just going to say it has to be some water that flows in more or less uniform direction in a skinny thing not gonna go into manmade versus. Not because I feel like if you if you dig something and it's manmade but water keeps flowing there for many many years. I mean you made a river you can. You can make a river a lake. Why can't you make a river right? Like if you dig that thing and water keeps flowing on it and then hume's become extinct and five billion years later stuff still flowing like a river it was may may it's like it's a river so the length thing though. There is a minimum length like you can't just take two uber. Bodies have ordered that are separated by one. Millimeter breakdown that one. Millimeter thing and say this is one millimeter distancing. That's a river it's like no you've just you've literally just connected to things. There is nothing in between you have to separate them by a certain amount now. What does that amount is five feet two feet? I feel like we all moralize no most of the time. Things don't get names unless they are considered significant out got to be river this whole competition for shortest rivers causing people to name things in silly ways. If it's like three inches not say this is the World Charles. Wherever that competition for short will make you name things that are not rivers to call reverse verse? That's just ridiculous like you can name give it a name or whatever but if it's like a one inch long it's not a river at all so you need some water flowing flowing through thing that I feel like has to be. I'M NOT GONNA say thinner than it is long. But it should be recognizable as a thing that stuff flows goes down And I think a lot of the things I video probably too short to be over but I think you see it could be something that you could you know. It's the the minimum like shorter than you might think especially given the with if you really want to name something. That's twenty yards long a river. Fine because you might need to have the name for that thing because you might have one body of water another body water. What do you call the thing in? Between does it belong to the left body of water the right body or if it's long enough to be significant it should have a name and you could call it a river You could get into streaming creek and all sorts of stuff like that but I feel like you know river I'm GonNa say it's generic term like dish but it is is in discussions like this especially with the shortest one. I I don't I don't think it's productive to decide whether you're going gonNA call it a creek or stream or creek. Or whatever the other various synonyms are. We're all just saying. Is this a body of water worthy of being named all right I mean I I I think this is like it's however you wanted to find it. There are things that don't look like rivers but if you trace it back it turns is at this leads into a body of water. It ends up becoming the Mississippi River. You can jump over the Mississippi River in Minnesota at the source of it because it's tiny but it becomes the Mississippi the sippy river. It's the Mississippi River and it's it's very much like how do you want to set the definitions Geography is similar to like Strana me where it's like. What's planet well? Some group could define it in some way. But there's sort of like common use and it's very different. Yeah exactly for for professionals. There has to be a hard best definition like for matmaker and stuff like that but for regular people. They don't have to know about that definition when they're discussing rivers in in general that it's it's enough to I feel like there's this is one of those not probably not a lot of debate other than the shortest river people because we most people sort of know the Monday see them at only if you're in the Profession Ashen do you start drawing those fine distinctions and holding too. I do laugh my mom lives in Arizona and we often drive over a bridge over dirt. Sort that is the Gila River and it makes me laugh every time but the fact is in the there is a wet season. They're very briefly. And if there's a monsoon or a big rainstorm or something like that you know it will water will flow underneath that thing. But and they they call it a river even though for a large portion of the year there's no water in it but water flows through there in that direction and when it does. That's that's the Yellow River and sounds to me like you're driving over the Gila river bed for the area. Most of the year. It is a place where waiting for a river. It will get here eventually. It's not here right eight now. It's a riverbed it is. It is in the river is sleeping somewhere else for the moment. I don't know about the La River though about the Riverland Terminator. Two I guess yeah. Yeah and that's that is a river that they ended up putting concrete on and and guiding where it goes and you could call it something else but it was historically a river and it's still basically also very also dry out of the time if movies for sure believed absolutely also there's underground rivers but I don't even WanNa get talk talk about that. 'cause I don't even know what that is underground railroad but a little bit different. I think it's a lot different but okay.

Mississippi River Gila River La River Yellow River Sippy River Youtube Elliott Riverland Terminator Hume Arizona Mississippi Strana Minnesota
"hume" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"hume" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"It but now all of a sudden they're best bodies the russians the former soviets of become this great gigantic monster of an enemy it just isn't true what anyway tucker brought on a brit hume the commentator analyst emeritus to analyse this seeming in the sanity here rationality in lunacy that has overtaken washington dc now you have heard what what he was going to say here as i've been saying it myself in my own way for years now but i still wanted you to hear this a question of the tucker asks brit hume you have somebody who's under the influence of alcohol is numbered jump around the sat humiliates himself but not only that degrade the person is interviewing him i wonder if there is a cost longterm he's asking brit hume at these networks are actually in the longterm wiping themselves out harming themselves reputation only business wise with incidents like number yesterday here is the answer has been a belief for the longest time that the trump election was illegitimate and has been a a sense in the media that his election constitutes a national emergency because he is such an unqualified character and so likely to lead us off a cliff that it is a job of the media to join the resistance and to find out what must be behind his election and what scandals must lurk there to take him down that's plainly what this is all about the media poorly joined the resistance it borders on hysteria just so over the top i mean you don't have to be a trump admired to realize that the things that are being said or just wildly out of proportion now brit hume is not thought this for very long i i think recent events have brought him to this reality and in.

tucker brit hume analyst washington
"hume" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"hume" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Hume yes you mom uh the danger landfill two two oh god ooh mm oh man and oh you ooh one yeah laura yeah william wyler through dude all of things the in sure ooh oh you.

Hume william wyler
"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"The paper implied hume status as a white native currency lad meant hobble deserve more respect hobble then retreated from public view knowing the convicts would back hume side of the story hume was given more land and 18 26 the new governor ralph darling wanted to settle the south coast to keep it from the french and he wanted him to go and survey but hume past so darling turned to hovel yes hume then agreed to go out russi's oh my god love hate relate hobble and humour traveling together although why what is why this is like the reunion se cool of fucking will and grace this isn't it flakes reboot what the fox going out he couldn't let him go alone because then he would go down there and just fucking lie about everything they had done so he had to go with him okay so it's a spike trip said he was mitrovic saved the truth trip was going to fucking lies ass off in humans going to try to stop them the humans like i mean height exploring the little man yeah yeah yup he's like he likes it a bit drama i can't really get off the exploring unless ovalles' the bombing out my vienna was kinda guy needs to strangle himself to get off mess it's like i like exploring that is not a challenge if there's not like a guy thought he had all but every opportunity to know i could die i need my costanza.

hume ralph darling russi vienna
"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"That night fitzpatrick as away from the group shooting ducks when he was attacked by aborigines with spears he ran hearing is screams hume rushed to help with his gun and chased them off hobble never move the whole time i'll watch that plan later hume went to find them to talk to them about the local area so he shoots of these guys that he goes i just talk i talked to him about it totally cool and and then he even brought some of them back to the camp which hobble was very upset about any we don't have enough charts and he wrote disapprovingly of hume's familiarity with the aboriginal people him compared the land with descriptions made by matthew flinders and concluded they were in port philip which is obel fiddled this compass looked at the sun and claim they were western port which is what governor brisbane's objective had bent human pointed out the lack of any big islands or small penguins local here okay hubbell was chief navigator so it was western port k humor turned out to be right chief navigator hobble was as usual wrong he wanted to survey the area for future set of future settlement but hobble wanted to go home the fucking walked for all this time and they get there and eat fish and we'll explore now i've done here now now whatever have fun have your fun i'm taking the pram wheel and half of a tarp.

fitzpatrick hume matthew flinders port philip brisbane hubbell
"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"hume" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"The great man of the c hobble started whining again saying they should turn back and go to sydney but human had an idea he used his and a frame made from a waddell tree to build the craft hobble refuse to get in finally hume yelled at him if you don't do what i tell you all throw you win it worked the man got across the humor over hobble wrote in his journal that it was his tarp if they use good to point that out cool guy like train technically he's half of the fuck intent best but also if you're lying in your own journal it's purely for the idea that others will read it when you're gone and like let's be honest this not has proved him right he's gotta take so he'd be so happy that guy i thought i was crazy so have they use my vision boards dioramas don't just journals so how will now started totally rebelling he said the tar his tarp was wearing out in that they had completed their mission when they found the hume river human quote i do not think it necessary to point out the defects two of the tarp to the men if they don't like to risk themselves in it they can stop and be damned hobbling nord him and talk claude over to his side now hume was really pissed he wrote quote i told mr hobble that i would prefer being rid of him altogether rather than having one in his position setting such a bad example i gave him to understand very plainly that for me or all i card he might just remain on the side of the river he was on it but i was determined to pursue the journey as originally intended.

claude hume sydney hume river
"hume" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"hume" Discussed on EconTalk

"Sure in that of course raises the question of why is this this views again i don't think he was an outright skeptical accumulations the acl in the skeptical they us but why was he homeless more reticence on these issues in human was there's no way to answer this with any certainty kohl centuries later but it is easy i think to imagine a number of possibilities so maybe it was just a matter of temperament right that he's just temperament predisposed to be more circumspect media's more concerned for his reputation career professional success maybe he sees religion as just a less important phenomenon you're less dangerous phenomenon as you may be thinks the dangers of religion would be better combated through quiet neglect rather than open confrontation i think is quite likely that he wanted to avoid offending his mother his mother's equate pious presbyterian is very close to her lived with them will work with our almost as whole life is just he saw what happened is you right he learns a lesson from choose relative outspokenness of course are mutually exclusive i think many of these are or are likely true let's close with the issue that eat onyx talk about explicitly but it emerged from the book or appropriately that a departures rather than making explicit but um i'm reading the book m we have if i am correct we have many more of hume sliders to smith than we have a smith's letters to him sect wreck yes celery one from him to sniff fifteen from smith so sometimes we have to infer from the hume response what smith might have said and in utah use that.

smith hume utah