35 Burst results for "Human Rights Watch"

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:58 min | 3 d ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"That new video produced by human rights. Watch the video which released along with a new report. Titled gaza apparent war crimes during fighting. We're joined now. By omar shakir israel and palestine director at human rights watch. He's joining us from amman jordan. What were you most shocked by in these interviews in this investigation into what happened in israel's last attack on gaza maybe some of the testimony that we collected are among the most harrowing. I've ever come across in mind. Four and a half years working on israel. Palestine you at strikes that wiped out entire families. You hide cases where families reduced from having seven eight kids having one surviving member of their family. You had people's entire lives. Their homes their businesses their wives their children their husbands gone in a flash and those testimonies are so important for us to discuss today because the international community focuses on gaza may be when there are armed hostilities. But two months later these families continue to deal with the aftermath of the devastation wrought upon their lives. and it's a critically important to them to all victims of grave human rights abuse that there is accountability for these serious abuses and that steps are taken by the international community to prevent yet another cycle of bloodshed and repression. This wasn't the first in won't be the last us. We take grave definitive action. What has been responsive they israeli government to your report omar to human rights watch report. Human rights watch wrote these really government in june. We specified the strikes that we're looking into. We sent them a number of detailed questions. They replied to our letter saying they were not obligated under israeli law to answer our questions and providing a list of general assertions stating for example that they took measures to minimize the impact from their strikes that fault belongs to hamas because according to them they fire from populated areas and saying that of course they would investigate these strikes but these are the same allegation..

gaza omar shakir israel amman human rights watch palestine jordan Palestine omar hamas
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:02 min | 3 d ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Of a tight and persecution that new video produced by human rights. Watch the video which released along with a new report. Titled gaza apparent war crimes during fighting. We're joined now. By omar shakir israel and palestine director at human rights watch. He's joining us from amman jordan. What were you most shocked by in these interviews in this investigation into what happened in israel's last attack on gaza maybe some of the testimony that we collected are among the most harrowing. I've ever come across in mind. Four and a half years working on israel. Palestine you at strikes that wiped out entire families you had cases where families reduced from having seven eight kids having one surviving member of their family. You had people's entire lives. Their homes their businesses their wives their children their husbands gone in a flash and those testimonies are so important for us to discuss today because the international community focuses on gaza may be when there are armed hostilities. But two months later these families continue to deal with the aftermath of the devastation wrought upon their lives. and it's a critically important to them to all victims of grave human rights abuse that there is accountability for these serious abuses and that steps are taken by the international community to prevent yet another cycle of bloodshed and repression. This wasn't the first in won't be the last us. We take grave definitive action. What has been responsive they israeli government to your report omar to human rights watch report. Human rights watch wrote these really government in june. We specified the strikes that we're looking into. We sent them a number of detailed questions. They replied to our letter saying they were not obligated under israeli. Lock to answer our questions. And providing a list of general assertions stating for example that they took measures to minimize the impact from their strikes. That fault belongs to hamas because according to them they fire from populated areas and saying that of course they would investigate these strikes but these are the same allegation..

gaza omar shakir israel amman human rights watch palestine jordan Palestine omar hamas
Human Rights Watch: Israeli War Crimes Apparent in Gaza War

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 6 d ago

Human Rights Watch: Israeli War Crimes Apparent in Gaza War

"Human Rights Watch has accused the Israeli ministry of carrying out attacks that's apparently amount to war crimes during an eleven day will in may against the Hamas militant group the international human rights organization issued its conclusions off to investigating three Israeli air strikes that it said killed sixty two Palestinian civilians it said there were no evident military targets in the vicinity of the attacks the report also accuses Palestinian militants of apparent war crimes by launching over four thousand on guided rockets and mortars at Israeli population centers such attacks the group says violate the prohibition against deliberate or indiscriminate attacks against civilians I'm Charles de Ledesma

Israeli Ministry International Human Rights Org Human Rights Watch Hamas Charles De Ledesma
"human rights watch" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:10 min | Last week

"human rights watch" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Human rights watch, accusing the Israeli military of carrying out attacks and apparently amount of more crimes during the 11 Day war against Hamas and May, the international human Rights group issuing the conclusions after investigating three Israeli airstrikes, and it claims killed 62 Palestinian civilians. The report also accusing Palestinian terrorists of apparent war crimes by launching more than 4000 unguided rockets and borders at Israeli population centers, saying such attacks violate the prohibition against deliberate or Indiscriminate attacks against civilians. Troops have surrounded Tunisia's parliament, blocking its speaker from entering after the president suspended the legislature and fired the prime minister and other top members of the government, sparking concerns for the North African countries. Young democracy in the face of nationwide protests over Tunisia's economic problems and the government's handling the coronavirus, the country's president decided over the weekend to dismiss the officials. Town halls dot com. New York Governor Cuomo questioning the impartiality of lawyers looking into sexual harassment allegations against that's for the investigators. I have concerns as to the Independence of the reviewers, Cuomo says. This is happening in a political system. Facts Trump Pardon the pun ideology. And I am eager for the truth to come out. And when that happens, New Yorkers will be shocked at what they have heard about this. Versus what they know about it. Separately, another team of lawyers working for the state Assembly is investigating whether there are grounds to impeach Cuomo. I'm Ed Donahue, Wall Street may be ready to take a pause following yesterday's record high closes to the key averages. Stock futures this morning are in the red more on these stories, town hall dot com. Jay Farner here, CEO of Rocket mortgage and rocket companies. Last year, we saw historically low mortgage interest rates. What you may not know is that interest rates are already starting to increase, and it's likely that trend is only going to continue..

Jay Farner Ed Donahue 62 Last year Hamas Trump yesterday three May more than 4000 unguided rocket this morning Governor Israeli Tunisia prime minister Palestinian North African New Yorkers Day war Rocket
China Sanctions Wilbur Ross and Others, Responding to Hong Kong Warnings

All Things Considered

01:49 min | Last week

China Sanctions Wilbur Ross and Others, Responding to Hong Kong Warnings

"Fresh sanctions on a handful of US individuals. It's retaliation for sanctions the bite and administration imposed on Chinese officials last week. Over Beijing's crackdown on democracy in Hong Kong. Its latest attack comes just days before a visit to China by Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman and US China ties are already tense, though, as NPR's John Ruit reports there is no sign China's sanctions will derail the visit. Sanctions are the first imposed by China under a new law passed in June, which facilitates retaliation for foreign sanctions. Among those it hits a former Commerce secretary Wilbur Ross, and the China director at Human Rights Watch Sophie Richardson. For years, Beijing's responded to US sanctions and tariffs with tit for tat measures in Beijing's calculation, it had to respond to the US Bonnie Lynn, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, says doing so before Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman's trip makes sense would disappear better if it happened a couple days after Deputy Secretary Sherman's trip that she says might risk being interpreted as a signal that the meeting didn't go well. And Sherman will be the most senior U. S official to travel to China since President Biden took office. Relations are at their worst in decades. But there's speculation that the trip could start to lay the groundwork for a meeting sometime this year between Biden and Chinese leader Xi Jinping. There is a desire to be able to showcase that the two world leaders can work together and part of that is being able to meet and discuss issues they agree on as well as those where they have differences, and I really hope As we see more of these incidents is on either side that they won't derail progress towards the usual meeting because both sides, she says, have significant incentives for Biden and she to meet sooner rather than later. John Ruijin

Deputy Secretary Of State Wend China Beijing John Ruit Wilbur Ross Sophie Richardson Bonnie Lynn United States Deputy Secretary Sherman NPR President Biden Hong Kong Center For Strategic And Inter Human Rights Watch Sherman Xi Jinping Biden John Ruijin
"human rights watch" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:24 min | Last week

"human rights watch" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington. The U. S military has been fighting in Afghanistan for just shy of 20 years. In just 40 days, U. S forces will be gone for good. What comes next for Afghans is more or less unknown. Among the big Open questions is how to prevent a catastrophic deterioration of human rights in Afghanistan. It's a question Patricia Gossman has been thinking about. She's an associate Asia director for Human Rights Watch, and she spent more than three decades visiting Afghanistan and documenting rights abuses. Their welcome Thank you Before we look ahead. Let's look back you have written about and I'll use your words. Massive human rights abuses and war crimes over these last two decades, and you say it's By all sides, Would you just Penis? A picture of the array of things you're talking about. Sure when the U. S came into Afghanistan After 9 11. It was an intervention largely driven by the need to retaliate for those attacks. And that shaped what happened next. The U. S sought out. Allies on the ground from the warlords and strong men and other Afghans who had been fighting the Taliban prior to 9 11, many of whom had long track records. Serious human rights abuses, including rape, summary executions, torture and so on. But for the US, these were the allies they felt they needed in order to prosecute the war against the Taliban. Of course, the Taliban headed out its own terrible track record. What would you say to then? I want to ask this carefully. But I'm imagining us. Military Commander listening might say Look, we we didn't have a lot of choices over who we were going to ally with and fight with, you know. Gandhi wasn't available. Saint Peter was not on the ground in Kandahar. You know nobody Who we could ally with was the saint. So so choices have to be made in war. And I say, I want to ask that carefully because I don't want to excuse or gloss over some of the horrific crimes that you have helped to document. Well, certainly choices were made, but they were the wrong choices from the start. The US sort of looked at. How can we put together something that will hold? And so it was expedient to work with people who are already fighting the Taliban. You know, if you look at, for example, the Afghanistan papers that the Washington Post produced there are numerous conversations with people in the US among US officials who are well aware Of the problems that this was causing. There's a quote from former Ambassador Crocker about one of the another notorious figure who was minister of defense in the early years, Marshal Fahim. And his involvement in murdering another minister and U. S officials entirely aware of this and even describing that as being in the presence of evil. Alongside abuses. There have also been human rights gains, fragile ones, But I'm thinking of women's rights in particular. Yes, there have and this is part of the fundamental contradiction to the U. S. Approach in Afghanistan. There were very important gains and a real commitment to these. I think, particularly this I would like described as it opened up space. For women's rights activists begin to emerge into to pursue reforms. One example I like to refer to as when the Constitution was being drafted. Women's rights activists really push to make sure that that constitution Included a clause that stipulated that men and women were eagle. Otherwise, it would never have made it in there. Now we're faced with the return of the Taliban stronger than ever. Who have no interest in protecting those most of those rights. They were fragile. And we're seeing now just exactly how fragile they are. So what in your view needs to happen now? Hold on to what has been positive and stop things going downhill and downhill fast. Well, I think there's also a mistake. Now in the way the U. S. Is looking at this. The war is over. For us, and it's increasingly looking like a general disengagement. Regardless of some of the promises that have been made about an enduring partnership, right. I am compelled to point out President Biden keeps saying, Look, we're not leaving you. We will remain engaged. The embassy is open financial support will keep flowing. Yes, And I hope that's true. But what we're seeing on the ground is among all embassies, including the U. S is a downsizing. Their aid is not at the levels it used to be. So I'm afraid that what we may see, and this would be disastrous is Disengagement, uh, kind of washing our hands of the whole. Situation. Um, as if well, we did what we could. Now we're going to leave. Yeah, I was going to ask What's the most important way that the U. S in your view needs to engage going forward. Continued financial support. This is the time when Afghanistan needs that continued engagement needs to be putting pressure on the Taliban needs financial assistance more than ever. To keep vital programs in education and health care going. Patricia Gassman. She is associate Asia director for Human Rights Watch. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me. A few years back. Richard Major saw something strange happening at a trash bin near his home in Sydney. I made this observation of a cockatoo flipping open a been to get in and get some food out of it. Which I thought was an interesting innovation. A cockatoo, he explains, is a big white Australian parent with this yellow unkempt hair do on the top this big yellow crest. They're really in your face, and they're just full of life and mischief and does an Ecologist who spent his life studying Australian birds. Major was intrigued. I wasn't really expecting cockatoos to be Rubbish bin Feeders. They're not scavengers. These are good, self respecting plant feeders. He sent a video to colleagues in Germany, and we were super amazed by it. Barbara Clump is a behavioral Ecologist at the Max Plank Institute, the Crocker to make it look very easy, But it's a very complex behavioural sequence, so the scientists and their colleagues began serving Sydney residents had they Seen cockatoos raiding their garbage, and over several years they saw the behavior spread from three suburbs to 44. After some computer analysis of how that behavior spread, they determined the birds were learning from each other. A culture of trashcan break ins was radiating out from that first bird who had a light bulb moment. Next. They filmed hundreds of cockatoos doing this and Different parts of Sydney, but they try and then they open and how they hold it and walk along the rim, and then they flip it over. Am They found regional flourishes and how birds in different suburbs open the lids. We call them subculture, regional differences in how things are done and those cultures Have been learned socially. So that's a demonstration that the birds are learning from each other. Their work appears today in the journal Science. All that time. Observing the birds was not without consequences for clump in one suburb. I found out only after weeks that I was the sensation on the local Facebook group. I was like the crazy bird lady. She's not going to let that stop. Er Klump has already got her next study in mind, she says. Unsurprisingly, humans don't really love big, messy parrots raiding their trash so people in Sydney are devising anti parrot innovations to keep them out. So how do to humans adapt to The court reviews figuring out how to open the bins and then how do the cocoa trees adapt to the people trying to stop them? She says an evolutionary arms race is underway and she'll be right there to observe. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. In the midst of.

Barbara Clump Patricia Gossman Mary Louise Kelly Patricia Gassman Ailsa Chang Richard Major Los Angeles Washington Sydney Germany Kandahar Max Plank Institute Taliban Afghanistan Er Klump Facebook 40 days U. S Human Rights Watch Gandhi
Microsoft's Bing Temporarily Blocked Searches of Tiananmen Square 'Tank Man' Image

BBC Newsday

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Microsoft's Bing Temporarily Blocked Searches of Tiananmen Square 'Tank Man' Image

"Microsoft has been rebuked after its search engine Bing blocked results for the query tank Man. The request normally finds the iconic image of a man defying tanks after the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing. Director of Human Rights Watch tweeted that Microsoft Action on the anniversary of the crackdown in Beijing was

Microsoft Tiananmen Square Beijing Human Rights Watch
"human rights watch" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:49 min | 2 months ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Itself. There is no equivalence between a terrorist group indiscriminately firing rockets at civilians and a country defending its people from those attacks. So we call in the mosques and other groups in Gaza end the rocket attacks immediately. That ain't would, Bernie Sanders says. He is really built. A man has evolved over the years. Into a pretty Strong right wing government. And there coalition now includes people who are over Racists. And when you have the United States of America, Ellie Putting almost $4 billion a year into Israel. We have the right To demand that they respect the human rights of old people, including the Palestinians. What we need now is an evenhanded policy evenhanded policy. So when 1500 rockets are sent From Gaza into Israel if you should sit 1500 rockets back That's not the kind of evenhanded you mean what she did to Labe. Apartheid B. This is an apartheid system. I mean, I mean, Israel's own prominent human rights organization, Betselem has declared it Human Rights Watch has declared it poor tired, Ayanna Pressley. Another quarter of the squad compared the treatment of Palestinians to the treatment of blacks in America Last summer, when black lives matter, protestors took to the streets to demand justice. They were met with force They face tear gas, rubber bullets and the militarized police. Just as our Palestinian brothers and sisters are facing in Jerusalem today. Does that mean Mr McConnell? In America. Of apartheid. I mean, the plight of the Palestinians is deemed to be equipped to the plight of blacks in America. And therefore America must also be an apartheid state. I would think Is the same thing..

Ayanna Pressley Bernie Sanders Ellie America Gaza McConnell 1500 rockets Jerusalem today Last summer Betselem Israel United States of America Human Rights Watch Labe Palestinians Palestinian almost $4 billion a year
"human rights watch" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:17 min | 4 months ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"She gave me a broad overview. First of the current situation there Well, the situation in North Korea is quite dire of the moment, North Korea putting place very extreme and unnecessary restrictions and measures. With the pretext off protecting the country from the Corbett 19 pandemic, And this has included basically controls off the border with shoot inside orders against anybody on the border, both close to the North Korean border, both in North Korea or in China, control of information and restrictions off food and basic need products in terms off those being imported from China. That sounds pretty draconian, even by North Korean standards, particularly the shooting on sight, so that's made presumably an enormous impact on People getting access if goods are not flowing through borders, the impact has bean extreme. Several sources with contacts in North Korea have been repeating that the situation is almost a similar US. Things were in the 19 nineties, which Is the most difficult period off North Korea's Postwar history. And that's a period where some estimates between few 100,000 and up 2 to 3 million people died off starvation. So what extent is there any accurate picture about the covert numbers inside the country Because you mentioned that the restrictions of being put in place under the guise of Of the pandemic. But what do we know about covert inside the country? Just a few weeks ago, the World Health Organization released data, saying that almost over to 22,000 tests were done inside North Korea, and they're still claims that there's zero cases. But this test numbers are very small. But there's been several reports by different media outlets that have a sources inside North Korea. That have spoken several times about large numbers of deaths among soldiers. Possible outbreaks in northern cities, including his hot mom pole, or changing domestic trouble is almost forbidden. And there's no basic necessity, goods and medicines and given the lack of the basic goods just for being able to live life at the most basic level. What do we then to make of everyday life for North Koreans? What we're here. Arnie's people not being able to get enough food people only being able to get like one bowl of boiled corn a day. It's one of the more dangerous periods because the food that we had harvested last year has already been finished, and we're still waiting for the new greens that will start coming out. So it's that period where the North Korean people would be relying mostly on Chinese products. In an opinion piece that you've written, you said that the people of North Korea have been for gotten Is there anything that the international community conducive to help them? The key? Sure is that government is around the world do personal through yaar. So the if they start opening again, trade with China bring food allowed him humanitarian aid. Just very recently that you and announced that even the last three U. N NGO workers have left the country. So even if a crisis were to happen, and even in the international community was aware of the situation where in media intervention were necessary at this point, that's not really possible. It was Lena Yoon, senior career researcher for Human Rights Watch. Now we're well aware of how disruptive the pandemic has been. The World Bank estimates that Cove it has created the worst crisis to education and learning in a century. In Zimbabwe. The impact is already being felt after a marked drop in the national pass straight for primary school public exams. It's raised concerns about an education system that many believed already had problems. Shingen Yorker reports from Harari. Excited pupils are hitting back to boarding school wheeling their trunks to the waiting Busses. Parents.

World Health Organization Lena Yoon Zimbabwe China last year World Bank 19 nineties North Korean Shingen Yorker North Korea zero cases First Human Rights Watch both U. N one bowl of boiled corn a day over to 22,000 tests US Harari few weeks ago
A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:37 min | 5 months ago

A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

"Rumors and scattered reports of atrocities in ethiopia's northern region of tigray have been swirling for months amid a media blackout. But the picture is now starting to become clearer and evidence for war. Crimes and crimes against humanity are stacking up on sunday. America's secretary of state anthony blinken condemned the killings sexual assaults and forced removals said to have taken place in tigray and called for troops to be withdrawn. The conflict began late last year. When the region's ruling party the tigray people's liberation front or tps aleph was booted out of the federal government where it had dominated for decades has to be off. Matt has announced quote final military operation against the defiant gripe province in coming days and a statement. Mr abiy said there was a catholic devise strategy to defeat the grand people's liberation front in the regional capital makaay without harming civilians late in november. Mr abi declared victory. Over the tb l. f. An armed resistance has continued yesterday. If government rejected america's demands describing. Mr lincoln's comments as regrettable. Thousands are known to have died in the conflict and more than two million people have been displaced. The growing civil war has drawn in fighters from neighboring regions and troops from eritrea which borders tigray to the north. I'm gonna stay. International has just released a report detailing its investigation into this incident that took place in late november an accident which is one of the oldest and most famous holy cities. Tom gardner addis. ababa correspondent. Ever soldiers killed hundreds of civilians over two days. And what i'm going to stay says was retaliation for an attack by local youth on their military camp now. Amnesty says the soldiers roams around the streets of the city picking out on young men and killing them on the spot then proceeded to plunder the city essentially of everything of value survivors said that all they could see on the streets with bodies and people crying this systematic slaughter civilians and axiom may amount to crimes against humanity according to amnesty. And you say the main players in this incident or allegedly airtran soldiers right just to remind people. This conflict has drawn in a few other parties. In addition to the ethiopian federal army and two grand forces loyal to the tps laugh you also have militia security forces from may bring regional state of. Im hara which has a rivalry with the laugh and disputed territories along their border and then and this is really controversial element. You have troops from eritrea. Which since the beginning of the conflict has been fighting alongside the ethiopian army against the which has a long rivalry with as well as to whether all these parties are committing atrocities. I think based on everything we know so far. Yes but i think. Eritrean soldiers are the most widely and extensively implicated and there are allegations of other atrocities beyond. What's happened in axiom. Ever since the war began in late november we've been hearing accounts trickling out which beginners rumor clearer. Picture is slowly started to emerge. We've seen several videos that appear to show ethiopian soldiers. Standing among the bodies of civilians. They've murdered there was an investigation by human rights. Watch found. European army had shelled towns including the capital of tigray mckelway killing at least eight hundred civilians including women and children and winding back to the beginning of the war the very first atrocity we heard about was this massacre in the town of my tatra which is in western tigray near the border with the neighboring regional state. I'm harlem according to a report that amnesty published at the time most of the victims were. I'm horrors murdered by militia. Sure the ousted rulers of tigray the epl f. That was then confirmed by day. State appointed human rights commission. Here however take ryan's reflect across the border to saddam tell of attacks on civilians by them militiamen an by government soldiers in the same area for its part. What is the european government saying about all these reports so that is an important question on february. The twenty six th the ethiopian rights commission which is a state appointed or body released a statement saying that it had also conduct an investigation. And that it's key. Findings brutally corroborated those of amnesty. That's quite a significant step forward by the commission which tried two to three years ago would never have come out with a statement like that. The question though moving forward is whether the government decides to accept its findings and act on them. We have heard a lot from the prime minister's office the attorney general's office and other government agencies about accountability but so far very little indication that the government is willing to hold anyone but members of the tepe accountable for crimes committed during this conflict. More makes it even more. Complicated of course is the fact that the prime culprits in this case were eritrean. Troops can be very politically difficult for the government. Addis ababa which has been relying on these troops from eritrea relying on its relationship with the eritrean government to conduct its military operations in

Tigray Anthony Blinken Mr Abiy Mr Abi Mr Lincoln Tom Gardner Addis Eritrea Ethiopian Federal Army Im Hara Ethiopian Army America Ethiopia Ababa European Army TB Federal Government Airtran Matt State Appointed Human Rights C European Government
Advocacy group: Biden should revamp US human rights policy

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:08 sec | 7 months ago

Advocacy group: Biden should revamp US human rights policy

"On an advocacy group calling on President elect Joe Biden to revamp the nation's human rights policy. Human rights Watch laying out a long wish list for the Biden

Joe Biden Biden
Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

BBC World Service

06:00 min | 7 months ago

Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

"Used a BBC World Service. Let's turn now to reactions to the sentence, handed down to to one one of of Saudi Saudi Arabia Arabia is is best best known known women's women's rights rights activists. activists. She's She's the the Jane. Jane. I'll I'll have have flu. flu. Probably Probably activist activist who who campaign campaign for for women's women's rights rights to to drive drive has has been been sentenced sentenced to more than five years in prison by a special criminal court on that call was actually set up to try terrorism charges. It's an absolute was arrested in May, 2018 just before women were given the right to drive. Saudi authorities deny her arrest had anything to do with that issue. She was convicted of various charges, including trying to harm national security. In advance of foreign agenda all denied by her that speak now to her sister earlier. I'll have the welcome to news day earlier. Thank you so much for joining us. I mean, you had you and your family, of course for continuously Against this sentence against her imprisonment. So five years and eight months. What do you make of that? Hi. So first of all, it's five years and eight months. But if you do all the calculation because she spent already three years almost three years in prison on there for two years and a half she she voted Meteo stay in prison, eh? So it means that she can be freed by next March. 2021, however, Login T really was very, very sad when she heard the news that the sentence because for her, it means that the court consider her as terrorists. And that's why she's going on appeal. She will appeal. Um s O in order to obtain her innocents. Okay. And what do they based that on that charge on? What exactly are they saying that she's done to actually have this charge of terrorism leveled against her? So if you read the charges, it is. There are so many charges, for example, applying for the United Nations, Uh, tweeting on Twitter and using social media to advocate for women's right. There are everything related to her activities on also being in contact with international NGOs like A mysterious into a Miss Stanton on the international or Human Rights Watch, etcetera, but also contracting, for example, the UK Embassy and contacting that European Union representation in Saudi Arabia and they consider those two entities or was also Netherlands. Those three entities as terrorists of foreign entities. So it is a bit strange. They are allies and at the same time considered as a terrorist Indeed, yes, that's that's an argument that has got many contradictions in it hasn't it and also that the court dismissed planes that she had been tortured whilst She was held now you would dispute that. Exactly. So it was two other whole process and the acceleration off the trial started almost two weeks ago and into its ago. It was mainly about the charges against the grain. And when that don't say OK, bye. Next session, I will pronounce that the verdict. And she said Lujan said Okay, but you never investigate on the church. Er how? Come on. This is okay. We will start and the next day It was, um, a to the regular courts at trial regarding the church er and two days after they said Okay, we did the investigation and we are Conclude that there was no torture. So it was you say, and she says, And she says, What exactly happened to what your detail is quite horrific. It is extremely shocking. So it's impossible to imagine that such things could happen in prison. And especially, I mean When we say Saudi Arabia we know that the situation off women but also the women. We try toe over protect themselves. Sometimes it is impossible to imagine that men they do all these bad things to a single women on a so she was even sexually harassed, electrocuted. It's hard to eat. It'll, uh, getting very sick and yes, she was shaking a difficulty to breathe Exeter for a couple of months. And of course, she was incarcerated just shortly before women or her campaign to allow women were one of the things allow women to be able to drive in Saudi Arabia actually got the go ahead, so she hasn't experienced that. But she can Be released from jail as you say the release convey as early as as the spring next year, But I guess if she wants to carry on campaigning, that would be a problem for her. She may end up back in inside jail. So what is she communicated to you? She intends to do Who's she looking talk to to help her. Well, First of all the main, you know, you need to choose your battles, certain points. So the fight she's doing right now. She is T o to prove that she was tortured. So this is the first thing and also to get her innocents. So I guess, uh, doing those fights. It is her priority for the time being. We will see later on Okay. We're good to talk to you. And we will obviously be following that story very closely to find out what happens to Lucien. I'll have little on her release. That's a sister Talia. I'll have through. Thank you for talking to me today.

Saudi Saudi Arabia Saudi FLU Jane Miss Stanton International Or Human Rights Uk Embassy Arabia BBC Etcetera Lujan United Nations European Union Netherlands Twitter Exeter Lucien Talia
"human rights watch" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 7 months ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As they wait to see a doctor inside. As a department just for malnourished kids who've developed other complications has it is about is here with her granddaughter providers. 18 months old. She keeps vomiting. But she's too weak to move on her car. So the vomit dribbles down her neck and into her tattered tracksuit. So that was your way didn't have enough to feed her. Sometimes we only have tea for two or three days. We don't even have bread. President Bush says money scarce because his sons can't find work to get to hospital. She had to borrow $8 for the taxi. That's a huge sum seems like this a jarring considering how much the U. S spent on the war in Afghanistan. Some $2 trillion, according to one study. Most of that spending was military related. But billions was shelled out on development. So why Afghans starving. It's a million dollar question, isn't it? Actually, it's a many million dollar question Have the ball is from human rights watch, she says. For years, corruption SAP funds, diplomats kept rotating in and out they in the aid workers who were supposed to oversee the assistance. Largely stayed in their compounds for security reasons. The cumulative effect of all that is pretty disastrous. You know, we have a country which is still got some of the worst development indicators in the world. After an extraordinary amount of money being spent bar in aid workers say things have gotten more organized. Although the international community is donating less with the funding it does expect to get UNICEF believes it will be able to treat a third of the Children who need urgent help. This is have a bargain. The international community is largely done with Afghanistan, and that includes America. There's just no realistic expectation. That the U. S. Is going to remain interested in Afghanistan ready to continue bankrolling Afghanistan's deeply financially dependent governments. Already, kids like Provida,.

Afghanistan President Bush Provida UNICEF U. S America
Why a New Abortion Ban in Poland is Causing a Furor

PRI's The World

05:31 min | 9 months ago

Why a New Abortion Ban in Poland is Causing a Furor

"Today in Poland where for five straight days. Now, streets across the country have been filled with protesters as we mark the swearing in of new Supreme Court, Justice Amy Coney Barrett, and wonder how the court will now see Roe v Wade Poland is an interesting case protesters. There are angry precisely because of a high court ruling on. Abortion last week, Poland's constitutional tribunal outlawed the practice in all but the most exceptional of circumstances as the world's Europe correspondent Orla Barry reports. The latest legal decision is now being widely condemned by women's rights, groups, Justin of it. The refs as a founding member of the abortion dream, team they're a well-known group of activists who says out in two thousand sixteen to de stigmatize abortion in Poland the dress had an abortion in. Two thousand six and even though she worked with an abortion support group called almost no one about your own experience for more than twelve years up to two thousand, eighteen I was talking about this as anonymous person. I was not showing my face I was afraid about my community for threats says, she worried what our neighbors would thank her. There's nothing unusual about women keeping their abortion secret in Poland more than one thousand. Legal abortions for carried out in the country last year but women's groups reckon that the number of illegal abortions or those performed abroad is closer to two hundred thousand. No one knows the exact figure the court ruling last Thursday. Permits Abortion only in cases of rape incest and the mother's life is at risk activists say that just adds to the stigma and it helps explain why women have been out protesting every day since. In more. So last night protesters poured red paint across the city's main bridge holding up signs that read you have blood on your hands, and this is war in the western city of Poznan demonstrators interrupted Sunday church services. Video posted online. A couple of dozen protesters are seen approaching the altar chanting we've had enough, but the refs ca says young people using such fury at the church is something new for Poland. There are very young women who are protesting chorus creaming on the on the priests in small towns. And like really today jurors, it is something which hasn't been seen on the streets before this is something new. What we see ninety percent of Poles identifies Catholic, and since coming to power in two thousand fifteen, the ruling law and Justice Party has promoted what it calls traditional Catholic values but recent surveys show the majority of Poles did not support more restrictive abortion laws. Activists say the new measures are a threat to women's rights in Poland Hillary Margolis is a senior. Researcher. With human rights, Watch under the Lawn Justice Party, we've seen repeated attempts to completely ban abortion also to obstruct sexuality education schools to really smear and undermine women's rights, groups and activists including those who work on violence against women and Margolis says, it's not just women's rights conservative politicians have in their sides the way they've used the concept of the so called traditional family to undermine women's rights but also lgbt rapes is very worry but in some ways has seen. Some success you they've managed to get people afraid and that is I think part of how they have kept power. But protesters say they will not be deterred several university faculties canceling classes tomorrow and some companies have announced a day off. So workers can protest Anthony in eleven. Scott is a sexual and reproductive health and rights activists based on more. So she says is not just young women who are taking to the streets taxi drivers joined yesterday form as join and. Some smaller towns and of the groups that has already joined the protest were actually the police officers that goes ing one of the provinces they just took their helmets off and they entered the crowd in order to participate. But not all police officers support the demonstrators that have been street clashes in Warsaw and Levin of SCO worries things might get more violent yesterday. The prime minister gave permission for the Military Police to join the police in the streets and they only do. You really believe that there is a huge risk of riots and the public turning islands. The Polish government has been accused of appointing judges loyal to the ruling party activists are hopeful that an international body like the European. Court of Human Rights could challenge the recent decision on abortion on that basis. In the meantime campaigners say they're worried about their future in Poland I asked just thrift Ska from the abortion dream, team if she's concerned about being targeted by authorities of cars every. Day that we are expecting them. So if there will be some kind of idea to close us, we will move abroad and we'll be still working will not stop for the rest says no matter what the government does women will continue to have abortions in Poland, and groups like hers will keep fighting for the right to do. So for the world I'm Morna Barry.

Poland Court Of Human Rights Wade Poland Hillary Margolis Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett Orla Barry Justice Party Morna Barry Europe Rape Lawn Justice Party Justin Poznan Founding Member ROE Warsaw
Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

Democracy Now! Audio

00:27 sec | 10 months ago

Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

"And Bengladeshi. The approved the use of the death penalty for convicted rapists. This comes following widespread protests over several high profile rape cases including a gang rape and a remote village which circulated on Social Media Human Rights Watch US South Asia director knock. She ganguly noted that most cases are not reported or prosecuted and conviction rates are low and the government should instead focus on reforming Bangladesh is justice system.

Rape Ganguly Bangladesh Director Asia
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 10 months ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
"human rights watch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:03 min | 10 months ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The end when they broke it up with the cuddling and assault on the protesters. What many of the people we interviewed felt and what their sense was. They felt that this Particular protest was being targeted because in part where it was in Mont haven in the south, funks, primarily black and brown neighborhood and the fact that it was being led by Group, Two are who are known for known to the NYPD. Take back the Bronx for NYPD Accountability de Colonized this place. They are known for being outspoken advocates against police brutality calling for accountability, and many felt that the police planned this operation to send A strong message to these protesters. These organizer's in this neighborhood. I see our lines are starting to light up listeners. We can take some phone calls. If you are a protester on the scene, If you are a police officer on the scene was this a human rights violation, a violation of international human rights law. As human rights Watch now labels it with our guest from human Rights Watch Ida Sawyer, Sawyer and Gothamist. Police beat reporter Jake often huts 646435 70 to 80 will get to a few phone calls 646435. 70 to 80 or tweet at Brian Live just to follow up on what? What? You were just saying. I don't know, Jake. I'll put this to you, the organizers of the protest. We're a group called FTP formation FTP for our listeners not familiar commonly stands for expletive. The police ftp clips from the protest certainly shows some emotionally charged in confrontational language against the police. One of the organizers, Shannon Jones said in her interview with You, Jake, that quote hugging cops was essentially a waste of time flyers were posted depicting burning police cause So is there anything about FTP formation or the rhetoric of this particular march that when compared to other marches at the time could have colored the ex NYPD. He's expectation of violence. Or is this the police showing a thin skin to what was never more than an expression no matter how harsh of free speech I'll jump in. I think I think part of this. But this context is that FTP is just a coalition of groups. And they really kind of came about last year in response to the proposal to add a lot of police officers in the subway system. And in the pre pandemic times there were three protests. Against adding cops to the transit system. The first one it seemed like police were really caught off guard by there were hundreds of people in the streets. Where's this Mass? There jumping action There was there was stuff like graffiti. And Next to have this enormous police response and I suspect they had sort of singled out this Umbrella group FTP as something that they wanted to zero in on and you know, to make sure that nothing got got out of hand. I mean, like, points out there there was. There was no evidence of that at this. At this event. It was Led by two women of color who have Lived in the South Bronx for a long time They were passing out food to homeless almost wrong. Cites a few minutes before this. I don't I don't think that there was like any Any strong reasons. Believe that this was going to be a protest that foot did damage on the community that they wouldn't Here's a caller gym in the Bronx. Who says she's part of ftp Jim? Thank you so much for calling in your on W m i C Hi. How are you? Good. How are you? My name? Good. My name is Jeff Isaac and a part of Bronx Vice NYPD accountability. Fortunately known. It's why accountability across all social media platforms. Um and I think that what's being lost here, um, possibly purposely. Is the origin of why the FTP formation began. The formation began as a direct response to the attacks on Black and Brown youth in the New York City subway transit. By the NYPD. So you had an incident that occurred in Brooklyn where Adrian appear. Ah, young black youth. Was stopped and guns were pulled out on him by the NYPD for allegedly fare evasion. Right then you also had an attack on students. In Brooklyn at a train station where The NYPD basically knuckled up. I got into this fight a fistfight with Children and beat up Children. Upon seeing this. We as bronc sight. Understand? We recognise that Something that's been happening to us since we were illegally trafficked here from Africa. So is the continuation of the attack against black and brown people. But now the focus is taking place in the New York City transit system. So as a response to that the FTP formation began. We came out to support Adrian appear and the Children in Brooklyn and the countless others who have been attacked by The NYPD. Enforcement affair evasion. That is why it began. And this is something that I think that once we came out and act like other people to join us, other black and brown marginalized in New York, er's understood it. They recognised it. And they affirmed it. By their participation. Um, as you know, broad specs for NYPD Accountability is one of several groups that started to swipe that four campaign. What is that? A direct response to the over policing of black and brown communities throughout New York City. So Human rights watch, swipe it forward, like let people into now. Late again. Swipe it Forward meeting. Let people into the subway. Like Ford is a direct direct. Action. Jensen, too stunned to say, Hey, it is not illegal to look out for your fellow New Yorker. Poverty should not be criminalized. And if you have the means to swipe someone into the it prevents PP and anyone else from attacking that person from quote unquote evasion. What would you say to anyone who asks Why do you have to use the F initial As part of the group. Well, Once again, why's black and brown speech was, Why's the speech of us as black people always being police? Why does the language Upset you more than the action against the press. Jim. Thank you so much for all that background. Let's take another call Dean in Ridgewood. You're on W. M. C. Dean says he was at this particular protest. Hello? Hi, Brian. Hi, j Hi. The other guests. Yeah, I was there as a peaceful protester. And just hearing the mayor speak is so absurd and disrespectful Teo, the leader of a city to dismiss the findings of human rights, wash. An international aid organization and go with the internal investigation of his Like dismal administration is just so bleak. And like, what a complete failure of leadership like You can't imagine anything worse than that. I thought so much and I'm going to play. I'm going to play another clip of the mayor than from that segment last Friday. Cause here we are three months later and no updates on the Department of Investigation Enquiry, which he says he's waiting for in order to determine from his point of view whether a human rights violation was Committed and whether the police commissioner should be disciplined for it. And while they're no longer using the gun in gasoline to justify the raid, because that's been demonstrated to have been false, they still insist that there was enough to act on. So here's a little more of the mayor from last Friday, making that very point On the question of the threat of violence. We had seen violence in the days before, and there were specific threats directed at that site earlier in the afternoon. I know that for a fact because it was reported to me earlier that afternoon, different once referred to the Again, please different than the ones that the commissioner referred to there and accurately. Yes, And the point, though, is I don't want anyone to go buy one person's story or another person's story. I want a complete investigation. And then the people. If everything's were done, right, they were done right if they were done wrong. Anyone who did something wrong should be held accountable in the appropriate way. We're not doing it based on anything short of a complete investigation. So Jake often hearts from Gothamist. What it was that new to you that the mayor was saying that there is other information. Besides the discredited information about specific threats directed A TTE that site that caused the police to kettle. The protesters. I mean, it was it was. I guess it was new. I don't know. We've asked them over and over. Was there anything? Was there any other specific now that the gas in there were gun have been discredited? Was there any other specific that the man has come up with that another time? The 40th precinct of the NYPD. The post on Facebook that they had a credible threat that people had planted bricks somewhere along this protest route. Again. No evidence of that These. These organizers are not known for planting bricks or throwing bricks into the storefronts in their own community. If the idea of the mayor Proof of that. They have not provided it. I also want to just point out there. When you when you spoke with the mayor last week, really.

NYPD New York City Jake Brooklyn officer Adrian Brian Live Jim assault South Bronx Mont haven Shannon Jones Bronx Ida Sawyer Africa reporter
"human rights watch" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

07:52 min | 11 months ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Is that the Trump Administration quote effort to cherry pick rights in order to deny some of their human rights. Eyes a dangerous political stunt that could spark a race to the bottom by human rights abusing governments around the world. Louise sharpen a Thie Yuen, director of Human Rights Watch, said quote US Commission on Unalienable Rights is a deeply misguided enterprise with the potential to undermine human rights protections that governments find disagreeable. The commission promotes the false premise that Too many people, particularly lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, and women are asserting their rights. Oh, How dare they? It's inconvenient and distasteful. Yeah. So this brought to mind. Ah, very fine Speech ah, to the U. N General Assembly that occurred several years ago by none other than Hillary Clinton at the time, I believe was Secretary of State. For the United States. Ah wondered. Previous administration and really had some important things to say about that connection between gay rights and human rights. And human rights being gay rights, and so, uh, hopefully here we can do a little bit of Internet magic with the Wayback machine. I think I got it and present that to you. All right. They are denied opportunities to work and learn, driven from their homes and countries and forced to suppress or deny who they are. To protect themselves from harm. I am talking about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people. Human beings born free and given Bastogne, equality and dignity, who have a right to claim that which is now one of the remaining human rights. Challenges of our time. My own country's record on human rights for gay people is far from perfect. Until 2003. It was still a crime in parts of our country. Many LGBT Americans have endured violence and harassment in their own lives, and for some, including many young people, bullying and exclusion are daily experiences. So we, like all nations have more work to do to protect human rights at home. Some seemed to believe it is a Western phenomenon and therefore people outside the West have grounds to reject it. Well in reality, gay people are born into and belong to every society in the world. They're all ages. All races, all faiths. They are doctors and teachers. Farmers and bankers, soldiers and athletes and whether we know it or whether we acknowledge it. They are our family, our friends and our neighbors. Being gay is not a Western invention. It is a human reality. I'm not sure that was the exact clip I was looking or that we were looking for, but encapsulated the speech. At least she isn't of it. Yes, there is a half a now our version of it out there on the YouTube's and Other places on the Internets. If that, what did your appetite for more on the topic? Yes, Thank you. Well, speaking of, ah, things like human rights and the consequences of changes and administration. Etcetera, Um Ah well. Our most recent, Ah, Manifestation of that is in the Ah The loss of Ah Ruth Bader Ginsburg as Supreme Court justice. And Ah, um Now a replacement, although how can you possibly think that's when I was a kid? But someone to to at least fill that seat is been proposed by the Trump administration. Thiss from the Washington Blade. Recently, President Trump has selected Amy Kuney Barrett as federal appellate, Ah federal appellate judge and a favorite among religious conservatives as his choice to replace progressive champion River Gator, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. On the Supreme Court. Trump announced. The selection of Barrett, who currently serves on the U. S Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals had a White House Rose Garden event on Saturday, calling for a quote, straightforward and prompt confirmation. Trump said. Quote. For the last three years, Judge Barrett has served with immense distinction on the federal bench. Amy is more than a stellar scholar and judges also profound, devoted mother. Her family is a core part of who Amy is. He opened her home and her heart and adopted two beautiful Children from Haiti. They're incredible Bond with her youngest child, a son with down syndrome is a true inspiration. Garrett, in her remarks, acknowledged Ginsberg upon her passing, but also the late US associate Judge Antonin Scalia, with whom she worked as a law clerk and who was renowned for his anti all to be too cute Descents. Garrett said. Quote. I clerked for Justice Scalia more than 20 years ago, But the lessons I learned still resonate. His judicial philosophy is mine to a judge must apply the law as written. Judges are not policymakers, and they must be resolute in setting aside any policy views they might hold. An inside source close to the selection process confirmed to the blade late Friday that Trump's pick would be Barrett. The news was first reported by CNN and CBS News. Artist trumps third pick for the Supreme Court after the appointment and confirmations of US associate justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. Senate Republicans have signal they intend to hold a confirmation vote on the nominee, despite objections from Democrats who say the chambers should hold off given election day is less than two months away. LGBT rights groups wary of parrots writings, asserting a judge's obligation is to place faith. Above the law were quick to denounce the choice after the news was made. Afonso David, president of the Human Rights campaign, said in a statement. The nomination is a slap in the face again. Ginsberg's legacy Hey, said quote. If she is nominated and confirmed Cockney Barrett would work to dismantle all that Ruth Bader Ginsburg fought for during her extraordinary career. An appointment of this magnitude must be made by the president inaugurated in January. Human rights campaign perfectly opposes Cockney Barrett's domination and this sham process, in contrast to Ginsberg, who joined each of the major decisions in favor of LGBTQ rights from the Supreme Court..

Amy Kuney Barrett Ruth Bader Ginsburg President Trump Supreme Court Trump administration US Judge Antonin Scalia Ginsberg Hillary Clinton YouTube Senate U. S Seventh Circuit Court of harassment president Louise Haiti director
Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:57 sec | 11 months ago

Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

"Afghanistan has issued a decree allowing women to be listed on the identity cards of their Children. NPR's DEA had eight reports. Until now, the documents on Ly contained the names of Father's. The new law is expected to make things easier for single Afghan mothers in particular, who struggle to do things like sign their kids up for school or get them emergency medical care. This is how the bar co director of the women's rights division at Human Rights Watch, So this law is actually a really important development, which is gonna have a lot of really world consequences. Boss says The new decree may also shift the common notion in Afghanistan that Children are their father's property, and it comes at an important time. The government and the Taliban are negotiating pace and feminist fear women's rights will be compromised to appease the insurgents. There's a sense that laws mandating women's equality have to be pushed through quickly. D a deed. NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD, Europe's largest

Afghanistan NPR LY Director DEA Islamabad Taliban Europe Government
Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 11 months ago

Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

"Has issued a decree saying women will now be listed on the identity cards of their Children. That's according to his spokesman. Until now, Afghan Children on Lee had their father's listed as NPR's DEA Hadeed reports. The new law is expected to make things easier for single Afghan mothers in particular who struggle to do things like sign their kids up for school or get them emergency medical care. This is how the bar co director of the women's rights division at Human Rights Watch, So this law is actually a really important development, which is gonna have a lot of really world consequences. Boss says The new decree may also shift the common notion in Afghanistan that Children are their father's property. And it comes at an important time. The government and the Taliban are negotiating pace and feminist fear women's rights. We compromised to appease the insurgents, There's a sense that laws mandating women's equality have to be pushed through quickly. D a

Dea Hadeed Director Afghanistan Taliban NPR LEE Government
Blaze That Destroyed Greece's Moria Refugee Camp Symbolizes Breakdown in E.U. Over Future of Migrants

TIME's Top Stories

02:23 min | 11 months ago

Blaze That Destroyed Greece's Moria Refugee Camp Symbolizes Breakdown in E.U. Over Future of Migrants

"Twelve thousand migrants and refugees were left without shelter or access to basic services after fires over the past two days spread throughout Greece's largest refugee camp Maurya on the island of less bows affiars came amid escalating tension on the island within Greece and the wider European Union, the issue of migrants, the residents, most of whom are fleeing from Afghanistan Syria have faced overcrowded and dangerous living circumstances since. The CAP was founded in two thousand fifteen. Then last week the CAP had its first outbreak of covid nineteen leading to a two week quarantine that severely restricted residents movements the first fire broke out on Tuesday evening destroying the majority of the camp the next night a second fire broke out at an informal settlement in the nearby olive grove turning the last intact section of the camp into. Ash. Although it remains unclear how exactly the fires began authorities say the fires were started by refugees protesting new covid nineteen policies. Others blamed far right. Greek locals for starting the fire amid rising anti migrant sentiment on the island. While neither accounts have been verified the rumors circulating about who started the fires are illustrative of larger tensions on the island whereby migrants are fed up of their poor living circumstances and local resonance are increasingly resentful of the lack of national regional and international support for managing the influx of migrants and refugees on the island. It all comes at a time where many migrants feel Europe is turning its back on them becoming less tolerant and less willing to help with countries like France taking tougher measures on immigration. We've been saying that Maurya is a ticking time. Bomb Says Eva Khazei a researcher at Human Rights Watch says she and many other experts predicted a crisis like this would unfold. It's not surprising. She says at all but it's incredibly sad it shows how badly the European Union and Greece have manage this situation. Now with most of the camp destroyed the future of migrants and refugees living in Mauriot remain unknown.

Greece European Union Eva Khazei Maurya Afghanistan Human Rights Watch Europe Mauriot Syria France Researcher
Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. Kosovo. With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. Dr Dole and welcome to the program. I David thanks so much for having me. Please call me Rachel. While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, of course, the podcast website. In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, thousand seven, the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. Unquote. Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. Regarding off label use of these drugs, eleven years later, Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. How. Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. The report found in two thousand, sixteen, seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, for example, Sarah. Quel. Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, seventy, nine, thousand, long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. Committee. Heard this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. Close quote. This is my third related interview. In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. And in February, eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate neatly into the specifics of the report. What did the report find regarding the extent to which? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. David. So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, has implications for patient safety and and health We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. So that's about two, hundred, Ninety, eight, thousand, six, hundred, fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated So specifically, we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. So that's kind of the. Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, fifteen, twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, seventeen to twenty eighteen, and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. So you know. I. Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, seventeen, twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, can you give an approximation of the cost? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, mean, this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. I don't remember offhand. Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, thousand, twelve constituting roughly three, hundred, sixty, three, million part D plan payments that year and of course, there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. So it's it's fairly substantial.

Dr Rachel Dolan FDA David Intra United States Antipsychotic Trump Administration Nursing Home Facility Dr Dole Us House Of Representatives Dr David Graham Human Rights Watch Kosovo House Energy And Commerce Comm Means Committee Diana Zuckerman America Obama Administration Psychosis Rispler
China Sanctions 11 US Citizens Including Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz

The World

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

China Sanctions 11 US Citizens Including Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz

"Will sanction 11 Americans in response to similar US measures announced last week against Hong Kong and Chinese officials. NPR's Emily Thing, reports. The move comes amid escalating tensions between Washington and Beijing among the American sanctions. Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, who China has already sanctioned in retaliation for other American sanctions over China's detention and abuse of millions of ethnic Uighur Muslims. Human Rights Watch executive director Kenneth Roth and Michael Abramowitz, the president of Freedom House will also be sanctioned meeting any assets they have in China will be frozen and they travel to China banned. Last week. The U. S sanctioned Hong Kong chief executive carry land and 10 other Hong Kong and Beijing officials for their involvement in the national security law that has been used to prosecute a broad range of dissent in Hong Kong. Emily Thing. NPR NEWS Beijing At the close on Wall

Hong Kong Emily Thing China Beijing NPR Marco Rubio United States Kenneth Roth Executive Director Chief Executive Ted Cruz Michael Abramowitz Freedom House Washington President Trump U. S
Officials resign in Lebanon in wake of deadly blast

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Officials resign in Lebanon in wake of deadly blast

"A growing fury in Lebanon as the country deals with the aftermath of a huge explosion in Beirut that has left 300,000 people homeless. And at least 160 people dead. Protests have erupted yesterday, Demonstrators staged mock hangings of top officials demanding they resigned. A few members of parliament have Meanwhile, the political elite point fingers at each other for the failure to secure the huge cache of ammonium nitrate that caused the blast. Nadim Curie is Thie, executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative team and the former head of Lebanon's human rights Watch office and his watch. Lebanon have to rebuild calamity after calamity and he joins us now to discuss what's happening. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Your grandmother lives near the port. Can you tell me how she and your other family members are doing? No, they survived. Almost miraculously, when you see the damage that happened to their building and how close they were to the explosion, they survived with minor scratches. Most of my friends and neighbors from that area everyone has a survival story. It was often a question of seconds of luck of a door that protected them from a flying glass and so forth. Most Lebanese have stories of survival over the last 23 decades, escaping bombs escaping now this explosion, But this time it really that the scale of it is shocking for listeners with don't know Beirut, it happened. Very close to the major entry point of the city. This was also the area where most of the restaurants, cafes and bars were so really, it's an attack that sort of at the heart of the city. The Lebanese have started to protest again. Government corruption They had been doing that for most of last year. What makes this kind of endemic corruption different in Lebanon? Than in other places where it might exist in Lebanon. The corruption has now become part of the A of the political system of the country. The so called you know, Secretary in Cassock Schimmel system You cannot appoint A single official. Whatever the rank is without going through the client, illest IQ sectarian networks off what we call the Sarma, the sectarian leaders. Now, why is this corrupt Because that means you cannot hold a single official responsible without going through these traditional sectarian client ballistic networks, so we should say here. Of course, Ever since the Civil war in Lebanon. What has been put in place? Is that a sort of government that is set up Tio Cater to different sectarian interests in the country. Yes, This is how it officially gets described. But in practice, what we've discovered is that it's really a system that caters to six oligarchs who are corrupt. They are of different confessions. And they pretend to speak in the name ofthe their sectarian group by saying we defend this confessional group. All services for the group have to flow through us. But in practice what the Lebanese have been discovering over the years is They're not protecting anyone but their own pockets and their cronies, pockets and the system in a way, it's a bit like a cancer. It started initially, supposedly for the High level positions to ensure that all communities are represented, but almost like a cancer that is spreading through the body politick. It has now circulated down to every single layer of administration of our government's so even when you go to the port of Beirut You know, the porters that are getting named, depend on a political leader, appointing them And why did they do that? Because this is how they keep them in line and this is how they get their political loyalty. It's a system of patronage, essentially. So what needs to happen then? In your view to move the country forward. The main Demand today is tohave a salvation government off people that are outside off the existing political class. This would be a government that has a clear mandate to steer the ship through the economic crisis that would have the trust of the people. It would be an exceptional situation for two or three years just to stabilize the ship. And adopt affair addict oral law and have elections in two or three years, which hopefully we'll see the emergence of new political parties. I must ask you a someone who watches Lebanon A someone who is Lebanese. Are you concerned that this might be a tipping point? It is a tipping point if we do not get rid of this political class All of Lebanon's talents. Those who can leave will leave in the coming 12 months. They no longer want to live in that country because they see a state that is killing them slowly and they're not just killing them with these explosions there, killing them with the corruption, which makes the environment unlivable. Lebanon now has one of the highest cancer rates. It's killing them with the economy, the country can be rebuilt. Unfair er better basis, but it's clear now that this cannot happen While the current political class remains in place. I realize what we're talking about is really a fight as to who's going to stay in Lebanon. It's day or us

Lebanon Beirut Nadim Curie Thie Arab Reform Initiative Cancer Executive Director Official Sarma Cassock Schimmel Secretary
Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

Between The Lines

08:26 min | 1 year ago

Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

"Battle of free speech on Australian University campuses. Allying piece was interviewed by the Media Department at the University of new. South. Wales about the human rights implications of Hong. Kong's new national security role as. Director at Human Rights Watch and an adjunct law lecturer at the university. She expressed concern about the laws and called on the United Nations Secretary General to appoint a special envoy in Hong Kong. Well, it's hardly a very controversial stuff in democracy lock Australia Russia. Will sell you think. We'll after the article, win online the pro. Chinese Communist Party students at the university they demanded the article be removed. You see caused a fence it was hurtful to the communist government in China. The university caved in and pulled the article. Only. After an outcry in the press was the article riposted. So. How did we get to the point when one of Australia's leading universities agrees to political censorship in favor of another nation state? Elaine. Joins me now aligned welcome to between the lines. Great to have you on the program. Thanks Tom. Now, the article is back on the University of New South Wales website but with caveats that the views expressed do not represent the views of the university you happy with this outcome. Well I'm glad that they put it back up. But I am pretty disappointed at the university's response I mean I think you know the views expressed in that article of us about the human rights situation in Hong Kong and I think that shouldn't be something that should be controversial and I was a bit surprised actually that the university was so quick to distance themselves from those views and I think you know I presumed that the ferocity of the campaign by the Pro Chinese Communist Party. Students really took them by surprise. But I think now the question really is how is Going to respond to this and I, think the students you know really are looking to see what is going to be the public response and what next is the university going to do to address these shoes mind you. This is not the only incident of academic freedom being compromised. Can you tell us about some of the other cases? Yeah, Human Rights Watch has actually been documenting Chinese document lit threats to academic freedom since two thousand fifteen not just in Australia about universities all around the world we've looked cases in the US the UK Canada France and right here, and what we've seen is that there is A universities are in a tight bind because the become quite dependent on foreign students. Many of those students coming from China those students have a very different world view, many of them and when they come here. Obviously you know coming here should come with a guarantee of academic freedom and what these should be quite basic things for an Australian university education. But in reality if those students try and for instance, join protests on campus about Hong Kong or Fin Jiang they are often then reported to the Chinese consulates So they are very afraid of doing anything like that they just. Try and keep the hits down and you know you only have to look at the controversy that's happened on Q. Withdrew Pavlou and how he has been treated to see that you know we you know it's not a very impressive response from the universities to to say, Scott Free speech and academic freedom only sorts of sensitive topics like shin-jang like Hong Kong, and like human rights in China. Now you mentioned drew heavily, he was expelled from the University of Queensland in part. For, organizing, what was it very noisy pro Hong Kong protests is that right? Well, he's been suspended. So I, think you know the industry who six months suspension six month suspension so He has been you know he's had been a pretty provocative campaigner. Some of these methods may have been a bit unorthodox, but at the end of the day, look at what happened to him on on that campus I. Mean there were fistfights erupting you cue between the different student groups you had in our pro CCP's students you know supporting the Communist Party trying to tear down. The messages from? Hong, Kong democracy supporters and the only person who's actually suffered any retaliation or reprisals is is drew himself, and so we wanna see universities really safeguard academic freedom and free speech and I think that means also acting against those who are intimidating or harassing all those on campus and making the campus a safe space to express all sorts of different views. Now in your case, a lot of the outrage amongst the Chinese students was expressed and organized I understand on Chinese soil media platforms way chat. which are now apparently watched by Beijing and to what extent you concerned about those platforms like we had and I think the other one is is a waiver we Yes that's right. Yeah I mean. These were the platforms where they organize. Look if students want to express different view an opposing you that's fine I think. I'm concerned is the extent to which this campaign became one of intimidating and harassing other students who expressed different views and as I understand it were threats made that they would report people to the Chinese consulate. For expressing excuse so I think the universities actually really need to monitor. Their social media channels and not just use them as a means of advertising for you know potential new students come to the university but also make sure that those channels are being you know being up being watched not to to censor free speech. But as I said, you know where that free speech is crossing the line. I also think they just need to be clear to the students. You know what what that means that it means. Going to a means being exposed to two different views and a free to discuss and debate those issues, but you're not free to shut down. The views of others. Of course, a line universities in Australia and this is cried sacred I've become increasingly dependent on. Overseas students for their budgets. Some have more diversified student bodies but others locked. University of new, South, Wales away opposite talking about University of New South Wales because of your special case this week they heavily concentrated on the Chinese market now since covert. US W has been one of the hardest hit by travel restrictions at recently made nearly I think five hundred staff redundant. Do you think this budget anxiety affected their handling of the issue align peace and? Yes I've been I think this reliance on the revenue from foreign students is something that you know all universities are facing now and so it it is putting them in a difficult position but I think that's why actually universities need to have a unified front. I think they really need to look at their existing. Codes of conduct they don't actually deal with these issues of foreign students might come from very different oil you, and so you know what I've suggested to you, and it's still view and to many other universities in Australia is to adopt a twelve point code of conduct specifically on these issues and they need to be alive to these issues. They need to incorporate it more into the orientation when you foreign students coming to campus so that they really understand what academic freedom means with our and they need to sort of monitor and. Safeguard, for you know acts of intimidation or harassment because I'm not so worried about myself but I'm more worried about other students on campus who will see how the situation has developed and then they might be too scared to speak out on. Hong Kong will fit in the classroom or other academics who might think twice about taking a meteorological on Hong Kong because they'll be worried about the potential backlash. So you know I think universities really need to take a stand on this and you know it needs to be done. You know jointly. By by all USTRALIAN universities.

Hong Kong Australia University Of New South Wales Human Rights Watch University Of New Chinese Communist Party Australian University Chinese Consulate China Hong Pro Chinese Communist Party University Of Queensland Wales United Nations Communist Government Media Department Director
"human rights watch" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"There's a disturbing new report out this morning. It claims widespread, abusive practices involving hundreds of child athletes in Japan. Minky Warden is director of the Human Rights Watch report. With the 2020 Olympic Games now delayed for a year due to the pandemic. Human Rights Watch is calling on Japan Tio take decisive action and to lead and tackling this global crisis. Nearly 70 page report contains accounts of athletes being choked. Whipped with whistles. And sexually abused. More than 50 straight nights, and protesters are still at it every single night in Portland, Oregon, now clashes with federal law enforcement officers with Homeland security in a violent night that sees tear gas and a police association building set on fire or land is currently the poster child for this administration. They are using us sort of throwing mud on the wall to see if this is an issue that might stick for the president, Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenbloom lawsuits are in the works, the city's mayor getting into it with Assitant Trump and his stepped up policy to crack down on crowds protesting police brutality and systemic racism. Democrats in the House now demanding internal investigations to see if Homeland Security and the Justice Department Have gone too far. It's 9 38 and the trading day is open for business on Wall Street and the numbers while they were flat. Let's check him out right now in business news from Bloomberg. Is Tom Busby kind of a lackluster start to the new trading Day Jeff investors awaiting the results of AstraZeneca's phase one trial of its experimental covert 19 vaccine that's going to compete abate against Moderna, the Cambridge based drug maker. Those results due today, so right now, down futures down 35 the NASDAQ down to S and P 500 lower by four years of Halliburton, up 8%. The oilfield services giant easily topping earnings forecast last quarter even though energy prices tumbled. But the big winner Shares of New Haven, Connecticut based drug maker Bio Excel up 30%. That follows positive results of AH late stage trial of its therapy for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder Time. Tom Busby Bloomberg Business on W..

Homeland Security Tom Busby Bloomberg Japan Oregon Tom Busby Assitant Trump Minky Warden Bloomberg New Haven Ellen Rosenbloom Halliburton AstraZeneca Portland Connecticut Justice Department director
UN: Libya's warring sides have agreed to restart peace talks

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:12 min | 1 year ago

UN: Libya's warring sides have agreed to restart peace talks

"The UN says Libya's warring factions have agreed to resume ceasefire talks follows days of heavy fighting in and around the capital Tripoli. Well, let's get more on this now with Mary Fitzgerald. Who is a research on Libya? Welcome back to the briefing Mary. Could you explain to listeners where we've got? Because there's been so many attempts to bring around some reconciliation? We have two warring parties here. The renegade leader, a half Dr who's oddly backed by many regional powers up against the forces in Tripoli, but just explain where we're on why there is potentially an opportunity for change. Well I would be very wary about even that ten am. And certainly there's a lot of skepticism on the ground amongst on radio bands about the these latest s statements from the U N various internationals and skepticism. That is warranted. This! Particular war. It's a war over the capital. Tripoli Started in April last year, when how star at launch offensive to capture at AAA from the. UN recognized a government on the very day that UN Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez was to try if impetus to the UN political process, that political process is something. Half Star has tried to undermine at every juncture for several years now, and he didn't capture the capital despite. Promising his Libyan supporters and also external backers that he would be able to seize the capital within days or weeks, and with little bloodshed, and here we are over year later with. Thousands, dead, and hundreds of thousands, said displaced as a result of of this conflict, so this latest burst of up talk about negotiations comes as after has experienced a series of losses in recent months. He's lost control of a number of. Small towns in western Libya, but more importantly Anne. He has lost a key asset airbase in Western, Nubia, from which he he used that to to launch attacks. The capital so after is not just. Facing a failing offensive, he's also really am on the back foot and. Some of his forces have have retreated in recent weeks including a whole host of Russian mercenaries who've been finding him, so that's the background to this. Clearly, after feels his his in a corner, his backers, no doubt the UA at primarily also Egypt Saudi, Arabia and Russia and also clearly are in a bit of a pickle in terms of of the way forward here so this To restart talks aimed at reaching a lasting ceasefire. Talks that have been suspended for for the last three months, that was a an earlier burst at the beginning of the year brokered by Russia and Turkey Turkey being back our backer rather of the. The internationally recognized government that hostile his trying to unseat. They basically. Created a momentum earlier this year that led to those initial and talks, but this is very stop start and the reason there is a lot of skepticism on the ground in Libya is Libyans have seen so many times before promises about, and it goes stations to agree a ceasefire, and they ultimately breakdown, and and we're still in the middle of this grinding stalemated war. War A married Tummy. If people. In Tripoli, the capital is is life kind of taking on in an okay way. We know that they have a battle to deal with corona virus as well which is is very difficult to deal with when you're being besieged on your outskirts. How is the city functioning at this time as the city that you know personally very well? Well, my my last trip was in December and at that point that was a lot of trepidation. amongst residents of AAA that the war could move closer and closer to the center of the city while we've seen happened in recent weeks. Is that there has been an increase in targeting off Just at the weekend, seven people were killed. When there was shelling on a popular picnic spot, right in the center of. The U. N. and international human rights organizations subset most of these civilian debts, most of this indiscriminate shelling. Is attributable to to his forces. There is a belief on the ground in Tripoli that. These attacks are being done as a kind of a revenge or out of frustration, because basically run, and his forces are not getting what they want on top of all of that. Yes, covid nineteen has made an appearance in in in Libya. There have been hundreds of cases as been recently been a spurt of cases in southern Libya, but this of course has made things all the more challenging for for ordinary Libyans what we've seen in some. Positive way in in the last couple of days is the return of some of those thousands of people have been displaced over the last year as a result of the war, some of them are returning to their homes, but there returning also to. Some residential areas where landmines have been planted just today Human Rights Watch issued a report basically accusing after his forces of. Planting landmines across territory that they were in around Tripoli. Particularly residential areas are reapproach. Is it a a an amazing update on this story? We need come back to you more clearly on another show, but Mary thank you for joining, and that was the Libya expert. Mary fits General Gerald and you're listening to the briefing monocle. Twenty Four.

Tripoli Libya UN Mary Fitzgerald Secretary General Antonio Guti Russia AAA Monocle Anne Arabia General Gerald
Rakhine and ruin: insurgency in Myanmar

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:43 min | 1 year ago

Rakhine and ruin: insurgency in Myanmar

"On Tuesday. A driver for the world. Health Organization was killed in rock kind state in Myanmar. After his car was hit by gunfire the attack took place in a region where government troops have been locked in fierce fighting with the Arakan Army which wants greater autonomy for the state and for the kind of Arakan people countries including Britain and America have called for an end to fighting amid the cove nineteen pandemic but clashes have intensified governments. Flailing response seems to be boosting. The Arakan Army and the and army declared a month-long ceasefire but it was rejected by the government as unrealistic. Charlie McCann Economists Southeast Asia correspondent fighting between the army and the Burmese military has escalated over the last two months as has a war of words that they've been fighting. Each group has blamed the other for firing at the. Who car which was carrying swabs from patients to be tested for Krona virus. So this conflict get it start then. The conflict erupted on January fourth. Two Thousand Nineteen not coincidentally Myanmar's Independence Day about three hundred and fifty fighters from the army attacked for police posts in northern. Rakhine state killing thirteen officers. Now there had been skirmishes between the American army and the Burmese military before that but the insurgents had never been quite so brazen in response the government. Which of course is led by Aung San Succi a Nobel Peace Prize winner instructed the army to crush the rebels and the military has since deployed an estimated. Fifteen thousand to twenty thousand troops and deployed heavy artillery airstrikes hidden and even naval patrols despite all this the economy is actually making some headway. And so what are the stakes in this fight? What is it that the army wants with African army are ethnic rock kind? Buddhists who are longing for independence. They feel neglected by the central government for decades. Rakhine is one of me and Mars poorest states and the advent of civilian rule with Aung San Suu Dci in two thousand sixteen Only exacerbated tensions the Eric a National Party won a majority of parliamentary seats in the state of Rakhine and they believed that Aung San Suu Cheese Party. The National League for Democracy would let it nominate the state's chief minister instead the ANALII appointed one of their own and the a. n. p. and and many were kind sell. This is a great betrayal. That sense of embitterment deepened in two thousand eighteen. When the police killed seven protesters and arrested that. Npr's chairman all of which contributed to further radicalizing the raccoons and this is a state in. Myanmar. There's not unfamiliar with with sectarian tensions. That's right in two thousand seventeen. The Burmese military launched its clearance operations against the hinge a persecuted Muslim. Ethnic Minority Walser lived in Rakhine state. The kind the hinge Are Two of many ethnic. Minorities got it across me and mark who are discriminated against and are advocating for fighting for more freedoms if not independence and ask for the conflict between the Arakan army on the national military. How how's that going? The military is suffering terrible casualties. And the army are are humiliating. The military I conducting hundreds of duck shins of politicians businessmen civil servants and indeed soldiers the military's accustomed to siege warfare not to the kinds of tactics being deployed by the army which hides the jungle but also operates an urban areas which takes pot shots at our patrols also does all these brazen things like bombings and abductions and to the military's really floundering. It's response the army's successes really driven in large part by the group's Commander Thuan Rot nine. I am the leader of Argon. Army Major General Plan Renai educated. He's charismatic he's young. We have lost our rights. The rights of the indigenous people in contrast to many of the leaders of the countries other insurgencies who has been described to me by an analyst as comprising the FISA Club of guerrilla leaders. The commander recently called on his followers to throw off the shackles of Burmese. Racism and colonialism. So uses this very rousing language. Harks back to the long periods when kind state was a glorious independent kingdom. Every American has a dream in their heart is slickness is mirrored. In the group's social media videos which feature attractive young soldiers declaring their love for their homeland and engaging in wholesome wrestling matches we will never ever give up and and so with its army on the back foot. Then how has the government responded to this slick operation having handedly in June? It blocked mobile Internet service to about one million people in Rakhine engine states according to Human Rights. Watch this is one of the world's longest government imposed Internet blackouts last month. That also blocked access several news websites. That report on the conflict as well as designating the Eric Armenia. A terrorist organization that then enabled police to charge journalists who interviewed. That can army's commander in chief with violating the Counter Terrorism Law and we're kind civilians are really coming under fire. Amnesty International claims that the military has been shooting indiscriminately at recline towns and has been torturing and murdering civilians. We know that more than one. Hundred thousand civilians have been displaced by the fighting and now a meteoroid reports shows that forty two civilians have died since March twenty third and so again in our we have this example of the military taking an extremely heavy handed approach against its own citizens under the watch of Aung San. Suu She I mean. Her reputation suffered greatly after the crisis. How do you see this crisis? Playing out on Sun suits. He won election twenty-six teen on her promise to bring peace to the country the fact that her government has instructed the military to crush the rebels as she put it has designated them a terrorist organization. There's no way that she'll be able to bring about peace with methods like those to me. It looks as if the conflict is only going to escalate the atkin armies ten unflicting so much damage the government will have to make some concessions and indeed has over the past six months more than two hundred hand government employees and Chen state which is just north of re kind. A lot of the fighting has taken place have resigned after being threatened by its fighters. Now the rebels don't have the firepower to defeat the government militarily but they might not need to if they can inflict enough humiliation. The government might decide to retreat from the fight and seek a political settlement. Either way see piece for the possible future curly. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you

Army Government Arakan Army American Army Rakhine State Myanmar Aung San Succi Rakhine Arakan Aung San Charlie Mccann San Suu Cheese Party Health Organization San Suu Dci National League For Democracy America SUU Commander Thuan Rot
"human rights watch" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on KTOK

"United Nations or Human Rights Watch and they're saying that's that's the Rubicon that's the road that's the river we can't cross right now that once we do that if we really are developing autonomous lethal drone technology or even even if it's not from the air something on the ground the that that something that perhaps is is a but that's the bridge too far for many countries and they say that's what we have to be worried about well one of it well I I actually disagree that economy is the place that you want to draw the line I would say you know you want to draw the line to make sure that your weapons do what you want them to do and that can include economy and that includes kind of narrow artificial intelligence an example is a Thomas artificial intelligence we've had for a long time it's the Israeli herpes missile there is that is launched in World War two you member they have bullets with research so that the shooter would know where the bullets were going but it was a threat just sort because the target could actually look and say well I can see where the bullets are coming from right yeah and that that's kind of what the Herbie does it is launched over a specified kill region and it has the ability to what her in as soon as it hit by radar it traces that read are back from where from whence it came it follows that beam down if you will and actually takes off the radar installation and you can do all of this totally autonomously now you'll notice that that's a very very narrow mission and I think Meryl missions for ATI including a Thomas a high are are more manageable where you get into the problem is broad range artificial intelligence right and I think the one that's in the news as a self driving car which has it has all sorts of problems associated with it and it has problems with an attendant contingencies it'll right recognize a wind blown bags that you're running crossed or even that uber self driving car the killed the killed glitch Gimpel software and I was living in Tempe by the way during all of those experiments I'll tell you about that if you wanted who were pretty interesting but that that's where again let's come back to that because I'm not sure I understand the difference that you're drawing between that but I I think that's where the scary part really is when we say limited like a limited a I regarding.

United Nations ATI Thomas Tempe Meryl
"human rights watch" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on KCRW

"Can post jobs and you screener questions to build their short list of preferred candidates learn more at indeed dot com slash fire i'm more on all onto the point as climate change increases the risk of wildfire is california ready most people in los angeles responding to threats by returning to their old habits and old patterns of mind which were developed in really a completely different sire ecosystem is it time to reconsider rebuilding and increasing development even further into fire prone areas that's to the point hit a three nineteen here k._c._r._w. my name is larry perot thanks for joining us on this tuesday afternoon glad you're along for the ride coming up on all things considered a conversation with clara long she is a senior researcher for human rights watch she'll she's been monitoring border detention facilities and talk about what migrant children are experiencing there we'll have more on that and why the acting head of customs and protection is resigning may have something to do with all that also coming up the trump administration has been stepping up efforts to stop shipments of technology to china now federal express has sued the commerce department seeing the restrictions are nearly impossible to comply with later on without dave bartholomew rock and roll as we know it might not exist the trumpeter songwriter bandleader producer interests died on sunday at the age of one hundred new orleans we'll have a remembrance coming up this hour as well stick around right now a look at your road with holly atoms well hello looks like in downtown los angeles right now in the northbound one zero one before the one ten a crash involving a big rig that one's blocking middle lanes has you stopped from seventh street also in we have sort of alert on the northbound five just a little south of rinaldi trailer wheels reported in the fast lane and eastbound tenant robertson car broken down in middle lanes thanks so much trailer wheel one your with a trailer is though that's the big question clouds and fog tonight lows in the mid fifties to around sixty tomorrow partial clearing by burn off to the beaches by the afternoon from n._p._r. news this is all things considered i'm audie cornish and i'm ari shapiro we're gonna head out next on a road trip with our colleague mary louise kelley she's been driving her home state of georgia top to bottom reporting on how clean energy is taking hold in a red state this summer we're looking at clean energy climate change and what it's going to take for the u._s. to cut carbon emissions in georgia mary-louise has found solar energy taking off and change in communities in the process today her road.

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"human rights watch" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on AP News

"Came as Human Rights Watch issued a report urging him and other South African leaders to push Imbaba as president to put an end to security force abuses. Radio. Radio. I. Federal prosecutors say well heeled parents were able to game the system when it came to getting their children into elite universities thirty-three parents are said by prosecutors to a paid some twenty five million dollars either outright cash or charitable donations to edge, college and career network or its charity edges founder, William Rick singer, allegedly provided them with two avenues, rigging the SAT or ACT test. By reportedly bribing the test monitors or getting their kids on campus student athletes by bribing coaches, or in some cases athletic administrators Andrew Lulling as a US attorney for Massachusetts. These parents are a catalog of wealth and privilege. They include for example, CEO's of private and public companies successful securities and real estate investors to well known after a famous fashion designer and the co chairman of a global law firm EMMY winner and Oscar nominee, Felicity Huffman and fellow Hollywood star Laurie Lachlan. Are among those charts? Singer has pleaded guilty and says he is cooperating with authorities the British parliament deals Prime Minister, Theresa may, another stinging Brexit defeat I continue to believe that by far the best outcome is United Kingdom leaves the European Union and an orderly fashion with. And the DEA we've negotiated is the best. And indeed the only deal available may says parliament will get to vote between a no deal Brexit and delaying departure from the European Union opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn thinks as time powers coming to a close. The prime minister's run down the clock on the caucus rain run out on her Britain is supposed to leave the EU on the twenty ninth of this month. A former Catholic priest defrocked in nineteen Ninety-two was shot. The death inside his home in Henderson, Nevada. Seventy oh, John Capelli's name was on the list of some one hundred eighty priests recently. This is AP radio news. After seeing a surge in recent months of families crossing the border with Mexico. The government is trying to get ready for what could be a very busy spring and summer the AP's. Jackie Quinn has more the department of health and human services is again, asking the military for help and housing thousands of youngsters who are likely to cross into the US from Mexico as the weather gets warmer. It happened last year and the Pentagon approved the use of the Goodfellow air base near San Angelo, Texas that location was big enough for twenty thousand children. But there were concerns about who would pay for building housing and other support facilities on the base, it wound up not being used, but health and human services is now asking for a smaller space and seeking money from congress to make sure the children can be accommodated. Jackie Quinn, Washington. I'm Tim Maguire AP radio news. Amazon music of voices. All you need. Alexa,.

William Rick singer European Union Prime Minister parliament Jackie Quinn Mexico Brexit AP Jeremy Corbyn Felicity Huffman Alexa Amazon United Kingdom Tim Maguire Imbaba
"human rights watch" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"That report from up fronts. Justin gold Human Rights Watch today released its annual report on the state of human rights around the world and struck a hopeful note, the group's twenty nineteen World Report says coalitions of states civic groups and everyday citizens are confronting repressive. Leaders worldwide Matisse truly a reports Human Rights Watch raised the alarm about countries with autocratic leaders executive director. Kenneth wells ticked off the action of demand put in in Russia, which the one in Turkey and Victoria. Among others. But he said the good news is the global cash back against autocrats. These days the autocrats tend to capture the headlines, but what really struck us at Human Rights Watch. As we look back over the past year has been the pushback that those autocrats have spawned. What we've seen is that people who are defending human rights democracy and the rule of law have really stepped forward that they have been enraged by these attorney and trends, and they've taken upon themselves as individuals and governments to act in this powerful counter attack, in our view is the real news the past year, the uncovered news that we'd like to highlight with this report human rights Walsh. Also, put this on the immigration policy of President Donald Trump saying he's violating immigrants' rights. I mean, the case of the United States, it's imposing artificial impediments on the right to seek asylum. Trump demonize is these caravans leading Central America's major threat to the United States. Now, these are just people fleeing violence in the US is in places like Honduras, or El Salvador, right? They have every right in the world to present themselves at border-crossing and say I want to seek asylum. I'm Trump is trying to make a difficult by slow walking the hearing of those asylum cases, so they're sitting there in Tijuana or other Mexican border towns unsafe when they should be admitted right away. So they can have their claim hurt the reports as the United States likes behind other countries in key aspects, it's eight thirty states deal all of the death penalty. Police officer killed almost nine hundred people this year and the criminal Justice system discriminates against African Americans. The report also noted an increase in the number of age crimes that Human Rights Watch. His can it was said what's taking back the house of representatives in the midterm elections. And the demonstrations against the nomination of supreme court Justice Brad Kavanagh of show, the resilience of democracy leader is a we show from Hungary walking Human Rights Watch. She says demonstration in December under the sign of people rising. Yep. Against repressive laws. The adoption of the so-called slave law in December with the final straw for thousands of Syrians who again have taken to the streets. The law was prompted by the need to address the shortage of workers in the country resort resulting in large part due to an exodus of hundreds of thousands of Hungarians abroad. We'll come to point where people in Hungary seem to seem to say enough is enough. Tens of thousands of Hungarians from all walks of life have taken to the streets across the country. Demanding that this particular slave lobby scrapped. But they're also calling for a free press an end to corruption and for the restoration of an independent judiciary. The report bemoaned the lack of response by democratic governments to repressive policies around the world, but it find hope in the reactions by people around the world confronting that preparation for KPMG news. I met you. The African Union issued a surprise last-minute demand for Congo's government to suspend announcement of final results have the disputed presidential election. The African Union cited serious doubts. Congo's constitutional court is poised to rule as early as tomorrow on a challenge filed by the elections declared runner up Martin fi you Lou has requested a recount he alleges fraud. The African Union statement said African heads of state and governments agreed to urgently dispatch a high level delegation to Congo to find a way out of the post electoral crisis in the vast central African nation Congo faces. The extraordinary situation of an election allegedly rigged in favor of an opposition candidate fi. You accuses the administration of outgoing President Joseph Kabila of falsifying the results to declare opposition leader Felix disa- Keti the winner after the rule. Alling party candidate did poorly. But fi you fi-. You Lou has cited figures compiled by the influential Catholic churches, forty thousand election observers that found he won sixty one percent of the vote he alleges that President Kabila engineered a back room deal, which is a kitty in order to thwart anticorruption efforts in a country with vast mineral wealth, two sets of leak data show that fi you won the election by a landslide. That's according to an investigation published this week by Radio, France, Internationale and other media working with the Congo research group, all the election results, not just the presidential ones have been widely questioned after Kabila's ruling coalition won a majority in legislative and provincial votes. While it's presidential candidate finished a distant third. This is the Pacific evening. News on KPFA. Berkeley, KPFK Los Angeles KFC Fresno with neck sprinkled. I'm Eileen Alphand dairy. Everyone. This is Brian Edwards, and I'm cat Brooks. Weekday mornings, we host upfront two hours of conversation about what's in the news, and what should the politics technology prisons? Police what's happening in city hall, and at the state house in Washington and in the streets that starting at seven AM right after democracy now on up front. Area. Labor.

Congo United States Donald Trump President Joseph Kabila African Union Hungary Lou Russia Turkey Kenneth wells Justin Brad Kavanagh city hall executive director President Eileen Alphand KPMG
"human rights watch" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Wbz newsradio ten thirty and wbz news time seven twenty six new court filings reveal a plot to execute a former new england mafia boss using a remote control plane rigged with explosives that was during the nineteen nineties documents filed ahead of the may ninth murder trial of francis cadillac frank salami included 2016 sixteen fbi report detailing the alleged scheme the report says mob enforcer kevin hanrahan plan to fly in explosiveladen plane into salam as home in sharon he also wanted to detonate a suitcase with explosives at a restaurant in providence frequented by rhode island mobster luigi baby shacks manako saw salomon codefendant paul redick are accused of killing boston nightclub owner and federal witness stephen dasaro whose remains were found in providence in two thousand sixteen there are new details about the abduction of a newborn at a florida hospital decades ago at her sentencing hearing friday gloria williams testifying that you put baby kamara in a bag and worried that she would be caught she's also begging for the parents forgiveness abc's eva pilgrim tells us what's next rank can't take a baby gloria williams claims he was in an abusive relationship depressed after a miscarriage when he walked out of that maternity ward with chameleon mobely now get caught the new it that secret would catch up with williams nearly two decades later told us last year she still loved williams he loved me for eighteen years prosecutors arguing the abduction was a selfish act williams told her true identity shortly before her arrest after realizing come i couldn't get a driver's license without a valid birth certificate or social security card human rights watch is asking dubai's ruling sheikh to reveal the whereabouts of his daughter after a french expi and others say she fled the marin only to be arrested off the coast of india the organization says that dubai silence on sheikha latifa bint mohammed al maktoum could qualify as an enforced disappearance to buy declined to comment publicly about sheikha latifa since the associated press reported in april on her disappearance the human rights watches middle east director says that emirates authorities should immediately reveal the whereabouts of the girl confirmed her status and allow her to contact the outside world wbz news time is seven twenty eight right now we've got fifty eight degrees partly cloudy skies in boston wbz's charlie sherman is up next he'll have the extended forecast and all the top stories the new.

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"human rights watch" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Australians are overwhelmingly in support of legalizing samesex marriage according to a voter survey released wednesday in australia and now parliament is considering legislation that would legalise gay marriage without requiring religious leaders in the country to officiate in a report issued this week human rights watch says delays in guatemala's court system are threatening anticorruption efforts in the country but he a martin has more from guatemala human rights watch says the fight against impunity and water mullah has reached a critical moment that while changes have been made in the last few years pretrial delays could prevent politicians from going to trial for corruption and investigation of eight high profile corruption cases including that of former president otto pettus molina found that a pattern of repeated an unjustified delays is threatening to run out the clock that's because the terms of both water mollis attorney general and the went back to intern national anticorruption commission are scheduled to end next year and the year after for npr news amadiyah martin in antigua what the mullahs the climate goal agreed to under the paris accord will not be enough that today from german chancellor angela merkel who says the nearly two hundred nations who signed onto the landmark agreement will need to do more to address global warming at climate talks in bonn today un secretary general antonio gutierrez said the world may have only five years to take measures needed to meet an ambitious targets set out under the pact at last check on wall street the dow is down one hundred seven points this is npr news.

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"human rights watch" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on PRI's The World

"What does human rights watch want the united states to do human rights watch wants the united states and in particular the united arab emirates to first of all um deal with these claims in a serious way because the uae told the associated press that there were no secret prisons that claim beggars belief because again you've got to separate investigations tons of yemenis documenting in reporting on these issues and the us is saying sank itself has not been involved in these abuses but the problem that you've got is even if the us is not itself torturing people even if the us is not itself abusing people if the us is benefitting from torture abuse that raises serious international law concerns that sort of the question on the table is what was the us aware of now the us has to be aware given this public reporting what steps is going to take to pressure its partner of the uae one of its main partners in the counterterror campaigns in yemen to cease these abuses and redress them christine beverly as a researcher for human rights watch thanks christine thanks very much some updates now on stories we've been following yesterday we mentioned the carrier manufacturing plant in indiana donald trump had made a deal to save hundreds of jobs at the plant from being moved to mexico he touted it as a great victory but cuts were always part of the deal carriers just announced the first round of layoffs to begin next month and the millions in promised investment in the plant that will go toward increasing automation now to another story reported last week from detroit it was about iraqis living in the us being sent back to iraq our reporter spoke with families in michigan who feared their loved ones could be deported at any moment as a result of an agreement between the trump administration and the iraqi government here's the update a federal judge has halted these deportations for two weeks the judge argued that the potential harm for these deportees far outweighs any interest the government might half in sending them back to iraq.

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