35 Burst results for "Human Rights Watch"

Rights group: Litany of crises in 2022 but also good signs

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Rights group: Litany of crises in 2022 but also good signs

"A leading human rights group says a litany of crises emerged in 2022, but also moments of hope. Human Rights Watch says in its annual report covering conditions in more than 100 countries that amid widespread economic problems and government repression, there are signs that power is shifting as people take to the streets to demonstrate dissatisfaction, in Iran, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, China, and elsewhere. One of the greatest humanitarian crises continues to be in Myanmar, where the government sees power in February of 2021. The group's acting executive director Tirana Hassan, cites opposition to Russia's invasion of Ukraine as a hopeful sign. All governments should bring the same spirit of solidarity to the multitude of human rights crises around the globe Hasan says, and not just when it suits their interests. Jennifer King, Washington

Human Rights Watch Tirana Hassan Sri Lanka Afghanistan Iran Myanmar China Ukraine Russia Hasan Jennifer King Washington
UN committee takes step to treaty on crimes against humanity

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

UN committee takes step to treaty on crimes against humanity

"A key UN committee has taken a first step towards agreeing on a treaty that recognizes crimes against humanity committed at any time not just during conflicts The committee that deals with legal issues has approved a resolution to hold sessions in the next two years where groundwork would be laid to push through the treaty in September 2024 while there are treaties on genocide and torture amongst others there is no treaty specifically devoted to crimes against humanity according to the group Human Rights Watch crimes against humanity have been defined by the International Criminal Court as crimes such as rape and torture committed against the civilian population based on a government or organizational policy I'm Karen Chammas

UN Human Rights Watch Crimes Agai International Criminal Court Karen Chammas
"human rights watch" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:23 min | 5 months ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"From artillery barrages, defending against attack and maybe mounting assaults when they can manage to. This is how raptor described his time in the trenches earlier. Constantly shelled. It's really hard. It's meant to be because you just don't know if you're going to survive, it actually is quite heavy on your mind. And Scott, I talked to another recon officer who works with raptor, who also spent time in the trenches. He goes by the nickname concrete, and he said, when the Russians were on the offensive earlier on, the situation was no better. They have a cannon shelling in the morning and after that they're trying to jump in our trenches. The infantry is now based the highest price for this work. Frank, the group Human Rights Watch yesterday released a report about the use of cluster bombs in this conflict. They were banned by a global treaty in 2010, but Russia and Ukraine didn't agree to sign it. Frank, what are cluster bombs and have you seen any evidence they are being used? Yeah, these are often rockets that are launched and then they spread out all these little bomblets that can maim and kill people, many, many years after their deployed. And Human Rights Watch says nearly 700 civilian casualties from cluster bombs. Here in Ukraine between February and July, almost all of them are from Russian forces, but the Ukrainian forces, according to Human Rights Watch, also have used them at least twice. And I saw them actually when I was traveling with the military in Ukrainian territory, one of these missiles as essentially as a rocket was jammed into the side of a hillside. And of course it already spread all these cluster bombs fortunately, I think they have been cleared along the path, certainly that we took. But they're very, very dangerous and they can, you know, I've seen cases when I used to work in I worked in Vietnam where decades after these are released, they can end up injuring, particularly children who will pick them up and play with them. In Paris, Frank Langford is reporting from Odessa Ukraine in the south. Frank, thank you as always, and stay safe. Thanks, Scott. Great to talk. Now, think back to 2016, you may remember cycle after cycle of news about Russian interference in the U.S. election via social media, thousands of questionable accounts, so dissent and show just how easy it was to manipulate users online. Now, researchers at

raptor Human Rights Watch Ukraine Frank Scott Russia Frank Langford Vietnam Odessa Paris U.S.
Myanmar executes ex-lawmaker, 3 other political prisoners

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 6 months ago

Myanmar executes ex-lawmaker, 3 other political prisoners

"The executions of four prisoners By Myanmar's military government announced in state media has drawn widespread condemnation The deputy Asia director of the watchdog Human Rights Watch Phil Robertson roundly condemns the hunters action and says the executions point up the failure of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations or ASEAN to take the lead in trying to resolve the situation in the country and that it was time for the international community to act decisively This is a real wake up call for the international community that they can not allow Myanmar to slide off the table to be concerned too much about other things and ignore Myanmar's worsening Civil War in the human rights atrocities that are going along with it One prominent activist tells the AP the execution show the generals were out of control and predicts the deaths would harden resistance I'm Charles De

Watchdog Human Rights Watch Phil Robertson Myanmar Association Of Southeast Asian Asia AP Charles De
Rights groups urge Sri Lanka not to use force on protesters

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

Rights groups urge Sri Lanka not to use force on protesters

"International human rights groups are urging Sri Lanka's new president to immediately order security forces to cease use of force against protesters A day after president rhino wick from a singer who has sworn in hundreds of armed troops raided a protest camp outside the president's office in the early hours of Friday attacking demonstrators with batons Human Rights Watch says the action sends a dangerous message to the Sri Lankan people that the new government intends to act through brute force rather than through the rule of law the group's South Asia director says the nation urgently needs measures to address the economic needs of Sri lankans who demanding a government that respects fundamental rights I'm Charles De

President Rhino Wick Batons Human Rights Watch Sri Lanka Sri Lankan South Asia Charles De
"human rights watch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 8 months ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A court in Cambodia's capital on Tuesday convicted a Cambodian American lawyer and activist of treason dozens of others were also convicted as prime minister Hun sen continues his crackdown on descent Michael Sullivan reports from Bangkok The verdict was never much in doubt which is why a little over a year ago Terry sang took a pair of scissors to a flowing brown hair anticipating prison and prison lice You know I like long hair I look like Peter Pan right now And even though I'm saving a lot of money on shampoo which is a good thing I wanted to communicate with this regime that I do not fear it And I do not fear facing jail on just charges The court sentenced her on Tuesday to 6 years She and many of the others were charged in connection with a failed attempt by an opposition leader to return from exile in 2019 The opposition party was disbanded just ahead of the 2018 general election Hun sen's party then sweat The verdict against Terry sang in the over 50 other people who were convicted in court These are based on bogus charges Phil Robertson is deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch The court is far from independent In fact it's a kangaroo court It's something that does the bidding of the ruling political party in the prime minister It appears that munsen and his government are trying to wipe out any vestige of the political opposition During the months long trial Terry sang doubled down on our defiance Appearing in front of the court in different costumes Sometimes as a traditional Cambodian dancer another time in prison garb and in Chinese peasant clothes suggesting prime minister Hun sen has mortgaged his country's future to China As the trial progressed many of the accused chose to flee into exile Terry sang told me that wasn't an option for her This is home no one can force me to leave my home It's a home the U.S. educated lawyer had to flee once before after the genocidal Khmer Rouge killed her parents And that's another sore spot for her The Khmer Rouge tribunal that was supposed to find justice for the survivors but after 15 years only managed to convict three aging men The Khmer Rouge tribunal was our only opportunity really for reconciliation for justice and it turned out to be a major sham A sham she said because the United Nations accepted the idea of a hybrid UN Cambodian tribunal under Cambodian law One that allowed prime minister Hun sen to effectively decide who would and wouldn't be tried She also told me last year she believed her U.S. passport bought her some protection but Phil Robertson from Human Rights Watch says her lengthy sentence shows Hun sen could only be embarrassed publicly for so long They're sending a message that they don't care what the international community thinks when it comes to core issues of political power But Terry sang was defiant to the end Standing outside the courthouse the morning of the verdicts dressed as lady liberty Today this autocratic regime wants to imprison freedom She was dragged off by police shortly after And has been sent to a remote prison in the north where access to her lawyer and U.S. consular officials will be difficult Michael Sullivan and PR news Bangkok You're listening to NPR news I'm Stephen dubner on the next free economics radio can a sporting event really repair.

Terry sang Hun sen Phil Robertson Khmer Rouge tribunal Human Rights Watch The court Michael Sullivan munsen Peter Pan Cambodia opposition party Bangkok Khmer Rouge Asia U.S. China United Nations Human Rights Watch UN NPR news Stephen dubner
Watchdog says Afghan Taliban detaining, torturing civilians

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

Watchdog says Afghan Taliban detaining, torturing civilians

"Human Rights Watch says Taliban security forces in northern Afghanistan have unlawfully detained and tortured residents accused of association with an opposition armed group The New York based watchdog says since mid may fighting has escalated in a northeastern province as anti Taliban forces their attacked Taliban units and checkpoints The Taliban have responded by deploying thousands of fighters on search operations targeting communities they allege a supporting the opposition forces the anti Taliban fighters have formed out of the remnants of Afghanistan's shattered security forces They vowed to resist the Taliban in a remote region that's defied conquerors before I'm Charles De

Taliban Human Rights Watch Afghanistan New York Charles De
Four Disney Employees Arrested in Florida Human Trafficking Sting

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | 11 months ago

Four Disney Employees Arrested in Florida Human Trafficking Sting

"CEO is donating $5 million to the hate group Human Rights Watch and Human Rights Campaign or whatever they're called, they're doing walkouts, they're demanding gay fairytales. Maybe the head of Disney should take a little bit of a step back and know what exactly is going on in his own company. The post millennial dot com Disney employees plural busted in child trafficking sting just days after corporation opposed anti grooming law. Quote, the sheriff of Pope county held a press conference on Wednesday, talking about the culmination of a massive sting operation which led to a 108 arrests being made, including four Disney employees. The so called operation march sadness too was a multi agency effort centered around Florida's Polk county, which lies around southwest of the Orlando urban area and is a highly touristic area. Also included a retired judge from Illinois, a few restaurant managers, a man who works at fun spot in several who work at Disney. One of the people just happened to be a lifeguard at the Polynesian resort for Disney. The sheriff said quote, you think there's a few children around there, that's right. I didn't stutter. He was a lifeguard at the Polynesian resort and he was bragging about that. Jackson is accused of sending explicit photos to someone he thought was 14 years old. So why is Florida? I'm not Florida. Why is Disney opposing the praying and the recruitment and the attacking of new people that are young while also their own employees are engaging that kind of behavior? It's really bizarre, actually.

Disney Human Rights Watch And Human R Pope County Polynesian Resort Polk County Florida Orlando Illinois Jackson
 Sponsors asked to defend support for Beijing Winter Olympics

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Sponsors asked to defend support for Beijing Winter Olympics

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting sponsors have been asked to defend support for the Beijing winter Olympics Human Rights Watch has asked leading sponsors of the Beijing winter Olympics to explain why they remain largely silent about alleged human rights abuses in China in an online briefing the rights group said it reached out to all but one of the I. O. C. so called top sponsors in lengthy letters almost six months ago the only reply came from Ali ons last month saying we stand behind the Olympic movement earlier this week the international trade union confederation issued a scathing report alleging genocide and crimes against humanity in the Xinjiang region of northwest China the Beijing games open February fourth hi Mike

Mike Rossi Beijing Winter Olympics Human I. O. C. Winter Olympics Beijing International Trade Union China ALI Olympic Xinjiang Mike
"human rights watch" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"What will happen to the women The Taliban is notorious for its repressive policies and human rights violations against women and girls Well two months in we're now witnessing the Taliban imposed further restrictions to women's rights Next week they're barring women who work for the city of Kabul from coming into the office The Taliban says it's working out a plan for how women will work in those government offices Well to help us understand what this might mean we have with us Heather bar She's with the Human Rights Watch and she joins us from Pakistan Welcome to the show Thank you What more can you tell us about your understanding of this action by the Taliban regarding women who are city employees The women will still receive their salaries according to the Taliban but it says they're working to accommodate them in government offices What could this mean under Taliban rule Well this is part of a much broader pattern of really severe rollbacks on the most fundamental rights of women and girls the right to work the right to go to school So you know there's been a whole series of restrictions on women's ability to work including quite early on the Taliban advising women to stay indoors and not go to work because they said that their own fighters had not been trained and might mistreat women And also just to say that this promise that women will still receive their salary is almost certainly a lie Because government employees whether or not they're actually showing up in the office are not being paid and have not been paid for months because about 75% of the government's budget came from international donors and those international donors all cut that money off overnight when the Taliban seized power on August 15th You illustrated pretty well some of the some of the changes that women are experiencing But what have they told you firsthand about their experiences since the Taliban took over in August How has life changed for them So it's very consistent you know what women have to say They really describe their lives as having ended overnight On August 15th you know like education that they had fought for and worked for their whole lives jobs careers that they had built this is pretty much all vanished And one of the other things that's happened is that on September 18th the Taliban reopened secondary schools across the country but only for boys And it's worth remembering also any time we hear the Taliban say look just be patient We're coming up with a plan We are going to let you study We are going to let you work We just need to figure out the logistics of it This is pretty much the same messaging that they had when they were previously in power from 1996 to 2001 During that period they never said definitively that girls could never study women could never work They said be patient and wait for the conditions to be right But during those years that moment that moment when the conditions were right it never arrived I mean with that Heather we are seeing that many Afghan women are fighting back We've seen this in the form of protests and women speaking out For example here's kata Yun Kofi back in September talking with the Indian English speaking channel W IO and TV The.

Taliban Heather bar Kabul Human Rights Watch Pakistan government Heather Yun Kofi
"human rights watch" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"But go ahead Our country must suppose selling weapons to anyone anywhere without human rights law compliance The Israeli government isn't a part time regime not my words the words of Human Rights Watch and Israel's own Human Rights Watch organization bed sullen I urge my colleagues Please stand with me and so reporting you how much time do I have rich Ted deutsches a sort of moderate rather wimpy Democrat not a Florida And even he had enough of this Cut 13 go But mister speaker I can not I can not allow one of my colleagues to stand on the floor of the House of Representatives and label the Jewish democratic State of Israel in apartheid state I reject it today this caucus this body the House of Representatives will overwhelmingly stand with our ally the State of Israel in replenishing this defensive system If you believe in human rights if you believe in saving lives Israeli lives and Palestinian lives I say to my colleague who just besmirched our ally then you will support this legislation may have 15 more seconds 30 seconds Is recognized for an additional 30 seconds Mister speaker we can have an opportunity to debate lots of issues on the House floor But to falsely characterize the State of Israel is consistent with those Let's be clear It's consistent with those who advocate for the dismantling of the one Jewish state in the world And when there is no place on the map for one Jewish state that's anti semitism And I reject that

Israeli government Human Rights Watch organizatio Ted deutsches Israel Florida
Rep. Ted Deutch Strikes Back at Rep. Rashida Tlaib's Anti-Semitic Comments

Mark Levin

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Ted Deutch Strikes Back at Rep. Rashida Tlaib's Anti-Semitic Comments

"Our country must suppose selling weapons to anyone anywhere without human rights law compliance The Israeli government isn't a part time regime not my words the words of Human Rights Watch and Israel's own Human Rights Watch organization bed sullen I urge my colleagues Please stand with me and so reporting you how much time do I have rich Ted deutsches a sort of moderate rather wimpy Democrat not a Florida And even he had enough of this Cut 13 go But mister speaker I can not I can not allow one of my colleagues to stand on the floor of the House of Representatives and label the Jewish democratic State of Israel in apartheid state I reject it today this caucus this body the House of Representatives will overwhelmingly stand with our ally the State of Israel in replenishing this defensive system If you believe in human rights if you believe in saving lives Israeli lives and Palestinian lives I say to my colleague who just besmirched our ally then you will support this legislation may have 15 more seconds 30 seconds Is recognized for an additional 30 seconds Mister speaker we can have an opportunity to debate lots of issues on the House floor But to falsely characterize the State of Israel is consistent with those Let's be clear It's consistent with those who advocate for the dismantling of the one Jewish state in the world And when there is no place on the map for one Jewish state that's anti semitism And I reject that

Israeli Government Human Rights Watch Organizatio Ted Deutsches Israel House Of Representatives Florida House
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Doves cry by prince this is democracy now I am equipment. Security forces in Lebanon fired water cannons and tear gas or protesters marking one year since the devastating explosion at the port of Beirut that killed 218 people injured 7000 destroyed or damaged 300,000 homes. One of the largest non nuclear explosions in history. But so far no one in the political leadership has been held accountable for leaving over 2700 tons of highly explosive ammonium nitrate fertilizer unattended at Beirut support. This comes as a new report by Human Rights Watch implicates senior Lebanese officials for failing to protect the public. This is Paul in the gear who spoke this week about how his three year old daughter Alexandra was at home with her mother Tracy when they heard the blast. Tracey tried to shield Alexandra but a shockwave from the explosion forced them across the room. They were knocked unconscious. Her husband Paul came home to find them badly injured and unconscious but alive. Their daughter died days later in the hospital. He said officials should have done more to prevent her death. They had 14 minutes and they did not react. I want to try to put myself in the shoes of Michelle on for instance and just taking an example. What was he thinking at this time? So he's sitting at home you know or in his palace. Turn on the TV and looks at smoke coming out of the hardware. He's the best brigade in the army specializes in weaponry. And he looks at the and he looks at these images. He's the president of the country. And supposedly the father of all they call it an Arabic. What does a human being think when he looks at that? In my opinion these people waited and watched for 40 minutes waited for us to die. When Casey and I were carrying our daughter that had a huge edema. You know down on the street destroyed the streets of Jamaica in our neighborhood and looking watching people on the floor debt trying to make a way to the first hospital and do the Red Cross post and to the next hospital. I had to take my dying daughter on a scooter. And Tracy was with three broken ribs three four broken vertebra and edema on her face. Detached lungs had to go on hitchhiking to the hospital. All in the gear recounting what happened one year ago and the port of Beirut explosion. For more we go to Beirut Lebanon to speak with I am at you. The Lebanon and British Bahrain researcher for Human Rights Watch who co authored the new report they killed us from the inside an investigation into the August 4th Beirut last. Welcome to democracy now. Thank you for joining us from Lebanon. We're mass protests broke out yesterday. You were there in the streets. If you can describe the scene there and then put it in the context of the findings of your report. In the on today. The protests yesterday were hopeful they were the biggest protests that we've had in over a year in Lebanon. Thousands of people came out to demand justice and accountability for the last. They came from all parts of the country converging at the port to hear statements from the families of those who died in the explosion. There was a moment of silence at exactly 6 O 8 p.m. and then people headed over to parliament where there were some skirmishes between security forces who were securing the perimeter of parliament and protesters who were trying to storm in. Now parliament in the seat of parliament is very it was very significant for protesters yesterday because the parliament is currently not lifting immunity that would allow the traditional investigator investigating the last charge and interrogate former ministers and parliamentarians implicated in the last protesters channeled their anger at the seats of parliament and they were matched with brute force. The security forces used very large amounts of tear gas. They shot rubber bullets at protesters in violation of international norms. They even shot rubber bullets at number at least two members of the media who were covering the protests. They used water cannons against protesters. And it's really important to note that the use of force by the security forces was not only aimed at securing the perimeter of parliament. It seemed to be aimed at ending the protests and dispersing the protesters. They were firing tear gas into crowds containing families women and children who were just standing and chanting peacefully. There was absolutely no need for those peaceful protests to be dispersed. It really was quite a show of brute force on a day that was very painful for every Lebanese person every person who was in the country when the explosion rocked the capital. I don't think there's a single person in Beirut who wasn't in some way impacted by the blast. And your report you find in the report reviewing official documents doing multiple interviews with top officials including the president the caretaker prime minister the head of the country state security. Talk about what you found and what you're calling for now. The findings I mean there were rumors since the explosion happened that high level officials were aware of the ammonium nitrate. But just seeing all of the evidence in one place seeing how many times these high level officials were warned not only about the presence of the ammonium nitrates and the port. But the dangers that ammonium nitrate could pose to public safety. We didn't find any Lebanese official who took any responsibility for securing the ports and for removing the ammonium nitrate and ensuring that the public was not harmed by the impacts of the ammonium nitrates. The levels of corruption and negligence that we found through this documentation was really just shocking and what was even more shocking was the interviews that we conducted with these high level officials. There really didn't seem to be any sense of remorse or accountability. Every senior official that we met with was very quick to dismiss the allegations against them say that they acted within the powers that they had. And just point the fingers at other people. Nobody took responsibility. Nobody apologized. There was such a callousness that came through in these interviews with high level officials that I just found very unsettling. So you're calling for the UN to get involved to do the investigation? Yes we're calling for the Human Rights Council at the United Nations to send an investigative mission to Lebanon to investigate. What the ammonium nitrate was in Lebanon in the first place. Who knew about the ammonium nitrates in the ports and failed to act? And then what triggered the explosion last year on August the fourth. And the investigative mission should very clearly define what. Violations the Lebanese states committed against its population particularly the violation of the right to life. We're also calling for this fact finding body or investigative mission to propose recommendations to reform the port system and the custom system. The judicial system to ensure that something like this can never happen again and that the justice system in Lebanon is better equipped to be able to deal with investigations of this magnitude. I am a Jew I want to thank you for being with us Lebanon Bahrain researcher for Human Rights Watch. We'll link to that report. They killed us from the inside investigation into the August 4th Beirut blast. In 20 seconds we'll be back to look.

Beirut Lebanon parliament Human Rights Watch Alexandra edema Beirut Lebanon Tracy British Bahrain Paul Tracey Red Cross Michelle Jamaica Casey army Human Rights Council UN United Nations
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"This is democracy now. We live in constant. Struggle for the truth. And we live in constant struggle in remaking America in its image of freedom and liberty for all. Not the image of the past. But the image of what the future of America should look like. As the CDC issues a new 60 day eviction moratorium. We'll speak to Congress remember Ilhan Omar who camped out on the steps of the U.S. capitol overnight Friday to pressure the Biden administration to take action. We'll talk to her about housing. The recent U.S. air strikes on her home country of Somalia plus her memoir this is what America looks like. My journey from refugee to congresswoman. We'll also hear from a Kansas City tenant who faces eviction. I actually have my dad's ashes and one of my big concerns is you know if I get kicked out on the street like. What am I gonna do with my dad's ashes? And we go to Lebanon where security forces fired water cannons and tear gas at protesters marking one year since the devastating explosion at the port of Beirut that killed hundreds and displaced thousands. Human Rights Watch is accusing senior Lebanese officials of failing to protect the public. Culpability for the explosion still rests with those officials who knew the ammonium nitrate was being stored at the ports and an unconscionable and dangerous manner and failed to do what was within their authority and.

U.S. Ilhan Omar Biden administration CDC Somalia Congress Kansas City Lebanon Beirut Human Rights Watch
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"This is democracy now. We live in constant. Struggle for the truth. And we live in constant struggle in remaking America in its image of freedom and liberty for all. Not the image of the past. But the image of what the future of America should look like. As the CDC issues a new 60 day eviction moratorium. We'll speak to Congress remember Ilhan Omar who camped out on the steps of the U.S. capitol overnight Friday to pressure the Biden administration to take action. We'll talk to her about housing. The recent U.S. air strikes on her home country of Somalia plus her memoir this is what America looks like. My journey from refugee to congresswoman. We'll also hear from a Kansas City tenant who faces eviction. I actually have my dad's ashes and one of my big concerns is you know if I get kicked out on the street like. What am I gonna do with my dad's ashes? And we go to Lebanon where security forces fired water cannons and tear gas at protesters marking one year since the devastating explosion at the port of Beirut that killed hundreds and displaced thousands. Human Rights Watch is accusing senior Lebanese officials of failing to protect the public. Culpability for the explosion still rests with those officials who knew the ammonium nitrate was being stored at the ports and an unconscionable and dangerous manner and failed to do what was within their authority and.

U.S. Ilhan Omar Biden administration CDC Somalia Congress Kansas City Lebanon Beirut Human Rights Watch
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"This is democracy now. We live in constant. Struggle for the truth. And we live in constant struggle in remaking America in its image of freedom and liberty for all. Not the image of the past. But the image of what the future of America should look like. As the CDC issues a new 60 day eviction moratorium. We'll speak to Congress remember Ilhan Omar who camped out on the steps of the U.S. capitol overnight Friday to pressure the Biden administration to take action. We'll talk to her about housing. The recent U.S. air strikes on her home country of Somalia plus her memoir this is what America looks like. My journey from refugee to congresswoman. We'll also hear from a Kansas City tenant who faces eviction. I actually have my dad's ashes and one of my big concerns is you know if I get kicked out on the street like. What am I gonna do with my dad's ashes? And we go to Lebanon where security forces fired water cannons and tear gas at protesters marking one year since the devastating explosion at the port of Beirut that killed hundreds and displaced thousands. Human Rights Watch is accusing senior Lebanese officials of failing to protect the public. Culpability for the explosion still rests with those officials who knew the ammonium nitrate was being stored at the ports and an unconscionable and dangerous manner and failed to do what was within their authority and.

U.S. Ilhan Omar Biden administration CDC Somalia Congress Kansas City Lebanon Beirut Human Rights Watch
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"That new video produced by human rights. Watch the video which released along with a new report. Titled gaza apparent war crimes during fighting. We're joined now. By omar shakir israel and palestine director at human rights watch. He's joining us from amman jordan. What were you most shocked by in these interviews in this investigation into what happened in israel's last attack on gaza maybe some of the testimony that we collected are among the most harrowing. I've ever come across in mind. Four and a half years working on israel. Palestine you at strikes that wiped out entire families. You hide cases where families reduced from having seven eight kids having one surviving member of their family. You had people's entire lives. Their homes their businesses their wives their children their husbands gone in a flash and those testimonies are so important for us to discuss today because the international community focuses on gaza may be when there are armed hostilities. But two months later these families continue to deal with the aftermath of the devastation wrought upon their lives. and it's a critically important to them to all victims of grave human rights abuse that there is accountability for these serious abuses and that steps are taken by the international community to prevent yet another cycle of bloodshed and repression. This wasn't the first in won't be the last us. We take grave definitive action. What has been responsive they israeli government to your report omar to human rights watch report. Human rights watch wrote these really government in june. We specified the strikes that we're looking into. We sent them a number of detailed questions. They replied to our letter saying they were not obligated under israeli law to answer our questions and providing a list of general assertions stating for example that they took measures to minimize the impact from their strikes that fault belongs to hamas because according to them they fire from populated areas and saying that of course they would investigate these strikes but these are the same allegation..

gaza omar shakir israel amman human rights watch palestine jordan Palestine omar hamas
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Of a tight and persecution that new video produced by human rights. Watch the video which released along with a new report. Titled gaza apparent war crimes during fighting. We're joined now. By omar shakir israel and palestine director at human rights watch. He's joining us from amman jordan. What were you most shocked by in these interviews in this investigation into what happened in israel's last attack on gaza maybe some of the testimony that we collected are among the most harrowing. I've ever come across in mind. Four and a half years working on israel. Palestine you at strikes that wiped out entire families you had cases where families reduced from having seven eight kids having one surviving member of their family. You had people's entire lives. Their homes their businesses their wives their children their husbands gone in a flash and those testimonies are so important for us to discuss today because the international community focuses on gaza may be when there are armed hostilities. But two months later these families continue to deal with the aftermath of the devastation wrought upon their lives. and it's a critically important to them to all victims of grave human rights abuse that there is accountability for these serious abuses and that steps are taken by the international community to prevent yet another cycle of bloodshed and repression. This wasn't the first in won't be the last us. We take grave definitive action. What has been responsive they israeli government to your report omar to human rights watch report. Human rights watch wrote these really government in june. We specified the strikes that we're looking into. We sent them a number of detailed questions. They replied to our letter saying they were not obligated under israeli. Lock to answer our questions. And providing a list of general assertions stating for example that they took measures to minimize the impact from their strikes. That fault belongs to hamas because according to them they fire from populated areas and saying that of course they would investigate these strikes but these are the same allegation..

gaza omar shakir israel amman human rights watch palestine jordan Palestine omar hamas
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Your response Omar shakir. Amy it's clear that they're trying to follow the air-b-n-b model. When I'm referencing here is when air-b-n-b made a decision a couple of years ago to stop listing in the occupied West Bank because doing so made them complicit in serious human rights abuses. They undertook a similar strategy and they eventually bullied air-b-n-b into caving. The difference here is that Ben and Jerry's is a deeply principled company with clearly articulated values and are acting pursuant to this. This is a company that at its core takes the principles of human rights and social justice seriously. The reality here is Logan mentioned is that settlements are illegal. There are war crimes under the fourth Geneva convention. And when businesses operate in the West Bank they're directly benefiting from and contributing to the entrenched discriminatory system there. What do I mean? I mean businesses that operate in the West Bank receive permits access to infrastructure that are systematically denied to Palestinians. They're operating on or with land that was confiscated from Palestinians. There are providing jobs and revenue that goes into further entrenching. These war crime settlements and they also operate in a system in which you have dual legal regimes and which in the very same store that sells Ben and Jerry if a Palestinian and an Israeli happened to work there. Their government under different systems with different rights and protections. So the reality here is that businesses under the UN guiding principles have a duty not to contribute to human rights abuses. That's the decision Ben and Jerry's made. It's a principle distinction following their international legal obligations. These anti boycott laws aren't just posing issues under the First Amendment they're actually punishing companies that do the right thing by ending their complicity in human rights abuse. Human Rights Watch does business and human rights work around the world and we are calling for companies that operate in settlements to do the same thing that companies are involved in human rights abuses everywhere else do which is end that complicity in rights abuse. And so how exactly will this go down in Israel and the occupied territories? It won't take place for another year because of the contract that Ben and Jerry's has with the local distributors that right Omar. Best correct. This in essence this decision says that they are not going to operate in settlements. And because their current distributor in Israel was not willing to agree to that condition. They will not be renewing their agreement with that distributor beyond the end of 2022 and to the extent that they continue to operate in Israel. They will ensure that they do so without operating the occupied Palestinian territory which of course includes occupied east Jerusalem which the Israeli government has annexed but remains occupied territory under international Law & Order the Israeli government every day routinely systematically is abusing the rights of Palestinians and systematically oppressing them. Omar Shakira want to thank you for being with us Israel and Palestine director of Human Rights Watch speaking to us from aman Jordan and Logan behalf vice president of communications for J street. Next up we go to Guatemala where thousands took to the streets Thursday for a national strike demanding the.

West Bank Omar shakir Jerry Ben Amy Logan Geneva Israeli government Israel UN Omar east Jerusalem Omar Shakira aman Jordan Human Rights Watch Palestine Guatemala
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"This is part of a systematic practice and it must end. Omar shakir is Israel and Palestine director at Human Rights Watch will link to your report Gaza apparent war crimes during May fighting. And Omar we're going to ask you to stay with us for our next segment. As we look at the fallout from Ben and Jerry's decision to halt ice cream sales in Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank. The Israeli government claims the move is anti semitic. But many Jewish groups including J.

Omar shakir Human Rights Watch Palestine Gaza Omar Israel Israeli government Jerry Ben West Bank
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The UN says that Israeli air strikes in May killed at least a 129 civilians including 66 children. The Israeli military said that Palestinian armed groups in Gaza fired more than 4360 rockets and mortars towards Israel between May 10 and 21 resulting in 12 civilian deaths including two children. Several Palestinians also died in Gaza when rockets fired by armed groups fell short and landed in Gaza. Rockets that Palestinian armed groups fire at Israel are inherently indiscriminate when directed towards areas with civilians. Their use in such circumstances violates the laws of war and amounts to war crimes. For years Israeli and Palestinian authorities have systematically failed to credibly investigate alleged war crimes. The International Criminal Court prosecutor should investigate Israeli attacks in Gaza that evidently killed civilians and lawfully rocket attacks by Palestinian armed groups against Israel that violate the laws of war and other grave abuses including the crimes against humanity of apartheid and persecution. That new video produced by Human Rights Watch the video was released along with a new report titled Gaza apparent war crimes during fighting. We're joined now by Omar shakir Israel and Palestine director at Human Rights Watch. She's joining us from aman Jordan. What were you most shocked by in these interviews and this investigation into what happened in Israel's last attack on Gaza? Amy some of the testimonies that we collected are among the most harrowing I've ever come across in my four and a half years working on Israel Palestine. You had strikes that wiped out entire families. You had cases where families reduced from having 7 8 kids to having one surviving member of their family. You had people's entire lives their homes their businesses. Their wives their children their husbands gone in a flash. And those testimonies are so important for us to discuss today because the international community focuses on Gaza maybe when there are armed hostilities. But two months later these families continue to deal with the aftermath of the devastation wrought upon their lives. And it's a critically important to them and to all victims of grave human rights abuse that there is accountability for these serious abuses and that steps are taken by the international community to prevent yet another cycle of bloodshed and repression. This wasn't the first and it won't be the last unless we take grave definitive action. What has been the response of the Israeli government to your report Omar to Human Rights Watch report? Human Rights Watch wrote to the Israeli government in June. We specified the strikes that we were looking into. We sent them a number of detailed questions. They replied to our letter saying that they were not obligated under Israeli law to answer our questions and providing a list of general assertions stating for example that they took measures to minimize the impact from their strikes. That belongs to Hamas because according to them they fire from populated areas and saying that of course they would investigate these strikes. But these are the same allegations. These are the same claims they trot out each time they did so in 2008 and 2012 and 2014 2018 and 2019 and they're doing so again today. The reality is that there is a whitewashed mechanism within Israel that ensures that these abuses are not investigated that impunity is the norm. And that's why it's so important that the International Criminal Court include Visa attacks as well as their larger context including apartheid and persecution in the formal probe that they are currently working on. I wanted to ask you about the change and perception in the United States about what's happening. With the Israeli government and the occupation. I remember that front page. Photo display it was Friday May 28th and the headline was they were just children. And it shows scores of more than 65 children's faces in Gaza who died in the attack. That's sort of reporting should be the norm. I mean it's unfortunate for too many years. That has not been the case. You know the reality here is for too often Palestinian deaths when they're covered. I mean just this week as you mentioned you know in the lead to the news program today you had a 20 year old Palestinian who was killed killed while in a protest over the killing of a 12 year old and an organization whose work is the defense for children international Palestine to document children's deaths had their offices raided this week by the Israeli army. You know too often these sorts of events don't make the international news cycle. These sorts of events highlight the crimes against humanity from apartheid and persecution. There is certainly Amy growing awareness. I think that apartheid and persecution are the reality for millions of Palestinians. I think we saw a shift in the latest hostilities including members of the U.S. Congress who didn't just focus on the latest Palestinian rocket or Israeli air strike but looked at what they described as root causes of the conflict looking at the larger context the discriminatory treatment of Palestinians. That's so important because the first step to solving any problem is to diagnose it correctly. So recognition needs to happen and then the action needs to be taken that's commiserate with that problem. In this case ending complicity with grave crimes as well as ensuring accountability for them. You talked about the killing of the 12 year old Palestinian boy. He was named Muhammad alame sat in the backseat of his father's card and Israeli checkpoint north of Hebron the 11th Palestinian child killed by Israeli forces in the occupied West Bank this year. That's according to defense for children international which publicized Muhammad's killing on Wednesday. Yesterday Israeli forces raided the group's main office seizing files about Palestinian children in Israeli detention. Can you comment on this? Absolutely. Look Amy there has been a systematic assault on human rights advocacy on the individuals and groups that are reporting documenting speaking out against the reality of Israeli repression. You know for international groups that can take the form of denials of entry or deportation for Israeli groups it can be smear campaigns. But Palestinian groups face it the worst. This is not the only example of the army raiding a human rights organization that happened a couple of years ago with the group album yet. And it's not limited to that. As we speak there are Palestinian human rights defenders that are sitting in an Israeli prison over there activism and advocacy. There are Palestinian human rights defenders who face a travel ban a punitive van that seems linked to the work they do promoting awareness and calling for an end to Israeli repression. So it's important for the international community to speak out to defend the space for human rights advocacy and human rights groups to operate because if the international community can not protect the space for human rights groups to report on human rights abuse how are they ever going to stop human rights abuse in the first place? These are not one offs..

Gaza Israel Israeli government Human Rights Watch Palestine Omar shakir aman Jordan International Criminal Court Amy Rockets UN Omar Hamas Muhammad alame Israeli army U.S. Congress United States Hebron West Bank Muhammad
"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The UN says that Israeli air strikes in May killed at least a 129 civilians including 66 children. The Israeli military said that Palestinian armed groups in Gaza fired more than 4360 rockets and mortars towards Israel between May 10 and 21 resulting in 12 civilian deaths including two children. Several Palestinians also died in Gaza when rockets fired by armed groups fell short and landed in Gaza. Rockets that Palestinian armed groups fire at Israel are inherently indiscriminate when directed towards areas with civilians. They're used in such circumstances violates the laws of war and amounts to war crimes. For years Israeli and Palestinian authorities have systematically failed to credibly investigate alleged war crimes. The International Criminal Court prosecutor should investigate Israeli attacks in Gaza that evidently killed civilians and lawfully rocket attacks by Palestinian armed groups against Israel that violate the laws of war and other grave abuses including the crimes against humanity of apartheid and persecution. That new video produced by Human Rights Watch the video was released along with a new report titled Gaza apparent war crimes during fighting. We're joined now by Omar shakir Israel and Palestine director at Human Rights Watch. She's joining us from aman Jordan. What were you most shocked by in these interviews and this investigation into what happened in Israel's last attack on Gaza? Amy some of the testimonies that we collected are among the most harrowing I've ever come across in my four and a half years working on Israel Palestine. You had strikes that wiped out entire families. You had cases where families reduced from having 7 8 kids to having one surviving member of their family. You had people's entire lives their homes their businesses. Their wives their children their husbands gone in a flash. And those testimonies are so important for us to discuss today because the international community focuses on Gaza maybe when there are armed hostilities but two months later these families continue to deal with the aftermath of the devastation wrought upon their lives. And it's a critically important to them and to all victims of grave human rights abuse that there is accountability for these serious abuses and that steps are taken by the international community to prevent yet another cycle of bloodshed and repression. This wasn't the first and it won't be the last unless we take grave definitive action. What has been the response of the Israeli government to your report Omar to Human Rights Watch report? Human Rights Watch wrote to the Israeli government in June we specified the strikes that we were looking into. We sent them a number of detailed questions. They replied to our letter saying that they were not obligated under Israeli law to answer our questions and providing a list of general assertions stating for example that they took measures to minimize the impact from their strikes. That belongs to Hamas because according to them they fire from populated areas and saying that of course they would investigate these strikes. But these are the same allegations. These are the same claims they trot out each time. They did so in 2008 and 2012 and 2014 2018 and 2019 and they're doing so again today. The reality is that there is a whitewashed mechanism within Israel that ensures that these abuses are not investigated that impunity is the norm. And that's why it's so important that the International Criminal Court include Visa attacks as well as their larger context including apartheid and persecution in the formal probe that they are currently working on. I wanted to ask you about the change and perception in the United States about what's happening. With the Israeli government and the occupation. I remember that front page. Photo display it was Friday May 28th and the headline was they were just children. And it shows scores of more than 65 children's faces in Gaza who died in the attack. That's sort of reporting should be the norm. I mean it's unfortunate for too many years. That has not been the case. You know the reality here is for too often Palestinian deaths when they're covered. I mean just this week as you mentioned in the lead to the news program today you had a 20 year old Palestinian who was killed. Killed while in a protest over the killing of a 12 year old and an organization whose work is the children international Palestine to document children's deaths had their offices rated this week by the Israeli army. You know too often these sorts of events don't make the international news cycle. These sorts of events highlight the crimes against humanity from apartheid and persecution. There is certainly Amy growing awareness. I think that apartheid and persecution are the reality for millions of Palestinians. I think we saw a shift in the latest hostilities including members of the U.S. Congress who didn't just focus on the latest Palestinian rocket or Israeli air strike but looked at what they described as root causes of the conflict looking at the larger context the discriminatory treatment of Palestinians. That's so important because the first step to solving any problem is to diagnose it correctly. So recognition needs to happen and then the action needs to be taken that's commiserate with that problem. In this case ending complicity with grave crimes as well as ensuring accountability for them. You talked about the killing of the 12 year old Palestinian boy. He was named Muhammad alame sat in the back seat of his father's card and Israeli checkpoint north of Hebron the 11th Palestinian child killed by Israeli forces in the occupied West Bank this year. That's according to defense for children international which publicized Muhammad's killing on Wednesday. Yesterday Israeli forces raided the group's main office seizing files about Palestinian children in Israeli detention. Can you comment on this? Absolutely. Look Amy there has been a systematic assault on human rights advocacy on the individuals and groups that are reporting documenting speaking out against the reality of Israeli repression. You know for international groups that can take the form of denials of entry or deportation for Israeli groups it can be smear campaigns. But Palestinian groups face it the worst. This is not the only example of the army raiding a human rights organization that happened a couple of years ago with the group album yet. And it's not limited to that. As we speak there are Palestinian human rights defenders that are sitting in an Israeli prison. You know over there activism and advocacy there are Palestinian human rights defenders who face a travel ban a punitive van that seems linked to the work they do promoting awareness and calling for an end to Israeli repression. So it's important for the international community to speak out to defend the space for human rights advocacy and human rights groups to operate because if the international community can not protect the space for human rights groups to report on human rights abuse how are they ever going to stop human rights abuse in the first place? These are not one offs..

Gaza Israel Israeli government Human Rights Watch Palestine Omar shakir aman Jordan International Criminal Court Amy Rockets UN Omar Hamas Muhammad alame Israeli army U.S. Congress United States Hebron West Bank Muhammad
Human Rights Watch: Israeli War Crimes Apparent in Gaza War

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Human Rights Watch: Israeli War Crimes Apparent in Gaza War

"Human Rights Watch has accused the Israeli ministry of carrying out attacks that's apparently amount to war crimes during an eleven day will in may against the Hamas militant group the international human rights organization issued its conclusions off to investigating three Israeli air strikes that it said killed sixty two Palestinian civilians it said there were no evident military targets in the vicinity of the attacks the report also accuses Palestinian militants of apparent war crimes by launching over four thousand on guided rockets and mortars at Israeli population centers such attacks the group says violate the prohibition against deliberate or indiscriminate attacks against civilians I'm Charles de Ledesma

Israeli Ministry International Human Rights Org Human Rights Watch Hamas Charles De Ledesma
"human rights watch" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"We don't know how far it goes We don't know what exactly tech companies can do to stop it. But i'd like to give us just a little bit of a time line as we dive in so first off in. So was founded in twenty ten. They've been around for more than a decade now and they claim that this technology they're selling is to authorize governments and this will help them combat terrorism and organized crime and stuff like that but according to several reports including piece by amnesty international software that was created by an seo was used in attacks against people you wouldn't ordinarily considered terrorists people like journalists who reported on human rights abuses people like human rights activists who were reported on human rights abuses. There's a little bit of pattern is what we're saying. There's also evidence that not conclusive but there's evidence that we can trace the use of pegasus to the murder of specific people such as jamal khashoggi. Who was a vivisection dismembered while alive by the saudi government. The us refused to do anything. And as we record today The saudi government has experienced no repercussions for this state sanctioned. Murder of there was a another journalists..

saudi government jamal khashoggi us
China Sanctions Wilbur Ross and Others, Responding to Hong Kong Warnings

All Things Considered

01:49 min | 1 year ago

China Sanctions Wilbur Ross and Others, Responding to Hong Kong Warnings

"Fresh sanctions on a handful of US individuals. It's retaliation for sanctions the bite and administration imposed on Chinese officials last week. Over Beijing's crackdown on democracy in Hong Kong. Its latest attack comes just days before a visit to China by Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman and US China ties are already tense, though, as NPR's John Ruit reports there is no sign China's sanctions will derail the visit. Sanctions are the first imposed by China under a new law passed in June, which facilitates retaliation for foreign sanctions. Among those it hits a former Commerce secretary Wilbur Ross, and the China director at Human Rights Watch Sophie Richardson. For years, Beijing's responded to US sanctions and tariffs with tit for tat measures in Beijing's calculation, it had to respond to the US Bonnie Lynn, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, says doing so before Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman's trip makes sense would disappear better if it happened a couple days after Deputy Secretary Sherman's trip that she says might risk being interpreted as a signal that the meeting didn't go well. And Sherman will be the most senior U. S official to travel to China since President Biden took office. Relations are at their worst in decades. But there's speculation that the trip could start to lay the groundwork for a meeting sometime this year between Biden and Chinese leader Xi Jinping. There is a desire to be able to showcase that the two world leaders can work together and part of that is being able to meet and discuss issues they agree on as well as those where they have differences, and I really hope As we see more of these incidents is on either side that they won't derail progress towards the usual meeting because both sides, she says, have significant incentives for Biden and she to meet sooner rather than later. John Ruijin

Deputy Secretary Of State Wend China Beijing John Ruit Wilbur Ross Sophie Richardson Bonnie Lynn United States Deputy Secretary Sherman NPR President Biden Hong Kong Center For Strategic And Inter Human Rights Watch Sherman Xi Jinping Biden John Ruijin
"human rights watch" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Singer fairies totally china's internal affairs and the sanction bass is based on founded accusation. Doing xinjiang is just just a precautionary measures in anti terrorism and now decision to seek out. Our national interest and human rights has arguably been one of the greatest points of tension in the us chinese relationship. The organization human rights watch has said that china is in the midst of its darkest period for human rights since the tnn square massacre. So what are the allegations that human rights groups have leveled against china in recent years. We've heard human rights organizations accusing china of atrocities in xinjiang. Some human rights organization said this crime against humanity and including the biden The situation john in that words. Genocides of course china dispute these allegations. There's always problems with tibet and then more recently immoral recent years was the problem with hong kong through which both sides imposed sanctions on one another and many commentators have said that china and the us are actually entering into a new type of cold war. But you have cautioned against that analogy. Why is that well. I think it's always very tempting to use historical analogies to talk about The reality at present reality. But i think there are so many differences betraying at the twentieth century cold war and the major power competition today. One of the most striking differences is economy right. China's not the second largest economy in the world its economy hugely integrated into global supply. Chain twenty century code will was characterized by proxy wars in. It was driven by ideological expansion. And i think you to wear not there yet. Although some commentators would phrase the us china competition as ultimately struggle of different values. I think that's up to debate. You know not everybody would agree with that but however we characterize us china relationship. Nobody wants both powys to biggest opposing. The vote to go into war ever was politics. Dan be distorted. Ebola will be caught in the middle and of course you will also have to remember that. Us in china Both nuclear powers and Do not forget. It is the ordinary people on both sides of the pacific potentially more in the rest of the world who are caught up in the middle. And vincent we always ask. Oh what else. Question on our podcast. So let's shift away from the historical relationship between the us and china and talk about something that is actually happening this week..

china xinjiang organization human rights watc Some human rights organization Us biden tibet hong kong john powys Ebola Dan vincent
"human rights watch" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"human rights watch" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"With president biden now at the helm and the chinese economy predicted to overtake the us. In just a few years. How have relations between the two nations changed since kissinger's visit in nineteen seventy one. And what is the future of these two superpowers who better to ask than vincent. Knee the guardians china affairs correspondent who presented a documentary on bbc world. Service called when kissinger went to china. I started off by asking him. How nineteen seventy-one meeting came about what to some extent. It was a multi year project. Starting with both sides signaled intention of contact. This was initially conducted a very quietly and in a very subtle way beginning with the us. Calling china it's proper name at people's republic of china instead of red china or communist china and in beijing mao also wants to get in touch with richard nixon and his administration so they stay on the media's began to reduce the use of blessed capitalists. The things like this a eventually president. Nixon told pakistani president. Y'all calm and yao coundon tote chairman mao. That's the americans was serious. So that was the beginning of this contact. At in retrospect it was a very practical way of changing the course of the cold war. If you think about in the ninety sixties seventies when richard nixon came to power in ninety sixty eight vietnam. War was still a huge controversy in the us. Adding china around ninety sixty nine. There was a border war between china and the soviet union and around around autumn nineteen. Sixty nine It was rumored that's soviet union wants to to plan a pre emptive strike on china's so chairman mao at the time was really looking for a way out of this. And of course you know for nixon. I going to another communist big power. They wanted to change the triangular relationship between the us soviet union and china

china xinjiang organization human rights watc Some human rights organization Us biden tibet hong kong john powys Ebola Dan vincent
Microsoft's Bing Temporarily Blocked Searches of Tiananmen Square 'Tank Man' Image

BBC Newsday

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Microsoft's Bing Temporarily Blocked Searches of Tiananmen Square 'Tank Man' Image

"Microsoft has been rebuked after its search engine Bing blocked results for the query tank Man. The request normally finds the iconic image of a man defying tanks after the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing. Director of Human Rights Watch tweeted that Microsoft Action on the anniversary of the crackdown in Beijing was

Microsoft Tiananmen Square Beijing Human Rights Watch
A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:37 min | 2 years ago

A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

"Rumors and scattered reports of atrocities in ethiopia's northern region of tigray have been swirling for months amid a media blackout. But the picture is now starting to become clearer and evidence for war. Crimes and crimes against humanity are stacking up on sunday. America's secretary of state anthony blinken condemned the killings sexual assaults and forced removals said to have taken place in tigray and called for troops to be withdrawn. The conflict began late last year. When the region's ruling party the tigray people's liberation front or tps aleph was booted out of the federal government where it had dominated for decades has to be off. Matt has announced quote final military operation against the defiant gripe province in coming days and a statement. Mr abiy said there was a catholic devise strategy to defeat the grand people's liberation front in the regional capital makaay without harming civilians late in november. Mr abi declared victory. Over the tb l. f. An armed resistance has continued yesterday. If government rejected america's demands describing. Mr lincoln's comments as regrettable. Thousands are known to have died in the conflict and more than two million people have been displaced. The growing civil war has drawn in fighters from neighboring regions and troops from eritrea which borders tigray to the north. I'm gonna stay. International has just released a report detailing its investigation into this incident that took place in late november an accident which is one of the oldest and most famous holy cities. Tom gardner addis. ababa correspondent. Ever soldiers killed hundreds of civilians over two days. And what i'm going to stay says was retaliation for an attack by local youth on their military camp now. Amnesty says the soldiers roams around the streets of the city picking out on young men and killing them on the spot then proceeded to plunder the city essentially of everything of value survivors said that all they could see on the streets with bodies and people crying this systematic slaughter civilians and axiom may amount to crimes against humanity according to amnesty. And you say the main players in this incident or allegedly airtran soldiers right just to remind people. This conflict has drawn in a few other parties. In addition to the ethiopian federal army and two grand forces loyal to the tps laugh you also have militia security forces from may bring regional state of. Im hara which has a rivalry with the laugh and disputed territories along their border and then and this is really controversial element. You have troops from eritrea. Which since the beginning of the conflict has been fighting alongside the ethiopian army against the which has a long rivalry with as well as to whether all these parties are committing atrocities. I think based on everything we know so far. Yes but i think. Eritrean soldiers are the most widely and extensively implicated and there are allegations of other atrocities beyond. What's happened in axiom. Ever since the war began in late november we've been hearing accounts trickling out which beginners rumor clearer. Picture is slowly started to emerge. We've seen several videos that appear to show ethiopian soldiers. Standing among the bodies of civilians. They've murdered there was an investigation by human rights. Watch found. European army had shelled towns including the capital of tigray mckelway killing at least eight hundred civilians including women and children and winding back to the beginning of the war the very first atrocity we heard about was this massacre in the town of my tatra which is in western tigray near the border with the neighboring regional state. I'm harlem according to a report that amnesty published at the time most of the victims were. I'm horrors murdered by militia. Sure the ousted rulers of tigray the epl f. That was then confirmed by day. State appointed human rights commission. Here however take ryan's reflect across the border to saddam tell of attacks on civilians by them militiamen an by government soldiers in the same area for its part. What is the european government saying about all these reports so that is an important question on february. The twenty six th the ethiopian rights commission which is a state appointed or body released a statement saying that it had also conduct an investigation. And that it's key. Findings brutally corroborated those of amnesty. That's quite a significant step forward by the commission which tried two to three years ago would never have come out with a statement like that. The question though moving forward is whether the government decides to accept its findings and act on them. We have heard a lot from the prime minister's office the attorney general's office and other government agencies about accountability but so far very little indication that the government is willing to hold anyone but members of the tepe accountable for crimes committed during this conflict. More makes it even more. Complicated of course is the fact that the prime culprits in this case were eritrean. Troops can be very politically difficult for the government. Addis ababa which has been relying on these troops from eritrea relying on its relationship with the eritrean government to conduct its military operations in

Tigray Anthony Blinken Mr Abiy Mr Abi Mr Lincoln Tom Gardner Addis Eritrea Ethiopian Federal Army Im Hara Ethiopian Army America Ethiopia Ababa European Army TB Federal Government Airtran Matt State Appointed Human Rights C European Government
Advocacy group: Biden should revamp US human rights policy

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:08 sec | 2 years ago

Advocacy group: Biden should revamp US human rights policy

"On an advocacy group calling on President elect Joe Biden to revamp the nation's human rights policy. Human rights Watch laying out a long wish list for the Biden

Joe Biden Biden
Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

BBC World Service

06:00 min | 2 years ago

Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

"Used a BBC World Service. Let's turn now to reactions to the sentence, handed down to to one one of of Saudi Saudi Arabia Arabia is is best best known known women's women's rights rights activists. activists. She's She's the the Jane. Jane. I'll I'll have have flu. flu. Probably Probably activist activist who who campaign campaign for for women's women's rights rights to to drive drive has has been been sentenced sentenced to more than five years in prison by a special criminal court on that call was actually set up to try terrorism charges. It's an absolute was arrested in May, 2018 just before women were given the right to drive. Saudi authorities deny her arrest had anything to do with that issue. She was convicted of various charges, including trying to harm national security. In advance of foreign agenda all denied by her that speak now to her sister earlier. I'll have the welcome to news day earlier. Thank you so much for joining us. I mean, you had you and your family, of course for continuously Against this sentence against her imprisonment. So five years and eight months. What do you make of that? Hi. So first of all, it's five years and eight months. But if you do all the calculation because she spent already three years almost three years in prison on there for two years and a half she she voted Meteo stay in prison, eh? So it means that she can be freed by next March. 2021, however, Login T really was very, very sad when she heard the news that the sentence because for her, it means that the court consider her as terrorists. And that's why she's going on appeal. She will appeal. Um s O in order to obtain her innocents. Okay. And what do they based that on that charge on? What exactly are they saying that she's done to actually have this charge of terrorism leveled against her? So if you read the charges, it is. There are so many charges, for example, applying for the United Nations, Uh, tweeting on Twitter and using social media to advocate for women's right. There are everything related to her activities on also being in contact with international NGOs like A mysterious into a Miss Stanton on the international or Human Rights Watch, etcetera, but also contracting, for example, the UK Embassy and contacting that European Union representation in Saudi Arabia and they consider those two entities or was also Netherlands. Those three entities as terrorists of foreign entities. So it is a bit strange. They are allies and at the same time considered as a terrorist Indeed, yes, that's that's an argument that has got many contradictions in it hasn't it and also that the court dismissed planes that she had been tortured whilst She was held now you would dispute that. Exactly. So it was two other whole process and the acceleration off the trial started almost two weeks ago and into its ago. It was mainly about the charges against the grain. And when that don't say OK, bye. Next session, I will pronounce that the verdict. And she said Lujan said Okay, but you never investigate on the church. Er how? Come on. This is okay. We will start and the next day It was, um, a to the regular courts at trial regarding the church er and two days after they said Okay, we did the investigation and we are Conclude that there was no torture. So it was you say, and she says, And she says, What exactly happened to what your detail is quite horrific. It is extremely shocking. So it's impossible to imagine that such things could happen in prison. And especially, I mean When we say Saudi Arabia we know that the situation off women but also the women. We try toe over protect themselves. Sometimes it is impossible to imagine that men they do all these bad things to a single women on a so she was even sexually harassed, electrocuted. It's hard to eat. It'll, uh, getting very sick and yes, she was shaking a difficulty to breathe Exeter for a couple of months. And of course, she was incarcerated just shortly before women or her campaign to allow women were one of the things allow women to be able to drive in Saudi Arabia actually got the go ahead, so she hasn't experienced that. But she can Be released from jail as you say the release convey as early as as the spring next year, But I guess if she wants to carry on campaigning, that would be a problem for her. She may end up back in inside jail. So what is she communicated to you? She intends to do Who's she looking talk to to help her. Well, First of all the main, you know, you need to choose your battles, certain points. So the fight she's doing right now. She is T o to prove that she was tortured. So this is the first thing and also to get her innocents. So I guess, uh, doing those fights. It is her priority for the time being. We will see later on Okay. We're good to talk to you. And we will obviously be following that story very closely to find out what happens to Lucien. I'll have little on her release. That's a sister Talia. I'll have through. Thank you for talking to me today.

Saudi Saudi Arabia Saudi FLU Jane Miss Stanton International Or Human Rights Uk Embassy Arabia BBC Etcetera Lujan United Nations European Union Netherlands Twitter Exeter Lucien Talia
Why a New Abortion Ban in Poland is Causing a Furor

PRI's The World

05:31 min | 2 years ago

Why a New Abortion Ban in Poland is Causing a Furor

"Today in Poland where for five straight days. Now, streets across the country have been filled with protesters as we mark the swearing in of new Supreme Court, Justice Amy Coney Barrett, and wonder how the court will now see Roe v Wade Poland is an interesting case protesters. There are angry precisely because of a high court ruling on. Abortion last week, Poland's constitutional tribunal outlawed the practice in all but the most exceptional of circumstances as the world's Europe correspondent Orla Barry reports. The latest legal decision is now being widely condemned by women's rights, groups, Justin of it. The refs as a founding member of the abortion dream, team they're a well-known group of activists who says out in two thousand sixteen to de stigmatize abortion in Poland the dress had an abortion in. Two thousand six and even though she worked with an abortion support group called almost no one about your own experience for more than twelve years up to two thousand, eighteen I was talking about this as anonymous person. I was not showing my face I was afraid about my community for threats says, she worried what our neighbors would thank her. There's nothing unusual about women keeping their abortion secret in Poland more than one thousand. Legal abortions for carried out in the country last year but women's groups reckon that the number of illegal abortions or those performed abroad is closer to two hundred thousand. No one knows the exact figure the court ruling last Thursday. Permits Abortion only in cases of rape incest and the mother's life is at risk activists say that just adds to the stigma and it helps explain why women have been out protesting every day since. In more. So last night protesters poured red paint across the city's main bridge holding up signs that read you have blood on your hands, and this is war in the western city of Poznan demonstrators interrupted Sunday church services. Video posted online. A couple of dozen protesters are seen approaching the altar chanting we've had enough, but the refs ca says young people using such fury at the church is something new for Poland. There are very young women who are protesting chorus creaming on the on the priests in small towns. And like really today jurors, it is something which hasn't been seen on the streets before this is something new. What we see ninety percent of Poles identifies Catholic, and since coming to power in two thousand fifteen, the ruling law and Justice Party has promoted what it calls traditional Catholic values but recent surveys show the majority of Poles did not support more restrictive abortion laws. Activists say the new measures are a threat to women's rights in Poland Hillary Margolis is a senior. Researcher. With human rights, Watch under the Lawn Justice Party, we've seen repeated attempts to completely ban abortion also to obstruct sexuality education schools to really smear and undermine women's rights, groups and activists including those who work on violence against women and Margolis says, it's not just women's rights conservative politicians have in their sides the way they've used the concept of the so called traditional family to undermine women's rights but also lgbt rapes is very worry but in some ways has seen. Some success you they've managed to get people afraid and that is I think part of how they have kept power. But protesters say they will not be deterred several university faculties canceling classes tomorrow and some companies have announced a day off. So workers can protest Anthony in eleven. Scott is a sexual and reproductive health and rights activists based on more. So she says is not just young women who are taking to the streets taxi drivers joined yesterday form as join and. Some smaller towns and of the groups that has already joined the protest were actually the police officers that goes ing one of the provinces they just took their helmets off and they entered the crowd in order to participate. But not all police officers support the demonstrators that have been street clashes in Warsaw and Levin of SCO worries things might get more violent yesterday. The prime minister gave permission for the Military Police to join the police in the streets and they only do. You really believe that there is a huge risk of riots and the public turning islands. The Polish government has been accused of appointing judges loyal to the ruling party activists are hopeful that an international body like the European. Court of Human Rights could challenge the recent decision on abortion on that basis. In the meantime campaigners say they're worried about their future in Poland I asked just thrift Ska from the abortion dream, team if she's concerned about being targeted by authorities of cars every. Day that we are expecting them. So if there will be some kind of idea to close us, we will move abroad and we'll be still working will not stop for the rest says no matter what the government does women will continue to have abortions in Poland, and groups like hers will keep fighting for the right to do. So for the world I'm Morna Barry.

Poland Court Of Human Rights Wade Poland Hillary Margolis Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett Orla Barry Justice Party Morna Barry Europe Rape Lawn Justice Party Justin Poznan Founding Member ROE Warsaw
Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

Democracy Now! Audio

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

"And Bengladeshi. The approved the use of the death penalty for convicted rapists. This comes following widespread protests over several high profile rape cases including a gang rape and a remote village which circulated on Social Media Human Rights Watch US South Asia director knock. She ganguly noted that most cases are not reported or prosecuted and conviction rates are low and the government should instead focus on reforming Bangladesh is justice system.

Rape Ganguly Bangladesh Director Asia
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 2 years ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

"Afghanistan has issued a decree allowing women to be listed on the identity cards of their Children. NPR's DEA had eight reports. Until now, the documents on Ly contained the names of Father's. The new law is expected to make things easier for single Afghan mothers in particular, who struggle to do things like sign their kids up for school or get them emergency medical care. This is how the bar co director of the women's rights division at Human Rights Watch, So this law is actually a really important development, which is gonna have a lot of really world consequences. Boss says The new decree may also shift the common notion in Afghanistan that Children are their father's property, and it comes at an important time. The government and the Taliban are negotiating pace and feminist fear women's rights will be compromised to appease the insurgents. There's a sense that laws mandating women's equality have to be pushed through quickly. D a deed. NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD, Europe's largest

Afghanistan NPR LY Director DEA Islamabad Taliban Europe Government